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Sample records for pure zinc deficiency

  1. Zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tuerk, Melanie J; Fazel, Nasim

    2009-03-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in numerous biochemical pathways. Zinc deficiency affects many organ systems, including the integumentary, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems. This article aims to discuss zinc metabolism and highlights a few of the diseases associated with zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency results in dysfunction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity and increases the susceptibility to infection. Supplementation of zinc has been shown to reduce the incidence of infection as well as cellular damage from increased oxidative stress. Zinc deficiency is also associated with acute and chronic liver disease. Zinc supplementation protects against toxin-induced liver damage and is used as a therapy for hepatic encephalopathy in patients refractory to standard treatment. Zinc deficiency has also been implicated in diarrheal disease, and supplementation has been effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of acute diarrhea. This article is not meant to review all of the disease states associated with zinc deficiency. Rather, it is an introduction to the influence of the many roles of zinc in the body, with an extensive discussion of the influence of zinc deficiency in selected diseases. Zinc supplementation may be beneficial as an adjunct to treatment of many disease states.

  2. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications.

  3. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  4. Zinc deficiency and toxicity in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Jennifer L; Bowen, Christine N

    2014-10-01

    Zinc is a commonly overlooked deficiency in developed countries, occurring in infants, children, and adolescents during critical growth periods. The purpose of this review is to present the evidence of zinc deficiencies and toxicities as well as treatment in pediatrics. During the last decade, the significance of zinc deficiency in childhood growth, morbidity, and mortality has been recognized by a number of large-scale supplementation trials in underdeveloped countries. Recognition of the recent nationwide shortage of injectable zinc available for total parenteral nutrition supplementation over the last 2 years focused attention on the possibility of zinc deficiency in the United States. Although primarily thought of as a problem reserved for underdeveloped countries, zinc deficiency has increasing pediatric prevalence in the USA. Zinc is an essential trace element in the body that is responsible for numerous structural, catalytic, and biochemical functions. Deficiencies can occur because of poor dietary intake, long-term parenteral nutrition without supplementation, and enteral causes such as malabsorption. Zinc deficiency is closely associated with stunting, respiratory infections, diarrhea, and dermatitis. Deficiency is hard to define solely by the serum levels. Clinicians should utilize a combination of serum zinc levels, presenting signs and symptoms, and nutritional intake via oral, enteral, and parenteral routes to accurately assess the deficiency risk and diagnosis.

  5. Zinc and biotin deficiencies after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, N; Muwakkit, S; Abboud, M; Saab, R

    2010-01-01

    We report zinc and biotin deficiencies after pancreaticoduodenectomy in a 16 year old female presenting clinically with marked alopecia, total body hair loss, dry skin with scales, and maculopathy with significant vision loss. These micronutrient deficiencies likely occurred due to resection of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, sites of primary absorption of several micronutrients and their protein carriers, including zinc and biotin. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent irreversible sequelae. Adequate supplementation of zinc and biotin as well as dietary advice is needed for clinical improvement.

  6. Model of how plants sense zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ana G L; Persson, Daniel P; Husted, Søren; Schjørring, Jan K; Alexander, Ross D; Aarts, Mark G M

    2013-09-01

    Plants are capable of inducing a range of physico-chemical and microbial modifications of the rhizosphere which can mobilize mineral nutrients or prevent toxic elements from entering the roots. Understanding how plants sense and adapt to variations in nutrient availability is essential in order to develop plant-based solutions addressing nutrient-use-efficiency and adaptation to nutrient-limited or -toxic soils. Recently two transcription factors of the bZIP family (basic-region leucine zipper) have been identified in Arabidopsis and shown to be pivotal in the adaptation response to zinc deficiency. They represent not only the first regulators of zinc homeostasis identified in plants, but also a very promising starting-point that can provide new insights into the molecular basis of how plants sense and adapt to the stress of zinc deficiency. Considering the available information thus far we propose in this review a putative model of how plants sense zinc deficiency.

  7. Zinc deficiency in molybdenum poisoned cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Parada, R.

    1981-02-01

    Clinical signs ascribable to zinc deficiency were noted in a group of Friesian cows industrially poisoned with molybdenum. Zinc, copper, and molybdenum were determined in blood serum and black hair, and in the contaminated alfalfa pasture the group grazed on. Hematological parameters, and serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase activity, were also determined. Pooled samples of alfalfa from 2 uncontaminated pastures, and of blood, serum and black hair of clinically normal Friesian cattle grazing on these were used as controls. A mixed contamination of the polluted pasture with molybdenum and copper was found, both metals being inversely correlated with he distance to the polluting chimney. Zinc concentrations were normal and not significantly correlated with the distance to the chimney very high molybdenum was found in serum and hair of the poisoned animals; copper was normal in serum and hair. Low calcium and Alkaline phosphatase activity were found in serum, both variables being significantly correlated with serum zinc. Reduced red blood cell number, packed cell volumes and hemoglobin concentrations were also found, but no significant correlation of these parameters with any of the trace metals in serum or hair was found. Signs ascribed to zinc deficiency were consistent with the reduction of zinc in serum and hair and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity in serum. A zinc deficiency conditioned by a simultaneous increased intake of molybdenum and copper is proposed.

  8. Zinc deficiency in senile purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Haboubi, N Y; Haboubi, N A; Gyde, O H; Small, N A; Barford, A V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting plasma zinc concentrations were lower in elderly people with senile purpura than in a control group matched for age. No significant difference was found in the mean serum concentration of albumin, which is the main binder of zinc. No other clinical or laboratory findings differentiated the two groups. As the cause of the low plasma zinc values has not been found it is suggested that further studies of the related factors including input, output, and binding should be made before a therapeutic trial is launched. PMID:4056071

  9. Zinc Deficiency and Microtubule Function in Prostate Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    in rat models of zinc deficiency with no reported change between control and deficient conditions [Oteiza et al., 1990]. However, microtubule...polymerization rates were decreased in zinc deficient rats in that study. The authors suggested that zinc deficiency might cause a change in the expression of...spermatozoan motility I. Distribution of iron, zinc and copper in sea urchin spermatozoa . 1972 Exp Cell Res. 70(2):311-316, 1972. Oteiza PI, Hurley LS

  10. Zinc deficiency: a special challenge.

    PubMed

    Hambidge, K Michael; Krebs, Nancy F

    2007-04-01

    In the development and testing of programs designed to improve complementary feeding globally, local nonfortified food-based solutions comprise an important strategy for the foreseeable future. These solutions are especially vital for the rural poor of less-developed countries. Zinc is notable among individual nutrients that have been designated as "problem" nutrients, adequate intake of which is difficult from complementary foods without fortification. This article considers the potential role of meat +/- liver in addressing this apparent problem. In a recent Colorado study, beef and cereal have been determined to be equally acceptable between age 5-7 mo as first and regular complementary foods. Average intake and absorption of Zn from beef by 7 mo of age, together with the modest intake/absorption of Zn from breast milk at that age, were adequate to meet average dietary and physiologic zinc requirements, respectively. Barriers to acceptability and availability of affordable meat are considered, but these are neither universal nor irresolvable in all populations.

  11. [Effects of zinc deficiency and vitamin D deficiency on bone calcification and development of rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Zheng, D; Qian, Y; Wu, K

    1992-09-01

    Zinc deficiency rat model was made by feeding zinc deficiency diet. The level of bone calcium of the zinc deficiency rats was significantly lower than that of the control rats. Their bone cortex was thinner and bone density decreased. The counts of their cartilage cells and hypertrophic cells of epiphyseal plate were less frequent, and the diameter of their hypertrophic cells was smaller than that of the controls. It suggested that zinc deficiency caused defective bone calcification which was similar to that in vitamin D deficiency. Zinc deficiency seemed to hinder the linear growth of long bone and might be the cause of dwarf.

  12. Effects of zinc deficiency on pituitary somatotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Focht, S.; Fosmire, G.; Hymer, W.C. )

    1991-03-15

    To test whether the growth retardation that accompanies zinc deficiency may involve a direct effect of zinc on pituitary, rats were divided into three groups and fed a Zn deficient diet for 10 days. On day 10 rats were anesthetized and blood, femurs, and pituitaries were collected. Pituitaries from each group were either enzymatically dissociated into individual cells or homogenized and centrifuged into three fractions. Growth retardation was evidenced by decreased body weights and narrower epiphyseal widths in PF and ZD rats. Pituitary weights were also lower in PF and ZD rats. Pituitary zinc per unit tended to be highest in PF and lowest in ZD rats, although this trend was significant only for the 250g pellet fraction. Total cell counts from dissociated pituitaries tended to be highest for AL and lowest for ZD rats. Total growth hormone (HGH) per pituitary also followed this trend, although the amount of GH per somatotroph did not buffer between groups. Interestingly, GH released from dissociated pituitary cells cultured in defined media for 3 days was twice as great from ZD vs PF, AL being intermediate. Serum GH levels did not differ between groups although the trend was ZD > PF >AL.

  13. Infants and elderlies are susceptible to zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Toyoharu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of zinc for human health has been recognized since the early 1960s, but today there is little concern about zinc deficiency in developed countries. In this study, we measured the zinc concentration in hair from 28,424 Japanese subjects (18,812 females and 9,612 males) and found that 1,754 subjects (6.17%) had zinc concentrations lower than 2 standard deviations (86.3 ppm) below the control reference range, which qualifies as zinc deficiency. In particular, a considerable proportion of elderlies and children (20% or more) were found to have marginal to severe zinc deficiency. A zinc concentration of 9.7 ppm was the lowest observed in a 51-year-old woman; this concentration was approximately 1/13 of the mean reference level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in adults increased with aging to a maximum of 19.7% by the 8th decade of life, and decreased to 3.4% above 90-year-old. The proportion of zinc deficiency in infants 0–4 years was 36.5% in males and 47.3% in females; these percentages were higher than the maximum prevalence in elderly subjects. These findings suggest that infants and elderlies are prone to zinc deficiency and that intervention of zinc deficiency is necessary for normal human development, health and longevity. PMID:26912464

  14. Pure spin current transport in gallium doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althammer, Matthias; Mukherjee, Joynarayan; Geprägs, Stephan; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Opel, Matthias; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Gross, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    We study the flow of a pure spin current through zinc oxide by measuring the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in thin film trilayer samples consisting of bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG), gallium-doped zinc oxide (Ga:ZnO), and platinum. We investigate the dependence of the SMR magnitude on the thickness of the Ga:ZnO interlayer and compare to a Bi:YIG/Pt bilayer. We find that the SMR magnitude is reduced by almost one order of magnitude upon inserting a Ga:ZnO interlayer and continuously decreases with increasing interlayer thickness. Nevertheless, the SMR stays finite even for a 12 nm thick Ga:ZnO interlayer. These results show that a pure spin current indeed can propagate through a several nm-thick degenerately doped zinc oxide layer. We also observe differences in both the temperature and the field dependence of the SMR when comparing tri- and bilayers. Finally, we compare our data to the predictions of a model based on spin diffusion. This shows that interface resistances play a crucial role for the SMR magnitude in these trilayer structures.

  15. Zinc Deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Gustavo; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Cori, Héctor; López de Romaña, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Zinc deficiency affects multiple vital functions in the life cycle, especially growth. Limited information is available on the magnitude of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean. To examine the latest available information on both the prevalence of zinc deficiency and the risk of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was identified through a systematic review looking for the latest available data on serum zinc concentrations from surveys or studies with national representativeness conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean. The risk of zinc deficiency in Latin America and the Caribbean was estimated based on dietary zinc inadequacy (according to the 2011 National Food Balance Sheets) and stunting in children under 5 years of age. Only four countries had available national biochemical data. Mexican, Colombian, Ecuadorian, and Guatemalan children under 6 years of age and women 12 to 49 years of age had a high prevalence of zinc deficiency (19.1% to 56.3%). The countries with the highest risk of zinc deficiency (estimated prevalence of inadequate zinc intake > 25% plus prevalence of stunting > 20%) were Belize, Bolivia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Zinc dietary inadequacy was directly correlated with stunting (r = 0.64, p < .001). Prevalence data from the four available Latin America and Caribbean national surveys indicate a high prevalence of zinc deficiency in children under 6 years of age and women 12 to 49 years of age. High rates of both estimated zinc dietary inadequacy and stunting were also reported in most Latin America and Caribbean countries.

  16. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hagmeyer, Simone; Haderspeck, Jasmin Carmen; Grabrucker, Andreas Martin

    2015-01-01

    Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies. PMID:25610379

  17. Genetic causes and gene–nutrient interactions in mammalian zinc deficiencies: acrodermatitis enteropathica and transient neonatal zinc deficiency as examples.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Shakhenabat; Din, Jamila; Maret, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Discovering genetic causes of zinc deficiency has been a remarkable scientific journey. It started with the description of a rare skin disease, its treatment with various agents, the successful therapy with zinc, and the identification of mutations in a zinc transporter causing the disease. The journey continues with defining the molecular and cellular pathways that lead to the symptoms caused by zinc deficiency. Remarkably, at least two zinc transporters from separate protein families are now known to be involved in the genetics of zinc deficiency. One is ZIP4, which is involved in intestinal zinc uptake. Its mutations can cause acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) with autosomal recessive inheritance. The other one is ZnT2, the transporter responsible for supplying human milk with zinc. Mutations in this transporter cause transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD) with symptoms similar to AE but with autosomal dominant inheritance. The two diseases can be distinguished in affected infants. AE is fatal if zinc is not supplied to the infant after weaning, whereas TNZD is a genetic defect of the mother limiting the supply of zinc in the milk, and therefore the infant usually will obtain enough zinc once weaned. Although these diseases are relatively rare, the full functional consequences of the numerous mutations in ZIP4 and ZnT2 and their interactions with dietary zinc are not known. In particular, it remains unexplored whether some mutations cause milder disease phenotypes or increase the risk for other diseases if dietary zinc requirements are not met or exceeded. Thus, it is not known whether widespread zinc deficiency in human populations is based primarily on a nutritional deficiency or determined by genetic factors as well. This consideration becomes even more significant with regard to mutations in the other 22 human zinc transporters, where associations with a range of diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and mental illnesses have been observed

  18. Structural changes in rabbit oral epithelium caused by zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C E; Ashrafi, S H; Waterhouse, J P

    1981-01-01

    We report the successful establishment of zinc deficiency in rabbits by dietary means. The soybean protein of a standard rabbit diet was replaced by egg albumin. Weanling, New Zealand white rabbits, were fed a low zinc diet containing 1.5 microgram Zn/g of diet. Zinc-deficient rabbits showed stunted growth, weight loss, altered posture, partial alopecia and crusting of skin. Structural alterations in oral epithelium of the zinc-deficient rabbits included in the tongue flattened filiform papillae showing parakeratosis, in the cheek parakeratosis of the normally nonkeratinized epithelium and hyperplasia of the lip epidermis.

  19. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  20. High Dose Zinc Supplementation Induces Hippocampal Zinc Deficiency and Memory Impairment with Inhibition of BDNF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit. PMID:23383172

  1. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jing, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit.

  2. Intravenous zinc therapy for acquired zinc deficiency secondary to gastric bypass surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vick, Garrett; Mahmoudizad, Rod; Fiala, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency may result from either a congenitally inherited defect of zinc absorption or is acquired secondarily from a variety of factors affecting dietary zinc intake, absorption, or loss. We report a case of acquired zinc deficiency secondary to gastric bypass surgery that resulted in vulvar cutaneous manifestations of delayed onset, with failure to clear after oral supplementation with zinc. The patient experienced improvement of symptoms only after administration of intravenous zinc supplementation. Upon review of the current literature, it is thought that the patient's original suboptimal response to oral supplementation and improvement after receiving intravenous zinc were related to the intentional surgical alteration and bypass of the absorptive capacity of the duodenum and jejunum. With the current prevalence of obesity and availability of surgical weight loss therapies, it is important to be mindful of the resulting nutritional deficiencies, their clinical manifestations, and factors affecting the efficacy of therapeutic approaches as seen in this case.

  3. Tracing of Zinc Nanocrystals in the Anterior Pituitary of Zinc-Deficient Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Kuldeep, Anjana; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, Ranveer Singh

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to trace zinc nanocrystals in the anterior pituitary of zinc-deficient Wistar rats by using autometallographic technique. Male Wistar rats (30-40 days of age, pre-pubertal period) of 40-50 g body weight were divided into the following: the ZC (zinc control) group-fed with 100 ppm zinc in diet, the ZD (zinc-deficient) group-fed with zinc-deficient (1.00 ppm) diet and the PF (pair-fed) group-received 100 ppm zinc in diet. The experiments were set for 2 and 4 weeks. Pituitary was removed and processed for the autometallographic technique. The control and pair-fed groups retained their normal morphological features. However, male Wistar rats fed on zinc-deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks displayed a wide range of symptoms such as significant (P < 0.05) decrease in diet consumption, body weight and pituitary weight and decrease in gradation of intensity of zinc nanocrystals in the nuclei. The present findings suggest that the dietary zinc deficiency causes decreased intensity of zinc nanocrystals localization and their distribution in the pituitary thereby contributing to the dysfunction of the pituitary of the male Wistar rats. The severity of zinc deficiency symptoms progressed after the second week of the experiment. Decreased intensity of zinc nanocrystals attenuates the pituitary function which would exert its affect on other endocrine organs impairing their functions indicating that the metabolic regulation of pituitary is mediated to a certain extent by zinc and/or hypothalamus-hypophysial system which also reflects its essentiality during the period of growth.

  4. Maternal zinc deficiency and congenital anomalies in newborns.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Mahmood; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Rassi, Sepehr; Naseh, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Zinc deficiency in pregnant women is common, especially in the third trimester of pregnancy. The available data, however, on the association between zinc deficiency and congenital malformations in the Iranian population are insufficient. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether maternal serum zinc deficiency is associated with major congenital malformations in newborns. This descriptive, case-control study involved mothers of 80 neonates with congenital anomalies (study group) admitted to the Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran. During the same period (2014 and 2015), serum zinc was measured in 80 mothers who had delivered normal newborns without congenital malformations (control group). Mothers with serum zinc deficiency had a more than sevenfold risk of malformations in the fetus compared with mothers with normal serum zinc (OR, 7.013; 95%CI: 2.716-18.110). Newborns with malformation weighing ≤2500 g were associated with lower maternal serum zinc compared with the control group (P = 0.006). There is an association between congenital malformation in newborns and maternal zinc deficiency. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Zinc deficiency alters soybean susceptibility to pathogens and pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inadequate plant nutrition and biotic stress are key threats to current and future crop yields. Zinc deficiency and toxicity in major crop plants have been documented, but there is limited information on how pathogen and pest damage may be affected by differing plant zinc levels. In our study, we us...

  6. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  7. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  8. Zinc deficiency affects the composition of the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.J.; Leure-DuPree, A.E.; Fosmire, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    The response of the adrenal gland to zinc deficiency was examined in male weanling rats. In comparison with decapsulated adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, glands from zinc deficient rats had greater relative weight (mg/g body wt), DNA concentration, and total lipid and cholesterol concentrations as well as a smaller protein/DNA ratio. Several of these differences (protein/DNA and cholesterol concentration) could be attributed to the inanition accompanying zinc deficient values were similar to those of pair fed controls. Values for total DNA and protein concentration were similar for all groups. Electron micrographs of the zona fasciculata showed a small number of lipid droplets in the adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, an increase in lipid droplets from pair fed controls, and an even more striking increase in lipid droplets from the zinc deficient adrenals. The increased adrenal lipid composition in the zinc deficient group may be secondary to enhanced steroidogenesis or a zinc deficiency-induced defect of lipid metabolism.

  9. Soil factors associated with zinc deficiency in crops and humans.

    PubMed

    Alloway, B J

    2009-10-01

    Zinc deficiency is the most ubiquitous micronutrient deficiency problem in world crops. Zinc is essential for both plants and animals because it is a structural constituent and regulatory co-factor in enzymes and proteins involved in many biochemical pathways. Millions of hectares of cropland are affected by Zn deficiency and approximately one-third of the human population suffers from an inadequate intake of Zn. The main soil factors affecting the availability of Zn to plants are low total Zn contents, high pH, high calcite and organic matter contents and high concentrations of Na, Ca, Mg, bicarbonate and phosphate in the soil solution or in labile forms. Maize is the most susceptible cereal crop, but wheat grown on calcareous soils and lowland rice on flooded soils are also highly prone to Zn deficiency. Zinc fertilizers are used in the prevention of Zn deficiency and in the biofortification of cereal grains.

  10. Zinc deficiency and neurodevelopment: the case of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Ana M.; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is essential for normal brain development. Gestational severe zinc deficiency can lead to overt fetal brain malformations. Although not teratogenic, suboptimal zinc nutrition during gestation can have long-term effects on the offspring's nervous system. This paper will review current knowledge on the role of zinc in modulating neurogenesis and neuronal apoptosis, as well as the proposed underlying mechanisms. A decrease in neuronal zinc causes cell cycle arrest, which in part involves a deregulation of select signals (ERK1/2, p53, NF-κB). Zinc deficiency also induces apoptotic neuronal death through the intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway, which can be triggered by the activation of the zinc-regulated enzyme caspase-3, and as a consequence of abnormal regulation of pro-survival signals (ERK1/2, NF-κB). Alterations in the finely-tuned processes of neurogenesis, neuronal migration, differentiation and apoptosis, that involve the developmental shaping of the nervous system, could have a long-term impact on brain health. Zinc deficiency during gestation, even at the marginal levels observed in human populations, could increase the risk for behavioral/neurological disorders in infancy, adolescence and adulthood. PMID:20333753

  11. Chronic zinc deficiency alters chick gut microbiota composition and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under co...

  12. Effect of zinc gluconate, sage oil on inflammatory patterns and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Ali, Abdel-Moniem A; Elabidine, Nabila Zein; Mursey, Nada M

    2017-08-28

    The relationship between zinc homeostasis and pancreatic function had been established. In this study we aimed firstly to configure the inflammatory pattern and hyperglycemia in zinc deficient diabetic rats. Secondly to illustrate the effect of two selected agents namely Zinc gluconate and sage oil (Salvia Officinalis, family Lamiaceae). Rats were fed on Zinc deficient diet, deionized water for 28days along with Zinc level check up at intervals to achieve zinc deficient state then rats were rendered diabetic through receiving one dose of alloxan monohydrate (120mg/kg) body weight, classified later into 5 subgroups. Treatment with sage oil (0.042mg/kg IP) and Zinc gluconate orally (150mg/kg) body weight daily for 8 weeks significantly reduced serum glucose, C-reactive protein (CRP), Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α), interleukins-6 1 β, inflammatory8 (IFN ȣ), pancreatic 1L1-β along with an increase in serum Zinc and pancreatic Zinc transporter 8 (ZNT8). Histopathological results of pancreatic tissues showed a good correlation with the biochemical findings. Both sage oil and zinc gluconate induced an improvement in the glycemic and inflammatory states. This may be of value like the therapeutic agent for diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A combined marginal deficiency of copper and zinc does not exacerbate oxidant stress asssociated with copper or zinc deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both copper deficiency (Cu-def) and zinc deficiency (Zn-def) result in oxidative stress. Thus, an experiment was conducted to determine whether a marginal Zn-def amplified oxidative stress responses to a marginal Cu-def, or vice versa. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 10 ...

  14. Testicular apoptosis after dietary zinc deficiency: ultrastructural and TUNEL studies.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepa; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, Ranveer Singh

    2011-10-01

    The present study was conducted in Wistar rats to determine whether prepubertal dietary zinc deficiency causes apoptotic changes in testes. Prepubertal male Wistar rats (40-50 gm) were divided into 3 groups: zinc control (ZC), pairfed (PF), and zinc deficient (ZD). Control and pairfed groups were given a 100 ppm zinc diet while the deficient groups received 1 ppm zinc diet for 2 and 4 weeks (w), respectively. Ultrastructural studies revealed several apoptotic features such as wavy basement membrane, displaced nuclei, chromatin condensation, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear membrane dissolution, loss of inter-Sertoli cell junctional complexes, and intercellular bridges and deformed mitochondria. A variable spectrum of sperm defects had also been visualized e.g., acrosomal deformities such as decapitation and a ring of condensed chromatin around the nuclear periphery, deformed sperm heads with a condensed nucleus, tail-elements with superfluous cytoplasm, and damage to the mitochondrial sheath and aggregation of spermatozoa within the membrane. This was further supported by TUNEL studies. Apoptotic index, epididymal sperm concentration, motility, and fertility index also revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in zinc deficient groups (2 and 4 w) when compared with their respective control and pairfed groups. All the above findings are indicative that changes observed in the testes after dietary zinc deficiency are due to the onset of apoptosis. Increased apoptotic degeneration in testes may cause irreversible changes in the germ cells associated with decreased epididymal sperm concentration, motility, and fertility index which contributes to the low efficiency of spermatogenesis thereby indicating a possible role of zinc in fertility.

  15. Properties of Zip4 accumulation during zinc deficiency and its usefulness to evaluate zinc status: a study of the effects of zinc deficiency during lactation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Nakagawa, Miki; Tsujimura, Natsuki; Miyazaki, Shiho; Kizu, Kumiko; Goto, Tomoko; Komatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Ayu; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Kambe, Taiho; Komai, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Systemic and cellular zinc homeostasis is elaborately controlled by ZIP and ZnT zinc transporters. Therefore, detailed characterization of their expression properties is of importance. Of these transporter proteins, Zip4 functions as the primarily important transporter to control systemic zinc homeostasis because of its indispensable function of zinc absorption in the small intestine. In this study, we closely investigated Zip4 protein accumulation in the rat small intestine in response to zinc status using an anti-Zip4 monoclonal antibody that we generated and contrasted this with the zinc-responsive activity of the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We found that Zip4 accumulation is more rapid in response to zinc deficiency than previously thought. Accumulation increased in the jejunum as early as 1 day following a zinc-deficient diet. In the small intestine, Zip4 protein expression was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum and was accompanied by reduction of ALP activity, suggesting that the jejunum can become zinc deficient more easily. Furthermore, by monitoring Zip4 accumulation levels and ALP activity in the duodenum and jejunum, we reasserted that zinc deficiency during lactation may transiently alter plasma glucose levels in the offspring in a sex-specific manner, without affecting homeostatic control of zinc metabolism. This confirms that zinc nutrition during lactation is extremely important for the health of the offspring. These results reveal that rapid Zip4 accumulation provides a significant conceptual advance in understanding the molecular basis of systemic zinc homeostatic control, and that properties of Zip4 protein accumulation are useful to evaluate zinc status closely. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Zinc deficiency affects physiological and anatomical characteristics in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Mattiello, Edson M; Ruiz, Hugo A; Neves, Julio C L; Ventrella, Marília C; Araújo, Wagner L

    2015-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential microelement involved in several plant physiological processes. Therefore, it is important to identify Zn deficiencies promptly--before extensive damage occurs to the plant. The diagnostic tools that are used to identify Zn deficiencies are very important in areas where Zn deficiencies occur. Such diagnostic tools are vital for nutritional management and fertilizer recommendations. The current study investigated the effects of Zn deficiency on maize plants by recording a number of physiological and anatomical parameters. A Zn omission trial (from 0 to 22 days) was carried out to produce plants that had varying degrees of Zn deficiency. Typical symptoms of Zn deficiency (e.g. chlorotic stripes and purple shades on the edges and leaf sheath) appeared 16 days after the omission of Zn from nutrient solutions. As the time of Zn omission increased, there were significant decreases in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, maximal efficiency of photosystem I (evaluated by Fv/Fm), biomass (dry weight) and Zn concentrations in plants. Zinc-deficient plants also had a lower vascular bundle proportion coupled with a higher stomata density. These physiological and anatomical changes negatively impacted plant growth. Moreover, they occurred before visible symptoms of Zn deficiency were observed. Zinc concentrations were recorded for younger leaves, rather than for more mature leaves, which is usually recommended for plant analysis. The results demonstrate that the analysis of Zn in young leaves of maize is a very sensitive indicator of Zn status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of severe zinc deficiency and zinc supplement on spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi Boroujeni, S; Naghdi, N; Shahbazi, M; Farrokhi, A; Bagherzadeh, F; Kazemnejad, A; Javadian, M

    2009-07-01

    Zinc deficiency during pregnancy and during lactation has been shown to impair cognitive function and motor activity in offspring rats. In the present study, the effect of zinc deficiency and zinc supplement on spatial learning and memory in Morris Water Maze (MWM) and motor activity in open field were investigated. Pregnant rats after mating were divided to three groups. Control group fed a standard diet and a zinc deficient (ZnD) group fed a diet deficient in zinc (0.5-1.5 ppm) and a zinc supplement (ZnS) group fed a standard diet and enhanced zinc in the drinking water (10 ppm). All the diets were exposed during the last trisemester of pregnancy and during lactation. Rat's offspring in these groups were tested for spatial learning and memory in MWM at post natal day (PND) 56 and were tested for motor activity in open field at PND 66.The Escape Latency (EL) and Traveled Distance (TD) in the ZnD group were increased but Percentage of Time Spent in the target quadrant (PTS) was decreased compared to the control group. In addition, these were no significant differences in EL and TD, but PTS had significant increase in ZnS compared to the control group. In the open field, Total Distance Moved (TDM) and Time of Motor Activity (TMA) for the ZnD were decreased compared to the control group, but there were no significant differences in TDM and TMA between control and ZnS groups. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency during the last trimester of pregnancy and during lactation impaired spatial learning and memory in their offsprings and has also negative effect on motor activity. In addition, ZnS has a significant effect on spatial learning and memory but no effect on motor activity in their offsprings.

  18. Zinc deficiency in malabsorption states: a cause of infertility?

    PubMed

    Jameson, S

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen patients with malabsorption, 7 women and 5 men, were investigated extensively. All showed low serum zinc concentrations irrespective of the duration of illness and degree of malabsorption. Eleven of the 13 had active coeliac disease. It was suspected that the low serum zinc concentrations reflected a state of zinc deficiency, and this theory was borne out by the fact that no inflammatory reaction, no clear-cut albumin deficiency, and no oestrogen or corticosteroid influence could be demonstrated. All 7 women suffered from infertility, in most of them of long standing. Two showed secondary infertility after pregnancy and abnormal labour resulting in infants with congenital malformations (one case of bilateral congenital dislocation of the hip and one of multiple cardiac anomalies). I have reported similar complications in pregnancies in which the serum zinc was low. One of the infertile women conceived after the institution of gluten-free diet and zinc therapy, but later aborted spontaneously. Investigations on zinc metabolism and intestinal absorption might well prove valuable in otherwise unexplained infertility and could open up a new therapeutic approach.

  19. [Zinc intoxication dogs with simultaneous zinc deficiency--an expanded case study].

    PubMed

    Meiser, H; Schulz, R

    1997-01-01

    A dachshund suffered from vomitus, anorexia, apathy, and anemia. A metal button consisting of brass (alloy of copper and zinc) was diagnosed in the stomach and was removed. Blood analysis revealed an elevated level of zinc (10.7 micrograms/ml) associated with a low copper concentration (0.02 microgram/ml). This apparently paradoxical finding of copper deficiency despite of copper exposition (brass button) caused us to determine the diaminoxidase activity in serum, representing an indicator for the copper accumulating ceruloplasmin. The enzyme activity was found to be decreased. The case study brings to mind the mutual interaction between zinc and copper. Apparently, a copper deficiency is not necessarily due to a reduced supply of copper. Moreover, as shown by further investigations, an attenuated diaminoxidase activity represents an important parameter to diagnose a copper deficient state.

  20. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas; de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; de Medeiros Rocha, Érika Dantas; França, Mardone Cavalcante; de Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31) and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31) for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results Our study showed (1) an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2) a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3) increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4) increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5) an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations. PMID:26507491

  1. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... zinc deficient infants and children, for treating the common cold and recurrent ear infections, the flu, upper respiratory ... be sprayed in the nostrils for treating the common cold. Zinc sulfate is used in eye drop solutions ...

  2. Biofortification of Wheat Cultivars to Combat Zinc Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Muhammad U; Hassan, Muhammad U; Khan, Imran; Chattha, Muhammad B; Mahmood, Athar; Chattha, Muhammad U; Nawaz, Muhammad; Subhani, Muhammad N; Kharal, Mina; Khan, Sadia

    2017-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency caused by inadequate dietary intake is a global nutritional problem, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, zinc biofortification of wheat and other cereal crops is being urgently addressed and highly prioritized as a research topic. A field study was planned to evaluate the influence of zinc application on grain yield, grain zinc content, and grain phytic acid concentrations of wheat cultivars, and the relationships between these parameters. Three wheat cultivars, C1 = Faisalabad-2008, C2 = Punjab-2011, and C3 = Millet-2011 were tested with five different methods of zinc application: T1 = control, T2 = seed priming, T3 = soil application, T4 = foliar application, and T5 = soil + foliar application. It was found that grain yield and grain zinc were positively correlated, whereas, grain phytic acid and grain zinc were significantly negatively correlated. Results also revealed that T5, T3, and T4 considerably increased grain yield; however, T2 only slightly enhanced grain yield. Grain zinc concentration increased from 33.1 and 33.7 mg kg(-1) in T1 to 62.3 and 63.1 mg kg(-1) in T5 in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015, respectively. In particular, T5 markedly decreased grain phytic acid content; however, maximum concentration was recorded in T1. Moreover, all the tested cultivars exhibited considerable variation in grain yield, grain zinc, and grain phytic acid content. In conclusion, T5 was found to be most suitable for both optimum grain yield and grain biofortification of wheat.

  3. Biofortification of Wheat Cultivars to Combat Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Muhammad U.; Hassan, Muhammad U.; Khan, Imran; Chattha, Muhammad B.; Mahmood, Athar; Chattha, Muhammad U.; Nawaz, Muhammad; Subhani, Muhammad N.; Kharal, Mina; Khan, Sadia

    2017-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency caused by inadequate dietary intake is a global nutritional problem, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, zinc biofortification of wheat and other cereal crops is being urgently addressed and highly prioritized as a research topic. A field study was planned to evaluate the influence of zinc application on grain yield, grain zinc content, and grain phytic acid concentrations of wheat cultivars, and the relationships between these parameters. Three wheat cultivars, C1 = Faisalabad-2008, C2 = Punjab-2011, and C3 = Millet-2011 were tested with five different methods of zinc application: T1 = control, T2 = seed priming, T3 = soil application, T4 = foliar application, and T5 = soil + foliar application. It was found that grain yield and grain zinc were positively correlated, whereas, grain phytic acid and grain zinc were significantly negatively correlated. Results also revealed that T5, T3, and T4 considerably increased grain yield; however, T2 only slightly enhanced grain yield. Grain zinc concentration increased from 33.1 and 33.7 mg kg−1 in T1 to 62.3 and 63.1 mg kg−1 in T5 in 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, respectively. In particular, T5 markedly decreased grain phytic acid content; however, maximum concentration was recorded in T1. Moreover, all the tested cultivars exhibited considerable variation in grain yield, grain zinc, and grain phytic acid content. In conclusion, T5 was found to be most suitable for both optimum grain yield and grain biofortification of wheat. PMID:28352273

  4. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  5. Chronic Zinc Deficiency Alters Chick Gut Microbiota Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Neuman, Hadar; Moscovich, Sharon; Glahn, Raymond P.; Koren, Omry; Tako, Elad

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under conditions of Zn deficiency have yet to be studied. Using the broiler chicken (Gallus gallus) model, the aim of this study was to characterize distinct cecal microbiota shifts induced by chronic dietary Zn depletion. We demonstrate that Zn deficiency induces significant taxonomic alterations and decreases overall species richness and diversity, establishing a microbial profile resembling that of various other pathological states. Through metagenomic analysis, we show that predicted Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways responsible for macro- and micronutrient uptake are significantly depleted under Zn deficiency; along with concomitant decreases in beneficial short chain fatty acids, such depletions may further preclude optimal host Zn availability. We also identify several candidate microbes that may play a significant role in modulating the bioavailability and utilization of dietary Zn during prolonged deficiency. Our results are the first to characterize a unique and dysbiotic cecal microbiota during Zn deficiency, and provide evidence for such microbial perturbations as potential effectors of the Zn deficient phenotype. PMID:26633470

  6. Gender Dependent Evaluation of Autism like Behavior in Mice Exposed to Prenatal Zinc Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Boeckers, Tobias M; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has recently been linked to the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as environmental risk factor. With an estimated 17% of the world population being at risk of zinc deficiency, especially zinc deficiency during pregnancy might be a common occurrence, also in industrialized nations. On molecular level, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect a signaling pathway at glutamatergic synapses that has previously been identified through genetic mutations in ASD patients, the Neurexin-Neuroligin-Shank pathway, via altering zinc binding Shank family members. In particular, prenatal zinc deficient but not acute zinc deficient animals have been reported to display autism like behavior in some behavioral tests. However, a full behavioral analysis of a possible autism like behavior has been lacking so far. Here, we performed an extensive behavioral phenotyping of mice born from mothers with mild zinc deficiency during all trimesters of pregnancy. Prenatal zinc deficient animals were investigated as adults and gender differences were assessed. Our results show that prenatal zinc deficient mice display increased anxiety, deficits in nest building and various social interaction paradigm, as well as mild alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations. A gender specific analysis revealed only few sex specific differences. Taken together, given that similar behavioral abnormalities as reported here are frequently observed in ASD mouse models, we conclude that prenatal zinc deficient animals even without specific genetic susceptibility for ASD, already show some features of ASD like behavior.

  7. Gender Dependent Evaluation of Autism like Behavior in Mice Exposed to Prenatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has recently been linked to the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as environmental risk factor. With an estimated 17% of the world population being at risk of zinc deficiency, especially zinc deficiency during pregnancy might be a common occurrence, also in industrialized nations. On molecular level, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect a signaling pathway at glutamatergic synapses that has previously been identified through genetic mutations in ASD patients, the Neurexin-Neuroligin-Shank pathway, via altering zinc binding Shank family members. In particular, prenatal zinc deficient but not acute zinc deficient animals have been reported to display autism like behavior in some behavioral tests. However, a full behavioral analysis of a possible autism like behavior has been lacking so far. Here, we performed an extensive behavioral phenotyping of mice born from mothers with mild zinc deficiency during all trimesters of pregnancy. Prenatal zinc deficient animals were investigated as adults and gender differences were assessed. Our results show that prenatal zinc deficient mice display increased anxiety, deficits in nest building and various social interaction paradigm, as well as mild alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations. A gender specific analysis revealed only few sex specific differences. Taken together, given that similar behavioral abnormalities as reported here are frequently observed in ASD mouse models, we conclude that prenatal zinc deficient animals even without specific genetic susceptibility for ASD, already show some features of ASD like behavior. PMID:26973485

  8. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  9. Paradoxical zinc toxicity and oxidative stress in the mammary gland during marginal dietary zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Mack, Ronald P.; Lee, Sooyeon; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) regulates numerous cellular functions. Zn deficiency is common in females; ~80% of women and 40% of adolescent girls consume inadequate Zn. Zn deficiency enhances oxidative stress, inflammation and DNA damage. Oxidative stress and inflammation is associated with breast disease. We hypothesized that Zn deficiency increases oxidative stress in the mammary gland, altering the microenvironment and architecture. Zn accumulated in the mammary glands of Zn deficient mice and this was associated with macrophage infiltration, enhanced oxidative stress and over-expression of estrogen receptor α. Ductal and stromal hypercellularity was associated with aberrant collagen deposition and disorganized e-cadherin. Importantly, these microenvironmental alterations were associated with substantial impairments in ductal expansion and mammary gland development. This is the first study to show that marginal Zn deficiency creates a toxic microenvironment in the mammary gland impairing breast development. These changes are consistent with hallmarks of potential increased risk for breast disease and cancer. PMID:25088245

  10. Iron and zinc concentrations and /sup 59/Fe retention in developing fetuses of zinc-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.M.; Loennerdal, B.H.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-11-01

    Because disturbances in iron metabolism might contribute to the teratogenicity of zinc deficiency, we examined the effect of zinc deficiency on fetal iron accumulation and maternal and fetal retention of /sup 59/Fe. Pregnant rats were fed from mating a purified diet containing 0.5, 4.5 or 100 micrograms Zn/g. Laparotomies were performed on d 12, 16, 19 and 21 of gestation. Maternal blood and concepti were analyzed for zinc and iron. Additional groups of dams fed 0.5 or 100 micrograms Zn/g diet were gavaged on d 19 with a diet containing /sup 59/Fe. Six hours later maternal blood and tissues, fetuses and placentas were counted for /sup 59/Fe. Maternal plasma zinc, but not iron, concentration was affected by zinc deficiency on d 12. Embryo zinc concentration on d 12 increased with increasing maternal dietary zinc, whereas iron concentration was not different among groups. On d 16-21 plasma iron was higher in dams fed 0.5 micrograms Zn/g diet than in those fed 4.5 or 100 micrograms/g, whereas plasma zinc was lower in dams fed 0.5 or 4.5 micrograms Zn/g than in those fed 100 micrograms Zn/g diet. On d 19 zinc concentration in fetuses from dams fed 0.5 micrograms/g zinc was not different from that of those fed 4.5 micrograms/g zinc, and iron concentration was higher in the 0.5 microgram Zn/g diet group. The increase in iron concentration in zinc-deficient fetuses thus occurs too late to be involved in major structural teratogenesis. Although whole blood concentration of /sup 59/Fe was not different in zinc-deficient and control dams, zinc-deficient dams had more /sup 59/Fe in the plasma fraction.

  11. [A neonate with anaemia of prematurity: zinc protoporphyrin identifies iron deficiency anaemia without iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    van der Feen, Diederik E; van Hillegersberg, Jacqueline L A M; Schippers, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Anaemia is a common problem in premature infants and is generally easy to treat with iron supplementation. If the anaemia persists despite appropriate correction of deficiencies, more extensive evaluation is required. We describe a case of a premature male infant with a production-deficient anaemia without metabolic deficiencies, eventually identified as anaemia of prematurity. This type of anaemia is commonly diagnosed but its highly variable and complex aetiology and phenotype are often poorly understood. A probable explanation for the anaemia of prematurity in this case was a transient iron incorporation defect, identifiable by high levels of zinc protoporphyrin.

  12. Evolution of the degradation mechanism of pure zinc stent in the one-year study of rabbit abdominal aorta model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongtao; Wang, Cong; Liu, Chaoqiang; Chen, Houwen; Wu, Yifan; Han, Jintao; Jia, Zichang; Lin, Wenjiao; Zhang, Deyuan; Li, Wenting; Yuan, Wei; Guo, Hui; Li, Huafang; Yang, Guangxin; Kong, Deling; Zhu, Donghui; Takashima, Kazuki; Ruan, Liqun; Nie, Jianfeng; Li, Xuan; Zheng, Yufeng

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, pure zinc stents were implanted into the abdominal aorta of rabbits for 12 months. Multiscale analysis including micro-CT, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and histological stainings was performed to reveal the fundamental degradation mechanism of the pure zinc stent and its biocompatibility. The pure zinc stent was able to maintain mechanical integrity for 6 months and degraded 41.75 ± 29.72% of stent volume after 12 months implantation. No severe inflammation, platelet aggregation, thrombosis formation or obvious intimal hyperplasia was observed at all time points after implantation. The degradation of the zinc stent played a beneficial role in the artery remodeling and healing process. The evolution of the degradation mechanism of pure zinc stents with time was revealed as follows: Before endothelialization, dynamic blood flow dominated the degradation of pure zinc stent, creating a uniform corrosion mode; After endothelialization, the degradation of pure zinc stent depended on the diffusion of water molecules, hydrophilic solutes and ions which led to localized corrosion. Zinc phosphate generated in blood flow transformed into zinc oxide and small amounts of calcium phosphate during the conversion of degradation microenvironment. The favorable physiological degradation behavior makes zinc a promising candidate for future stent applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Zinc deficiency in a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient during a parenteral trace element product shortage.

    PubMed

    Franck, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition product shortages are common and place vulnerable patients at risk for nutrient deficiencies. This case report describes a parenteral nutrition-dependent patient who was found to have zinc deficiency during a parenteral nutrition product shortage. The management of the patient's zinc deficiency is described.

  14. Combinatorial effects of zinc deficiency and arsenic exposure on zebrafish (Danio rerio) development

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lisa; Barton, Carrie L.; Chase, Tyler T.; Gonnerman, Greg D.; Wong, Carmen P.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Ho, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Zinc deficiency and chronic low level exposures to inorganic arsenic in drinking water are both significant public health concerns that affect millions of people including pregnant women. These two conditions can co-exist in the human population but little is known about their interaction, and in particular, whether zinc deficiency sensitizes individuals to arsenic exposure and toxicity, especially during critical windows of development. To address this, we utilized the Danio rerio (zebrafish) model to test the hypothesis that parental zinc deficiency sensitizes the developing embryo to low-concentration arsenic toxicity, leading to altered developmental outcomes. Adult zebrafish were fed defined zinc deficient and zinc adequate diets and were spawned resulting in zinc adequate and zinc deficient embryos. The embryos were treated with environmentally relevant concentrations of 0, 50, and 500 ppb arsenic. Arsenic exposure significantly reduced the amount of zinc in the developing embryo by ~7%. The combination of zinc deficiency and low-level arsenic exposures did not sensitize the developing embryo to increased developmental malformations or mortality. The combination did cause a 40% decline in physical activity of the embryos, and this decline was significantly greater than what was observed with zinc deficiency or arsenic exposure alone. Significant changes in RNA expression of genes that regulate zinc homeostasis, response to oxidative stress and insulin production (including zip1, znt7, nrf2, ogg1, pax4, and insa) were found in zinc deficient, or zinc deficiency and arsenic exposed embryos. Overall, the data suggests that the combination of zinc deficiency and arsenic exposure has harmful effects on the developing embryo and may increase the risk for developing chronic diseases like diabetes. PMID:28837703

  15. Discovery of Human Zinc Deficiency: Its Impact on Human Health and Disease123

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ananda S.

    2013-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc in humans was established in 1963. During the past 50 y, tremendous advances in both clinical and basic sciences of zinc metabolism in humans have been observed. The major factor contributing to zinc deficiency is high phytate-containing cereal protein intake in the developing world, and nearly 2 billion subjects may be zinc deficient. Conditioned deficiency of zinc has been observed in patients with malabsorption syndrome, liver disease, chronic renal disease, sickle cell disease, and other chronic illnesses. Major clinical problems resulting from zinc deficiency in humans include growth retardation; cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. In the Middle East, zinc-deficient dwarfs did not live beyond the age of 25 y, and they died because of intercurrent infections. In 1963, we knew of only 3 enzymes that required zinc for their activities, but now we know of >300 enzymes and >1000 transcription factors that are known to require zinc for their activities. Zinc is a second messenger of immune cells, and intracellular free zinc in these cells participate in signaling events. Zinc has been very successfully used as a therapeutic modality for the management of acute diarrhea in children, Wilson’s disease, the common cold and for the prevention of blindness in patients with age-related dry type of macular degeneration and is very effective in decreasing the incidence of infection in the elderly. Zinc not only modulates cell-mediated immunity but is also an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23493534

  16. Esophageal carcinogenesis in the rat: zinc deficiency and alcohol effects on tumor induction.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Schrager, T F; Broitman, S

    1997-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed zinc-deficient or supplemented diets for 2 weeks, administered a carcinogenic dose of methylbenzylnitrosamine and observed over 20 or more weeks for effects of superimposing excess zinc or alcohol on development of esophageal tumors. In three separate experiments it was shown that (1) excess zinc offered no protection, (2) switching diets during or after carcinogen exposure pointed toward involvement of zinc in both initiation and promotion, (3) neither ethanol nor 3-methyl butanol alone affected tumorigenesis but the two combined and superimposed on a zinc deficiency resulted in a significant enhancement of neoplasia. In one group of rats fed the zinc-deficient diet only, with no carcinogen, 4 rats developed neoplasms, one of which was malignant. Cell proliferation, an integral component of zinc deficiency, appears to be an important contribution to tumor induction in this model.

  17. Gestational Zinc Deficiency Impairs Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Hepatitis B Vaccination in Offspring Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ning; Wang, Xuelian; Zhang, Ying; Gu, Qiuhong; Huang, Fen; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational zinc deficiency has been confirmed to impair the infant immune function. However, knowledge about effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy on hepatitis B vaccine responsiveness in offspring is limited. In this report, we aimed to examine how maternal zinc deficiency during pregnancy influences humoral and cellular immune responses to hepatitis B vaccination in offspring of BALB/c mice. Methodology/Principal Findings From day 1 of pregnancy upon delivery, maternal mice were given a standard diet (30 mg/kg/day zinc), zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc), or combination of zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc in the first 2 weeks of gestation) and zinc supplement diet (150 mg/kg/day zinc for the last week of pregnancy), respectively. Newborn pups of these maternal mice were immunized with hepatitis B vaccine at postnatal weeks 0, 2 and 4. Then, splenocytes and blood samples from the offspring mice were harvested for detection of serum zinc concentrations, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, expression of cytokines using ELISA, CCK-8 and flow cytometric analysis. Results from the present study demonstrated that gestational zinc deficiency inhibited antibody responses, and decreased the proliferative capacity of T cells in offsprings immunized with hepatitis B vaccine. Additionally, HBsAg-specific cytokines analysis revealed that gestational zinc deficiency could inhibit secretion of IFN-γ from splenocytes, and decrease IFN-γ expression of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Gestational zinc deficiency can weaken the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to hepatitis B vaccine via decreasing B cell counts and hepatitis B virus-specific immunoglobulin G production, as well as reducing T cell proliferation, CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio, and Th1-type immune responses. PMID:24069198

  18. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  19. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerates ethanol-induced liver injury in mice: involvement of intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency.

  20. Zinc deficiency in infants and children: a review of its complex and synergistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Nancy F; Miller, Leland V; Hambidge, K Michael

    2014-11-01

    Zinc deficiency is estimated to contribute to over half a million deaths per year in infants and children under 5 years of age. This paper reviews the features of mild-to-moderate zinc deficiency, which include growth faltering, deficits in immune function and altered integrity and function of the gastro-intestinal tract. Sub-clinical features include oxidative stress and a pro-inflammatory state. The homeostatic response to low dietary zinc intake by increasing absorption is limited, especially if the source of zinc is of poor bioavailability, and conservation of endogenous intestinal losses is a critical component of adaptation. Owing to low zinc intakes, older breastfed infants, especially those of low birthweight, are predictably at risk of zinc deficiency if complementary food choices are unfortified and/or low in zinc. Host factors such as young age, poor intra-uterine zinc accretion owing to poor maternal status and/or prematurity, and gastro-intestinal dysfunction also potently predispose to zinc deficiency. Environmental enteropathy, which is prevalent in low-resource settings, may substantially impair zinc absorption and/or increase endogenous losses, and thus lead to relatively high zinc requirements. Emerging evidence highlights common features between chronic inflammation and zinc deficiency, and each may exacerbate the other. More investigations of zinc homeostasis in populations in low-resource settings are needed to better quantify absorption capacity and losses. Effective preventive strategies must address potentially higher zinc requirements as well as the underlying context that perpetuates a vicious cycle of zinc deficiency and multiple adverse outcomes.

  1. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect.

  2. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy - development of new strategies: Report from an expert workshop

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might co...

  3. Ecto 5' nucleotidase (5'NT) as a sensitive indicator of human zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meftah, S; Prasad, A S; Lee, D Y; Brewer, G J

    1991-10-01

    Ecto 5' nucleotidase (5'NT) is an integral plasma membrane enzyme located on most mammalian cells, and it is zinc dependent. We assayed 5'NT activity in the lymphocytes of two groups of subjects. The first group of six subjects had a mild state of zinc deficiency, as measured on the basis of zinc levels in lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets, but were otherwise healthy. They received 50 mg zinc as acetate orally for 12 weeks. The second six subjects were normal human volunteers in whom a mild state of zinc deficiency was induced experimentally by dietary techniques (4.2 to 5.6 mg daily zinc intake). For the assay of 5'NT, intact lymphocytes were incubated with 8-14C-labeled inosine monophosphate as substrate. Product and substrate were separated by thin-layer chromatography. Zinc level in cells was measured by flameless atomic absorption technique. In the first group of subjects with zinc deficiency, the decreased activity of 5'NT was corrected and the cellular zinc levels were normalized by oral zinc supplementation (p less than 0.01). In the second group of subjects, the baseline data were compared with those in early zinc depletion (4 to 8 weeks) and late depletion periods (greater than 20 weeks). A decrease in the activity of 5'NT was observed during the early zinc depletion phase. Zinc levels in lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets decreased significantly only during the late zinc depletion phase (p less than 0.01). Plasma zinc level did not change even during the late zinc depletion phase. Our studies show that 5'NT activity may be a sensitive and useful indicator of mild deficiency of zinc in human subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Frequency distribution of zinc in leaves with and without zinc-deficiency symptoms, all collected from a single orange tree

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Alexander, G.V.; Kinnear, J.; Procopiou, J.; Haritou-Andriotaki, A.; Papanicolaou, X.

    1982-07-01

    Leaves with zinc-deficiency symptoms had a lower Zn concentration than corresponding leaves without symptoms and of the same age from the same orange (Citrus senensis L.) tree on sour orange (C. aurantium L.) rootstock grown in Rhodes, Greece. There was considerable overlap, however, with the frequency distribution of each group approximating a normal curve. But both kinds of leaves combined showed a more normal distribution. Some leaves with symptoms had higher zinc concentrations than some without symptoms. There was a threefold range in Zn concentration for each group of leaves. Zinc-deficient leaves had less phosphorus, calcium, and manganese and more iron, aluminum, silicon, and titanium (the so-called dust elements) than did leaves with no deficiency symptoms. Some of these elements gave normal curves for both Zn-deficient and non-Zn-deficient leaves.

  5. A short-term zinc-deficient diet decreases bone formation through down-regulated BMP2 in rat bone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effects of a short-term dietary zinc deficiency on bone metabolism. Zinc deficiency increased the mRNA expression of zinc uptake transporters such as Zip1, Zip13, and Zip14 in bone. However, zinc deficiency might not maintain zinc storage in bone, resulting in a decrease in bone formation through downregulation of the expression levels of osteoblastogenesis-related genes.

  6. Zinc deficiency increases organ damage and mortality in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Knoell, Daren L.; Julian, Mark W.; Bao, Shengying; Besecker, Beth; Macre, Jennifer E.; Leikauf, George D.; DiSilvestro, Robert A.; Crouser, Elliott D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Zinc deficiency is common among populations at high risk for sepsis mortality, including elderly, alcoholic, and hospitalized patients. Zinc deficiency causes exaggerated inflammatory responses to endotoxin but has not been evaluated during bacterial sepsis. We hypothesized that subacute zinc deficiency would amplify immune responses and oxidant stress during bacterial sepsis [i.e., cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] resulting in increased mortality and that acute nutritional repletion of zinc would be beneficial. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Adult male C57BL/6 mice. Interventions Ten-week-old, male, C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three dietary groups: 1) control diet, 2) zinc-deficient diet for 3 weeks, and 3) zinc-deficient diet for 3 weeks followed by oral zinc supplementation for 3 days (n = 35 per diet). Mice were then assigned to receive either CLP or sham operation (n = 15 each per diet). CLP and sham-operated treatment groups were further assigned to a 7-day survival study (n = 10 per treatment per diet) or were evaluated at 24 hours (n = 5 per treatment per diet) for signs of vital organ damage. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis mortality was significantly increased with zinc deficiency (90% vs. 30% on control diet). Zinc-deficient animals subject to CLP had higher plasma cytokines, more severe organ injury, including increased oxidative tissue damage and cell death, particularly in the lungs and spleen. None of the sham-operated animals died or developed signs of organ damage. Zinc supplementation normalized the inflammatory response, greatly diminished tissue damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Conclusions Subacute zinc deficiency significantly increases systemic inflammation, organ damage, and mortality in a murine polymicrobial sepsis model. Short-term zinc repletion provides significant, but incomplete protection despite normalization

  7. Short-Term Subclinical Zinc Deficiency in Weaned Piglets Affects Cardiac Redox Metabolism and Zinc Concentration.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2017-04-01

    Background: Subclinical zinc deficiency (SZD) represents the common zinc malnutrition phenotype. However, its association with oxidative stress is not well understood. The heart muscle may be a promising target for studying early changes in redox metabolism.Objective: We investigated the effects of short-term SZD on cardiac redox metabolism in weaned piglets.Methods: Forty-eight weaned German Large White × Landrace × Piétrain piglets (50% castrated males and 50% females; body weight of 8.5 kg) were fed diets with different zinc concentrations for 8 d. Measurements included cardiac parameters of antioxidative capacity, stress-associated gene expression, and tissue zinc status. Analyses comprised (linear, broken-line) regression models and Pearson correlation coefficients.Results: Glutathione and α-tocopherol concentrations as well as catalase, glutathione reductase, B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, and caspase 9 gene expression plateaued in response to reduction in dietary zinc from 88.0 to 57.6, 36.0, 36.5, 41.3, 55.3, and 33.8 mg/kg, respectively (P < 0.0001). Further reduction in dietary zinc promoted a linear decrease of glutathione and α-tocopherol (30 and 0.6 nmol/mg dietary Zn, respectively; P < 0.05) and a linear increase of gene expression [0.02, 0.01, 0.003, and 0.02 Log10(2(-ΔΔCt))/mg dietary Zn, respectively; P < 0.05)]. Tissue zinc declined linearly with reduction in dietary zinc (0.21 mg tissue Zn/mg dietary Zn; P = 0.004) from 88.0 to 42.7 mg/kg (P < 0.0001), below which it linearly increased inversely to further reduction in dietary zinc (0.57 mg tissue Zn/mg dietary Zn; P = 0.006). H2O2-detoxification activity and metallothionein 1A gene expression decreased linearly with reduction in dietary zinc from 88.0 to 28.1 mg/kg [0.02 mU and 0.008 Log10(2(-ΔΔCt))/mg dietary Zn, respectively; P < 0.05]. Fas cell-surface death receptor, etoposide-induced 2.4 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene expression correlated positively to

  8. Zinc Deficiency Is associated With Depressive Symptoms-Results From the Berlin Aging Study II.

    PubMed

    Jung, Alissa; Spira, Dominik; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina

    2017-08-01

    Zinc plays an important role for behavioral and mental function, maintaining the correct functions of intracellular signal transduction, cellular and trans-membrane transport, protein synthesis, and antioxidant system. We investigated both dietary zinc intake and plasma zinc levels and the correlation with depressive symptoms in a large sample of community-dwelling old. One thousand five hundred fourteen older people (aged 60-84 years, 772 women) from the Berlin Aging Study II were included. Zinc intake was assessed by the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Plasma zinc levels were assessed with atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the "Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale" and the "Geriatric Depression Scale." Zinc deficiency in blood plasma was found in 18.7% of participants, and depressive symptoms in 15.7%. Participants with depressive symptoms had lower energy-adjusted zinc intake (median 11.1 vs 11.6 µmol/L; p = .048) and lower plasma zinc levels (median 12.2 vs12.3 mg/dL; p = .037). Even after adjustment for known predictors of depression, plasma zinc deficiency remained significantly associated with depressive symptoms (odds ratio: 1.490, 95% confidence interval: 1.027-2.164; p = .036). In the multiple logistic regression model stratified by sex, we found that plasma zinc deficiency was strongly associated with a higher risk for depressive symptoms in women (odds ratio: 1.739, 95% confidence interval: 1.068-2.833; p = .026). Plasma zinc deficiency was common in our old study population. An increase in dietary zinc and higher plasma zinc levels may reduce the risk of depressive symptoms. A screening for reduced dietary zinc intake or plasma zinc deficiency might be beneficial in older people at risk of depressive symptoms.

  9. A case of transient zinc deficiency in a breast-fed preterm infant successfully treated with oral zinc supplementation: review of zinc metabolism and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Mandato, F; Rubegni, P; Buonocore, G; Fimiani, M

    2009-12-01

    A 15-week-old baby girl, born at the 29 week of gestation, presented with a four-week history of demarcated, erythematous, erosive and exudative patches on the perianal, perioral and acral areas. A clinical diagnosis of zinc deficiency was considered. Serum zinc level was decreased (0.5 mg/L; normal 0.70-1.50 mg/L), the mother's serum and milk had normal zinc values. The baby was started an empiric trial of oral zinc supplementation (3 mg zinc gluconate/kg body weight/ day) with complete healing of lesions after two weeks. Treatment was gradually withdrawn at six months of age with no relapse. Transient zinc deficiency due to increased zinc requirements in breast-fed mainly preterm infants is a condition similar to acrodermatitis enteropathica, an autosomal recessive disorder of enteric zinc absorption affecting almost exclusively not breast-fed infants. Early recognition of the disorder and introduction of zinc supplementation rapidly reverses transient zinc deficiency, that probably will become more and more frequent, because of the rising rate of premature infants with breast-feeding only.

  10. Effect of polaprezinc on taste disorders in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Hiroki; Yoshinaga, Koji; Eta, Runa; Emori, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Daisuke; Iino, Yuka; Sawada, Miwa; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Takei, Mineo

    2006-01-01

    The effect of polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc ion and L-carnosine, on abnormalities of taste sensation induced by feeding a zinc-deficient diet to rats was examined by using the two-bottle preference test (quinine hydrochloride as a bitter taste and sodium chloride as a salty taste). Rats were fed either a zinc-deficient or a zinc-sufficient diet. The zinc-deficient diet increased the preference for both taste solutions, while polaprezinc (at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg) restored the altered taste preferences. We also evaluated the proliferation of taste bud cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). The BrdU incorporation into taste bud cells was significantly reduced in rats fed a zinc-deficient diet compared with rats fed a zinc-sufficient diet (from 50.8% to 45.0%, p<0.05) and this reduction was reversed by polaprezinc at doses of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg, increasing to 50.2%, 53.5%, and 52.5%, respectively. These findings indicate that zinc deficiency induces the delayed of proliferation of taste bud cells, while polaprezinc improves cell proliferation. In conclusion, polaprezinc had a therapeutic effect in a rat model of abnormal taste sensation. Its mechanism of action was suggested to involve improvement of the decrease in taste bud cell proliferation caused by zinc deficiency.

  11. In vivo effects of zinc deficiency on calmodulin concentrations in selected rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.S.; McBride, S.A.; Graham, S.; Nelson, N.R.; Slotnick, B.M.; Henkin, R.I.

    1987-12-14

    Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats, one fed zinc-deficient diet, ad libitum, the other, pair-fed with the same diet, but given supplemental zinc in the drinking water were studied. After ten weeks of diet, rats were exsanguinated and zinc and calmodulin concentration in brain and testes were measured. Mean zinc concentration in testes was significantly decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/, but mean zinc concentration in brain was not different. Similarly, mean calmodulin concentration in testes was decreased in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/ whereas mean calmodulin concentration in brain was not different. Distribution studies of zinc and calmodulin showed that both zinc and calmodulin were released more freely into soluble fractions of testes in rats fed zinc-deficient diet without supplemental Zn/sup + +/. These results indicate, for the first time in in vivo studies, that zinc influences the calmodulin content of testes. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Pure and zinc doped nano-hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Kashmira P.; Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S.; Joshi, Mihir J.

    2014-09-01

    The structural, antimicrobial, and hemolytic properties and bioactivity have been studied of pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) and zinc doped hydroxyapatite (Zn-HAP) nano-particles for their medical applications. Pure HAP and Zn-HAP nano-particles were synthesized by the surfactant mediated approach. The doping of zinc was estimated by EDAX. The average particle size was determined by applying Scherrer's formula to powdered XRD patterns. The nano-particle morphology was studied by TEM and the presence of various functional groups was identified by FTIR spectroscopy. Good antimicrobial activity of nano-HAP and nano-Zn-HAP was found against five organisms, viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcous aureus and Bacillus cereus as Gram positive. The ability of new apatite formation on the surface of pure and doped HAP samples was studied by using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) in vitro. Hemolytic study indicated that all samples were non-hemolytic and suggesting potential application as bone implant material.

  13. Protective effects of zinc on oxidative stress enzymes in liver of protein-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Garg, M L; Dhawan, D K

    2005-01-01

    Persons afflicted with protein malnutrition are generally deficient in a variety of essential micronutrients like zinc, copper, iron, and selenium, which in turn affects number of metabolic processes in the body. To evaluate the protective effects of zinc on the enzymes involved in oxidative stress induced in liver of protein-deficient rats, the current study was designed. Zinc sulfate at a dose level of 227 mg/L zinc in drinking water was administered to female Sprague-Dawley normal control as well as protein-deficient rats for a total duration of 8 weeks. The effects of zinc treatment in conditions of protein deficiency were studied on rat liver antioxidant enzymes, which included catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Protein deficiency in normal rats resulted in a significant increase in hepatic activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase and the levels of lipid peroxidation. A significant inhibition in the levels of reduced glutathione and the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase has been observed after protein deficiency in normal rats. Interestingly, Zn treatment to protein-deficient animals lowered already raised activity catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase and levels of lipid peroxidation to significant levels when compared to protein-deficient animals. Also, Zn treatment to the protein-deficient animals resulted in a significant elevation in the levels of GSH and SOD activity as compared to their respective controls, thereby indicating its effectiveness in regulating their levels in adverse conditions. It has also been observed that concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and selenium were found to be decreased significantly in protein-deficient animals. However, the levels of these elements came back to within normal limits when zinc was administrated

  14. Experimental zinc deficiency in guinea-pigs: biochemical changes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Gupta, R K

    1986-05-01

    1. Zinc deficiency was produced experimentally in guinea-pigs fed on a diet containing 1.25 mg Zn/kg diet over a period of 60 d. In addition, the response of the Zn-deficient (ZnD) animals to Zn supplementation was studied for 15 d. 2. In the ZnD group a significant reduction was found in serum Zn and protein concentrations and in alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1; AP) activity from day 24 onwards. 3. Paper electrophoretic studies on serum revealed a significant decrease in relative values, as well as absolute values, of albumin and gamma-globulin and an increase in beta-globulin. 4. Albumin:globulin increased on day 24 but decreased significantly from day 48 onwards. 5. The kidney and testis of the ZnD group showed a reduction in Zn and protein contents, and AP activity. 6. Zn supplementation of the previously ZnD group resulted in marked although incomplete improvement in the biochemical indices studied.

  15. Esophageal carcinogenesis in the rat: zinc deficiency, DNA methylation and alkyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Broitman, S; Schrager, T F

    1997-01-01

    Rats fed zinc-deficient diets and given an esophageal carcinogen, methylbenzylnitrosamine, develop tumors in greater incidence and with increased frequency compared to zinc-supplemented rats. This greater susceptibility is associated with a unique esophageal lesion, parakeratosis, with markedly increased epithelial necrosis and cell proliferation. Recent studies have shown that the increased susceptibility to tumorigenesis was further associated with a number of metabolic and biochemical alterations including increased binding of the carcinogen to DNA, shifts in O6-methylguanine (O6MeG)/7-methylguanine ratios and suggestions that the promutagen O6MeG lesion is not repaired effectively in the zinc-deficient esophagus; the latter was not reflected in the amount of O6-methyltransferase activity, however. The weight of evidence supports a presumption that zinc deficiency interferes with normal DNA repair mechanisms, the nature of which is not clear. An interesting additional finding was that zinc deficiency alone was associated with esophageal tumor induction, without carcinogen, which indicates that genetic material in the zinc-deficient esophageal epithelium is damaged sufficiently, without further chemical injury, to result in loss of control of cell proliferation. Manipulation of the time of exposure to zinc deficiency and carcinogen exposure defined the initiation period as most affected by the deficiency. Furthermore, reduced carcinogen exposure (and less toxicity), along with zinc deficiency, permits development of more tumors of the endophytic type, the form more relevant to human esophageal tumors. The groundwork, as described in this paper, has now been prepared to directly address the latter issue, endophytic tumors, and the putative relation of zinc deficiency to esophageal cancer in human populations.

  16. Zinc deficiency in men with Crohn's disease may contribute to poor sperm function and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, A M

    2003-12-01

    In Great Britain, married couples were reported to have between 1.9 and 2.1 children, while men with Crohn's disease had a mean of 1.2 and of 0.4 children before and after diagnosis, respectively. The role of zinc for male fertility is essential. Although lack of zinc in Crohn's disease is well established in up to 70% of patients, a possible relation between zinc deficiency and male subfertility in Crohn's disease remains unclear. This study is aimed at examining a possible link between zinc deficiency in men with Crohn's disease and male subfertility in this group of patients.

  17. Chronic but not acute antidepresant treatment alters serum zinc/copper ratio under pathological/zinc-deficient conditions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mlyniec, K; Ostachowicz, B; Krakowska, A; Reczynski, W; Opoka, W; Nowak, G

    2014-10-01

    Depression is the leading psychiatric disorder with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Clinical studies report lower serum zinc in depressed patients, suggesting a strong link between zinc and mood disorders. Also copper as an antagonistic element to zinc seems to play a role in depression, where elevated concentration is observed. In the present study we investigated serum copper and zinc concentration after acute or chronic antidepressant (AD) treatment under pathological/zinc-deficient conditions. Zinc deficiency in mice was induced by a special diet administered for 6 weeks (zinc adequate diet - ZnA, contains 33.5 mgZn/kg; zinc deficient diet - ZnD, contains 0.2 mgZn/kg). Animals received acute or chronically saline (control), imipramine, escitalopram, reboxetine or bupropion. To evaluate changes in serum copper and zinc concentrations the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was performed. In ZnD animals serum zinc level was reduced after acute ADs treatment (similarly to vehicle treatment), however, as demonstrated in the previous study after chronic ADs administration no differences between both ZnA and ZnD groups were observed. Acute ADs in ZnD animals caused different changes in serum copper concentration with no changes after chronic ADs treatment. The calculated serum Zn/Cu ratio is reduced in ZnD animals (compared to ZnA subjects) treated with saline (acutely or chronically) and in animals treated acutely with ADs. However, chronic treatment with ADs normalized (by escitalopram, reboxetine or bupropion) or increased (by imipramine) this Zn/Cu ratio. Observed in this study normalization of serum Zn/Cu ratio in depression-like conditions by chronic (but not acute) antidepressants suggest that this ratio may be consider as a marker of depression or treatment efficacy.

  18. Peroxiredoxin Chaperone Activity Is Critical for Protein Homeostasis in Zinc-deficient Yeast* ♦

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Colin W.; Taggart, Janet; Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Kubisiak, Michael; Panascharoen, Supawee; Schelble, Katherine; Eide, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is required for the folding and function of many proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency are regulated by the Zap1 transcription factor. One Zap1 target gene encodes the Tsa1 peroxiredoxin, a protein with both peroxidase and protein chaperone activities. Consistent with its regulation, Tsa1 is critical for growth under low zinc conditions. We previously showed that Tsa1's peroxidase function decreases the oxidative stress that occurs in zinc deficiency. In this report, we show that Tsa1 chaperone, and not peroxidase, activity is the more critical function in zinc-deficient cells. Mutations restoring growth to zinc-deficient tsa1 cells inactivated TRR1, encoding thioredoxin reductase. Because Trr1 is required for oxidative stress tolerance, this result implicated the Tsa1 chaperone function in tolerance to zinc deficiency. Consistent with this hypothesis, the tsa1Δ zinc requirement was complemented by a Tsa1 mutant allele that retained only chaperone function. Additionally, growth of tsa1Δ was also restored by overexpression of holdase chaperones Hsp26 and Hsp42, which lack peroxidase activity, and the Tsa1 paralog Tsa2 contributed to suppression by trr1Δ, even though trr1Δ inactivates Tsa2 peroxidase activity. The essentiality of the Tsa1 chaperone suggested that zinc-deficient cells experience a crisis of disrupted protein folding. Consistent with this model, assays of protein homeostasis suggested that zinc-limited tsa1Δ mutants accumulated unfolded proteins and induced a corresponding stress response. These observations demonstrate a clear physiological role for a peroxiredoxin chaperone and reveal a novel and unexpected role for protein homeostasis in tolerating metal deficiency. PMID:24022485

  19. Prevention of upper aerodigestive tract cancer in zinc-deficient rodents: inefficacy of genetic or pharmacological disruption of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Fong, Louise Y Y; Jiang, Yubao; Riley, Maurisa; Liu, Xianglan; Smalley, Karl J; Guttridge, Denis C; Farber, John L

    2008-03-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is associated with an increased risk of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer. In rodents, zinc deficiency predisposes to carcinogenesis by causing proliferation and alterations in gene expression. We examined whether in zinc-deficient rodents, targeted disruption of the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 pathway by the COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib or by genetic deletion prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Tongue cancer prevention studies were conducted in zinc-deficient rats previously exposed to a tongue carcinogen by celecoxib treatment with or without zinc replenishment, or by zinc replenishment alone. The ability of genetic COX-2 deletion to protect against chemically-induced forestomach tumorigenesis was examined in mice on zinc-deficient versus zinc-sufficient diet. The expression of 3 predictive biomarkers COX-2, nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B p65 and leukotriene A(4) hydrolase (LTA(4)H) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In zinc-deficient rats, celecoxib without zinc replenishment reduced lingual tumor multiplicity but not progression to malignancy. Celecoxib with zinc replenishment or zinc replenishment alone significantly lowered lingual squamous cell carcinoma incidence, as well as tumor multiplicity. Celecoxib alone reduced overexpression of the 3 biomarkers in tumors slightly, compared with intervention with zinc replenishment. Instead of being protected, zinc-deficient COX-2 null mice developed significantly greater tumor multiplicity and forestomach carcinoma incidence than wild-type controls. Additionally, zinc-deficient COX-2-/- forestomachs displayed strong LTA(4)H immunostaining, indicating activation of an alternative pathway under zinc deficiency when the COX-2 pathway is blocked. Thus, targeting only the COX-2 pathway in zinc-deficient animals did not prevent UADT carcinogenesis. Our data suggest zinc supplementation should be more thoroughly explored in human prevention clinical trials for UADT cancer.

  20. Marginal zinc deficiency increases oxidative DNA damage in the prostate after chronic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Elias, Valerie; Loban, Andrei; Scrimgeour, Angus G.; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 12% of Americans do not consume the recommended level of zinc and could be at risk for marginal zinc deficiency. Zinc functions in antioxidant defense and DNA repair and could be important for prostate health. We hypothesized that marginal zinc deficiency sensitizes the prostate to oxidative stress and DNA damage. Rats were fed a zinc-adequate (ZA; 30 mg Zn/kg) or marginally zinc-deficient (MZD; 5–6 mg Zn/kg) diet for 6 weeks. MZD increased p53 and PARP expression but no change in 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine levels was detected. To examine the susceptibility to exogenous oxidative stress, rats fed a ZA or MZD diet were assigned to exercising (EXE) or sedentary (SED) groups for 9 weeks. MZD or EXE alone did not affect oxidative DNA damage in the prostate; however, combined MZD + EXE increased DNA damage in the dorsolateral lobe. PARP and p53 expression was not further induced with MZD + EXE, suggesting that MZD interferes with DNA repair responses to stress. Finally, the addition of phytase to the MZD diet successfully restored zinc levels in the prostate and decreased DNA damage back to ZA levels. Overall, this study suggests that marginal zinc deficiency sensitizes the prostate to oxidative stress and demonstrates the importance of maintaining optimal zinc nutrition in physically active populations. PMID:19836448

  1. Induction of nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis in motor neurons by zinc-deficient superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Estévez, A G; Crow, J P; Sampson, J B; Reiter, C; Zhuang, Y; Richardson, G J; Tarpey, M M; Barbeito, L; Beckman, J S

    1999-12-24

    Mutations in copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD) have been implicated in the selective death of motor neurons in 2 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. The loss of zinc from either wild-type or ALS-mutant SODs was sufficient to induce apoptosis in cultured motor neurons. Toxicity required that copper be bound to SOD and depended on endogenous production of nitric oxide. When replete with zinc, neither ALS-mutant nor wild-type copper, zinc SODs were toxic, and both protected motor neurons from trophic factor withdrawal. Thus, zinc-deficient SOD may participate in both sporadic and familial ALS by an oxidative mechanism involving nitric oxide.

  2. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  3. Znt7 (Slc30a7)-deficient mice display reduced body zinc status and body fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Yu, Yan Yiu; Kirschke, Catherine P; Gertz, Erik R; Lloyd, Kent K C

    2007-12-21

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that ZNT7 is involved in transporting the cytoplasmic zinc into the Golgi apparatus of the cell for zinc storage or to be incorporated into newly synthesized zinc-requiring enzymes/proteins. To evaluate the physiological role of ZNT7, we created a mouse model of Znt7 deficiency by a gene-trap approach. Znt7-deficient mice were zinc-deficient based on their low zinc content in serum, liver, bone, kidney, and small intestine. In embryonic fibroblasts isolated from Znt7-deficient mice, cellular zinc was approximately 50% that of wild-type controls. Znt7-deficient mice also displayed some classic manifestations of dietary zinc deficiency, such as reduced food intake and poor body weight gain. However, the mutant mice did not show any sign of hair abnormality and dermatitis that are commonly associated with dietary zinc deficiency. A radioactive feeding study suggested that Znt7-deficient mice had reduced zinc absorption in the gut resulting in decreased zinc accumulations in other organs in the body. The poor growth found in Znt7-deficient mice could not be corrected by feeding the mutant mice with a diet containing 6-fold higher zinc (180 mg/kg) than the suggested adequate intake amount (30 mg/kg). Furthermore, the reduced body weight gain of the mutant mice was largely due to the decrease in body fat accumulation. We conclude that ZNT7 has essential functions in dietary zinc absorption and in regulation of body adiposity.

  4. Zinc-deficient sprouting blight potatoes and their possible relation with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Cevval; Taneli, Fatma; Oksel, Figen; Hakerlerler, Huseyin

    2005-01-01

    Maternal nutritional zinc deficiency is blamed in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. In animal and plant domains zinc is required for growth and development. The objective of the present study was to show that sprouting blighted potato tuber is zinc deficient. In five potato varieties, zinc was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in wet-ashed paired slices of edible potato tuber and in its peel, in blighted potato tuber and in its sprout. Zinc contents were measured as the mean (+/- SEM) and the following values were found, 0.388 +/- 0.036, 0.623 +/- 0.059, 0.550 +/- 0.030 and 1.089 +/- 0.181 mg per 100 g wet weight, respectively. In conclusion, we believe that long-term consumption of zinc-depleted, blight potato tuber by pregnant woman could be potentially teratogenic with the consequent birth of a baby with neural tube defects.

  5. Changes in immunoglobulin levels in zinc-deficient mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Lee, C. M.; Ashraf, M.

    1994-01-01

    A metabolic imbalance technique was used to study the effects of zinc deficiency on immunoglobulin levels in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice developed higher numbers of parasitemia earlier and exhibited prolonged infection. Irrespective of the diet, higher IgG1, IgG2b, and IgM levels, lower IgG2a and IgA levels, and uniform IgG3 levels were exhibited primarily by mice infected with T musculi and to a lesser extent by mice immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice showed smaller increases in IgG1 and IgM, but larger gains in IgG2b compared with mice on full-complement and pair-fed diets. However, IgG2a decreased significantly in zinc-deficient mice. PMID:7932840

  6. Zinc Deficiency after Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Bindal, Vivek; Graham, Yitka; Dudeja, Usha; Lakdawala, Muffazal; Small, Peter K

    2017-02-01

    Up to 50% of patients have zinc deficiency before bariatric surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the commonest bariatric procedure worldwide. It can further exacerbate zinc deficiency by reducing intake as well as absorption. The British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society, therefore, recommends that zinc level should be monitored routinely following gastric bypass. However, the American guidance does not recommend such monitoring for all RYGB patients and reserves it for patients with 'specific findings'. This review concludes that clinically relevant Zn deficiency is rare after RYGB. Routine monitoring of zinc levels is hence unnecessary for asymptomatic patients after RYGB and should be reserved for patients with skin lesions, hair loss, pica, dysgeusia, hypogonadism or erectile dysfunction in male patients, and unexplained iron deficiency anaemia.

  7. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, K.I.; Caffrey, P.B. )

    1989-08-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. The authors suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase--each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures.

  8. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    PubMed Central

    Keating, K. Irwin; Caffrey, P. Barone

    1989-01-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. We suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase—each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures. PMID:16594062

  9. Effects of zinc deficiency on ethanol metabolism and alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Das, I; Burch, R E; Hahn, H K

    1984-10-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase, low Km and high Km mitochondrial and microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase, and in vivo ethanol elimination rates were determined in five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats given liquid diets, as follows: control (C), control plus 5% ethanol (CE), pair-fed control and zinc-deficient (PC-ZnD), zinc-deficient (ZnD), and zinc-deficient plus 5% ethanol (ZnDE). Rats fed CE had decreased liver and serum zinc content. The animals given ZnD diets had an even more dramatic decrease in their tissue zinc concentrations and displayed marked growth retardation. The in vivo blood ethanol elimination rate was increased in animals fed ethanol, and this increase was accompanied by increased alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. There was a significant decrease in the ethanol elimination rate in rats given ZnD and ZnDE diets. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities in rats with deficient zinc levels also were decreased, and there were no changes in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde is impaired in zinc deficiency, but acetaldehyde to acetate conversion appears normal.

  10. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the endogenous phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Allen, O.B.; Bettger, W.J.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on patterns of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane proteins and erythrocyte filterability was examined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing less than 1.1 mg zinc/kg diet ad libitum for 3 wk. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg zinc/kg diet. Net phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane proteins were carried out by an in vitro assay utilizing (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The membrane proteins were subsequently separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the /sup 32/P content of gel slices was counted by Cerenkov counting. Erythrocyte filterability was measured as the filtration time of suspensions of erythrocytes, both untreated and preincubated with diamide, under constant pressure. Erythrocyte ghosts from zinc-deficient rats demonstrated greater dephosphorylation of protein bands R1 plus R2 and R7 than pair-fed rats and greater net phosphorylation of band R2.2 than pair-fed or ad libitum-fed control rats (P less than 0.05). Erythrocytes from ad libitum-fed control rats showed significantly longer filtration times than those from zinc-deficient or pair-fed control rats. In conclusion, dietary zinc deficiency alters in vitro patterns of erythrocyte membrane protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, whereas the depression in food intake associated with the zinc deficiency increases erythrocyte filterability. 71 references.

  11. Effect of zinc deficiency of expression of specific mRNAs in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.J.; Kimball, S.R.; Leure-duPree, A.E.; Jefferson, L.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Retinol is released from the liver bound to a specific transport protein, retinol binding protein (RBP), which binds to transthyretin (TTR) to transport retinol to the retinal pigment epithelium for use in the visual cycle. The synthesis of RBP as well as the transport of vitamin A from the liver is especially sensitive to zinc deficiency (ZD). Impaired hepatic synthesis of RBP has been reported in zinc-deficient rats. In the present study, the effect of ZD on the expression of mRNAs in the liver was examined by isolating total RNA from control, pair-fed, and zinc-deficient rats and translating the RNA in a messenger-dependent reticulocyte lysate. The radiolabeled translation products were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. The amounts of 12 of the approximately 200 radiolabeled translation products which could be distinguished were found to be altered in zinc-deficient compare to control samples. To investigate the expression of a specific mRNA, a cDNA to TTR was employed to probe the RNA samples. Slot blot analysis revealed that TTR mRNA was reduced to 57 {plus minus} 14% of the control in pair-fed rats to 29 {plus minus} 19% of control in zinc-deficient rats. The decrease in TTR mRNA is consistent with the observation that serum TTR is decreased during zinc deficiency caused by cirrhosis.

  12. Effects of zinc and/or iron deficiency on rectal temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Konomi, Aki; Yokoi, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    O'Dell et al. reported that rectal temperature was decreased by zinc deficiency in rats. However, it is not known whether a combined deficiency of zinc and iron affects rectal temperature. Forty 4-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into four dietary treatment groups of 10 rats each for the 4-wk study: zinc-deficient group (4.5 mg Zn and 35 mg Fe/kg diet; -Zn), iron-deficient group (30 mg Zn/kg diet, no supplemental iron; -Fe), zinc/iron-deficient group (4.5 mg Zn/kg diet, no supplemental iron; -Zn-Fe), and control group (AIN-93G; Cont). At d 24-27, the rectal temperature was determined. The rectal temperature of the -Zn group was significantly lower than the Cont group. The rectal temperature of the -Zn-Fe group was similar to that of the Cont group, although thyroid-stimulating hormone and total thyroxin concentrations were the lowest in the -Zn-Fe group among all groups. The pattern of the plasma nitrate/nitrite concentrations across groups was similar to rectal temperature. Although observation of the rectal temperature is not conclusive, the balance between zinc and iron intake seems to determine the body temperature set point. These results suggest that the thermogenic effect of thyroid hormones is not thought to influence the paradoxical maintenance of rectal temperature in combined deficiency of zinc and iron.

  13. Role of zinc in regulating the testicular function. Part 3. Histopathological changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency in testes of male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Hafiez, A A; el-Kirdassy, Z H; el-Malkh, N M; el-Zayat, E M

    1990-01-01

    Zinc deficiency affects the testicular tissues adversely. The testes of zinc-deficient rats showed variable degrees of degeneration compared to both control and zinc-supplemented ones. Initially, there was an early pronounced spermatic arrest followed by a series of degeneration of the cellular layers constituting the seminiferous tubules in the zinc-deficient rats. Degenerative changes were additionally demonstrated in the interstitial tissue cells of the zinc-deficient rats. These histopathological observations in testes of zinc-deficient rats run in parallel provide an additional support to our previous publications in which we recorded a significant reduction in both serum and testicular levels of testosterone in the same group of animals, since spermatogenesis in rodents appeared to depend primarily on testosterone level.

  14. Serum zinc levels in patients with iron deficiency anemia and its association with symptoms of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kelkitli, Engin; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Aslan, Nevin Alayvaz; Kilic-Baygutalp, Nurcan; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Kurt, Nezahat; Bakan, Nuri; Bakan, Ebubekir

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Zinc is the co-factor of several enzymes and plays a role in iron metabolism, so zinc deficiency is associated with IDA. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the relationship of symptoms of IDA and zinc deficiency in adult IDA patients. The study included 43 IDA patients and 43 healthy control subjects. All patients were asked to provide a detailed history and were subjected to a physical examination. The hematological parameters evaluated included hemoglobin (Hb); hematocrit (Ht); red blood cell (erythrocyte) count (RBC); and red cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (МСН), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (МСНС), and red cell distribution width (RDW). Anemia was defined according to the criteria defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Serum zinc levels were measured in the flame unit of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Symptoms attributed to iron deficiency or depletion, defined as fatigue, cardiopulmonary symptoms, mental manifestations, epithelial manifestations, and neuromuscular symptoms, were also recorded and categorized. Serum zinc levels were lower in anemic patients (103.51 ± 34.64 μ/dL) than in the control subjects (256.92 ± 88.54 μ/dL; <0.001). Patients with zinc level <99 μ/dL had significantly more frequent mental manifestations (p < 0.001), cardiopulmonary symptoms (p = 0.004), restless leg syndrome (p = 0.016), and epithelial manifestations (p < 0.001) than patients with zinc level > 100 μ/dL. When the serum zinc level was compared with pica, no statistically significant correlation was found (p = 0.742). Zinc is a trace element that functions in several processes in the body, and zinc deficiency aggravates IDA symptoms. Measurement of zinc levels and supplementation if necessary should be considered for IDA patients.

  15. Effects of zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation on homocysteine levels and related enzyme expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyan; Rech, Leslie; Wu, Yinghong; Goltz, Douglas; Taylor, Carla G; House, James D

    2015-04-01

    Methionine synthase (MS) and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) are both zinc (Zn)-dependent methyltransferases and involved in the methylation of homocysteine. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary Zn supply on homocysteine levels and expression of the two enzymes in growing rats. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned randomly to four dietary groups (n=8/group) for 3 weeks: Zn deficient (ZD; <1mg Zn/kg); Zn control (ZC; 30mg Zn/kg); Zn supplemented (ZS; 300mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Serum and femur Zn concentrations were 83% and 58% lower in ZD, and 49% and 62% higher in ZS compared to ZC (P<0.001), respectively. The ZD rats had lower feed intake (37%), body weight gains (45%), liver (43%) and kidney (31%) weights than those of ZC (P<0.001), but these parameters in ZD were not significantly different from the PF controls. Serum homocysteine concentrations were 65% higher in ZD compared to PF (P<0.05), and there was no significant difference in serum folate levels between ZD and PF groups. The mRNA expression of liver and kidney MS was 57% and 38% lower in ZD than PF (P<0.001), respectively. Hepatic and renal BHMT mRNA levels were not altered in ZD compared to controls. The aforementioned measurements were not significantly different between ZS and ZC groups, except Zn levels. These results demonstrated that homocysteine homeostasis appeared to be disturbed by Zn deficiency but not Zn supplementation, and elevated serum homocysteine might be due to reduced expression of MS during Zn deficiency.

  16. Antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the zinc deficiency model in rats involves the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Rafało, Anna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Lankosz, Marek; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The zinc deficiency animal model of depression has been proposed; however, it has not been validated in a detailed manner. We have recently shown that depression-like behavior induced by dietary zinc restriction is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here we examined the effects of chronic administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX), on behavioral and biochemical alterations (within NMDAR signaling pathway) induced by zinc deficiency. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then, FLX treatment (10mg/kg, i.p.) begun. Following 2 weeks of FLX administration the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test (FST) and the spontaneous locomotor activity test. Twenty four hours later tissue was harvested. The proteins of NMDAR (GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B) or AMPAR (GluA1) subunits, p-CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus (Western blot) and serum zinc level (TXRF) were examined. Depression-like behavior induced by ZnD in the FST was sensitive to chronic treatment with FLX. ZnD increased levels of GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and decreased pS485-GluA1, p-CREB and BDNF proteins. Administration of FLX counteracted the zinc restriction-induced changes in serum zinc level and hippocampal GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and p-CREB but not BDNF or pS845-GluA1 protein levels. This finding adds new evidence to the predictive validity of the proposed zinc deficiency model of depression. Antidepressant-like activity of FLX in the zinc deficiency model is associated with NMDAR complex.

  17. Zinc deficiency reduces fertility in C. elegans hermaphrodites and disrupts oogenesis and meiotic progression.

    PubMed

    Hester, James; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Diaz, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Zinc is necessary for successful gametogenesis in mammals; however the role of zinc in the gonad function of non-mammalian species has not been investigated. The genetic tractability, short generation time, and hermaphroditic reproduction of the nematode C. elegans offer distinct advantages for the study of impaired gametogenesis as a result of zinc deficiency. However the phenotypic reproductive effects arising from zinc restriction have not been established in this model. We therefore examined the effect of zinc deficiency on C. elegans reproduction by exposing worms to the zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (TPEN). Treatment began at the early larval stage and continued until reproductive senescence. TPEN treatment reduced the total number of progeny produced by C. elegans hermaphrodites compared with control subjects, with the largest difference in output observed 48h after larval stage 4. At this time-point, zinc deficient worms displayed fewer embryos in the uterus and disorganized oocyte development when observed under DIC microscopy. DAPI staining revealed impaired oogenesis and chromosome dynamics with an expanded region of pachytene stage oocytes extending into the proximal arm of the gonad. This phenotype was not seen in control or zinc-rescue subjects. This study demonstrates that reproduction in C. elegans is sensitive to environmental perturbations in zinc, indicating that this is a good model for future studies in zinc-mediated subfertility. Aberrant oocyte development and disruption of the pachytene-diplotene transition indicate that oogenesis in particular is affected by zinc deficiency in this model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of moderate zinc deficiency on cognitive performance in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Massaro, T F; Mohs, M; Fosmire, G

    1982-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to establish a dietary zinc level which approximates a moderate deficiency in the young adult rat and to determine if a concurrent zinc deficiency affects cognitive performance. Male rats were fed varying levels of zinc in diet throughout a 17-day period. The lowest dietary level that depressed serum and bone zinc without influencing food consumption or body weight gains was observed to be 5.8 microgram Zn/g diet. Young adult rats maintained on either a zinc adequate (24.4 microgram Zn/g) or low-zinc (5.3 microgram Zn/g) diet were tested in a modified Skinner Box involving tests of visual, auditory, association, and discrimination learning. No differences were observed in the visual discrimination performance of the zinc deficient animals when compared with control counterparts. Deficits in the ability to transfer a learned association between visual and auditory stimuli were observed, however, in the deficient group during the transfer test phase. The latter performed better during the final auditory discrimination task in transferring a learned food-relevant cue.

  19. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  20. Influences of yokukansankachimpihange on aggressive behavior of zinc-deficient mice and actions of the ingredients on excessive neural exocytosis in the hippocampus of zinc-deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Tamano, Haruna; Yusuke, Enya; Ide, Kazuki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of Yokukansankachimpihange (YKSCH), a form of Yokukansan containing parts of two herbaceous plants, Citrus Unshiu Peel (Chimpi) and Pinellia Tuber (Hange), on aggressive behavior of mice housed individually. Mice were fed a zinc-deficient diet for 2 weeks. In a resident-intruder test, the cumulative duration of aggressive behavior was decreased in zinc-deficient mice administrated drinking water containing YKSCH (approximately 300 mg/kg body weight/day) for 2 weeks. We tested mice for geissoschizine methyl ether (GM), which is contained in Uncaria Hook, and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a major metabolite of glycyrrhizin contained in Glycyrrhiza, which were contained in YKS and YKSCH. In hippocampal slices from zinc-deficient rats, excess exocytosis at mossy fiber boutons induced with 60 mM KCl was attenuated in the presence of GA (100–500 µM) or GM (100 µM). The intracellular Ca2+ level, which showed an increase induced by 60 mM KCl, was also attenuated in the presence of GA (100–500 µM) or GM (100 µM). These results suggest that GA and GM ameliorate excess glutamate release from mossy fiber boutons by suppressing the increase in intracellular Ca2+ signaling. These ameliorative actions may contribute to decreasing the aggressiveness of mice individually housed under zinc deficiency, potentially by suppressing excess glutamatergic neuron activity in the hippocampus. PMID:27245118

  1. Effect of iron and zinc deficiency on short term memory in children.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, K; Bhaskaran, Mythily; Krishnamurthy, Gautham; Vasudevan, Hemamalini; Vasudevan, Kavita

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of iron and zinc deficiency on short term memory of children in the age group of 6-11 years and to assess the response to supplementation therapy. Interventional study. 100 children in the age group of 6-11 years (subdivided into 6-8 yr and 9-11 yr groups) from an urban corporation school. After collection of demographic data, the study children underwent hematological assessment which included serum iron, serum zinc, and hemoglobin estimation. Based on the results, they were divided into Iron deficient, Zinc deficient, and Combined deficiency groups. Verbal and nonverbal memory assessment was done in all the children. Iron (2mg/kg bodyweight in two divided doses) and zinc (5mg once-a-day) supplementation for a period of 3 months for children in the deficient group. All children with iron and zinc deficiency in both the age groups had memory deficits. Combined deficiency in 9-11 years group showed severe degree of affectation in verbal (P<0.01) and non-verbal memory (P<0.01), and improved after supplementation (P = 0.05 and P< 0.01, respectively). In 6-8 years group, only non-verbal form of memory (P =0.02) was affected, which improved after supplementation. Iron and zinc deficiency is associated with memory deficits in children. There is a marked improvement in memory after supplementation. Post supplementation IQ scores do not show significant improvement in deficient groups in 6-8 year olds.

  2. Prevalence and correlates of zinc deficiency in pregnant Vietnamese women in Ho Chi Minh City.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Goto, Aya; Nguyen, Tu Van T; Vo, Khoa Tuan; Ta, Tuyet Mai T; Nguyen, Thuy Ninh T; Nguyen, Tien Minh; Ho, My Binh T; Phan, Ngoc Anh T; Vu, Hong Hanh T; Truong, Thuc My; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    Although Vietnam is a region with a plant-based diet that has a high zinc deficiency, epidemiological data showing how this affects pregnant women are limited. This study explores the prevalence of zinc deficiency and possible correlates in pregnant Vietnamese women in Ho Chi Minh City. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a general hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. All pregnant women who came to their first antenatal care visit from November 2011 to June 2012 were recruited. Those taking a vitamin and/or mineral supplement were excluded. Serum zinc concentrations, determined by a standard colorimetric method, of 10.7 μmol/L-17.5 μmol/L (70.0 g/dL-114 g/dL) were classified as normal and under 10.7 μmol/L (70.0 g/dL) as zinc deficient. In total, 254 pregnant women were invited and 107 (42%) participated. The mean age of participants was 29 years, and mean gestational age was 10 weeks. Median zinc concentration in serum was 13.6 μmol/L, and the prevalence of zinc deficiency was 29% (95% CI=21%-39%). The daily intake of a milk product supplement was the only significant correlate of zinc deficiency of the items investigated (adjusted OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.16-0.99, p=0.049). This is the first study reporting that more than 25% of pregnant Vietnamese women in Ho Chi Minh City are zinc deficient. Further academic and clinical input is needed to confirm the scale of this neglected issue and to investigate the potential of milk product supplementation in this population.

  3. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the accumulation of cadmium and metallothionein in selected tissues of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of continuous dietary zinc deficiency on the metabolism of the toxic heavy metal cadmium has not been widely studied. This investigation was designed to assess the effects of subadequate dietary zinc intake on the accumulation of dietary cadmium and on metallothionein (MT) and zinc concentrations in target organs of cadmium toxicity. Adult male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were allowed, ad libitum, diets either adequate (60 ppm) or deficient (7 ppm) in zinc for a total of 9 wk. The zinc-deficient diet resulted in an approximately 40% reduction in plasma zinc (assessed at 3, 6, and 9 wk) in the absence of overt signs of zinc deficiency (i.e., reduced weight gain, alopecia, etc.). Separate groups of rats were also maintained on zinc-defined diets for a total of 9 wk, but cadmium was added to the diet (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm) a the end of wk 3 and maintained at that level throughout the remaining 6 wk of the study, when the rats were killed. The feeding of the zinc-deficient diet markedly enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the liver, kidney, and testes. Hepatic, renal, and testicular zinc concentrations were not affected by suboptimal zinc intake alone. However, marked reductions in renal and testicular zinc concentrations were caused by zinc deficiency in concert with cadmium exposure. MT levels, when related to tissue cadmium concentrations, were elevated to a significantly lesser extent in the kidneys of zinc-deficient animals. These results indicate that marginal zinc deficiency markedly increases cadmium accumulation in various organs and reduces zinc content and MT induction in some organs.

  4. Zinc deficiency in field-grown pecan trees: changes in leaf nutrient concentrations and structure.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Barrios, Dámaris; Abadía, Javier; Lombardini, Leonardo; Abadía, Anunciación; Vázquez, Saúl

    2012-06-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a typical nutritional disorder in pecan trees [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] grown under field conditions in calcareous soils in North America, including northern Mexico and south-western United States. The aim of this study was to assess the morphological and nutritional changes in pecan leaves affected by Zn deficiency as well as the Zn distribution within leaves. Zinc deficiency led to decreases in leaf chlorophyll concentrations, leaf area and trunk cross-sectional area. Zinc deficiency increased significantly the leaf concentrations of K and Ca, and decreased the leaf concentrations of Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu. All nutrient values found in Zn-deficient leaves were within the sufficiency ranges, with the only exception of Zn, which was approximately 44, 11 and 9 µg g(-1) dry weight in Zn-sufficient, moderately and markedly Zn-deficient leaves, respectively. Zinc deficiency led to decreases in leaf thickness, mainly due to a reduction in the thickness of the palisade parenchyma, as well as to increases in stomatal density and size. The localisation of Zn was determined using the fluorophore Zinpyr-1 and ratio-imaging technique. Zinc was mainly localised in the palisade mesophyll area in Zn-sufficient leaves, whereas no signal could be obtained in Zn-deficient leaves. The effects of Zn deficiency on the leaf characteristics of pecan trees include not only decreases in leaf chlorophyll and Zn concentrations, but also a reduction in the thickness of the palisade parenchyma, an increase in stomatal density and pore size and the practical disappearance of Zn leaf pools. These characteristics must be taken into account to design strategies to correct Zn deficiency in pecan tree in the field. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Zinc deficiency with reduced mastication impairs spatial memory in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kumiko; Tsuji, Tadataka; Tanaka, Susumu; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-12-01

    Sufficient oral microelements such as zinc and fully chewing of foods are required to maintain cognitive function despite aging. No knowledge exists about the combination of factors such as zinc deficiency and reduced mastication on learning and memory. Here we show that tooth extraction only in 8-week-old mice did not change the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein-labeled astrocytes in the hippocampus or spatial memory parameters. However, tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation strongly impaired spatial memory and led to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. The impaired spatial performance in the zinc-deficient only (ZD) mice also coincided well with the increase in the astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. After switching both zinc-deficient groups to a normal diet with sufficient zinc, spatial memory recovered, and more time was spent in the quadrant with the goal in the probe test in the mice with tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation (EZD) compared to the ZD mice. Interestingly, we found no differences in astrocytic density in the CA1 region among all groups at 22 weeks of age. Furthermore, the escape latency in a visible probe test at all times was longer in zinc-deficient groups than the others and demonstrated a negative correlation with body weight. No significant differences in escape latency were observed in the visible probe test among the ZD, EZD, and normal-fed control at 4 weeks (CT4w) groups in which body weight was standardized to that of the EZD group, or in the daily reduction in latency between the normal-fed control and CT4w groups. Our data showed that zinc-deficient feeding during a young age impairs spatial memory performance and leads to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region and that zinc-sufficient feeding is followed by recovery of the impaired spatial memory along with changes in astrocytic density. The combination of the two factors, zinc deficiency

  6. Molecular Basis of Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency: NOVEL ZnT2 MUTATIONS DISRUPTING ZINC BINDING AND PERMEATION.

    PubMed

    Golan, Yarden; Itsumura, Naoya; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Kambe, Taiho; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2016-06-24

    A gradually increasing number of transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD) cases was recently reported, all of which were associated with inactivating ZnT2 mutations. Here we characterized the impact of three novel heterozygous ZnT2 mutations G280R, T312M, and E355Q, which cause TNZD in exclusively breastfed infants of Japanese mothers. We used the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to provide direct visual evidence for the in situ dimerization of these ZnT2 mutants, and to explore their subcellular localization. Moreover, using three complementary functional assays, zinc accumulation using BiFC-Zinquin and Zinpyr-1 fluorescence as well as zinc toxicity assay, we determined the impact of these ZnT2 mutations on vesicular zinc accumulation. Although all three mutants formed homodimers with the wild type (WT) ZnT2 and retained substantial vesicular localization, as well as vesicular zinc accumulation, they had no dominant-negative effect over the WT ZnT2. Furthermore, using advanced bioinformatics, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis we found that these mutations localized at key residues, which play an important physiological role in zinc coordination (G280R and E355Q) and zinc permeation (T312M). Collectively, our findings establish that some heterozygous loss of function ZnT2 mutations disrupt zinc binding and zinc permeation, thereby suggesting a haploinsufficiency state for the unaffected WT ZnT2 allele in TNZD pathogenesis. These results highlight the burning need for the development of a suitable genetic screen for the early diagnosis of TNZD to prevent morbidity.

  7. Zinc deficiency during in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes causes meiotic block and developmental failure.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yubyeol; Yoon, Junchul David; Cai, Lian; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Kim, Eunhye; Zheng, Zhong; Jeung, Euibae; Lee, Eunsong; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of zinc deficiency during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine oocytes. Zinc deficiency was induced by administering the membrane‑permeable zinc chelator N,N,N',N'‑tetrakis‑(2‑pyridylmethyl)‑ethylendiamine (TPEN). First, the effects of zinc deficiency during IVM on a TPEN‑treated group and a TPEN+zinc-treated group compared with a control group were assessed. The oocyte maturation rates and subsequent embryonic developmental competence of the TPEN+zinc‑treated oocytes were similar to those of the control oocytes (metaphase II [MII] rate, 93.0 and 92.7%, respectively, and blastocyst [BL] formation rate, 42.0 and 40.0%, respectively). These results were significantly different from those obtained for the TPEN‑treated oocytes (MII rate, 0.61%; BL formation rate, 0%). Although the TPEN‑treated oocytes were arrested at metaphase I (MI), the distribution of microtubules was normal. However, microfilament formation was abnormal in the TPEN‑treated oocytes. Furthermore, the effect of a temporary zinc deficiency during IVM on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryonic development was assessed. TPEN (10 µM) was added to the IVM medium for 0, 7, 15 or 22 h. The 0 h‑treated oocytes showed an 83.9% MII rate, while the 7 h‑treated oocytes had a significantly lower MII rate (44.8%). Most of the 15- and 22 h‑treated oocytes were arrested at MI (MI rate: 98.0 and 97.2%, respectively; MII rate, 0% in both groups). Reductions in the BL formation were dependent on the TPEN treatment duration (29.3, 9.2, 0, and 0% after 0, 7, 15 and 22 h, respectively). In conclusion, zinc is an essential element for successful oocyte maturation and embryonic development in pigs. Zinc deficiency caused a meiotic block and had lasting effects on early embryonic development.

  8. Risk of zinc, iodine and other micronutrient deficiencies among school children in North East Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, R A; Winichagoon, P; Pongcharoen, T; Gowachirapant, S; Boonpraderm, A; Manger, M S; Bailey, K B; Wasantwisut, E; Gibson, R S

    2006-05-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies during childhood can contribute to impairments in growth, immune competence, and mental and physical development, and the coexistence of several such deficiencies can adversely affect the efficacy of single micronutrient interventions. To assess the prevalence of zinc and iodine deficiency and their interrelationships with vitamin A deficiency and anemia and associations with socio-economic status, hemoglobin type, and anthropometry in a cross-sectional study. A total of 10 primary schools in North East Thailand. Non-fasting venipuncture blood samples and casual urine samples were collected from 567 children aged 6-13 years. Anthropometric measures and serum zinc, albumin, C-reactive protein and urinary iodine, are reported here and integrated with published data on vitamin A, anemia, and socio-economic status. Of the children, 57% had low serum zinc and 83% had urinary iodine levels below the 100 microg/l cutoff. Suboptimal serum zinc and urinary iodine concentrations may result from low intakes of zinc and iodized salt. Significant risk factors for low serum zinc were serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l and being male. Those for urinary iodine <100 microg/l were height-for-age score>median and being female. For serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l, risk factors were low hemoglobin, low serum zinc, and <9 years, and for low hemoglobin indicative of anemia risk factors were <9 years, AE hemoglobinopathy, and serum retinol <1.05 micromol/l. Of the children, 60% were at risk of two or more coexisting micronutrient deficiencies, most commonly suboptimal urinary iodine and low serum zinc. The findings emphasize the need for multimicronutrient interventions in North East Thailand.

  9. Acute dietary zinc deficiency before conception compromises oocyte epigenetic programming and disrupts embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X; Diaz, FJ

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings show that zinc is an important factor necessary for regulating the meiotic cell cycle and ovulation. However, the role of zinc in promoting oocyte quality and developmental potential is not known. Using an in vivo model of acute dietary zinc deficiency, we show that feeding a zinc deficient diet (ZDD) for 3–5 days before ovulation (preconception) dramatically disrupts oocyte chromatin methylation and preimplantation development. There was a dramatic decrease in histone H3K4 trimethylation and global DNA methylation in zinc deficient oocytes. Moreover, there was a 3–20 fold increase in transcript abundance of repetitive elements (Iap, Line1, Sineb1, Sineb2), but a decrease in Gdf9, Zp3 and Figla mRNA. Only 53% and 8% of mature eggs reached the 2-cell stage after IVF in animals receiving a 3 and 5 day ZDD, respectively, while a 5 day ZDD in vivo reduced the proportion of 2-cells to 49%. In vivo fertilized 2-cell embryos cultured in vitro formed fewer (38%) blastocysts compared to control embryos (74%). Likewise, fewer blastocyst and expanded blastocyst were collected from the reproductive tract of zinc deficient animals on day 3.5 of pregnancy. This could be due to a decrease in Igf2 and H19 mRNA in ZDD blastocyst. Supplementation with a methyl donor (SAM) during IVM restored histone H3K4me3 and doubled the IVF success rate from 17% to 43% in oocytes from zinc deficient animals. Thus, the terminal period of oocyte development is extremely sensitive to perturbation in dietary zinc availability. PMID:23348678

  10. Zinc deficiency in rats is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Pochwat, Bartłomiej; Hołuj, Malgorzata; Ostachowicz, Beata; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2015-01-02

    Data indicated that zinc deficiency may contribute to the development of depression; however changes induced by zinc deficiency are not fully described. In the present paper we tested whether the dietary zinc restriction in rats causes alterations in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits in brain regions that are relevant to depression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50 mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3 mg Zn/kg) for 4 or 6weeks. Then, the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test, sucrose intake test and social interaction test. Western blot assays were used to study the alterations in NMDAR subunits GluN2A and GluN2B and proteins associated with NMDAR signaling in the hippocampus (Hp) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Following 4 or 6 weeks of zinc restriction, behavioral despair, anhedonia and a reduction of social behavior occurred in rats with concomitant increased expression of GluN2A and GluN2B and decreased expression of the PSD-95, p-CREB and BDNF protein levels in the Hp. The up-regulation of GluN2A protein was also found in the PFC, but only after prolonged (6 weeks) zinc deprivation. The procedure of zinc restriction in rats causes behavioral changes that share some similarities to the pathophysiology of depression. Obtained data indicated that depressive-like behavior induced by zinc deficiency is associated with the changes in NMDAR signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Zinc Supplementation on DNA Damage in Rats with Experimental Kidney Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yegin, Sevim Çiftçi; Dede, Semiha; Mis, Leyla; Yur, Fatmagül

    2017-04-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of zinc on oxidative DNA damage in rats with experimental acute and chronic kidney deficiency. Six groups of five Wistar-Albino rats each were assigned as controls (C), acute kidney deficiency (AKD), zinc-supplemented (+Zn), acute kidney deficiency, zinc-supplemented (AKD + Zn), chronic kidney deficiency (CKD) and zinc-supplemented chronic kidney deficiency (CKD + Zn). The levels of 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were determined, being the lowest in the CKD group (p < 0.05), higher in the C group than those of rats with CKD but lower than that of all the other groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the controls and the CKD + Zn group, or between the AKD and the +Zn groups. Among all groups, the highest 8-OHdG level was found in the AKD + Zn group (p < 0.05). DNA damage was greater in acute renal failure than in rats with chronic renal failure. The DNA damage in the zinc group was significantly higher than in the controls.

  12. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. PMID:24275069

  13. Marginal zinc deficiency and changes in behavioral salt taste threshold and salt preference in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, X W; Dejima, Y; Suzuki, T; Himeno, S; Okazaki, Y

    1991-04-01

    An animal model of marginal zinc deficiency was tested in mice, and salt taste threshold and salt preference were investigated in the state of marginal zinc deficiency. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, four-week-old male ICR mice were fed diets of three different levels of zinc content (3.17, 9.27, or 48.13 micrograms Zn/g) for 60 days. Food intake, growth, zinc levels in tissues, hepatic metallothionein (MT) content, and activities of selected enzymes (hepatic and RBC delta-amino-levulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) and plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP] did not differ among the groups throughout the experiment, and no overt signs of zinc deficiency were manifested in any group. In Experiment 2, four-week-old male ICR mice were fed a zinc-deficient diet (1.98 micrograms Zn/g) or a zinc-adequate diet (49.14 micrograms Zn/g) for 56 days. Food intake and growth did not differ between the two groups, and no overt signs of zinc deficiency were observed throughout the experiment. Zinc levels in the plasma and femur--but not those in the brain, kidneys, liver, and red blood cell (RBC)--and plasma ALP activities were significantly lower on Day 42 and Day 56 of the experiment in the mice fed the zinc-deficient diet (ZnD group) than in those fed the zinc-adequate diet (ZnA group). Hepatic MT contents were lower in the ZnD group than in the ZnA group on Day 56 only. Salt taste threshold was 0.05% in the ZnA group, while it was 0.1% in the ZnD group, between Day 30 and Day 38, and between Day 44 and Day 52 of the experiment. Preference for 0.9% NaCl solution was no different in the two groups when tested between Day 38 and Day 40 or between Day 52 and Day 54, but that for 1.6% NaCl solution was significantly higher in the ZnD group than in the ZnA group between Day 40 and Day 42, and between Day 54 and Day 56.

  14. Refractory Pure Red Cell Aplasia Manifesting as Deficiency of Adenosine Deaminase 2.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Hasan; Egler, Rachel; Dalal, Jignesh

    2017-07-01

    Primary progress has been made in the last 2 years, particularly in finding novel disease-causing genes for a number of autoinflammatory diseases and primary immunodeficiencies. Whole-exome sequencing has dramatically increased the pace at which causative genes are being discovered. CECR1 (Cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1) gene encodes adenosine deaminase 2 (ADA2) protein. Patients who carry CECR1 mutation(s) suffer from deficiency of ADA2 (DADA2). Here, we describe a patient with pure red cell aplasia discovered to have DADA2. We also review the literature on DADA2. This report will help raise awareness of physicians for this complex disease.

  15. Effects of zinc deficiency on morphogenesis of the fetal rat eye.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J M; Hurley, L S

    1987-02-01

    Maternal zinc deficiency during pregnancy results in a high frequency of fetal eye malformations in the Long-Evans rat. In this study we examine the development of the eye from days 12 through 21 of gestation in conceptuses of dams fed deficient or adequate levels of zinc and also examine maternal plasma and conceptus zinc concentrations during this period. Dams were fed diets containing 0.5 (0.5 Zn group), 4.5 (4.5 Zn group), or 100 (100 Zn AL group) micrograms zinc per gram diet ad libitum, or 100 micrograms zinc g-1 diet in amounts restricted on a daily basis to the intake of matched animals from the 0.5 Zn group (100 Zn RI group). Conceptuses were removed and maternal plasma was collected on days 12, 14, 16, 19 and 21 of gestation. Maternal plasma and conceptus zinc concentrations reflected maternal dietary zinc level, with dam plasma Zn concentrations in the order of 0.5 Zn group less than 4.5 Zn group less than 100 Zn group on all days. A similar pattern held for embryo/fetus zinc, except for days 19 and 21, at which times the 0.5 Zn and 4.5 Zn fetuses had similar zinc concentrations. Histological examination of the developing eye of 0.5 Zn fetuses on days 12 and 14 revealed that invagination of the optic cup was often deficient, and that closure of the choroid fissure did not occur, resulting in colobomata and retinal folding visible at term. A very few fetuses were found at term to be anophthalmic or have only remnants of ocular tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Frequency of symptomatic zinc deficiency in very low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Wulf, K; Wilhelm, A; Spielmann, M; Wirth, S; Jenke, A C

    2013-01-01

    Current concepts on zinc requirements for premature infants rely on studies dating back more than 20 years. Given that nowadays more premature infants frequently survive we aimed to obtain recent frequency data on zinc deficiency in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants.226 VLBW infants born between July 2005 and December 2009 were retrospectively included in this study. Mean gestational age (GA) was 28.7 weeks (range 23+0 to 38+0) and mean birth weight 1120g (range 354-1495). All infants received zinc supplementation according to the ESPGHAN guidelines. 26 (11.5%) patients showed clinical signs for zinc deficiency of whom 15 had serum zinc concentrations < 50µg/dl, 9 between 50 and 70 µg/dl and 2 > 70 µg/dl. Infants presenting with dermatitis had significantly lower concentrations (mean 26.7 µg/dl, range 19-31) when compared to infants with diarrhoea or isolated peripheral oedema (35.3 µg/dl and 51.8 µg/dl respectively). Strongest independent risk factors were low GA, being small for GA and suffering from intestinal resection due to necrotizing enterocolitis. Frequency of zinc concentrations <50 µg/dl were calculated to be 6.6% in VLBW infants.Even though current guidelines for zinc supplementation were followed the frequency of zinc deficiency was found to be unexpectedly high in ELBW and SGA infants. Despite the retrospective nature of this single centre study, our data strongly suggest that recommendations on zinc supplementation in ELBW and SGA infants should be reviewed.

  17. [Zinc deficiency on pathological changes of femur epiphyseal growth plate in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuehong; Cheng, Yiyong; Hong, Yan; Li, Shutian

    2003-01-01

    To study zinc deficiency on pathological changes of femur epiphyseal growth plate in rats thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: zinc-deficient group (Zd), control group (Ctr), and pair-fed group (Zp) to study the effects of zinc deficiency on femur epiphyseal growth plate of rats and the mechanism involved. After 8 weeks feeding, the histomorphology of right femur indicated that chondrocytes in the epiphyseal growth plate of Zd group were generally ill-organized and mis-shaped. The number of chondrocytes decreased. Trabecular bone in the epiphyseal of Zd group were also ill-organized, scarce and slim. The cavities of marrow in Zd animals were significantly larger than those of Ctr and Zp. The volume of trabecular bone, the mean trabecular plate density of Zd rats were significantly decreased, but their mean trabecular plate space was significantly increased. In addition, the Zd animals had significantly lower concentration of osteocalcin and growth hormone in sera. The above results suggested that zinc deficiency impaired proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes and balance between osteoblast and osteoclast function by reduce growth hormone levels in sera. The lack of zinc in diet resulted in disorder of bone molding and ultrastructure.

  18. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44×10(-6) to 2.59×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.70×10(-7)M at pH11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl(-), Br(-), F(-), I(-), IO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), CO3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), S2O4(2-), C2O4(2-), SCN(-), N3(-), citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  20. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-04-27

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe²⁺ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni²⁺ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni²⁺ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni²⁺ absorption and (ii) Zn²⁺ inhibits Ni²⁺ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency.

  1. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii) Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency. PMID:25923075

  2. Growth of trypanosomes in vivo, host body weight gains, and food consumption in zinc-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Ashraf, M.; Lee, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the effect of zinc deficiency on food consumption and the growth of mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasite products. In addition, the effects of zinc deficiency on the growth and development of parasites in vivo was studied. Infected mice consumed more food than noninfected mice, and the level of food consumption in the zinc-deficient mice was much less and showed general decline during the observation period. Also, infected mice on both full-complement and zinc-deficient diets gained more body weight than control mice. Throughout the observational period, trypanosomes from zinc-deficient mice showed considerably higher variability in size as determined by coefficient of variation. In both dietary groups, the average length of trypanosomes was not significantly different. PMID:9002416

  3. Molecular basis for the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis: An experimental study in the Sprague-dawley rat model

    PubMed Central

    Omu, Alexander E.; Al-Azemi, Majedah K.; Al-Maghrebi, May; Mathew, Chacko T.; Omu, Florence E.; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Anim, Jehoram T.; Oriowo, Mabayoje A.; Memon, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. Materials and Methods: Three groups of eight adult male SD rats were maintained for 4 weeks on a normal diet as control, zinc deficient diet and zinc deficient diet with zinc supplementation of 28 mg zinc/kg body weight respectively. Using standard techniques, the following parameters were compared between the three groups of experimental animals at the end of 4 weeks: (a) Serum zinc, magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), selenium (Se) and cadmium (Cd), (b) serum sex hormones, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), (c) interleukin-4 (IL-4), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 expression in the testes, (d) assessment of apoptosis of testicular cells using electron microscopy and (e) testicular volume and histology using the orchidometer and Johnsen score, respectively. Results: The zinc deficient group showed a reduction of testicular volume, serum concentrations of Zn, Cu, Se, Mg, SOD, GPX, IL-4, Bcl-2 and testosterone (P < 0.05), as well as increased levels of serum Cd, MDA and tissue TNF-α, Bax, caspase-3 and apoptosis of the germ cells (P < 0.05) compared with control and zinc supplementation groups. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency is associated with impaired spermatogenesis because of reduced testosterone production, increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. These findings suggest that zinc has a role in male reproduction. PMID:25624578

  4. Lack of an effect of dietary fructose on severity of zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Failla, M L; Fields, M; Rose, A; Seidel, K

    1987-08-01

    Because feeding rats diets containing fructose as the carbohydrate source reduces copper and selenium status, we investigated whether the type of dietary carbohydrate also affected indices of zinc status. The experimental design was a 2 X 2 factorial study with the source of dietary carbohydrate (cornstarch or fructose) and the level of dietary zinc (0.7 or 31 micrograms Zn/g) as the variables. The experiment utilized 76 weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups. Animals fed a zinc-deficient fructose diet were allowed to consume the diet ad libitum; all other groups were pair-fed to that group to ensure equivalent nutrient and energy intake. The results of the 29-d study showed that the most sensitive indices of zinc status measured, including growth, survival and the zinc concentrations of plasma, femur and testes, were not affected by the type of dietary carbohydrate. This lack of an effect of fructose on the zinc status of the experimental animals indicates that the ability of fructose to exacerbate copper and selenium deficiencies is specific, rather than representing a generalized effect of this simple sugar on the requirements and/or metabolism of all essential trace elements.

  5. Expression and cellular localization of ZIP1 transporter under zinc-deficiency in wild emmer wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a common problem leading to severe decreases in grain yield and has detrimental effects on nutritional quality in cereals. Wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, exhibits a potential genetic resource for wheat improvement due to its compatibility with modern wh...

  6. Over-expression of Zip-13 mRNA in kidney and lung during dietary zinc deficiency in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Hu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Tongfu; Qi, Xin; Wan, Yang; Liu, Xiaopeng; Jiang, Yali; Zhang, Lianying

    2011-03-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all organisms, which is involved in the function of numerous key enzymes in metabolism. Two gene families have been identified involved in zinc homeostasis. ZnT transporters reduce intracellular zinc while Zip transporters increase intracellular zinc. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that Zip-1, ZnT-1, Zip-2 and LIV-1 mRNA are associated with zinc level in established human breast cancer in nude mice model. In this study, six zinc transporters: ZnT-1, ZnT-2, ZnT-4, Zip-1, Zip-8 and Zip-13 were chosen. We aim to determine the relation between zinc transporters and zinc level in kidney and lung of Wistar rats. Eighteen Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal group, zinc-deficiency group and pair-fed group. After 22 days, the rats were killed and organs samples were taken, then zinc transporters mRNA were detected by RT-PCR. Compared with the normal group, Zip-13 shows an up-regulation (P < 0.05) in zinc-deficiency group both in kidney and lung, and Zip-8 was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in zinc-deficiency group in kidney.

  7. The effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Mi; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Soon Bae; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2016-07-01

    Introduction High sodium intake is the main cause of fluid overload in hemodialysis (HD) patients, leading to increased cardiovascular mortality. High sodium intake is known to be associated with low salt taste acuity and/or high preference. As the zinc status could influence taste acuity, we analyzed the effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in HD patients. Methods A total of 77 HD patients was enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Zinc deficiency was defined as serum zinc level with below 70 µg/mL. The patients were divided into two groups based on serum zinc level. Salt taste acuity and preference were determined by a sensory test using varying concentrations of NaCl solution, and dietary sodium intake was estimated using 3-day dietary recall surveys. Findings The mean salt recognition threshold and salt taste preference were significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group. And there was significant positive correlation between salt taste preference and dietary sodium intake in zinc deficient group (r = 0.43, P = 0.002). Although, the dietary sodium intake showed a high tendency with no significance (P = 0.052), interdialytic weight gain was significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group (2.68 ± 1.02 kg vs. 3.18 ± 1.02 kg; P = 0.047). Discussion Zinc deficiency may be related to low salt taste acuity and high salt preference, leading to high dietary sodium intake in HD patients.

  8. Zinc deficiency-associated dermatitis in infants during a nationwide shortage of injectable zinc - Washington, DC, and Houston, Texas, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Ruktanonchai, Duke; Lowe, Michael; Norton, Scott A; Garret, Tiana; Soghier, Lamia; Weiss, Edward; Hatfield, June; Lapinski, Jeffrey; Abrams, Steven; Barfield, Wanda

    2014-01-17

    Injectable zinc, a vital component of parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations, has been in short supply in the United States since late 2012. In December 2012, three premature infants with cholestasis hospitalized in Washington, DC, experienced erosive dermatitis in the diaper area and blisters on their extremities, a condition that can be associated with zinc deficiency. All three infants were receiving PN because they had extreme cholestasis and were unable to be fed by mouth or tube. The PN administered to each infant was zinc deficient. Injectable zinc normally is added to PN for premature or medically compromised infants (e.g., those with cholestasis) by the hospital pharmacy because the amount of zinc needed by each patient differs; however, the pharmacy had run out of injectable zinc. No alternatives were available; other preparations of parenteral trace elements either contained insufficient zinc to meet infants' requirements or had the potential to cause trace element toxicity in infants with cholestasis (2). The dermatitis of one infant resolved after the patient was able to take nutrition by mouth. The other two infants were found to have low serum zinc levels. In January 2013, CDC was notified of four additional cases of zinc deficiency among infants with cholestasis who received zinc-deficient PN in a hospital in Houston, Texas. In collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the two hospitals obtained emergency shipments of injectable zinc. No additional cases were reported. Current injectable zinc supplies have been increasing as FDA collaborates with pharmaceutical companies to import emergency supplies. FDA is working to establish temporary backup sources should future shortages occur.

  9. Alterations of Bio-elements, Oxidative, and Inflammatory Status in the Zinc Deficiency Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Noworyta-Sokołowska, Karolina; Misztak, Paulina; Gołębiowska, Joanna; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Krośniak, Mirosław; Wojtanowska-Krośniak, Agnieszka; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Lankosz, Marek; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study showed that dietary zinc restriction induces depression-like behavior with concomitant up-regulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Because metal ions, oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in depression/NMDAR function, in the present study, bio-elements (zinc, copper, iron, magnesium, and calcium), oxidative (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; protein carbonyl content), and inflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β) factors were measured in serum, hippocampus (Hp), and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to a zinc-adequate (ZnA) (50 mg Zn/kg) or a zinc-deficient (ZnD) (3 mg Zn/kg) diet for 4 or 6 weeks. Both periods of dietary zinc restriction reduced serum zinc and increased serum iron levels. At 4 weeks, lowered zinc level in the PFC and Hp as well as lowered iron level in the PFC of the ZnD rats was observed. At 6 weeks, however, iron level was increased in the PFC of these rats. Although at 6 weeks zinc level in the PFC did not differ between the ZnA and ZnD rats, extracellular zinc concentration after 100 mM KCl stimulation was reduced in the PFC of the ZnD rats and was accompanied by increased extracellular iron and glutamate levels (as measured by the in vivo microdialysis). The examined oxidative and inflammatory parameters were generally enhanced in the tissue of the ZnD animals. The obtained data suggest dynamic redistribution of bio-elements and enhancement of oxidative/inflammatory parameters after dietary zinc restriction, which may have a link with depression-like behavior/NMDAR function/neurodegeneration.

  10. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a reactive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary Zinc (Zn) deficiency affects approximately 30% of the world’s population. Zinc is a vital micronutrient and is important for the body’s ability to function. To date, accurate biological markers of the Zn subject’s status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chicken mod...

  11. Bifidobacterium animalis protects intestine from damage induced by zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Mengheri, E; Nobili, F; Vignolini, F; Pesenti, M; Brandi, G; Biavati, B

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the potential beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium animalis on intestinal damage using zinc-deficient (ZD) rats as a model for intestinal alterations. The ZD rats were fed diets containing 1 mg Zn/kg for 20 (ZD(20)) or 40 (ZD(40)) d to induce damage that differed in severity. Subgroups of these rats, the ZD(20) + B and ZD(40) + B groups, received a suspension of B. animalis (3.5 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily for the last 10 d. Another subgroup, the ZD(40) + B + 7 d group, was fed the ZD diet for 7 d after the B. animalis treatment period. Zinc deficiency induced ulcerations, edema, inflammatory cell infiltration and dilatation of blood vessels in duodenum, jejunum and ileum, with increasing severity between 20 and 40 d of zinc deficiency. The mucosa of the ZD(20) + B group was well preserved, and most of the morphologic alterations induced by zinc deficiency were normalized in the ZD(40) + B group. The high fecal concentrations of B. animalis in the ZD(40) + B and ZD(40) + B + 7 d groups indicate that these bifidobacteria survived passage through the gastrointestinal tract and proliferated. Electron microscopy confirmed the elevated numbers of bifidobacteria in cecum. Treatment with B. animalis resulted in greater epithelial cell proliferation and disaccharidase activities in the ZD(40) + B group compared with the ZD(40) group. These findings indicate that B. animalis can protect the intestine from alterations induced by zinc deficiency, suggesting that this bacterium may play a role in intestinal mucosal defense.

  12. Zinc-induced modulation of some biochemical parameters in a high- and a low-zinc-accumulating genotype of Cicer arietinum L. grown under Zn-deficient condition.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shadab Naseer; Umar, Shahid; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-09-01

    This study presents a comparative account of biochemical responses evoked by a high-zinc-accumulating (HZnG) and a low-zinc-accumulating (LZnG) genotype of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under conditions of zinc deficiency (0 mg ZnSO4 kg(-1) soil) and on exogenous zinc supply (2.5, 5, and 10 mg ZnSO4 kg(-1) soil), at different growth stages (pre-flowering, flowering, and post-flowering) of the crop. Both the genotypes exhibited significant variation in contents of chlorophyll, protein, nitrate, and leghemoglobin, and in the activity of enzymes (nitrate reductase, superoxide dismutase, and carbonic anhydrase), under zinc-limiting condition. The HZnG maintained a significantly higher level of biochemical parameters at deficient zinc levels, while LZnG was more affected by Zn deficiency (with reduced biochemical attributes), compared to HZnG. However, application of soil zinc alleviated the Zn-induced disturbance and improved the biochemical parameters in both genotypes. The differential biochemical response of plants to Zn deficiency indicated existence of genotypic variation in efficient utilization of the available Zn. The HZnG was more effective in overcoming Zn deficiency than the LZnG. This study suggests that metal-dependent biochemical parameters can be used as reliable indices for selection of genotypes with a better Zn utilization capacity, i.e., the Zn-efficient genotypes.

  13. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-03-20

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation.

  14. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  15. Influence of zinc deficiency on iron metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Loennerdal, B.; Keen, C.L. )

    1991-03-15

    It has been reported that one of the effects of dietary Zn deficiency is increased tissue Fe concentrations. One explanation for this is that Fe absorption is enhanced in Zn deficiency. An additional possibility is that Fe metabolism is altered in the deficient animal. To test this idea, the authors studied the effects of Zn deficiency on Fe metabolism in d 18 male rats fed diets ad libitum containing 0.3 ppm Zn (ZD) or 50 ppm Zn (C) for 2 wk. Following i.v. injection with a tracer dose of transferrin saturated with {sup 59}Fe, rats were killed at time intervals up to 120 min. Tissues were collected and analyzed for {sup 59}Fe radioactivity and mineral concentrations. Plasma, kidney, and liver Fe concentrations of ZD rats were higher than those of C rats while Zn concentrations were lower. At all time points, kidney and liver {sup 59}Fe retention on a per g basis was higher in the ZD rats than in the C rats. In contrast, there was no difference in the clearance of {sup 59}Fe from the plasma between the groups, implying that the higher tissue {sup 59}Fe retention in ZD rats was not due to a shortened biological half-life of Tf. The above data show that independent of Fe absorption, Zn deficiency can increase Fe retention, although the mechanism(s) underlying this effect remains to be determined.

  16. Testis damage induced by zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Merker, H J; Günther, T

    1997-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed a Zn-deficient diet (1.2 mg/kg of Zn) for 28 days. Testes were then studied by light and electron microscopy. Zn deficiency induced necroses of precursors of germ cells leading to tubular atrophy and affected differentiation of spermatids. This was expressed by the occurrence of 2-4 axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes in one spermatid. Moreover, outer dense fibres, which normally contain 90% of sperm Zn, were "uncoiled" and flattened. The multiplication of the axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes induced by Zn deficiency might have been produced by an increase of Fe in spermatids and an increased formation of oxygen free radicals.

  17. Protein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi; Bolick, David T; Leng, Joy; Medlock, Greg L; Kolling, Glynis L; Papin, Jason A; Swann, Jonathan R; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-11-01

    Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. With the use of a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14-24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in malnourished children. The results show that we can model

  18. Anaemia, folate, zinc and copper deficiencies among adolescent schoolgirls in eastern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Ishraga I; Mahgoub, Hyder M; Mohamed, Ayoub A; Ali, Naji I; Elbashir, Mustafa I; Adam, I

    2009-12-01

    Anaemia is a widespread problem especially in the tropics. Among adolescent girls, it has negative consequences on growth, school performance, morbidity and reproductive performance. A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of anaemia, iron, folate, zinc and copper deficiencies amongst adolescent schoolgirls in New Halfa, eastern Sudan, and to examine the relationship of these micronutrients with haemoglobin (Hb) levels. Out of 187 adolescent schoolgirls, 181 (96.8%) had anaemia (Hb<12 g/dl); 21% had mild anaemia (Hb 11.0-11.9 g/dl); 66.8.1% had moderate anaemia (Hb 8.0-10.9 g/dl), and 12.1% had severe anaemia (Hb<8 g/dl), respectively. Iron deficiency (S-ferritin<12 μg/l), iron deficiency anaemia (<12 m/dl and S- ferritin<12 μg/l) and folate deficiency (S-folate<3 ng/ml) were prevalent in 17.6%, 16.5% and 69% of these girls, respectively. Nine percent and 5.9% of these girls had zinc (<75 μg/ml) and copper deficiency (<75 μg/ml), respectively. Twenty-six (14%) girls had ≥ 2 micronutrient deficiencies. S-ferritin and zinc were significantly lower in patients with severe anaemia. Haemoglobin levels were significantly positively correlated with zinc levels (r=0.161, P=0.03) and with copper levels (r=0.151, P=0.03). Thus, interventions are required to prevent and control anaemia in this setting. Further research is needed.

  19. Protein- and zinc-deficient diets modulate the murine microbiome and metabolic phenotype12

    PubMed Central

    Bolick, David T; Leng, Joy; Medlock, Greg L; Kolling, Glynis L; Papin, Jason A; Guerrant, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Environmental enteropathy, which is linked to undernutrition and chronic infections, affects the physical and mental growth of children in developing areas worldwide. Key to understanding how these factors combine to shape developmental outcomes is to first understand the effects of nutritional deficiencies on the mammalian system including the effect on the gut microbiota. Objective: We dissected the nutritional components of environmental enteropathy by analyzing the specific metabolic and gut-microbiota changes that occur in weaned-mouse models of zinc or protein deficiency compared with well-nourished controls. Design: With the use of a 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy–based metabolic profiling approach with matching 16S microbiota analyses, the metabolic consequences and specific effects on the fecal microbiota of protein and zinc deficiency were probed independently in a murine model. Results: We showed considerable shifts within the intestinal microbiota 14–24 d postweaning in mice that were maintained on a normal diet (including increases in Proteobacteria and striking decreases in Bacterioidetes). Although the zinc-deficient microbiota were comparable to the age-matched, well-nourished profile, the protein-restricted microbiota remained closer in composition to the weaned enterotype with retention of Bacteroidetes. Striking increases in Verrucomicrobia (predominantly Akkermansia muciniphila) were observed in both well-nourished and protein-deficient mice 14 d postweaning. We showed that protein malnutrition impaired growth and had major metabolic consequences (much more than with zinc deficiency) that included altered energy, polyamine, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Consistent with major changes in the gut microbiota, reductions in microbial proteolysis and increases in microbial dietary choline processing were observed. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with metabolic alterations that we previously observed in

  20. Suppression of placental metallothionein 1 and zinc transporter 1 mRNA expressions contributes to fetal heart malformations caused by maternal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaobin; He, Xiaoyu; Hong, Xinru; Kang, Fenhong; Chen, Suqing; Wang, Qing; Chen, Xiaoqiu; Hu, Dian; Sun, Qinghua

    2014-12-01

    Zinc has been implicated to have a protective role against heart malformations during fetal development. Metallothionein 1 (MT-1) and zinc transporter 1 (ZnT-1) are two major metabolic factors that are associated with zinc metabolism. The present work aimed to investigate the association of placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 expressions with fetal heart malformations resulting from maternal zinc deficiency. Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into five groups of extremely low-zinc, low-zinc, moderately low-zinc, marginally low-zinc and normal zinc (n = 9-12), and were fed diets with controlled zinc content at 1.0 ± 0.3, 8.4 ± 1.8, 15.4 ± 2.8, 22.4 ± 4.1 and 29.4 ± 5.3 [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] mg of zinc/kg, respectively, from day 25 of preconception until day 19 of gestation. The female rats were bred, their fetuses were harvested at day 19 of gestation after killing the dams, and fetal hearts were morphologically examined. Zinc concentration and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in maternal venous blood sera were tested, and MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions in the placenta were assayed. Zinc concentrations and ALP activities in the blood were low in all zinc-deficient diet groups in a dose-dependent fashion. The incidences of heart malformations were increased, and the levels of placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions were decreased in the extremely low-zinc, low-zinc and moderately low-zinc groups compared with the normal zinc group. Specifically, mRNA levels of placental MT-1 or ZnT-1 were significantly decreased and were lower than the specific threshold values in the fetuses with heart malformations but not in the fetuses without heart malformations in all the groups. These data indicate that maternal zinc deficiency resulted in an elevated incidence of fetal heart malformations, which was associated with significant decreases in placental MT-1 and ZnT-1 mRNA expressions to the levels below the threshold values that may be a

  1. The Proteome of Copper, Iron, Zinc, and Manganese Micronutrient Deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott I.; Castruita, Madeli; Malasarn, Davin; Urzica, Eugen; Erde, Jonathan; Page, M. Dudley; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals such as copper, iron, zinc, and manganese play important roles in several biochemical processes, including respiration and photosynthesis. Using a label-free, quantitative proteomics strategy (MSE), we examined the effect of deficiencies in these micronutrients on the soluble proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We quantified >103 proteins with abundances within a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrated statistically significant changes in ∼200 proteins in each metal-deficient growth condition relative to nutrient-replete media. Through analysis of Pearson's coefficient, we also examined the correlation between protein abundance and transcript abundance (as determined via RNA-Seq analysis) and found moderate correlations under all nutritional states. Interestingly, in a subset of transcripts known to significantly change in abundance in metal-replete and metal-deficient conditions, the correlation to protein abundance is much stronger. Examples of new discoveries highlighted in this work include the accumulation of O2 labile, anaerobiosis-related enzymes (Hyd1, Pfr1, and Hcp2) in copper-deficient cells; co-variation of Cgl78/Ycf54 and coprogen oxidase; the loss of various stromal and lumenal photosynthesis-related proteins, including plastocyanin, in iron-limited cells; a large accumulation (from undetectable amounts to over 1,000 zmol/cell) of two COG0523 domain-containing proteins in zinc-deficient cells; and the preservation of photosynthesis proteins in manganese-deficient cells despite known losses in photosynthetic function in this condition. PMID:23065468

  2. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy—development of new strategies: report from an expert workshop1234

    PubMed Central

    Young, Graeme P; Mortimer, Elissa K; Gopalsamy, Geetha L; Alpers, David H; Binder, Henry J; Manary, Mark J; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S; Brown, Ian L; Brewer, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might complement the current recommendation and what research was needed to develop these approaches. Several key points were identified. The design of novel zinc interventions would be facilitated by a better understanding of how disturbed gut function, such as environmental (or tropical) enteropathy, affects zinc absorption, losses, and homeostasis. Because only 10% of zinc stores are able to be rapidly turned over, and appear to be rapidly depleted by acute intestinal illness, they are probably best maintained by complementary regular supplementation in a primary prevention strategy rather than secondary prevention triggered by acute diarrhea. The assessment of zinc status is challenging and complex without simple, validated measures to facilitate field testing of novel interventions. Zinc bioavailability may be a crucial factor in the success of primary prevention strategies, and a range of options, all still inadequately explored, might be valuable in improving zinc nutrition. Some therapeutic actions of zinc on diarrhea seem attributable to pharmacologic effects, whereas others are related to the reversal of deficiency (ie, nutritional). The distinction between these 2 mechanisms cannot be clarified given the insensitivity of serum zinc to identify subclinical deficiency states. Why zinc seems to be less effective than expected at all ages, and ineffective for secondary prevention of diarrhea in children <12 mo of age, remains unclear. It was concluded that a reframing of the current recommendation is warranted with consideration of how to better optimize and deliver zinc and whether to provide a complementary public health primary prevention zinc strategy. This requires

  3. Anaemia, zinc and copper deficiencies among pregnant women in central Sudan.

    PubMed

    Bushra, Mohamed; Elhassan, Elhassan M; Ali, Naji I; Osman, Elfatih; Bakheit, Khalid H; Adam, Ishag I

    2010-12-01

    Anaemia is a widespread problem in many parts of the world especially in tropic areas. Among pregnant women, it has negative consequences on maternal and perinatal outcomes. A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of anaemia, iron, zinc and copper deficiencies among pregnant women in Wad Medani hospital, central Sudan and to examine the relationship of these micronutrients with haemoglobin (Hb) levels. One hundred four (52.5%) out of 200 pregnant women had anaemia (Hb < 11 gm/dl) and 3 (1.5) % had severe anaemia (Hb < 7 gm/dl). Iron deficiency (S-ferritin < 15 µg/l), iron deficiency anaemia (<11 gm/dl and S-ferritin < 15 µg/l) were prevalent in 25 (12.5%) and 13 (6.5%) of these women, respectively. Ninety (45.0%) and eight (4.0%) of these women had zinc (<80 µg/ml) and copper (<80 µg/ml) deficiency, respectively. In 24 (12.0%) of these women, there were ≥2 deficiencies of these elements. S-copper was not [corrected] significantly lower in patients with anaemia. While age, parity, gestational age, ferritin, zinc and copper were not predictors for anaemia, women who practiced pica were at higher risk for anaemia (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.4-7.9, P = 0.004). Gestational age was significantly inversely correlated with haemoglobin (r = 0.161, P = 0.03), S-ferritin (r = 0.285, P = 0.001) and S-zinc (r = 0.166, P = 0.02). Thus, dietary and supplement interventions are required to prevent and control anaemia in this setting. Further research is needed.

  4. Natural Genetic Variation of Seed Micronutrients of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown in Zinc-Deficient and Zinc-Amended Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaochao; Yuan, Lixing; Ludewig, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The quality of edible seeds for human and animal nutrition is crucially dependent on high zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) seed concentrations. The micronutrient bioavailability is strongly reduced by seed phytate that forms complexes with seed cations. Superior genotypes with increased seed Zn concentrations had been identified, but low micronutrient seed levels often prevail when the plants are grown in Zn-deficient soils, which are globally widespread and correlate with human Zn-deficiency. Here, seed Zn concentrations of Arabidopsis accessions grown in Zn-deficient and Zn-amended conditions were measured together with seed Fe and manganese (Mn), in a panel of 108 accessions. By applying genome-wide association, de novo candidate genes potentially involved in the seed micronutrient accumulation were identified. However, a candidate inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6-kinase 3 gene (ITPK3), located close to a significant nucleotide polymorphism associated with relative Zn seed concentrations, was dispensable for seed micronutrients accumulation in Col-0. Loss of this gene in itpk3-1 did neither affect phytate seed levels, nor seed Zn, Fe, and Mn. It is concluded that large natural variance of micronutrient seed levels is identified in the population and several accessions maintain high seed Zn despite growth in Zn-deficient conditions. PMID:27507976

  5. Investigation of Electrodeposited Alloys and Pure Metals as Substitutes for Zinc and Cadmium for Protective Finishes for Steel Parts of Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-09-01

    appears relatively free of corrosion. For this reason, an experiment was made using weight-loss measurements in combinatioa with the "wet- dry " test , Sueh...specimens in the "wet- dry " test was not given in the Sixth Progress Report, because the test was still under way when the report was being written. The...pure zinc and zinc-tin alloys*the same cannot be said for the damaged coating. In this wet- dry test , even pure zinc is superior to the cadmium if

  6. Catalase in testes and epididymidis of wistar rats fed zinc deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, S; Prasad, S; Nair, N; Saini, M R; Bedwal, R S

    2009-01-01

    Catalase activities have been evaluated in testes and caput and cauda epididymis of Wistar rats fed on zinc deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks. The enzyme activity has been measured as chromic acetate formed by heating of dichromate (in acetic acid) in presence of H(2) O(2) with perchromic acid as an unstable intermediate. Observed non-significant increase in catalase activity in testes as well as in caput and cauda epididymis of 2 weeks experiments has been related to low levels of H(2) O(2) produced in two organs whereas significant (P<0.01/0.001) increase in catalase activity in 4-weeks experiments indicate for increased oxidative stress due to phagocytotic activity of Sertoli cells in testes and damaged spermatozoa in epididymis. Thus, zinc deficiency increases catalase activity in testes and epididymis.

  7. Influence of zinc deficiency on cell-membrane fluidity in Jurkat, 3T3 and IMR-32 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Sandra V; Zago, M Paola; MacKenzie, Gerardo G; Keen, Carl L; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether zinc deficiency can affect plasma membrane rheology. Three cell lines, human leukaemia T-cells (Jurkat), rat fibroblasts (3T3) and human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32), were cultured for 48 h in control medium, in zinc-deficient medium (1.5 microM zinc; 1.5 Zn), or in the zinc-deficient medium supplemented with 15 microM zinc (15 Zn). The number of viable cells was lower in the 1.5 Zn group than in the control and 15 Zn groups. The frequency of apoptosis was higher in the 1.5 Zn group than in the control and 15 Zn groups. Membrane fluidity was evaluated using the 6-(9-anthroyloxy)stearic acid and 16-(9-anthroyloxy)palmitic acid probes. Membrane fluidity was higher in 1.5 Zn cells than in the control cells; no differences were observed between control cells and 15 Zn cells. The effect of zinc deficiency on membrane fluidity at the water/lipid interface was associated with a higher phosphatidylserine externalization. The higher membrane fluidity in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer was correlated with a lower content of arachidonic acid. We suggest that the increased fluidity of the membrane secondary to zinc deficiency is in part due to a decrease in arachidonic acid content and the apoptosis-related changes in phosphatidylserine distribution. PMID:14629198

  8. Zinc deficiency results in a post transcriptional impairment in insulin synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jhala, U.S.; Baly, D.L. )

    1991-03-15

    Zinc deficiency results in a decrease in glucose stimulated insulin release. This study was conducted to examine whether zinc deficiency results in a decrease in insulin mRNA levels. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a purified diet containing 1ppm Zn(ZnD-1) 5ppm Zn(ZnD-5) or 30 ppm (ZnS) or were food restricted to match the intake of ZnD-1(PF-1) and ZnD-5(PF-5). Using the isolated perfused pancreas technique and a maximal glucose stimulus of 300 mg/dl, the authors confirmed their previous findings of a 50% decrease in insulin secretion in ZnD-5 compared with PF-5 and ZnS and a 50 to 75% decrease in insulin secretion in ZnD-1 compared with PF-1 and ZnS respectively. With a lower glucose stimulus impaired insulin release was observed only in ZnD-1 but in ZnD-5. Despite dramatic differences in insulin secretion, insulin message levels were not altered in the various experimental groups suggesting that the defect is not at the transcriptional level. Hence translation may be decreased or degradation of the protein may be increased. It is tempting to speculate that since insulin is stored as a hexamer of zinc, deficiency may result in the formation of an altered storage complex rendering it susceptible to proteolytic degradation.

  9. Plant breeding: a long-term strategy for the control of zinc deficiency in vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Ruel, M T; Bouis, H E

    1998-08-01

    Because trace minerals are important not only for human nutrition but for plant nutrition as well, plant breeding holds great promise for making a significant, sustainable, low-cost contribution to the reduction of micronutrient deficiencies in humans. It may also have important spinoff effects for increasing farm productivity in developing countries in an environmentally beneficial way. This article describes ongoing plant breeding research that could increase the intake of bioavailable zinc from food staple crops in vulnerable populations in developing countries. The 3 most promising plant breeding strategies toward this goal are as follows: 1) increasing the concentration of zinc, 2) reducing the amount of phytic acid (a strong inhibitor of zinc absorption), and 3) raising the concentrations of sulfur-containing amino acids (thought to promote zinc absorption) in the plant. The agronomic advantages and disadvantages as well as the potential benefits and limitations of each approach for human nutrition are described. Research is currently underway to identify the optimal combination of these approaches that will maximize the effect on human zinc nutrition.

  10. Plant breeding to control zinc deficiency in India: how cost-effective is biofortification?

    PubMed

    Stein, Alexander J; Nestel, Penelope; Meenakshi, J V; Qaim, Matin; Sachdev, H P S; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2007-05-01

    To estimate the potential impact of zinc biofortification of rice and wheat on public health in India and to evaluate its cost-effectiveness compared with alternative interventions and international standards. The burden of zinc deficiency (ZnD) in India was expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. Current zinc intakes were derived from a nationally representative household food consumption survey (30-day recall) and attributed to household members based on adult equivalent weights. Using a dose-response function, projected increased zinc intakes from biofortified rice and wheat were translated into potential health improvements for pessimistic and optimistic scenarios. After estimating the costs of developing and disseminating the new varieties, the cost-effectiveness of zinc biofortification was calculated for both scenarios and compared with alternative micronutrient interventions and international reference standards. India. Representative household survey (n = 119 554). The calculated annual burden of ZnD in India is 2.8 million DALYs lost. Zinc biofortification of rice and wheat may reduce this burden by 20-51% and save 0.6-1.4 million DALYs each year, depending on the scenario. The cost for saving one DALY amounts to $US 0.73-7.31, which is very cost-effective by standards of the World Bank and the World Health Organization, and is lower than that of most other micronutrient interventions. Not only may zinc biofortification save lives and prevent morbidity among millions of people, it may also help accommodate the need to economise and to allocate resources more efficiently. Further research is needed to corroborate these findings.

  11. Effectiveness of zinc protoporphyrin/heme ratio for screening iron deficiency in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong Hee

    2011-02-01

    Hemoglobin and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) tests are commonly used to screen for iron deficiency, but little research has been done to systematically evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of these two tests. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc protoporphyrin/heme (ZPP/H) ratio as a point-of-service screening test for iron deficiency among preschool-aged children by comparing the sensitivity and specificity of hemoglobin, ZPP/H ratio, and serum ferritin (SF). Also completed were assessments for the prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) with indicators of ferritin models. This study was carried out with 95 children ages 3 to 6 y. Anthropometric measurements were assessed, and blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin, SF, transferrin saturation (TS), and ZPP. Anemia was common and the prevalences of anemia, ID, and IDA were 14.7%, 12.6%, and 5.2%, respectively. The ZPP/H ratio was strongly and significantly correlated with hemoglobin. And ZPP/H ratio was a more sensitive test for ID than hemoglobin or SF measurement, correctly identifying more than twice as many iron-deficient children (sensitivity of 91.7%, compared to 41.7% for hemoglobin and SF). However, ZPP/H ratio had lower specificity (60.2%, compared to 89.1% for hemoglobin or 96.4% for SF) and resulted in the false identification of more subjects who actually were not iron deficient than did hemoglobin or SF. Low hemoglobin concentration is a late-stage indicator of ID, but ZPP/H ratio can detect ID at early stages and can be performed easily at a relatively low cost. Therefore, ZPP/H ratio can serve as a potential screening test for pre-anemic iron deficiency in community pediatric practices.

  12. Effects of zinc, iron and copper deficiencies on cadmium in tissues of Japanese quail. [Coturnix coturnix japonica

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.S.; Tao, S.H.; Stone, C.L.; Fry, B.E. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Experiments with young Japanese quail were conducted to determine whether combined moderate deficiencies of zinc, iron and copper would cause greater uptake and tissue retention of cadmium than the single deficiencies. Birds were fed the experimental diets containing 62 ppb cadmium from hatching to 16 days of age. On day 9 each bird received a dose of /sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/ in its diet. On day 10, the duodenal and jejunal-ileal tissues contained large amounts of cadmium, and there were many significant effects of treatment on cadmium-109 retention in the livers and kidneys. At day 16, zinc deficiency caused increased cadmium in the liver, whereas iron and copper deficiencies each caused increased cadmium in the kidneys. Combined deficiencies had little or no greater effect than single deficiencies and in some cases the combined effect was less than that of a single deficiency. 13 references, 11 tables.

  13. A dominant negative heterozygous G87R mutation in the zinc transporter, ZnT-2 (SLC30A2), results in transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lasry, Inbal; Seo, Young Ah; Ityel, Hadas; Shalva, Nechama; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Berezovsky, Igor; Goncearenco, Alexander; Klar, Aharon; Levy, Jacob; Anikster, Yair; Kelleher, Shannon L; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2012-08-24

    Zinc is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiency as they require large amounts of zinc for their normal growth and development. We have recently described the first loss-of-function mutation (H54R) in the zinc transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) in mothers with infants harboring transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD). Here we identified and characterized a novel heterozygous G87R ZnT-2 mutation in two unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish mothers with infants displaying TNZD. Transient transfection of G87R ZnT-2 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi retention, whereas the WT transporter properly localized to intracellular secretory vesicles in HC11 and MCF-7 cells. Consequently, G87R ZnT-2 showed decreased stability compared with WT ZnT-2 as revealed by Western blot analysis. Three-dimensional homology modeling based on the crystal structure of YiiP, a close zinc transporter homologue from Escherichia coli, revealed that the basic arginine residue of the mutant G87R points toward the membrane lipid core, suggesting misfolding and possible loss-of-function. Indeed, functional assays including vesicular zinc accumulation, zinc secretion, and cytoplasmic zinc pool assessment revealed markedly impaired zinc transport in G87R ZnT-2 transfectants. Moreover, co-transfection experiments with both mutant and WT transporters revealed a dominant negative effect of G87R ZnT-2 over the WT ZnT-2; this was associated with mislocalization, decreased stability, and loss of zinc transport activity of the WT ZnT-2 due to homodimerization observed upon immunoprecipitation experiments. These findings establish that inactivating ZnT-2 mutations are an underlying basis of TNZD and provide the first evidence for the dominant inheritance of heterozygous ZnT-2 mutations via negative dominance due to homodimer formation.

  14. A Dominant Negative Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter, ZnT-2 (SLC30A2), Results in Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lasry, Inbal; Seo, Young Ah; Ityel, Hadas; Shalva, Nechama; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Berezovsky, Igor; Goncearenco, Alexander; Klar, Aharon; Levy, Jacob; Anikster, Yair; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiency as they require large amounts of zinc for their normal growth and development. We have recently described the first loss-of-function mutation (H54R) in the zinc transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) in mothers with infants harboring transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD). Here we identified and characterized a novel heterozygous G87R ZnT-2 mutation in two unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish mothers with infants displaying TNZD. Transient transfection of G87R ZnT-2 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi retention, whereas the WT transporter properly localized to intracellular secretory vesicles in HC11 and MCF-7 cells. Consequently, G87R ZnT-2 showed decreased stability compared with WT ZnT-2 as revealed by Western blot analysis. Three-dimensional homology modeling based on the crystal structure of YiiP, a close zinc transporter homologue from Escherichia coli, revealed that the basic arginine residue of the mutant G87R points toward the membrane lipid core, suggesting misfolding and possible loss-of-function. Indeed, functional assays including vesicular zinc accumulation, zinc secretion, and cytoplasmic zinc pool assessment revealed markedly impaired zinc transport in G87R ZnT-2 transfectants. Moreover, co-transfection experiments with both mutant and WT transporters revealed a dominant negative effect of G87R ZnT-2 over the WT ZnT-2; this was associated with mislocalization, decreased stability, and loss of zinc transport activity of the WT ZnT-2 due to homodimerization observed upon immunoprecipitation experiments. These findings establish that inactivating ZnT-2 mutations are an underlying basis of TNZD and provide the first evidence for the dominant inheritance of heterozygous ZnT-2 mutations via negative dominance due to homodimer formation. PMID:22733820

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of zinc sulphate used in clustered model treatment in alleviating zinc deficiency in cattle and its effect on hormones, vitamins and production parameters.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M C; Joshi, C

    2005-10-01

    A survey was conducted in 10 districts of northern India. Significant deficiency of zinc was observed in soil, fodders and (cattle) serum samples. The animals showed typical signs of zinc deficiency, namely stiff gait, swelling of hocks and knees, subcutaneous fluid accumulation, rough coat, etc. of variable intensity. A clustered model therapeutic trial was conducted and zinc-deficient cattle were divided into three groups. Group A was provided with mineral mixture containing zinc sulphate. Group B was given mineral mixture without zinc sulphate and group C was given no mineral mixture. Significant improvement (p < 0.01) was observed in the haemoglobin (Hb), total white blood cells (WBC) and total erythrocyte count (TEC) levels at the 7th day of treatment in the animals of group A. Significant improvement in enzyme serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) was observed in group A animals at the 7th day, while improvement in asparatate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ceruloplasmin (Cp) was observed after 21 days of treatment. Regarding hormones, significant improvement was observed in thyroxine (T3) and triiodothyronine (T4), oestrogen and progesterone in group A animals within 14 days of treatment. The values of vitamin A showed a highly significant (p < 0.01) improvement within 7 days of treatment in group A animals and that of vitamin E on the 21 st day of treatment. The milk yield of lactating cattle and body weight of growing calves in group A showed highly significant (p < 0.01) increases at about 14 and 30 days, respectively. It is concluded that zinc sulphate supplementation is highly effective in alleviating zinc deficiency and improving various biochemical and production parameters in cattle. The clustered model treatment provides a better indicator of the most limiting element under field conditions where simultaneous deficiency of various minerals is prevalent.

  16. Symptomatic copper deficiency in three Wilson's disease patients treated with zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Dzieżyc, Karolina; Litwin, Tomasz; Sobańska, Anna; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by excess of copper that leads to accumulation of copper mainly in the liver, brain and needs life-long decoppering therapy. However, overtreatment with anti-copper agents may lead to copper deficiency which may cause neurological and hematological symptoms. Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes. This report describes three WD patients with diagnosed copper deficiency during zinc sulphate (ZS) treatment. After 5-16 years of therapy all patients developed leucopenia. Spinal cord injury was manifested in two of the patients. One of them also presented myopathy. In conclusion, copper deficiency may occur in different time after treatment onset, therefore regular copper metabolism and hematological monitoring is necessary. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of experimental zinc deficiency on thyroid gland in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Garg, S L

    1997-01-01

    Zinc deficiency was produced experimentally in guinea-pigs fed on a diet containing 1.03 mg Zn/kg over a period of 45 days. Clinical signs exhibited in Zn-deficient (ZnD) animals were depression with abnormal posture, scaly skin lesions on various parts of the body, oedematous swelling on hind limbs and marked alopecia. There was no effect on food intake. Serum studies in ZnD group revealed significant decreases in the concentrations of Zn from 20 days onwards, and tri-iodo-thyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) from 30 days onwards. Thyroid glands of ZnD animals were smaller in size and pale or whitish pale in colour. Histopathologically, these glands showed changes of atrophy and degeneration in the follicles. It could be concluded that the depletion in serum T3 and T4 due to Zn deficiency was related to thyroid lesions.

  18. Zinc deficiency alters host response and pathogen virulence in a mouse model of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Bolick, David T; Kolling, Glynis L; Moore, John H; de Oliveira, Luís Antônio; Tung, Kenneth; Philipson, Casandra; Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of diarrheal disease globally. In the current study, we investigated the impact of zinc deficiency on the host and pathogenesis of EAEC. Several outcomes of EAEC infection were investigated including weight loss, EAEC shedding and tissue burden, leukocyte recruitment, intestinal cytokine expression, and virulence expression of the pathogen in vivo. Mice fed a protein source defined zinc deficient diet (dZD) had an 80% reduction of serum zinc and a 50% reduction of zinc in luminal contents of the bowel compared to mice fed a protein source defined control diet (dC). When challenged with EAEC, dZD mice had significantly greater weight loss, stool shedding, mucus production, and, most notably, diarrhea compared to dC mice. Zinc deficient mice had reduced infiltration of leukocytes into the ileum in response to infection suggesting an impaired immune response. Interestingly, expression of several EAEC virulence factors were increased in luminal contents of dZD mice. These data show a dual effect of dietary zinc in benefitting the host while impairing virulence of the pathogen. The study demonstrates the critical importance of zinc and may help elucidate the benefits of zinc supplementation in cases of childhood diarrhea and malnutrition.

  19. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status of young women fed vitamin B-6 deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    Turnlund, J.R.; Keyes, W.R.; Hudson, C.A.; Betschart, A.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Sauberlich, H.E. Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA )

    1991-03-11

    A study was conducted in young women to determine the effect of vitamin B-6 deficient diets on copper, iron and zinc metabolism. Young women were confined to a metabolic research unit for 84 and 98 days. They were fed a vitamin B-6 deficient formula diet initially, followed by food diet containing four increasing levels of vitamin B-6. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status were determined at intervals throughout the study. Absorption was determined using the stable isotopes {sup 65}Cu, {sup 54}Fe, and {sup 67}Zn. Status was based on serum copper and zinc, hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume. Copper absorption averaged 18 {plus minus} 1% during vitamin B-6 depletion, significantly lower than 24 {plus minus} 1% during repletion, but serum copper was not affected and balance was positive. Iron absorption was not impaired significantly by vitamin B-6 deficient diets, but status declined during the depletion period. Zinc absorption averaged 40 {plus minus} 2% during depletion and 27 {plus minus} 2% during repletion. Zinc absorption and retention were significantly greater during vitamin B-6 depletion, but serum zinc declined suggesting the absorbed zinc was not available for utilization. The results suggest that vitamin B-6 depletion of young women may inhibit copper absorption, affect iron status and alter zinc metabolism. The effects of vitamin B-6 depletion differ markedly among these elements.

  20. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent.

    PubMed

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward J M; Ander, E Louise; Watts, Michael J; Young, Scott D; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R

    2015-06-22

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita(-1) d(-1) (± SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge.

  1. The use of zinc protoporphyrin in screening young children for iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Siegel, R M; LaGrone, D H

    1994-08-01

    The common practice of screening children for iron deficiency with hematocrit (HCT) or hemoglobin detects only those children with iron deficiency severe enough to cause anemia. At 40 cents per test, zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) can be measured in the physician's office and identify iron deficiency before anemia develops. The purpose of our study was to evaluate ZPP screening in young children by hematofluorimetry. All children between 9 and 36 months old were enrolled over a 1-year period. All children with HCT < 33% or iron deficiency (ZPP > or = 50 mumoles per mole-heme) were treated with ferrous sulfate at 3 mg-Fe/kg/day for 3 months. Four hundred and fifty-eight children were screened with a blood ZPP and spun HCT at entry. Two hundred and forty-three children (53%) had both a normal ZPP and HCT, 155 (34%) had a ZPP > or = 50 and normal HCT, 26 (6%) had a ZPP > or = 50 with HCT < 33%, and 34 (7%) had a normal ZPP and HCT < 33%. Of those with an elevated ZPP and normal HCT, 76% had a therapeutic response to iron therapy, with a 10% decrease in ZPP (P < 0.005). ZPP had a greater sensitivity (81%) than HCT (16%) in identifying children with iron deficiency. ZPP proved to be an effective and inexpensive addition to HCT in identifying children with iron deficiency.

  2. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    PubMed Central

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita−1 d−1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  3. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-06-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita-1 d-1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge.

  4. Growth and characterization of pure and KCl doped zinc thiourea chloride (ZTC) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruby Nirmala, L.; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J.

    2013-02-01

    Potassium Chloride (KCl) as an additive is added into zinc thiourea chloride solution in a small amount (1 M%) by the method of slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature to get a new crystal. Due to the doping of the impurities on the crystals, remarkable changes in the physical properties were obtained. The grown crystals have been subjected to different instrumentation methods. The incorporation of the amount of potassium and zinc in the crystal lattices has been determined by AAS method. The lattice dimensions have been identified from single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The presence of functional group for the grown crystals has been identified by FTIR analysis. The optical, thermal and mechanical behaviors have been assessed by UV-Vis, TG/DTA and Vickers hardness methods respectively. The presence of dislocations of atoms has been identified by etching studies.

  5. Growth and characterization of pure and KCl doped zinc thiourea chloride (ZTC) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ruby Nirmala, L; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J

    2013-02-01

    Potassium Chloride (KCl) as an additive is added into zinc thiourea chloride solution in a small amount (1M%) by the method of slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature to get a new crystal. Due to the doping of the impurities on the crystals, remarkable changes in the physical properties were obtained. The grown crystals have been subjected to different instrumentation methods. The incorporation of the amount of potassium and zinc in the crystal lattices has been determined by AAS method. The lattice dimensions have been identified from single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The presence of functional group for the grown crystals has been identified by FTIR analysis. The optical, thermal and mechanical behaviors have been assessed by UV-Vis, TG/DTA and Vickers hardness methods respectively. The presence of dislocations of atoms has been identified by etching studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum Zinc Deficiency and its Relation to Liver Fibrosis in Chronic HCV: a Real-Life Egyptian Study.

    PubMed

    Omran, Dalia A; Darweesh, Samar Kamal; Fouad, Hanan; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Saif, Sameh; Fared, Azza; Hassany, Mohamed; Mobarak, Lamiaa; El-Tahawy, Mahmoud A; Yosry, Ayman

    2017-01-16

    Zinc is essential for the activation of approximately 300 metallo-enzymes. Serum and hepatic zinc is decreased in chronic liver disease patients, and zinc depletion has been suggested to accelerate liver fibrosis. The study was designed to assess Zinc status in chronic HCV Egyptian patients and its relationship to fibrosis stage diagnosed by FibroScan. This was a cross-sectional study on 297 Egyptian patients with naïve chronic HCV. All patients underwent laboratory tests (including assessment of serum Zinc) and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by Transient Elastography (FibroScan(®)). The study included 170 (57.2%) females and 127 (42.8%) males with a mean age 52.4 ± 10.2 years. Most of the patients had zinc deficiency as the mean zinc level was 55.5 ± 30.7 μg/dl. The FibroScan scores showed that 97 patients had mild to moderate fibrosis (≤F2), while 200 patients had advanced to severe fibrosis (˃F2). Zinc level was significantly lower in patients with ˃F2 than those with ≤F2 (52 ± 30.7 vs 62.5 ± 29.7, p value: 0.005), as the zinc values decreased with the progression of liver fibrosis. Serum zinc level had a negative significant correlation with INR and negative significant correlation with FibroScan score but no correlation to bilirubin, ALT, AST, or albumin. Most of Egyptian chronic liver disease patients had zinc deficiency. Zinc level gets significantly lower with progression of fibrosis. Zinc supplementation is essential before and during antiviral therapy for HCV.

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors bZIP19 and bZIP23 regulate the adaptation to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Ana G L; Herrero, Eva; Lin, Ya-Fen; Huettel, Bruno; Talukdar, Sangita; Smaczniak, Cezary; Immink, Richard G H; van Eldik, Mandy; Fiers, Mark; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G M

    2010-06-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms. When facing a shortage in zinc supply, plants adapt by enhancing the zinc uptake capacity. The molecular regulators controlling this adaptation are not known. We present the identification of two closely related members of the Arabidopsis thaliana basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factor gene family, bZIP19 and bZIP23, that regulate the adaptation to low zinc supply. They were identified, in a yeast-one-hybrid screening, to associate to promoter regions of the zinc deficiency-induced ZIP4 gene of the Zrt- and Irt-related protein (ZIP) family of metal transporters. Although mutation of only one of the bZIP genes hardly affects plants, we show that the bzip19 bzip23 double mutant is hypersensitive to zinc deficiency. Unlike the wild type, the bzip19 bzip23 mutant is unable to induce the expression of a small set of genes that constitutes the primary response to zinc deficiency, comprising additional ZIP metal transporter genes. This set of target genes is characterized by the presence of one or more copies of a 10-bp imperfect palindrome in their promoter region, to which both bZIP proteins can bind. The bZIP19 and bZIP23 transcription factors, their target genes, and the characteristic cis zinc deficiency response elements they can bind to are conserved in higher plants. These findings are a significant step forward to unravel the molecular mechanism of zinc homeostasis in plants, allowing the improvement of zinc bio-fortification to alleviate human nutrition problems and phytoremediation strategies to clean contaminated soils.

  8. Zinc deficiency suppresses matrix mineralization and retards osteogenesis transiently with catch-up possibly through Runx 2 modulation.

    PubMed

    Kwun, In-Sook; Cho, Young-Eun; Lomeda, Ria-Ann R; Shin, Hong-In; Choi, Je-Yong; Kang, Young-Hee; Beattie, John H

    2010-03-01

    A characteristic sign of zinc deficiency is retarded skeletal growth, but the role of zinc in osteoblasts is not well understood. Two major events for bone formation include osteoblast differentiation by bone marker gene expression, which is mainly regulated by bone-specific transcription factor Runx2 and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization by Ca deposits for bone nodule formation. We investigated whether zinc deficiency down-regulates bone marker gene transcription and whether this might occur through modulation of Runx2. We also investigated whether zinc deficiency decreases ECM mineralization in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. In the presence of 5 mumol/L TPEN as zinc chelator, zinc deficiency (ZnD: 1 micromol Zn/L) decreased bone marker gene (collagen type I, osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase, osteoclacin and parathyroid hormone receptor) expression, as compared to normal osteogenic medium (OSM) or zinc adequate medium (ZnA: 15 micromol/L) (P<0.05) both at 5 days (proliferation) and 15 days (matrix maturation). Decreased bone marker gene transcription by zinc deficiency could be caused by decreased nuclear Runx2 protein (P=0.05) and transcript (P<0.05) levels in ZnD. Furthermore, within the first 24 h of differentiation when Runx2 expression is induced, maximal Runx2 mRNA and nuclear protein levels were delayed in ZnD compared to OSM and ZnA. ECM Ca deposition was also lower in ZnD, which was also indirectly confirmed by detection of decreased cellular (synthesized) and medium (secreted) ALP activity as well as matrix ALP activity. Taken together, zinc deficiency attenuated osteogenic activity by decreasing bone marker gene transcription through reduced and delayed Runx2 expression and by decreasing ECM mineralization through inhibition of ALP activity in osteoblasts. Decreased and delayed bone marker gene, Runx2 expression and ECM mineralization in osteoblasts by zinc deficiency can be a potential explanation for the retarded skeletal growth which is the

  9. Acetaldehyde addition throughout the growth phase alleviates the phenotypic effect of zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Sauvage, François-Xavier; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    During experiments to determine the effects of exogenously added acetaldehyde on pure cultures of various yeast strains, we discovered that an early acetaldehyde perfusion during the growth phase allowed several yeasts to partially overcome the phenotypic effects of zinc depletion during alcoholic fermentation. We, therefore, performed genome-wide expression and proteomic analysis on an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain (VL1) growing in zinc-replete or zinc-depleted conditions in the presence of perfused acetaldehyde to identify molecular markers of this effect. Zinc depletion severely affects ethanol production and therefore nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) regeneration, although we observed partial compensation by the upregulation of the poorly efficient Fe-dependent Adh4p in our conditions. A coordinate metabolic response was indeed observed in response to the early acetaldehyde perfusion, and particularly of the lower part of glycolysis, leading to the cellular replenishment of NAD cofactor. These various findings suggest that acetaldehyde exchange between strains may inhibit the growth of some yeast strains while encouraging the growth of others. This phenomenon could be particularly important for understanding the ecology of colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae after elimination of non-Saccharomyces yeasts.

  10. Maternal zinc deficiency, but not copper deficiency or diabetes, results in increased embryonic cell death in the rat: implications for mechanisms underlying abnormal development.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M A; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Rucker, R B; Rogers, J M; Keen, C L

    1995-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of maternal copper deficiency, zinc deficiency, and diabetes are largely unknown. Here we investigated whether these insults are associated with altered patterns of cell death in gestation day (GD) 11.0 rat embryos. Four weeks prior to mating, rats in the copper-deficient group (CuD) were fed a copper-deficient diet supplemented with the chelator, triethylenetetramine, to facilitate the depletion of tissue copper stores. Rats in this group were switched to a triethylenetetramine-free copper-deficient diet 1 week prior to mating. Dams in the diabetic and control groups were fed a control (8 micrograms copper, 25 micrograms zinc/g) diet throughout the study. On GD 3.0, one subset of the control dams was assigned to the zinc-deficient group (ZnD) and fed a zinc-deficient diet. A second subset of control dams was assigned to a restricted fed group and fed the control diet in quantities consumed by the zinc-deficient dams. Litters were taken by cesarean section on GD 11.0. Embryos were examined for gross morphology and assessed for patterns of cell death using Nile blue sulfate. Embryos from the CuD dams were characterized by edematous hindbrain. Embryos from the diabetic group were characterized by delayed development. Altered patterns of cell death were only detected in embryos from the ZnD dams. Within the ZnD group, embryos were either characterized by small size, edematous head region, and control patterns of cell death, or normal size, normal morphology, and increased cell death. These different patterns of morphology and cell death in the embryos of ZnD dams were associated with different patterns of maternal food intake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Effect of zinc deficiency on mouse renal interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuli; Liang, Dan; Lian, Xu; Chi, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Xuemei; Zhao, Yue; Ping, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    There is emerging evidence that tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the final common pathway of the majority of chronic progressive renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Zinc, an essential dietary element, has been suggested to be important for a number of protein functions during fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. However, the effect of zinc deficiency (ZnD) on renal interstitial fibrosis in DN remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of ZnD on renal interstitial fibrosis during DN using an streptozotocin‑induced model of diabetes with immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis. The present study identified that dietary zinc restriction significantly decreased zinc concentrations in the plasma and mouse kidney. ZnD enhanced albuminuria and extracellular matrix protein expression, associated with diabetic renal interstitial fibrosis by activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts and regulation of the expression of fibrosis‑associated factors, which may be mediated by the activation of fibroblasts via the TGF‑β/Smad signaling pathway. The data indicates that ZnD serves an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms of renal interstitial fibrosis during the development of DN.

  12. Zinc deficiency and low enterocyte zinc transporter expression in human patients with autism related mutations in SHANK3

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Stefanie; Sauer, Ann Katrin; Hagmeyer, Simone; Mangus, Katharina; Linta, Leonhard; Liebau, Stefan; Bockmann, Juergen; Huguet, Guillaume; Bourgeron, Thomas; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2017-01-01

    Phelan McDermid Syndrome (PMDS) is a genetic disorder characterized by features of Autism spectrum disorders. Similar to reports of Zn deficiency in autistic children, we have previously reported high incidence of Zn deficiency in PMDS. However, the underlying mechanisms are currently not well understood. Here, using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry to measure the concentration of Zinc (Zn) and Copper (Cu) in hair samples from individuals with PMDS with 22q13.3 deletion including SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3), we report a high rate of abnormally low Zn/Cu ratios. To investigate possible underlying mechanisms, we generated enterocytes from PMDS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and used Caco-2 cells with knockdown of SHANK3. We detected decreased expression of Zn uptake transporters ZIP2 and ZIP4 on mRNA and protein level correlating with SHANK3 expression levels, and found reduced levels of ZIP4 protein co-localizing with SHANK3 at the plasma membrane. We demonstrated that especially ZIP4 exists in a complex with SHANK3. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry on gut sections from Shank3αβ knockout mice and confirmed a link between enterocytic SHANK3, ZIP2 and ZIP4. We conclude that apart from its well-known role in the CNS, SHANK3 might play a specific role in the GI tract. PMID:28345660

  13. Zinc deficiency and low enterocyte zinc transporter expression in human patients with autism related mutations in SHANK3.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Stefanie; Sauer, Ann Katrin; Hagmeyer, Simone; Mangus, Katharina; Linta, Leonhard; Liebau, Stefan; Bockmann, Juergen; Huguet, Guillaume; Bourgeron, Thomas; Boeckers, Tobias M; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2017-03-27

    Phelan McDermid Syndrome (PMDS) is a genetic disorder characterized by features of Autism spectrum disorders. Similar to reports of Zn deficiency in autistic children, we have previously reported high incidence of Zn deficiency in PMDS. However, the underlying mechanisms are currently not well understood. Here, using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry to measure the concentration of Zinc (Zn) and Copper (Cu) in hair samples from individuals with PMDS with 22q13.3 deletion including SHANK3 (SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3), we report a high rate of abnormally low Zn/Cu ratios. To investigate possible underlying mechanisms, we generated enterocytes from PMDS patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and used Caco-2 cells with knockdown of SHANK3. We detected decreased expression of Zn uptake transporters ZIP2 and ZIP4 on mRNA and protein level correlating with SHANK3 expression levels, and found reduced levels of ZIP4 protein co-localizing with SHANK3 at the plasma membrane. We demonstrated that especially ZIP4 exists in a complex with SHANK3. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemistry on gut sections from Shank3αβ knockout mice and confirmed a link between enterocytic SHANK3, ZIP2 and ZIP4. We conclude that apart from its well-known role in the CNS, SHANK3 might play a specific role in the GI tract.

  14. An Investigation of Electrodeposited Alloys and Pure Metals as Substitutes for Zinc and Cadmium for Protective Finishes for Steel Parts of Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-11-30

    22188 (None) (None) AFTR-5692 Nov • 47 Undass. U.S. English 145 photos, tables, diagr, graphs Data are presented on static and dynamic...Electrodeposited Alloys. Static Electrode Potential Measurements of Electrocüeposited Allovs and Pure Metals . . 9 Zinc - Copper Alloys .9 Zinc - Tin Alloys...11 Static and Dynamic Potential and Corrosion Current Density Measurements of Fourteen C?.st Binary Alloy Systems , . , , 11

  15. [Prevalence of deficiency and dietary intake of iron, zinc and copper in Chilean childbearing age women].

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Borja, Angélica; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate anemia, the biochemical status and dietary adequacy of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), in Chilean childbearing age women. We studied a convenience sample of 86 women aged 18 to 48 years from Santiago, Chile. We determined anemia and the micronutrient status through hemoglobin (Hb) mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, zinc protoporphyrin, serum ferritin (SF), serum Zn and Cu. Dietary adequacy was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Of all women, 4.7% had Fe deficiency (ID) anemia, 21 % ID without anemia, 26 % depleted Fe stores and 48.3% normal Fe status. Obese women had higher SF (p<0.01) compared with those classified as having normal BMI. Also, showed higher Hb (p<0.05) concentrations compared with overweight and normal weight women. Partidipants showed 3.5 % and 2.3 % of Zn and Cu deficiency, respectively. Also, 95 %, 94 % and 99 % had adequate intake of Fe, Zn and Cu respectively, according to EAR cut points. There were no significant differences in micronutrients intake across different nutritional status. There was a low prevalence of anemia, Fe, Zn and Cu deficiency. A high percentage of women reached micronutrient adequacy. However, 47% of women had ID without anemia and Fe depleted stores.

  16. Short-term zinc deficiency inhibits chondrocyte proliferation and induces cell apoptosis in the epiphyseal growth plate of young chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xibin; Fosmire, Gary J; Gay, Carol V; Leach, Roland M

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zinc deficiency on chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in the epiphyseal growth plate of juvenile chickens. Newly hatched broiler chickens were fed either a low zinc (10 mg/kg diet) or a zinc-adequate (68 mg/kg diet) soy protein-based purified diet. Cell proliferation in the growth plate was evaluated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling. Apoptosis was assessed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Chondrocyte differentiation was evaluated with immunostaining of osteonectin as a marker of maturation. As early as d 3 of feeding, zinc deficiency significantly inhibited chondrocyte proliferation, promoted cell differentiation and induced cell apoptosis in the growth plate. These effects were manifested primarily in areas remote from the blood supply. Immunostaining for local growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) did not reveal any differences between growth plates of zinc-deficient and zinc-adequate chickens after 3 d of feeding. By d 7, severe growth plate lesions characterized by reduced cellularity and abnormally shaped cells were formed in areas remote from blood vessels. Immunoreactive IGF-1, PTHrP and FGF-2 were all greatly reduced in the lesion. However, the growth rate and food intake of zinc-deficient chickens were not different from those of the controls during the 7-d experiment. Therefore, a direct effect of zinc deficiency on proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of growth plate chondrocytes was indicated.

  17. Self-catalyzed growth of pure zinc blende 〈110〉 InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia Li, Junshuai; Wu, Yao; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrate the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth of 〈110〉 InP nanowires (NWs) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The 〈110〉 InP nanowire is formed via a spontaneous kinking from the original 〈111〉 growth direction, which is attributed to instabilities at the liquid/solid interface caused by a fast In incorporation into the droplet. The NW length before kinking has a nearly linear relationship with the diameter, offering a way to control the NW morphology for different applications. The 〈110〉 nanowire exhibits pure zinc blende crystal structure and a narrower emission linewidth in comparison with a typical 〈111〉 nanowire, demonstrating its potential applications in high-performance electronic and photonic devices.

  18. Growth of Pure Zinc-Blende GaAs(P) Core-Shell Nanowires with Highly Regular Morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunyan; Fonseka, H Aruni; Aagesen, Martin; Gott, James A; Sanchez, Ana M; Wu, Jiang; Kim, Dongyoung; Jurczak, Pamela; Huo, Suguo; Liu, Huiyun

    2017-08-09

    The growth of self-catalyzed core-shell nanowires (NWs) is investigated systematically using GaAs(P) NWs. The defects in the core NW are found to be detrimental for the shell growth. These defects are effectively eliminated by introducing beryllium (Be) doping during the NW core growth and hence forming Be-Ga alloy droplets that can effectively suppress the WZ nucleation and facilitate the droplet consumption. Shells with pure zinc-blende crystal quality and highly regular morphology are successfully grown on the defect-free NW cores and demonstrated an enhancement of one order of magnitude for room-temperature emission compared to that of the defective shells. These results provide useful information on guiding the growth of high-quality shell, which can greatly enhance the NW device performance.

  19. Rapid Crown Root Development Confers Tolerance to Zinc Deficiency in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Amrit K.; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is one of the leading nutrient disorders in rice (Oryza sativa). Many studies have identified Zn-efficient rice genotypes, but causal mechanisms for Zn deficiency tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we report a detailed study of the impact of Zn deficiency on crown root development of rice genotypes, differing in their tolerance to this stress. Zn deficiency delayed crown root development and plant biomass accumulation in both Zn-efficient and inefficient genotypes, with the effects being much stronger in the latter. Zn-efficient genotypes had developed new crown roots as early as 3 days after transplanting (DAT) to a Zn deficient field and that was followed by a significant increase in total biomass by 7 DAT. Zn-inefficient genotypes developed few new crown roots and did not increase biomass during the first 7 days following transplanting. This correlated with Zn-efficient genotypes retranslocating a higher proportion of shoot-Zn to their roots, compared to Zn-inefficient genotypes. These latter genotypes were furthermore not efficient in utilizing the limited Zn for root development. Histological analyses indicated no anomalies in crown tissue of Zn-efficient or inefficient genotypes that would have suggested crown root emergence was impeded. We therefore conclude that the rate of crown root initiation was differentially affected by Zn deficiency between genotypes. Rapid crown root development, following transplanting, was identified as a main causative trait for tolerance to Zn deficiency and better Zn retranslocation from shoot to root was a key attribute of Zn-efficient genotypes. PMID:27066060

  20. Influence of pH on the toxic effects of zinc, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol on pure cultures of soil microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beelen, P. van; Fleuren-Kemilae, A.K.

    1997-02-01

    In this study the effect of acidification of soil pore water on the uptake and toxicity of cationic and anionic pollutants was measured in an experimental model system. The influence of pH on the toxic effects of zinc, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol was studied in buffered suspensions of pure cultures of soil microorganisms. In this system the speciation of the toxicant, the pH, and the biomass are defined, constant, and thus easier to study than in a system with the solid soil matrix and pore water. The mineralization of [{sup 14}C]acetate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was used to measure the toxic effects of pollutants on a fungus (Aspergillus niger CBS 121.49), an actinomycete (Streptomyces lividans 66), two Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida strains (MT-2 and DSM 50026), and a gram-positive strain (Rhodococcus erythropolis A177). Large differences in sensitivity were observed between the species. For pentachlorophenol the highest EC50 was 81 mg/L for Pseudomonas putida at pH 8, whereas the lowest was 0.13 mg/L for Aspergillus niger at pH 6. Aspergillus niger was not sensitive to 1,000 mg Zn/L, whereas Pseudomonas putida at pH 7.8 showed the lowest EC50, 0.14 mg Zn/L. When pH was increased, pentachlorophenol became less toxic and showed less sorption to the biomass, whereas zinc and cadmium became more toxic and showed more sorption to the biomass. The results indicate that higher pore-water concentrations due to acidification of zinc- and cadmium-polluted soils may not be accompanied by increased toxic effects on microorganisms because of the relatively low toxicity of these metals in pore water at low pH.

  1. Experimental congenital hydrocephalus. A review with special consideration of hydrocephalus produced by zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Adeloye, A; Warkany, J

    1976-01-01

    A review was made of experimental methods available to produce congenital hydrocephalus by teratogenic methods. Radiation, infections, trypan blue, hypervitaminosis A, salicylates and nutritional deficiencies were considered. In the course of prenatal zinc deficiency experiments, congenital hydrocephalus was frequently encountered and histologic sections were made of many representative specimens. Details of the findings are described, among them various types of aqueduct stenosis or obileration. Although these anomalies suggest that occlusion of the aqueduct is the cause of the enlargement of the ventricular system it was noted that there was also ventricular dilatation caudal to the stenotic point of the aqueduct. Hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis has also been observed in experimental animals. It seems possible that some cases of congenital hydrocephalus attributed to aqueductal stenosis are examples of hydrocephalus with secondary block of the aqueduct.

  2. Studies on the pathology of experimental zinc deficiency in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Sadana, J R; Gupta, R K

    1988-05-01

    Zinc deficiency was produced in guinea-pigs by feeding a diet containing 1.25 micrograms Zn per g of diet over a period of 60 days. A significant reduction in serum and tissue (kidney, liver and testis) Zn concentration was observed in the Zn-deficient (ZnD) group. Gross lesions were thickening of skin, atrophy of testis and thyroid and enlargement of adrenals. Histologically, there was parakeratosis, hyperkeratosis and acanthosis in skin, tongue and oesophagus, degeneration and strophy of testis, necrosis of the pancreas, atrophy of the thyroid, atrophy of the zona glomerulosa and hyperplasia of the zona reticularis and medulla of the adrenals. In order to study the response to Zn supplementation, the Zn-replete diet was fed over a period of 15 days to guinea-pigs which had been given the ZnD diet for 45 days. These animals exhibited marked, though not complete, improvement in the pathological changes.

  3. Growth and Characterization of Pure and Cd-Doped Zinc Tris-Thiourea Sulfate (ZTS) Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muley, G. G.

    2014-02-01

    Single crystals of pure and Cd-doped zinc tris-thiourea sulfate (ZTS) were grown for frequency conversion applications by a low temperature solution growth method, allowing slow evaporation of the water solvent at a constant temperature. The solubility of ZTS was found to increase with the concentration of Cd in the aqueous solution. The optical transparency was found to increase in the Cd-doped crystals as compared to that in the undoped crystals. The doping of Cd was confirmed quantitatively by the atomic absorption spectroscopy and qualitatively by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From the powder x-ray diffraction study, it was found that the lattice constants (a, b and c) decrease with the concentration of Cd in ZTS, but the change in the crystal symmetry and space group has not been reported. A␣change in growth habit of Cd-doped crystals has been observed. Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis was employed to learn the thermal stability of the grown crystals, and 2 mol% Cd-doped ZTS crystal was found to thermally stable up to 230 °C. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurement reveals improvement in the SHG efficiency, as 4 mol% Cd-doped ZTS crystal has 1.36 times more SHG efficiency as compared to the pure ZTS crystal.

  4. Growth and characterization of pure and potassium iodide-doped zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, C.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Mahadevan, C. K.

    2009-02-01

    Single crystals of pure and potassium iodide (KI)-doped zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) were grown from aqueous solutions by the slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were transparent. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The grown crystals were also characterized by recording the powder X-ray diffraction pattern and by identifying the diffracting planes. The FT-IR spectrum was recorded in the range 400-4500 cm -1. Second harmonic generation (SHG) was confirmed by the Kurtz powder method. The thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies reveal that the materials have good thermal stability. Atomic absorption studies confirm the presence of dopant in ZTS crystals. The electrical measurements were made in the frequency range 10 2-10 6 Hz and in the temperature range 40-130 °C along a-, b- and c-directions of the grown crystals. The present study shows that the electrical parameters viz. dc conductivity, dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor and ac conductivity increase with increase in temperature. Activation energy values were also determined for the ac conduction process in grown crystals. The dc conductivity, dielectric constant, dielectric loss factor and ac conductivity of KI-doped ZTS crystal were found to be more than those of pure ZTS crystals.

  5. Growth and studies of pure and potassium iodide-doped zinc tris-thiourea sulphate (ZTS) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, C.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.

    2008-12-01

    Single crystals of pure and potassium iodide (KI)-doped Zinc Tris-thiourea Sulphate (ZTS) were grown from aqueous solutions by slow evaporation technique. The grown crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction to determine the unit cell dimensions. The grown crystals were also characterized by recording the powder X-ray diffraction patterns and by identifying the diffracting planes. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectra have been recorded in the range 400-4500 cm -1. Second harmonic generation (SHG) for the materials of this work was confirmed using Nd:YAG laser. The UV-visible spectra show that the grown crystals have wide optical transparency in the entire visible region. The Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA) thermograms reveal that the materials have good thermal stability. Atomic absorption study reveals the presence of potassium in the doped f crystals. The electrical measurements were made in the temperature range 40-130 °C along c-direction of the grown crystals. The dielectric studies show that there may be a ferroelectric transition at 50 °C for both pure and KI-doped ZTS crystals. DC conductivity for both the samples is found to be increasing with increase in temperature. Activation energy values were also determined for both AC and DC conduction processes in the samples.

  6. Early-in-life dietary zinc deficiency and supplementation and mammary tumor development in adulthood female rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Flávia R M; Grassi, Tony F; Zapaterini, Joyce R; Bidinotto, Lucas T; Barbisan, Luis F

    2017-06-01

    Zinc deficiency during pregnancy and postnatal life can adversely increase risk of developing human diseases at adulthood. The present study was designed to evaluate whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation during the pregnancy, lactation and juvenile stages interferes in the development of mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Pregnant female SD rats were allocated into three groups: zinc-adequate diet (ZnA - 35-mg/kg chow), zinc-deficient diet (ZnD - 3-mg/kg chow) or zinc-supplemented diet (ZnS - 180-mg/kg chow) during gestational day 10 (GD 10) until the litters' weaning. Female offspring received the same diets as their dams until postnatal day (PND) 51. At PND 51, the animals received a single dose of DMBA (50 mg/kg, ig) and zinc-adequate diets. At PND 180, female were euthanized, and tumor samples were processed for histological evaluation and gene expression microarray analysis. The ZnD induced a significant reduction in female offspring body weight evolution and in mammary gland development. At late in life, the ZnD or ZnS did not alter the latency, incidence, multiplicity, volume or histological types of mammary tumors in relation to the ZnA group. However, the total tumor number in ZnS group was higher than in ZnA group, accompanied by distinct expression of 4 genes up- and 15 genes down-regulated. The present findings indicate that early-in-life dietary zinc supplementation, differently to zinc deficiency, has a potential to modify the susceptibility to the development of mammary tumors induced by DMBA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Silicon addition to soybean (Glycine max L.) plants alleviate zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Ma Blanca; Echevarria, Virginia; Gonzalo, Ma José; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2016-11-01

    It is well established the beneficial role of silicon (Si) in alleviating abiotic stress. However, it remains poorly understood the mechanisms of the Si-mediated protection against metal deficiency, especially the zinc (Zn) one. Recently, it has been proposed that Si may act by an interaction with this biometal in the root apoplast contributing to its movement through the plant, as in the case of Fe deficiency. In the present work, the effect of initial or continuous Si doses in soybean Zn deficient plants has been studied. For that purpose, plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with different Si doses (0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 mM) under Zn limiting conditions. SPAD index in leaves, several growth parameters, mineral content in the whole plant and the formation of Zn pools in roots were determined. An initial addition of 0.5 mM of Si to the nutrient solution led to an enhancement of plants growth, Zn and Si content in leaves, and a higher storage of Zn in the root apoplast. The results suggest that this treatment enhanced Zn accumulation on roots and its movement to shoots when needed, mitigating Zn deficiency symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Contribution of zinc deficiency to insulin resistance in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Takashi; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Kurokochi, Kazutaka; Inukai, Michio; Masugata, Hisashi; Goda, Fuminori; Haba, Reiji; Watanabe, Seishiro; Senda, Shoichi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between metabolic abnormalities of trace elements and insulin resistance has been established. Recent studies have revealed that insulin resistance is associated with autoimmune responses. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between zinc or copper metabolism and insulin resistance in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Sixteen patients with PBC were divided into two groups: early and advanced stage disease. The overall value of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in patients with advanced stage PBC was significantly higher than that in patients with early stage PBC, although the mean value in advanced stage PBC was significantly lower than that in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis. There was an inverse correlation between serum zinc concentrations and HOMA-IR values in patients with PBC, while we found no correlation between serum copper levels and HOMA-IR values. HOMA-IR values were inversely associated with peripheral platelet counts, indicating the relationship between insulin resistance and hepatic fibrosis. These results suggest that zinc deficiency plays important roles of insulin resistance and subsequent hepatic fibrosis in patients with PBC, although insulin resistance in advanced stage PBC was significantly milder than that in HCV-related liver cirrhosis.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Phase-pure Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Bradley Michael

    Semiconductor nanoparticles have been an important area of research in many different disciplines. A substantial amount of this work has been put toward advancing the field of photovoltaics. However, current p-type photovoltaic materials can not sustain the large scale production needed for future energy demands due to their low elemental abundance. Therefore, Earth abundant semiconductor materials have become of great interest to the photovoltaic community especially, the material copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), also known by its mineral name kesterite. CZTS exhibits desirable properties for photovoltaics, such as elemental abundance, high absorption coefficient (~104 cm-1 ), high carrier concentration, and optimum direct band gap (1.5 eV). To date, solution based approaches for making CZTS have yielded the most promising conversion efficiencies in solar cells. To that end, the motivation of nanoparticle based inks that can be used in high throughput production are an attractive route for large scale deployment. This has driven the need to make high quality CZTS nanoparticles that possess the properties of the pure kesterite phase with high monodispersity that can be deposited into dense thin films. The inherent challenge of making a quaternary compound of a single phase has made this a difficult task; however, some of those fundamental problems are addressed in this thesis. This had resulted in the synthesis of phase-pure k-CZTS confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Furthermore, ultra-fast laser spectroscopy was done on CZTS thin films made from phase-pure kesterite nanoparticles synthesized in this work. This thesis provides new data that directly probes the lifetime of photogenerated free carriers in kesterite CZTS (k-CZTS) thin films.

  10. Zinc and iron deficiency and their interrelations in low-income African American and Hispanic children in Atlanta1234

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Frederick K; Swaby-Ellis, E Dawn; Smith, Joy L; Jacques, Anne; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2010-01-01

    Background: Information about the zinc status of low-income minority children in the United States is lacking. Objective: The objective was to determine the prevalence of zinc deficiency and anemia and their interrelation among low-income African American and Hispanic preschool children. Design: This was a cross-sectional study in which a prospective 3-d food diary was completed, and hemoglobin, serum ferritin, zinc, copper, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured. Children with elevated C-reactive protein concentrations were excluded from analysis. Results: Of 292 children recruited, 280 (mean ± SD age: 2.5 ± 1.2 y) qualified for analysis. One hundred forty-six (52%) children were African American and 134 (48%) were Hispanic; 202 (72%) were enrolled in the Women, Infants, and Children nutrition program. A low serum zinc concentration (<10.7 μmol/L) was present in 34 (12%) children, and 37 (13%) were anemic (hemoglobin < 110 g/L). African American (odds ratio: 3.47; 95% CI: 1.51, 7.96) and anemic (odds ratio: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.24, 6.90) children had an increased risk of zinc deficiency. Serum zinc correlated with hemoglobin (r = 0.24, P < 0.001). Children with a height/length less than the fifth percentile had significantly lower mean serum zinc concentrations than those with a height/length greater than the fifth percentile (12.4 ± 1.8 compared with 13.0 ± 2.2 μmol/L; P < 0.001). In a multiple logistic regression model, African American race-ethnicity was associated with zinc deficiency (odds ratio: 0.26; P = 0.02). The main sources of iron and zinc in the diets were meat products and cereals. Conclusions: The prevalence of zinc deficiency and anemia was high in this population of low-income minority children, especially among African Americans. Further investigation of the incidence of zinc deficiency and the ability of anemia to screen for it is warranted. PMID:20147474

  11. [Histological alterations in the submandibular glands and testicles in rats induced by soy and zinc deficient diet].

    PubMed

    Vanderlei, L C; Arruda Veiga, M C; Reis, N S; Tambeli, C H

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine in rats the histologic alterations of the submandibular glands and testicles induced by soy diets and zinc deficient diet. The zinc deficiency produced testicles alterations including seminiferous tubulus atrophy, germinative epithelium degeneration, spermatogenesis alterations and a significant atrophy of the submandibular glands which presented no much delimitated acines. The soy diet without complementations also compromised the spermatogenesis by showing seminiferous tubulus atrophied and a reduction of the germinative epithelium. The soy diet complemented by saline and vitaminic mixtures didn't produced testicles alterations but its induced in the submandibular glands a hypertrophy of the ductal component mainly in relation to the granular component.

  12. Dietary zinc deficiency fuels esophageal cancer development by inducing a distinct inflammatory signature

    PubMed Central

    Taccioli, C; Chen, H; Jiang, Y; Liu, XP; Huang, K; Smalley, KJ; Farber, JL; Croce, CM; Fong, LY

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). The causes of inflammation in ESCC, however, are undefined. Dietary zinc-deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of ESCC. We have previously shown that short-term ZD (6 weeks) in rats induces overexpression of the proinflammatory mediators S100a8 and S100a9 in the esophageal mucosa with accompanying esophageal epithelial hyperplasia. Here we report that prolonged ZD (21 weeks) in rats amplified this inflammation that when combined with non-carcinogenic low doses of the environmental carcinogen N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) elicited a 66.7% (16/24) incidence of ESCC. With zinc-sufficiency NMBA produced no cancers (0/21) (P<0.001). At tumor endpoint, the neoplastic ZD esophagus as compared with zinc-sufficient esophagus had an inflammatory gene signature with upregulation of numerous cancer-related inflammation genes (CXC and CC chemokines, chemokine receptors, cytokines, and Cox-2) in addition to S100a8 and S100a9. This signature was already activated in the earlier dysplastic stage. Additionally, time-course bioinformatics analysis of expression profiles at tumor endpoint and prior to NMBA exposure revealed that this sustained inflammation was due to ZD rather than carcinogen exposure. Importantly, zinc replenishment reversed this inflammatory signature at both the dysplastic and neoplastic stages of ESCC development, and prevented cancer formation. Thus, the molecular definition of ZD-induced inflammation as a critical factor in ESCC development has important clinical implications with regard to development and prevention of this deadly disease. PMID:22179833

  13. Clinically distinct presentations of copper deficiency myeloneuropathy and cytopenias in a patient using excessive zinc-containing denture adhesive.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Sahara J; Sofronescu, Alina G

    2017-08-01

    While copper deficiency has long been known to cause cytopenias, copper deficiency myeloneuropathy is a more recently described entity. Here, we present the case of two clinically distinct presentations of acquired copper deficiency syndromes secondary to excessive use of zinc-containing denture adhesive over five years: myeloneuropathy and severe macrocytic anemia and neutropenia. Extensive laboratory testing and histologic evaluation of the liver and bone marrow, were necessary to rule out other disease processes and establish the diagnosis of copper deficiency. The initial presentation consisted of a myelopathy involving the posterior columns. Serum and urine copper were significantly decreased, and serum zinc was elevated. On second presentation (five years later), multiple hematological abnormalities were detected. Serum copper was again decreased, while serum zinc was elevated. Zinc overload is a preventable cause of copper deficiency syndromes. This rare entity presented herein highlights the importance of patient, as well as provider, education. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Zinc deficiency exacerbates while zinc supplement attenuates cardiac hypertrophy in high-fat diet-induced obese mice through modulating p38 MAPK-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Gu, Junlian; Chen, Jing; Payne, Kristen McClung; Tan, Yi; Wang, Yuehui; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Gilbert C; Wintergerst, Kupper; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2016-09-06

    Childhood obesity often leads to cardiovascular diseases, such as obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), in adulthood, due to chronic cardiac inflammation. Zinc is structurally and functionally essential for many transcription factors; however, its role in ORCH and underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear and were explored here in mice with obesity induced with high-fat diet (HFD). Four week old mice were fed on either HFD (60%kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) for 3 or 6 months, respectively. Either diet contained one of three different zinc quantities: deficiency (ZD, 10mg zinc per 4057kcal), normal (ZN, 30mg zinc per 4057kcal) or supplement (ZS, 90mg zinc per 4057kcal). HFD induced a time-dependent obesity and ORCH, which was accompanied by increased cardiac inflammation and p38 MAPK activation. These effects were worsened by ZD in HFD/ZD mice and attenuated by ZS in HFD/ZS group, respectively. Also, administration of a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor in HFD mice for 3 months did not affect HFD-induced obesity, but completely abolished HFD-induced, and zinc deficiency-worsened, ORCH and cardiac inflammation. In vitro exposure of adult cardiomyocytes to palmitate induced cell hypertrophy accompanied by increased p38 MAPK activation, which was heightened by zinc depletion with its chelator TPEN. Inhibition of p38 MAPK with its specific siRNA also prevented the effects of palmitate on cardiomyocytes. These findings demonstrate that ZS alleviates but ZD heightens cardiac hypertrophy in HFD-induced obese mice through suppressing p38 MAPK-dependent cardiac inflammatory and hypertrophic pathways.

  15. Effects of zinc deficiency and supplementation on leptin and leptin receptor expression in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hidenori; Nakai, Taketo; Konishi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Keiichi; Sakazaki, Fumitoshi; Min, Kyong-Son

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-derived hormone that primarily regulates energy balance in response to nutrition. Human placental cells produce leptin, whereas murine placental cells produce soluble leptin receptors (Ob-R). However, the roles of these proteins during pregnancy have not been elucidated completely. As an essential metal, zinc (Zn) is central to insulin biosynthesis and energy metabolism. In the present study, the effects of Zn deficiency and supplementation on maternal plasma leptin and soluble Ob-R regulation in pregnant mice placentas were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Nutritional Zn deficiency significantly reduced plasma insulin concentrations and fetal and placental weights in pregnant mice. Plasma leptin concentrations in pregnant mice also increased 20- to 40-fold compared with those in non-pregnant mice. Although dietary Zn deficiency and supplementation did not affect plasma leptin concentrations in non-pregnant mice, Zn-deficient pregnant mice had significantly reduced plasma leptin concentrations and adipose leptin mRNA expression. In contrast, Zn-supplemented pregnant mice had increased plasma leptin concentrations without increased adipose leptin mRNA expression. Placental soluble Ob-R mRNA expression also decreased in Zn-deficient mice and tended to increase in Zn-supplemented mice. These results indicate that Zn influences plasma leptin concentrations by modulating mRNA expression of soluble Ob-R in the placenta, and leptin in visceral fat during pregnancy. These data suggest that both adipose and placenta-derived leptin system are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism during fetal growth.

  16. Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes showed differential expression in poplar trees under iron or zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2015-08-15

    Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes were cloned from the iron chlorosis resistant (PtG) and susceptible (PtY) Populus tremula 'Erecta' lines. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed no significant difference between PtG and PtY. The predicted proteins contain a conserved ZIP domain with 8 transmembrane (TM) regions. A ZIP signature sequence was found in the fourth TM domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PtIRT1 was clustered with tomato and tobacco IRT genes that are highly responsible to iron deficiency. The PtIRT3 gene was clustered with the AtIRT3 gene that was related to zinc and iron transport in plants. Tissue specific expression indicated that PtIRT1 only expressed in the root, while PtIRT3 constitutively expressed in all tested tissues. Under iron deficiency, the expression of PtIRT1 was dramatically increased and a significantly higher transcript level was detected in PtG than in PtY. Iron deficiency also enhanced the expression of PtIRT3 in PtG. On the other hand, zinc deficiency down-regulated the expression of PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 in both PtG and PtY. Zinc accumulated significantly under iron-deficient conditions, whereas the zinc deficiency showed no significant effect on iron accumulation. A yeast complementation test revealed that the PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 genes could restore the iron uptake ability under the iron uptake-deficiency condition. The results will help understand the mechanisms of iron deficiency response in poplar trees and other woody species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Zinc Deficiency With Dermatitis in a Parenteral Nutrition-Dependent Patient Due to National Shortage of Trace Minerals.

    PubMed

    Sant, Vivek R; Arnell, Tracey D; Seres, David S

    2016-05-01

    The shortages of intravenous drugs remains critical, with sterile injectables accounting for 80% of the approximately 300 shortages. The impact is being felt in patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), and severe deficiencies are becoming more commonplace. We report here a man who developed severe zinc deficiency, manifesting as a painful desquamative rash, due to an inability to obtain multi-trace element additives for his PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Possibility of alveolar bone promoting enhancement by using lipophilic and/or hydrophilic zinc related compounds in zinc-deficient osteoporosis rats.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yoshihiro; Otsuka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is improvement of therapeutic treatment for periodontitis by using lipophilic and/or hydrophilic zinc materials. The sample suspension injections were prepared from zinc octanate (C8Zn), zinc stearate (C18Zn), zinc sulfate hepta-hydrate (ZnSO4) and tricalcium phosphate (ZnTCP) containing 6.17 w/w% zinc. After administrating of all injections to around alveolar bone of zinc-deficient osteoporosis rats, plasma Zn concentration, bone mineral content (BMC) of jawbone, BMC and bone mechanical strength (BMS) of femur and permeability tests for hairless rat stripped skin were measured as therapeutic scores. BMC and BMS were measured by using an X-ray computing tomography and the three-point bending method, respectively. The body weight, plasma Zn concentrations and the area under curve (AUC) for Zn of C8Zn, C18Zn and ZnTCP group rats were higher than those of control group, but those of ZnSO4 group were not changed. BMC of alveolar bone and femur and BMS of femur for C8Zn and C18Zn groups for 12 weeks were significantly higher than those of the control group, but those of ZnSO4 group were not changed. Stripped rat skin permeability treated by the hydrophilic creams containing C8Zn was 5-times higher than that of ZnTCP.

  19. Zinc deficiency in the rat alters the lipid composition of the erythrocyte membrane Triton shell.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, E R; Bettger, W J

    1992-12-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the lipid composition of the erythrocyte membrane Triton shell was determined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing < 1.0 mg Zn/kg diet ad libitum. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg Zn/kg diet. A Zn refed group was fed the -Zn diet until day 18 and then pair-fed the +Zn diet until day 21. Dietary Zn deficiency caused an increased cholesterol/phospholipid ratio in Triton shells compared to those from pair-fed controls. Zn deficiency caused a decreased double bond index of fatty acids in phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylcholine (PC); there was a decreased proportion of 18:2n-6 and 22:4n-6 in PC and 20:4n-6 in PI as compared to that found in pair-fed controls. All glycerophospholipids that were retained in the shell had a lower double bond index and increased content of 16:0 and/or 18:0 relative to the phospholipid in the intact membrane.

  20. Zinc deficiency and metabolism of histones and non-histone proteins in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Czupryn, M.; Falchuk, K.H.; Vallee, B.L.

    1987-12-15

    Histones and most other basic chromosomal proteins are not extracted from zinc-deficient (-Zn) Euglena gracilis chromatin either by 0.25 M HCl or by 0.3-0.6 M NaCl/7 M urea. Instead, a class of 3-5-kilodalton (kDa) polypeptides, which is absent in zinc-sufficient (+Zn) cells, is solubilized. These heterogeneous polypeptides are comprised of Asn, Arg, Cys, and Gln. The partial sequence of one of these, which is composed only of Arg and Asn, is Arg-Asn-Asn-Arg-Arg-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-. This demonstrates they are not proteolytic fragments of the histones, proteins which do not contain contiguous Arg-Asn or Asn-Asn sequences. Once -Zn chromatin is depleted of this 3-5-kDa material, nearly all of the histones and most non-histone proteins are extracted. On the other hand, if chromatin first is depleted of, and subsequently is reconstituted with, the 3-5-kDa material, the chromosomal proteins are not solubilized, as observed with intact chromatin. Histone H4 is an exception. Electrophoretic analysis of the solubilized H4 reveals that the degree to which it is acetylated in -Zn is lower than in +Zn chromatin. Jointly, these data indicate that chromosomal proteins bind much more tightly to DNA of -Zn than +Zn cells. The histone/DNA weight ratio in -Zn chromatin is 0.44 compared to 1.04 in +Zn chromatin. However, the 3-5-kDa polypeptide fraction maintains the amount of total basic proteins per unit mass of DNA at approximately 1. Further, four non-histone proteins extractable with 5% HClO/sub 4/ or 0.35 M NaCl and characterized by high electrophoretic mobility have been purified from +Zn nuclei. Only one of these proteins is found in -Zn chromatin. Thus, zinc deficiency induces changes in the amounts and types of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as in their interaction with DNA. These findings are discussed in relation to recent advances in understanding of the role of zinc in replication and transcription.

  1. Disturbed energy metabolism and muscular dystrophy caused by pure creatine deficiency are reversible by creatine intake

    PubMed Central

    Nabuurs, C I; Choe, C U; Veltien, A; Kan, H E; van Loon, L J C; Rodenburg, R J T; Matschke, J; Wieringa, B; Kemp, G J; Isbrandt, D; Heerschap, A

    2013-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) plays an important role in muscle energy homeostasis by its participation in the ATP–phosphocreatine phosphoryl exchange reaction mediated by creatine kinase. Given that the consequences of Cr depletion are incompletely understood, we assessed the morphological, metabolic and functional consequences of systemic depletion on skeletal muscle in a mouse model with deficiency of l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT−/−), which catalyses the first step of Cr biosynthesis. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a near-complete absence of Cr and phosphocreatine in resting hindlimb muscle of AGAT−/− mice. Compared with wild-type, the inorganic phosphate/β-ATP ratio was increased fourfold, while ATP levels were reduced by nearly half. Activities of proton-pumping respiratory chain enzymes were reduced, whereas F1F0-ATPase activity and overall mitochondrial content were increased. The Cr-deficient AGAT−/− mice had a reduced grip strength and suffered from severe muscle atrophy. Electron microscopy revealed increased amounts of intramyocellular lipid droplets and crystal formation within mitochondria of AGAT−/− muscle fibres. Ischaemia resulted in exacerbation of the decrease of pH and increased glycolytic ATP synthesis. Oral Cr administration led to rapid accumulation in skeletal muscle (faster than in brain) and reversed all the muscle abnormalities, revealing that the condition of the AGAT−/− mice can be switched between Cr deficient and normal simply by dietary manipulation. Systemic creatine depletion results in mitochondrial dysfunction and intracellular energy deficiency, as well as structural and physiological abnormalities. The consequences of AGAT deficiency are more pronounced than those of muscle-specific creatine kinase deficiency, which suggests a multifaceted involvement of creatine in muscle energy homeostasis in addition to its role in the phosphocreatine–creatine kinase system. PMID:23129796

  2. Zinc.

    PubMed

    Barceloux, D G

    1999-01-01

    The use of zinc in metal alloys and medicinal lotions dates back before the time of Christ. Currently, most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. Some studies support the use of zinc gluconate lozenges to treat the common cold, but there are insufficient data at this time to recommend the routine use of these lozenges. Zinc is an essential co-factor in a variety of cellular processes including DNA synthesis, behavioral responses, reproduction, bone formation, growth, and wound healing. Zinc is a relatively common metal with an average concentration of 50 mg/kg soil and a range of 10-300 mg/kg soil. Meat, seafood, dairy products, nuts, legumes, and whole grains contain relatively high concentrations of zinc. The mobility of zinc in anaerobic environments is poor and therefore severe zinc contamination occurs primarily near points sources of zinc release. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc. The ingestion of 1-2 g zinc sulfate produces emesis. Zinc compounds can produce irritation and corrosion of the gastrointestinal tract, along with acute renal tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc chloride from smoke bombs detonated in closed spaces may cause chemical pneumonitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the occupational setting inhalation of fumes from zinc oxide is the most common cause of metal fume fever (fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste, salivation). Zinc compounds are not suspected carcinogens. Treatment of zinc toxicity is supportive. Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (CaNa2EDTA) is the chelator of choice based on case reports that demonstrate normalization of zinc concentrations, but there are few clinical data to confirm the efficacy of this agent.

  3. Zinc-deficient culture medium and protein kinase C inhibitors impair phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of murine splenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.J.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Zinc deficiency inhibits mitogen-induced proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in this process is being evaluated by culturing splenocytes from C57Bl/6 mice in medium containing 5% Chelex-treated fetal bovine serum and the T-cell mitogen, phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA induces proliferation measured by ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal induction at 2.5 {mu}g/ml. The PKC inhibitors staurosporine and H-7 inhibit PHA-stimulated proliferation in concentration-dependent manners with IC{sub 50} values of 2.6 nM and 15 {mu}M, respectively. PHA has little or not effect on proliferation of cells cultured in medium containing 0.8 {mu}M zinc. However, increasing the medium zinc concentration to 16 {mu}M dramatically increases PHA-stimulated proliferation over control cultures. The results suggest that PHA-induced proliferation of murine T-cells is mediated by PKC. It is hypothesized that zinc deficiency inhibits mitogen-stimulated proliferation by preventing PKC coupling to plasma membranes. The results of these studies may provide a mechanism to explain impaired immunocompetence and other clinical problems associated with zinc deficiency.

  4. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age. PMID:27626474

  5. Effect of experimental zinc deficiency and repletion on some immunological variables in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Verma, P C; Gupta, R P; Sadana, J R; Gupta, R K

    1988-01-01

    1. Cellular and humoral immune responses were studied in guinea-pigs fed on zinc-deficient (ZnD), Zn-adequate (control) and Zn-replete diets containing 1.25, 50 and 100 mg Zn/kg diet respectively. 2. It was found that the ZnD guinea-pigs had significantly decreased ability to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against sheep erythrocytes as compared with controls on the 9th day of immunization. This was further substantiated by histological examination of DTH-positive skin sections. 3. A significant reduction in direct splenic plaque-forming-cell response and haemagglutinating-antibody titre was also observed in ZnD guinea-pigs. 4. Serum electrophoretic studies revealed a highly disordered protein profile with a significantly depressed value for gamma-globulin. 5. Zn repletion of the previously ZnD group resulted in marked, though incomplete, restoration of immunological responses.

  6. Zinc deficiency in chronic kidney disease: is there a relationship with adipose tissue and atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Lobo, Julie Calixto; Torres, João Paulo Machado; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular complications caused by an accelerated atherosclerotic disease consist the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). These patients present multiple atherosclerotic risk factors, considered traditional, as well as nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation and oxidative stress. These complications are also seen in obesity, in which endothelial dysfunction is one of the early stages of atherosclerosis. The impact of trace metal deficiencies on this process is not well studied in patients with CKD and in obese people, although the influence of trace elements depletion, particularly zinc (Zn), may have significant clinical implications. This brief review describes the functions of Zn as well as the respective role of this trace element in atherosclerosis processes, with a particular emphasis on obese patients with chronic kidney disease.

  7. Growth of zinc-deficient rats during intra-gastric tube feeding.

    PubMed

    Norii, Takafumi

    2008-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the reasons for the lack of growth in rats fed a zinc-deficient (ZnD) diet via gastric tube. Four days after rats were given free access to the ZnD diet (0.3 mg/kg Zn), their food intake had decreased, and their growth had stopped. Rats were then fed via gastric tube; growth was restored in rats fed a control diet (25 mg/kg Zn; restored group) but not in those fed the ZnD diet (ZnD group). In the ZnD group, there was no reduction in the apparent absorption of dry matter, protein, or ash during 3 days of tube feeding. Dry matter in urine was markedly higher on day 3 and mainly consisted of glucose. Urinary nitrogen was also elevated in the ZnD group, but nitrogen balance remained positive; i.e., bodily protein continued to increase during the 3 days of tube feeding. Drinking water consumption in the ZnD group was markedly reduced from the second day of tube feeding. On the other hand, urine volume in the ZnD group was comparable to that in the restored group. Water content in the bodies of the ZnD group was reduced. These observations demonstrate that the ZnD group was dehydrated. In conclusion, rats fed a ZnD diet via gastric tube did not grow because their drinking water consumption decreased with progression of zinc deficiency, thereby, decreasing bodily water content. Administration of water led to growth in the ZnD group.

  8. Effect of experimental zinc deficiency on immunological responses in Salmonella-infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Garg, S R

    2000-07-01

    Cellular and humoral immune responses to Salmonella dublin infection were studied in guinea-pigs given zinc-deficient (ZnD) or zinc-adequate (ZnA) diet, containing 1.03 or 52.4 mg Zn/kg, respectively. On day 30, each animal of each dietary group was inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(6)viable cells of S. dublin strain 493. On the 15th day after infection, the immune responses were assessed by skin hypersensitivity (SH) tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum antibody with Salmonella -extract antigen. ZnD animals had significantly decreased ability to produce Salmonella -specific immediate and delayed type SH responses. These results were further substantiated by histological examination of skin sections. The ELISA indicated significantly lower Salmonella -specific serum antibody titres in ZnD animals than in ZnA animals. Mean viable counts of S. dublin in the liver and spleen of ZnD animals were significantly higher than those in ZnA animals. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  9. Impaired thyroid hormone status and thermoregulation during cold exposure of zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Hall, C B; Marchello, M J

    1992-08-01

    Forty-five male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were matched by weight into three groups (n = 15). One group was fed ad libitum a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm of zinc (control). A second group was fed ad libitum a similar diet but with a deficient zinc intake of less than 1 ppm (ZnD). A third group was pair-fed (PF) the control diet in amounts equal to that consumed by the matched ZnD animals. After 42 days, the animals were fasted for 12 hr then five animals from each group were sacrificed and the remainder was exposed to 3 degrees C for 6 hr. Rectal temperatures were lower (p less than 0.05) in ZnD at 23 degrees C and during cold exposure. Plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were reduced (p less than 0.05) at room temperature in ZnD rats. During cold exposure, the ZnD animals had depressed (p less than 0.05) plasma thyrotropin, T4 and T3 concentrations. Thus, ZnD adversely affects thermoregulatory performance of rats acutely exposed to cold by influencing thyroid hormone metabolism.

  10. Deficiency of the zinc finger protein ZFP106 causes motor and sensory neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Peter I.; Fratta, Pietro; Landman, Allison S.; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Wackerhage, Henning; Groves, Michael; Busam, Bharani Shiva; Galino, Jorge; Corrochano, Silvia; Beskina, Olga A.; Esapa, Christopher; Ryder, Edward; Carter, Sarah; Stewart, Michelle; Codner, Gemma; Hilton, Helen; Teboul, Lydia; Tucker, Jennifer; Lionikas, Arimantas; Estabel, Jeanne; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Brandner, Sebastian; Plagnol, Vincent; Bennet, David L. H.; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger motifs are distributed amongst many eukaryotic protein families, directing nucleic acid–protein and protein–protein interactions. Zinc finger protein 106 (ZFP106) has previously been associated with roles in immune response, muscle differentiation, testes development and DNA damage, although little is known about its specific function. To further investigate the function of ZFP106, we performed an in-depth characterization of Zfp106 deficient mice (Zfp106−/−), and we report a novel role for ZFP106 in motor and sensory neuronal maintenance and survival. Zfp106−/− mice develop severe motor abnormalities, major deficits in muscle strength and histopathological changes in muscle. Intriguingly, despite being highly expressed throughout the central nervous system, Zfp106−/− mice undergo selective motor and sensory neuronal and axonal degeneration specific to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Neurodegeneration does not occur during development of Zfp106−/− mice, suggesting that ZFP106 is likely required for the maintenance of mature peripheral motor and sensory neurons. Analysis of embryonic Zfp106−/− motor neurons revealed deficits in mitochondrial function, with an inhibition of Complex I within the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our results highlight a vital role for ZFP106 in sensory and motor neuron maintenance and reveal a novel player in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration. PMID:26604141

  11. Deficiency of the zinc finger protein ZFP106 causes motor and sensory neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Peter I; Fratta, Pietro; Landman, Allison S; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Wackerhage, Henning; Groves, Michael; Busam, Bharani Shiva; Galino, Jorge; Corrochano, Silvia; Beskina, Olga A; Esapa, Christopher; Ryder, Edward; Carter, Sarah; Stewart, Michelle; Codner, Gemma; Hilton, Helen; Teboul, Lydia; Tucker, Jennifer; Lionikas, Arimantas; Estabel, Jeanne; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K; Brandner, Sebastian; Plagnol, Vincent; Bennet, David L H; Abramov, Andrey Y; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2016-01-15

    Zinc finger motifs are distributed amongst many eukaryotic protein families, directing nucleic acid-protein and protein-protein interactions. Zinc finger protein 106 (ZFP106) has previously been associated with roles in immune response, muscle differentiation, testes development and DNA damage, although little is known about its specific function. To further investigate the function of ZFP106, we performed an in-depth characterization of Zfp106 deficient mice (Zfp106(-/-)), and we report a novel role for ZFP106 in motor and sensory neuronal maintenance and survival. Zfp106(-/-) mice develop severe motor abnormalities, major deficits in muscle strength and histopathological changes in muscle. Intriguingly, despite being highly expressed throughout the central nervous system, Zfp106(-/-) mice undergo selective motor and sensory neuronal and axonal degeneration specific to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Neurodegeneration does not occur during development of Zfp106(-/-) mice, suggesting that ZFP106 is likely required for the maintenance of mature peripheral motor and sensory neurons. Analysis of embryonic Zfp106(-/-) motor neurons revealed deficits in mitochondrial function, with an inhibition of Complex I within the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our results highlight a vital role for ZFP106 in sensory and motor neuron maintenance and reveal a novel player in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

  12. Effect of controlled zinc release on bone mineral density from injectable Zn-containing beta-tricalcium phosphate suspension in zinc-deficient diseased rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Ohshita, Yuko; Marunaka, Sunao; Matsuda, Yoshihia; Ito, Atsuo; Ichinose, Noboru; Otsuka, Kuniko; Higuchi, William I

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of zinc (Zn)-containing beta-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP) in correcting the bone mineral deficiency noted in osteoporosis using ovariectomized rat model. Four rats were used for each of the four experimental groups: D0, D10, D20, and N10. The rats in D0, D10, and D20 groups were ovariectomized, and fed a vitamin D-, Ca-, and Zn-deficient diet, and induced Zn-deficient osteoporoses for 9 weeks. In contrast, the N10 group was the normal rats fed normal healthy diet for 9 weeks. D0 group was injected with pure beta-TCP suspension, D10 and D20 groups were injected with suspensions containing 10 mg of 10 mol % (6.17 wt % Zn) and 20 mol % (12.05 wt % Zn) Zn-TCP, respectively, and the healthy group, N10 were injected with 10 mol %. Zn-TCP suspensions. Injections were administered intramuscularly in the left thigh once a week in all rats, and fed a vitamin D- and Zn-deficient diet for 9 weeks. The plasma calcium (Ca) and Zn levels, plasma alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebra and femora were measured. The plasma Zn levels in all the rats were between 1.1 and 2.8 microg/mL. The areas under the curves for the Ca, Zn, and ALP (Ca-AUC, Zn-AUC, and ALP-AUC) levels between 0 and 63 days were calculated. Results for the AUCs were as follows: (1) the Zn-AUCs were in the order of N10 = D20 > D10 > D0; (2) the Ca-AUCs for D0, D10 groups were significantly lower than that for the N10 group; (3) the ALP-AUCs for the D10 and D20 groups were significantly higher than that for the N10 group, and that of the D0 group was in between those. The body weight of D10 and D20 groups significantly increased with time, that of the D0 group increased slightly, and that of the N10 group remained unchanged for the entire experimental period. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae of the D10 and D20 groups (about 100 mg/cm(2)) was significantly higher than that of the D0 group but lower than that of

  13. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-02-02

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  14. Zinc in denture adhesive: a rare cause of copper deficiency in a patient on home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rakesh; Hawthorne, Barney; Durai, Dharmaraj; McDowell, Ian

    2015-10-09

    A 65-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, who had been on home parenteral nutrition for many years, presented with perioral paraesthesia and a burning sensation in the mouth. Initial blood tests including serum ferritin, vitamin B12 and folate, were normal apart from mild pancytopaenia. Serum copper was low, in spite of receiving regular copper in her parenteral feeds. The copper in her parenteral feeds was increased initially, but when it did not improve, she was started on weekly intravenous copper infusions. She was using dental adhesive, which had zinc in it, and a possibility that this was causing her copper deficiency was raised. Serum zinc levels were normal, but urinary zinc was very high. The patient was advised to use zinc-free dental adhesive and her copper level returned to normal within a few months with normalisation of her pancytopaenia, and partial resolution of her oral paraesthesia. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Repression of Sulfate Assimilation Is an Adaptive Response of Yeast to the Oxidative Stress of Zinc Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Yi; Roje, Sanja; Sandoval, Francisco J.; Bird, Amanda J.; Winge, Dennis R.; Eide, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The Zap1 transcription factor is a central player in the response of yeast to changes in zinc status. Previous studies identified over 80 genes activated by Zap1 in zinc-limited cells. In this report, we identified 36 genes repressed in a zinc- and Zap1-responsive manner. As a result, we have identified a new mechanism of Zap1-mediated gene repression whereby transcription of the MET3, MET14, and MET16 genes is repressed in zinc-limited cells. These genes encode the first three enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. We found that MET30, encoding a component of the SCFMet30 ubiquitin ligase, is a direct Zap1 target gene. MET30 expression is increased in zinc-limited cells, and this leads to degradation of Met4, a transcription factor responsible for MET3, MET14, and MET16 expression. Thus, Zap1 is responsible for a decrease in sulfate assimilation in zinc-limited cells. We further show that cells that are unable to down-regulate sulfate assimilation under zinc deficiency experience increased oxidative stress. This increased oxidative stress is associated with an increase in the NADP+/NADPH ratio and may result from a decrease in NADPH-dependent antioxidant activities. These studies have led to new insights into how cells adapt to nutrient-limiting growth conditions. PMID:19656949

  16. Repression of sulfate assimilation is an adaptive response of yeast to the oxidative stress of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Yi; Roje, Sanja; Sandoval, Francisco J; Bird, Amanda J; Winge, Dennis R; Eide, David J

    2009-10-02

    The Zap1 transcription factor is a central player in the response of yeast to changes in zinc status. Previous studies identified over 80 genes activated by Zap1 in zinc-limited cells. In this report, we identified 36 genes repressed in a zinc- and Zap1-responsive manner. As a result, we have identified a new mechanism of Zap1-mediated gene repression whereby transcription of the MET3, MET14, and MET16 genes is repressed in zinc-limited cells. These genes encode the first three enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. We found that MET30, encoding a component of the SCF(Met30) ubiquitin ligase, is a direct Zap1 target gene. MET30 expression is increased in zinc-limited cells, and this leads to degradation of Met4, a transcription factor responsible for MET3, MET14, and MET16 expression. Thus, Zap1 is responsible for a decrease in sulfate assimilation in zinc-limited cells. We further show that cells that are unable to down-regulate sulfate assimilation under zinc deficiency experience increased oxidative stress. This increased oxidative stress is associated with an increase in the NADP(+)/NADPH ratio and may result from a decrease in NADPH-dependent antioxidant activities. These studies have led to new insights into how cells adapt to nutrient-limiting growth conditions.

  17. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β.

  18. Experimental zinc deficiency in guinea-pigs: clinical signs and some haematological studies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Gupta, R K

    1985-09-01

    Thirty-three male, weanling guinea-pigs were divided into two groups. One group was fed on a zinc-deficient (ZnD) diet (1.25 mg Zn/kg diet) for 45 d and then divided into two subgroups: subgroup 1 continued on diet ZnD while subgroup 2 was fed on a Zn-repleted diet (100 mg Zn/kg diet) for 15 d. The second group was fed on a Zn-adequate diet (50 mg Zn/kg diet) for 60 d. Zn deficiency could be produced within 21 d as evidenced by clinical signs and reduction in serum Zn concentration. Clinical signs exhibited were listlessness, scabby lesions on skin near the foot pads, mild alopecia and a reduction in body-weight gain. No effect was observed on food intake. Significant decreases in packed cell volume and total leucocyte count from 48 d onwards accompanied by absolute lymphocytopenia and relative neutrophilia were observed. Supplementation of Zn in the Zn-repleted group resulted in marked, through incomplete, improvement with regard to serum Zn concentration, clinical signs and haematological changes.

  19. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  20. c-Fos expression in the parabrachial nucleus following intraoral bitter stimulation in the rat with dietary-induced zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Akiyo; Honma, Shiho; Inui-Yamamoto, Chizuko; Ito, Akira; Niwa, Hitoshi; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2017-03-15

    Zinc deficiency causes various symptoms including taste disorders. In the present study, changes in expression of c-Fos immunoreactivity in neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), one of the relay nuclei for transmission of gustatory information, after bitter stimulation to the dorsal surface of the tongue were examined in zinc-deficient rats. Experimental zinc-deficient animals were created by feeding a low-zinc diet for 4weeks, and showed the following symptoms of zinc deficiency: low body weight, low serum zinc content and behavioral changes to avoid bitter stimulation. In normal control animals, intraoral application of 1mM quinine caused increased numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the external lateral subnucleus and external medial subnucleus of the PBN (elPBN and emPBN, respectively) compared with application of distilled water. However, in the zinc-deficient animals, the numbers of c-Fos-IR neurons in the elPBN and emPBN did not differ significantly between application of quinine and distilled water. After feeding the zinc-deficient animals a normal diet for 4weeks, the symptoms of zinc deficiency recovered, and the expression of c-Fos-IR neurons following intraoral bitter stimulation became identical to that in the normal control animals. The present results indicate that dietary zinc deficiency causes alterations to neuronal activities in the gustatory neural circuit, and that these neuronal alterations can be reversed by changing to a normal diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Iron, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Zinc Deficiencies in Children Presenting with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Villagomez, Amelia; Ramtekkar, Ujjwal

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder increasing in prevalence. Although there is limited evidence to support treating ADHD with mineral/vitamin supplements, research does exist showing that patients with ADHD may have reduced levels of vitamin D, zinc, ferritin, and magnesium. These nutrients have important roles in neurologic function, including involvement in neurotransmitter synthesis. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of each of these nutrients in the brain, the possible altered levels of these nutrients in patients with ADHD, possible reasons for a differential level in children with ADHD, and safety and effect of supplementation. With this knowledge, clinicians may choose in certain patients at high risk of deficiency, to screen for possible deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron by checking RBC-magnesium, 25-OH vitamin D, serum/plasma zinc, and ferritin. Although children with ADHD may be more likely to have lower levels of vitamin D, zinc, magnesium, and iron, it cannot be stated that these lower levels caused ADHD. However, supplementing areas of deficiency may be a safe and justified intervention. PMID:27417479

  2. Effects of cooking methods on the iron and zinc contents in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) to combat nutritional deficiencies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elenilda J.; Carvalho, Lucia M. J.; Dellamora-Ortiz, Gisela M.; Cardoso, Flávio S. N.; Carvalho, José L. V.; Viana, Daniela S.; Freitas, Sidinea C.; Rocha, Maurisrael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Because iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in developing countries, determining the levels of iron and zinc in beans, the second most consumed staple food in Brazil, is essential, especially for the low-income people who experience a deficiency of these minerals in their diet. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cooking methods by measuring the iron and zinc contents in cowpea cultivars before and after soaking to determine the retention of these minerals. Methods The samples were cooked in both regular pans and pressure cookers with and without previous soaking. Mineral analyses were carried out by Spectrometry of Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Results The results showed high contents of iron and zinc in raw samples as well as in cooked ones, with the use of regular pan resulting in greater percentage of iron retention and the use of pressure cooker ensuring higher retention of zinc. Conclusions The best retention of iron was found in the BRS Aracê cultivar prepared in a regular pan with previous soaking. This cultivar may be indicated for cultivation and human consumption. The best retention of zinc was found for the BRS Tumucumaque cultivar prepared in a pressure cooker without previous soaking. PMID:24624050

  3. Effects of cooking methods on the iron and zinc contents in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) to combat nutritional deficiencies in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elenilda J; Carvalho, Lucia M J; Dellamora-Ortiz, Gisela M; Cardoso, Flávio S N; Carvalho, José L V; Viana, Daniela S; Freitas, Sidinea C; Rocha, Maurisrael M

    2014-01-01

    Because iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in developing countries, determining the levels of iron and zinc in beans, the second most consumed staple food in Brazil, is essential, especially for the low-income people who experience a deficiency of these minerals in their diet. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cooking methods by measuring the iron and zinc contents in cowpea cultivars before and after soaking to determine the retention of these minerals. The samples were cooked in both regular pans and pressure cookers with and without previous soaking. Mineral analyses were carried out by Spectrometry of Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). The results showed high contents of iron and zinc in raw samples as well as in cooked ones, with the use of regular pan resulting in greater percentage of iron retention and the use of pressure cooker ensuring higher retention of zinc. The best retention of iron was found in the BRS Aracê cultivar prepared in a regular pan with previous soaking. This cultivar may be indicated for cultivation and human consumption. The best retention of zinc was found for the BRS Tumucumaque cultivar prepared in a pressure cooker without previous soaking.

  4. MicroRNA dysregulation and esophageal cancer development depend on the extent of zinc dietary deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fong, Louise Y; Taccioli, Cristian; Jing, Ruiyan; Smalley, Karl J; Alder, Hansjuerg; Jiang, Yubao; Fadda, Paolo; Farber, John L; Croce, Carlo M

    2016-03-08

    Zinc deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and marginal ZD is prevalent in humans. In rats, marked-ZD (3 mg Zn/kg diet) induces a proliferative esophagus with a 5-microRNA signature (miR-31, -223, -21, -146b, -146a) and promotes ESCC. Here we report that moderate and mild-ZD (6 and 12 mg Zn/kg diet) also induced esophageal hyperplasia, albeit less pronounced than induced by marked-ZD, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, -146a). On exposure to an environmental carcinogen, ~16% of moderate/mild-ZD rats developed ESCC, a cancer incidence significantly greater than for Zn-sufficient rats (0%) (P ≤ 0.05), but lower than marked-ZD rats (68%) (P < 0.001). Importantly, the high ESCC, marked-ZD esophagus had a 15-microRNA signature, resembling the human ESCC miRNAome, with miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 as the top-up-regulated species. This signature discriminated it from the low ESCC, moderate/mild-ZD esophagus, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, miR-223). Additionally, Fbxw7, Pdcd4, and Stk40 (tumor-suppressor targets of miR-223, -21, and -31) were downregulated in marked-ZD cohort. Bioinformatics analysis predicted functional relationships of the 3 tumor-suppressors with other cancer-related genes. Thus, microRNA dysregulation and ESCC progression depend on the extent of dietary Zn deficiency. Our findings suggest that even moderate ZD may promote esophageal cancer and dietary Zn has preventive properties against ESCC. Additionally, the deficiency-associated miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 may be useful therapeutic targets in ESCC.

  5. Comparison of serum copper, magnesium, zinc and calcium levels between G6PD deficient and normal Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, B H; Tsai, J L; Tsai, L Y; Chao, M C

    1999-11-01

    Minerals are important for normal hematopoiesis and may play a role in acute hemolytic anemia induced by G6PD deficiency. To compare serum magnesium, copper, zinc and calcium levels between G6PD deficiency and normal control adults, we investigated 69 G6PD deficient (28 male, 41 female) and 61 age- matched G6PD normal adults (26 male, 35 female). Serum magnesium, copper, zinc and calcium levels were determined by atomic absorbance spectrometry. Our results revealed that male adults with G6PD deficiency had significantly higher serum copper and magnesium levels than those of the control group (P < 0.01, < 0.05, respectively). In G6PD normal adults, serum copper levels were significantly lower in males than in females (P < 0.01). In the group of G6PD deficiency adults, serum copper levels in males (103.0 +/- 10.4 ug/dL) were significantly lower than those in females (139.0 +/- 34.3 ug/dL) (P < 0.01). Serum magnesium values and zinc values in males (2.42 +/- 0.38 mEq/L and 102.2 +/- 26.5 ug/dL) were significantly higher than those in females (2.07 +/- 0.20 mEq/L and 87.0 +/- 14.9 ug/dL) (P all < 0.01). Female adults with G6PD deficiency had significantly higher serum calcium levels and lower magnesium levels than those of the control group (P all < 0.01). The significantly higher levels of serum copper and magnesium in G6PD deficient male adults may play some role concerning red blood cells in resistance to plasmodium falciparum.

  6. Cell apoptosis induced by zinc deficiency in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells via a mitochondrial-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baolei; Yang, Maowei; Liang, Dan; Yang, Lei; Cao, Junjun; Zhang, Le

    2012-02-01

    Deficiency of zinc plays an important role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Apoptosis of osteoblast causing the loss of bone mass is an important event in the osteoporosis. In this article, we investigated whether zinc deficiency would induce cell apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells and ask if it is involved in mitochondrial-mediated pathway. Significant increased apoptosis were observed in zinc deficiency group (ZnD: 5 μM TPEN and 1 μM zinc) compared with untreated control or zinc adequacy group (ZnA: 5 μM TPEN and 15 μM zinc). The mitochondrial membrane potential was strikingly reduced in ZnD group. Furthermore, we observed that the levels of Bax in mitochondria fraction and cyto c, AIF, and cleaved caspase-3/-9 in cytosol fraction were increased in ZnD group. We proposed that zinc deficiency would induce the translocation of Bax into mitochondria, which could lead to the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential as well as the increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability. In addition, cyto c and AIF were released from mitochondria into the cytosol, which finally activated caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis processes in MC3T3-E1 cells. Our findings suggested that zinc deficiency is capable of inducing apoptosis through a mitochondria-mediated pathway in osteoblastic cells.

  7. Zinc

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc was recognized as an essential trace metal for humans during the studies of Iranian adolescent dwarfs in the early 1960s. Zinc metal existing as Zn2+ is a strong electron acceptor in biological systems without risks of oxidant damage to cells. Zn2+ functions in the structure of proteins and is ...

  8. Limbic system pathologies associated with deficiencies and excesses of the trace elements iron, zinc, copper, and selenium.

    PubMed

    Torres-Vega, Adriana; Pliego-Rivero, Bernardo F; Otero-Ojeda, Gloria A; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M; Vieyra-Reyes, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    Deficiencies of nutrients such as amino acids, vitamins, lipids, and trace elements during gestation and early infanthood have strong deleterious effects on the development of the limbic system; these effects may be irreversible, even when adequate supplementation is provided at later developmental stages. Recent advances in the neurochemistry of biometals are increasingly establishing the roles of the trace elements iron, copper, zinc, and selenium in a variety of cell functions and are providing insight into the repercussions of deficiencies and excesses of these elements on the development of the central nervous system, especially the limbic system. The limbic system comprises diverse areas with high metabolic demands and differential storage of iron, copper, zinc, and selenium. This review summarizes available evidence suggesting the involvement of these trace elements in pathological disorders of the limbic system. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  9. Moderate zinc deficiency reduces testicular Zip6 and Zip10 abundance and impairs spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Croxford, Thomas P; McCormick, Nicholas H; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2011-03-01

    Male infertility accounts for ~40% of cases of failure to conceive. Testes have a strict zinc (Zn) requirement and severe Zn deficiency compromises spermatogenesis, sperm viability, and motility, compromising fertility in men. Despite the high prevalence of marginal Zn deficiency in humans, less emphasis has been placed on understanding the consequences on male reproduction. Swiss Webster mice were used to visualize Zip protein expression during spermatogenesis using immunohistochemistry. Data suggest Zip5 imports Zn into Sertoli cells and spermatocytes, augmented by Zip10 (primary spermatocytes) and Zip8 (secondary spermatocytes). Zip6, 8, and 10 expression was retained in round spermatids, although Zip8 and Zip10 expression disappears during spermatid maturation. Zip1 and Zip6 expression was detected in mature, elongated spermatids. Zip14 was detected in undifferentiated spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Mice fed diets (n = 10/group) reduced in Zn concentration [marginal-Zn diet (MZD), 10 mg Zn/kg; low-Zn diet (ZD), 7 mg Zn/kg] for 30 d had >35% lower liver Zn concentrations than mice fed the control diet (C; 30 mg Zn/kg) (P < 0.05). Plasma Zn and testosterone concentrations and the testes Zn concentration and weight were not significantly lower than in controls. Plasma Zn was greater in the ZD group than in the C and MZD groups. Mice fed ZD had a reduced number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells (~50%; P < 0.05), compromised seminiferous tubule structure, and reduced Zip10 and Zip6 abundance (>50%; P < 0.5) compared with mice fed C. Our data provide compelling evidence that reduced Zn intake may be associated with infertility in men, perhaps independent of decreased levels of circulating Zn or testosterone, which warrants further investigation in human populations.

  10. Non-invasive detection of iron deficiency by fluorescence measurement of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin in the lip

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Georg; Homann, Christian; Teksan, Ilknur; Hasbargen, Uwe; Hasmüller, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca M.; Khaled, Nadia; Sroka, Ronald; Stauch, Thomas; Stepp, Herbert; Vogeser, Michael; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, more individuals have iron deficiency than any other health problem. Most of those affected are unaware of their lack of iron, in part because detection of iron deficiency has required a blood sample. Here we report a non-invasive method to optically measure an established indicator of iron status, red blood cell zinc protoporphyrin, in the microcirculation of the lower lip. An optical fibre probe is used to illuminate the lip and acquire fluorescence emission spectra in ∼1 min. Dual-wavelength excitation with spectral fitting is used to distinguish the faint zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence from the much greater tissue background fluorescence, providing immediate results. In 56 women, 35 of whom were iron-deficient, the sensitivity and specificity of optical non-invasive detection of iron deficiency were 97% and 90%, respectively. This fluorescence method potentially provides a rapid, easy to use means for point-of-care screening for iron deficiency in resource-limited settings lacking laboratory infrastructure. PMID:26883939

  11. Activation of the Yeast UBI4 Polyubiquitin Gene by Zap1 Transcription Factor via an Intragenic Promoter Is Critical for Zinc-deficient Growth*

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Colin W.; Taggart, Janet; Jeong, Jeeyon; Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Eide, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Stability of many proteins requires zinc. Zinc deficiency disrupts their folding, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system may help manage this stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UBI4 encodes five tandem ubiquitin monomers and is essential for growth in zinc-deficient conditions. Although UBI4 is only one of four ubiquitin-encoding genes in the genome, a dramatic decrease in ubiquitin was observed in zinc-deficient ubi4Δ cells. The three other ubiquitin genes were strongly repressed under these conditions, contributing to the decline in ubiquitin. In a screen for ubi4Δ suppressors, a hypomorphic allele of the RPT2 proteasome regulatory subunit gene (rpt2E301K) suppressed the ubi4Δ growth defect. The rpt2E301K mutation also increased ubiquitin accumulation in zinc-deficient cells, and by using a ubiquitin-independent proteasome substrate we found that proteasome activity was reduced. These results suggested that increased ubiquitin supply in suppressed ubi4Δ cells was a consequence of more efficient ubiquitin release and recycling during proteasome degradation. Degradation of a ubiquitin-dependent substrate was restored by the rpt2E301K mutation, indicating that ubiquitination is rate-limiting in this process. The UBI4 gene was induced ∼5-fold in low zinc and is regulated by the zinc-responsive Zap1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, Zap1 controls UBI4 by inducing transcription from an intragenic promoter, and the resulting truncated mRNA encodes only two of the five ubiquitin repeats. Expression of a short transcript alone complemented the ubi4Δ mutation, indicating that it is efficiently translated. Loss of Zap1-dependent UBI4 expression caused a growth defect in zinc-deficient conditions. Thus, the intragenic UBI4 promoter is critical to preventing ubiquitin deficiency in zinc-deficient cells. PMID:27432887

  12. Trace Element Status (Iron, Zinc, Copper, Chromium, Cobalt, and Nickel) in Iron-Deficiency Anaemia of Children under 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Maria Georgieva; Petkova-Marinova, Tsvetelina Valentinova; Pogorielov, Maksym Vladimirovich; Loboda, Andrii Nikolaevich; Nedkova-Kolarova, Vania Nedkova; Bozhinova, Atanaska Naumova

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine trace element status and aetiologic factors for development of trace elements deficiencies in children with iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) aged 0 to 3 years. Contingent and Methods. 30 patients of the University Hospital, Pleven, Bulgaria—I group; 48 patients of the Sumy Regional Child's Clinical Hospital, Sumy, Ukraine—II group; 25 healthy controls were investigated. Serum concentrations of iron, zinc, copper, chromium, cobalt, and nickel were determined spectrophotometrically and by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results. Because the obtained serum levels of zinc, copper, and chromium were near the lower reference limits, I group was divided into IA and IB. In IA group, serum concentrations were lower than the reference values for 47%, 57%, and 73% of patients, respectively. In IB group, these were within the reference values. In II group, results for zinc, cobalt, and nickel were significantly lower (P < 0.05), and results for copper were significantly higher in comparison to controls. Conclusion. Low serum concentrations of zinc, copper, cobalt, and nickel were mainly due to inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and micronutrient interactions in both studied groups. Increased serum copper in II group was probably due to metabolic changes resulting from adaptations in IDA. Data can be used for developing a diagnostic algorithm for IDA. PMID:24839556

  13. The efficacy of micronutrient supplementation in reducing the prevalence of anaemia and deficiencies of zinc and iron among adolescents in Sri Lanka

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of combined iron and zinc over the iron- or zinc-only supplementation in correcting deficiency and possible interactive effects in a group of adolescent school children. Subjects and methods: Schoolchildren (n=821) of 12–16 years of age were randomized into ...

  14. Detection of iron-deficiency anemia in hospitalized patients by zinc protoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Wong, S S; Qutishat, A S; Lange, J; Gornet, T G; Buja, L M

    1996-01-15

    The diagnostic value of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) as an indicator of iron-deficient anemia (IDA) in hospitalized patients is assessed in this study. ZPP was measured using an AVIV hematofluorometer with a coefficient of variation (CV) less than 5% and a recovery of greater than 97%. A reference range of 53-70 mu mol/mol heme was determined for ZPP in non-anemic patients in a hospital population. Hospitalized patients (221) with low hemoglobin (< 120 g/l) were evaluated for their iron status. ZPP and other anemia tests were performed. Macrocytic patients with mean corpuscular volume (MCV) greater than 98 fl) were excluded from the study. Seventy-four microcytic patients (MCV < 80 fl) were determined as having IDA according to a diagnostic algorithm. A distribution study of these microcytic patients showed that there was a significant overlap of values between the IDA and non-IDA patients for all serum anemia tests. A receiver-operator curve analysis revealed that ZPP has a relatively high degree of diagnostic efficiency better than iron and ferritin for this patient population. At a cutoff value > 170 mu mol/mol heme, ZPP has a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. In addition, ZPP is also elevated in normocytic patients (MCV = 80-98 fl) with low ferritin values, who may have iron depletion. From these data, it is proposed that ZPP may be used as a screening tool for IDA in hospitalized patients.

  15. Enhanced oxidative stress resistance through activation of a zinc deficiency transcription factor in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E; Martin, Ruth C

    2014-11-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems.

  16. Hepatic cells' mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities during Trypanosoma musculi infection in zinc-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Ashraf, M.; Lee, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of zinc deficiency on hepatic cell mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities were examined in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasitic products. On a full-complement or pair-fed diet, infected and homogenate-inoculated mice showed mitotic activity gains of 7.9% to 80.3% and 6.5% to 99.0%, respectively. Infected and homogenate-inoculated mice on a zinc-deficient diet showed 21.8% to 95.7% and 17.2% to 65.2%, respectively, more dividing liver cells compared with controls. In comparison to controls, macrophages isolated from infected and homogenate-immunized mice on full-complement or pair-fed diets had phagocytized 13.4% to 31.4% more latex particles from day 50 to 80. In the zinc-deficient group, macrophages isolated from infected mice had significant numbers of phagocytized latex particles (1.8% to 38.5%) from day 20 to day 80 compared with controls. The homogenate-immunized mice also had increased numbers (18.6 to 30.8%) of phagocytized latex particles. PMID:9145631

  17. Moderate zinc deficiency negatively affects biomechanical properties of rat tibiae independently of body composition.

    PubMed

    Scrimgeour, Angus G; Stahl, Chad H; McClung, James P; Marchitelli, Louis J; Young, Andrew J

    2007-12-01

    To guide development of novel nutritional strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of stress fractures, we observed the effects of manipulating dietary zinc (Zn) content on bone integrity in Sprague-Dawley rats fed either a severely Zn-deficient (ZnD; 1 ppm), a moderately Zn-deficient (MZnD; 5 ppm) or a Zn-adequate (ZnAD; 30 ppm) diet for 6 weeks. At the completion of the diet period, body composition, bone mineral content (BMC), bone area (BA) and bone mineral density (BMD) were determined in vivo by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Following euthanasia, long bones were collected for determination of Zn content and biomechanical strength testing. Despite significant positive correlations between dietary Zn and both body weight (BW) and bone Zn content for the entire cohort (r = .77 and r = .83, respectively), rats fed MZnD or ZnAD diets did not differ in feed intakes, body composition, BMC, BA, BMD or BW. Tibial bones, but not femur bones, appear to be more responsive to dietary Zn manipulation, as all bone biomechanical strength indices in the ZnAD-fed rats were significantly greater than in rats fed the ZnD diets. Rats fed either MZnD or ZnAD diets had stronger tibiae (129% increase in maximum load and stress at maximum load, P<.01) compared with those fed ZnD diets. The load at breakage for the tibial bones of rats fed MZnD diets was not different from the ZnD rats, but lower (P<.05) than that of the ZnAD rats. These results suggest that since feed intakes, body composition, BMC, BA, BMD and BW were not significantly different between the MZnD- and ZnAD-fed animals, the reduced bone integrity observed in the MZnD-fed rats resulted from dietary Zn inadequacy, and not as a result of the reduced growth that is typically associated with Zn deficiency.

  18. Zinc-dependent lysosomal enlargement in TRPML1-deficient cells involves MTF-1 transcription factor and ZnT4 (Slc30a4) transporter.

    PubMed

    Kukic, Ira; Lee, Jeffrey K; Coblentz, Jessica; Kelleher, Shannon L; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2013-04-15

    Zinc is critical for a multitude of cellular processes, including gene expression, secretion and enzymatic activities. Cellular zinc is controlled by zinc-chelating proteins and by zinc transporters. The recent identification of zinc permeability of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 (transient receptor potential mucolipin 1), and the evidence of abnormal zinc levels in cells deficient in TRPML1, suggested a role for TRPML1 in zinc transport. In the present study we provide new evidence for such a role and identify additional cellular components responsible for it. In agreement with the previously published data, an acute siRNA (small interfering RNA)-driven TRPML1 KD (knockdown) leads to the build-up of large cytoplasmic vesicles positive for LysoTracker™ and zinc staining, when cells are exposed to high concentrations of zinc. We now show that lysosomal enlargement and zinc build-up in TRPML1-KD cells exposed to zinc are ameliorated by KD of the zinc-sensitive transcription factor MTF-1 (metal-regulatory-element-binding transcription factor-1) or the zinc transporter ZnT4. TRPML1 KD is associated with a build-up of cytoplasmic zinc and with enhanced transcriptional response of mRNA for MT2a (metallothionein 2a). TRPML1 KD did not suppress lysosomal secretion, but it did delay zinc leak from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. These results underscore a role for TRPML1 in zinc metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that TRPML1 works in concert with ZnT4 to regulate zinc translocation between the cytoplasm and lysosomes.

  19. Iodine, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum levels in children aged between 6 and 12 years in the rural area with iodine deficiency and in the city center without iodine deficiency in Hatay

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Tanju; Savaş, Nazan; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Sangün, Özlem; Aydın, Zeki; Mustafa, Didin; Öztürk, Oktay Hasan; Mısırlıoğlu, Seher; Öktem, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Thyroid diseases related with iodine deficiency are observed commonly in our country and in the world. In this study, we aimed to investigate iodine deficiency in urine and selenium, zinc, copper or molybdenum deficiency which may accompany this in children aged between 6 and 12 years in two schools in the province of Hatay (endemic goitre region). Material and Methods: This study is a case-control field-study in which students aged between 6 and 12 years were included. One hundred fourteen subjects from the village of Tanışma related to the center of our province and 100 subjects from the city center of Hatay (Antakya) were included in the study. Iodine, selenium, zinc, copper and molybdenum levels were measured in the urine samples of the students included in the study. Results: Iodine deficiency was found with a severe (5%), moderate (18.4%) and mild degree (43%), respectively in the village of Tanışma. Mild iodine deficiency (7%) was found in the center of Hatay. No moderate and severe iodine deficiency was found in the control group. A significant difference was found between the groups in terms of urine iodine excretion (p<0.001). A significant correlation was found between the levels of iodine, selenium, zinc and molybdenum (p<0.05). A moderately positive correlation was found between iodine and selenium (p<0.001). A moderately positive correlation was found between iodine and zinc levels (p<0.001) and a weak correlation was found between iodine and molybdenum (p<0.01). No significant correlation was found between iodine level and copper level (p>0.05). Conclusions: Selenium and zinc deficiency may accompany iodine deficiency. Selenium and zinc deficiency should be considered in individuals who are found to have iodine deficiency especially in endemic goitre regions. PMID:26078645

  20. Zinc and copper in Asian pregnancies--is there evidence for a nutritional deficiency?

    PubMed

    Campbell-Brown, M; Ward, R J; Haines, A P; North, W R; Abraham, R; McFadyen, I R; Turnlund, J R; King, J C

    1985-09-01

    In 92 Hindu Asians, 59% of them vegetarian, and 51 Europeans longitudinal measurements were made during pregnancy of the zinc and copper concentrations in plasma and hair together with urinary zinc excretion, as indices of their zinc and copper status. Maternal diets were assessed once at booking. Zinc intakes ranged from 3.1 to 16.9 mg/day, with average intakes least in vegetarian Hindus and most in Europeans. Average copper intakes ranged between 1.48 and 1.80 mg/day and were similar in the three patient groups. Both ethnic groups showed the pregnancy-associated fall in the plasma concentration of zinc and rise in that of copper but throughout the study Hindus had statistically significant lower levels of zinc and higher levels of copper than Europeans. Urinary zinc excretion was not only significantly lower throughout the study in Hindus than in Europeans but the increase in excretion which occurred after 20 weeks gestation was smaller. There were no ethnic differences in the zinc content of hair. Urinary zinc excretion correlated with both plasma zinc levels and dietary zinc. Mean birthweight in the Hindus was 2912 g and 34% of infants were below the 10th centile, using the Aberdeen standards, compared with 6% of the European babies (mean birthweight 3349 g). No association was found between crude or adjusted birthweight and any of the measures of zinc or copper status in either ethnic group. The Hindus had an apparently lower average zinc status than the Europeans, but there was no evidence that this had acted as a nutritional constraint and was the cause of their slower rate of intrauterine growth.

  1. Zinc and growth.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Y

    1996-08-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrients and plays an important role in growth and sexual function. Zinc deficiency has been known to cause growth retardation and hypogonadism. Several mechanisms of growth retardation and hypogonadism due to zinc deficiency have been suggested. Zinc affects growth hormone (GH) metabolism. Conversely, GH affects zinc metabolism. Zinc deficiency may result in reduced GH production and/or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Zinc deficiency may also affect bone metabolism and gonadal function. The interrelationships among zinc, growth, gonadal function, and GH-IGF-I axis appears to be complex.

  2. Compound Heterozygous Mutations in SLC30A2/ZnT2 Results in Low Milk Zinc Concentrations: A Novel Mechanism for Zinc Deficiency in a Breast-Fed Infant

    PubMed Central

    Itsumura, Naoya; Inamo, Yasuji; Okazaki, Fumiko; Teranishi, Fumie; Narita, Hiroshi; Kambe, Taiho; Kodama, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    Zinc concentrations in breast milk are considerably higher than those of the maternal serum, to meet the infant's requirements for normal growth and development. Thus, effective mechanisms ensuring secretion of large amounts of zinc into the milk operate in mammary epithelial cells during lactation. ZnT2 was recently found to play an essential role in the secretion of zinc into milk. Heterozygous mutations of human ZnT2 (hZnT2), including H54R and G87R, in mothers result in low (>75% reduction) secretion of zinc into the breast milk, and infants fed on the milk develop transient neonatal zinc deficiency. We identified two novel missense mutations in the SLC30A2/ZnT2 gene in a Japanese mother with low milk zinc concentrations (>90% reduction) whose infant developed severe zinc deficiency; a T to C transition (c.454T>C) at exon 4, which substitutes a tryptophan residue with an arginine residue (W152R), and a C to T transition (c.887C>T) at exon 7, which substitutes a serine residue with a leucine residue (S296L). Biochemical characterization using zinc-sensitive DT40 cells indicated that the W152R mutation abolished the abilities to transport zinc and to form a dimer complex, indicating a loss-of-function mutation. The S296L mutation retained both abilities but was extremely destabilized. The two mutations were found on different alleles, indicating that the genotype of the mother with low milk zinc was compound heterozygous. These results show novel compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC30A2/ZnT2 gene causing zinc deficiency in a breast-fed infant. PMID:23741301

  3. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-07-16

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency.

  4. Cardiac changes in apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide system induced by prenatal and postnatal zinc deficiency in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Juriol, Lorena Vanesa; Gobetto, María Natalia; Mendes Garrido Abregú, Facundo; Dasso, Marina Ercilia; Pineda, Gonzalo; Güttlein, Leandro; Carranza, Andrea; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Elesgaray, Rosana; Arranz, Cristina Teresa; Tomat, Analía Lorena

    2016-11-07

    Zinc restriction during fetal and postnatal development could program cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of zinc restriction during fetal life, lactation, and/or post-weaning growth on cardiac inflammation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide system of male and female adult rats. Wistar rats were fed a low- or a control zinc diet during pregnancy and up to weaning. Afterward, offspring were fed either a low- or a control zinc diet until 81 days of life. IL-6 and TNF-α levels, TUNEL assay, TGF-β1 expression, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances that determine lipoperoxidation damage, NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide anion production, antioxidant and nitric oxide synthase activity, mRNA and protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and serine1177 phosphorylation isoform were determined in left ventricle. Zinc deficiency activated apoptotic and inflammatory processes and decreased TGF-β1 expression and nitric oxide synthase activity in cardiac tissue of both sexes. Male zinc-deficient rats showed no changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, but a lower serine1177 phosphorylation. Zinc deficiency induced an increase in antioxidant enzymes activity and no differences in lipoperoxidation products levels in males. Females were less sensitive to this deficiency exhibiting lower increase in apoptosis, lower decrease in expression of TGF-β1, and higher antioxidant and nitric oxide enzymes activities. A zinc-adequate diet during postnatal life reversed most of these mechanisms. Prenatal and postnatal zinc deficiency induces alterations in cardiac apoptotic, inflammatory, oxidative, and nitric oxide pathways that could predispose the onset of cardiovascular diseases in adult life.

  5. Effect of low-zinc status and essential fatty acids deficiency on the activities of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in liver and serum of albino rats.

    PubMed

    Ajayi, Olubunmi Bolanle; Odutuga, Adewale

    2004-04-01

    The effects of dietary deficiencies of zinc and essential fatty acids (EFAs) or both on aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were investigated in young growing rats. Four groups of albino rats were fed diets deficient in either EFA (4% hydrogenated coconut oil) or zinc (6 ppm) or both. The control diet was adequate in EFA (4% soybean oil) and zinc (100 ppm). The feeding trial lasted eight weeks and the activities of AST and ALT were determined in the liver and serum. EFA deficiency had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on liver AST. However, zinc and the double deficiencies depressed AST activity in the organ. Deficiencies of EFA, zinc and their combination depressed ALT activity in the liver significantly (p < 0.05) with a concomitant increase recorded in the serum. The data suggested alteration in endothelial permeability of the plasma membrane and thus leakage of membrane constituents in the tissue studied. It is therefore considered that these deficient diets may affect liver tissue negatively in view of the role of these enzymes in amino acid metabolism.

  6. Interactions of iron with manganese, zinc, chromium, and selenium as related to prophylaxis and treatment of iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bjørklund, Geir; Aaseth, Jan; Skalny, Anatoly V; Suliburska, Joanna; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2017-05-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is considered as the most common nutritional deficiency. Iron deficiency is usually associated with low Fe intake, blood loss, diseases, poor absorption, gastrointestinal parasites, or increased physiological demands as in pregnancy. Nutritional Fe deficiency is usually treated with Fe tablets, sometimes with Fe-containing multimineral tablets. Trace element interactions may have a significant impact on Fe status. Existing data demonstrate a tight interaction between manganese (Mn) and Fe, especially in Fe-deficient state. The influence of Mn on Fe homeostasis may be mediated through its influence on Fe absorption, circulating transporters like transferrin, and regulatory proteins. The existing data demonstrate that the influence of zinc (Zn) on Fe status may be related to their competition for metal transporters. Moreover, Zn may be involved in regulation of hepcidin production. At the same time, human data on the interplay between Fe and Zn especially in terms of Fe-deficiency and supplementation are contradictory, demonstrating both positive and negative influence of Zn on Fe status. Numerous data also demonstrate the possibility of competition between Fe and chromium (Cr) for transferrin binding. At the same time, human data on the interaction between these metals are contradictory. Therefore, while managing hypoferremia and Fe-deficiency anemia, it is recommended to assess the level of other trace elements in parallel with indices of Fe homeostasis. It is supposed that simultaneous correction of trace element status in Fe deficiency may help to decrease possible antagonistic or increase synergistic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Zinc deficiency augments leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Jie; Bao, Shengying; Bolin, Eric R; Burris, Dara L; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Qinghua; Killilea, David W; Shen, Qiwen; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Belury, Martha A; Failla, Mark L; Knoell, Daren L

    2013-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency and obesity are global public health problems. Zn deficiency is associated with obesity and comorbid conditions that include insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the function of Zn in obesity remains unclear. Using a mouse model of combined high-fat and low-Zn intake (0.5-1.5 mg/kg), we investigated whether Zn deficiency exacerbates the extent of adiposity as well as perturbations in metabolic and immune function. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control (C) diet for 6 wk, followed by further subdivision into 2 additional groups fed Zn-deficient diets (C-Zn, HFD-Zn), along with a C diet and an HFD, for 3 wk (n = 8-9 mice/group). The extent of visceral fat, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation was unaffected by Zn deficiency. Strikingly, Zn deficiency significantly augmented circulating leptin concentrations (HFD-Zn vs. HFD: 3.15 ± 0.16 vs. 2.59 ± 0.12 μg/L, respectively) and leptin signaling in the liver of obese mice. Furthermore, gene expression of macrophage-specific markers ADAM8 (A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 8) and CD68 (cluster of differentiation 68) was significantly greater in adipose tissue in the HFD-Zn group than in the HFD group, as confirmed by CD68 protein analysis, indicative of increased macrophage infiltration. Inspection of Zn content and mRNA profiles of all Zn transporters in the adipose tissue revealed alterations of Zn metabolism to obesity and Zn deficiency. Our results demonstrate that Zn deficiency increases leptin production and exacerbates macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue in obese mice, indicating the importance of Zn in metabolic and immune dysregulation in obesity.

  8. Single versus multiple deficiencies of methionine, zinc, riboflavin, vitamin B-6 and choline elicit surprising growth responses in young chicks.

    PubMed

    Baker, D H; Edwards, H M; Strunk, C S; Emmert, J L; Peter, C M; Mavromichalis, I; Parr, T M

    1999-12-01

    A soy-protein isolate diet that was deficient in methionine (Met), zinc (Zn), riboflavin, vitamin B-6 and choline for chick growth (Assay 1) was used to study individual or multiple deficiencies of several of these nutrients. In all cases, adding all three deficient nutrients together resulted in growth responses that were superior to those resulting from supplementation with any pairs of deficient nutrients. In Assay 2, single addition of Zn but not of methionine or riboflavin produced a growth response, but the combination of either Zn and Met or Zn and riboflavin resulted in growth responses that were greater than the response elicited by Zn alone. Assay 3 involved individual or multiple deficiencies of choline, riboflavin and vitamin B-6, and individual additions suggested that choline was first limiting. Choline + riboflavin supplementation, however, produced marked growth and gain:food responses that were far greater than those resulting from supplemental choline or riboflavin alone. Moreover, the growth response to a combination of choline + pyridoxine (PN) was also greater than that obtained from any of the three nutrients fed alone; even PN + riboflavin (in the absence of choline) produced responses greater than those observed with the unsupplemented negative-control diet. In Assay 4, chicks responded to individual additions of riboflavin, PN or Met, and in Assay 5, to either riboflavin or PN; all two-way combinations resulted in growth rates that were far greater than those occurring with any single addition. The data from these experiments show that unlike the situation with three deficient amino acids, the expected responses to first-, second- and third-limiting B-vitamins or deficient vitamins combined with deficient levels of Zn or Met do not follow the expected pattern of response to first-, further response to first- and second- and an even further response to first-, second- and third-limiting nutrients.

  9. Size-mediated cytotoxicity of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide, pure and zinc-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human hepatoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanand Venkatasubbu, G.; Ramasamy, S.; Avadhani, G. S.; Palanikumar, L.; Kumar, J.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoparticles are highly used in biological applications including nanomedicine. In this present study, the interaction of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) with hydroxyapatite (HAp), zinc-doped hydroxyapatite, and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were investigated. Hydroxyapatite, zinc-doped hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were prepared by wet precipitation method. They were subjected to isochronal annealing at different temperatures. Particle morphology and size distribution were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The nanoparticles were co-cultured with HepG2 cells. MTT assay was employed to evaluate the proliferation of tumor cells. The DNA damaging effect of HAp, Zn-doped HAp, and TiO2 nanoparticles in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were evaluated using DNA fragmentation studies. The results showed that in HepG2 cells, the anti-tumor activity strongly depend on the size of nanoparticles in HCC cells. Cell cycle arrest analysis for HAp, zinc-doped HAp, and TiO2 nanoparticles revealed the influence of HAp, zinc-doped HAp, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. The results imply that the novel nano nature effect plays an important role in the biomedicinal application of nanoparticles.

  10. Slc39a1 to 3 (Subfamily II) Zip Genes in Mice have Unique Cell-Specific Functions during Adaptation to Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kambe, Taiho; Geiser, Jim; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2008-01-01

    Subfamily II of the solute-carrier (Slc)39a family contains three highly conserved members (ZIPs 1 to 3) that share a twelve amino acid signature sequence present in the putative fourth transmembrane domain and function as zinc transporters in transfected cells. The physiological significance of this genetic redundancy is unknown. Herein, we report that the complete elimination of all three of these Zip genes, by targeted mutagenesis and cross-breeding mice, causes no overt phenotypic effect. When fed a zinc-adequate diet, several indicators of zinc status were indistinguishable between wild-type and triple-knockout mice; including embryonic morphogenesis and growth, alkaline phosphatase activity in the embryo, and ZIP4 protein in the visceral yolk sac and initial rates (30 min) of accumulation/retention of 67Zn in liver and pancreas. When fed a zinc-deficient diet, embryonic membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced to a much greater extent and 80% of the embryos in the triple-knock mice developed abnormally compared to 12% of the embryos in wild-type mice. During zinc deficiency, the accumulation/retention (3 hr) of 67Zn in the liver and pancreas of weanlings was significantly impaired in the triple-knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Thus, none of these three mammalian Zip genes apparently plays a critical role in zinc homeostasis when zinc is replete, but they play important, non-compensatory roles when this metal is deficient. PMID:18353881

  11. Slc39a1 to 3 (subfamily II) Zip genes in mice have unique cell-specific functions during adaptation to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Taiho; Geiser, Jim; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E; Andrews, Glen K

    2008-05-01

    Subfamily II of the solute carrier (Slc)39a family contains three highly conserved members (ZIPs 1-3) that share a 12-amino acid signature sequence present in the putative fourth transmembrane domain and function as zinc transporters in transfected cells. The physiological significance of this genetic redundancy is unknown. Here we report that the complete elimination of all three of these Zip genes, by targeted mutagenesis and crossbreeding mice, causes no overt phenotypic effect. When mice were fed a zinc-adequate diet, several indicators of zinc status were indistinguishable between wild-type and triple-knockout mice, including embryonic morphogenesis and growth, alkaline phosphatase activity in the embryo, ZIP4 protein in the visceral yolk sac, and initial rates (30 min) of accumulation/retention of (67)Zn in liver and pancreas. When mice were fed a zinc-deficient diet, embryonic membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced to a much greater extent, and 80% of the embryos of the triple-knockout mice developed abnormally compared with 12% of the embryos of wild-type mice. During zinc deficiency, the accumulation/retention (3 h) of (67)Zn in the liver and pancreas of weanlings was significantly impaired in the triple-knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Thus none of these three mammalian Zip genes apparently plays a critical role in zinc homeostasis when zinc is replete, but they play important, noncompensatory roles when this metal is deficient.

  12. GC-MS analysis of headspace and liquid extracts for metabolomic differentiation of citrus Huanglongbing and zinc deficiency in leaves of 'Valencia' sweet orange from commercial groves.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan Manuel; García-Torres, Rosalía; Etxeberria, Edgardo; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is considered the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. Symptoms-based detection of HLB is difficult due to similarities with zinc deficiency. To find metabolic differences between leaves from HLB-infected, zinc-deficient, and healthy 'Valencia' orange trees by using GC-MS based metabolomics. Analysis based on GC-MS methods for untargeted metabolite analysis of citrus leaves was developed and optimized. Sample extracts from healthy, zinc deficient, or HLB-infected sweet orange leaves were submitted to headspace solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and derivatization treatments prior to GC-MS analysis. Principal components analysis achieved correct classification of all the derivatized liquid extracts. Analysis of variance revealed 6 possible biomarkers for HLB, of which 5 were identified as proline, β-elemene, (-)trans- caryophyllene, and α-humulene. Significant (P < 0.05) differences in oxo-butanedioic acid, arabitol, and neo-inositol were exclusively detected in samples from plants with zinc deficiency. Levels of isocaryophyllen, α-selinene, β-selinene, and fructose were significantly (P < 0.05) different in healthy leaves only. Results suggest the potential of using identified HLB biomarkers for rapid differentiation of HLB from zinc deficiency. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Prevalence of iron and zinc deficiencies among preschool children ages 3 to 5 y in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Motadi, Selekane Ananias; Mbhenyane, Xikombiso G; Mbhatsani, Hlekani V; Mabapa, Ngoako S; Mamabolo, Ramoteme L

    2015-03-01

    Children under the age of 5 y constitute the most vulnerable group for iron and zinc deficiencies and their nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of zinc and iron deficiency among preschool children aged 3 to 5 y in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. This study included 349 preschool children recruited from two municipalities of Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa. Municipalities were purposively selected and simple random sampling was used to choose children. Body weight and height were measured using standard techniques. Serum zinc, iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation, transferrin and C-reactive protein levels were also assessed, as were hemoglobin levels. The prevalence of wasting, stunting, and underweight was 1.4%, 18.6%, and 0.3%, respectively; whereas 20.9% of the children were overweight and 9.7% were obese. The prevalence of zinc deficiency was 42.6% and anemia was 28%; both were higher in girls than in boys. When using serum ferritin and transferrin saturation 7 (2%) of the children had iron-deficiency anemia. Combined iron and zinc deficiencies using ferritin was found in 8 (2.3%) of the children; when using transferrin saturation these deficiencies were found in 42 (12%) of the children. Iron and zinc deficiencies as well as anemia, accompanied by high prevalence of stunting; and overweight and obesity, were common in preschool children. The results observed here call for interventions to combat the escalating problem of child malnutrition in the form of nutritional education for mothers and food handlers at preschools to ensure food diversification in these children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Microstructure, corrosion properties and bio-compatibility of calcium zinc phosphate coating on pure iron for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance in the initial stage of implantation, a phosphate (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O) coating was obtained on the surface of pure iron by a chemical reaction method. The anti-corrosion property, the blood compatibility and the cell toxicity of the coated pure iron specimens were investigated. The coating was composed of some fine phosphate crystals and the surface of coating was flat and dense enough. The electrochemical data indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated pure iron was improved with the increase of phosphating time. When the specimen was phosphated for 30min, the corrosion resistance (Rp) increased to 8006 Ω. Compared with that of the naked pure iron, the anti-hemolysis property and cell compatibility of the coated specimen was improved significantly, while the anti-coagulant property became slightly worse due to the existence of element calcium. It was thought that phosphating treatment might be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility of pure iron for biomedical application.

  15. Efficacy of exogenous oral zinc in treatment of patients with carbonic anhydrase VI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Henkin, R I; Martin, B M; Agarwal, R P

    1999-12-01

    We previously described a disorder in 18 patients with decreased parotid saliva gustin/carbonic anhydrase (CA) VI secretion associated with loss of taste (hypogeusia) and smell (hyposmia) and distorted taste (dysgeusia) and smell (dysosmia). Because gustin/CAVI is a zinc-dependent enzyme we instituted a study of treatment with exogenous zinc to attempt to stimulate synthesis/secretion of gustin/CAVI and thereby attempt to correct the symptoms of this disorder. Fourteen of the 18 patients with this disorder completed the study. They were treated with 100 mg of exogenous zinc daily for 4 to 6 months, in an open clinical trial. Both before and after treatment, measurements were obtained of parotid saliva gustin/CAVI, parotid saliva, serum and urine zinc, taste and smell function, and, in some patients, examination of circumvallate taste buds by electron microscopy. Treatment success was predicated upon significant increases in parotid saliva gustin/CAVI. This occurred in 10 of the 14 patients who were labeled responders; they also exhibited improvement in taste and smell acuity, a diminution in dysgeusia and dysosmia and increased zinc concentrations in parotid saliva, serum, and urine. Taste bud morphology returned to normal in each responder in whom it was measured. No increase in gustin/CAVI occurred in 4 patients who were labeled nonresponders; they exhibited no improvement in taste or smell acuity and no increases in parotid saliva zinc. However, serum and urine zinc increased to levels similar to those measured in the 10 responders. Two of 4 nonresponders reported diminution in dysgeusia and dysosmia. Taste bud morphology did not change from the abnormal state in the 1 nonresponder in whom it was measured. Zinc treatment is effective in patients in whom this trace metal increases synthesis/secretion of gustin/CAVI and ineffective in those in whom it does not. Increased gustin/CAVI in this disorder is probably associated with zinc stimulation of the gene

  16. Isoflurane anesthesia exacerbates learning and memory impairment in zinc-deficient APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunsheng; Liu, Ya; Yuan, Ye; Cui, Weiwei; Zheng, Feng; Ma, Yuan; Piao, Meihua

    2016-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is known to play crucial roles in numerous brain functions including learning and memory. Zn deficiency is believed to be widespread throughout the world, particularly in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of studies have shown that volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane, might be potential risk factors for the development of AD. However, whether isoflurane exposure accelerates the process of AD and cognitive impairment in AD patients with Zn deficiency is yet to be documented. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of 1.4% isoflurane exposure for 2 h on learning and memory function, and neuropathogenesis in 10-month-old Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient, and Zn-treated APP/PS1 mice with the following parameters: behavioral tests, neuronal apoptosis, Aβ, and tau pathology. The results demonstrated that isoflurane exposure showed no impact on learning and memory function, but induced transient elevation of neuroapoptosis in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. Exposure of isoflurane exhibited significant neuroapoptosis, Aβ generation, tau phosphorylation, and learning and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice in the presence of Zn deficiency. Appropriate Zn treatment improved learning and memory function, and prevented isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in APP/PS1 mice. Isoflurane exposure may cause potential neurotoxicity, which is tolerated to some extent in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. When this tolerance is limited, like in AD with Zn deficiency, isoflurane exposure markedly exacerbated learning and memory impairment, and neuropathology, indicating that AD patients with certain conditions such as Zn deficiency may be vulnerable to volatile anesthetic isoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary zinc deficiency impairs humoral and cellular immune responses to BCG and ESAT-6/CFP-10 vaccination in offspring and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lina; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Changcai; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaolei; Huang, Qing; Zhou, Gengyin

    2016-03-01

    Besides being the world's most widely used vaccine, BCG is the most controversial vaccine in current use. Estimates of protection impaired by BCG against pulmonary TB vary from nil to 80%. Dietary zinc deficiency has been confirmed to impair the immune function of animals. However, knowledge about effects of mild dietary zinc deficiency and the time of vaccination on BCG vaccine responsiveness in offspring and adult rats is limited. This work investigated the consequences of feeding zinc deficient and normal zinc diets to rats during gestation, infancy or adulthood on the immune responses to BCG vaccination. On gestation day 0, sixteen maternal rats were divided into two groups and fed with diets bellow: a control diet ad libitum (30 μg zinc/g diet, NC), a zinc deficient diet ad libitum (8 μg zinc/g diet, ZnD). Pup rats were served as experimental subjects. From day 1 of pregnancy upon delivery, maternal rats were given a standard diet (30 mg/kg/day zinc) or zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc) respectively. Adult male 10-week Wistar rats were divided into two dietary groups for 17 weeks of feeding: a control diet ad libitum (30 μg zinc/g diet, NC), a zinc deficient diet ad libitum (8 μg zinc/g diet, ZnD). The birth time of newborn pups was recorded as the zero week. For adult male rats, the time of receiving different assigned diet was recorded as the zeroth week. Newborn pups of these maternal rats were immunized with BCG vaccine or MTB antigen ESAT-6/CFP-10 at postnatal 0 and 2 week. The adult male rats were immunized on the 12th and 14th week. Then, blood samples, thymus and spleen from the rats were harvested for detection of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses using ELISA, MTT and QRT-PCR analysis. Decreased INF-γ and TNF-α production in plasma, changes of expression level of ZIP2, ZIP8, NF-κB and IL-6 mRNA in immune organs, together with reduced T cell proliferation was observed in pups and adult BCG rats suffered from dietary zinc deficiency

  18. Zinc Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Involved in Valproic Acid Induced Hepatotoxicity: Protection by Zinc and Selenium Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Ahangar, Nematollah; Naderi, Maloos; Noroozi, Abdolali; Ghasemi, Maryam; Zamani, Ehsan; Shaki, Fatemeh

    2017-01-25

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an antiepileptic drug, which its usage is limited due to its hepatotoxicity. The present study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se), necessary trace elements, against VPA-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. The animals were divided into five groups: control, VPA 200 mg/kg, VPA + Zn (100 mg/kg), VPA + Se (100 mg/kg), and VPA + Zn + Se. The administration of VPA for four consecutive weeks resulted in decrease in serum level of Zn in rats. Also, an increase in liver marker enzymes (ALT and AST) and also histological changes in liver tissue were shown after VPA administration. Oxidative stress was evident in VPA group by increased lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein carbonyl (PCO), glutathione (GSH) oxidation, and reducing total antioxidant capacity. Zn and Se (100 mg/kg) administration was able to protect against deterioration in liver enzyme, abrogated the histological change in liver tissue, and suppressed the increase in oxidative stress markers. Zn and combination of Zn plus Se treatment showed more protective effects than Se alone. These results imply that Zn and Se should be suggested as effective supplement products for the prevention of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity.

  19. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions.

  20. Drug-development concepts as guides for optimizing clinical trials of supplemental zinc for populations at risk of deficiency or diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Alpers, David H; Young, Graeme P; Tran, Cuong D; Mortimer, Elissa K; Gopalsamy, Geetha L; Krebs, Nancy F; Manary, Mark J; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S; Binder, Henry J; Brown, Ian L; Miller, Leland V

    2017-03-01

    Studies on the efficacy of zinc supplementation for treatment or prevention of diarrhea have shown an inconsistent effect in populations at risk for zinc deficiency. Unlike drugs, which have no preexisting presence in the body, endogenous zinc must be assessed pharmacokinetically by isotope tracer studies. Although such methods have produced much data, very few studies have estimated the dose and the timing of dosing of zinc supplementation. This review examines drug kinetics used to establish the best dose, the timing of such doses, and the mechanism of action through pharmacodynamic markers and applies them, where possible, to zinc supplements. The findings reveal that little is known, especially in children at highest risk of zinc deficiency. Key data missing to inform proper dosing, whether for treatment of disease or for preventive nutrient supplementation, are noted. Addressing these uncertainties could improve study design, leading to future studies of zinc supplements that might be of greater benefit. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Influence of Iron and Zinc Supplementation on the Bioavailability of Provitamin A Carotenoids from Papaya Following Consumption of a Vitamin A-Deficient Diet.

    PubMed

    Kana-Sop, Marie Modestine; Gouado, Inocent; Achu, Mercy Bih; Van Camp, John; Amvam Zollo, Paul Henri; Schweigert, Florian J; Oberleas, Donald; Ekoe, Tetanye

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies are serious public health problems in Cameroon, as in many developing countries. Local vegetables which are sources of provitamin A carotenoids (PACs) can be used to improve vitamin A intakes. However, traditional meals are often unable to cover zinc and iron needs. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of 3 PACs (α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) in young men, who were fed with a vitamin A-free diet and received iron and zinc supplementation. Twelve healthy participants were divided into three groups and were supplemented with elemental iron (20 mg of iron fumarate), 20 mg of zinc sulfate or iron+zinc (20 mg of iron in the morning and 20 mg of zinc in the evening) for 11 d. They were given a vitamin A- and PAC-free diet from the 6th to the 11th day, followed by a test meal containing 0.55 kg of freshly peeled papaya as a source of PACs. Blood samples were collected four times successively on the 11th day (the test meal day), at T0 (just after the test meal), after 2 h (T2), after 4 h (T4) and after 7 h (T7). Ultracentrifugation was used to isolate serum chylomicrons. Retinol appearance and PAC postprandial concentrations were determined. The supplementation with zinc, iron and iron+zinc influenced the chylomicron appearance of retinol and PACs differently as reflected by retention times and maximum absorption peaks. Iron led to highest retinol levels in the chylomicron. Zinc and iron+zinc supplements were best for optimal intact appearance of α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin respectively. Supplementation with iron led to the greatest bioavailability of PACs from papaya and its conversion to retinol.

  2. Effects of deficiency and excess of zinc on morphophysiological traits and spatiotemporal regulation of zinc-responsive genes reveal incidence of cross talk between micro- and macronutrients.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ajay; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Meagher, Richard B; Sahi, Shivendra V

    2013-05-21

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential micronutrient which affects plant growth and development in deficiency and can be toxic when present in excess. In Arabidopsis thaliana , different families of cation transporters play pivotal roles in Zn homeostasis. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of Zn in its deficiency (0 μM; Zn-) and excess (75 μM; Zn++) on various morphophysiological and molecular traits. Primary root length was reduced in Zn- seedlings, whereas there were significant increases in the number and length of lateral roots under Zn- and Zn++ conditions, respectively. Concentration of various macro- and microelements showed variations under different Zn regimes and notable among them was the reduced level of iron (Fe) in Zn++ seedlings compared to Zn+. Certain members of the ZIP family (ZIP4, ZIP9, and ZIP12) showed significant induction in roots and shoots of the Zn- seedlings. Their suppression under Zn++ condition indicated their transcriptional regulation by Zn and their roles in the maintenance of its homeostasis. Zn-deficiency-mediated induction of HMA2 in roots and shoots suggested its role in effluxing Zn into xylem for long-distance transport. Attenuation in the expression of Fe-responsive FRO2 and IRT1 in Zn- roots and their induction in Zn++ roots provided empirical evidence toward the prevalence of a cross talk between Zn and Fe homeostasis. Variable effects of Zn- and Zn++ on the expression of subset of genes involved in the homeostasis of phosphate (Pi), potassium (K), and sulfur (S) further highlighted the prevalence of cross talk between the sensing and signaling cascades of Zn and macronutrients. Further, the inducibility of ZIP4 and ZIP12 in response to cadmium (cd) treatment could be harnessed by tailoring them in homologous or heterologous plant system for removing pollutant toxic heavy metals from the environment.

  3. Symptomatic zinc deficiency in a full-term breast-fed infant.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Sambasiviah C; Udagani, Malleshappa M; Badakali, Ashok V; Yelameli, Bhuvaneshwari C

    2010-06-15

    A nine-month-old female infant presented with an eruption over her face, perineal region, and upper and lower limbs. She had sparse hair growth and diarrhea. Clinical features and investigations were suggestive of hypozincemia. Therapy with zinc and weaning from breastfeeding led to resolution of the condition, confirming a diagnosis of hypozincemia type-II. Recently, a mutation in the zinc transporter gene SLC30A2 (ZnT-2), identified in the mothers of infants suffering from this disorder, is implicated as the cause. This report highlights the occurrence of hypozincemia among a population at risk, consisting of infants who are exclusively breast-fed for a prolonged period.

  4. Prenatal zinc deficiency: influence on heart morphology and distribution of key heart proteins in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Veronica; Keen, Carl L; Lanoue, Louise

    2008-06-01

    The etiology of congenital heart disease is multifactorial, with genetics and nutritional deficiencies recognized as causative agents. Maternal zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with an increased risk for fetal heart malformations; however, the contributing mechanisms have yet to be identified. In this study, we fed pregnant rats a Zn-adequate diet (ZnA), a Zn-deficient (ZnD), or a restricted amount of Zn adequate diet (RF) beginning on gestation day (GD) 4.5, to examine whether increased cell death and changes in cardiac neural crest cells (NCC) play a role in Zn deficiency-induced heart defects. Fetuses were collected on GD 13.5, 15.5, and 18.5 and processed for GATA-4, FOG-2, connexin-43 (Cx43), HNK-1, smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression. Fetuses from ZnA-fed dams showed normal heart development, whereas fetuses from dams fed with the ZnD diet exhibited a variety of heart anomalies, particularly in the region of the outflow tract. HNK-1 expression was lower than normal in the hearts of GD13.5 and 15.5 ZnD fetuses, particularly in the right atrium and in the distal tip of the interventricular septum. Conversely, Cx43 immunoreactivity was increased throughout the heart in fetuses from ZnD dams compared to fetuses from control dams. The distribution and intensity of expression of SMA, GATA-4, FOG-2, and markers of apoptosis were similar among the three groups. We propose that Zn deficiency induced alterations in the distribution of Cx43 and HNK-1 in fetal hearts contribute to the occurrence of the developmental heart anomalies.

  5. Influence of dietary carbohydrate on zinc-deficiency-induced changes in oxidative defense mechanisms and tissue oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Keen, C L

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dietary carbohydrate type on the expression of zinc (Zn) deficiency in rats with respect to tissue oxidative damage and defense mechanisms. Rats were fed diets containing adequate (+Zn) or low concentrations (-Zn) of Zn. Both fructose- and glucose-based diets were tested. Pair-fed controls were also studied to evaluate changes in the oxidative defense system which are secondary to Zn-deficiency-induced anorexia. Plasma and liver Zn concentrations and CuZn superoxide dismutase activities were lower in the -Zn rats than in the +Zn rats. Liver glutathione (GSH) and disulfide glutathione concentrations were higher in the -Zn rats than in the +Zn rats; this difference was most pronounced in the fructose groups. Liver and heart selenium glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) activities were lower in the -Zn-fructose group than in the +Zn-fructose group. Liver Se-GSH-Px activity was higher in the fructose groups than in the glucose groups. Liver GSH reductase (GSH-Red) activity was lower in the -Zn-fructose group than in its control group. Liver glutamine synthetase activity was lower in the -Zn-glucose group and in the fructose groups than in the glucose control group. Liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) production was similar among the groups. Collectively, these results support the concept that Zn deficiency can result in an impaired oxidant defense system. Based on the observation that pair-fed control animals also showed evidence of oxidative damage, we suggest that one factor that contributes to the effect of Zn deficiency is the reduction in caloric intake that occurs in these animals. Fructose feeding resulted in increased activities of several of the oxidant defense enzymes. Protein oxidative damage assessed by glutamine synthetase activity was increased by both Zn deficiency and fructose feeding.

  6. Diagnostic utility of zinc protoporphyrin to detect iron deficiency in Kenyan preschool children: a community-based survey.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Emily M; Prentice, Andrew M; Demir, Ayşe Y; Andang'o, Pauline E A; Verhoef, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) has been used to screen and manage iron deficiency in individual children, but it has also been recommended to assess population iron status. The diagnostic utility of ZPP used in combination with haemoglobin concentration has not been evaluated in pre-school children. We aimed to a) identify factors associated with ZPP in children aged 12-36 months; b) assess the diagnostic performance and utility of ZPP, either alone or in combination with haemoglobin, to detect iron deficiency. We used baseline data from 338 Kenyan children enrolled in a community-based randomised trial. To identify factors related to ZZP measured in whole blood or erythrocytes, we used bivariate and multiple linear regression analysis. To assess diagnostic performance, we excluded children with elevated plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein or α1-acid glycoprotein, and with Plasmodium infection, and we analysed receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves, with iron deficiency defined as plasma ferritin concentration < 12 μg/L. We also developed models to assess the diagnostic utility of ZPP and haemoglobin concentration when used to screen for iron deficiency. Whole blood ZPP and erythrocyte ZPP were independently associated with haemoglobin concentration, Plasmodium infection and plasma concentrations of soluble transferrin receptor, ferritin, and C-reactive protein. In children without inflammation or Plasmodium infection, the prevalence of true iron deficiency was 32.1%, compared to prevalence of 97.5% and 95.1% when assessed by whole blood ZPP and erythrocyte ZPP with conventional cut-off points (70 μmol/mol and 40 μmol/mol haem, respectively). Addition of whole blood ZPP or erythrocyte ZPP to haemoglobin concentration increased the area-under-the-ROC-curve (84.0%, p = 0.003, and 84.2%, p = 0.001, respectively, versus 62.7%). A diagnostic rule (0.038689 [haemoglobin concentration, g/L] + 0.00694 [whole blood ZPP, μmol/mol haem] >5

  7. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    PubMed

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Rapid screening for zinc deficiency using portable x-ray fluorescence in fingernails

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elemental composition of fingernails is a useful indicator of micronutrient status and may reflect an individual’s intake over time. Our objective was to determine if portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a viable method to assess zinc content in fingernails in the field. Human fingernail samples ran...

  9. Are Low Intakes and Deficiencies in Iron, Vitamin A, Zinc, and Iodine of Public Health Concern in Ethiopian, Kenyan, Nigerian, and South African Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Harika, Rajwinder; Faber, Mieke; Samuel, Folake; Mulugeta, Afework; Kimiywe, Judith; Eilander, Ans

    2017-09-01

    To perform a systematic review to evaluate iron, vitamin A, zinc, and iodine status and intakes in children and adolescents (0-19 years) in Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Both national and subnational data published from the year 2005 to 2015 were searched via MEDLINE, Scopus, and national public health websites. For each micronutrient and country, status data from relevant studies and surveys were combined into an average prevalence and weighted by sample size (WAVG). Inadequate intakes were estimated from mean (SD) intakes. This review included 55 surveys and studies, 17 from Ethiopia, 11 from Kenya, 12 from Nigeria, and 16 from South Africa. The WAVG prevalence of anemia ranged from 25% to 53%, iron deficiency from 12% to 29%, vitamin A deficiency (VAD) from 14% to 42%, zinc deficiency from 32% to 63%, and iodine deficiency from 15% to 86% in children aged 0 to 19 years from 4 countries. Generally, children <5 years had higher prevalence of anemia (32%-63%), VAD (15%-35%), and zinc deficiency (35%-63%) compared to children aged 5 to 19 years. Studies with intake data indicated that inadequate intakes ranged from 51% to 99% for zinc, 13% to 100% for iron, and 1% to 100% for vitamin A. Households failing to consume adequately iodized (>15 ppm) salt ranged from 2% in Kenya to 96% in Ethiopia. With large variation within the 4 African countries, our data indicate that anemia and vitamin A, zinc, and iodine deficiencies are problems of public health significance. Effective public health strategies such as dietary diversification and food fortification are needed to improve micronutrient intake in both younger and older children.

  10. Biochemical indicators of root damage in rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes under zinc deficiency stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Sung; Wissuwa, Matthias; Zamora, Oscar B; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2017-06-30

    Zn deficiency is one of the major soil constraints currently limiting rice production. Although recent studies demonstrated that higher antioxidant activity in leaf tissue effectively protects against Zn deficiency stress, little is known about whether similar tolerance mechanisms operate in root tissue. In this study we explored root-specific responses of different rice genotypes to Zn deficiency. Root solute leakage and biomass reduction, antioxidant activity, and metabolic changes were measured using plants grown in Zn-deficient soil and hydroponics. Solute leakage from roots was higher in sensitive genotypes and linked to membrane damage caused by Zn deficiency-induced oxidative stress. However, total root antioxidant activity was four-fold lower than in leaves and did not differ between sensitive and tolerant genotypes. Root metabolite analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography indicated that Zn deficiency triggered the accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate and acetate in sensitive genotypes, while less or no accumulation was seen in tolerant genotypes. We suggest that these metabolites may serve as biochemical indicators of root damage under Zn deficiency.

  11. ZINC-DEFICIENCY ENHANCES PRO-INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AFTER OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that humans are differentially susceptible to adverse health effects induced by exposure to ozone. Serum analysis of vitamins and trace elements have shown that the elderly (people >65 years) are deficient in sever...

  12. ZINC-DEFICIENCY ENHANCES PRO-INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AFTER OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that humans are differentially susceptible to adverse health effects induced by exposure to ozone. Serum analysis of vitamins and trace elements have shown that the elderly (people >65 years) are deficient in sever...

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-induced overproduction of nitric oxide and overexpression of iNOS and interleukin-1β proteins in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Inoue, Tsutomu; Sato, Makiko; Miyajima, Yuka; Nodera, Makoto; Hanyu, Mayuko; Ohno, Yoichi; Shibazaki, Satomi; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2012-03-01

    Zinc deficiency leads to decreased cellular immune responses. The overproduction of nitrogen species derived from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), its enzyme, and interleukine-1 beta (IL-1β), and inflammatory cytokine have been implicated in immune responses. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in NO metabolites, iNOS, and IL-1β protein expression in the lungs of zinc-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight, 100 g) were divided into two groups and were fed either a zinc-deficient diet (ZnD) or a zinc-containing diet (Cont). After 4 weeks on these diets, rats received a 10-mg/kg dose of LPS injected via the tail vein and were then maintained for an additional 72 h. To determine total NO concentrations in the blood, serum zinc concentration, iNOS protein expression, IL-1β, and iNOS immunohistochemistry, blood and lung samples were obtained at pre-LPS injection, 5, 24, and 72 h after injection. Total NO levels were significantly increased at 5, at 24, and at 72 h after LPS injection compared with pre-LPS injection level in ZnD group; significant changes in total NO levels was elevated at 5 h from at pre-LPS level but not significant changes from basal level at 24 and 72 h in the control group. Based on western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry, clear bands indicating iNOS and IL-1β protein expression and iNOS antibody-stained inflammatory cells were detected at 5 and 24 h in the ZnD group and 5 h in the Cont group, not observed at 24 and 72 h in the control group. These results suggest that zinc deficiency induces overexpression of iNOS and IL-1β proteins from inflammatory cells around the alveolar blood vessels, resulting in overproduction of total NO and persisted inflammatory response in the zinc-deficient rat lung. Taken together, overexpression of LPS-induced iNOS, overproduction of iNOS-derived NO, and overexpression of IL-1β may induce nitrosative and oxidative

  14. Comparison of soil and foliar zinc application for enhancing grain zinc content of wheat when grown on potentially zinc-deficient calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai-qing; Tian, Xiao-hong; Cao, Yu-xian; Lu, Xin-chun; Liu, Ting

    2014-08-01

    The concentration of Zn and phytic acid in wheat grain has important implications for human health. We conducted field and greenhouse experiments to compare the efficacy of soil and foliar Zn fertilisation in improving grain Zn concentration and bioavailability in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain grown on potentially Zn-deficient calcareous soil. Results from the 2-year field experiment indicated that soil Zn application increased soil DTPA-Zn by an average of 174%, but had no significant effect on grain Zn concentration. In contrast, foliar Zn application increased grain Zn concentration by an average of 61%, and Zn bioavailability by an average of 36%. Soil DTPA-Zn concentrations varied depending on wheat cultivars. There were also significant differences in grain phytic acid concentration among the cultivars. A laboratory experiment indicated that Zn (from ZnSO4 ) had a low diffusion coefficient in this calcareous soil. Compared to soil Zn application, foliar Zn application is more effective in improving grain Zn content of wheat grown in potentially Zn-deficient calcareous soils. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Apparent zinc absorption and zinc status of weanling rats fed moderately zinc-deficient diets enriched with beef tallow or sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Weigand, E; Boesch-Saadatmandi, C

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare apparent Zn absorption and Zn status of weanling rats fed diets that differed in Zn level, fat level and fat source. Semi-synthetic diets, which were about isoenergetic and contained 3% soyabean oil, were supplemented with 7 or 100 mg Zn/kg to create a mild Zn deficiency (LZ) or a high Zn supply (HZ) and with 0 (LF), 22% beef tallow (BT) or 22% sunflower oil (SF) according to a 2 × 3 factorial design of treatments. They were fed ad libitum to 6 × 8 rats for 28 days. Energy intake and growth rates were comparable among the HZ groups. Weight gains in the LZ-LF, LZ-BT and LZ-SF groups averaged 5.54, 4.95 and 4.15 g/day, and apparent Zn absorption averaged 79.4, 60.3 and 48.0 μg Zn/day, respectively, whereas faecal Zn excretion was comparable among these groups. Apparent Zn absorption, and plasma and femur Zn concentrations were lower in the high-fat groups than in the LF group, possibly due to the high cellulose content of the BT and SF diets. Plasma Zn concentrations were higher in the animals fed the BT-based than in the SF-based diets, whereas femur and soft tissue Zn concentrations were comparable among these groups. The differences between the LZ-BT and LZ-SF groups in growth rate, Zn absorption rate and Zn status were confirmed in a second experiment. The results indicate that moderately Zn-deficient diets enriched with SF in relation to BT affect Zn metabolism of weanling rats by a yet unknown mechanism.

  16. Zinc deficiency negatively affects alkaline phosphatase and the concentration of Ca, Mg and P in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Lomeda, Ria-Ann R.; Ryu, Sang-Hoon; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Shin, Hong-In; Beattie, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Zn is an essential nutrient that is required in humans and animals for many physiological functions, including immune and antioxidant function, growth, and reproduction. The present study evaluated whether Zn deficiency would negatively affect bone-related enzyme, ALP, and other bone-related minerals (Ca, P and Mg) in rats. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of the three different Zn dietary groups, such as Zn adequate (ZA, 35 mg/kg), pair fed (PF, 35 mg/kg), Zn deficient (ZD, 1 mg/kg) diet, and fed for 10 weeks. Food intake and body weight were measured daily and weekly, respectively. ALP was measured by spectrophotometry and mineral contents were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometer (ICP-MS). Zn deficient rats showed decreased food intake and body weight compared with Zn adequate rats (p<0.05). Zn deficiency reduced ALP activity in blood (RBC, plasma) and the tissues (liver, kidney and small intestine) (p<0.05). Also, Zn deficiency reduced mineral concentrations in rat tissues (Ca for muscle and liver, and Mg for muscle and liver) (p<0.05). The study results imply the requirement of proper Zn nurture for maintaining bone growth and formation. PMID:20535396

  17. Prevalence of prenatal zinc deficiency and its association with socio-demographic, dietary and health care related factors in Rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies witnessed that prenatal zinc deficiency (ZD) predisposes to diverse pregnancy complications. However, scientific evidences on the determinants of prenatal ZD are scanty and inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to assess the prevalence and determinants of prenatal ZD in Sidama zone, Southern Ethiopia. Methods A community based, cross-sectional study was conducted in Sidama zone in January and February 2011. Randomly selected 700 pregnant women were included in the study. Data on potential determinants of ZD were gathered using a structured questionnaire. Serum zinc concentration was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Statistical analysis was done using logistic regression and linear regression. Results The mean serum zinc concentration was 52.4 (+/-9.9) μg/dl (95% CI: 51.6-53.1 μg/dl). About 53.0% (95% CI: 49.3-56.7%) of the subjects were zinc deficient. The majority of the explained variability of serum zinc was due to dietary factors like household food insecurity level, dietary diversity and consumption of animal source foods. The risk of ZD was 1.65 (95% CI: 1.02-2.67) times higher among women from maize staple diet category compared to Enset staple diet category. Compared to pregnant women aged 15-24 years, those aged 25-34 and 35-49 years had 1.57 (95% CI: 1.04-2.34) and 2.18 (95% CI: 1.25-3.63) times higher risk of ZD, respectively. Women devoid of self income had 1.74 (95% CI: 1.11-2.74) time increased risk than their counterparts. Maternal education was positively associated to zinc status. Grand multiparas were 1.74 (95% CI: 1.09-3.23) times more likely to be zinc deficient than nulliparas. Frequency of coffee intake was negatively association to serum zinc level. Positive association was noted between serum zinc and hemoglobin concentrations. Altitude, history of iron supplementation, maternal workload, physical access to health service, antenatal care and nutrition education were not associated to

  18. Prevalence of prenatal zinc deficiency and its association with socio-demographic, dietary and health care related factors in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Samson; Enquselassie, Fikre; Umeta, Melaku

    2011-11-29

    Several studies witnessed that prenatal zinc deficiency (ZD) predisposes to diverse pregnancy complications. However, scientific evidences on the determinants of prenatal ZD are scanty and inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to assess the prevalence and determinants of prenatal ZD in Sidama zone, Southern Ethiopia. A community based, cross-sectional study was conducted in Sidama zone in January and February 2011. Randomly selected 700 pregnant women were included in the study. Data on potential determinants of ZD were gathered using a structured questionnaire. Serum zinc concentration was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Statistical analysis was done using logistic regression and linear regression. The mean serum zinc concentration was 52.4 (+/-9.9) μg/dl (95% CI: 51.6-53.1 μg/dl). About 53.0% (95% CI: 49.3-56.7%) of the subjects were zinc deficient. The majority of the explained variability of serum zinc was due to dietary factors like household food insecurity level, dietary diversity and consumption of animal source foods. The risk of ZD was 1.65 (95% CI: 1.02-2.67) times higher among women from maize staple diet category compared to Enset staple diet category. Compared to pregnant women aged 15-24 years, those aged 25-34 and 35-49 years had 1.57 (95% CI: 1.04-2.34) and 2.18 (95% CI: 1.25-3.63) times higher risk of ZD, respectively. Women devoid of self income had 1.74 (95% CI: 1.11-2.74) time increased risk than their counterparts. Maternal education was positively associated to zinc status. Grand multiparas were 1.74 (95% CI: 1.09-3.23) times more likely to be zinc deficient than nulliparas. Frequency of coffee intake was negatively association to serum zinc level. Positive association was noted between serum zinc and hemoglobin concentrations. Altitude, history of iron supplementation, maternal workload, physical access to health service, antenatal care and nutrition education were not associated to zinc status. ZD is of public

  19. Effect of experimental zinc deficiency and repletion on sodium, potassium, copper and iron concentrations in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R P; Verma, P C; Sadana, J R; Gupta, V K

    1989-09-01

    Zinc, sodium, potassium, copper and iron concentrations were analysed in serum and tissues of guinea-pigs fed on a diet containing 1.25 mg Zn/kg diet over a period of 60 d. The response of the Zn-deficient (ZnD) animals to Zn supplementation (100 mg Zn/kg diet) was also studied for 15 d. Serum studies in the ZnD group revealed significant decreases in the concentrations of Zn and Na from 24 d, and increases in the concentrations of Fe and K from 36 and 48 d onwards respectively; an increase in Cu was seen on day 60 only. Zn deficiency caused significant reductions in Na, K and Zn and increases in Cu and Fe contents of liver and kidney. In testis, significant decreases were noted only in Zn, K and Fe contents. Zn supplementation of the previously ZnD group resulted in marked improvements in serum and tissue mineral levels. However, hepatic Cu and Fe and renal K did not appear to respond appreciably.

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C.; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:28248212

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-12

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  2. Dermatitis and optic neuropathy due to zinc deficiency after malabsortive bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    We present a patient who underwent successful classic duodenal switch and developed a marked dermatitis with a significant functional limitation. This is an unusual complication, despite the relatively moderate prevalence of nutrient deficiency after this type of bariatric surgery. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and emphasize the importance of an appropriate nutritional management.

  3. Zinc and iron metabolism in Euglena gracilis: metal redistribution during Zn and Fe deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.; Gingrich, D.; Antholine, W.E.; Petering, D.H.

    1986-05-01

    The normal cytosolic distribution of Zn and Fe in Euglena gracilis and their changes during Zn and Fe deficiency and repletion in relationship to cell proliferation were examined. Using Sephadex G-75 chromatography, two metal pools were found-Zn and Fe bound to high molecular weight (HMW) proteins and a pool of low molecular weight (LMW) Zn and Fe of less than 2000 daltons (ZnL, FeL), containing 80-90% of the cytosolic Zn and Fe. ZnL and FeL can be separated on Sephadex G-15 and by HPLC techniques. According to ESR analysis both HMW and LMW iron is high spin Fe(III). Under conditions of Zn deficiency, cell proliferation is halted after 48 hrs. in concert with the depletion of the ZnL. Within error, HMW protein bound Zn is unaffected. ZnL appears to be a labile store of Zn to supply the cell with this essential metal. In contrast, during Fe deficiency cell proliferation is unaffected. Yet both HMW and LMW pools are depleted within 48 hrs. Both bands of Fe appear to be storage forms of the metal. Proliferative capacity of the alga is evidently more sensitive to Zn deficiency than to Fe depletion, possibly because Euglena can scavenge adventitious Fe from the medium by a siderophore-mediated mechanism.

  4. Maternal zinc deficiency in rats affects growth and glucose metabolism in the offspring by inducing insulin resistance postnatally.

    PubMed

    Jou, Ming-Yu; Philipps, Anthony F; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-09-01

    Interactions among zinc (Zn), insulin, and glucose metabolism are complex. Maternal Zn deficiency affects maternal carbohydrate metabolism, but the mechanisms underlying changes in glucose homeostasis of offspring are not well understood. Rats consumed Zn-deficient (ZnD; 7 microg/g) or control (ZnC; 25 microg/g) diets ad libitum from 3 wk preconception to 21 d postparturition. Litters were culled to 7 pups/dam postnatally and pups were allowed to nurse their original mothers; after weaning, pups were fed nonpurified diet. Insulin and glucose tolerance tests were performed on the pups at wk 5 and 10. Although there was no difference in birth weight between groups, ZnD pups weighed significantly more than controls by d 10 (+5%) and 20 (+10%). Both blood glucose and serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) concentrations at wk 3 were significantly higher in ZnD pups than in controls. Both male and female ZnD rats were less sensitive to insulin and glucose stimulation than controls at wk 5 and 10. At wk 15, serum leptin concentrations were higher in male ZnD rats than in controls. Phosphorylation of muscle Akt protein, an insulin receptor (IR) signaling intermediate, was lower in female ZnD rats than in controls at wk 15, but they did not differ in phosphorylation of IR. Maternal Zn deficiency resulted in greater serum IGF-1 concentrations and the excessive postnatal weight gain in their offspring as well as impaired subsequent glucose sensitivity. It was associated with gender-specific alterations in the serum leptin concentration and the insulin signaling pathway. These findings suggest that suboptimal maternal Zn status induces long-term changes in the offspring related to abnormal glucose tolerance.

  5. Concurrent iron and zinc deficiencies in lactating mothers and their children 6-23 months of age in two agro-ecological zones of rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Roba, Kedir Teji; O'Connor, Thomas P; Belachew, Tefera; O'Brien, Nora M

    2016-12-09

    The aim of this study is to examine the co-occurrences of low serum ferritin and zinc and anaemia among mothers and their children in two agro-ecological zones of rural Ethiopia. Data were collected from 162 lactating mothers and their breast fed children aged 6-23 months. The data were collected via a structured interview, anthropometric measurements, and blood tests for zinc, ferritin and anaemia. Correlation, Chi-square and multivariable analysis were used to determine the association between nutritional status of mothers and children, and agro-ecological zones. Low serum levels of iron and zinc, anaemia and iron deficiency anaemia were found in 44.4, 72.2, 52.5 and 29.6% of children and 19.8, 67.3, 21.8, 10.5% of mothers, respectively. There was a strong correlation between the micronutrient status of the mothers and the children for ferritin, zinc and anaemia (p < 0.005). Deficiency in both zinc and ferritin and one of the two was observed in 19.1, and 53.7% of the mothers and 32.7 and 46.3%, of their children, respectively. In the 24 h before the survey, 82.1% of mothers and 91.9% of their infants consumed foods that can decrease zinc bioavailability while only 2.5% of mothers and 3.7% of their infants consumed flesh foods. This study shows that micronutrient deficiencies were prevalent among lactating mothers and their children, with variation in prevalence across the agro-ecological zones. This finding calls for a need to design effective preventive public health nutrition programs to address both the mothers' and their children's needs.

  6. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle stages in zinc deficient fetal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, M.S.; Rogers, J.M.; Zucker, R.M.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1986-03-05

    The authors are currently studying the effects of Zn deficiency on chromatin structure, DNA synthesis, protein synthesis and cell division in the rat. Here the authors present preliminary results of nuclear DNA measurement by flow cytometry. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a fluorescent probe for total nuclear DNA isolated from Day 18 fetal rat brain. Previously, dams were fed a control (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet), restricted (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) or a Zn deficient (0.5 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) diet. Fetuses were taken at Day 18 of gestation by casaerean section. Whole brain was quickly excised and frozen rapidly in a plastic vial which was subsequently immersed in an alcohol/dry ice bath at -80/sup 0/C. Brain was thawed at 37/sup 0/C in a citrate/DMSO/pH 7.6 buffer and dissociated by several passes through a 26 gauge needle. Nuclei were isolated and stained by incubating in 50 ..mu..g/ml PI, 0.125 ..mu..g/ml RNA-ASE, 0.1% NP-40 at 25/sup 0/C. Zn deficiency resulted in a larger coefficient of variation (CV) for the Go/Gi DNA peak in fetal brain nuclei. The DNA profile of these nuclei is suggestive of a possible block at the Go/Gi-S interphase; restricted fed and ad lib fed controls showed no such blockage.

  7. Zinc and infant nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ackland, M Leigh; Michalczyk, Agnes A

    2016-12-01

    Zinc is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes in all cells. It is a critical dietary nutrient, particularly in the early stages of life. In the early neonatal period, adequate sources of zinc can be obtained from breast milk. In rare circumstances, the mammary gland produces zinc deficient milk that is potentially lethal for exclusively breast-fed infants. This can be overcome by zinc supplementation to the infant. Alterations to key zinc transporters provide insights into the mechanisms of cellular zinc homeostasis. The bioavailability of zinc in food depends on the presence of constituents that may complex zinc. In many countries, zinc deficiency is a major health issue due to poor nourishment. Young children are particularly affected. Zinc deficiency can impair immune function and contributes to the global burden of infectious diseases including diarrhoea, pneumonia and malaria. Furthermore, zinc deficiency may extend its influence across generations by inducing epigenetic effects that alter the expression of genes. This review discusses the significance of adequate zinc nutrition in infants, factors that influence zinc nutrition, the consequences of zinc deficiency, including its contribution to the global burden of disease, and addresses some of the knowledge gaps in zinc biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A micronutrient powder with low doses of highly absorbable iron and zinc reduces iron and zinc deficiency and improves weight-for-age Z-scores in South African children.

    PubMed

    Troesch, Barbara; van Stuijvenberg, Martha E; van Stujivenberg, Martha E; Smuts, Cornelius M; Kruger, H Salomè; Biebinger, Ralf; Hurrell, Richard F; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2011-02-01

    Micronutrient powders (MNP) are often added to complementary foods high in inhibitors of iron and zinc absorption. Most MNP therefore include high amounts of iron and zinc, but it is no longer recommended in malarial areas to use untargeted MNP that contain the Reference Nutrient Intake for iron in a single serving. The aim was to test the efficacy of a low-iron and -zinc (each 2.5 mg) MNP containing iron as NaFeEDTA, ascorbic acid (AA), and an exogenous phytase active at gut pH. In a double-blind controlled trial, South African school children with low iron status (n = 200) were randomized to receive either the MNP or the unfortified carrier added just before consumption to a high-phytate maize porridge 5 d/wk for 23 wk; primary outcomes were iron and zinc status and a secondary outcome was somatic growth. Compared with the control, the MNP increased serum ferritin (P < 0.05), body iron stores (P < 0.01) and weight-for-age Z-scores (P < 0.05) and decreased transferrin receptor (P < 0.05). The prevalence of iron deficiency fell by 30.6% (P < 0.01) and the prevalence of zinc deficiency decreased by 11.8% (P < 0.05). Absorption of iron from the MNP was estimated to be 7-8%. Inclusion of an exogenous phytase combined with NaFeEDTA and AA may allow a substantial reduction in the iron dose from existing MNP while still delivering adequate iron and zinc. In addition, the MNP is likely to enhance absorption of the high native iron content of complementary foods based on cereals and/or legumes.

  9. Subclinical zinc deficiency impairs pancreatic digestive enzyme activity and digestive capacity of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Daniel; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term subclinical Zn deficiency on exocrine pancreatic activity and changes in digestive capacity. A total of forty-eight weaned piglets were fed ad libitum a basal diet (maize and soyabean meal) with adequate Zn supply (88 mg Zn/kg diet) during a 2-week acclimatisation phase. Animals were then assigned to eight dietary treatment groups (n 6) according to a complete randomised block design considering litter, live weight and sex. All pigs were fed restrictively (450 g diet/d) the basal diet but with varying ZnSO4.7H2O additions, resulting in 28·1, 33·6, 38·8, 42·7, 47·5, 58·2, 67·8 and 88·0 mg Zn/kg diet for a total experimental period of 8 d. Pancreatic Zn concentrations and pancreatic activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A and B, elastase and α-amylase exhibited a broken-line response to stepwise reduction in dietary Zn by declining beneath thresholds of 39·0, 58·0, 58·0, 41·2, 47·5, 57·7 and 58·0 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. Furthermore, carboxypeptidase B and α-amylase activities were significantly lower in samples with reduced pancreatic Zn contents. Coefficients of faecal digestibility of DM, crude protein, total lipids and crude ash responded similarly to pancreatic enzyme activities by declining below dietary thresholds of 54·7, 45·0, 46·9 and 58·2 mg Zn/kg diet, respectively. In conclusion, (1) subclinical Zn deficiency impaired pancreatic exocrine enzymes, (2) this response was connected to pancreatic Zn metabolism and (3) the decline in catalytic activity impaired faecal digestibility already after 1 week of insufficient alimentary Zn supply and very early before clinical deficiency symptoms arise.

  10. Zinc interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The most common and probably the most harmful micronutrient deficiency of commercial pecan enterprises is zinc deficiency. A review is presented of how orchard nutrient element management practices potentially influence tree Zn nutrition. Findings provide background information on how to reduce th...

  11. [Zinc and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic β cells contain the highest amount of zinc among cells within the human body, and hence, the relationship between zinc and diabetes has been a topic of great interest. While many studies demonstrating possible involvement of zinc deficiency in diabetes have been reported, precise mechanisms how zinc regulates glucose metabolism are still far from understood. Recent studies revealed that zinc can transmit signals that are driven by a variety of zinc transporters in a tissue and cell-type specific manner and deficiency in some zinc transporters may cause human diseases. Here, we review the role of zinc in metabolism particularly focusing on the emerging role of zinc transporters in diabetes.

  12. Improved adipose tissue metabolism after 5-year growth hormone replacement therapy in growth hormone deficient adults: The role of zinc-α2-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Balaž, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Vlcek, Miroslav; Surova, Martina; Krumpolec, Patrik; Vanuga, Peter; Gašperíková, Daniela; Klimeš, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) supplementation therapy to adults with GH deficiency has beneficial effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism, improving thus adipocyte functional morphology and insulin sensitivity. However, molecular nature of these effects remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that lipid-mobilizing adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein is causally linked to GH effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism. Seventeen patients with severe GH deficiency examined before and after the 5-year GH replacement therapy were compared with age-, gender- and BMI-matched healthy controls. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used to assess whole-body and adipose tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. Glucose tolerance was determined by oGTT, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity by MRI, adipocyte size morphometrically after collagenase digestion, lipid accumulation and release was studied in differentiated human primary adipocytes in association with GH treatment and zinc-α2-glycoprotein gene silencing. Five-year GH replacement therapy improved glucose tolerance, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and reduced adipocyte size without affecting adiposity and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression was positively associated with whole-body and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and negatively with adipocyte size. GH treatment to adipocytes in vitro increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression (>50%) and was paralleled by enhanced lipolysis and decreased triglyceride accumulation (>35%). Moreover, GH treatment improved antilipolytic action of insulin in cultured adipocytes. Most importantly, silencing zinc-α2-glycoprotein eliminated all of the GH effects on adipocyte lipid metabolism. Effects of 5-year GH supplementation therapy on adipose tissue lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity are associated with zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Presence of this adipokine is required for the GH action on adipocyte lipid metabolism in vitro.

  13. Improved adipose tissue metabolism after 5-year growth hormone replacement therapy in growth hormone deficient adults: The role of zinc-α2-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Balaž, Miroslav; Ukropcova, Barbara; Kurdiova, Timea; Vlcek, Miroslav; Surova, Martina; Krumpolec, Patrik; Vanuga, Peter; Gašperíková, Daniela; Klimeš, Iwar; Payer, Juraj; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) supplementation therapy to adults with GH deficiency has beneficial effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism, improving thus adipocyte functional morphology and insulin sensitivity. However, molecular nature of these effects remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that lipid-mobilizing adipokine zinc-α2-glycoprotein is causally linked to GH effects on adipose tissue lipid metabolism. Seventeen patients with severe GH deficiency examined before and after the 5-year GH replacement therapy were compared with age-, gender- and BMI-matched healthy controls. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was used to assess whole-body and adipose tissue-specific insulin sensitivity. Glucose tolerance was determined by oGTT, visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity by MRI, adipocyte size morphometrically after collagenase digestion, lipid accumulation and release was studied in differentiated human primary adipocytes in association with GH treatment and zinc-α2-glycoprotein gene silencing. Five-year GH replacement therapy improved glucose tolerance, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and reduced adipocyte size without affecting adiposity and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression was positively associated with whole-body and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and negatively with adipocyte size. GH treatment to adipocytes in vitro increased zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression (>50%) and was paralleled by enhanced lipolysis and decreased triglyceride accumulation (>35%). Moreover, GH treatment improved antilipolytic action of insulin in cultured adipocytes. Most importantly, silencing zinc-α2-glycoprotein eliminated all of the GH effects on adipocyte lipid metabolism. Effects of 5-year GH supplementation therapy on adipose tissue lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity are associated with zinc-α2-glycoprotein. Presence of this adipokine is required for the GH action on adipocyte lipid metabolism in vitro

  14. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R K; Moore, J B; Green, C L; Cousins, R J

    2001-11-20

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116-5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status.

  15. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: Effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Raymond K.; Moore, J. Bernadette; Green, Calvert L.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116–5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status. PMID:11717422

  16. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Resistance through Activation of a Zinc Deficiency Transcription Factor in Brachypodium distachyon1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E.; Martin, Ruth C.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  17. Effect of zinc deficiency on NADPH and cytochrome P-450 dependent active oxygen generation in rat lung and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hammermueller, J.D.; Bray, T.M.; Bettger, W.J.

    1986-03-05

    The cyt. P-450 system and cyt. P-450 reductase are involved in the generation of active oxygen species such as H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short term, severe, dietary zinc deficiency in rats on the formation of active oxygen in vitro. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed egg white-based diets containing less than 1 ppm Zn (ZnD). Controls were fed ad libitum (ZnAl) or pair-fed (ZnPF) a diet containing 100 ppm Zn. After 3 weeks lung and liver microsomes were assayed for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production (pmol H/sub 2/O/sub 2//mg protein/min) and cyt. P-450 reductase activity (nmol cyt. C reduced/mg protein/min). For the measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production exogenous substrate (aminopyrine) and NADPH (cofactor) were provided to drive the cyt. P-450 system and NaN/sub 3/ was used to inhibit catalase. The results showed a significant effect of dietary Zn on NADPH and cyt. P-450 dependent active oxygen generation and support the hypothesis that Zn has a role in the function of biomembranes.

  18. Znt7 (Slc30a7)-DEFICIENT MICE DISPLAY REDUCED BODY ZINC STATUS AND BODY FAT ACCUMULATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that ZNT7 is involved in transporting the cytoplasmic zinc into the Golgi apparatus of the cell for zinc storage or to be incorporated into the newly synthesized zinc-requiring enzymes/proteins. To evaluate the physiological role of ZNT7, we created a mouse model o...

  19. Increased expression of six ZIP family genes by zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with enhanced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Tiong, Jingwen; McDonald, Glenn; Genc, Yusuf; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Huang, Chun Y

    2015-09-01

    Low zinc (Zn) in soils reduces yield and grain Zn content. Regulation of ZRT/IRT-like protein (ZIP) family genes is a major mechanism in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil. Although several Zn deficiency-inducible ZIP genes are identified in cereals, there has been no systematic study on the association of Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation with expression of ZIP family genes. We measured Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants by resupplying 0.5 μM Zn, and quantified the transcripts of thirteen HvZIP genes. Subcellular localization and tissue-specific expression were also determined for Zn deficiency-inducible HvZIP genes. Zn deficiency enhanced the capacity of uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn, and sustained the enhanced capacity for 6 d after Zn resupply. Six HvZIP genes were highly induced in roots of Zn-deficient plants, and their proteins were localized in the plasma membrane. Tissue-specific expression in roots supports their roles in uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn under low Zn conditions. Our results provide a comprehensive view on the physiological roles of ZIP genes in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil, and pave the way for development of new strategies to improve Zn-deficiency tolerance and biofortification in cereals.

  20. NADPH oxidase-2 mediates zinc deficiency-induced oxidative stress and kidney damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Mirandy S; Adesina, Sherry E; Ellis, Carla L; Gooch, Jennifer L; Hoover, Robert S; Williams, Clintoria R

    2017-01-01

    Zn(2+) deficiency (ZnD) is comorbid with chronic kidney disease and worsens kidney complications. Oxidative stress is implicated in the detrimental effects of ZnD. However, the sources of oxidative stress continue to be identified. Since NADPH oxidases (Nox) are the primary enzymes that contribute to renal reactive oxygen species generation, this study's objective was to determine the role of these enzymes in ZnD-induced oxidative stress. We hypothesized that ZnD promotes NADPH oxidase upregulation, resulting in oxidative stress and kidney damage. To test this hypothesis, wild-type mice were pair-fed a ZnD or Zn(2+)-adequate diet. To further investigate the effects of Zn(2+) bioavailability on NADPH oxidase regulation, mouse tubular epithelial cells were exposed to the Zn(2+) chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) or vehicle followed by Zn(2+) supplementation. We found that ZnD diet-fed mice develop microalbuminuria, electrolyte imbalance, and whole kidney hypertrophy. These markers of kidney damage are accompanied by elevated Nox2 expression and H2O2 levels. In mouse tubular epithelial cells, TPEN-induced ZnD stimulates H2O2 generation. In this in vitro model of ZnD, enhanced H2O2 generation is prevented by NADPH oxidase inhibition with diphenyleneiodonium. Specifically, TPEN promotes Nox2 expression and activation, which are reversed when intracellular Zn(2+) levels are restored following Zn(2+) supplementation. Finally, Nox2 knockdown by siRNA prevents TPEN-induced H2O2 generation and cellular hypertrophy in vitro. Together, these findings reveal that Nox2 is a Zn(2+)-regulated enzyme that mediates ZnD-induced oxidative stress and kidney hypertrophy. Understanding the specific mechanisms by which ZnD contributes to kidney damage may have an important impact on the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  1. Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency Caused by a Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) Gene in the Mother Highlighting the Importance of Zn2+ for Normal Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Kernland, Kristin; Schöni, Martin H.; Petkovic, Vibor; Flück, Christa E.; Eblé, Andrée; Mullis, Primus E.

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal dietary zinc (Zn2+) intake is increasingly appreciated as an important public health issue. Zn2+ is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to Zn2+ deficiency, as they require large amounts of Zn2+ for their normal growth and development. Although term infants are born with an important hepatic Zn2+ storage, adequate Zn2+ nutrition of infants mostly depends on breast milk or formula feeding, which contains an adequate amount of Zn2+ to meet the infants' requirements. An exclusively breast-fed 6 months old infant suffering from Zn2+ deficiency caused by an autosomal dominant negative G87R mutation in the Slc30a2 gene (encoding for the zinc transporter 2 (ZnT-2)) in the mother is reported. More than 20 zinc transporters characterized up to date, classified into two families (Slc30a/ZnT and Slc39a/Zip), reflect the complexity and importance of maintaining cellular Zn2+ homeostasis and dynamics. The role of ZnTs is to reduce intracellular Zn2+ by transporting it from the cytoplasm into various intracellular organelles and by moving Zn2+ into extracellular space. Zips increase intracellular Zn2+ by transporting it in the opposite direction. Thus the coordinated action of both is essential for the maintenance of Zn2+ homeostasis in the cytoplasm, and accumulating evidence suggests that this is also true for the secretory pathway of growth hormone. PMID:24194756

  2. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Impair Gene Expression of PPARα, PPARγ, and Mitochondrial Enoyl-CoA Delta Isomerase in the Liver of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and mitochondrial Δ3Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver. Weanling rats were assigned to five groups (eight animals each) and fed semi-synthetic, low-carbohydrate diets containing 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (low-Zn (LZ) or high-Zn (HZ)) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower (SF) oil for four weeks. One group each was fed the LZ-CB, LZ-SF, or HZ-SF diet free choice, and one group each was fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in restricted amounts according to intake of the respective LZ diets. The LZ diets markedly lowered growth and zinc concentrations in plasma and femur. Hepatic mRNA levels of PPARα, PPARγ, and ECI were not reduced by the moderate zinc deficiency. Overall, ECI-mRNA abundance was marginally higher in the SF-fed than in the CB-fed animals. PMID:24855375

  3. Genomic instability related to zinc deficiency and excess in an in vitro model: is the upper estimate of the physiological requirements recommended for children safe?

    PubMed

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, María Virginia; Gambaro, Rocío Celeste; Seoane, Analía Isabel

    2017-08-01

    Micronutrients are important for the prevention of degenerative diseases due to their role in maintaining genomic stability. Therefore, there is international concern about the need to redefine the optimal mineral and vitamin requirements to prevent DNA damage. We analyzed the cytostatic, cytotoxic, and genotoxic effect of in vitro zinc supplementation to determine the effects of zinc deficiency and excess and whether the upper estimate of the physiological requirement recommended for children is safe. To achieve zinc deficiency, DMEM/Ham's F12 medium (HF12) was chelated (HF12Q). Lymphocytes were isolated from healthy female donors (age range, 5-10 yr) and cultured for 7 d as follows: negative control (HF12, 60 μg/dl ZnSO4); deficient (HF12Q, 12 μg/dl ZnSO4); lower level (HF12Q + 80 μg/dl ZnSO4); average level (HF12Q + 180 μg/dl ZnSO4); upper limit (HF12Q + 280 μg/dl ZnSO4); and excess (HF12Q + 380 μg/dl ZnSO4). The comet (quantitative analysis) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assays were used. Differences were evaluated with Kruskal-Wallis and ANOVA (p < 0.05). Olive tail moment, tail length, micronuclei frequency, and apoptotic and necrotic percentages were significantly higher in the deficient, upper limit, and excess cultures compared with the negative control, lower, and average limit ones. In vitro zinc supplementation at the lower and average limit (80 and 180 μg/dl ZnSO4) of the physiological requirement recommended for children proved to be the most beneficial in avoiding genomic instability, whereas the deficient, upper limit, and excess (12, 280, and 380 μg/dl) cultures increased DNA and chromosomal damage and apoptotic and necrotic frequencies.

  4. The therapeutic effect on bone mineral formation from biomimetic zinc containing tricalcium phosphate (ZnTCP) in zinc-deficient osteoporotic mice.

    PubMed

    Chou, Joshua; Hao, Jia; Hatoyama, Hirokazu; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of biomimetic zinc-containing tricalcium phosphate (ZnTCP) produced by hydrothermally converting calcium carbonate exoskeletons from foraminifera, in the treatment of osteoporotic mice. X-Ray powder diffraction showed crystallographic structures matching JCPDS profile for tricalcium phosphate. Mass spectroscopy used to calculate total composition amount showed similar amount of calcium (5×10(4) µg/g) and phosphate (4×10(4) ppm) after conversion and the presence of zinc (5.18×10(3) µg/g). In vitro zinc release showed no release in PBS buffer and <1% zinc release in 7 days. In vivo evaluation was done in ovariectomized mice by implanting the ZnTCP samples in the soft tissues near the right femur bone for four weeks. Thirty ddY mice (5 weeks old, average weight of 21 g) were divided into six experimental groups (normal, sham, OVX, β-TCP, ZnTCP and direct injection of zinc). CT images were taken every two weeks where the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were calculated by software based on CT images. The ZnTCP group exhibits cortical and cancellous bone growth of 45% and 20% respectively. While sham, OVX and β-TCP suffered from bone loss. A correlation was made between the significant body weight increase in ZnTCP with the significant increase in plasma zinc level compared with OVX. The presented results indicate that biomimetic ZnTCP were effective in preventing and treating bone loss in osteoporotic mice model.

  5. The Therapeutic Effect on Bone Mineral Formation from Biomimetic Zinc Containing Tricalcium Phosphate (ZnTCP) in Zinc-Deficient Osteoporotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Joshua; Hao, Jia; Hatoyama, Hirokazu; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of biomimetic zinc-containing tricalcium phosphate (ZnTCP) produced by hydrothermally converting calcium carbonate exoskeletons from foraminifera, in the treatment of osteoporotic mice. X-Ray powder diffraction showed crystallographic structures matching JCPDS profile for tricalcium phosphate. Mass spectroscopy used to calculate total composition amount showed similar amount of calcium (5×104 µg/g) and phosphate (4×104 ppm) after conversion and the presence of zinc (5.18×103 µg/g). In vitro zinc release showed no release in PBS buffer and <1% zinc release in 7 days. In vivo evaluation was done in ovariectomized mice by implanting the ZnTCP samples in the soft tissues near the right femur bone for four weeks. Thirty ddY mice (5 weeks old, average weight of 21 g) were divided into six experimental groups (normal, sham, OVX, β-TCP, ZnTCP and direct injection of zinc). CT images were taken every two weeks where the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were calculated by software based on CT images. The ZnTCP group exhibits cortical and cancellous bone growth of 45% and 20% respectively. While sham, OVX and β-TCP suffered from bone loss. A correlation was made between the significant body weight increase in ZnTCP with the significant increase in plasma zinc level compared with OVX. The presented results indicate that biomimetic ZnTCP were effective in preventing and treating bone loss in osteoporotic mice model. PMID:23967249

  6. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  7. Zinc and skin biology.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Youichi; Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Shimada, Shinji

    2016-12-01

    Of all tissues, the skin has the third highest abundance of zinc in the body. In the skin, the zinc concentration is higher in the epidermis than in the dermis, owing to a zinc requirement for the active proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes. Here we review the dynamics and functions of zinc in the skin as well as skin disorders associated with zinc deficiency, zinc finger domain-containing proteins, and zinc transporters. Among skin disorders associated with zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica is a disorder caused by mutations in the ZIP4 transporter and subsequent zinc deficiency. The triad acrodermatitis enteropathica is characterized by alopecia, diarrhea, and skin lesions in acral, periorificial, and anogenital areas. We highlight the underlying mechanism of the development of acrodermatitis because of zinc deficiency by describing our new findings. We also discuss the accumulating evidence on zinc deficiency in alopecia and necrolytic migratory erythema, which is typically associated with glucagonomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of zinc pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  9. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  10. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  11. History of zinc in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Forrest H

    2012-11-01

    Zinc was established as essential for green plants in 1926 and for mammals in 1934. However, >20 y would pass before the first descriptions of zinc deficiencies in farm animals appeared. In 1955, it was reported that zinc supplementation would cure parakeratosis in swine. In 1958, it was reported that zinc deficiency induced poor growth, leg abnormalities, poor feathering, and parakeratosis in chicks. In the 1960s, zinc supplementation was found to alleviate parakeratosis in grazing cattle and sheep. Within 35 y, it was established that nearly one half of the soils in the world may be zinc deficient, causing decreased plant zinc content and production that can be prevented by zinc fertilization. In many of these areas, zinc deficiency is prevented in grazing livestock by zinc fertilization of pastures or by providing salt licks. For livestock under more defined conditions, such as poultry, swine, and dairy and finishing cattle, feeds are easily supplemented with zinc salts to prevent deficiency. Today, the causes and consequences of zinc deficiency and methods and effects of overcoming the deficiency are well established for agriculture. The history of zinc in agriculture is an outstanding demonstration of the translation of research into practical application.

  12. Protein deficiency, but not zinc deficiency, reduces recovery of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibre diameters in the gastrocnemius muscle of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Prescod, Alexia L V; Halliday, William C; Taylor, Carla G

    2011-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of protein- and energy-type malnutrition in combination with Zn deficiency on the growth, serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), gastrocnemius muscle mass and fibre diameter of growing rats during a deficiency phase followed by nutritional rehabilitation. Rats (3-weeks old) were randomly assigned to baseline, or Zn-deficient (Z, < 1 mg Zn/kg), protein-deficient (P, 20 g protein/kg), combined Zn- and protein-deficient (ZP), energy-deficient (E, feed intake pair-fed to Z) or control (C, 30 mg Zn/kg and 170 g protein/kg) groups for a 3-week deficiency phase, followed by a 3-week repletion phase with the control diet. ATPase histochemical staining at pH 9·4 was used to differentiate type 1 and type 2 muscle fibres. After the deficiency phase, the ZP and P groups had lower body weight and smaller gastrocnemius muscle mass than the Z and E groups. Type 1 and 2 muscle fibre diameters (T1- and T2-MFD, respectively) were reduced in the ZP, P and Z groups compared with the E and C groups. Serum Zn was reduced in the ZP, P and Z groups, but serum IGF-1 was lowest in the Z and E groups. After the repletion phase, T1-MFD did not recover in the P and E groups nor T2-MFD in the P group, despite the P and E groups having a better recovery of body weight. In summary, previous protein deficiency, but not Zn deficiency, limited the recovery of both T1- and T2-MFD during nutritional repletion. The quality of skeletal muscle recovery in the malnourished groups was not associated with body weight, muscle mass, serum Zn or IGF-1 concentrations.

  13. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  14. Rats allowed to self-select zinc-deficient lard and fish-oil diets did not develop a preference for fish-oil diet.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akie; Nakashima, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    Zinc (Zn)-deficiency causes a reduction in food intake and alters adipose metabolism. The effect of zinc restriction in rats on the selection of fish-oil and lard was studied during a period of reduced appetite. The reduction of appetite was caused by an experimentally induced Zn-deficiency. Four-week-old male rats were divided into three dietary treatment groups: Zn-adequate (ZnA, 30.9 mg Zn/kg), marginal Zn-deficient (ZnM, 5.9 mg Zn/kg) or Zn-deficient (ZnD, 0.9 mg Zn/kg). The three groups were placed on a self-selection regimen of the ZnA-fish-oil diet (ZnA-FD) and the ZnA-lard diet (ZnA-LD), the ZnM-FD and the ZnM-LD or the ZnD-FD and the ZnD-LD, respectively for 24 d. The amount of the FD intake in the ZnD group decreased to 0.5 g/d after day 4-6 of self-selecting on the LD and the FD and no significant increase in the FD intake in the group was observed during the self-selection period. However, after day 7-9 and 13-15, the FD intake of the ZnA and the ZnM groups increased, respectively, and at the end of the self-selection period the ZnM and the ZnA rats consumed about 2.0 g FD/d and 4.5 g FD/d, respectively. The FD intake ratio [FD intake (g)/total intake (g)] in the ZnD rats during the self-selection period was the lowest and that in the ZnA rats was the highest of three groups. In conclusion, we showed that zinc status alters fish-oil and lard selection patterns and ZnD rats did not show a preference for fish-oil.

  15. Zinc and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Angela V; Craig, Winston J; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    Well planned vegetarian diets can provide adequate amounts of zinc from plant sources. Vegetarians appear to adapt to lower zinc intakes by increased absorption and retention of zinc. Good sources of zinc for vegetarians include whole grains, tofu, tempeh, legumes, nuts and seeds, fortified breakfast cereals and dairy products. The inhibitory effects of phytate on absorption of zinc can be minimised by modern food-processing methods such as soaking, heating, sprouting, fermenting and leavening. Absorption of zinc can be improved by using yeast-based breads and sourdough breads, sprouts, and presoaked legumes. Studies show vegetarians have similar serum zinc concentrations to, and no greater risk of zinc deficiency than, non-vegetarians (despite differences in zinc intake).

  16. Zinc and spinal cord injury: a review.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, B

    1984-04-01

    Everything that is living needs zinc. Because of its multiple cellular functions, many symptoms and signs have been associated with zinc deficiency in humans including poor wound healing, rashes, diarrhea, decreased sexual function, and growth retardation. These problems are usually caused by other factors and indiscriminate use of zinc supplements is associated with some risk. Because inaccurate diagnosis can prevent alternative appropriate therapy and evidence is lacking that zinc supplementation beyond normal levels is generally beneficial, zinc status should be assayed prior to its administration; serum-zinc levels are the easiest method obtainable. A normal value is strong evidence against zinc deficiency (unless zinc replenishment has just been initiated); a single depressed value, however, may reflect the body's response to stress and not true zinc deficiency. A single low value in an acutely stressed patient should be interpreted with caution and repeated in several days. Symptoms and signs caused by zinc deficiency usually respond to zinc supplementation.

  17. Fructose consumption and moderate zinc deficiency influence growth and adipocyte metabolism in young rats prone to adult-onset obesity.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Erin L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J; King, Janet C

    2007-07-01

    The effects of low zinc, high fructose diet on growth and adipocyte metabolism were examined in rats. At 28 days of age, animals were assigned to diets either adequate in zinc (30 ppm) with water (AZW) or fructose solution (AZF), or low in zinc (5 ppm) with water (LZW) or fructose solution (LZF). Body weight and food and fructose solution intake were measured three times a week. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks, and energy expenditure was measured. The rats were killed at 12 weeks. Adipocytes were cultured in medium containing C14-glucose and physiological insulin concentrations. The animals in the LZF group consumed less energy and gained less weight than the other groups. Serum zinc concentrations were lower in the LZF than the AZF group. Energy expenditure over a 24-h period did not differ between groups; however, the respiratory quotient in the fed state was higher in the groups consuming fructose solution than in those consuming water. The mesenteric adipocytes from the animals in the LZF group utilized more glucose. Thus, the addition of fructose to a LZ diet reduced energy intake and growth and altered adipocyte fuel metabolism in young growing rats.

  18. Red mold rice promoted antioxidase activity against oxidative injury and improved the memory ability of zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Ho, Bing-Ying; Wang, Chin-Thin; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2009-11-25

    Zn deficiency is a common disease leading to memory impairment with increasing age. This study evaluated the protection effects of red mold rice (RMR) administration and Zn supplementation against memory and learning ability impairments from oxidative stress caused by Zn deficiency. Rats (4 weeks old) were induced to be Zn deficiency by a Zn-deficient diet for 12 weeks. After that, rats were administered Zn, 1xRMR, 5xRMR, and various dosages of RMR plus Zn, respectively. Decreases of antioxidant enzyme activities in the hippocampus and cortex were observed, and the levels of Ca, Fe, and Mg were increased in the hippocampus and cortex of Zn-deficient rats, leading to memory and learning ability injury. However, the administration of RMR (1- or 5-fold dosage) and with or without Zn significantly improved the antioxidase and neural activity to maintain cortex and hippocampus functions. This study demonstrates that RMR is a possible functional food for the prevention or cure of neural injury associated with Zn deficiency.

  19. The Involvement of OsPHO1;1 in the Regulation of Iron Transport Through Integration of Phosphate and Zinc Deficiency Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saenchai, Chorpet; Bouain, Nadia; Kisko, Mushtak; Prom-u-thai, Chanakan; Doumas, Patrick; Rouached, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Plants survival depends on their ability to cope with multiple nutrient stresses that often occur simultaneously, such as the limited availability of essential elements inorganic phosphate (Pi), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe). Previous research has provided information on the genes involved in efforts by plants to maintain homeostasis when a single nutrient (Pi, Zn, or Fe) is depleted. Recent findings on nutritional stress suggest that plant growth capacity is influenced by a complex tripartite interaction between Pi, Zn, and Fe homeostasis. However, despite its importance, how plants integrate multiple nutritional stimuli into complex developmental programs, and which genes are involved in this tripartite (Pi ZnFe) interaction is still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the physiological and molecular responses of rice (Oriza sativa L.) to a combination of Pi, Zn, and/or Fe deficiency stress conditions. Results showed that Fe deficiency had the most drastic single-nutrient effect on biomass, while the Zn deficiency-effect depended on the presence of Pi in the medium. Interestingly, the observed negative effect of Fe starvation was alleviated by concomitant Pi or PiZn depletion. Members of the OsPHO1 family showed a differential transcriptional regulation in response PiZnFe combinatory stress conditions. Particularly, the transcripts of the OsPHO1;1 sense and its natural antisense cis-NatPHO1;1 showed the highest accumulation under PiZn deficiency. In this condition, the Ospho1;1 mutants showed over-accumulation of Fe in roots compared to wild type plants. These data reveal coordination between pathways involved in Fe transport and PiZn signaling in rice which involves the OsPHO1; 1, and support the hypothesis of a genetic basis for Pi, Zn, and Fe signaling interactions in plants. PMID:27092147

  20. The Involvement of OsPHO1;1 in the Regulation of Iron Transport Through Integration of Phosphate and Zinc Deficiency Signaling.

    PubMed

    Saenchai, Chorpet; Bouain, Nadia; Kisko, Mushtak; Prom-U-Thai, Chanakan; Doumas, Patrick; Rouached, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Plants survival depends on their ability to cope with multiple nutrient stresses that often occur simultaneously, such as the limited availability of essential elements inorganic phosphate (Pi), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe). Previous research has provided information on the genes involved in efforts by plants to maintain homeostasis when a single nutrient (Pi, Zn, or Fe) is depleted. Recent findings on nutritional stress suggest that plant growth capacity is influenced by a complex tripartite interaction between Pi, Zn, and Fe homeostasis. However, despite its importance, how plants integrate multiple nutritional stimuli into complex developmental programs, and which genes are involved in this tripartite (Pi ZnFe) interaction is still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the physiological and molecular responses of rice (Oriza sativa L.) to a combination of Pi, Zn, and/or Fe deficiency stress conditions. Results showed that Fe deficiency had the most drastic single-nutrient effect on biomass, while the Zn deficiency-effect depended on the presence of Pi in the medium. Interestingly, the observed negative effect of Fe starvation was alleviated by concomitant Pi or PiZn depletion. Members of the OsPHO1 family showed a differential transcriptional regulation in response PiZnFe combinatory stress conditions. Particularly, the transcripts of the OsPHO1;1 sense and its natural antisense cis-NatPHO1;1 showed the highest accumulation under PiZn deficiency. In this condition, the Ospho1;1 mutants showed over-accumulation of Fe in roots compared to wild type plants. These data reveal coordination between pathways involved in Fe transport and PiZn signaling in rice which involves the OsPHO1; 1, and support the hypothesis of a genetic basis for Pi, Zn, and Fe signaling interactions in plants.

  1. Zinc Deficiency Up-Regulates Expression of High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Genes in Both Phosphate-Sufficient and -Deficient Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunyuan; Barker, Susan Jane; Langridge, Peter; Smith, Frank W.; Graham, Robin David

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate (P) is taken up by plants through high-affinity P transporter proteins embedded in the plasma membrane of certain cell types in plant roots. Expression of the genes that encode these transporters responds to the P status of the plants, and their transcription is normally tightly controlled. However, this tight control of P uptake is lost under Zn deficiency, leading to very high accumulation of P in plants. We examined the effect of plant Zn status on the expression of the genes encoding the HVPT1 and HVPT2 high-affinity P transporters in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Weeah) roots. The results show that the expression of these genes is intimately linked to the Zn status of the plants. Zn deficiency induced the expression of genes encoding these P transporters in plants grown in either P-sufficient or -deficient conditions. Moreover, the role of Zn in the regulation of these genes is specific in that it cannot be replaced by manganese (a divalent cation similar to Zn). It appears that Zn plays a specific role in the signal transduction pathway responsible for the regulation of genes encoding high-affinity P transporters in plant roots. The significance of Zn involvement in the regulation of genes involved in P uptake is discussed. PMID:10982454

  2. Prevalence of anemia and deficiency of iron, folic acid, and zinc in children younger than 2 years of age who use the health services provided by the Mexican Social Security Institute

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Ximena; Flores-Hernández, Sergio; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio; Muñoz, Sergio; Turnbull, Bernardo; Martínez-Andrade, Gloria; Ramos, Rosa I; González-Unzaga, Marco; Mendoza, María E; Martínez, Homero

    2007-01-01

    Background In Mexico, as in other developing countries, micronutrient deficiencies are common in infants between 6 and 24 months of age and are an important public health problem. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and of iron, folic acid, and zinc deficiencies in Mexican children under 2 years of age who use the health care services provided by the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS). Methods A nationwide survey was conducted with a representative sample of children younger than 2 years of age, beneficiaries, and users of health care services provided by IMSS through its regular regimen (located in urban populations) and its Oportunidades program (services offered in rural areas). A subsample of 4,955 clinically healthy children was studied to determine their micronutrient status. A venous blood sample was drawn to determine hemoglobin, serum ferritin, percent of transferrin saturation, zinc, and folic acid. Descriptive statistics include point estimates and 95% confidence intervals for the sample and projections for the larger population from which the sample was drawn. Results Twenty percent of children younger than 2 years of age had anemia, and 27.8% (rural) to 32.6% (urban) had iron deficiency; more than 50% of anemia was not associated with low ferritin concentrations. Iron stores were more depleted as age increased. Low serum zinc and folic acid deficiencies were 28% and 10%, respectively, in the urban areas, and 13% and 8%, respectively, in rural areas. The prevalence of simultaneous iron and zinc deficiencies was 9.2% and 2.7% in urban and rural areas. Children with anemia have higher percentages of folic acid deficiency than children with normal iron status. Conclusion Iron and zinc deficiencies constitute the principal micronutrient deficiencies in Mexican children younger than 2 years old who use the health care services provided by IMSS. Anemia not associated with low ferritin values was more prevalent than

  3. Prevalence of anemia and deficiency of iron, folic acid, and zinc in children younger than 2 years of age who use the health services provided by the Mexican Social Security Institute.

    PubMed

    Duque, Ximena; Flores-Hernández, Sergio; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio; Muñoz, Sergio; Turnbull, Bernardo; Martínez-Andrade, Gloria; Ramos, Rosa I; González-Unzaga, Marco; Mendoza, María E; Martínez, Homero

    2007-11-30

    In Mexico, as in other developing countries, micronutrient deficiencies are common in infants between 6 and 24 months of age and are an important public health problem. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and of iron, folic acid, and zinc deficiencies in Mexican children under 2 years of age who use the health care services provided by the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS). A nationwide survey was conducted with a representative sample of children younger than 2 years of age, beneficiaries, and users of health care services provided by IMSS through its regular regimen (located in urban populations) and its Oportunidades program (services offered in rural areas). A subsample of 4,955 clinically healthy children was studied to determine their micronutrient status. A venous blood sample was drawn to determine hemoglobin, serum ferritin, percent of transferrin saturation, zinc, and folic acid. Descriptive statistics include point estimates and 95% confidence intervals for the sample and projections for the larger population from which the sample was drawn. Twenty percent of children younger than 2 years of age had anemia, and 27.8% (rural) to 32.6% (urban) had iron deficiency; more than 50% of anemia was not associated with low ferritin concentrations. Iron stores were more depleted as age increased. Low serum zinc and folic acid deficiencies were 28% and 10%, respectively, in the urban areas, and 13% and 8%, respectively, in rural areas. The prevalence of simultaneous iron and zinc deficiencies was 9.2% and 2.7% in urban and rural areas. Children with anemia have higher percentages of folic acid deficiency than children with normal iron status. Iron and zinc deficiencies constitute the principal micronutrient deficiencies in Mexican children younger than 2 years old who use the health care services provided by IMSS. Anemia not associated with low ferritin values was more prevalent than iron-deficiency anemia. The presence

  4. Highly nonlinear varistors from oxygen-deficient zinc oxide thin films by hot-dipping in Bi2O3: Influence of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Peng, Zhijian; Wang, Qi; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-12-01

    Highly nonlinear varistors were fabricated by hot-dipping oxygen-deficient zinc oxide (ZnO1-x, x < 1) thin films in Bi2O3. The ZnO1-x films were deposited on conducting silicon chips by radio frequency magnetron sputtering of a sintered zinc oxide ceramic target. Then the films were hot-dipped at a temperature from 200 to 600 °C in Bi2O3. With the increase in hot-dipping temperature, the nonlinear coefficient (α) of the film varistors increases first and then decreases, and the leakage current (IL) correspondingly decreases initially and then increases, owing mainly to the formation and destroying of complete ZnO1-x/Bi2O3 grain boundaries and the roundness change of the ZnO1-x grains; and the varistor voltage (E1mA) decreases from 0.0268 to 0.0137 V/nm, due to the decreased number of effective grain boundaries in the materials. The film varistors prepared by hot-dipping at 400 °C exhibit the optimum nonlinear properties with the highest α = 15.1, lowest IL = 0.0223 mA/cm2, and E1mA = 0.0176 V/nm. Such nanoscaled film varistors will be very promising in electrical/electronic devices working in low-voltage.

  5. Estrogen retention and estrogen receptor distribution in uterus of rats deficient in zinc and/or vitamin B/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.E.; Vessal, M.

    1986-03-01

    Holley et al have reported that uptake and retention of a tracer dose of (/sup 3/H)-estradiol (E/sub 2/) by rat uteri nuclei was increased four-fold in pyridoxine-deprived young rats as compared to controls. The diet lacked a specific input of zinc, a nutrient which may also influence estrogen impact on target cells. The authors have tested the effect of diets restricted in either zinc or pyridoxine singly or in combination upon both retention of estrogen and subcellular distribution of estrogen receptor in rat uterus. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed their respective diets for five weeks. Stage of estrous cycle was determined by examination of vaginal smears. On the morning of estrous, each rat was given an IP injection of (/sup 3/H) E/sub 2/. Nuclear and cytosolic E/sub 2/ was determined after 20 minutes. A second series of animals were killed at estrous after the same period of dietary treatment and nuclear and cytosolic estradiol receptors were measured. Uterine retention of injected E/sub 2/ was increased 2-fold when Zn was limiting (3 ppm), 1.5-fold when B/sub 6/ was low and 3.5-fold when both were low. Dually deficient rats displayed a 10-fold increase in nuclear content of E/sub 2/ receptor but no significant change in total cellular receptor content.

  6. The co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation has the opposite effects on mood compared with either condition alone due to changes in the central norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Hironori; Omata, Naoto; Kiyono, Yasushi; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Mita, Kayo; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Wada, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Nutritional and social environmental problems during the early stages of life are closely associated with the pathophysiology of mood disorders such as depression. Disruption or dysfunction of the central norepinephrine (NE) system is also considered to play a role in mood disorders. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of zinc deficiency and/or social isolation on mood and changes in the central NE system using rats. Compared with the controls, the rats subjected to zinc deficiency or social isolation alone exhibited increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and greater depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. However, the co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior and control levels of depression-like behavior. Social isolation alone decreased the rats' cerebral NE concentrations. The expression of the NE transporter was not affected by social isolation alone, but its expression in the locus coeruleus was markedly decreased by the co-occurrence of social isolation and zinc deficiency, and this change was accompanied by an increase in the blood concentration of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, which is a marker of central NE system activity. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency or social isolation alone induce anxious or depressive symptoms, but the presence of both conditions has anxiolytic or antidepressive effects. Furthermore, these opposing effects of mood-related behaviors were found to be associated with changes in the central NE system. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of cluster of grapes like pure and Zinc-doped CuO nanoparticles by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, J; Srinivasan, N; Chandrasekaran, P; Girija, E K

    2015-02-05

    Pure CuO and Zn-doped CuO nanoparticles were synthesized from sol-gel process by reacting copper acetate monohydrate with a urea in distilled water at 80°C. The synthesized Samples were different concentrations but same annealing temperature at 400°C. The obtained samples were characterized by means of UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). UV-visible technique used to measure the band gap of the synthesized samples. The XRD spectra of the synthesized samples confirmed the CuO nanoparticles with monoclinic structure. All the functional groups of the pure and doped synthesized samples were investigated by FT-IR analysis. The morphological and elemental estimation of the pure and Zn-doped synthesized samples were examined by FE-SEM with EDS.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of cluster of grapes like pure and Zinc-doped CuO nanoparticles by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, J.; Srinivasan, N.; Chandrasekaran, P.; Girija, E. K.

    2015-02-01

    Pure CuO and Zn-doped CuO nanoparticles were synthesized from sol-gel process by reacting copper acetate monohydrate with a urea in distilled water at 80 °C. The synthesized Samples were different concentrations but same annealing temperature at 400 °C. The obtained samples were characterized by means of UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). UV-visible technique used to measure the band gap of the synthesized samples. The XRD spectra of the synthesized samples confirmed the CuO nanoparticles with monoclinic structure. All the functional groups of the pure and doped synthesized samples were investigated by FT-IR analysis. The morphological and elemental estimation of the pure and Zn-doped synthesized samples were examined by FE-SEM with EDS.

  9. Characterization of the Bacillus stearothermophilus manganese superoxide dismutase gene and its ability to complement copper/zinc superoxide dismutase deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, C; Van Kaer, L; Van Camp, W; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Dhaese, P

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant clones containing the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene of Bacillus stearothermophilus were isolated with an oligonucleotide probe designed to match a part of the previously determined amino acid sequence. Complementation analyses, performed by introducing each plasmid into a superoxide dismutase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, allowed us to define the region of DNA which encodes the MnSOD structural gene and to identify a promoter region immediately upstream from the gene. These data were subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing. Since MnSOD is normally restricted to the mitochondria in eucaryotes, we were interested (i) in determining whether B. stearothermophilus MnSOD could function in eucaryotic cytosol and (ii) in determining whether MnSOD could replace the structurally unrelated copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) which is normally found there. To test this, the sequence encoding bacterial MnSOD was cloned into a yeast expression vector and subsequently introduced into a Cu/ZnSOD-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional expression of the protein was demonstrated, and complementation tests revealed that the protein was able to provide tolerance at wild-type levels to conditions which are normally restrictive for this mutant. Thus, in spite of the evolutionary unrelatedness of these two enzymes, Cu/ZnSOD can be functionally replaced by MnSOD in yeast cytosol. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:2407726

  10. Zinc protoporphyrin and percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes as markers of functional iron deficiency during therapy with erythropoietin in patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matzkies, F K; Cullen, P; Schaefer, L; Hartmann, M; Hohage, H; Schaefer, R M

    1999-12-01

    We assessed zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) and the percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes in patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) treated with recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO). Patients received 150 IU rhEPO subcutaneously every second day for 10 days, and 150 IU rhEPO plus 62.5 mg of intravenous iron every second day for an additional 10 days. Before rhEPO therapy, ZPP was at 64.3 +/- 27.3 micromol/mol heme and the percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes was elevated at 9.7%, indicating mild functional iron deficiency. Ferritin was 1,002 +/- 956 microg/L, with transferrin saturation of 19.1 +/- 9.7%. Under rhEPO alone, ZPP rose to 80.1 +/- 21.6 micromol/mol heme and the percentage of hypochromic red cells rose to 22.9 +/- 4.7%; ferritin fell to 705 +/- 601 microg/L and transferrin saturation fell to 12 +/- 6.3%. When rhEPO was supplemented with iron, ZPP fell to 70.4 +/- 20.5 micromol/mol heme, the percentage of hypochromic red cells fell to 14.7 +/- 3.4%; ferritin was unchanged at 771 +/- 62 microg/L and transferrin saturation rose to 20.5 +/- 5.5%. In contrast to ferritin and transferrin saturation, ZPP and the percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes effectively detect the functional iron deficiency under rhEPO therapy in advanced AIDS.

  11. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Alter Lipid and Fatty Acid Composition in the Liver of Weanling Rats Fed Diets Rich in Cocoa Butter or Safflower Oil.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Edgar; Egenolf, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether a moderate zinc deficiency alters hepatic lipid composition. Male weanling rats, assigned to five groups (8 animals each), were fed low-carbohydrate high-fat diets supplemented with 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (LZ or HZ) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower oil (SF) for four weeks. One group each had free access to the LZ-CB and LZ-SF diets, one group each was restrictedly fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in matching amounts, and one group had free access to the HZ-SF diet (ad libitum control). The rats fed the LZ diets had significantly lower energy intakes and final body weights than the ad libitum control group, and lower plasma and femur Zn concentrations than the animals consuming the HZ diets. Hepatic cholesterol, triacylglycerol and phospholipid concentrations, and fatty acid composition of hepatic triacylglycerols and phospholipids did not significantly differ between the LZ and their respective HZ groups, but were greatly affected by dietary fat source. In conclusion, the moderate Zn deficiency did not significantly alter liver lipid concentrations and fatty acid composition.

  12. Differentiation of soluble proteins in cataracts caused by deficiencies of methionine, riboflavin or zinc in diets fed to Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, and lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush.

    PubMed

    Barash, H; Poston, H A; Rumsey, G L

    1982-10-01

    Water soluble extracts from cataractous and normal salmonid lenses were subjected to thin-layer isoelectric focusing. The cataracts resulted from deficiencies of specific nutrients in diets fed to three species of salmonids as follows: (1) rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) fed a diet deficient in riboflavin; (2) Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed a diet deficient in methionine; and (3) rainbow trout and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fed a diet deficient in zinc. In all tests, the protein pattern of cataractous lenses differed from that of normal lenses. Each cataract caused by the different dietary deficiencies had a specific pattern of soluble lens proteins. Even though the general patterns of the soluble lens proteins for all three salmonids though the general patterns of the soluble lens proteins for all three salmonids studied were similar, a specific pattern was unique for each of the species.

  13. Mapping of iron and zinc quantitative trait loci in soybean for association to iron deficiency chlorosis resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a nutritional disease of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which when left unchecked can result in a severe yield penalty or even death in the most extreme cases. In order to curb these effects, resistance to the disease is needed. Breeding for resistance has been ...

  14. Iron Availability Affects Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Responses, and Evidence of Cross-Talk with Auxin and Zinc in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandna; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Yadav, Sandeep; Sarkar, Ananda K; Dantu, Prem Kumar; Jain, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is pivotal for plant growth and development. Pi deficiency triggers local and systemically regulated adaptive responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Inhibition of primary root growth (PRG) and retarded development of lateral roots (LRs) are typical local Pi deficiency-mediated responses of the root system. Expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes is regulated systemically. Here, we report the differential influence of iron (Fe) availability on local and systemic sensing of Pi by Arabidopsis. P-Fe- condition disrupted local Pi sensing, resulting in an elongated primary root (PR). Altered Fe homeostasis in the lpsi mutant with aberration in local Pi sensing provided circumstantial evidence towards the role of Fe in the maintenance of Pi homeostasis. Reporter gene assays, expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes (ARGs) and root phenotyping of the arf7arf19 mutant demonstrated the role of Fe availability on local Pi deficiency-mediated LR development. In addition, Fe availability also exerted a significant influence on PSR genes belonging to different functional categories. Together, these results demonstrated a substantial influence of Fe availability on Pi deficiency-mediated responses of ontogenetically distinct traits of the root system and PSR genes. The study also provided evidence of cross-talk between Pi, Fe and Zn, highlighting a complex tripartite interaction amongst them for maintaining Pi homeostasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Relationship between abnormal sperm morphology induced by dietary zinc deficiency and lipid composition in testes of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Merrells, Krystal J; Blewett, Heather; Jamieson, Jennifer A; Taylor, Carla G; Suh, Miyoung

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary Zn deficiency during sexual maturation on sperm integrity and testis phospholipid fatty acid composition. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into four dietary groups for 3 weeks: Zn control (ZC; 30 mg Zn/kg); Zn marginally deficient (ZMD; 9 mg Zn/kg); Zn deficient (ZD; < 1 mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30 mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Morphology of cauda epididymal sperm and lipid profiles of testis phospholipids were analysed. The rats fed the ZD diet had a lower testis weight (P < 0.02). Seminal vesicles and prostate weight were also lower in the ZD and PF groups. Rats fed the ZD diet, but not the ZMD diet, had 34-35 % more abnormal spermatozoa and 24 % shorter sperm tail length than the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.001). Testis cholesterol concentration was higher in the ZD rats compared with the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.04). Testes were highly enriched with n-6 fatty acids by showing n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratios of 27:1 in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 23:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The dominant fatty acid in testes was docosapentaenoic acid (22 : 5n-6), comprising 15 and 24 % of PC and PE, respectively. This fatty acid was significantly lower in the ZD rats, whereas 18 : 2n-6 was higher compared with the rats in the other diet groups. These results demonstrate that severe Zn deficiency adversely affects sperm integrity and modulates testis fatty acid composition by interrupting essential fatty acid metabolism. This suggests that Zn deficiency-associated abnormal testicular function is perhaps preceded by altered membrane fatty acid composition, especially of a major fatty acid, 22 : 5n-6.

  16. Intrinsic functional defects of type 2 innate lymphoid cells impair innate allergic inflammation in promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Philip A; Constantinides, Michael G; McDonald, Benjamin D; Urban, Joseph F; Sperling, Anne I; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is transiently expressed during development of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) but is not present at the mature stage. We hypothesized that PLZF-deficient ILC2s have functional defects in the innate allergic response and represent a tool for studying innate immunity in a mouse with a functional adaptive immune response. We determined the consequences of PLZF deficiency on ILC2 function in response to innate and adaptive immune stimuli by using PLZF(-/-) mice and mixed wild-type:PLZF(-/-) bone marrow chimeras. PLZF(-/-) mice, wild-type littermates, or mixed bone marrow chimeras were treated with the protease allergen papain or the cytokines IL-25 and IL-33 or infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis to induce innate type 2 allergic responses. Mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin-alum, followed by intranasal challenge with ovalbumin alone, to induce adaptive TH2 responses. Lungs were analyzed for immune cell subsets, and alveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for ILC2-derived cytokines. In addition, ILC2s were stimulated ex vivo for their capacity to release type 2 cytokines. PLZF-deficient lung ILC2s exhibit a cell-intrinsic defect in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to innate stimuli, resulting in defective recruitment of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia. In contrast, the adaptive allergic inflammatory response to ovalbumin and alum was unimpaired. PLZF expression at the innate lymphoid cell precursor stage has a long-range effect on the functional properties of mature ILC2s and highlights the importance of these cells for innate allergic responses in otherwise immunocompetent mice. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  17. Vitamin B-12 Deficiency in Children Is Associated with Grade Repetition and School Absenteeism, Independent of Folate, Iron, Zinc, or Vitamin A Status Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Duong, Minh-Cam; Mora-Plazas, Mercedes; Marín, Constanza; Villamor, Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    Micronutrients are essential to neurocognitive development; yet their role in educational outcomes is unclear. We examined the associations of micronutrient status biomarkers with the risk of grade repetition and rates of school absenteeism in a cohort of school children. We recruited 3156 children aged 5-12 y from public schools in Bogota, Colombia. Circulating ferritin, hemoglobin, zinc, vitamin A, and vitamin B-12; erythrocyte folate; and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were measured in blood samples obtained at the beginning of the year. Absenteeism was recorded weekly during the school year, and grade repetition was determined the next year. Risk ratios for grade repetition and rate ratios for absenteeism were estimated by categories of micronutrient status indicators with use of Poisson regression, adjusting for potential confounders. The risk of grade repetition was 4.9%, and the absenteeism rate was 3.8 d per child-year of observation. Vitamin B-12 deficiency (<148 pmol/L) was associated with an adjusted 2.36-fold greater risk of grade repetition (95% CI: 1.03, 5.41; P = 0.04) compared with plasma concentrations ≥148 pmol/L. Other micronutrients were not related to grade repetition. Vitamin B-12 deficiency was also associated with school absenteeism rates. Compared with children with plasma vitamin B-12 concentrations ≥148 pmol/L, vitamin B-12-deficient children had a 1.89-times higher adjusted rate (95% CI: 1.53, 2.34; P < 0.0001). Anemia was related to a 72% higher rate (95% CI: 48%, 99%; P < 0.0001), whereas every 5-fL difference in MCV was associated with a 7% lower adjusted rate (95% CI: 4%, 10%; P < 0.0001). Vitamin B-12 deficiency was associated with risk of grade repetition and school absenteeism rates in school children from Bogota, Colombia. The effects of correcting vitamin B-12 deficiency on educational outcomes and neurocognitive development of school children need to be determined in intervention studies. © 2015 American Society for

  18. Common Bean: A Legume Model on the Rise for Unraveling Responses and Adaptations to Iron, Zinc, and Phosphate Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma A.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was domesticated ∼8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein) and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development, and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals. PMID:27200068

  19. Common Bean: A Legume Model on the Rise for Unraveling Responses and Adaptations to Iron, Zinc, and Phosphate Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma A; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G; Valdés-López, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was domesticated ∼8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein) and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development, and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals.

  20. Zinc: An Essential Micronutrient

    PubMed Central

    SAPER, ROBERT B.; RASH, REBECCA

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for human metabolism that catalyzes more than 100 enzymes, facilitates protein folding, and helps regulate gene expression. Patients with malnutrition, alcoholism, inflammatory bowel disease, and malabsorption syndromes are at an increased risk of zinc deficiency. Symptoms of zinc deficiency are nonspecific, including growth retardation, diarrhea, alopecia, glossitis, nail dystrophy, decreased immunity, and hypogonadism in males. In developing countries, zinc supplementation may be effective for the prevention of upper respiratory infection and diarrhea, and as an adjunct treatment for diarrhea in malnourished children. Zinc in combination with antioxidants may be modestly effective in slowing the progression of intermediate and advanced age-related macular degeneration. Zinc is an effective treatment for Wilson disease. Current data do not support zinc supplementation as effective for upper respiratory infection, wound healing, or human immunodeficiency virus. Zinc is well tolerated at recommended dosages. Adverse effects of long-term high-dose zinc use include suppressed immunity, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, anemia, copper deficiency, and possible genitourinary complications. PMID:20141096

  1. History of zinc in agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc was established as essential for green plants in 1926 and for mammals in 1934. However, over 20 years would past before the first descriptions of zinc deficiencies in farm animals appeared. In 1955, it was reported that zinc supplementation would cure a parakeratosis in swine. In 1958, it wa...

  2. History of Zinc in Agriculture12

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Forrest H.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc was established as essential for green plants in 1926 and for mammals in 1934. However, >20 y would pass before the first descriptions of zinc deficiencies in farm animals appeared. In 1955, it was reported that zinc supplementation would cure parakeratosis in swine. In 1958, it was reported that zinc deficiency induced poor growth, leg abnormalities, poor feathering, and parakeratosis in chicks. In the 1960s, zinc supplementation was found to alleviate parakeratosis in grazing cattle and sheep. Within 35 y, it was established that nearly one half of the soils in the world may be zinc deficient, causing decreased plant zinc content and production that can be prevented by zinc fertilization. In many of these areas, zinc deficiency is prevented in grazing livestock by zinc fertilization of pastures or by providing salt licks. For livestock under more defined conditions, such as poultry, swine, and dairy and finishing cattle, feeds are easily supplemented with zinc salts to prevent deficiency. Today, the causes and consequences of zinc deficiency and methods and effects of overcoming the deficiency are well established for agriculture. The history of zinc in agriculture is an outstanding demonstration of the translation of research into practical application. PMID:23153732

  3. Evaluation and comparison of zinc absorption level from 2-Alkyle 3-Hydroxy pyranon-zinc complexes and zinc sulfate in rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Badii; Niloufar, Nekouei; Abolfazl, Mostafavi; Lofollah, Saghaei; Ali, Khodarahmi Qadam; Soheyla, Valadian

    2013-01-01

    Although zinc sulfate has been used to improve disorders originated from zinc deficiency, its low compliance is due to gastrointestinal complications; therefore, other zinc compounds have been suggested as replacers for zinc deficient people. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the absorption of ethyl and methyl zinc-maltol with that of zinc sulfate to substitute zinc sulfate with those complexes. After five weeks of being fed by zinc deficient food, zinc deficient rats were divided into four groups randomly receiving medicinal solutions of zinc sulfate, zinc ethyl maltol and zinc methyl maltol using feeding tube method for two weeks while the control was received distilled water. Serum zinc concentration and ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) and LDH (Lactate Dehydrogenase) activity of rats were determined before and after the study. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 11.5. The study was conducted from 2008 to 2010. Serum zinc concentration and enzyme activity in all groups receiving drug solution increased. The most and least increase were in zinc sulfate and zinc methyl maltol groups, respectively. The difference between zinc methyl maltol and zinc sulfate group was significant (P < 0.05); however, this difference was not significant in the case of zinc ethyl maltol. Zinc ethyl maltol can be a suitable and preferable substitute for zinc sulfate.

  4. Evaluation and comparison of zinc absorption level from 2-Alkyle 3-Hydroxy pyranon-zinc complexes and zinc sulfate in rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Badii; Niloufar, Nekouei; Abolfazl, Mostafavi; Lofollah, Saghaei; Ali, Khodarahmi Qadam; Soheyla, Valadian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although zinc sulfate has been used to improve disorders originated from zinc deficiency, its low compliance is due to gastrointestinal complications; therefore, other zinc compounds have been suggested as replacers for zinc deficient people. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the absorption of ethyl and methyl zinc-maltol with that of zinc sulfate to substitute zinc sulfate with those complexes. Materials and Methods: After five weeks of being fed by zinc deficient food, zinc deficient rats were divided into four groups randomly receiving medicinal solutions of zinc sulfate, zinc ethyl maltol and zinc methyl maltol using feeding tube method for two weeks while the control was received distilled water. Serum zinc concentration and ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) and LDH (Lactate Dehydrogenase) activity of rats were determined before and after the study. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 11.5. The study was conducted from 2008 to 2010. Results: Serum zinc concentration and enzyme activity in all groups receiving drug solution increased. The most and least increase were in zinc sulfate and zinc methyl maltol groups, respectively. The difference between zinc methyl maltol and zinc sulfate group was significant (P < 0.05); however, this difference was not significant in the case of zinc ethyl maltol. Conclusion: Zinc ethyl maltol can be a suitable and preferable substitute for zinc sulfate. PMID:24223392

  5. The role of zinc deficiency-induced changes in the phospholipid-protein balance of blood serum in animal depression model by Raman, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Depciuch, J; Sowa-Kućma, M; Nowak, G; Szewczyk, B; Doboszewska, U; Parlinska-Wojtan, M

    2017-02-28

    Depression is a serious mental illness. To study the mechanisms of diseases and search for new, more effective therapies, animal models are used. Unfortunately, none of the available models does reflect all symptoms of depression. Zinc deficiency is proposed as a new animal model of depression. However, it has not been yet validated in a detailed manner. Recently, spectroscopic techniques are increasingly being used both in clinical and preclinical studies. Here we examined the effect of zinc deficiency and amitryptyline treatment on the phospholipid - protein balance in the blood serum of rats using Raman, Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and UV-vis technique. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with a zinc ample diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then amitriptyline administration (AMI, 10mg/kg, i.p.) was started. After injecting the drug for 2-weeks, blood samples were collected and analyzed. It was found that zinc deficiency decreases both the level of phospholipids and proteins and also causes structural changes in their structures. In the ZnD group amitriptyline treatment influenced the protein level and structure. UV-vis spectroscopy combined with the second derivative calculated from the FTIR spectra provided information that the proteins in blood serum of rat fed with a low Zn diet regain their intact structure after amitriptyline medication. Simultaneously, the antidepressant therapy did not have any effect on the level of phospholipids in this group of rats. Additionally, our results show, that amitriptyline administration can change the structure of phospholipids in rats subjected to zinc ample diet. This altered structure of phospholipids was identified as shortening of carbon chains. Our findings indicate that the decreased level of zinc may be the cause of depressive disorders, as it leads to changes in the phospholipid-protein balance necessary for the proper functioning of the body. This study also shows

  6. [Zinc deficiency and associated factors in colombian children; results from the 2010 national nutrition survey; a cross sectional study].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Javier; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2014-04-01

    Introducción: El zinc (Zn) es un micronutriente esencial en el crecimiento celular, la síntesis proteica y la diferenciación celular. La deficiencia de Zn afecta el crecimiento y desarrollo del niño, el metabolismo energético y la respuesta inmune. Objetivo: Examinar los factores asociados a la deficiencia de Zn en una muestra representativa de colombianos niños. Pacientes y métodos: Estudio descriptivo transversal, secundario de la información obtenida en la Encuesta Nacional de la Situación Nutricional 2010 (ENSIN 2010), en 4.279 niños entre 12 y 59 meses. Los niveles plasmáticos de Zn se determinaron por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica, y los factores asociados (sexo, edad, etnia, puntaje de SISBEN, región y área geográfica) se recogieron por encuesta estructurada. Se establecieron asociaciones mediante la construcción de modelos de regresión y factores asociados. Resultados: Se encontró un valor promedio de Zinc de 78,5 μg/dl (IC 95% = 76,7-80,4 μg/dl). El 43,3% (IC 95% 42,2-44,3%) de los niños presentaron niveles de Zn menores a 65 μg/dl. Los niños pertenecientes a grupos étnicos (indígena) o que residen en áreas rurales; presentaron mayor déficit de Zn (56,3% y 47,8%) respectivamente. Los modelos de regresión muestran que; ser indígena (OR 1,76 IC 95% 1,29-2,41); y residir en zonas rurales (OR 1,39 IC 95% 1,16-1,67), se asociaron al déficit de Zn. Conclusiones: La población estudiada presenta una alta prevalencia de déficit de Zn, por lo que se recomienda intervenciones integrales donde estén involucrados el componente nutricional y educativo.

  7. Effects of maternal marginal zinc deficiency on myelin protein profiles in the suckling rat and infant rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Oteiza, P I; Gershwin, M E; Golub, M S; Keen, C L

    1992-07-01

    In the current study, the effects of marginal Zn deficiency on myelin protein profiles in neonatal rats and rhesus monkeys were investigated. Following mating, rats were fed a Zn-adequate diet, ad libitum (50 micrograms Zn/g; 50 Zn AL), or a marginal Zn diet (10 micrograms Zn/g) from day 0 (10 Zn d0) or day 14 (10 Zn d14) of gestation to day 20 postnatal. An additional group of dams was restricted-fed the control diet to the food intake of the 10 Zn d0 group (50 Zn RF). Day 20 pup plasma and liver Zn concentrations in the 10 Zn groups were lower than in the 50 Zn groups. In a parallel experiment, rhesus monkeys were fed a Zn-adequate ad libitum diet (100 micrograms Zn/g) or a marginal Zn diet (4 micrograms Zn/g diet; MZD) throughout gestation and lactation. Day 30 monkey infant plasma and liver Zn levels were similar in the MZD and control groups. Rat brain and monkey brain cortex weights were similar among the dietary groups. The amount of myelin recovered (mg protein/g brain) from day 20 rat pups from the 10 Zn groups was lower than that recovered from the 50 Zn rat pups. Myelin recovery from the MZD and control monkey infants was similar. When myelin protein profiles were characterized, it was found that the percentages of high-molecular-weight (HMW) proteins and Wolfgram protein were higher, whereas the percentages of small and large basic proteins were lower in myelin from the 10 Zn d0 and 50 Zn RF pups compared to the distribution in the 50 Zn AL rat pups. Results for the 10 Zn d0 and 10 Zn d14 pups were similar for all of the parameters studied. The percentage of HMW proteins was higher and that of basic protein lower in myelin from MZD monkey infants compared to the percentage of these proteins in myelin from controls. Although the interpretation of the rat data is complicated because of the anorexia associated with Zn deficiency, the observed changes in monkey myelin protein profiles provide strong evidence that maternal Zn deficiency affects myelination

  8. IFAP Syndrome Is Caused by Deficiency in MBTPS2, an Intramembrane Zinc Metalloprotease Essential for Cholesterol Homeostasis and ER Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Oeffner, Frank; Fischer, Gayle; Happle, Rudolf; König, Arne; Betz, Regina C.; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Neidel, Ulrike; del Carmen Boente, María; Redler, Silke; Romero-Gomez, Javier; Salhi, Aïcha; Vera-Casaño, Ángel; Weirich, Christian; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis with atrichia and photophobia (IFAP syndrome) is a rare X-linked, oculocutaneous human disorder. Here, we assign the IFAP locus to the 5.4 Mb region between DXS989 and DXS8019 on Xp22.11-p22.13 and provide evidence that missense mutations exchanging highly conserved amino acids of membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2 (MBTPS2) are associated with this phenotype. MBTPS2, a membrane-embedded zinc metalloprotease, activates signaling proteins involved in sterol control of transcription and ER stress response. Wild-type MBTPS2 was able to complement the protease deficiency in Chinese hamster M19 cells as shown by induction of an SRE-regulated reporter gene in transient transfection experiments and by growth of stably transfected cells in media devoid of cholesterol and lipids. These functions were impaired in five mutations as detected in unrelated patients. The degree of diminished activity correlated with clinical severity as noted in male patients. Our findings indicate that the phenotypic expression of IFAP syndrome is quantitatively related to a reduced function of a key cellular regulatory system affecting cholesterol homeostasis and ability to cope with ER stress. PMID:19361614

  9. A heterojunction photocatalyst composed of zinc rhodium oxide, single crystal-derived bismuth vanadium oxide, and silver for overall pure-water splitting under visible light up to 740 nm.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryoya; Takashima, Toshihiro; Tanigawa, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Shugo; Ohtani, Bunsho; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-10-12

    We recently reported the synthesis of a solid-state heterojunction photocatalyst consisting of zinc rhodium oxide (ZnRh2O4) and bismuth vanadium oxide (Bi4V2O11), which functioned as hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) evolution photocatalysts, respectively, connected with silver (Ag). Polycrystalline Bi4V2O11 (p-Bi4V2O11) powders were utilized to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/p-Bi4V2O11, which was able to photocatalyze overall pure-water splitting under red-light irradiation with a wavelength of 700 nm (R. Kobayashi et al., J. Mater. Chem. A, 2016, 4, 3061). In the present study, we replaced p-Bi4V2O11 with a powder obtained by pulverizing single crystals of Bi4V2O11 (s-Bi4V2O11) to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11, and demonstrated that this heterojunction photocatalyst had enhanced water-splitting activity. In addition, ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11 was able to utilize nearly the entire range of visible light up to a wavelength of 740 nm. These properties were attributable to the higher O2 evolution activity of s-Bi4V2O11.

  10. [Zinc and chronic enteropathies].

    PubMed

    Giorgi, P L; Catassi, C; Guerrieri, A

    1984-01-01

    In recent years the nutritional importance of zinc has been well established; its deficiency and its symptoms have also been recognized in humans. Furthermore, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica has been isolated, a rare but severe disease, of which skin lesions, chronic diarrhoea and recurring infections are the main symptoms. The disease is related to the malfunctioning of intestinal absorption of zinc and can be treated by administering pharmacological doses of zinc orally. Good dietary sources of zinc are meat, fish and, to a less extent, human milk. The amount of zinc absorbed in the small intestine is influenced by other nutrients: some compounds inhibit this process (dietary fiber, phytate) while others (picolinic acid, citric acid), referred to as Zn-binding ligands (ZnBL) facilitate it. Citric acid is thought to be the ligand which accounts for the high level of bioavailability of zinc in human milk. zinc absorption occurs throughout the small intestine, not only in the prossimal tract (duodenum and jejunum) but also in the distal tract (ileum). Diarrhoea is one of the clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency, thus many illnesses distinguished by chronic diarrhoea entail a bad absorption of zinc. In fact, in some cases of chronic enteropathies in infants, like coeliac disease and seldom cystic fibrosis, a deficiency of zinc has been isolated. Some of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, like retarded growth and hypogonadism, have been related to hypozinchemia which is present in this illness. Finally, it is possible that some of the dietary treatments frequently used for persistent post-enteritis diarrhoea (i.e. cow's milk exclusion, abuse and misuse of dietary fiber like carrot and carub powder, use of soy formula) can constitute a scarce supply of zinc and therefore could promote the persistency of diarrhoea itself.

  11. Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Roohani, Nazanin; Hurrell, Richard; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    Since its first discovery in an Iranian male in 1961, zinc deficiency in humans is now known to be an important malnutrition problem world-wide. It is more prevalent in areas of high cereal and low animal food consumption. The diet may not necessarily be low in zinc, but its bio-availability plays a major role in its absorption. Phytic acid is the main known inhibitor of zinc. Compared to adults, infants, children, adolescents, pregnant, and lactating women have increased requirements for zinc and thus, are at increased risk of zinc depletion. Zinc deficiency during growth periods results in growth failure. Epidermal, gastrointestinal, central nervous, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems are the organs most affected clinically by zinc deficiency. Clinical diagnosis of marginal Zn deficiency in humans remains problematic. So far, blood plasma/serum zinc concentration, dietary intake, and stunting prevalence are the best known indicators of zinc deficiency. Four main intervention strategies for combating zinc deficiency include dietary modification/diversification, supplementation, fortification, and bio-fortification. The choice of each method depends on the availability of resources, technical feasibility, target group, and social acceptance. In this paper, we provide a review on zinc biochemical and physiological functions, metabolism including, absorption, excretion, and homeostasis, zinc bio-availability (inhibitors and enhancers), human requirement, groups at high-risk, consequences and causes of zinc deficiency, evaluation of zinc status, and prevention strategies of zinc deficiency.

  12. Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Roohani, Nazanin; Hurrell, Richard; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Since its first discovery in an Iranian male in 1961, zinc deficiency in humans is now known to be an important malnutrition problem world-wide. It is more prevalent in areas of high cereal and low animal food consumption. The diet may not necessarily be low in zinc, but its bio-availability plays a major role in its absorption. Phytic acid is the main known inhibitor of zinc. Compared to adults, infants, children, adolescents, pregnant, and lactating women have increased requirements for zinc and thus, are at increased risk of zinc depletion. Zinc deficiency during growth periods results in growth failure. Epidermal, gastrointestinal, central nervous, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems are the organs most affected clinically by zinc deficiency. Clinical diagnosis of marginal Zn deficiency in humans remains problematic. So far, blood plasma/serum zinc concentration, dietary intake, and stunting prevalence are the best known indicators of zinc deficiency. Four main intervention strategies for combating zinc deficiency include dietary modification/diversification, supplementation, fortification, and bio-fortification. The choice of each method depends on the availability of resources, technical feasibility, target group, and social acceptance. In this paper, we provide a review on zinc biochemical and physiological functions, metabolism including, absorption, excretion, and homeostasis, zinc bio-availability (inhibitors and enhancers), human requirement, groups at high-risk, consequences and causes of zinc deficiency, evaluation of zinc status, and prevention strategies of zinc deficiency. PMID:23914218

  13. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)-Zinc Review.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-03-09

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  14. Increased risk of iron deficiency and reduced iron absorption but no difference in zinc, vitamin A or B-vitamin status in obese women in India.

    PubMed

    Herter-Aeberli, Isabelle; Thankachan, Prashanth; Bose, Beena; Kurpad, Anura V

    2016-12-01

    Two objectives were investigated: (1) to assess the risk of micronutrient deficiencies in relation to weight status in Indian women with a focus on iron but also including zinc, vitamin A and B vitamins and (2) to compare fractional iron absorption between obese (OB) and normal weight (NW) women. Part 1 was a cross-sectional study including 146 healthy, middle-class women from Bangalore, India, with a BMI between 19 and 40 kg/m(2). Anthropometrics and blood pressure were measured, and a fasting blood sample was obtained for the analysis of vitamin and mineral status, hepcidin, blood lipids and glucose. In part 2, 16 OB and 13 NW women consumed a standardized test meal labeled with the stable iron isotope (57)Fe. Incorporation of the iron isotope into erythrocytes was measured 14 days later. In addition, iron status, hepcidin and inflammatory markers were determined. In part 1, compared to NW women, overweight/OB subjects had significantly higher C-reactive protein, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and hepcidin concentrations (p < 0.05). The odds ratio for having high sTfR concentrations (i.e., low iron status) with increasing BMI was 1.09 (95 % CI 1.02-1.17). None of the other micronutrients investigated showed any differences between weight status groups. In part 2, fractional iron absorption was significantly lower in the OB group compared to the NW group even after controlling for differences in iron status (10.0 ± 6.5 vs. 16.7 ± 4.6 %; p = 0.038). OB women in Bangalore have an increased risk of low iron status and absorb less dietary iron; however, their risk of other micronutrient deficiencies was similar to NW women. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of considering the double burden of malnutrition in the planning of prevention strategies especially in transition countries with emerging obesity epidemics.

  15. Production of optically pure L-lactic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by using a newly isolated and D-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus paracasei strain.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Yuan, Shuo-Fu; Wang, Chun-An; Huang, Yin-Jung; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2015-12-01

    The use of lignocellulosic feedstock for lactic acid production with a difficulty is that the release of inhibitory compounds during the pretreatment process which inhibit the growth of microorganism. Thus we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus paracasei 7 BL, that has a high tolerance to inhibitors and produced optically pure l-lactic acid after the interruption of ldhD gene. The strain 7 BL fermented glucose efficiently and showed high titer of l-lactic acid (215 g/l) by fed-batch strategy. In addition, 99 g/l of l-lactic acid with high yield (0.96 g/g) and productivity (2.25-3.23 g/l/h) was obtained by using non-detoxified wood hydrolysate. Rice straw hydrolysate without detoxification was also tested and yielded a productivity rate as high as 5.27 g/l/h. Therefore, L. paracasei 7 BL represents a potential method of l-lactic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass and has attractive application for industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Maternal zinc status is associated with breast milk zinc concentration and zinc status in breastfed infants aged 4-6 months.

    PubMed

    Dumrongwongsiri, Oraporn; Suthutvoravut, Umaporn; Chatvutinun, Suthida; Phoonlabdacha, Phanphen; Sangcakul, Areeporn; Siripinyanond, Artitaya; Thiengmanee, Usana; Chongviriyaphan, Nalinee

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk provides adequate nutrients during the first 6 months of life. However, there are some reports of zinc deficiency in breastfed infants. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of zinc deficiency in infants aged 4-6 months and the associated factors. Healthy infants aged 4-6 months and their mothers were enrolled. They were classified by feeding types as breastfed (BF), formula-fed (FF), and mixed groups (MF). Data collection included demographic data, perinatal data, given diets, and anthropometric measurement. Blood from infants and lactating mothers, and breast milk samples were collected to assess plasma and breast milk zinc concentrations. From 158 infants, the prevalence of zinc deficiency (plasma level below 10.7 mol/L) was 7.6%, and according to feeding groups 14.9%, 5.3%, and 2.9% in the BF, the FF, and the MF groups, respectively. Breastfed infants with zinc deficiency had significantly lower maternal zinc concentrations compared with those without zinc deficiency. There was a higher proportion of maternal zinc deficiency in zinc-deficient infants than those without zinc deficiency (66.7% vs 16.2%, p=0.02). There was a positive correlation between zinc concentrations in breast milk and plasma zinc concentrations of infants (r=0.62, p=0.01) and plasma zinc concentrations of lactating mothers (r=0.56, p=0.016). Using the regression analysis, infant zinc status was associated with maternal plasma zinc concentrations among breastfed infants. The results of this study suggest that breastfed infants aged 4-6 months may have a risk of zinc deficiency and that risk is associated with maternal zinc status and breast milk zinc concentrations.

  17. Canine zinc-responsive dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Colombini, S

    1999-11-01

    Zinc is important in a multitude of biological functions, including regulation of the immune response, modulation of keratogenesis and wound healing, maintenance of normal reproductive function, and acuity of taste and smell. Zinc-responsive dermatosis is an uncommon disease of dogs resulting from either an absolute or relative deficiency in zinc. Dermatological lesions are characterized by erythema, alopecia, scales, and crusts that primarily affect the head. Two forms of the disease exist: a familial form affecting Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies and a form that affects growing puppies fed zinc-deficient or oversupplemented diets. The history, clinical signs, and skin biopsy results are typically diagnostic. Life-long zinc supplementation is usually necessary in the familial form of the disease, although dietary correction alone may be curative in the second form. Lethal acrodermatitis is a rare inherited disorder of Bull Terriers that does not respond to zinc supplementation and is invariably fatal.

  18. The effect of a moderate zinc deficiency and dietary fat source on the activity and expression of the Δ(3)Δ (2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase in the liver of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-06-01

    Auxiliary enzymes participate in β-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on Δ(3)Δ(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver and other tissues. Five groups of eight weanling rats each were fed moderately zinc-deficient (ZD) or zinc-adequate (ZA) semisynthetic diets (7 or 50 mg Zn/kg) enriched with 22 % cocoa butter (CB) or 22 % safflower oil (SO) for 4 weeks: (1) ZD-CB, fed free choice; (2) ZA-CBR, ZA-CB diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-CB group; (3) ZD-SO, fed free choice; (4) ZA-SOR, ZA-SO diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-SO group; and (5) ZA-SO, fed free choice. Growth and Zn status markers were markedly reduced in the ZD groups. ECI activity in the liver of the animals fed the ZD- and ZA-SO diets were significantly higher (approximately 2- and 3-fold, respectively) as compared with the CB-fed animals, whereas activities in extrahepatic tissues (kidneys, heart, skeletal muscle, testes, adipose tissue) were not altered by dietary treatments. Transcript levels of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver did not significantly differ between ZD and ZA rats, but were 1.6-fold higher in the ZA-SO- than in the ZD-CB-fed animals (P < 0.05). It is concluded that diets enriched with safflower oil as a source high in linoleic acid induce markedly increased hepatic ECI activities and that a moderate Zn deficiency does not affect transcription of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver.

  19. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-05-19

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. PMID:28264932

  1. Effect of resveratrol and zinc on intracellular zinc status in normal human prostate epithelial cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To evaluate the influence of resveratrol on cellular zinc status, normal human prostate epithelial (NHPrE) cells were treated with 6 levels of resveratrol (0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 microM) and 4 levels of zinc [0, 4, 16, and 32 microM for zinc-deficient (ZD), zinc-normal (ZN), zinc-adequate (ZA), an...

  2. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  3. Zinc homeostasis and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element, whose importance to the function of the central nervous system (CNS) is increasingly being appreciated. Alterations in zinc dyshomeostasis has been suggested as a key factor in the development of several neuropsychiatric disorders. In the CNS, zinc occurs in two forms: the first being tightly bound to proteins and, secondly, the free, cytoplasmic, or extracellular form found in presynaptic vesicles. Under normal conditions, zinc released from the synaptic vesicles modulates both ionotropic and metabotropic post-synaptic receptors. While under clinical conditions such as traumatic brain injury, stroke or epilepsy, the excess influx of zinc into neurons has been found to result in neurotoxicity and damage to postsynaptic neurons. On the other hand, a growing body of evidence suggests that a deficiency, rather than an excess, of zinc leads to an increased risk for the development of neurological disorders. Indeed, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect neurogenesis and increase neuronal apoptosis, which can lead to learning and memory deficits. Altered zinc homeostasis is also suggested as a risk factor for depression, Alzheimer's disease (AD), aging, and other neurodegenerative disorders. Under normal CNS physiology, homeostatic controls are put in place to avoid the accumulation of excess zinc or its deficiency. This cellular zinc homeostasis results from the actions of a coordinated regulation effected by different proteins involved in the uptake, excretion and intracellular storage/trafficking of zinc. These proteins include membranous transporters (ZnT and Zip) and metallothioneins (MT) which control intracellular zinc levels. Interestingly, alterations in ZnT and MT have been recently reported in both aging and AD. This paper provides an overview of both clinical and experimental evidence that implicates a dysfunction in zinc homeostasis in the pathophysiology of depression, AD, and aging. PMID:23882214

  4. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  5. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  6. The relevance of the colon to zinc nutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Globally, zinc deficiency is widespread, despite decades of research highlighting its negative effects on health, and in particular upon child health in low-income countries. Apart from inadequate dietary intake of bioavailable zinc, other significant contributors to zinc deficiency include the exce...

  7. Synthesis, structure, electronic spectroscopy, photophysics, electrochemistry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of highly-electron-deficient [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(perfluoroalkyl)porphinato]zinc(II ) complexes and their free base derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Goll, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Therien, M.J.; Ghosh, A.

    1996-09-04

    The synthesis, optical spectroscopy, photophysical properties, electrochemistry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of a series of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(perfluoroalkyl)porphinato]zinc(II ) complexes and their free base analogs are reported. The title compounds were prepared by a condensation methodology that utilizes perfluoro-1-(2`-pyrrolyl)-1-alkanol precursors and employs continuous water removal throughout the course of the reaction to yield the meso perfluorocarbon-substituted porphyrins. The nature of the porphyrin-pendant meso-perfluoroalkyl group exerts considerable influence over the macrocycle`s solubility properties. The structure of the monopyridyl adduct of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(heptafluoropropyl)porphinato] zinc(II) features an S{sub 4}-distorted porphyrin core; X-ray data are given. Electrochemical studies carried out on these porphyrin and (porphinato)zinc(II) complexes indicate that meso-perfluoroalkylporphyrins are among the most electron-deficient porphyrinic species known. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments corroborate the electron poor nature of these systems and evince extreme stabilization of the nitrogen ls orbitals, consonant with particularly effective removal of electron density from the macrocycle by the meso-perfluoroalkyl moieties that is modulated by {sigma}-symmetry orbitals. 27 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  9. Zinc, aging, and immunosenescence: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Ángel Julio Romero

    2015-01-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in many biochemical pathways and participates in several cell functions, including the immune response. This review describes the role of zinc in human health, aging, and immunosenescence. Zinc deficiency is frequent in the elderly and leads to changes similar to those that occur in oxidative inflammatory aging (oxi-inflamm-aging) and immunosenescence. The possible benefits of zinc supplementation to enhance immune function are discussed. PMID:25661703

  10. Association between Maternal Zinc Status, Dietary Zinc Intake and Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rebecca L; Grieger, Jessica A; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T

    2016-10-15

    Adequate zinc stores in the body are extremely important during periods of accelerated growth. However, zinc deficiency is common in developing countries and low maternal circulating zinc concentrations have previously been associated with pregnancy complications. We reviewed current literature assessing circulating zinc and dietary zinc intake during pregnancy and the associations with preeclampsia (PE); spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB); low birthweight (LBW); and gestational diabetes (GDM). Searches of MEDLINE; CINAHL and Scopus databases identified 639 articles and 64 studies were reviewed. In 10 out of 16 studies a difference was reported with respect to circulating zinc between women who gave birth to a LBW infant (≤2500 g) and those who gave birth to an infant of adequate weight (>2500 g), particularly in populations where inadequate zinc intake is prevalent. In 16 of our 33 studies an association was found between hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and circulating zinc; particularly in women with severe PE (blood pressure ≥160/110 mmHg). No association between maternal zinc status and sPTB or GDM was seen; however; direct comparisons between the studies was difficult. Furthermore; only a small number of studies were based on women from populations where there is a high risk of zinc deficiency. Therefore; the link between maternal zinc status and pregnancy success in these populations cannot be established. Future studies should focus on those vulnerable to zinc deficiency and include dietary zinc intake as a measure of zinc status.

  11. Association between Maternal Zinc Status, Dietary Zinc Intake and Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rebecca L.; Grieger, Jessica A.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    Adequate zinc stores in the body are extremely important during periods of accelerated growth. However, zinc deficiency is common in developing countries and low maternal circulating zinc concentrations have previously been associated with pregnancy complications. We reviewed current literature assessing circulating zinc and dietary zinc intake during pregnancy and the associations with preeclampsia (PE); spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB); low birthweight (LBW); and gestational diabetes (GDM). Searches of MEDLINE; CINAHL and Scopus databases identified 639 articles and 64 studies were reviewed. In 10 out of 16 studies a difference was reported with respect to circulating zinc between women who gave birth to a LBW infant (≤2500 g) and those who gave birth to an infant of adequate weight (>2500 g), particularly in populations where inadequate zinc intake is prevalent. In 16 of our 33 studies an association was found between hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and circulating zinc; particularly in women with severe PE (blood pressure ≥160/110 mmHg). No association between maternal zinc status and sPTB or GDM was seen; however; direct comparisons between the studies was difficult. Furthermore; only a small number of studies were based on women from populations where there is a high risk of zinc deficiency. Therefore; the link between maternal zinc status and pregnancy success in these populations cannot be established. Future studies should focus on those vulnerable to zinc deficiency and include dietary zinc intake as a measure of zinc status. PMID:27754451

  12. Associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after a zinc supplementation program in Guatemalan schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vinh Q.; Marcinkevage, Jessica; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C.; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo; DiGirolamo, Ann M.; Stein, Aryeh D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status are unknown in apparently healthy children at high risk for zinc deficiency. Objective To assess associations among zinc-related parameters in a sample of Guatemalan school-aged children. Methods We assessed total dietary intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after receiving 6 months of zinc supplementation or placebo in 691 Guatemalan schoolchildren aged 6 to 11 years. Most of the children also received zinc-fortified milk from a government program that started shortly after the trial began. We assessed associations between zinc intakes and serum zinc, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and albumin. Results At baseline, the prevalence of serum zinc < 65 μg/dL and dietary zinc intake below Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) (< 4 and < 7 mg/day for children < 9 and ≥ 9 years, respectively) were 21.6% and 39.4%, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and dietary zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were r = 0.07, 0.15, and 0.07, respectively. At the 6-month follow-up, low serum zinc and low total (diet plus fortified milk) zinc intakes were observed in 1.2% and 0.0% of children in the zinc-supplemented group and 4.0% and 34.1% in the placebo group, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and total zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were 0.10, 0.06, and −0.11 in the zinc-supplemented group and −0.04, 0.05, and 0.01 in the placebo group, respectively. Conclusions Zinc intake was inconsistently associated with markers of serum zinc concentration. Zinc fortification or supplementation attenuated the associations. PMID:23964387

  13. Associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after a zinc supplementation program in Guatemalan schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vinh Q; Marcinkevage, Jessica; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo; DiGirolamo, Ann M; Stein, Aryeh D

    2013-06-01

    The associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status are unknown in apparently healthy children at high risk for zinc deficiency. To assess associations among zinc-related parameters in a sample of Guatemalan school-aged children. We assessed total dietary intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after receiving 6 months of zinc supplementation or placebo in 691 Guatemalan schoolchildren aged 6 to 11 years. Most of the children also received zinc-fortified milk from a government program that started shortly after the trial began. We assessed associations between zinc intakes and serum zinc, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and albumin. At baseline, the prevalence of serum zinc < 65 microg/dL and dietary zinc intake below Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) (< 4 and < 7 mg/day for children < 9 and > or = 9 years, respectively) were 21.6% and 39.4%, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and dietary zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were r = 0.07, 0.15, and 0.07, respectively. At the 6-month follow-up, low serum zinc and low total (diet plus fortified milk) zinc intakes were observed in 1.2% and 0.0% of children in the zinc-supplemented group and 4.0% and 34.1% in the placebo group, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and total zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were 0.10, 0.06, and -0.11 in the zinc-supplemented group and -0.04, 0.05, and 0.01 in the placebo group, respectively. Zinc intake was inconsistently associated with markers of serum zinc concentration. Zinc fortification or supplementation attenuated the associations.

  14. Zinc sulfate taste acuity reflects dietary zinc intake in males.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J; Saling, Julia R; Starkey, Leah D

    2016-02-01

    Gauging an individual's response after they taste a solution of zinc sulfate has been proposed as a method of determining nutritional zinc deficiency, a so-called "zinc taste test." Despite the lack of evidence regarding any relationship between dietary zinc intake and zinc sulfate taste acuity, clinicians continue to utilize zinc sulfate taste testing with their patients. Therefore, assessing the relationship between zinc sulfate taste acuity and dietary zinc intake is warranted. This report assessed 363 individuals (77 males, 286 females) for zinc sulfate taste acuity and dietary zinc intake. Zinc sulfate taste acuity was assessed by both the Bryce-Smith & Simpson zinc taste test (BSZTT) and the taste intensity visual analog scale (TIVAS). Dietary intake of zinc was assessed by a zinc-specific food frequency questionnaire (ZnFFQ). Zinc sulfate taste acuity, as measured by the TIVAS, was found to be significantly different between the sexes (U = 8766; p = 0.013). Males averaged a TIVAS score of 21.58 ± 2.52 (Mean ± SEM) whereas females had a TIVAS score averaging 31.49 ± 1.67. No correlations were found between female zinc sulfate taste perception and dietary zinc intake as measured by both the BSZTT (rs = 0.014; p = 0.816) and the TIVAS (rs = 0.025; p = 0.679). Similarly, male zinc intake was not correlated with BSZTT scores (rs = 0.199; p = 0.099). However, zinc sulfate taste acuity, measured by the TIVAS, was significantly correlated with dietary zinc intake in the male population (rs = 0.237; p = 0.048). These findings suggest that zinc sulfate taste acuity measurement may aid in the assessment of zinc nutriture among males. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Zinc in Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gammoh, Nour Zahi; Rink, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    Micronutrient homeostasis is a key factor in maintaining a healthy immune system. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is involved in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. The main cause of zinc deficiency is malnutrition. Zinc deficiency leads to cell-mediated immune dysfunctions among other manifestations. Consequently, such dysfunctions lead to a worse outcome in the response towards bacterial infection and sepsis. For instance, zinc is an essential component of the pathogen-eliminating signal transduction pathways leading to neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) formation, as well as inducing cell-mediated immunity over humoral immunity by regulating specific factors of differentiation. Additionally, zinc deficiency plays a role in inflammation, mainly elevating inflammatory response as well as damage to host tissue. Zinc is involved in the modulation of the proinflammatory response by targeting Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB), a transcription factor that is the master regulator of proinflammatory responses. It is also involved in controlling oxidative stress and regulating inflammatory cytokines. Zinc plays an intricate function during an immune response and its homeostasis is critical for sustaining proper immune function. This review will summarize the latest findings concerning the role of this micronutrient during the course of infections and inflammatory response and how the immune system modulates zinc depending on different stimuli. PMID:28629136

  16. The immune system and the impact of zinc during aging

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Hajo; Rink, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    The trace element zinc is essential for the immune system, and zinc deficiency affects multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. There are remarkable parallels in the immunological changes during aging and zinc deficiency, including a reduction in the activity of the thymus and thymic hormones, a shift of the T helper cell balance toward T helper type 2 cells, decreased response to vaccination, and impaired functions of innate immune cells. Many studies confirm a decline of zinc levels with age. Most of these studies do not classify the majority of elderly as zinc deficient, but even marginal zinc deprivation can affect immune function. Consequently, oral zinc supplementation demonstrates the potential to improve immunity and efficiently downregulates chronic inflammatory responses in the elderly. These data indicate that a wide prevalence of marginal zinc deficiency in elderly people may contribute to immunosenescence. PMID:19523191

  17. Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Braun, J

    1999-03-01

    In iron deficiency and lead poisoning, the enzyme ferrochelatase catalyzes the incorporation of zinc, instead of iron, into protoporphyrin IX, resulting in the formation of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP). In healthy blood donors, there is a good inverse correlation between serum ferritin and ZPP levels. In renal failure patients and in patients with anemia caused by a variety of chronic disorders, two different types of iron deficiency are found: (a) absolute iron deficiency and (b) relative, or functional, iron deficiency. The latter occurs when iron, despite adequate stores, is not delivered rapidly enough to the erythroblasts. ZPP is not only indicative of absolute iron deficiency, but it is also, for now, the best indicator of iron-deficient erythropoiesis, along with the percentage of hypochromic red blood cells. By contrast, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation may not adequately assess functional iron deficiency. Elevated ZPP levels in renal failure patients can be caused by different pathogenetic mechanisms, such as chronic inflammatory disease, lead poisoning, and the presence of uremic factors, all of which could potentially inhibit heme biosynthesis. However, ZPP levels do not consistently predict an erythropoietic response to iron supplementation in maintenance hemodialysis patients, and thus, iron overload during i.v. iron supplementation cannot be detected by measuring ZPP.

  18. Zinc in innate and adaptive tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is important. It is the second most abundant trace metal with 2-4 grams in humans. It is an essential trace element, critical for cell growth, development and differentiation, DNA synthesis, RNA transcription, cell division, and cell activation. Zinc deficiency has adverse consequences during embryogenesis and early childhood development, particularly on immune functioning. It is essential in members of all enzyme classes, including over 300 signaling molecules and transcription factors. Free zinc in immune and tumor cells is regulated by 14 distinct zinc importers (ZIP) and transporters (ZNT1-8). Zinc depletion induces cell death via apoptosis (or necrosis if apoptotic pathways are blocked) while sufficient zinc levels allows maintenance of autophagy. Cancer cells have upregulated zinc importers, and frequently increased zinc levels, which allow them to survive. Based on this novel synthesis, approaches which locally regulate zinc levels to promote survival of immune cells and/or induce tumor apoptosis are in order. PMID:21087493

  19. What every dentist should know about zinc.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amar; von Fraunhofer, J Anthony; Bashirelahi, Nasir

    2011-01-01

    Zinc plays an important role in human physiology, from its involvement in the proper function of the immune system to its role in cellular growth, cell proliferation, and cell apoptosis as well as its essential role in the activity of numerous zinc-binding proteins. However, zinc also plays a key pathophysiological role in major neurological disorders and diabetes. Zinc deficiency is a worldwide problem, whereas excessive intake of zinc is relatively rare. Many patients are exposed to zinc on a regular basis through dentistry as a result of its use in certain restorative materials, mouthwashes, toothpastes and, notably, denture adhesives. Of particular importance to dental professionals are various case reports concerning the neurologic effects of excess zinc intake by patients who routinely use large quantities of zinc-containing denture adhesives. This review presents relevant information concerning the use of zinc in dentistry.

  20. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Isotopic variability of terrestrial zinc offers a unique tool for studying the geochemical and biochemical cycling of zinc through natural ecosystems. However, to realise this potential, the mechanisms controlling the isotopic composition of zinc during geosphere-biosphere interactions must first be understood. The uptake of zinc by plants involves a variety of abiotic and biochemical reactions, and can provide insights into the types of processes that may fractionate zinc isotopes within living systems. We therefore present an experimental study to quantify if and how zinc isotopes are fractionated during uptake in higher plants. Methodology: Two experimental approaches were taken: (1) a hydroponic study in which rice, lettuce, and tomato cultivars were grown in one of two nutrient solutions (a HEDTA + NTA buffered system, and an EDTA buffered system), and (2) a field-based study in which rice plants were grown in experimental paddy fields under both zinc-sufficient and zinc-deficient conditions. Upon harvest, roots, shoots, nutrient solutions and soils were acid digested, and matrix components were removed from the zinc fraction using anion exchange procedures. For soils the 'bioavailble' zinc fraction was abstracted using a 1 N HCl leaching step. Zinc isotopic compositions were determined on a ThermoElemental Axiom MC-ICP-MS, using copper as an internal reference to correct for mass discrimination effects. Combined measurement errors based on repeated analyses of ultra-pure standards and plant reference materials were <0.035 ppm per atomic mass unit (pamu) (2σ) for 66Zn/64Zn measurements. Results: Under hydroponic condisions, all three plant species exhibit a similar pattern of zinc isotopic discrimination, with a small enrichment from nutrient solution to root of +0.04 to +0.09 ppm pamu, followed by an isotopic depletion from root to shoot of -0.13 to -0.26 ppm pamu. While the same trend is observed with the HEDTA + NTA and EDTA nutrient

  1. Zinc Absorption by Young Adults from Supplemental Zinc Citrate Is Comparable with That from Zinc Gluconate and Higher than from Zinc Oxide123

    PubMed Central

    Wegmüller, Rita; Tay, Fabian; Zeder, Christophe; Brnić, Marica; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble zinc salts gluconate, sulfate, and acetate are commonly used as supplements in tablet or syrup form to prevent zinc deficiency and to treat diarrhea in children in combination with oral rehydration. Zinc citrate is an alternative compound with high zinc content, slightly soluble in water, which has better sensory properties in syrups but no absorption data in humans. We used the double-isotope tracer method with 67Zn and 70Zn to measure zinc absorption from zinc citrate given as supplements containing 10 mg of zinc to 15 healthy adults without food and compared absorption with that from zinc gluconate and zinc oxide (insoluble in water) using a randomized, double-masked, 3-way crossover design. Median (IQR) fractional absorption of zinc from zinc citrate was 61.3% (56.6–71.0) and was not different from that from zinc gluconate with 60.9% (50.6–71.7). Absorption from zinc oxide at 49.9% (40.9–57.7) was significantly lower than from both other supplements (P < 0.01). Three participants had little or no absorption from zinc oxide. We conclude that zinc citrate, given as a supplement without food, is as well absorbed by healthy adults as zinc gluconate and may thus be a useful alternative for preventing zinc deficiency and treating diarrhea. The more insoluble zinc oxide is less well absorbed when given as a supplement without food and may be minimally absorbed by some individuals. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01576627. PMID:24259556

  2. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND)—Zinc Review12345

    PubMed Central

    King, Janet C; Brown, Kenneth H; Gibson, Rosalind S; Krebs, Nancy F; Lowe, Nicola M; Siekmann, Jonathan H; Raiten, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is required for multiple metabolic processes as a structural, regulatory, or catalytic ion. Cellular, tissue, and whole-body zinc homeostasis is tightly controlled to sustain metabolic functions over a wide range of zinc intakes, making it difficult to assess zinc insufficiency or excess. The BOND (Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development) Zinc Expert Panel recommends 3 measurements for estimating zinc status: dietary zinc intake, plasma zinc concentration (PZC), and height-for-age of growing infants and children. The amount of dietary zinc potentially available for absorption, which requires an estimate of dietary zinc and phytate, can be used to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. PZCs respond to severe dietary zinc restriction and to zinc supplementation; they also change with shifts in whole-body zinc balance and clinical signs of zinc deficiency. PZC cutoffs are available to identify individuals and populations at risk of zinc deficiency. However, there are limitations in using the PZC to assess zinc status. PZCs respond less to additional zinc provided in food than to a supplement administered between meals, there is considerable interindividual variability in PZCs with changes in dietary zinc, and PZCs are influenced by recent meal consumption, the time of day, inflammation, and certain drugs and hormones. Insufficient data are available on hair, urinary, nail, and blood cell zinc responses to changes in dietary zinc to recommend these biomarkers for assessing zinc status. Of the potential functional indicators of zinc, growth is the only one that is recommended. Because pharmacologic zinc doses are unlikely to enhance growth, a growth response to supplemental zinc is interpreted as indicating pre-existing zinc deficiency. Other functional indicators reviewed but not recommended for assessing zinc nutrition in clinical or field settings because of insufficient information are the activity or amounts of zinc-dependent enzymes

  3. The Potential for Zinc Stable Isotope Techniques and Modelling to Determine Optimal Zinc Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cuong D.; Gopalsamy, Geetha L.; Mortimer, Elissa K.; Young, Graeme P.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognised that zinc deficiency is a major global public health issue, particularly in young children in low-income countries with diarrhoea and environmental enteropathy. Zinc supplementation is regarded as a powerful tool to correct zinc deficiency as well as to treat a variety of physiologic and pathologic conditions. However, the dose and frequency of its use as well as the choice of zinc salt are not clearly defined regardless of whether it is used to treat a disease or correct a nutritional deficiency. We discuss the application of zinc stable isotope tracer techniques to assess zinc physiology, metabolism and homeostasis and how these can address knowledge gaps in zinc supplementation pharmacokinetics. This may help to resolve optimal dose, frequency, length of administration, timing of delivery to food intake and choice of zinc compound. It appears that long-term preventive supplementation can be administered much less frequently than daily but more research needs to be undertaken to better understand how best to intervene with zinc in children at risk of zinc deficiency. Stable isotope techniques, linked with saturation response and compartmental modelling, also have the potential to assist in the continued search for simple markers of zinc status in health, malnutrition and disease. PMID:26035248

  4. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described.

  5. Levels of iron, silver, zinc, and lead in oranges and avocados from two gold-rich towns compared with levels in an adjacent gold-deficient town

    SciTech Connect

    Golow, A.A.; Laryea, J.N. )

    1994-09-01

    Fruits such as oranges and avocados are important sources of drinks and food in the Ghanaian Society. If such fruits contain various types of metals they may augument the types and amounts of them in the human body. The metals in fruits may depend on what is in the soils from which they are grown. If the soils contain toxic metals like lead, mercury and cadmium then the consumers may be poisoned as happened in the [open quotes]Ouchi - ouchi[close quotes], disease in Japan and similar episodes. In the area under study, the Geological Survey indicates the presence of 2.5 ppm of lead, 10 - 20 ppm of copper and less than 15 ppm of nickel. Silver, not reported in commercial amounts, is a byproduct of gold productions at Obuasi. Since copper and nickel are presented in the area traces of silver will certainly occur. In the same manner zinc is usually associated with lead as sulphide of zinc blend trace amounts of it are likely to occur in the area. Of the four metals measured, iron and zinc essential for citrus. The extractable iron and zinc in the area of study were 90 and 1.8 mg/kg, levels on the low side for the healthy growth of crops. The investigation reported here is the comparison of the levels of some metals in oranges and avocados from farms in Obuasi and Konongo with those from farms in Kumasi City. This is a part of a project aimed at finding out differences in the metal contents of various food crops grown in various regions of the country. Konongo and Obuasi have soils which are rich in gold but Kumasi city, which is not too distant from these towns, does not have gold in its soil. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Zinc Cream and Reliability of Tuberculosis Skin Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Bhargavi; Pelly, Tom F.; Gilman, Robert H.; Cabrera, Lilia; Delgado, Jose; Soto, Giselle; Friedland, Jon S.; Escombe, A. Roderick; Black, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    In 50 healthy Peruvian shantytown residents, zinc cream applied to tuberculosis skin-test sitescaused a 32% increase in induration compared with placebo cream. Persons with lower plasma zinc had smaller skin-test reactions and greater augmentation with zinc cream. Zinc deficiency caused false-negative skin-test results, and topical zinc supplementation augmented antimycobacterial immune responses enough to improve diagnosis. PMID:18214192

  7. Zinc in thalassemic patients and its relation with depression.

    PubMed

    Moafi, Alireza; Mobaraki, Gholamhossein; Taheri, Seyed Sadr; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Shahabi, Iraj; Majidi, Farshad

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a relationship between zinc levels and depression. Thalassemic patients are at risk of zinc deficiency due to various causes including Desferal injection. The aim of this study, therefore, is to investigate hair zinc levels in thalassemic patients and their association with depression. For the purposes of this survey, 50 patients with major thalassemia between 10-20 years old were selected randomly. The patients' hair zinc concentration was compared with a control group of similarly aged healthy individuals. Simultaneously, their psychological status was evaluated with either the "Beck" or "Marya Kovacs" test (according to age) so that the relation between depression and zinc concentration could be assessed. The mean hair zinc concentration in patients was more than the controls (193.96 +/- 92.4 ppm vs 149.6 +/- 72.21 ppm). Zinc deficiency was present in 10% of the patients, and 52% had some degree of depression. There was a reverse correlation between zinc deficiency and blood transfusion rate (p < 0.05). Also, while there were more incidences of depression among the zinc deficient patients, the difference was not significant. Regarding the high prevalence of depression and insignificant relation to the zinc deficiency in these thalassemic patients, this research suggests the need for further consideration concerning patients' psychological status, the risk factors of zinc deficiency, as well as extended assessment into other causes of depression.

  8. Method of preparing zinc orthotitanate pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Harada, Y.; Logan, W. R.; Gilligan, J. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Zinc orthotitanate suitable for use as a pigment for spacecraft thermal control coatings is prepared by heating a slightly zinc deficient reaction mixture of precipitated oxalates of zinc and titanium. The reaction mixture can be formed by coprecipitation of zinc and titanium oxalates from chloride solution or by mixing separately precipitated oxalates. The mixture is first heated to 400 to 600 C to remove volatiles and is then rapidly heated at 900 to 1200 C. Zinc orthotitanate produced by this method exhibits the very fine particle size needed for thermal control coatings as well as stability in a space environment.

  9. Bioavailability of zinc glycinate in comparison with zinc sulphate in the presence of dietary phytate in an animal model with Zn labelled rats.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, P; Windisch, W

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) from sulphate and glycinate as representatives of inorganic and organic zinc sources. The semi-synthetic basal diet contained 2 microg/g of native Zn and was fortified with pure sodium-phytate (8 g/kg) in order to simulate conditions of common cereal-based meals. The basal diet was supplemented with either 53 microg/g of Zn from sulphate (control) or 10 microg/g of Zn from either sulphate (ZnSulphate) or glycinate (ZnGly). Twenty-four (65)Zn-labelled, growing rats weighing 133 g were allotted to the three diets (eight animals per treatment) and were kept pair-fed to ZnSulphate for 15 days. Zn contents in blood plasma, femur and whole body, as well as, plasma alkaline phosphatase activities were reduced compared with control indicating a zinc deficiency in ZnSulphate and ZnGly treatment. This allowed their differentiation in zinc bioavailability. True absorption of dietary Zn was significantly higher in ZnGly than in ZnSulphate (51% vs. 44%) while losses of endogenous faecal Zn and urinary Zn were not affected to a quantitatively relevant extent (mean: 17% and 2% of intake). This resulted in a +30% significantly improved Zn retention for ZnGly (33% vs. 25%) and a lower severity on Zn deficiency symptoms compared with ZnSulphate. Metabolic utilization accounted for 95% of absorbed dietary Zn for both Zn sources. Overall, the bioavailability of zinc glycinate was significantly superior by 16% to zinc sulphate (49% vs. 42%), mainly because of a higher absorptive potential at presence of a strong anti-nutritive component (phytate) in the diet.

  10. Maternal Zinc Intakes and Homeostatic Adjustments during Pregnancy and Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Donangelo, Carmen Marino; King, Janet C.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc plays critical roles during embryogenesis, fetal growth, and milk secretion, which increase the zinc need for pregnancy and lactation. Increased needs can be met by increasing the dietary zinc intake, along with making homeostatic adjustments in zinc utilization. Potential homeostatic adjustments include changes in circulating zinc, increased zinc absorption, decreased zinc losses, and changes in whole body zinc kinetics. Although severe zinc deficiency during pregnancy has devastating effects, systematic reviews and meta-analysis of the effect of maternal zinc supplementation on pregnancy outcomes have consistently shown a limited benefit. We hypothesize, therefore, that zinc homeostatic adjustments during pregnancy and lactation improve zinc utilization sufficiently to provide the increased zinc needs in these stages and, therefore, mitigate immediate detrimental effects due to a low zinc intake. The specific questions addressed are the following: How is zinc utilization altered during pregnancy and lactation? Are those homeostatic adjustments influenced by maternal zinc status, dietary zinc, or zinc supplementation? These questions are addressed by critically reviewing results from published human studies on zinc homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation carried out in different populations worldwide. PMID:22852063

  11. MTF-1-Mediated Repression of the Zinc Transporter Zip10 Is Alleviated by Zinc Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lichten, Louis A.; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Guo, Liang; Embury, Jennifer; Cousins, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of cellular zinc uptake is a key process in the overall mechanism governing mammalian zinc homeostasis and how zinc participates in cellular functions. We analyzed the zinc transporters of the Zip family in both the brain and liver of zinc-deficient animals and found a large, significant increase in Zip10 expression. Additionally, Zip10 expression decreased in response to zinc repletion. Moreover, isolated mouse hepatocytes, AML12 hepatocytes, and Neuro 2A cells also respond differentially to zinc availability in vitro. Measurement of Zip10 hnRNA and actinomycin D inhibition studies indicate that Zip10 was transcriptionally regulated by zinc deficiency. Through luciferase promoter constructs and ChIP analysis, binding of MTF-1 to a metal response element located 17 bp downstream of the transcription start site was shown to be necessary for zinc-induced repression of Zip10. Furthermore, zinc-activated MTF-1 causes down-regulation of Zip10 transcription by physically blocking Pol II movement through the gene. Lastly, ZIP10 is localized to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes and neuro 2A cells. Collectively, these results reveal a novel repressive role for MTF-1 in the regulation of the Zip10 zinc transporter expression by pausing Pol II transcription. ZIP10 may have roles in control of zinc homeostasis in specific sites particularly those of the brain and liver. Within that context ZIP10 may act as an important survival mechanism during periods of zinc inadequacy. PMID:21738690

  12. Phytosiderophore release by wheat genotypes differing in zinc deficiency tolerance grown with Zn-free nutrient solution as affected by salinity.

    PubMed

    Daneshbakhsh, Bahareh; Khoshgoftarmanesh, Amir Hossein; Shariatmadari, Hossein; Cakmak, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information concerning the effect of salinity on phytosiderophores exudation from wheat roots. The aim of this hydroponic experiment was to investigate the effect of salinity on phytosiderophore release by roots of three bread wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency (Triticum aestivum L. cvs. Rushan, Kavir, and Cross) under Zn deficiency conditions. Wheat seedlings were transferred to Zn-free nutrient solutions and exposed to three salinity levels (0, 60, and 120 mM NaCl). The results indicated that Cross and Rushan genotypes exuded more phytosiderophore than did the Kavir genotype. Our findings suggest that the adaptive capacity of Zn-efficient 'Cross' and 'Rushan' wheat genotypes to Zn deficiency is due partly to the higher amounts of phytosiderophore release. Only 15 days of Zn deficiency stress was sufficient to distinguish between Zn-efficient (Rushan and Cross) and Zn-inefficient (Kavir) genotypes, with the former genotypes exuding more phytosiderophore than the latter. Higher phytosiderophore exudation under Zn deficiency conditions was accompanied by greater Fe transport from root to shoot. The maximum amount of phytosiderophore was exuded at the third week in 'Cross' and at the fourth week in 'Kavir' and 'Rushan'. For all three wheat genotypes, salinity stress resulted in higher amounts of phytosiderophore exuded by the roots. In general, for 'Kavir', the largest amount of phytosiderophore was exuded from the roots at the highest salinity level (120mM NaCl), while for 'Cross' and 'Rushan', no significant difference was found in phytosiderophore exudation between the 60 and 120 mM NaCl treatments. More investigation is needed to fully understand the physiology of elevated phytosiderophore release by Zn-deficient wheat plants under salinity conditions.

  13. Effect of zinc supplementation on infants with severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao; Qian, Su-Yun; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Zhe-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is a common respiratory infectious disease in infancy. Previous work shows controversial results on the benefit of zinc supplementation in patients with pneumonia. We conducted this study to investigate serum zinc status amongst infants with severe pneumonia and the clinical impact that zinc supplementation has on those patients with low serum zinc levels. This study design was a non-blinded prospective randomized controlled trial. The study is approved by the Ethics Committees of Beijing Children's Hospital. A total of 96 infants diagnosed with severe pneumonia and hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit between November 2011 and January 2012 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were divided into low serum zinc and normal serum zinc group. The low serum zinc group was randomized into treatment and control groups. Only the treatment group received zinc supplementation within 48-72 hours after hospitalization. The prevalence of zinc deficiency on admission was 76.0%. The low zinc level was most apparent in infants between 1 and 3 months of age. The serum zinc level increased in the zinc treatment group and returned to a normal level (median, 53.20 μmol/L) on day 12±2. There was no statistical difference in the pediatric critic illness score, lung injury score, length of hospital stay, and duration of mechanical ventilation between the zinc treatment group and control group. Zinc deficiency is common in infants with severe pneumonia. Normalization of zinc levels with zinc supplementation did not improve clinical outcomes of infants with pneumonia.

  14. The potential to improve zinc status through biofortification of staple food crops with zinc.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Christine

    2009-03-01

    Biofortification is an agricultural strategy that aims to increase the content of select micronutrients, including zinc, in staple food crops such as rice, wheat, maize, pearl millet, and others. When consumed among zinc-deficient populations, zinc-biofortified staple foods should improve the adequacy of zinc intakes and hence reduce the risk of dietary zinc deficiency. Several conditioning factors will contribute to the potential for this strategy to meet its goal, including the additional amount of zinc that can be bred into the staple crop food, the amount of zinc that remains in the staple crop food following usual processing methods, and the bioavailability of zinc from the staple crop food in the context of the usual diet. Reduction of the phytate content of cereals with the use of agricultural techniques is a potential complementary strategy for improving the bioavailability of zinc. The feasibility of biofortification to result in a meaningful increase in the adequacy of population zinc intakes and to reduce the consequences of zinc deficiencies still needs to be determined through efficacy trials. At the program level, the ability to widely disseminate biofortified crop varieties and the willingness of farmers to adopt them will also affect the magnitude of the impact of this strategy.

  15. Zinc distribution in blood components, inflammatory status, and clinical indexes of disease activity during zinc supplementation in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Jeghers, O; Pelen, F

    1993-05-01

    The effects of zinc supplementation on zinc status and on clinical and biological indicators of inflammation were investigated in 18 patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and in 9 healthy control subjects. Patients with mild and recent onset disease were assigned to a 60-d trial to receive either 45 mg Zn (as gluconate)/d or a placebo, while control subjects received the zinc supplement. Baseline mean plasma zinc of the patients was low whereas mononuclear cell zinc content was elevated, suggesting a redistribution of the element related to the inflammatory process rather than to a zinc-deficient state. Zinc supplementation increased plasma zinc to a similar extent in patients and in control subjects, which suggested no impairment of zinc intestinal absorption as a result of the inflammatory process. On the contrary, erythrocyte and leukocyte zinc concentrations were not modified in the two groups examined. No beneficial effect of zinc treatment could be demonstrated on either clinical or inflammation indexes.

  16. Zinc and Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokines: Implications for Cardiometabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meika; Samman, Samir

    2012-01-01

    In atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, the concomitant presence of low-grade systemic inflammation and mild zinc deficiency highlights a role for zinc nutrition in the management of chronic disease. This review aims to evaluate the literature that reports on the interactions of zinc and cytokines. In humans, inflammatory cytokines have been shown both to up- and down-regulate the expression of specific cellular zinc transporters in response to an increased demand for zinc in inflammatory conditions. The acute phase response includes a rapid decline in the plasma zinc concentration as a result of the redistribution of zinc into cellular compartments. Zinc deficiency influences the generation of cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α, and in response to zinc supplementation plasma cytokines exhibit a dose-dependent response. The mechanism of action may reflect the ability of zinc to either induce or inhibit the activation of NF-κB. Confounders in understanding the zinc-cytokine relationship on the basis of in vitro experimentation include methodological issues such as the cell type and the means of activating cells in culture. Impaired zinc homeostasis and chronic inflammation feature prominently in a number of cardiometabolic diseases. Given the high prevalence of zinc deficiency and chronic disease globally, the interplay of zinc and inflammation warrants further examination. PMID:22852057

  17. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  18. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  19. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  20. Zinc insufficiency during pregnancy. A review.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K

    1981-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has been found to cause problems in parturition and in the growth and development of the offspring. There are several groups of pregnant women at known risk of developing a zinc insufficiency; these include vegetarians, alcoholics, teenagers, women with multiple pregnancies, and women with impaired intestinal absorption of zinc. Nurses need to be able to identify the population at risk and to offer dietary counseling.

  1. Metabolism and tissue distribution of trace elements in broiler chickens' fed diets containing deficient and plethoric levels of copper, manganese, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sovik; Haldar, Sudipto; Saha, Pinaki; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar

    2010-11-01

    Supplementation of broiler diets with copper, manganese, and zinc at levels higher than that stipulated by the National Research Council 1994 reportedly improved live weight, feed conversion, and cured leg abnormality supposedly caused by inadequate intake of Mn and Zn. The objective of the study was to ascertain the effects of plethoric supplementation of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) on performance and metabolic responses in broiler chickens. The study also aimed to discriminate the responses of the birds when the mineral elements were supplemented either in an inorganic or in an organic form. Cobb 400 broiler chickens (1-day old, n = 300) were assigned to three dietary treatments each containing nine replicates with ten birds for 39 days. The treatments included a control in which the diet was devoid of supplemental trace elements and treatments supplemented with an inorganic trace element premix (ITM) and supplemented with a combination of the inorganic and an organic trace element premix (OTM). The ITM contained (per kilogram) copper, 15 g; iron, 90 g; manganese, 90 g; zinc, 80 g (all as sulfated salts); iodine (as potassium iodide), 2 g; and selenium (as sodium selenite), 0.3 g. The OTM on the other hand, contained copper, 2.5 g; iron, 15 g; manganese, 15 g; zinc, 13.33 g; and chromium, 0.226 g (all as protein chelates). Plethoric supplementation of trace elements improved live weight gain and feed/gain ratio (p < 0.05). Leg abnormality developed in the 16% of the control group of birds but not in the supplemented group. Metabolizability of dry matter, organic matter, and protein was higher (p < 0.01) in the ITM and OTM groups. Excretion of Cu, Fe, and Zn decreased (p < 0.1) due to supplementation of the trace elements leading to increased apparent absorption of the said mineral elements (p < 0.01). Concentration of the concerned trace elements in serum, liver, and composite muscle samples was higher (p < 0.05) in the ITM and OTM dietary groups

  2. Plasma zinc's alter ego is a low-molecular-weight humoral factor.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ou; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Urgast, Dagmar; Gordon, Margaret-Jane; Campbell, Gill; Feldmann, Jörg; Nixon, Graeme F; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Kwun, In-Sook; Beattie, John H

    2013-09-01

    Mild dietary zinc deprivation in humans and rodents has little effect on blood plasma zinc levels, and yet cellular consequences of zinc depletion can be detected in vascular and other tissues. We proposed that a zinc-regulated humoral factor might mediate the effects of zinc deprivation. Using a novel approach, primary rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were treated with plasma from zinc-deficient (<1 mg Zn/kg) or zinc-adequate (35 mg Zn/kg, pair-fed) adult male rats, and zinc levels were manipulated to distinguish direct and indirect effects of plasma zinc. Gene expression changes were analyzed by microarray and qPCR, and incubation of VSMCs with blood plasma from zinc-deficient rats strongly changed the expression of >2500 genes, compared to incubation of cells with zinc-adequate rat plasma. We demonstrated that this effect was caused by a low-molecular-weight (∼2-kDa) zinc-regulated humoral factor but that changes in gene expression were mostly reversed by adding zinc back to zinc-deficient plasma. Strongly regulated genes were overrepresented in pathways associated with immune function and development. We conclude that zinc deficiency induces the production of a low-molecular-weight humoral factor whose influence on VSMC gene expression is blocked by plasma zinc. This factor is therefore under dual control by zinc.

  3. Zinc-The key to preventing corrosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2011-01-01

    Centuries before it was identified as an element, zinc was used to make brass (an alloy of zinc and copper) and for medicinal purposes. Metallic zinc and zinc oxide were produced in India sometime between the 11th and 14th centuries and in China in the 17th century, although the discovery of pure metallic zinc is credited to the German chemist Andreas Marggraf, who isolated the element in 1746. Refined zinc metal is bluish-white when freshly cast; it is hard and brittle at most temperatures and has relatively low melting and boiling points. Zinc alloys readily with other metals and is chemically active. On exposure to air, it develops a thin gray oxide film (patina), which inhibits deeper oxidation (corrosion) of the metal. The metal's resistance to corrosion is an important characteristic in its use.

  4. Leptin, NPY, Melatonin and Zinc Levels in Experimental Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism: The Relation to Zinc.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasım; Mogulkoc, Rasim

    2017-06-01

    Since zinc mediates the effects of many hormones or is found in the structure of numerous hormone receptors, zinc deficiency leads to various functional impairments in the hormone balance. And also thyroid hormones have important activity on metabolism and feeding. NPY and leptin are affective on food intake and regulation of appetite. The present study is conducted to determine how zinc supplementation and deficiency affect thyroid hormones (free and total T3 and T4), melatonin, leptin, and NPY levels in thyroid dysfunction in rats. The experiment groups in the study were formed as follows: Control (C); Hypothyroidism (PTU); Hypothyroidism+Zinc (PTU+Zn); Hypothyroidism+Zinc deficient; Hyperthyroidism (H); Hyperthyroidism+Zinc (H+Zn); and Hyperthyroidism+Zinc deficient. Thyroid hormone parameters (FT3, FT4, TT3, and TT4) were found to be reduced in hypothyroidism groups and elevated in the hyperthyroidism groups. Melatonin values increased in hyperthyroidism and decreased in hypothyroidism. Leptin and NPY levels both increased in hypo- and hyperthyroidism. Zinc levels, on the other hand, decreased in hypothyroidism and increased in hyperthyroidism. Zinc supplementation, particularly when thyroid function is impaired, has been demonstrated to markedly prevent these changes.

  5. Rice fortification with zinc during parboiling may improve the adequacy of zinc intakes in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hotz, Christine; Kabir, Khandaker A; Dipti, Sharifa S; Arsenault, Joanne E; Bipul, Moniruzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is prevalent among children and women in Bangladesh and parboiled rice is the major staple food consumed. Parboiling offers an opportunity to increase the zinc and iron content of rice by adding fortificants to the soaking water. Rice zinc content increased with increasing amounts of zinc sulfate added to the parboil soaking water. Addition of 1300 mg zinc L(-1) increased raw polished rice zinc content from 16.6 to 44.9 mg kg(-1) and from 12.6 to 32.9 mg kg(-1) in the open and closed parboiling systems, equivalent to 170% and 161% increases, respectively. Retention of zinc after washing and cooking was 70-81% across all concentrations tested. Addition of iron-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and zinc sulfate together increased zinc, but not iron, content of polished rice. The simulated prevalence of inadequate zinc intake was reduced by more than half among children and nearly two-thirds among women if 50% of the population were to consume the 1300 mg zinc L(-1) parboiled fortified rice. Addition of zinc sulfate to soaking water during parboiling increases the zinc content of rice and, if found to be bioavailable, could substantially reduce the prevalence of inadequate zinc intake by children and women in Bangladesh. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Expression of HMA4 cDNAs of the zinc hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens from endogenous NcHMA4 promoters does not complement the zinc-deficiency phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana hma2hma4 double mutant

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mazhar; Nawaz, Ismat; Hassan, Zeshan; Hakvoort, Henk W. J.; Bliek, Mattijs; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Schat, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (Nc) exhibits a very high constitutive expression of the heavy metal transporting ATPase, HMA4, as compared to the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (At), due to copy number expansion and altered cis-regulation. We screened a BAC library for HMA4 and found that HMA4 is triplicated in the genome of a N. caerulescens accession from a former Zn mine near La Calamine (LC), Belgium. We amplified multiple HMA4 promoter sequences from three calamine N. caerulescens accessions, and expressed AtHMA4 and different NcHMA4 cDNAs under At and Nc HMA4 promoters in the A. thaliana (Col) hma2hma4 double mutant. Transgenic lines expressing HMA4 under the At promoter were always fully complemented for root-to-shoot Zn translocation and developed normally at a 2-μM Zn supply, whereas the lines expressing HMA4 under Nc promoters usually showed only slightly enhanced root to shoot Zn translocation rates in comparison with the double mutant, probably owing to ectopic expression in the roots, respectively. When expression of the Zn deficiency responsive marker gene ZIP4 was tested, the transgenic lines expressing AtHMA4 under an NcHMA4-1-LC promoter showed on average a 7-fold higher expression in the leaves, in comparison with the double hma2hma4 mutant, showing that this construct aggravated, rather than alleviated the severity of foliar Zn deficiency in the mutant, possible owing to expression in the leaf mesophyll. PMID:24187545

  7. Expression of HMA4 cDNAs of the zinc hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens from endogenous NcHMA4 promoters does not complement the zinc-deficiency phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana hma2hma4 double mutant.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mazhar; Nawaz, Ismat; Hassan, Zeshan; Hakvoort, Henk W J; Bliek, Mattijs; Aarts, Mark G M; Schat, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (Nc) exhibits a very high constitutive expression of the heavy metal transporting ATPase, HMA4, as compared to the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (At), due to copy number expansion and altered cis-regulation. We screened a BAC library for HMA4 and found that HMA4 is triplicated in the genome of a N. caerulescens accession from a former Zn mine near La Calamine (LC), Belgium. We amplified multiple HMA4 promoter sequences from three calamine N. caerulescens accessions, and expressed AtHMA4 and different NcHMA4 cDNAs under At and Nc HMA4 promoters in the A. thaliana (Col) hma2hma4 double mutant. Transgenic lines expressing HMA4 under the At promoter were always fully complemented for root-to-shoot Zn translocation and developed normally at a 2-μM Zn supply, whereas the lines expressing HMA4 under Nc promoters usually showed only slightly enhanced root to shoot Zn translocation rates in comparison with the double mutant, probably owing to ectopic expression in the roots, respectively. When expression of the Zn deficiency responsive marker gene ZIP4 was tested, the transgenic lines expressing AtHMA4 under an NcHMA4-1-LC promoter showed on average a 7-fold higher expression in the leaves, in comparison with the double hma2hma4 mutant, showing that this construct aggravated, rather than alleviated the severity of foliar Zn deficiency in the mutant, possible owing to expression in the leaf mesophyll.

  8. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc.

  9. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  10. Inheritance of seed iron and zinc concentrations in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Micronutrients are essential elements needed in small amounts for adequate human nutrition and include the elements iron and zinc. Both of these minerals are essential to human well-being, and an adequate supply of iron and zinc helps to prevent iron deficiency anemia and zinc deficiency, two preva...

  11. Zinc: an important cofactor in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2013-03-01

    There is mounting evidence that zinc, the second most abundant transition metal in blood, is an important mediator of haemostasis and thrombosis. Prompted by the observation that zinc deficiency is associated with bleeding and clotting abnormalities, there now is evidence that zinc serves as an effector of coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Zinc binds numerous plasma proteins and modulates their structure and function. Because activated platelets secrete zinc into the local microenvironment, the concentration of zinc increases in the vicinity of a thrombus. Consequently, the role of zinc varies depending on the microenvironment; a feature that endows zinc with the capacity to spatially and temporally regulate haemostasis and thrombosis. This paper reviews the mechanisms by which zinc regulates coagulation, platelet aggregation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis and outlines how zinc serves as a ubiquitous modulator of haemostasis and thrombosis.

  12. Effect of zinc supplementation on oxidative drug metabolism in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, M G; Macmathuna, P; Younger, K; Keeling, P W; Feely, J

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antipyrine were studied in seven zinc deficient patients with hepatic cirrhosis, before and after zinc supplementation. Each patient received zinc sulphate 660 mg daily for 30 days, restoring zinc status to normal as assessed by leucocyte zinc concentration. Antipyrine clearance was significantly reduced (P less than 0.05) and antipyrine elimination half-life increased (P less than 0.05) following administration of zinc sulphate without significant alteration in the apparent volume of distribution. It is concluded that supplementation of the zinc deficiency associated with hepatic cirrhosis impaired the hepatic oxidative metabolism of antipyrine. PMID:2049261

  13. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  14. Maternal and fetal plasma zinc in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bassiouni, B A; Foda, A I; Rafei, A A

    1979-04-01

    Zinc is important for fetal growth and is involved in several important enzyme systems. Maternal and umbilical plasma zinc concentrations were determined in 52 parturient women with mild and severe pre-eclampsia, and were compared with those obtained from 20 women in labor whose pregnancies had progressed normally. A decrease in maternal as well as umbilical plasma zinc concentrations was observed in pre-eclamptic women, and this decrease was statistically significant in severe pre-eclampsia. The causes of these changes in plasma zinc concentrations in pre-eclampsia were discussed, and the possible adverse effects of zinc deficiency on the mother and fetus were mentioned. Low plasma zinc concentrations in pre-eclampsia may be a sign of zinc deficiency, implying possible risks to the mother and her fetus. It is recommended that maintenance of adequate dietary zinc nutrition during pregnancy, and particularly in pre-eclampsia, is important.

  15. Zinc, copper and selenium in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, R S; Bahuguna, A

    1994-07-15

    Of the nine biological trace elements, zinc, copper and selenium are important in reproduction in males and females. Zinc content is high in the adult testis, and the prostate has a higher concentration of zinc than any other organ of the body. Zinc deficiency first impairs angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and this in turn leads to depletion of testosterone and inhibition of spermatogenesis. Defects in spermatozoa are frequently observed in the zinc-deficient rat. Zinc is thought to help to extend the functional life span of the ejaculated spermatozoa. Zinc deficiency in the female can lead to such problems as impaired synthesis/secretion of (FSH) and (LH), abnormal ovarian development, disruption of the estrous cycle, frequent abortion, a prolonged gestation period, teratogenicity, stillbirths, difficulty in parturition, pre-eclampsia, toxemia and low birth weights of infants. The level of testosterone in the male has been suggested to play a role in the severity of copper deficiency. Copper-deficient female rats are protected against mortality due to copper deficiency, and the protection has been suggested to be provided by estrogens, since estrogens alter the subcellular distribution of copper in the liver and increase plasma copper levels by inducing ceruloplasmin synthesis. The selenium content of male gonads increases during pubertal maturation. Selenium is localized in the mitochondrial capsule protein (MCP) of the midpiece. Maximal incorporation in MCP occurs at steps 7 and 12 of spermatogenesis and uptake decreases by step 15. Selenium deficiency in females results in infertility, abortions and retention of the placenta. The newborns from a selenium-deficient mother suffer from muscular weakness, but the concentration of selenium during pregnancy does not have any effect on the weight of the baby or length of pregnancy. The selenium requirements of a pregnant and lactating mother are increased as a result of selenium transport to the fetus via

  16. "Pure" motor hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Rubino, F A

    1975-01-01

    Attenuation of cerebral evoked responses after stimulation of the median nerve in the hemiplegic limbs suggested that an apparently pure motor hemiplegia in some patients may not have pure involvement of the corticospinal system. Frontoparietal metastasis, infarction in basis pontis and medullary pyramid, and occlusion of internal carotid artery in the neck resulted in pure motor hemiplegia in some individuals. Images PMID:1185228

  17. Micronutrients and women of reproductive potential: required dietary intake and consequences of dietary deficiency or excess. Part II--vitamin D, vitamin A, iron, zinc, iodine, essential fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Joe Leigh; Bailey, Lynn B; Pietrzik, Klaus; Shane, Barry; Holzgreve, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Part II of this review considers additional micronutrients. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin found in foods of animal origins (fatty fish, liver oil) or fortified products (milk, cheese). Vitamin D deficiency is common in African-American women living in northern latitudes. Vitamin D supplementation may be needed to reach desired 25-(OH)D3 concentrations of >50 nmol/L. In foods of animal origin, preformed Vitamin A is present; in plants (fruits and vegetables) vitamin A precursors (β-carotenoids) are present. Vitamin A supplementation is usually not warranted, and in developing countries should not exceed 3000 μg (10,000 IU)/day. Iron in the form of haem-iron is found in meat, fish and poultry; non-haem (inorganic) iron is found in vegetables, fruits and grains. Iron supplementation may be necessary in the third trimester, earlier in pregnancy or in non-pregnant states if serum ferritin is <20 μg/L or haemoglobin <10.9 g/dL. Zinc is available in red meat, seafood including oysters and unpolished grains; supplementation is not necessary. To assure adequate iodine, food is fortified worldwide with iodated salt. If urinary iodine levels are low, supplementation is needed. Essential fatty acids requirements can be met by one to two portions of fish per week.

  18. Effects of oxalic acid on availability of zinc from spinach leaves and zinc sulfate to rats.

    PubMed

    Welch, R M; House, W A; Van Campen, D

    1977-06-01

    Some effects of dietary oxalic acid on availability of zinc from organic and inorganic sources were assessed. Male rats fed zinc-deficient diets with and without added sodium oxalate were orally dosed once with either 65Zn-labeled spinach leaves or 65Zn-labeled zinc sulfate. Spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea, var. "Winter Bloomsdale") were grown in 65Zn-labeled nutrient solutions that contained 0.033, 0.131 or 0.262 ppm zinc. Increasing zinc supply to the plants increased zinc concentration in the leaves. Oxalic acid content in all leaves was about 7% dry weight. Dietary oxalate enhanced the availability of 65Zn from zinc sulfate, but had no effect on absorption and retention of 65Zn from spinach leaves. Regardless of dietary oxalate levels, absorption and retention of 65Zn was greater from spinach leaves than from zinc sulfate. We concluded that endogenous zinc in spinach leaves was readily available to zinc-deficient rats, and that dietary oxalate was not deleterious to zinc availability.

  19. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induces a functional zinc deficiency during pregnancy and teratogenesis that is independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Peters, J M; Taubeneck, M W; Keen, C L; Gonzalez, F J

    1997-11-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a peroxisome proliferator whose administration to rodents induces a pleiotropic response mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR alpha). The mechanisms underlying DEHP-induced reproductive toxicity and teratogenicity are not well understood but could be the result of an alteration in gene expression by PPAR alpha. Additionally, phthalate exposure is known to impair fetal zinc (Zn) levels during pregnancy. In this work, we investigated whether the reproductive toxicity and teratogenicity of DEHP are mediated by PPAR alpha and whether the receptor influences maternal and/or embryonic Zn metabolism. Pregnant female mice, homozygous wild-type (+/+) or PPAR alpha -null (-/-), were intubated with either vehicle alone or 1,000 mg DEHP/kg body weight on gestation day (GD) 8 and 9. Pregnancy outcome was evaluated on GD10 and GD18 in two cohorts of animals. Compared to controls, DEHP administration resulted in maternal toxicity, embryo/ fetal toxicity, and teratogenicity in both (+/+) and (-/-) mice. Maternal liver mRNA for cytochrome P-450 4A1 (CYP4A1) was higher in DEHP-treated (+/+) mice but not in DEHP-treated (-/-) mice on GD10, consistent with their respective phenotype. Maternal liver MT and Zn levels were significantly higher than in controls on GD10. In addition, embryonic Zn content was significantly lower in both genotypes treated with DEHP compared to controls. Results from this work show that DEHP-induced reproductive toxicity, teratogenicity, and altered Zn metabolism are not mediated through PPAR alpha-dependent mechanisms. In addition, this work suggests that DEHP-induced alterations in Zn metabolism contribute to the mechanisms underlying DEHP-induced reproductive toxicity and teratogenicity.

  20. [Red cell zinc protoporphyrin and its ratio to serum ferritin (ZPP/logSF index) in the detection of iron deficiency in patients with end-stage renal failure on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Ostrowski, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Wardyn, Kazimierz; Puka, Janusz; Włodarczyk, Dariusz; Switalski, Marek; Zakrzewska, Teresa; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring of iron metabolism has become a major clinical issue in end-stage renal patients undergoing hemodialysis. It can be done at three levels: storage, transport and marrow availability. The objective of that study was to evaluate if a combination of an iron storage marker, serum ferritin (SF) with red cell zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), a marker of iron availability for erythron, will improve diagnostic value of both tests. In a baseline survey in the population of 186 haemodialysis patients (75% treated with rHuEpo), the following parameters were determined: complete blood count, serum transferrin saturation (TSAT), transferrin, SF, hypochromic red cells % (HRC) and ZPP; the ZPP/logSF ratio was calculated. Iron deficiency was defined as a fernitin saturation--TSAT < 20%. In the second part of the study, 24 pts with SF < 50 ng/ml were given 50 mg of i.v. iron weekly for three months, then the same tests were repeated. During that time the doses of rhuEpo were stable. An increase in hemoglobin of > 1.0 g/dl was considered as a positive response. In 186 studied patients mean SF was 274 +/- 335 ng/ml, and mean ZPP was 68 +/- 44 mumol/mol heme. A ZPP/logSF ratio > or = 40 had the best combination of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in detecting iron deficiency (76% and 83% vs: 56% and 89% for ZPP > 90 mumol/mol heme, 84% and 34% for HRC > 5%, 68% and 58% for HRC > 10%) and the strong correlations with all other examined parameters were found. The index showed also the highest correlation with the response to the i.v. iron (r = 59; p < 0.01) of the tests evaluated. After three months the values of ZPP/logSF ratio decreased from 80 +/- 105 to 39 +/- 19 (p < 0.01). A significant difference between responders and nonresponders was found for basal ZPP/logSF (p < 0.05) but not for ZPP. Our data suggest that the ZPP/logSF index provides a new valuable parameter for the identification of hemodialysis patients with iron deficiency and the prediction an erythropoietic

  1. [Effect of treatment with a food supplement (containing: selected sea fish cartilage, vitamin C, vitamin E, folic acid, zinc, copper) in women with iron deficiency: double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, M; Opizzi, A; Andreoni, L; Trotti, R

    2006-10-01

    The term iron deficiency is used to indicate a condition in which the content of iron (Fe) in the organism is low, even before the consequent reduction in erythropoiesis comes about. This clinical situation is very frequent in patients in fertile age. The therapy commonly used (Fe salts) is often poorly tolerated. The use of a food supplement containing nutrients useful for improving the bioavailability of Fe and that is well tolerated can represent a valid alternative to iron therapy. The present study examines 49 fertile women with iron deficiency, of normal weight and not undergoing estroprogestin treatment. The patients underwent 3 assessments: basal, after 30 and after 60 days to determine their complete haemochrome, blood iron, blood ferritin, blood transferrin, iron binding capacity, folates, TSH, FT3, and FT4. Following the basal assessment, patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups: treatment A (25 patients): food supplement containing hydrolyzed sea fish cartilage, vitamin C, vitamin E, folic acid, zinc, copper (Captafer); treatment B (24 patients): placebo. The patients were then subdivided into 2 groups according to the basal blood iron (<60 microg/dL) or blood ferritin (<20 ng/mL) values. In the group presenting blood iron of <60 microg/dL only treatment A supplement produced a significant improvement in blood iron after 30 (P<0.001) and after 60 (P<0.005) days of treatment. The group with basal blood ferritin of <20 ng/mL presented blood iron levels of >60 microg/dL; in these patients after 60 days of treatment with the supplement, there was a significant increase in blood ferritin (P<0.05); the patients treated with placebo, on the other hand, did not show any significant difference compared to basal values. This study has shown that, in patients with iron deficiency, the use of a food supplement, consisting of nutrients that improve the bioavailability of Fe, leads to a significant improvement in blood iron and blood ferritin levels.

  2. Effect of Prenatal Zinc Supplementation on Birthweight

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, Jacques; Beatty, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 pregnant women in Ghana were randomly assigned to receive either a combined supplement of 40 mg of zinc as zinc gluconate and 40 mg of iron as ferrous sulphate or 40 mg of elemental iron as ferrous sulphate. Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179)=5.614, p=0.019]. Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy. PMID:19902797

  3. Role of nutritional zinc in the prevention of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-05-01

    Zinc is known as an essential nutritional factor in the growth of the human and animals. Bone growth retardation is a common finding in various conditions associated with dietary zinc deficiency. Bone zinc content has been shown to decrease in aging, skeletal unloading, and postmenopausal conditions, suggesting its role in bone disorder. Zinc has been demonstrated to have a stimulatory effect on osteoblastic bone formation and mineralization; the metal directly activates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, a rate-limiting enzyme at translational process of protein synthesis, in the cells, and it stimulates cellular protein synthesis. Zinc has been shown to stimulate gene expression of the transcription factors runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) that is related to differentiation into osteoblastic cells. Moreover, zinc has been shown to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption due to inhibiting osteoclast-like cell formation from bone marrow cells and stimulating apoptotic cell death of mature osteoclasts. Zinc has a suppressive effect on the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Zinc transporter has been shown to express in osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. Zinc protein is involved in transcription. The intake of dietary zinc causes an increase in bone mass. beta-Alanyl-L: -histidinato zinc (AHZ) is a zinc compound, in which zinc is chelated to beta-alanyl-L: -histidine. The stimulatory effect of AHZ on bone formation is more intensive than that of zinc sulfate. Zinc acexamate has also been shown to have a potent-anabolic effect on bone. The oral administration of AHZ or zinc acexamate has the restorative effect on bone loss under various pathophysiologic conditions including aging, skeletal unloading, aluminum bone toxicity, calcium- and vitamin D-deficiency, adjuvant arthritis, estrogen deficiency, diabetes, and fracture healing. Zinc compounds may be designed as new supplementation factor in the prevention and

  4. Prediction of Serum Zinc Levels in Mexican Children at 2 Years of Age Using a Food Frequency Questionnaire and Different Zinc Bioavailability Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Cantoral, Alejandra; Téllez-Rojo, Martha; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Schnaas, Lourdes; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Peterson, Karen; Ettinger, Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Background The 2006 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey documented a prevalence of zinc deficiency of almost 30% in children aged one to two years old. Objective We sought to validate a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) for quantifying dietary bioavailable zinc intake in two-year old Mexican children accounting for phytic acid intake and using serum zinc as a reference. Methods This cross-sectional study was nested within a longitudinal birth cohort of 333 young children in Mexico City. Non-fasting serum zinc concentration was measured and dietary zinc intake was calculated on the basis of a semi-quantitative FFQ administered to their mothers. The relationship between dietary zinc intake and serum zinc was assessed using linear regression, adjusting for phytic acid intake, and analyzed according to two distinct international criteria to estimate bioavailable zinc. Models were stratified by zinc deficiency status. Results Dietary zinc, adjusted for phytic acid intake, explained the greatest proportion of the variance of serum zinc. For each mg of dietary zinc intake, serum zinc increased on average by 0.95 μg/dL (0.15 μmol/L) (p=0.06). When stratified by zinc status, this increase was 0.74 μg/dL (p=0.12) for each milligram of zinc consumed among children with adequate serum zinc (N=276) whereas among those children with zinc deficiency (N=57), serum zinc increased by only 0.11 μg/dL (p=0.82). Conclusion A semi-quantitative FFQ can be used for predicting serum zinc in relation to dietary intake in young children, particularly among those who are zinc-replete, and when phytic acid/phytate intake is considered. Future studies should be conducted accounting for both zinc status and dietary zinc inhibitors to further elucidate and validate these findings. PMID:26121697

  5. Zinc Supplementation in Children with Asthma Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Rerksuppaphol, Sanguansak

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has demonstrated an association with the risk of asthma. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of zinc supplementation in reducing the severity of childhood asthma exacerbation. A number of 42 children with asthma exacerbation admitted to the hospital were randomized to receive either zinc bis-glycinate (30 mg elemental zinc/day) or a placebo in adjuvant to the standard treatment. The pediatric respiratory assessment measure (PRAM) was used to measure the asthma severity. The primary outcome was a change in asthma severity from the baseline to the end of study. The study found that PRAM score in the zinc group showed a more rapid decrease compared to the control group at the 24-hour (2.2±1.3 vs. 1.2±1.3; P = 0.015) and 48-hour (3.4±2.0 vs. 2.2±1.8; P = 0.042) intervals. At admission, overall mean serum zinc level was 63.8 mg/dL and 57.1% of children had zinc deficiency with no difference in prevalence between groups. PRAM scores did not differ between children with low and normal zinc status. In conclusion, zinc supplementation as the adjuvant therapy to the standard treatment during asthma exacerbation resulted in rapid lessening of severity. PMID:28058103

  6. Zinc and immunity: An essential interrelation.

    PubMed

    Maares, Maria; Haase, Hajo

    2016-12-01

    The significance of the essential trace element zinc for immune function has been known for several decades. Zinc deficiency affects immune cells, resulting in altered host defense, increased risk of inflammation, and even death. The micronutrient zinc is important for maintenance and development of immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. A disrupted zinc homeostasis affects these cells, leading to impaired formation, activation, and maturation of lymphocytes, disturbed intercellular communication via cytokines, and weakened innate host defense via phagocytosis and oxidative burst. This review outlines the connection between zinc and immunity by giving a survey on the major roles of zinc in immune cell function, and their potential consequences in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  8. The Essential Toxin: Impact of Zinc on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Laura M.; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    Compared to several other metal ions with similar chemical properties, zinc is relatively harmless. Only exposure to high doses has toxic effects, making acute zinc intoxication a rare event. In addition to acute intoxication, long-term, high-dose zinc supplementation interferes with the uptake of copper. Hence, many of its toxic effects are in fact due to copper deficiency. While systemic homeostasis and efficient regulatory mechanisms on the cellular level generally prevent the uptake of cytotoxic doses of exogenous zinc, endogenous zinc plays a significant role in cytotoxic events in single cells. Here, zinc influences apoptosis by acting on several molecular regulators of programmed cell death, including caspases and proteins from the Bcl and Bax families. One organ where zinc is prominently involved in cell death is the brain, and cytotoxicity in consequence of ischemia or trauma involves the accumulation of free zinc. Rather than being a toxic metal ion, zinc is an essential trace element. Whereas intoxication by excessive exposure is rare, zinc deficiency is widespread and has a detrimental impact on growth, neuronal development, and immunity, and in severe cases its consequences are lethal. Zinc deficiency caused by malnutrition and foods with low bioavailability, aging, certain diseases, or deregulated homeostasis is a far more common risk to human health than intoxication. PMID:20617034

  9. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  10. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  11. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  12. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  13. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  14. Plasma zinc levels, anthropometric and socio-demographic characteristics of school children in eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency is a major public health problem in many developing countries including Nepal. The present study was designed to assess the prevalence of zinc deficiency and to study the association of zinc deficiency with anthropometric and socio-demographic variables, in school children of eastern Nepal. Methods This cross-sectional study included total 125 school children of age group 6–12 years from Sunsari and Dhankuta districts of eastern Nepal. Plasma zinc level was estimated by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Results The Median interquartile range (IQR) values of zinc in the two districts Sunsari and Dhankuta were 5.9 (4.4, 7.9) μmol/L and 5.8 (4.3, 8.4) μmol/L respectively. A total of 55 children (87.3%) in Sunsari and 52 (83.9%) in Dhankuta had zinc deficiency, no significant difference was observed in the Median (IQR) plasma zinc levels (p = 0.9) and zinc deficiency patterns (p = 0.3) of the two districts. Significant differences were observed in the plasma zinc levels (p = 0.02) and zinc deficiency patterns (p = 0.001), of the school children having age groups 6–8 years than in 9–10 and 11–12 years of age, and zinc deficiency patterns between male and female school children (p = 0.04) respectively. Conclusions The present study showed higher prevalence of zinc deficiency among school children in eastern Nepal. In our study, zinc deficiency was associated with both sex and age. The findings from the present study will help to populate data for policy implementation regarding consumption and supplementation of zinc. PMID:24401366

  15. Excessive zinc ingestion: A reversible cause of sideroblastic anemia and bone marrow depression

    SciTech Connect

    Broun, E.R.; Greist, A.; Tricot, G.; Hoffman, R. )

    1990-09-19

    Two patients with sideroblastic anemia secondary to zinc-induced copper deficiency absorbed excess zinc secondary to oral ingestion. The source of excess zinc was a zinc supplement in one case; in the other, ingested coins. In each case, the sideroblastic anemia was corrected promptly after removal of the source of excess zinc. These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing this clinical entity, since the myelodysplastic features are completely reversible.

  16. Influence of phytase, EDTA, and polyphenols on zinc absorption in adults from porridges fortified with zinc sulfate or zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Marica; Wegmüller, Rita; Zeder, Christophe; Senti, Gabriela; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    Fortification of cereal staples with zinc is recommended to combat zinc deficiency. To optimize zinc absorption, strategies are needed to overcome the inhibitory effect of phytic acid (PA) and perhaps polyphenols. Five zinc absorption studies were conducted in young adults consuming maize or sorghum porridges fortified with 2 mg zinc as zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) or zinc oxide (ZnO) and containing combinations of PA or polyphenols as potential inhibitors and EDTA and phytase as potential enhancers. Fractional absorption of zinc (FAZ) was measured by using the double isotopic tracer ratio method. Adding phytase to the maize porridge immediately before consumption or using phytase for dephytinization during meal preparation both increased FAZ by >80% (both P < 0.001). Adding Na2EDTA at an EDTA:zinc molar ratio of 1:1 increased FAZ from maize porridge fortified with ZnSO4 by 30% (P = 0.01) but had no influence at higher EDTA ratios or on absorption from ZnO. FAZ was slightly higher from ZnSO4 than from ZnO (P = 0.02). Sorghum polyphenols had no effect on FAZ from dephytinized sorghum porridges but decreased FAZ by 20% from PA-rich sorghum porridges (P < 0.02). The combined inhibitory effect of polyphenols and PA was overcome by EDTA. In conclusion, ZnSO4 was better absorbed than ZnO, phytase used to degrade PA during digestion or during food preparation substantially increased zinc absorption from zinc-fortified cereals, EDTA at a 1:1 molar ratio modestly enhanced zinc absorption from ZnSO4-fortified cereals but not ZnO-fortified cereals, and sorghum polyphenols inhibited zinc absorption in the presence, but not absence, of PA. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01210794. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  18. Zinc Status in South Asian Populations—An Update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to highlight the prevalence of zinc deficiency and its health and economic consequences in South Asian developing countries and to shed light on possible approaches to combating zinc deficiency. A computer-based search was performed on PubMed, Google, and ScienceDirect.com to retrieve relevant scientific literature published between 2000 and 2012. The search yielded 194 articles, of which 71 were culled. Studies were further screened on the basis of population groups, age and sex, pregnancy, and lactation. The most relevant articles were included in the review. Cutoffs for serum zinc concentration defined for zinc deficiency were 65 µg/dL for males and females aged <10 years, 66 µg/dL for non-pregnant females, and 70 µg/dL for males aged ≥10 years. Population segments from rural and urban areas of South Asian developing countries were included in the analysis. They comprised pregnant and lactating women, preschool and school children. The analysis reveals that zinc deficiency is high among children, pregnant and lactating women in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Diarrhoea has been established as a leading cause to intensify zinc deficiency in Bangladesh. Little has been done in Sri Lanka and Nepal to estimate the prevalence of zinc deficiency precisely. A substantial population segment of the South Asian developing countries is predisposed to zinc deficiency which is further provoked by increased requirements for zinc under certain physiological conditions. Supplementation, fortification, and dietary diversification are the most viable strategies to enhancing zinc status among various population groups. PMID:23930332

  19. Zinc status in South Asian populations--an update.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed

    2013-06-01

    This article attempts to highlight the prevalence of zinc deficiency and its health and economic consequences in South Asian developing countries and to shed light on possible approaches to combating zinc deficiency. A computer-based search was performed on PubMed, Google, and ScienceDirect.com to retrieve relevant scientific literature published between 2000 and 2012. The search yielded 194 articles, of which 71 were culled. Studies were further screened on the basis of population groups, age and sex, pregnancy, and lactation. The most relevant articles were included in the review. Cutoffs for serum zinc concentration defined for zinc deficiency were 65 microg/dL for males and females aged < 10 years, 66 microg/dL for non-pregnant females, and 70 microg/dL for males aged > or = 10 years. Population segments from rural and urban areas of South Asian developing countries were included in the analysis. They comprised pregnant and lactating women, preschool and school children. The analysis reveals that zinc deficiency is high among children, pregnant and lactating women in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Diarrhoea has been established as a leading cause to intensify zinc deficiency in Bangladesh. Little has been done in Sri Lanka and Nepal to estimate the prevalence of zinc deficiency precisely. A substantial population segment of the South Asian developing countries is predisposed to zinc deficiency which is further provoked by increased requirements for zinc under certain physiological conditions. Supplementation, fortification, and dietary diversification are the most viable strategies to enhancing zinc status among various population groups.

  20. Production of nano zinc, zinc sulphide and nanocomplex of magnetite zinc oxide by Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, Mansoureh; Emtiazi, Giti; Roghanian, Rasoul

    2013-12-01

    ZnO (Zincite) nanoparticle has many industrial applications and is mostly produced by chemical reactions, usually prepared by decomposition of zinc acetate or hot-injection and heating-up method. Synthesis of semi-conductor nanoparticles such as ZnS (Sphalerite) by ultrasonic was previously reported. In this work, high-zinc tolerant bacteria were isolated and used for nano zinc production. Among all isolated microorganisms, a gram negative bacterium which was identified as Brevundimonas diminuta could construct nano magnetite zinc oxide on bacterial surface with 22 nm in size and nano zinc with 48.29 nm in size. A piece of zinc metal was immersed in medium containing of pure culture of B. diminuta. Subsequently, a yellow-white biofilm was formed which was collected from the surface of zinc. It was dried at room temperature. The isolated biofilm was analysed by X-ray diffractometer. Interestingly, the yield of these particles was higher in the light, with pH 7 at 23°C. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first report about the production of nano zinc metal and nano zinc oxide that are stable and have anti-bacterial activities with magnetite property. Also ZnS (sized 12 nm) produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri, was studied by photoluminescence and fluorescent microscope.

  1. Zinc and zinc transporters in macrophages and their roles in efferocytosis in COPD.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Rhys; Homan, Claire C; Tran, Hai B; Mukaro, Violet R; Lester, Susan E; Roscioli, Eugene; Bosco, Mariea D; Murgia, Chiara M; Ackland, Margaret Leigh; Jersmann, Hubertus P; Lang, Carol; Zalewski, Peter D; Hodge, Sandra J

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that nutritional zinc restriction exacerbates airway inflammation accompanied by an increase in caspase-3 activation and an accumulation of apoptotic epithelial cells in the bronchioles of the mice. Normally, apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared by macrophage efferocytosis, limiting any secondary necrosis and inflammation. We therefore hypothesized that zinc deficiency is not only pro-apoptotic but also impairs macrophage efferocytosis. Impaired efferocytic clearance of apoptotic epithelial cells by alveolar macrophages occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cigarette-smoking and other lung inflammatory diseases. We now show that zinc is a factor in impaired macrophage efferocytosis in COPD. Concentrations of zinc were significantly reduced in the supernatant of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with COPD who were current smokers, compared to healthy controls, smokers or COPD patients not actively smoking. Lavage zinc was positively correlated with AM efferocytosis and there was decreased efferocytosis in macrophages depleted of Zn in vitro by treatment with the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN. Organ and cell Zn homeostasis are mediated by two families of membrane ZIP and ZnT proteins. Macrophages of mice null for ZIP1 had significantly lower intracellular zinc and efferocytosis capability, suggesting ZIP1 may play an important role. We investigated further using the human THP-1 derived macrophage cell line, with and without zinc chelation by TPEN to mimic zinc deficiency. There was no change in ZIP1 mRNA levels by TPEN but a significant 3-fold increase in expression of another influx transporter ZIP2, consistent with a role for ZIP2 in maintaining macrophage Zn levels. Both ZIP1 and ZIP2 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm in normal human lung alveolar macrophages. We propose that zinc homeostasis i