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Sample records for pure zinc deficiency

  1. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  2. Dietary phytate, zinc and hidden zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological data suggest at least one in five humans are at risk of zinc deficiency. This is in large part because the phytate in cereals and legumes has not been removed during food preparation. Phytate, a potent indigestible ligand for zinc prevents it's absorption. Without knowledge of the frequency of consumption of foods rich in phytate, and foods rich in bioavailable zinc, the recognition of zinc deficiency early in the illness may be difficult. Plasma zinc is insensitive to early zinc deficiency. Serum ferritin concentration≤20μg/L is a potential indirect biomarker. Early effects of zinc deficiency are chemical, functional and may be "hidden". The clinical problem is illustrated by 2 studies that involved US Mexican-American children, and US premenopausal women. The children were consuming home diets that included traditional foods high in phytate. The premenopausal women were not eating red meat on a regular basis, and their consumption of phytate was mainly from bran breakfast cereals. In both studies the presence of zinc deficiency was proven by functional responses to controlled zinc treatment. In the children lean-mass, reasoning, and immunity were significantly affected. In the women memory, reasoning, and eye-hand coordination were significantly affected. A screening self-administered food frequency questionnaire for office might help caregiver's identify patients at risk of zinc deficiency.

  3. Clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal diseases, following uses of certain drugs such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease and diuretics in some cases, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. In pregnancy and during periods of growth the requirement of zinc is increased. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency include bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males; it is fatal if unrecognized and untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities, and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss, and hyperammonemia. Zinc is a growth factor. Its deficiency adversely affects growth in many animal species and humans. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and for cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Whether or not zinc is required for the metabolism of somatomedin needs to be investigated in the future. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level; the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus affect its functions. Zinc is required for the functions of several enzymes and whether or not it has an enzymatic role in steroidogenesis is not known at present

  4. Zinc deficiency in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Fitzgerald, J T; Hess, J W; Kaplan, J; Pelen, F; Dardenne, M

    1993-01-01

    Zinc is needed for growth and development, DNA synthesis, neurosensory functions, and cell-mediated immunity. Although zinc intake is reduced in elderly people, its deficiency and effects on cell-mediated immunity of the elderly have not been established. Subjects enrolled in "A Model Health Promotion and Intervention Program for Urban Middle Aged and Elderly Americans" were assessed for nutrition and zinc status. One hundred eighty healthy subjects were randomly selected for the study. Their mean dietary zinc intake was 9.06 mg/day, whereas the recommended dietary allowance is 15 mg/day. Plasma zinc was normal, but zinc in granulocytes and lymphocytes were decreased compared with younger control subjects. Of 118 elderly subjects in whom zinc levels in both granulocytes and lymphocytes were available, 36 had deficient levels. Plasma copper was increased, and interleukin 1 (IL-1) production was significantly decreased. Reduced response to the skin-test antigen panel and decreased taste acuity were observed. Thirteen elderly zinc-deficient subjects were supplemented with zinc, and various variables were assessed before and after zinc supplementation. Zinc supplementation corrected zinc deficiency and normalized plasma copper levels. Serum thymulin activity, IL-1 production, and lymphocyte ecto-5'-nucleotidase increased significantly after supplementation. Improvement in response to skin-test antigens and taste acuity was observed after zinc supplementation. A mild zinc deficiency appears to be a significant clinical problem in free-living elderly people. PMID:8353362

  5. Treatment of zinc deficiency without zinc fortification

    PubMed Central

    Oberleas, Donald; Harland, Barbara F.

    2008-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in animals became of interest until the 1950s. In this paper, progresses in researches on physiology of Zn deficiency in animals, phytate effect on bioavailability of Zn, and role of phytase in healing Zn deficiency of animals were reviewed. Several studies demonstrated that Zn is recycled via the pancreas; the problem of Zn deficiency was controlled by Zn homeostasis. The endogenous secretion of Zn is considered as an important factor influencing Zn deficiency, and the critical molar ratio is 10. Phytate (inositol hexaphosphate) constituted up to 90% of the organically bound phosphorus in seeds. Great improvement has been made in recent years on isolating and measuring phytate, and its structure is clear. Phytate is considered to reduce Zn bioavailability in animal. Phytase is the enzyme that hydrolyzes phytate and is present in yeast, rye bran, wheat bran, barley, triticale, and many bacteria and fungi. Zinc nutrition and bioavailability can be enhanced by addition of phytase to animal feeds. Therefore, using phytase as supplements, the most prevalent Zn deficiency in animals may be effectively corrected without the mining and smelting of several tons of zinc daily needed to correct this deficiency by fortification worldwide. PMID:18357621

  6. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  7. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  8. Human zinc deficiency: discovery to initial translation.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H

    2013-01-01

    Ananda S Prasad first suspected zinc deficiency in 1958 after he, at the request of James A Halsted, evaluated a patient with severe iron deficiency. In addition to iron deficiency, the patient appeared ∼10 y old and was severely stunted and prepubertal, though his chronological and bone age were much older. He also had hepatosplenomegaly and ate clay. The condition was not rare in that 11 cases were reported. In 1961 Prasad joined the Vanderbilt Nutrition Group led by William J. Darby at the US Naval Medical Research Unit-3, Cairo, Egypt. Prasad et al. studied 40 males similar to the index case. Contrasts with the index case included no clay eating and infection with schistosomiasis and hookworm. Zinc kinetics confirmed the zinc deficiency. Endocrine studies showed hypopituitarism. Treatment with zinc and an omnivorous diet was more efficacious for growth than no treatment, diet alone, or iron and diet. Later, Halsted et al. confirmed these findings in stunted Iranian farmers. The key role of diet in the illness became evident when Prasad found 16 severely stunted farmers from 2 oases who were not infected with schistosomiasis or hookworm. Later, Reinhold et al., in Halsted's group, reported that phytate and other indigestible zinc-binding ligands in unleavened bread prepared from high-extraction wheat flour suppress zinc absorption. PMID:23319126

  9. Zinc deficiency in molybdenum poisoned cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Parada, R.

    1981-02-01

    Clinical signs ascribable to zinc deficiency were noted in a group of Friesian cows industrially poisoned with molybdenum. Zinc, copper, and molybdenum were determined in blood serum and black hair, and in the contaminated alfalfa pasture the group grazed on. Hematological parameters, and serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase activity, were also determined. Pooled samples of alfalfa from 2 uncontaminated pastures, and of blood, serum and black hair of clinically normal Friesian cattle grazing on these were used as controls. A mixed contamination of the polluted pasture with molybdenum and copper was found, both metals being inversely correlated with he distance to the polluting chimney. Zinc concentrations were normal and not significantly correlated with the distance to the chimney very high molybdenum was found in serum and hair of the poisoned animals; copper was normal in serum and hair. Low calcium and Alkaline phosphatase activity were found in serum, both variables being significantly correlated with serum zinc. Reduced red blood cell number, packed cell volumes and hemoglobin concentrations were also found, but no significant correlation of these parameters with any of the trace metals in serum or hair was found. Signs ascribed to zinc deficiency were consistent with the reduction of zinc in serum and hair and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity in serum. A zinc deficiency conditioned by a simultaneous increased intake of molybdenum and copper is proposed.

  10. Infants and elderlies are susceptible to zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Toyoharu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of zinc for human health has been recognized since the early 1960s, but today there is little concern about zinc deficiency in developed countries. In this study, we measured the zinc concentration in hair from 28,424 Japanese subjects (18,812 females and 9,612 males) and found that 1,754 subjects (6.17%) had zinc concentrations lower than 2 standard deviations (86.3 ppm) below the control reference range, which qualifies as zinc deficiency. In particular, a considerable proportion of elderlies and children (20% or more) were found to have marginal to severe zinc deficiency. A zinc concentration of 9.7 ppm was the lowest observed in a 51-year-old woman; this concentration was approximately 1/13 of the mean reference level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in adults increased with aging to a maximum of 19.7% by the 8(th) decade of life, and decreased to 3.4% above 90-year-old. The proportion of zinc deficiency in infants 0-4 years was 36.5% in males and 47.3% in females; these percentages were higher than the maximum prevalence in elderly subjects. These findings suggest that infants and elderlies are prone to zinc deficiency and that intervention of zinc deficiency is necessary for normal human development, health and longevity. PMID:26912464

  11. Infants and elderlies are susceptible to zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Toyoharu

    2016-01-01

    The importance of zinc for human health has been recognized since the early 1960s, but today there is little concern about zinc deficiency in developed countries. In this study, we measured the zinc concentration in hair from 28,424 Japanese subjects (18,812 females and 9,612 males) and found that 1,754 subjects (6.17%) had zinc concentrations lower than 2 standard deviations (86.3 ppm) below the control reference range, which qualifies as zinc deficiency. In particular, a considerable proportion of elderlies and children (20% or more) were found to have marginal to severe zinc deficiency. A zinc concentration of 9.7 ppm was the lowest observed in a 51-year-old woman; this concentration was approximately 1/13 of the mean reference level. The prevalence of zinc deficiency in adults increased with aging to a maximum of 19.7% by the 8th decade of life, and decreased to 3.4% above 90-year-old. The proportion of zinc deficiency in infants 0–4 years was 36.5% in males and 47.3% in females; these percentages were higher than the maximum prevalence in elderly subjects. These findings suggest that infants and elderlies are prone to zinc deficiency and that intervention of zinc deficiency is necessary for normal human development, health and longevity. PMID:26912464

  12. Induction of zinc deficiency in sheep and its correction with a soluble glass bolus containing zinc.

    PubMed

    Kendall, N R; Telfer, S B

    2000-05-27

    Balance studies were carried out on four Suffolk-cross lambs which were fed a diet containing only 1.2 mg zinc/kg dry matter; zinc deficiency was induced within three weeks. After a period during which the deficiency was relieved by a pica, the zinc deficient state was re-established. Each sheep was then treated with a soluble glass bolus containing zinc, cobalt and selenium. The plasma zinc concentration of the sheep rapidly increased and was maintained for between six and 10 weeks. The bolus was able to supply the daily requirement of the sheep for zinc, with no detrimental effect on their copper status.

  13. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hagmeyer, Simone; Haderspeck, Jasmin Carmen; Grabrucker, Andreas Martin

    2014-01-01

    Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies. PMID:25610379

  14. Behavioral impairments in animal models for zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hagmeyer, Simone; Haderspeck, Jasmin Carmen; Grabrucker, Andreas Martin

    2015-01-01

    Apart from teratogenic and pathological effects of zinc deficiency such as the occurrence of skin lesions, anorexia, growth retardation, depressed wound healing, altered immune function, impaired night vision, and alterations in taste and smell acuity, characteristic behavioral changes in animal models and human patients suffering from zinc deficiency have been observed. Given that it is estimated that about 17% of the worldwide population are at risk for zinc deficiency and that zinc deficiency is associated with a variety of brain disorders and disease states in humans, it is of major interest to investigate, how these behavioral changes will affect the individual and a putative course of a disease. Thus, here, we provide a state of the art overview about the behavioral phenotypes observed in various models of zinc deficiency, among them environmentally produced zinc deficient animals as well as animal models based on a genetic alteration of a particular zinc homeostasis gene. Finally, we compare the behavioral phenotypes to the human condition of mild to severe zinc deficiency and provide a model, how zinc deficiency that is associated with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychological disorders might modify the disease pathologies. PMID:25610379

  15. Discovery of human zinc deficiency: 50 years later.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ananda S

    2012-06-01

    Essentiality of zinc for humans and its deficiency was recognized in 1963. During the past 50 years, it has become apparent that deficiency of zinc in humans is prevalent. Nutritional deficiency of zinc may affect nearly 2 billion subjects in the developing world. Consumption of cereal proteins high in phytate decreases the availability of zinc for absorption. Conditioned deficiency of zinc is also very common. Growth retardation, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, impaired immunity, neuro-sensory disorder and cognitive impairment are some of the clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency. Zinc is involved in many biochemical functions. Over 300 enzymes require zinc for their activation and nearly 2000 transcription factors require zinc for gene expression. Zinc is essential for cell mediated immunity. Zinc is also an effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. In therapeutic dosages, zinc has been used for the treatment of acute diarrhea in infants and children, common cold, Wilson's disease, sickle cell disease and for prevention of blindness in patients with age related macular degeneration.

  16. Clinical, endocrinological and biochemical effects of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S

    1985-08-01

    The essentiality of zinc for humans was recognized in the early 1960s. The causes of zinc deficiency include malnutrition, alcoholism, malabsorption, extensive burns, chronic debilitating disorders, chronic renal disease, certain diuretics, the use of chelating agents such as penicillamine for Wilson's disease, and genetic disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica and sickle cell disease. The requirement of zinc is increased in pregnancy and during the growing age period. The clinical manifestations in severe cases of zinc deficiency included bullous-pustular dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhoea, emotional disorder, weight loss, intercurrent infections, hypogonadism in males and it is fatal if untreated. A moderate deficiency of zinc is characterized by growth retardation and delayed puberty in adolescents, hypogonadism in males, rough skin, poor appetite, mental lethargy, delayed wound healing, taste abnormalities and abnormal dark adaptation. In mild cases of zinc deficiency in human subjects, we have observed oligospermia, slight weight loss and hyperammonaemia. Zinc is a growth factor. As a result of its deficiency, growth is affected adversely in many animal species and in man. Inasmuch as zinc is needed for protein and DNA synthesis and cell division, it is believed that the growth effect of zinc is related to its effect on protein synthesis. Testicular functions are affected adversely as a result of zinc deficiency in both humans and experimental animals. This effect of zinc is at the end organ level and the hypothalamic--pituitary axis is intact in zinc-deficient subjects. Inasmuch as zinc is intimately involved in a cell division, its deficiency may adversely affect testicular size and thus its function. In mice, the incidence of degenerate oocytes, and hypohaploidy and hyperhaploidy in metaphase II oocytes were increased due to zinc deficiency. Zinc at physiological concentrations reduced prolactin secretion from the pituitary in vitro and it has been

  17. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  18. Zinc deficiency alters soybean susceptibility to pathogens and pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate plant nutrition and biotic stress are key threats to current and future crop yields. Zinc deficiency and toxicity in major crop plants have been documented, but there is limited information on how pathogen and pest damage may be affected by differing plant zinc levels. In our study, we us...

  19. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  20. Zinc deficiency affects the composition of the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.J.; Leure-DuPree, A.E.; Fosmire, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    The response of the adrenal gland to zinc deficiency was examined in male weanling rats. In comparison with decapsulated adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, glands from zinc deficient rats had greater relative weight (mg/g body wt), DNA concentration, and total lipid and cholesterol concentrations as well as a smaller protein/DNA ratio. Several of these differences (protein/DNA and cholesterol concentration) could be attributed to the inanition accompanying zinc deficient values were similar to those of pair fed controls. Values for total DNA and protein concentration were similar for all groups. Electron micrographs of the zona fasciculata showed a small number of lipid droplets in the adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, an increase in lipid droplets from pair fed controls, and an even more striking increase in lipid droplets from the zinc deficient adrenals. The increased adrenal lipid composition in the zinc deficient group may be secondary to enhanced steroidogenesis or a zinc deficiency-induced defect of lipid metabolism.

  1. Metallothionein I and II protect against zinc deficiency and zinc toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kelly, E J; Quaife, C J; Froelick, G J; Palmiter, R D

    1996-07-01

    Metallothionein (MT)-bound zinc accumulates when animals are exposed to excess zinc and is depleted under conditions of zinc deficiency, suggesting that MT serves as a means of sequestering excess zinc as well as a zinc reservoir that can be utilized when zinc is deficient. To examine the importance of MT for these processes, mice with null alleles of both MT I and MT II genes were created and the zinc concentration and histological appearance of multiple organs assessed. At birth, the hepatic zinc concentration of these MT-null mice was lower than that of wild-type controls (0.27 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.11 micromol zinc/g tissue, P < 0.05). During the next 3 wk of suckling zinc-replete (95 micrograms zinc/g diet) dams, the hepatic zinc concentration of controls fell to 0.42 +/- 0.04 micromol/g but was unchanged in the MT-null mice (0.28 +/- 0.04 micromol/g). The most prominent histological anomaly observed at 3 wk of age was the presence of swollen Bowman's capsules in the kidneys of MT-null mice. When nursing MT-null dams were fed a severely zinc-deficient (1.5 microg/g) diet, kidney development in the MT-null pups was retarded as indicated by the retention of the nephrogenic zone and incomplete tubule development. We suggest that the lack of a hepatic reservoir of zinc jeopardizes the developing kidney in the MT-null mice. In addition to being more sensitive to dietary zinc restriction, MT-null mice are more sensitive to zinc toxicity. When adult mice were challenged with a ramping dose of zinc up to a total of 3700 micromol zinc/kg body weight, MT-null mice had a greater incidence of pancreatic acinar cell degeneration compared with control mice despite accumulating less zinc (2.72 +/- 0.46 vs. 1.23 +/- 0.52 micromol zinc/g pancreas, control and MT-null, respectively, P < 0.05). The results of these experiments suggest that MT I and MT II can protect against both zinc deficiency and zinc toxicity.

  2. Zinc deficiency increases the osmotic fragility of rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, B L; Browning, J D; Reeves, P G

    1987-11-01

    Zinc deficiency in rats causes increased osmotic fragility of their erythrocytes. This study was designed to determine the relationship of food intake and dietary sulfur amino acid level to the effect of low zinc status on fragility. Immature rats were fed for a 3-wk period a low zinc diet (less than 1 mg/kg) based on isolated soybean protein or a similar control diet (100 mg Zn/kg diet) supplied either ad libitum or by pair feeding. Fragility was measured by the degree of hemolysis in hypotonic saline solutions. In the first experiment, zinc deficiency resulted in higher fragility than in ad libitum controls; pair-fed controls were intermediate and not different from either. Experiment 2 included two levels of methionine, 0.4 and 0.9%, and two of zinc, 0 and 100 mg Zn/kg diet. At the 0.4%, but not at the 0.9% methionine level, hemolysis of red blood cells from the zinc-deficient rats was significantly greater than those from either pair-fed or ad libitum controls. Repletion for 1 or 2 d completely alleviated the increased fragility, but in vitro addition of zinc had no effect. Restricted intake of the zinc-adequate diet reversed the fragility within 1 d as readily as did ad libitum intake. Thus, the osmotic fragility induced by zinc deficiency was prevented by high sulfur amino acid intake and was readily reversed by dietary zinc. It is postulated that extracellular or membrane-bound zinc protects a component of the membrane that is essential to its function, and that reversal of the defect requires an in vivo metabolic process.

  3. Chronic zinc deficiency alters chick gut microbiota composition and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under co...

  4. Interactions between zinc deficiency and environmental enteropathy in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, Greta W; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency affects one-fifth of the world's population and leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. Environmental enteropathy (EE), a subclinical pathology of altered intestinal morphology and function, is almost universal among people living in developing countries and affects long-term growth and health. This review explores the overlapping nature of these 2 conditions and presents evidence for their interaction. EE leads to impaired zinc homeostasis, predominantly due to reduced absorptive capacity arising from disturbed intestinal architecture, and zinc deficiency exacerbates several of the proposed pathways that underlie EE, including intestinal permeability, enteric infection, and chronic inflammation. Ongoing zinc deficiency likely perpetuates the adverse outcomes of EE by worsening malabsorption, reducing intestinal mucosal immune responses, and exacerbating systemic inflammation. Although the etiology of EE is predominantly environmental, zinc deficiency may also have a role in its pathogenesis. Given the impact of both EE and zinc deficiency on morbidity and mortality in developing countries, better understanding the relation between these 2 conditions may be critical for developing combined interventions to improve child health.

  5. Zinc deficiency and neurodevelopment: the case of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Ana M.; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is essential for normal brain development. Gestational severe zinc deficiency can lead to overt fetal brain malformations. Although not teratogenic, suboptimal zinc nutrition during gestation can have long-term effects on the offspring's nervous system. This paper will review current knowledge on the role of zinc in modulating neurogenesis and neuronal apoptosis, as well as the proposed underlying mechanisms. A decrease in neuronal zinc causes cell cycle arrest, which in part involves a deregulation of select signals (ERK1/2, p53, NF-κB). Zinc deficiency also induces apoptotic neuronal death through the intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway, which can be triggered by the activation of the zinc-regulated enzyme caspase-3, and as a consequence of abnormal regulation of pro-survival signals (ERK1/2, NF-κB). Alterations in the finely-tuned processes of neurogenesis, neuronal migration, differentiation and apoptosis, that involve the developmental shaping of the nervous system, could have a long-term impact on brain health. Zinc deficiency during gestation, even at the marginal levels observed in human populations, could increase the risk for behavioral/neurological disorders in infancy, adolescence and adulthood. PMID:20333753

  6. Regulation of the adaptation to zinc deficiency in plants

    PubMed Central

    Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark GM

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which plants sense their micronutrient status, and adapt to their environment in order to ensure a sufficient micronutrient supply, are poorly understood. Zinc is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms. when facing a shortage in zinc supply, plants adapt by enhancing the zinc uptake capacity. The molecular regulators controlling this adaptation were recently identified. in this mini-review, we highlight recent progress in understanding the adaptation to zinc deficiency in plants and discuss the future challenges to fully unravel its molecular basis. PMID:21139426

  7. Human Zinc Deficiency: Discovery to Initial Translation123

    PubMed Central

    Sandstead, Harold H.

    2013-01-01

    Ananda S Prasad first suspected zinc deficiency in 1958 after he, at the request of James A Halsted, evaluated a patient with severe iron deficiency. In addition to iron deficiency, the patient appeared ∼10 y old and was severely stunted and prepubertal, though his chronological and bone age were much older. He also had hepatosplenomegaly and ate clay. The condition was not rare in that 11 cases were reported. In 1961 Prasad joined the Vanderbilt Nutrition Group led by William J. Darby at the US Naval Medical Research Unit-3, Cairo, Egypt. Prasad et al. studied 40 males similar to the index case. Contrasts with the index case included no clay eating and infection with schistosomiasis and hookworm. Zinc kinetics confirmed the zinc deficiency. Endocrine studies showed hypopituitarism. Treatment with zinc and an omnivorous diet was more efficacious for growth than no treatment, diet alone, or iron and diet. Later, Halsted et al. confirmed these findings in stunted Iranian farmers. The key role of diet in the illness became evident when Prasad found 16 severely stunted farmers from 2 oases who were not infected with schistosomiasis or hookworm. Later, Reinhold et al., in Halsted’s group, reported that phytate and other indigestible zinc-binding ligands in unleavened bread prepared from high-extraction wheat flour suppress zinc absorption. PMID:23319126

  8. Infantile zinc deficiency: Association with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Yasuda, Yuichi; Tsutsui, Toyoharu

    2011-01-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis and effective treatment of autism spectrum disorders is one of the challenges today. In this study, we examine hair zinc concentrations for 1,967 children with autistic disorders (1,553 males and 414 females), and show considerable association with zinc deficiency. Histogram of hair zinc concentration was non-symmetric with tailing in lower range, and 584 subjects were found to have lower zinc concentrations than −2 standard deviation level of its reference range (86.3–193ppm). The incidence rate of zinc deficiency in infant group aged 0–3 year-old was estimated 43.5 % in male and 52.5 % in female. The lowest zinc concentration of 10.7 ppm was detected in a 2-year-old boy, corresponding to about 1/12 of the control mean level. These findings suggest that infantile zinc deficiency may epigenetically contribute to the pathogenesis of autism and nutritional approach may yield a novel hope for its treatment and prevention. PMID:22355646

  9. Properties of Zip4 accumulation during zinc deficiency and its usefulness to evaluate zinc status: a study of the effects of zinc deficiency during lactation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Nakagawa, Miki; Tsujimura, Natsuki; Miyazaki, Shiho; Kizu, Kumiko; Goto, Tomoko; Komatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Ayu; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Kambe, Taiho; Komai, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Systemic and cellular zinc homeostasis is elaborately controlled by ZIP and ZnT zinc transporters. Therefore, detailed characterization of their expression properties is of importance. Of these transporter proteins, Zip4 functions as the primarily important transporter to control systemic zinc homeostasis because of its indispensable function of zinc absorption in the small intestine. In this study, we closely investigated Zip4 protein accumulation in the rat small intestine in response to zinc status using an anti-Zip4 monoclonal antibody that we generated and contrasted this with the zinc-responsive activity of the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We found that Zip4 accumulation is more rapid in response to zinc deficiency than previously thought. Accumulation increased in the jejunum as early as 1 day following a zinc-deficient diet. In the small intestine, Zip4 protein expression was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum and was accompanied by reduction of ALP activity, suggesting that the jejunum can become zinc deficient more easily. Furthermore, by monitoring Zip4 accumulation levels and ALP activity in the duodenum and jejunum, we reasserted that zinc deficiency during lactation may transiently alter plasma glucose levels in the offspring in a sex-specific manner, without affecting homeostatic control of zinc metabolism. This confirms that zinc nutrition during lactation is extremely important for the health of the offspring. These results reveal that rapid Zip4 accumulation provides a significant conceptual advance in understanding the molecular basis of systemic zinc homeostatic control, and that properties of Zip4 protein accumulation are useful to evaluate zinc status closely. PMID:26702153

  10. Properties of Zip4 accumulation during zinc deficiency and its usefulness to evaluate zinc status: a study of the effects of zinc deficiency during lactation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Nakagawa, Miki; Tsujimura, Natsuki; Miyazaki, Shiho; Kizu, Kumiko; Goto, Tomoko; Komatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Ayu; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Kambe, Taiho; Komai, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Systemic and cellular zinc homeostasis is elaborately controlled by ZIP and ZnT zinc transporters. Therefore, detailed characterization of their expression properties is of importance. Of these transporter proteins, Zip4 functions as the primarily important transporter to control systemic zinc homeostasis because of its indispensable function of zinc absorption in the small intestine. In this study, we closely investigated Zip4 protein accumulation in the rat small intestine in response to zinc status using an anti-Zip4 monoclonal antibody that we generated and contrasted this with the zinc-responsive activity of the membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We found that Zip4 accumulation is more rapid in response to zinc deficiency than previously thought. Accumulation increased in the jejunum as early as 1 day following a zinc-deficient diet. In the small intestine, Zip4 protein expression was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum and was accompanied by reduction of ALP activity, suggesting that the jejunum can become zinc deficient more easily. Furthermore, by monitoring Zip4 accumulation levels and ALP activity in the duodenum and jejunum, we reasserted that zinc deficiency during lactation may transiently alter plasma glucose levels in the offspring in a sex-specific manner, without affecting homeostatic control of zinc metabolism. This confirms that zinc nutrition during lactation is extremely important for the health of the offspring. These results reveal that rapid Zip4 accumulation provides a significant conceptual advance in understanding the molecular basis of systemic zinc homeostatic control, and that properties of Zip4 protein accumulation are useful to evaluate zinc status closely.

  11. Ocular symptoms as the initial signs of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Galip E; Sevim, Duygu Gulmez

    2016-02-01

    A 2-year-old boy with a history of food allergy presented with severe edema and erythema, excoriations and honey-colored crusting on both lower eyelids, and erythematous rash on his perioral region. An evaluation for micronutrient deficiencies revealed low plasma zinc level. The patient was started on a regimen of zinc supplementation, and at 4 weeks' follow-up there was nearly complete resolution of the lesions.

  12. Supplemental levels of iron and calcium interfere with repletion of zinc status in zinc-deficient animals.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, S; Platel, Kalpana

    2016-05-18

    Negative interactions between minerals interfering with each other's absorption are of concern when iron and calcium supplements are given to pregnant women and children. We have previously reported that supplemental levels of iron and calcium inhibit the bioaccessibility of zinc, and compromise zinc status in rats fed diets with high levels of these two minerals. The present study examined the effect of supplemental levels of iron and calcium on the recovery of zinc status during a zinc repletion period in rats rendered zinc-deficient. Iron and calcium, both individually and in combination, significantly interfered with the recovery of zinc status in zinc deficient rats during repletion with normal levels of zinc in the diet. Rats maintained on diets containing supplemental levels of these two minerals had significantly lower body weight, and the concentration of zinc in serum and organs was significantly lower than in zinc-deficient rats not receiving the supplements. Iron and calcium supplementation also significantly inhibited the activity of zinc-containing enzymes in the serum as well as liver. Both iron and calcium independently exerted this negative effect on zinc status, while their combination seemed to have a more prominent effect, especially on the activities of zinc containing enzymes. This investigation is probably the first systematic study on the effect of these two minerals on the zinc status of zinc deficient animals and their recovery during repletion with normal amounts of zinc. PMID:27101872

  13. Nutrition intervention strategies to combat zinc deficiency in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R S; Ferguson, E L

    1998-06-01

    Widespread zinc deficiency is likely to exist in developing countries where staple diets are predominantly plant based and intakes of animal tissues are low. The severe negative consequences of zinc deficiency on human health in developing countries, however, have only recently been recognized. An integrated approach employing targeted supplementation, fortification and dietary strategies must be used to maximize the likelihood of eliminating zinc deficiency at a national level in developing countries. Supplementation is appropriate only for populations whose zinc status must be improved over a relatively short time period, and when requirements cannot be met from habitual dietary sources. As well, the health system must be capable of providing consistent supply, distribution, delivery and consumption of the zinc supplement to the targeted groups. Uncertainties still exist about the type, frequency, and level of supplemental zinc required for prevention and treatment of zinc deficiency. Salts that are readily absorbed and at levels that will not induce antagonistic nutrient interactions must be used. At a national level, fortification with multiple micronutrients could be a cost effective method for improving micronutrient status, including zinc, provided that a suitable food vehicle which is centrally processed is available. Alternatively, fortification could be targeted for certain high risk groups (e.g. complementary foods for infants). Efforts should be made to develop protected fortificants for zinc, so that potent inhibitors of zinc absorption (e.g. phytate) present either in the food vehicle and/or indigenous meals do not compromise zinc absorption. Fortification does not require any changes in the existing food beliefs and practices for the consumer and, unlike supplementation, does not impose a burden on the health sector. A quality assurance programme is required, however, to ensure the quality of the fortified food product from production to consumption

  14. Nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Márcia Marília Gomes Dantas; de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; de Medeiros Rocha, Érika Dantas; França, Mardone Cavalcante; de Almeida, Maria das Graças; Brandão-Neto, José

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc is an essential nutrient that is required for numerous metabolic functions, and zinc deficiency results in growth retardation, cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. Objective This study evaluated nutritional assessment methods for zinc supplementation in prepubertal non-zinc-deficient children. Design We performed a randomised, controlled, triple-blind study. The children were divided into a control group (10% sorbitol, n=31) and an experimental group (10 mg Zn/day, n=31) for 3 months. Anthropometric and dietary assessments as well as bioelectrical measurements were performed in all children. Results Our study showed (1) an increased body mass index for age and an increased phase angle in the experimental group; (2) a positive correlation between nutritional assessment parameters in both groups; (3) increased soft tissue, and mainly fat-free mass, in the body composition of the experimental group, as determined using bioelectrical impedance vector analysis; (4) increased consumption of all nutrients, including zinc, in the experimental group; and (5) an increased serum zinc concentration in both groups (p<0.0001). Conclusions Given that a reference for body composition analysis does not exist for intervention studies, longitudinal studies are needed to investigate vector migration during zinc supplementation. These results reinforce the importance of employing multiple techniques to assess the nutritional status of populations. PMID:26507491

  15. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  16. Chronic Zinc Deficiency Alters Chick Gut Microbiota Composition and Function.

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Neuman, Hadar; Moscovich, Sharon; Glahn, Raymond P; Koren, Omry; Tako, Elad

    2015-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a prevalent micronutrient insufficiency. Although the gut is a vital organ for Zn utilization, and Zn deficiency is associated with impaired intestinal permeability and a global decrease in gastrointestinal health, alterations in the gut microbial ecology of the host under conditions of Zn deficiency have yet to be studied. Using the broiler chicken (Gallus gallus) model, the aim of this study was to characterize distinct cecal microbiota shifts induced by chronic dietary Zn depletion. We demonstrate that Zn deficiency induces significant taxonomic alterations and decreases overall species richness and diversity, establishing a microbial profile resembling that of various other pathological states. Through metagenomic analysis, we show that predicted Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways responsible for macro- and micronutrient uptake are significantly depleted under Zn deficiency; along with concomitant decreases in beneficial short chain fatty acids, such depletions may further preclude optimal host Zn availability. We also identify several candidate microbes that may play a significant role in modulating the bioavailability and utilization of dietary Zn during prolonged deficiency. Our results are the first to characterize a unique and dysbiotic cecal microbiota during Zn deficiency, and provide evidence for such microbial perturbations as potential effectors of the Zn deficient phenotype. PMID:26633470

  17. Iron Deficiency, Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin Deficiencies in Crohn's Disease: Substitute or Not?

    PubMed

    Kruis, Wolfgang; Phuong Nguyen, G

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammatory reactions, complications, extraintestinal manifestations and a loss of intestinal functions, for example, failures of absorption and secretion. According to intestinal dysfunction, a wide array of pathogenetic pathways is existing leading to iron deficiency and numerous vitamins as well as trace element deficiencies. Complications, symptoms and signs of those deficiencies are common in IBD with varying degrees of clinical significance. This review focuses on selected micronutrients including iron, zinc, magnesium and some vitamins. Epidemiology with respect to IBD, pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical aspects are addressed. Finally, some suggestions for treatment of deficient situations are discussed. In conclusion, some micronutrients have significant impact on complications and quality of life in IBD. Deficiencies may even influence the course of the disease. Those deficiencies should be thoroughly supplemented.

  18. Gender Dependent Evaluation of Autism like Behavior in Mice Exposed to Prenatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has recently been linked to the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) as environmental risk factor. With an estimated 17% of the world population being at risk of zinc deficiency, especially zinc deficiency during pregnancy might be a common occurrence, also in industrialized nations. On molecular level, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect a signaling pathway at glutamatergic synapses that has previously been identified through genetic mutations in ASD patients, the Neurexin-Neuroligin-Shank pathway, via altering zinc binding Shank family members. In particular, prenatal zinc deficient but not acute zinc deficient animals have been reported to display autism like behavior in some behavioral tests. However, a full behavioral analysis of a possible autism like behavior has been lacking so far. Here, we performed an extensive behavioral phenotyping of mice born from mothers with mild zinc deficiency during all trimesters of pregnancy. Prenatal zinc deficient animals were investigated as adults and gender differences were assessed. Our results show that prenatal zinc deficient mice display increased anxiety, deficits in nest building and various social interaction paradigm, as well as mild alterations in ultrasonic vocalizations. A gender specific analysis revealed only few sex specific differences. Taken together, given that similar behavioral abnormalities as reported here are frequently observed in ASD mouse models, we conclude that prenatal zinc deficient animals even without specific genetic susceptibility for ASD, already show some features of ASD like behavior. PMID:26973485

  19. Clinical zinc deficiency as early presentation of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Küry, Sébastien; De Bruyne, Ruth; Vanakker, Olivier M; Schmitt, Sébastien; Vande Velde, Saskia; Blouin, Eric; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Wilson disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP-ase Cu(2+) transporting polypeptide (ATP7B) gene. The copper accumulation in different organs leads to the suspicion of Wilson disease. We describe a child with clinical zinc deficiency as presenting symptom of Wilson disease, which was confirmed by 2 mutations within the ATP7B gene and an increased copper excretion.

  20. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  1. Zinc deficiency and zinc therapy efficacy with reduction of serum free copper in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J; Kaur, Sukhvir

    2013-01-01

    We are in the midst of an epidemic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in developed countries. We have postulated that ingestion of inorganic copper from drinking water and taking supplement pills and a high fat diet are major causative factors. Ingestion of inorganic copper can directly raise the blood free copper level. Blood free copper has been shown by the Squitti group to be elevated in AD, to correlate with cognition, and to predict cognition loss. Secondly, we have shown that AD patients are zinc deficient compared to age matched controls. Zinc is important in neuronal protection. We carried out a 6-month small double blind trial of a new zinc formulation on AD patients. We found that in patients 70 years and older, zinc therapy protected against cognition decline compared to placebo controls. We also found that zinc therapy significantly lowered blood free copper levels. So zinc efficacy could be due to restoring neuronal zinc levels, to lowering blood free copper levels, or to both. PMID:24224111

  2. Zinc-deficient diet decreases fetal long bone growth through decreased bone matrix formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Tak; Baek, Sang-Heum; Lee, Sang-Han; Park, Eui Kyun; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kwun, In-Sook; Shin, Hong-In

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of zinc on skeletal development during fetal development in pregnant ICR mice fed a zinc-deficient (3 mg/kg) or zinc-adequate (30 mg/kg) diet. We also included a group pair-fed with the zinc-deficient group to control for decreased appetite due to zinc deficiency. Developing fetuses at embryonic day 18.5 were removed by cesarean section, and the skeletal development was evaluated by histological analysis as well as by body weight and longitudinal growth measurement. Reduced maternal food intake in the zinc-deficient and pair-fed groups resulted in a marked and significant (P < .05) decrease in fetal weight compared to that of the zinc-adequate group. However, fetal length retardation in the pair-fed group was less marked than in the zinc-deficient group, suggesting that reduced supply of zinc from maternal circulation may play a role in longitudinal growth through skeletal development. The fetal developing tibia of the zinc-deficient group showed marked shortening of diaphysis and a mild narrowing of the hypertrophic chondrocyte zone width with increased osteoclast number, but there was no influence on the mineralization of bone matrix. This may be the result of reduced activation of osteoblasts and maturation of chondrocytes with increased osteoclastic activity, suggesting that zinc deficiency during the fetal development has a greater impact on the matrix formation of bone than the mineralization of bone matrix.

  3. Discovery of Human Zinc Deficiency: Its Impact on Human Health and Disease123

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ananda S.

    2013-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc in humans was established in 1963. During the past 50 y, tremendous advances in both clinical and basic sciences of zinc metabolism in humans have been observed. The major factor contributing to zinc deficiency is high phytate-containing cereal protein intake in the developing world, and nearly 2 billion subjects may be zinc deficient. Conditioned deficiency of zinc has been observed in patients with malabsorption syndrome, liver disease, chronic renal disease, sickle cell disease, and other chronic illnesses. Major clinical problems resulting from zinc deficiency in humans include growth retardation; cell-mediated immune dysfunction, and cognitive impairment. In the Middle East, zinc-deficient dwarfs did not live beyond the age of 25 y, and they died because of intercurrent infections. In 1963, we knew of only 3 enzymes that required zinc for their activities, but now we know of >300 enzymes and >1000 transcription factors that are known to require zinc for their activities. Zinc is a second messenger of immune cells, and intracellular free zinc in these cells participate in signaling events. Zinc has been very successfully used as a therapeutic modality for the management of acute diarrhea in children, Wilson’s disease, the common cold and for the prevention of blindness in patients with age-related dry type of macular degeneration and is very effective in decreasing the incidence of infection in the elderly. Zinc not only modulates cell-mediated immunity but is also an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:23493534

  4. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerates ethanol-induced liver injury in mice: involvement of intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency.

  5. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect.

  6. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect. PMID:27544374

  7. Zinc deficiency in infants and children: a review of its complex and synergistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Nancy F; Miller, Leland V; Hambidge, K Michael

    2014-11-01

    Zinc deficiency is estimated to contribute to over half a million deaths per year in infants and children under 5 years of age. This paper reviews the features of mild-to-moderate zinc deficiency, which include growth faltering, deficits in immune function and altered integrity and function of the gastro-intestinal tract. Sub-clinical features include oxidative stress and a pro-inflammatory state. The homeostatic response to low dietary zinc intake by increasing absorption is limited, especially if the source of zinc is of poor bioavailability, and conservation of endogenous intestinal losses is a critical component of adaptation. Owing to low zinc intakes, older breastfed infants, especially those of low birthweight, are predictably at risk of zinc deficiency if complementary food choices are unfortified and/or low in zinc. Host factors such as young age, poor intra-uterine zinc accretion owing to poor maternal status and/or prematurity, and gastro-intestinal dysfunction also potently predispose to zinc deficiency. Environmental enteropathy, which is prevalent in low-resource settings, may substantially impair zinc absorption and/or increase endogenous losses, and thus lead to relatively high zinc requirements. Emerging evidence highlights common features between chronic inflammation and zinc deficiency, and each may exacerbate the other. More investigations of zinc homeostasis in populations in low-resource settings are needed to better quantify absorption capacity and losses. Effective preventive strategies must address potentially higher zinc requirements as well as the underlying context that perpetuates a vicious cycle of zinc deficiency and multiple adverse outcomes.

  8. Zinc deficiency in children with environmental enteropathy - development of new strategies: Report from an expert workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc deficiency is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The WHO/UNICEF strategy for zinc supplementation as adjunctive therapy for diarrhea is poorly implemented. A conference of experts in zinc nutrition and gastrointestinal disorders was convened to consider approaches that might co...

  9. Frequency distribution of zinc in leaves with and without zinc-deficiency symptoms, all collected from a single orange tree

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Alexander, G.V.; Kinnear, J.; Procopiou, J.; Haritou-Andriotaki, A.; Papanicolaou, X.

    1982-07-01

    Leaves with zinc-deficiency symptoms had a lower Zn concentration than corresponding leaves without symptoms and of the same age from the same orange (Citrus senensis L.) tree on sour orange (C. aurantium L.) rootstock grown in Rhodes, Greece. There was considerable overlap, however, with the frequency distribution of each group approximating a normal curve. But both kinds of leaves combined showed a more normal distribution. Some leaves with symptoms had higher zinc concentrations than some without symptoms. There was a threefold range in Zn concentration for each group of leaves. Zinc-deficient leaves had less phosphorus, calcium, and manganese and more iron, aluminum, silicon, and titanium (the so-called dust elements) than did leaves with no deficiency symptoms. Some of these elements gave normal curves for both Zn-deficient and non-Zn-deficient leaves.

  10. Zinc-deficiency acrodermatitis in a patient with chronic alcoholism and gastric bypass: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Dariush; Ahmed, Zubair; Karikkineth, Ajoy; Williams, Richard; Zigel, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Acquired adult-onset zinc deficiency is occasionally reported in patients with malnutrition states, such as alcoholism, or malabsorptive states, such as post-bariatric surgery. The defining symptoms of hypozincemia include a classic triad of necrolytic dermatitis, diffuse alopecia, and diarrhea. We report a case of zinc deficiency in a 39-year-old man with history of gastric bypass surgery and alcoholism. For this patient, severe hypozincemia confirmed acrodermatitis, and zinc supplementation was met with gradual improvement. PMID:25147643

  11. [Evaluation of zinc deficiency tolerance in different kinds of apple rootstocks].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-dan; Liu, Fei; Wang, Yan-an; Fu, Chun-xia; Yan, Yu-jing; Sha, Guang-li; Shu, Huai-rui

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to screen and evaluate the zinc deficiency tolerance among eight apple rootstocks, i.e., Malus baccata, M. rockii, M. xiaojinensis, M. sikkimensis, M. sieversii, M. robusta, M. hupehensis and Malus 'Flame'. The experiment took these 8 kinds of root-stocks as the research materials to observe and analyze the index of the rootstock's height, dry biomass, root architecture and zinc concentration, and with help of the fuzzy membership function to work out a comprehensive evaluation on their zinc deficiency tolerance. The result showed that several obvious zinc deficiency symptoms were observed in three kinds of rootstocks (M. rockii, M. sikkimensis and M. sieversii), such as dwarfed plant and newborn small leaves, while such symptoms were not obvious in M. xiaojinensis and M. 'Flame'. The plant biomass, height and zinc accumulation of aerial part greatly decreased under zinc deficiency stress, while smaller reduction was observed in M. xiaojinensis than in other rootstocks. M. xiaojinensis and M. baccata had higher zinc concentrations in leaves than others. According to the fuzzy membership function and cluster analysis, the resistance of the eight apple rootstocks to zinc deficiency was ranked: M. xiaojinensis was the highest one; M. 'Flame' was the second; M. baccata, M. sikkimensis, M. robusta and M. hupehensis were rather weaker; M. rockii and M. sieversii demonstrated the highest sensitivity to zinc deficiency.

  12. [Evaluation of zinc deficiency tolerance in different kinds of apple rootstocks].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-dan; Liu, Fei; Wang, Yan-an; Fu, Chun-xia; Yan, Yu-jing; Sha, Guang-li; Shu, Huai-rui

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to screen and evaluate the zinc deficiency tolerance among eight apple rootstocks, i.e., Malus baccata, M. rockii, M. xiaojinensis, M. sikkimensis, M. sieversii, M. robusta, M. hupehensis and Malus 'Flame'. The experiment took these 8 kinds of root-stocks as the research materials to observe and analyze the index of the rootstock's height, dry biomass, root architecture and zinc concentration, and with help of the fuzzy membership function to work out a comprehensive evaluation on their zinc deficiency tolerance. The result showed that several obvious zinc deficiency symptoms were observed in three kinds of rootstocks (M. rockii, M. sikkimensis and M. sieversii), such as dwarfed plant and newborn small leaves, while such symptoms were not obvious in M. xiaojinensis and M. 'Flame'. The plant biomass, height and zinc accumulation of aerial part greatly decreased under zinc deficiency stress, while smaller reduction was observed in M. xiaojinensis than in other rootstocks. M. xiaojinensis and M. baccata had higher zinc concentrations in leaves than others. According to the fuzzy membership function and cluster analysis, the resistance of the eight apple rootstocks to zinc deficiency was ranked: M. xiaojinensis was the highest one; M. 'Flame' was the second; M. baccata, M. sikkimensis, M. robusta and M. hupehensis were rather weaker; M. rockii and M. sieversii demonstrated the highest sensitivity to zinc deficiency. PMID:26995912

  13. Zinc deficiency enhanced inflammatory response by increasing immune cell activation and inducing IL6 promoter demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen P.; Rinaldi, Nicole A.; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope Zinc deficiency results in immune dysfunction and promotes systemic inflammation. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of zinc deficiency on cellular immune activation and epigenetic mechanisms that promote inflammation. This work is potentially relevant to the aging population given that age-related immune defects, including chronic inflammation, coincide with declining zinc status. Methods and results An in vitro cell culture system and the aged mouse model were used to characterize immune activation and DNA methylation profiles that may contribute to the enhanced proinflammatory response mediated by zinc deficiency. Zinc deficiency up-regulated cell activation markers ICAM1, MHC class II, and CD86 in THP1 cells, that coincided with increased IL1β and IL6 responses following LPS stimulation. A decreased zinc status in aged mice was similarly associated with increased ICAM1 and IL6 gene expression. Reduced IL6 promoter methylation was observed in zinc deficient THP1 cells, as well as in aged mice and human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from aged individuals. Conclusion Zinc deficiency induced inflammatory response in part by eliciting aberrant immune cell activation and altered promoter methylation. Our results suggested potential interactions between zinc status, epigenetics, and immune function, and how their dysregulation could contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:25656040

  14. Neuropeptide Y fails to normalize food intake in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P S; Browning, J D; Sullivan, M J; O'Dell, B L; Macdonald, R S

    2002-02-01

    Zinc deprivation results in decreased and cyclic food intake in rats. We determined the response of zinc-deprived rats to neuropeptide Y (NPY). In a preliminary experiment, rats were fed a low (-Zn; <1 mg/kg) or adequate zinc diet (+Zn; 100 mg/kg) for 4 days. NPY (5 or 10 microg) was then administered via an intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula and food intake measured for 4 h. NPY stimulated food intake in all rats, but the difference in food intake due to zinc deprivation persisted. In a subsequent experiment, rats were fed the low zinc and adequate zinc diets for 4, 5 or 6 days. Food intake was suppressed in rats fed the low zinc compared to the adequate zinc diet on all of these days. When NPY (10 microg) was administered at the onset of the light cycle, the food intake was approximately 2.5-fold greater regardless of dietary zinc status, but the amount of food consumed by rats fed low zinc was approximately one-half the quantity consumed by NPY-stimulated zinc-adequate rats. NPY administered at the onset of dark failed to stimulate food intake in either dietary group although the total intake difference due to zinc status persisted. ICV administration of 5 nmol of zinc prior to NPY injection failed to correct the food intake response of the zinc-deficient rats. We conclude that the basis of the reduced food intake of zinc-deficient rats does not relate to NPY quantity or release, or to impairment of its signal transduction. There appears to be another undefined factor that limits food intake in zinc deficiency.

  15. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency also causes hair loss, diarrhea, eye and skin sores and loss of appetite. Weight loss, problems ... pneumonia and other infections. Zinc also helps the skin stay healthy. Some people who have skin ulcers ...

  16. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on testes of Wistar rats: Morphometric and cell quantification studies.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepa; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, Ranveer Singh

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of dietary zinc deficiency on testes of Wistar rats. Pre-pubertal rats (40-50g) were divided into three groups of 10 each viz. zinc control (ZC) and pair fed (PF) [100ppm zinc diet] and zinc deficient (ZD) [1ppm zinc diet]. Experiments were set for 2- and 4-weeks. Pre-pubertal rats fed zinc deficient diet for 2- and 4-weeks exhibited significant (P<0.05) decrease in diet consumption when compared with their respective control groups. Parallel to the reduced diet consumption, a significant (P<0.05) decrease in body and testicular weight of ZD animals was also observed. These observations indicate that the zinc deficiency reduces diet consumption and growth of the animals. Histological studies revealed degeneration in testes of ZD rats as evident by decreased seminiferous tubular diameter and Leydig cell nuclear diameter. Decreased Leydig cell nuclear diameter is responsible for disruption of the biochemical function of Leydig cell. Testicular atrophy (viz. wavy tunica propria, karyolysis, pyknosis, karyorhexis, apoptotic bodies, multinucleated giant cells, few sperms in the lumen, atrophied Leydig cells and accumulation of oedematous fluid in the interstitium) accompanied by significant loss of germ/somatic cells (viz. Type A and Type B spermatogonia, leptotene, zygotene, pachytene spermatocytes, Golgi, cap and acrosome spermatids, Sertoli and Leydig cell) was evident in ZD groups. The degeneration was severe after 4-weeks of zinc deficiency. These observations provide evidence that the functional and morphological changes in testes are probably due to zinc deficiency. Further, the increased oedematous fluid in the interstitial region is due to the cellular death. Impairment of spermatogenesis can be attributed to the direct action of zinc on testes or indirectly from Leydig cell degeneration indicating that zinc is a critical component for maintenance of both mitotic and meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  17. Peroxiredoxin Chaperone Activity Is Critical for Protein Homeostasis in Zinc-deficient Yeast* ♦

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, Colin W.; Taggart, Janet; Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Kubisiak, Michael; Panascharoen, Supawee; Schelble, Katherine; Eide, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is required for the folding and function of many proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency are regulated by the Zap1 transcription factor. One Zap1 target gene encodes the Tsa1 peroxiredoxin, a protein with both peroxidase and protein chaperone activities. Consistent with its regulation, Tsa1 is critical for growth under low zinc conditions. We previously showed that Tsa1's peroxidase function decreases the oxidative stress that occurs in zinc deficiency. In this report, we show that Tsa1 chaperone, and not peroxidase, activity is the more critical function in zinc-deficient cells. Mutations restoring growth to zinc-deficient tsa1 cells inactivated TRR1, encoding thioredoxin reductase. Because Trr1 is required for oxidative stress tolerance, this result implicated the Tsa1 chaperone function in tolerance to zinc deficiency. Consistent with this hypothesis, the tsa1Δ zinc requirement was complemented by a Tsa1 mutant allele that retained only chaperone function. Additionally, growth of tsa1Δ was also restored by overexpression of holdase chaperones Hsp26 and Hsp42, which lack peroxidase activity, and the Tsa1 paralog Tsa2 contributed to suppression by trr1Δ, even though trr1Δ inactivates Tsa2 peroxidase activity. The essentiality of the Tsa1 chaperone suggested that zinc-deficient cells experience a crisis of disrupted protein folding. Consistent with this model, assays of protein homeostasis suggested that zinc-limited tsa1Δ mutants accumulated unfolded proteins and induced a corresponding stress response. These observations demonstrate a clear physiological role for a peroxiredoxin chaperone and reveal a novel and unexpected role for protein homeostasis in tolerating metal deficiency. PMID:24022485

  18. Effects of zinc deficiency upon pituitary function in sexually mature and immature male rats.

    PubMed

    Root, A W; Duckett, G; Sweetland, M; Reiter, E O

    1979-06-01

    Serum pituitary levels of growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured in sexually mature (adult) and sexually immature (juvenile) male rats who had been deprived of dietary zinc for 15 and 7 weeks, respectively. When compared to pair-fed control rats receiving a zinc supplemented diet, both the adult and juvenile zinc deficient rats had significantly lower body weights, tail lengths and ventral prostate weights. The testes of the sexually immature rats were also smaller than those of the pair-fed animals. In sexually mature, zinc deficient rats serum concentrations of GH and testosterone were significantly lower and serum LH levels significantly higher than in ad libitum fed control rats. Pituitary and hypothalamic levels of other hormones did not differ from values recorded in control animals. In sexually immature zinc deficient rats serum concentrations of GH were also significantly depressed; pituitary content and concentration of LH and pituitary and serum levels of FSH were significantly increased over control values. No discernible effects of zinc deficiency upon hyplthalamic content of LH-releasing hormone or serum concentrations of PRL or TSH were recorded in juvenile rats. Zinc deficiency has minimal effects upon the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of sexually mature rats. In sexually immature males, zinc deprivation leads to impairment of gonadal growth and increased synthesis and/or secretion of the pituitary gonadotropins.

  19. Effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency and different ways of zinc supplementation for offspring on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaogang; Chen, Weiwei; Wei, Zhenzhen; Ren, Tianhong; Yang, Xin; Yu, Xiaodan

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of different ways of zinc supplementation on spatial learning and memory remains unclear. Objectives This study aims to assess the effectiveness of two ways of zinc supplementation – oral use and intravenous transfusion – in zinc-deficient offspring rats on learning and memory. Design Rats were randomly divided into six groups on the first day of pregnancy (n=12): control (CO), pair fed (PF), zinc deprived (ZD), oral zinc supplementation (OZS), injection zinc supplementation (IZS), and injection control. The offspring's spatial learning and memory were tested at postnatal day 35 using Morris water maze (MWM). Maternal rats’ serum zinc was measured at postnatal day 21, while pups’ serum zinc was measured at postnatal day 35. Results Compared with the CO and PF groups, pups in ZD group spent more time finding the latent platform and swam longer distances (p<0.05). Compared with ZD groups, pups in OZS group significantly decreased the time used for finding the platform and the swimming distance (p<0.05) and were similar to that of CO and PF groups (p>0.05). However, compared with ZD groups, pups in IZS did not show any improvement in the indexes of MWM (p>0.05) although their zinc serum concentration increased significantly (p<0.05). Conclusions These results indicate that mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy and lactation leads to the impairment of learning and memory function in offspring, and that OZS, instead of intravenous transfusion zinc supplementation, can recover the impairment of spatial learning and memory function. PMID:26829185

  20. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  1. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, K.I.; Caffrey, P.B. )

    1989-08-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. The authors suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase--each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures.

  2. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the endogenous phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Allen, O.B.; Bettger, W.J.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on patterns of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane proteins and erythrocyte filterability was examined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing less than 1.1 mg zinc/kg diet ad libitum for 3 wk. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg zinc/kg diet. Net phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane proteins were carried out by an in vitro assay utilizing (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The membrane proteins were subsequently separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the /sup 32/P content of gel slices was counted by Cerenkov counting. Erythrocyte filterability was measured as the filtration time of suspensions of erythrocytes, both untreated and preincubated with diamide, under constant pressure. Erythrocyte ghosts from zinc-deficient rats demonstrated greater dephosphorylation of protein bands R1 plus R2 and R7 than pair-fed rats and greater net phosphorylation of band R2.2 than pair-fed or ad libitum-fed control rats (P less than 0.05). Erythrocytes from ad libitum-fed control rats showed significantly longer filtration times than those from zinc-deficient or pair-fed control rats. In conclusion, dietary zinc deficiency alters in vitro patterns of erythrocyte membrane protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, whereas the depression in food intake associated with the zinc deficiency increases erythrocyte filterability. 71 references.

  3. Erosive oesophagitis revealing acute zinc deficiency during parenteral nutrition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Amoussou-Guenou, D; Boland, B; Rousseau, C; Lambert, M; Marbaix, E; Bourlond, J; Stein, F

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of acute zinc deficiency which occurred during parenteral nutrition in a patient with anorexia nervosa and which was characterized by a painful erosive oesophagitis preceding the typical oro-cutaneous symptoms. We also discuss the interpretation of plasma and urine zinc levels, the predisposing role of total parenteral alimentation and the specific therapeutic implications. PMID:2518587

  4. Zinc repletion with organic or inorganic forms of zinc and protein turnover in marginally zinc-deficient calves.

    PubMed

    Engle, T E; Nockels, C F; Kimberling, C V; Weaber, D L; Johnson, A B

    1997-11-01

    We conducted two experiments using marginally Zn-deficient (-Zn) calves to determine which supplemental chemical form of Zn would most rapidly reverse certain Zn deficiency signs and to determine whether a change in protein turnover had occurred in Zn deficiency. In Exp. 1, 40 crossbred beef heifers were allocated by BW to four groups. The control group received 23 mg Zn/kg diet DM from ZnSO4 supplemented to the -Zn diet (17 mg Zn/kg diet DM). The three other groups received the -Zn diet. After 21 d, based on a decreased (P < .05) feed efficiency, they were deemed -Zn. Cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was reduced (P < .05) but plasma and liver Zn were unaffected in the -Zn calves. Zinc was repleted by feeding iso-Zn amounts (23 mg Zn/kg diet DM) from Zn lysine, Zn methionine, or ZnSO4. At 8 h after injection of PHA, control CMI response values were similar to Zn Methionine, and Zn lysine was lower (P < .05). In Exp. 2, 10 Holstein steers were allocated by BW to two groups. One group received the -Zn diet, and the other received the +Zn diet. Urine collections were obtained from both groups of calves when the -Zn calves showed a decrease (P < .05) in feed efficiency relative to the controls and when they were repleted with 23 mg Zn/kg diet DM from ZnSO4 and their feed efficiency had returned to that of the controls. Urinary 3-methylhistidine indicated that -Zn calves had less (P < .05) daily protein degradation than the controls. Refeeding Zn to the -Zn group did not change BW or daily protein degradation. Results indicated that a marginal Zn deficiency decreased fractional accretion rate, increased (P < .05) urine excretion, and tended to increase (P < .19) Na and decrease (P < .12) K concentrations in the urine.

  5. Effect of zinc deficiency of expression of specific mRNAs in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.J.; Kimball, S.R.; Leure-duPree, A.E.; Jefferson, L.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Retinol is released from the liver bound to a specific transport protein, retinol binding protein (RBP), which binds to transthyretin (TTR) to transport retinol to the retinal pigment epithelium for use in the visual cycle. The synthesis of RBP as well as the transport of vitamin A from the liver is especially sensitive to zinc deficiency (ZD). Impaired hepatic synthesis of RBP has been reported in zinc-deficient rats. In the present study, the effect of ZD on the expression of mRNAs in the liver was examined by isolating total RNA from control, pair-fed, and zinc-deficient rats and translating the RNA in a messenger-dependent reticulocyte lysate. The radiolabeled translation products were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. The amounts of 12 of the approximately 200 radiolabeled translation products which could be distinguished were found to be altered in zinc-deficient compare to control samples. To investigate the expression of a specific mRNA, a cDNA to TTR was employed to probe the RNA samples. Slot blot analysis revealed that TTR mRNA was reduced to 57 {plus minus} 14% of the control in pair-fed rats to 29 {plus minus} 19% of control in zinc-deficient rats. The decrease in TTR mRNA is consistent with the observation that serum TTR is decreased during zinc deficiency caused by cirrhosis.

  6. Serum zinc levels in patients with iron deficiency anemia and its association with symptoms of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kelkitli, Engin; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Aslan, Nevin Alayvaz; Kilic-Baygutalp, Nurcan; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Kurt, Nezahat; Bakan, Nuri; Bakan, Ebubekir

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Zinc is the co-factor of several enzymes and plays a role in iron metabolism, so zinc deficiency is associated with IDA. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the relationship of symptoms of IDA and zinc deficiency in adult IDA patients. The study included 43 IDA patients and 43 healthy control subjects. All patients were asked to provide a detailed history and were subjected to a physical examination. The hematological parameters evaluated included hemoglobin (Hb); hematocrit (Ht); red blood cell (erythrocyte) count (RBC); and red cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (МСН), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (МСНС), and red cell distribution width (RDW). Anemia was defined according to the criteria defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Serum zinc levels were measured in the flame unit of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Symptoms attributed to iron deficiency or depletion, defined as fatigue, cardiopulmonary symptoms, mental manifestations, epithelial manifestations, and neuromuscular symptoms, were also recorded and categorized. Serum zinc levels were lower in anemic patients (103.51 ± 34.64 μ/dL) than in the control subjects (256.92 ± 88.54 μ/dL; <0.001). Patients with zinc level <99 μ/dL had significantly more frequent mental manifestations (p < 0.001), cardiopulmonary symptoms (p = 0.004), restless leg syndrome (p = 0.016), and epithelial manifestations (p < 0.001) than patients with zinc level > 100 μ/dL. When the serum zinc level was compared with pica, no statistically significant correlation was found (p = 0.742). Zinc is a trace element that functions in several processes in the body, and zinc deficiency aggravates IDA symptoms. Measurement of zinc levels and supplementation if necessary should be considered for IDA patients.

  7. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  8. Decreased food intake rather than zinc deficiency is associated with changes in plasma leptin, metabolic rate, and activity levels in zinc deficient rats( small star, filled).

    PubMed

    Gaetke, Lisa M.; Frederich, Robert C.; Oz, Helieh S.; McClain, Craig J.

    2002-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that the reduced food intake and poor weight gain in zinc deficient rats is due to: increased plasma leptin concentration, increased physical activity and/or increased metabolic rate. Weanling rats were assigned to three groups: controls fed ad libitum (C), zinc deficient (ZD), and pair-fed controls (PF), and tested in a metabolic chamber and activity monitor at baseline and weekly for four weeks. At the end of the study, all groups were compared for differences in plasma leptin concentrations. ZD and PF animals had markedly reduced food intake and weight gain. ZD had reduced stereotypic and locomotor activity compared to PF animals and both groups demonstrated an abolished peri-nocturnal activity spike and were much less active than controls. This was associated with a reduced total metabolic rate by day 30: ZD (0.73 +/- 0.07 kcal/hr, p = 0.0001) and PF (0.83 +/- 0.06 kcal/hr, p = 0.0001) groups vs. controls (1.82 +/- 0.09 kcal/hr). Plasma leptin concentrations in ZD (1.55 +/- 0.06 &mgr;g/L) were lower than controls (2.01 +/- 0.18 &mgr;g/L, p < 0.03), but neither ZD nor controls were statistically different from PF (1.68 +/- 0.05 &mgr;g/L). Both low leptin concentrations and low metabolic rates in the ZD and PF rats were associated with decreased food intake rather than zinc deficiency. The reduced food intake and poor weight gain observed in zinc deficient rats could not be explained by elevated leptin concentrations, hypermetabolism, or increased activity. Low serum leptin concentrations, hypometabolism, and decreased activity are more likely the result of the anorexia of zinc deficiency.

  9. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the accumulation of cadmium and metallothionein in selected tissues of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of continuous dietary zinc deficiency on the metabolism of the toxic heavy metal cadmium has not been widely studied. This investigation was designed to assess the effects of subadequate dietary zinc intake on the accumulation of dietary cadmium and on metallothionein (MT) and zinc concentrations in target organs of cadmium toxicity. Adult male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were allowed, ad libitum, diets either adequate (60 ppm) or deficient (7 ppm) in zinc for a total of 9 wk. The zinc-deficient diet resulted in an approximately 40% reduction in plasma zinc (assessed at 3, 6, and 9 wk) in the absence of overt signs of zinc deficiency (i.e., reduced weight gain, alopecia, etc.). Separate groups of rats were also maintained on zinc-defined diets for a total of 9 wk, but cadmium was added to the diet (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm) a the end of wk 3 and maintained at that level throughout the remaining 6 wk of the study, when the rats were killed. The feeding of the zinc-deficient diet markedly enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the liver, kidney, and testes. Hepatic, renal, and testicular zinc concentrations were not affected by suboptimal zinc intake alone. However, marked reductions in renal and testicular zinc concentrations were caused by zinc deficiency in concert with cadmium exposure. MT levels, when related to tissue cadmium concentrations, were elevated to a significantly lesser extent in the kidneys of zinc-deficient animals. These results indicate that marginal zinc deficiency markedly increases cadmium accumulation in various organs and reduces zinc content and MT induction in some organs.

  10. Zinc deficiency with reduced mastication impairs spatial memory in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kumiko; Tsuji, Tadataka; Tanaka, Susumu; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-12-01

    Sufficient oral microelements such as zinc and fully chewing of foods are required to maintain cognitive function despite aging. No knowledge exists about the combination of factors such as zinc deficiency and reduced mastication on learning and memory. Here we show that tooth extraction only in 8-week-old mice did not change the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein-labeled astrocytes in the hippocampus or spatial memory parameters. However, tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation strongly impaired spatial memory and led to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. The impaired spatial performance in the zinc-deficient only (ZD) mice also coincided well with the increase in the astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region. After switching both zinc-deficient groups to a normal diet with sufficient zinc, spatial memory recovered, and more time was spent in the quadrant with the goal in the probe test in the mice with tooth extraction followed by zinc deprivation (EZD) compared to the ZD mice. Interestingly, we found no differences in astrocytic density in the CA1 region among all groups at 22 weeks of age. Furthermore, the escape latency in a visible probe test at all times was longer in zinc-deficient groups than the others and demonstrated a negative correlation with body weight. No significant differences in escape latency were observed in the visible probe test among the ZD, EZD, and normal-fed control at 4 weeks (CT4w) groups in which body weight was standardized to that of the EZD group, or in the daily reduction in latency between the normal-fed control and CT4w groups. Our data showed that zinc-deficient feeding during a young age impairs spatial memory performance and leads to an increase in astrocytic density in the hippocampal CA1 region and that zinc-sufficient feeding is followed by recovery of the impaired spatial memory along with changes in astrocytic density. The combination of the two factors, zinc deficiency

  11. Zinc deficiency impairs neuronal precursor cell proliferation and induces apoptosis via p53-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Rikki S; Tassabehji, Nadine M; Hare, Joan; Sharma, Girdhari; Levenson, Cathy W

    2008-10-27

    The potential importance of stem cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS) that cannot only divide, but also participate in neurogenesis, is now widely appreciated. While we know that the trace element zinc is needed for brain development, the role of this essential nutrient in adult stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis has not been investigated. Adult male rats fed a zinc-restricted diet had approximately 50% fewer Ki67-positive stem cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ) and granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus compared to both zinc-adequate and pair-fed controls (p<0.05). Zinc-deficient rats also had a significant increase the number of TUNEL-labeled cells in the SGZ compared to pair-fed rats (p<0.05). To explore the mechanisms responsible for the effects of zinc deficiency, cultured human Ntera-2 (NT2) neuronal precursor cells were deprived of zinc using the chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Consistent with the effects of deficiency in vivo, TPEN treatment resulted in a significant decrease in cellular proliferation, as measured by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake, and an increase in caspase3/7-dependent apoptosis. These changes were accompanied by increases in nuclear p53. Oligonucleotide arrays, coupled with use of a dominant-negative p53 construct in NT2 cells, identified 14 differentially regulated p53 target genes. In the early phases zinc deficiency, p53 targets responsible for cell cycle arrest were induced. Continuation of deficiency resulted in the induction of a variety of pro-apoptotic genes such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and retinoblastoma-1 (Rb-1), as well as cellular protection genes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx). These data suggest that zinc plays a role in neurogenesis by regulating p53-dependent molecular mechanisms that control neuronal precursor cell proliferation and survival.

  12. Dietary zinc deficiency effects dorso-lateral and ventral prostate of Wistar rats: histological, biochemical and trace element study.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sangeeta; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, R S

    2014-10-01

    Zinc deficiency has become a global problem affecting the developed and developing countries due to inhibitors in the diet which prevents its absorption or due to a very low concentration of bioavailable zinc in the diet. Being present in high concentration in the prostate and having diverse biological function, we investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency for 2 and 4 weeks on dorso-lateral and ventral prostate. Sixty prepubertal rats were divided into three groups: zinc control (ZC), pair fed (PF) and zinc deficient (ZD) and fed on 100 μg/g (zinc control and pair fed groups) and 1 μg/g (zinc deficient) diet. Zinc deficiency was associated with degenerative changes in dorso-lateral and ventral prostate as made evident by karyolysis, karyorhexis, cytoplasmolysis, loss of cellularisation, decreased intraluminar secretion and degeneration of fibromuscular stroma. In response, protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, acid phosphatase, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase increased, exhibiting variable level of significance. Total protein and total zinc concentration in dorso-lateral and ventral prostate as well as in serum decreased (P < 0.001). Decrease (P < 0.001) was recorded in serum FSH and testosterone after 2 and 4 weeks of zinc deficiency. The changes were more prominent after 4 weeks of synthetic zinc deficient diet. The results indicate that zinc deficiency during prepubertal period affects the prostate structure, total protein concentration, enhanced protein carbonyl concentration, nitric oxide as well as acid phosphatase activities and impaired hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities. Evidently these changes could be attributed to dysfunction of dorso-lateral and ventral prostate after dietary zinc deficiency as well as impairment of metabolic and secretory activity, reduced gonadotropin levels by hypothalamus -hypophysial system which is indicative of a critical role of zinc in maintaining the prostate integrity. PMID

  13. Effect of zinc-deficient diet on oral tissues and periodontal indices in rats.

    PubMed

    Seyedmajidi, Seyed Ali; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moghadamnia, Aliakbar; Khani, Zohreh; Zahedpasha, Samir; Jenabian, Niloofar; Jorsaraei, Gholamali; Halalkhor, Sohrab; Motallebnejad, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) as a nutritional factor affects the health of the oral tissues. This study was done for the evaluation of the effects of zinc deficiency on the oral tissues of rats. The study was carried out on 14 male Wistar rats, cessation of lactation on the 24(th) day after birth. The rats were randomly divided into two groups. Zinc deficient (ZD) diet was used for one group and another group was fed with a zinc-containing (ZC) diet. The alterations of the oral tissues in both groups were evaluated clinically after four weeks. Also the gingival index and periodontal pocket depth were recorded. The measurement of serum zinc level was done by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The microscopic slides of oral tissue specimen were evaluated quantitatively. The serum zinc level of the ZD rats was lower than the ZC group (p< 0.001). According clinical findings, the gingival index was lower in ZC rat (p=0.001), but there was no significant difference regarding the periodontal pocket depth between two groups (p=0.07). Aphthous ulcer was observed in ZD rats on the floor of the mouth. There was no significant difference regarding the epithelial and keratin thickening between two groups. This study indicated that oral and periodontal health was better in ZC rats than in ZD rats. Aphthous lesions were more prominent in ZD rats. This study confirmed that zinc deficiency may endanger oral and periodo ntal structures.

  14. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium metabolism in patients with human growth hormone deficiency or acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Aihara, K; Nishi, Y; Hatano, S; Kihara, M; Ohta, M; Sakoda, K; Uozumi, T; Usui, T

    1985-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate trace metal metabolism in patients with known abnormalities of human growth hormone (hGH). The mean concentration of zinc in plasma and urine decreased in patients with hGH deficiency after hGH injection, whereas, after adenomectomy, in patients with acromegaly, zinc increased in plasma, remained the same in erythrocytes, and decreased in urine. There was a negative correlation between plasma zinc and serum hGH levels and a positive correlation between urinary zinc excretion and serum hGH levels in acromegaly. In hGH deficiency, the copper content remained unchanged in plasma and erythrocytes and rose in urine after treatment; however, in acromegaly, the copper content increased in plasma and remained unchanged in erythrocytes and urine after surgery. The mean concentration of erythrocyte manganese did not change significantly after treatment in patients with hGH deficiency or acromegaly, but the pre-hGH treatment level of erythrocyte manganese in hGH deficiency was lower than in the controls. Plasma selenium concentrations were decreased in hGH deficiency and increased in acromegaly patients after therapy. These results suggest that hGH affects the metabolism of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

  15. Iron and zinc deficiencies in China: what is a feasible and cost-effective strategy?

    PubMed

    Ma, Guansheng; Jin, Ying; Li, Yanping; Zhai, Fengying; Kok, Frans J; Jacobsen, Evert; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2008-06-01

    In order to prioritise interventions for micronutrient deficiencies in China, the populations affected by iron and zinc deficiencies were assessed based on data from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. The costs and cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food diversification and food fortification were estimated using the standard World Health Organization ingredients approach. Results indicated that 30% of children (60 years), pregnant and lactating women, and 20% of women of reproductive age were anaemic, some 245 million people. Approximately 100 million people were affected by zinc deficiency (zinc intake inadequacy and stunting), the majority living in rural areas. Among interventions on iron and zinc deficiency, biofortification showed the lowest costs per capita, I 0.01 (international dollars), while dietary diversification through health education represented the highest costs at I 1148(international dollars). The cost-effectiveness of supplementation, food fortification and dietary diversification for iron deficiency alone was I 179(international dollars) , I 66 and I 103 (international dollars) per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY), respectively. Data for biofortification were not available. For zinc deficiency, the corresponding figures were I 399(international dollars), I 153(international dollars) and I 103(international dollars) per DALY, respectively. In conclusion, iron and zinc deficiencies are of great public health concern in China. Of the two long-term intervention strategies, i.e. dietary diversification and biofortification with improved varieties, the latter is especially feasible and cost-effective for rural populations. Supplementation and fortification can be used as short-term strategies for specific groups.

  16. Zinc deficiency in the 11 day rat embryo: a scanning and transmission electron microscope study

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.J.; Dreosti, I.E.; Tulsi, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Zinc deficient rat embryos were obtained on the 11th day of pregnancy and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an increase in the number of deformed embryos, as well as embryonic growth retardation. In addition, the epithelium of zinc deficient embryos displayed a marked increase in surface microvilli, as well as the presence of blebbing. Transmission electron microscopy indicated extensive cell death in the neural epithelium which was apparently more severely damaged by zinc deficiency than were mesenchymal cells. Mitochondrial cristae were affected to a greater degree than any other membrane of the cell and cristael disintegration appeared to represent the principal cellular lesion preceding necrosis of neural cells and neural tube teratology. 29 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii) Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency. PMID:25923075

  18. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  19. Molecular basis for the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis: An experimental study in the Sprague-dawley rat model

    PubMed Central

    Omu, Alexander E.; Al-Azemi, Majedah K.; Al-Maghrebi, May; Mathew, Chacko T.; Omu, Florence E.; Kehinde, Elijah O.; Anim, Jehoram T.; Oriowo, Mabayoje A.; Memon, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of zinc deficiency on spermatogenesis in the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. Materials and Methods: Three groups of eight adult male SD rats were maintained for 4 weeks on a normal diet as control, zinc deficient diet and zinc deficient diet with zinc supplementation of 28 mg zinc/kg body weight respectively. Using standard techniques, the following parameters were compared between the three groups of experimental animals at the end of 4 weeks: (a) Serum zinc, magnesium (Mg), copper (Cu), selenium (Se) and cadmium (Cd), (b) serum sex hormones, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), (c) interleukin-4 (IL-4), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 expression in the testes, (d) assessment of apoptosis of testicular cells using electron microscopy and (e) testicular volume and histology using the orchidometer and Johnsen score, respectively. Results: The zinc deficient group showed a reduction of testicular volume, serum concentrations of Zn, Cu, Se, Mg, SOD, GPX, IL-4, Bcl-2 and testosterone (P < 0.05), as well as increased levels of serum Cd, MDA and tissue TNF-α, Bax, caspase-3 and apoptosis of the germ cells (P < 0.05) compared with control and zinc supplementation groups. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency is associated with impaired spermatogenesis because of reduced testosterone production, increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. These findings suggest that zinc has a role in male reproduction. PMID:25624578

  20. Zinc Deficiency: Descriptive Epidemiology and Morbidity among Preschool Children in Peri-urban Population in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Usha; Hiremath, Girish; Menon, Venugopal P.; Dhingra, Pratibha; Sarkar, Archana

    2009-01-01

    Community-based data relating to factors influencing zinc deficiency among preschool children in India are inadequate. Data of a large, double-blinded, randomized, controlled zinc-supplementation trial were used for assessing the descriptive epidemiology of zinc deficiency among children aged 6–35 months (n=940). In total, 609 children were followed up for 120 days for information on morbidity. Of these children, 116 from the control group belonging to the upper and the lower 25th quartile of plasma zinc status at baseline were selected for assessing the association of zinc deficiency with prospective morbidity. At baseline, demographic, socioeconomic and dietary information was collected, and anthropometric measurements and levels of plasma zinc were assessed. At baseline, 73.3% of the children were zinc-deficient (plasma zinc <70 µg/dL), of which 33.8% had levels of plasma zinc below 60 µg/dL. A significantly higher risk of morbidity was prevalent among the subjects with lower plasma zinc compared to those with higher levels of plasma zinc. PMID:19902798

  1. The effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Mi; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Soon Bae; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2016-07-01

    Introduction High sodium intake is the main cause of fluid overload in hemodialysis (HD) patients, leading to increased cardiovascular mortality. High sodium intake is known to be associated with low salt taste acuity and/or high preference. As the zinc status could influence taste acuity, we analyzed the effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in HD patients. Methods A total of 77 HD patients was enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Zinc deficiency was defined as serum zinc level with below 70 µg/mL. The patients were divided into two groups based on serum zinc level. Salt taste acuity and preference were determined by a sensory test using varying concentrations of NaCl solution, and dietary sodium intake was estimated using 3-day dietary recall surveys. Findings The mean salt recognition threshold and salt taste preference were significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group. And there was significant positive correlation between salt taste preference and dietary sodium intake in zinc deficient group (r = 0.43, P = 0.002). Although, the dietary sodium intake showed a high tendency with no significance (P = 0.052), interdialytic weight gain was significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group (2.68 ± 1.02 kg vs. 3.18 ± 1.02 kg; P = 0.047). Discussion Zinc deficiency may be related to low salt taste acuity and high salt preference, leading to high dietary sodium intake in HD patients.

  2. Characterization of the response to zinc deficiency in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mauro; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2012-05-01

    Zur regulators control zinc homeostasis by repressing target genes under zinc-sufficient conditions in a wide variety of bacteria. This paper describes how part of a survey of duplicated genes led to the identification of the open reading frame all2473 as the gene encoding the Zur regulator of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. All2473 binds to DNA in a zinc-dependent manner, and its DNA-binding sequence was characterized, which allowed us to determine the relative contribution of particular nucleotides to Zur binding. A zur mutant was found to be impaired in the regulation of zinc homeostasis, showing sensitivity to elevated concentrations of zinc but not other metals. In an effort to characterize the Zur regulon in Anabaena, 23 genes containing upstream putative Zur-binding sequences were identified and found to be regulated by Zur. These genes are organized in six single transcriptional units and six operons, some of them containing multiple Zur-regulated promoters. The identities of genes of the Zur regulon indicate that Anabaena adapts to conditions of zinc deficiency by replacing zinc metalloproteins with paralogues that fulfill the same function but presumably with a lower zinc demand, and with inducing putative metallochaperones and membrane transport systems likely being involved in the scavenging of extracellular zinc, including plasma membrane ABC transport systems and outer membrane TonB-dependent receptors. Among the Zur-regulated genes, the ones showing the highest induction level encode proteins of the outer membrane, suggesting a primary role for components of this cell compartment in the capture of zinc cations from the extracellular medium. PMID:22389488

  3. Alterations of Bio-elements, Oxidative, and Inflammatory Status in the Zinc Deficiency Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Noworyta-Sokołowska, Karolina; Misztak, Paulina; Gołębiowska, Joanna; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Krośniak, Mirosław; Wojtanowska-Krośniak, Agnieszka; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Lankosz, Marek; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study showed that dietary zinc restriction induces depression-like behavior with concomitant up-regulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Because metal ions, oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in depression/NMDAR function, in the present study, bio-elements (zinc, copper, iron, magnesium, and calcium), oxidative (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; protein carbonyl content), and inflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β) factors were measured in serum, hippocampus (Hp), and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to a zinc-adequate (ZnA) (50 mg Zn/kg) or a zinc-deficient (ZnD) (3 mg Zn/kg) diet for 4 or 6 weeks. Both periods of dietary zinc restriction reduced serum zinc and increased serum iron levels. At 4 weeks, lowered zinc level in the PFC and Hp as well as lowered iron level in the PFC of the ZnD rats was observed. At 6 weeks, however, iron level was increased in the PFC of these rats. Although at 6 weeks zinc level in the PFC did not differ between the ZnA and ZnD rats, extracellular zinc concentration after 100 mM KCl stimulation was reduced in the PFC of the ZnD rats and was accompanied by increased extracellular iron and glutamate levels (as measured by the in vivo microdialysis). The examined oxidative and inflammatory parameters were generally enhanced in the tissue of the ZnD animals. The obtained data suggest dynamic redistribution of bio-elements and enhancement of oxidative/inflammatory parameters after dietary zinc restriction, which may have a link with depression-like behavior/NMDAR function/neurodegeneration.

  4. Nutritional zinc status in weaning infants: association with iron deficiency, age, and growth profile.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Chang, Ju Young; Hong, Jeana; Ko, Jae Sung; Seo, Jeong Kee; Shin, Sue; Lee, Eun Hee

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the correlation between iron deficiency (ID) and zinc deficiency (ZD) and explored the demographic, anthropometric, and feeding-related factors associated with hypozincemia and hair zinc content in weaning infants. Infants aged 6-24 months were recruited, their feeding history was recorded, and their heights and weights were measured. Hemoglobin content, serum iron/total iron-binding capacity, and ferritin and zinc concentrations of serum and hair (using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy) were assessed. Among 101 infants, 64 (63.4 %) infants exhibited ID. The median serum zinc concentration in iron-deficient infants was lower than that in non-iron-deficient infants, respectively, 73.5 μg/dL (interquartile range [IQR], 65.0-83.8) vs. 87.0 μg/dL (IQR, 77.5-97.0; p = 0.001). The frequency of hypozincemia was also significantly higher in the iron-deficient group than in the non-iron-deficient group (21 out of 64 [32.8 %] vs. 4 out of 37 [10.8 %], respectively; p = 0.014). In multiple regression analysis, the risk of hypozincemia was significantly increased in infants with ID (p = 0.026), mildly underweight infants (weight-for-age Z score < -1; p = 0.034), and infants with mild wasting (weight-for-height Z score < -1; p = 0.028). Hair zinc concentrations (n = 81) were not significantly associated with ID status (p > 0.1); however, there was an inverse relationship between hair zinc concentrations and age of infants (r = -0.250; p = 0.024). In weaning infants, ID is a risk factor for hypozincemia. Hair zinc concentrations appeared to decrease as the age of infants increased during late infancy. Further large-scale studies are needed to validate the relationship between hypozincemia and mild degrees of weight gain impairment in this age group.

  5. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a reactive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary Zinc (Zn) deficiency affects approximately 30% of the world’s population. Zinc is a vital micronutrient and is important for the body’s ability to function. To date, accurate biological markers of the Zn subject’s status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chicken mod...

  6. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44×10(-6) to 2.59×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.70×10(-7)M at pH11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl(-), Br(-), F(-), I(-), IO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), CO3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), S2O4(2-), C2O4(2-), SCN(-), N3(-), citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  7. Validity of the copper/zinc ratio as a diagnostic marker for taste disorders associated with zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Toru; Miyazawa, Mai; Ohshiro, Tadahiro

    2016-07-01

    Although zinc (Zn) deficiency is often suspected in patients with taste disorders, it may be difficult to diagnose Zn deficiency, especially in patients without any clear risk factors. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to detect possible markers for taste disorders or zinc deficiency. To achieve this aim, we analyzed data obtained from 122 Japanese men who were not using medicines and had no diseases requiring treatment. We evaluated the following factors: awareness of dysgeusia; salty taste recognition threshold (SRT); the serum concentrations of Zn, copper (Cu), iron, alkaline phosphatase, and albumin; and the Cu/Zn ratio. The serum Cu/Zn ratio was positively correlated with the both the SRT and the awareness of dysgeusia. The serum Zn concentration was not correlated with the SRT or the awareness of dysgeusia in univariate analyses. However, in multivariate logistic regression, the serum Zn concentration was associated with the awareness of dysgeusia. In conclusion, the serum Cu/Zn ratio is a good diagnostic marker for taste disorders and the value of 1.1 may be a threshold level for detecting taste disorders. PMID:27259356

  8. Zinc deficiency dysregulates the synaptic ProSAP/Shank scaffold and might contribute to autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Grabrucker, Stefanie; Jannetti, Linda; Eckert, Matti; Gaub, Simone; Chhabra, Resham; Pfaender, Stefanie; Mangus, Katharina; Reddy, Parameshwar Pasham; Rankovic, Vladan; Schmeisser, Michael J; Kreutz, Michael R; Ehret, Günter; Boeckers, Tobias M; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the ProSAP/Shank family act as major organizing scaffolding elements within the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. Deletions, mutations or the downregulation of these molecules has been linked to autism spectrum disorders, the related Phelan McDermid Syndrome or Alzheimer's disease. ProSAP/Shank proteins are targeted to synapses depending on binding to zinc, which is a prerequisite for the assembly of the ProSAP/Shank scaffold. To gain insight into whether the previously reported assembly of ProSAP/Shank through zinc ions provides a crossing point between genetic forms of autism spectrum disorder and zinc deficiency as an environmental risk factor for autism spectrum disorder, we examined the interplay between zinc and ProSAP/Shank in vitro and in vivo using neurobiological approaches. Our data show that low postsynaptic zinc availability affects the activity dependent increase in ProSAP1/Shank2 and ProSAP2/Shank3 levels at the synapse in vitro and that a loss of synaptic ProSAP1/Shank2 and ProSAP2/Shank3 occurs in a mouse model for acute and prenatal zinc deficiency. Zinc-deficient animals displayed abnormalities in behaviour such as over-responsivity and hyperactivity-like behaviour (acute zinc deficiency) and autism spectrum disorder-related behaviour such as impairments in vocalization and social behaviour (prenatal zinc deficiency). Most importantly, a low zinc status seems to be associated with an increased incidence rate of seizures, hypotonia, and attention and hyperactivity issues in patients with Phelan-McDermid syndrome, which is caused by haploinsufficiency of ProSAP2/Shank3. We suggest that the molecular underpinning of prenatal zinc deficiency as a risk factor for autism spectrum disorder may unfold through the deregulation of zinc-binding ProSAP/Shank family members. PMID:24277719

  9. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-03-20

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation.

  10. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) control versus Zn(−) group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn(+) control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ6 desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn(+) group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn(−) group compared to the Zn(+) group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation. PMID:24658588

  11. Gestational marginal zinc deficiency impaired fetal neural progenitor cell proliferation by disrupting the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Johnathan R; Supasai, Suangsuda; Kha, Jennifer; Vaeth, Brandon M; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Adamo, Ana M; Oteiza, Patricia I

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated if a marginal zinc deficiency during gestation in rats could affect fetal neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation through a down-regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling pathway. Rats were fed a marginally zinc-deficient or adequate diet from the beginning of gestation until embryonic day (E)19. The proportion of proliferating cells in the E19 fetal ventricular zone was decreased by marginal zinc deficiency. Immunostaining for phosphorylated ERK1/2 in the cerebral cortex was decreased in the marginal zinc fetuses, and this effect was strongest in the ventricular zone. Furthermore, phosphorylation of the upstream mitogen-activated ERK kinases (MEK1/2) was not affected, suggesting that marginal zinc deficiency could have increased ERK-directed phosphatase activity. Similar findings were observed in cultured rat embryonic cortical neurons and in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, in which zinc-deficiency decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting MEK1/2 phosphorylation. Indeed, zinc deficiency increased the activity of the ERK-directed phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in the fetal cortex and IMR-32 cells. Inhibition of PP2A with okadaic acid prevented the decrease in ERK phosphorylation and proliferation of zinc-deficient IMR-32 cells. Together these results demonstrated that decreased zinc availability reduces ERK1/2 signaling and decreased NPC proliferation as a consequence of PP2A activation. Disruption of fetal neurogenesis could underlie irreversible neurobehavioral impairments observed after even marginal zinc nutrition during a critical period of early brain development.

  12. Natural Genetic Variation of Seed Micronutrients of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown in Zinc-Deficient and Zinc-Amended Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaochao; Yuan, Lixing; Ludewig, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The quality of edible seeds for human and animal nutrition is crucially dependent on high zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) seed concentrations. The micronutrient bioavailability is strongly reduced by seed phytate that forms complexes with seed cations. Superior genotypes with increased seed Zn concentrations had been identified, but low micronutrient seed levels often prevail when the plants are grown in Zn-deficient soils, which are globally widespread and correlate with human Zn-deficiency. Here, seed Zn concentrations of Arabidopsis accessions grown in Zn-deficient and Zn-amended conditions were measured together with seed Fe and manganese (Mn), in a panel of 108 accessions. By applying genome-wide association, de novo candidate genes potentially involved in the seed micronutrient accumulation were identified. However, a candidate inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6-kinase 3 gene (ITPK3), located close to a significant nucleotide polymorphism associated with relative Zn seed concentrations, was dispensable for seed micronutrients accumulation in Col-0. Loss of this gene in itpk3-1 did neither affect phytate seed levels, nor seed Zn, Fe, and Mn. It is concluded that large natural variance of micronutrient seed levels is identified in the population and several accessions maintain high seed Zn despite growth in Zn-deficient conditions. PMID:27507976

  13. Natural Genetic Variation of Seed Micronutrients of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown in Zinc-Deficient and Zinc-Amended Soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaochao; Yuan, Lixing; Ludewig, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The quality of edible seeds for human and animal nutrition is crucially dependent on high zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) seed concentrations. The micronutrient bioavailability is strongly reduced by seed phytate that forms complexes with seed cations. Superior genotypes with increased seed Zn concentrations had been identified, but low micronutrient seed levels often prevail when the plants are grown in Zn-deficient soils, which are globally widespread and correlate with human Zn-deficiency. Here, seed Zn concentrations of Arabidopsis accessions grown in Zn-deficient and Zn-amended conditions were measured together with seed Fe and manganese (Mn), in a panel of 108 accessions. By applying genome-wide association, de novo candidate genes potentially involved in the seed micronutrient accumulation were identified. However, a candidate inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6-kinase 3 gene (ITPK3), located close to a significant nucleotide polymorphism associated with relative Zn seed concentrations, was dispensable for seed micronutrients accumulation in Col-0. Loss of this gene in itpk3-1 did neither affect phytate seed levels, nor seed Zn, Fe, and Mn. It is concluded that large natural variance of micronutrient seed levels is identified in the population and several accessions maintain high seed Zn despite growth in Zn-deficient conditions. PMID:27507976

  14. Diffuse alopecia in a child due to dietary zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Eyad; Alhaj, Nehad; Alhaj, Nezam E

    2007-01-01

    . Thyroid function test results were normal and levels of vitamins A and D were also normal. Low levels of serum zinc were measured repeatedly at 48 and 61 microg/dL (reference, 66-144 microg/dL) at 2 different laboratories. She was started on zinc supplement (50 mg daily) for 6 months and her diet was modified. The hair loss stopped in 3 weeks. Follow-up in 4 months showed no evidence of alopecia, with normal-looking hair.

  15. Nutritional marginal zinc deficiency disrupts placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y L; Supasai, S; Kucera, H; Gaikwad, N W; Adamo, A M; Mathieu, P; Oteiza, P I

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated if marginal zinc nutrition during gestation could affect fetal exposure to glucocorticoids as a consequence of a deregulation of placental 11βHSD2 expression. Placenta 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11βHSD2) plays a central role as a barrier protecting the fetus from the deleterious effects of excess maternal glucocorticoids. Rats were fed control (25 μg zinc per g diet) or marginal (10 μg zinc per g diet, MZD) zinc diets from day 0 through day 19 (GD19) of gestation. At GD19, corticosterone concentration in plasma, placenta, and amniotic fluid was similar in both groups. However, protein and mRNA levels of placenta 11βHSD2 were significantly higher (25% and 58%, respectively) in MZD dams than in controls. The main signaling cascades modulating 11βHSD2 expression were assessed. In MZD placentas the activation of ERK1/2 and of the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 was low, while p38 phosphorylation and SP-1-DNA binding were low compared to the controls. These results point to a central role of ERK1/Egr-1 in the regulation of 11βHSD2 expression under the conditions of limited zinc availability. In summary, results show that an increase in placenta 11βHSD2 expression occurs as a consequence of gestational marginal zinc nutrition. This seems to be due to a low tissue zinc-associated deregulation of ERK1/2 rather than to exposure to high maternal glucocorticoid exposure. The deleterious effects on brain development caused by diet-induced marginal zinc deficiency in rats do not seem to be due to fetal exposure to excess glucocorticoids.

  16. Effects of zinc deficiency on the distribution of membrane-coating granules in rat buccal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, S H; Meyer, J; Squier, C A

    1980-06-01

    Nutritional zinc deficiency causes consistent excessive cell proliferation in the epithelium of the buccal mucosa. The number per cell and the intracellular location of membrane-coating granules in this epithelium were investigated in male rats placed at weanling age for a 4-week period on a diet containing 1.2 ppm of Zn and in their pair fed controls. Membrane-coating granules were identified on electron micrographs following their demonstration in thin sections by the use of an alkaline bismuth technique. Counts of membrane-coating granules in the first 4 rows of spinous cells and the last 4 rows of granular cells showed that in the zinc-deficient group (1) the total number of granules per cell was increased; (2) the proportion of granules displaced to the cell periphery was decreased in favor of a higher proportion persisting in the center and (3) there was a marked reduction in number and proportion of granules positioned near the superficial cell membrane. The greater uniformity in the distribution of the granules in the hyperplastic-hypertrophic epithelium of the zinc deficient group suggests weakening of the surface-oriented polarity characteristic of the control tissue.

  17. The influence of dietary folate supplementation on the incidence of teratogenesis in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Quinn, P B; Cremin, F M; O'Sullivan, V R; Hewedi, F M; Bond, R J

    1990-07-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the possibility that pteroylmonoglutamic acid supplementation would alleviate teratogenesis in zinc-deficient rats. Pregnant rats of the Wistar strain were fed on Zn-deficient (less than 0.5 mg Zn/kg) or Zn-supplemented (75 or 95 mg Zn/kg) diets from mating until day 18.5 of gestation. The basal level of pteroylmonoglutamic acid added to all diets (0.56 mg/kg) was supplemented with 30-200 mg/kg in selected diets. Dietary Zn deprivation resulted in fetal resorption, fetal growth retardation and reduced concentrations of Zn in fetuses and maternal plasma and tibia. Low maternal body-weight at conception emerged as an important determinant of risk of resorption in Zn-deficient rats. Dietary Zn deficiency resulted in reduced maternal plasma folate concentrations and these values were inversely correlated with litter size or weight in Zn-deficient rats. Pteroylmonoglutamic acid supplementation increased maternal plasma folate concentrations, but did not reduce the high incidence of teratogenesis which occurred in Zn-deficient rats. Supplementation of Zn-deficient rats with pteroylmonoglutamic acid significantly increased the incidence of clubbed foot and tended to increase the incidence of brain or meningeal abnormalities, or both, and cleft palate, but did not reduce maternal or fetal Zn status. Pteroylmonoglutamic acid supplementation also increased the weights of Zn-supplemented control fetuses. PMID:2400764

  18. Symptomatic copper deficiency in three Wilson's disease patients treated with zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Dzieżyc, Karolina; Litwin, Tomasz; Sobańska, Anna; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by excess of copper that leads to accumulation of copper mainly in the liver, brain and needs life-long decoppering therapy. However, overtreatment with anti-copper agents may lead to copper deficiency which may cause neurological and hematological symptoms. Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes. This report describes three WD patients with diagnosed copper deficiency during zinc sulphate (ZS) treatment. After 5-16 years of therapy all patients developed leucopenia. Spinal cord injury was manifested in two of the patients. One of them also presented myopathy. In conclusion, copper deficiency may occur in different time after treatment onset, therefore regular copper metabolism and hematological monitoring is necessary.

  19. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent.

    PubMed

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward J M; Ander, E Louise; Watts, Michael J; Young, Scott D; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita(-1) d(-1) (± SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  20. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    PubMed Central

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita−1 d−1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  1. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-06-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita-1 d-1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge.

  2. A Dominant Negative Heterozygous G87R Mutation in the Zinc Transporter, ZnT-2 (SLC30A2), Results in Transient Neonatal Zinc Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lasry, Inbal; Seo, Young Ah; Ityel, Hadas; Shalva, Nechama; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Glaser, Fabian; Berman, Bluma; Berezovsky, Igor; Goncearenco, Alexander; Klar, Aharon; Levy, Jacob; Anikster, Yair; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential mineral, and infants are particularly vulnerable to zinc deficiency as they require large amounts of zinc for their normal growth and development. We have recently described the first loss-of-function mutation (H54R) in the zinc transporter ZnT-2 (SLC30A2) in mothers with infants harboring transient neonatal zinc deficiency (TNZD). Here we identified and characterized a novel heterozygous G87R ZnT-2 mutation in two unrelated Ashkenazi Jewish mothers with infants displaying TNZD. Transient transfection of G87R ZnT-2 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi retention, whereas the WT transporter properly localized to intracellular secretory vesicles in HC11 and MCF-7 cells. Consequently, G87R ZnT-2 showed decreased stability compared with WT ZnT-2 as revealed by Western blot analysis. Three-dimensional homology modeling based on the crystal structure of YiiP, a close zinc transporter homologue from Escherichia coli, revealed that the basic arginine residue of the mutant G87R points toward the membrane lipid core, suggesting misfolding and possible loss-of-function. Indeed, functional assays including vesicular zinc accumulation, zinc secretion, and cytoplasmic zinc pool assessment revealed markedly impaired zinc transport in G87R ZnT-2 transfectants. Moreover, co-transfection experiments with both mutant and WT transporters revealed a dominant negative effect of G87R ZnT-2 over the WT ZnT-2; this was associated with mislocalization, decreased stability, and loss of zinc transport activity of the WT ZnT-2 due to homodimerization observed upon immunoprecipitation experiments. These findings establish that inactivating ZnT-2 mutations are an underlying basis of TNZD and provide the first evidence for the dominant inheritance of heterozygous ZnT-2 mutations via negative dominance due to homodimer formation. PMID:22733820

  3. Time-related changes induced by zinc-deficient diet in the concentration of rat cheek epithelial membrane-coating granules.

    PubMed

    Said al-Naief, N A; Ashrafi, S H

    1995-08-01

    Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 0.4 parts/10(6) zinc and controls were fed an identical diet supplemented with 40 parts/10(6) zinc. After 9, 18 and 27 days of zinc deficiency, specimens were excised from cheek epithelium and processed for transmission electron microscopy to study the concentration of membrane-coating granules (MCG). Their concentration was increased in the granular-cell layers of the zinc-deficient epithelium and became significantly greater after 18 and 27 days than 9 days of deficiency. MCGs appeared in the parakeratinized layers of zinc-deficient epithelium and their concentration became significantly greater after 27 days in comparison with 9 and 18 days of deficiency. Thus the intracellular retention of MCGs was increased in the granular and parakeratinized layers with the increase in time of zinc deficiency.

  4. [Prevalence of deficiency and dietary intake of iron, zinc and copper in Chilean childbearing age women].

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Borja, Angélica; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate anemia, the biochemical status and dietary adequacy of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), in Chilean childbearing age women. We studied a convenience sample of 86 women aged 18 to 48 years from Santiago, Chile. We determined anemia and the micronutrient status through hemoglobin (Hb) mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, zinc protoporphyrin, serum ferritin (SF), serum Zn and Cu. Dietary adequacy was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Of all women, 4.7% had Fe deficiency (ID) anemia, 21 % ID without anemia, 26 % depleted Fe stores and 48.3% normal Fe status. Obese women had higher SF (p<0.01) compared with those classified as having normal BMI. Also, showed higher Hb (p<0.05) concentrations compared with overweight and normal weight women. Partidipants showed 3.5 % and 2.3 % of Zn and Cu deficiency, respectively. Also, 95 %, 94 % and 99 % had adequate intake of Fe, Zn and Cu respectively, according to EAR cut points. There were no significant differences in micronutrients intake across different nutritional status. There was a low prevalence of anemia, Fe, Zn and Cu deficiency. A high percentage of women reached micronutrient adequacy. However, 47% of women had ID without anemia and Fe depleted stores.

  5. Megestrol acetate increases short-term food intake in zinc-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Patricia S; Browning, Jimmy D; MacDonald, Ruth S

    2002-03-01

    Rats offered a zinc-deficient (-Zn) diet voluntarily reduce their food intake within 3-4 days. Megestrol acetate (MA) is an appetite-stimulating drug used to treat cachexia of chronic diseases. In previous work, we found MA administration to male rats increased consumption of a -Zn diet. This approach would provide a useful tool for nutritional studies in which nutrient intake, except for zinc, would be maintained. The present study further examined the use of MA to increase consumption of a -Zn diet over a longer time period in both male and female rats. Rats were fed either a -Zn or a zinc-adequate (+Zn) diet. In Experiment 1, rats were treated orally with 0, 20, 50 or 100 mg MA/kg BW in corn oil for 21 days. MA stimulated intake of the -Zn diet in a linear manner. In Experiments 2 and 3, male and female rats, respectively, were fed the -Zn or +Zn diets and treated with 100 mg MA/kg BW for 21 days. In both experiments, MA administration increased intake of the -Zn diet to levels similar to the +Zn diet through Day 14. MA increased the hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentration in male rats, but did not affect serum IGF-I. MA administration improved growth of female but not male rats fed the -Zn diet. In females, serum IGF-I was not lower in zinc-deficient rats, which may have allowed the improved growth response with MA. Hence, MA administration may be a useful tool to increase consumption of a -Zn diet in short-term studies.

  6. Effect of zinc-deficient nutrition on craniofacial bone growth in rats

    PubMed Central

    Seyedmajidi, Seyed Ali; Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Moghadamnia, Aliakbar; Haghanifar, Sina; Ziaei, Reihaneh; Zahedpasha, Samir; Arash, Valioallah; Jorsaraei, Gholamali; Halalkhor, Sohrab

    2014-01-01

    Background: Zinc (Zn) is an essential nutrient that is required in humans and animals for the growth, development, and maintenance of healthy bones. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of zinc-deficient nutrition on the dental, mandibular, maxillary, and cranial dimensions of rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was carried out on 14 male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into two groups. Group I rats were fed with a Zn-deficient (ZD) diet, and Group II rats with a Zn-containing (ZC) diet. All the rats on the experimental diet were killed at the end of the fourth week and their blood samples were taken. The serum Zn levels were measured by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Radiographic assessment of the jaw bone density was done at the end of the study. Subsequently, the final measurements were made on the dry skulls, the mandibles, and teeth in both the groups. Statistical evaluation was performed by the student's t-test and repeated measures analysis. The difference between the groups was considered statistically significant if P < 0.05. Results: The ZD group showed a significantly lower value in body weight (P < 0.05), serum level of zinc (P < 0.0001), and radiographic bone density of the mandible (P = 0.02). With regard to the craniofacial parameters, a significant difference was observed only in the length of the clinical crowns of the teeth (L13), which were longer in group II as compared to group I (P = 0.03). Conclusion: This study confirmed that changes in zinc intake could not affect the growth of craniofacial structures. Also, it might change the radiographic bone density of the mandible. PMID:25225561

  7. Rapid Crown Root Development Confers Tolerance to Zinc Deficiency in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Amrit K.; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is one of the leading nutrient disorders in rice (Oryza sativa). Many studies have identified Zn-efficient rice genotypes, but causal mechanisms for Zn deficiency tolerance remain poorly understood. Here, we report a detailed study of the impact of Zn deficiency on crown root development of rice genotypes, differing in their tolerance to this stress. Zn deficiency delayed crown root development and plant biomass accumulation in both Zn-efficient and inefficient genotypes, with the effects being much stronger in the latter. Zn-efficient genotypes had developed new crown roots as early as 3 days after transplanting (DAT) to a Zn deficient field and that was followed by a significant increase in total biomass by 7 DAT. Zn-inefficient genotypes developed few new crown roots and did not increase biomass during the first 7 days following transplanting. This correlated with Zn-efficient genotypes retranslocating a higher proportion of shoot-Zn to their roots, compared to Zn-inefficient genotypes. These latter genotypes were furthermore not efficient in utilizing the limited Zn for root development. Histological analyses indicated no anomalies in crown tissue of Zn-efficient or inefficient genotypes that would have suggested crown root emergence was impeded. We therefore conclude that the rate of crown root initiation was differentially affected by Zn deficiency between genotypes. Rapid crown root development, following transplanting, was identified as a main causative trait for tolerance to Zn deficiency and better Zn retranslocation from shoot to root was a key attribute of Zn-efficient genotypes. PMID:27066060

  8. Experimental congenital hydrocephalus. A review with special consideration of hydrocephalus produced by zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Adeloye, A; Warkany, J

    1976-01-01

    A review was made of experimental methods available to produce congenital hydrocephalus by teratogenic methods. Radiation, infections, trypan blue, hypervitaminosis A, salicylates and nutritional deficiencies were considered. In the course of prenatal zinc deficiency experiments, congenital hydrocephalus was frequently encountered and histologic sections were made of many representative specimens. Details of the findings are described, among them various types of aqueduct stenosis or obileration. Although these anomalies suggest that occlusion of the aqueduct is the cause of the enlargement of the ventricular system it was noted that there was also ventricular dilatation caudal to the stenotic point of the aqueduct. Hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis has also been observed in experimental animals. It seems possible that some cases of congenital hydrocephalus attributed to aqueductal stenosis are examples of hydrocephalus with secondary block of the aqueduct. PMID:1022424

  9. Growth and characterization of pure and KCl doped zinc thiourea chloride (ZTC) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ruby Nirmala, L; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J

    2013-02-01

    Potassium Chloride (KCl) as an additive is added into zinc thiourea chloride solution in a small amount (1M%) by the method of slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature to get a new crystal. Due to the doping of the impurities on the crystals, remarkable changes in the physical properties were obtained. The grown crystals have been subjected to different instrumentation methods. The incorporation of the amount of potassium and zinc in the crystal lattices has been determined by AAS method. The lattice dimensions have been identified from single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The presence of functional group for the grown crystals has been identified by FTIR analysis. The optical, thermal and mechanical behaviors have been assessed by UV-Vis, TG/DTA and Vickers hardness methods respectively. The presence of dislocations of atoms has been identified by etching studies. PMID:23220671

  10. Cyclic feeding behaviour and changes in hypothalamic galanin and neuropeptide Y gene expression induced by zinc deficiency in the rat.

    PubMed

    Selvais, P L; Labuche, C; Nguyen, X N; Ketelslegers, J M; Denef, J F; Maiter, D M

    1997-01-01

    Dietary zinc-deficiency induces a striking reduction and a cyclic pattern of food intake in rodents. To elucidate the mechanisms for these effects, we studied the hypothalamic content, synthesis, and distribution of galanin (GAL) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) during zinc deficiency and refeeding in the rat. In Wistar rats, three weeks of zinc-deprivation consistently induced a reduction and a cyclic pattern of night- and day-time food intake, as well as of water intake. This was accompanied in zinc-deficient (ZD) rats, and to a lesser extent in pair-fed (PF) rats, by a decrease of hypothalamic GAL mRNA concentration (CTR: 100 +/- 8, ZD: 61 +/- 4, PF: 78 +/- 2 arbitrary densitometric units, ADU, P < 0.01) and an increase of hypothalamic NPY (CTR: 100 +/- 11, ZD: 154 +/- 10, PF: 126 +/- 4 ADU, P < 0.05), without peptide modification. The two neuropeptidergic systems were not affected by the cycles of feeding, with the exception of the NPY-immunoreactivity in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (geniculo-hypothalamic tract), that was inversely correlated to the food intake in both ZD and PF animals. In a second experiment, we showed that zinc-repletion for 4 days suppressed the behaviour induced by a two-week zinc-deprivation, and reversed the increase of NPY mRNA in ZD animals. We finally demonstrated that zinc-deficiency induced a similar behaviour in Zucker rats. However, in these rats whose synthesis of NPY is constitutively up-regulated, no change of NPY synthesis was observed in ZD rats, suggesting that the increase observed in Wistar is adaptative rather than instrumental to the abnormal food intake. In conclusion, we have further characterized the cyclic feeding behaviour of the zinc-deficient Wistar rats, and shown in these animals a decreased activity of the GAL system and an increased activity of the NPY system, likely corresponding to a compensatory response of the two neuropeptidergic systems, as observed in food-deprived animals. As spontaneous food intake of ZD rats

  11. Zinc Ionophore (Clioquinol) Inhibition of Human ZIP1-Deficient Prostate Tumor Growth in the Mouse Ectopic Xenograft Model: A Zinc Approach for the Efficacious Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.; Zou, Jing; Zheng, Yao; Naslund, Michael J.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in males. This is mainly due to the absence of an available efficacious chemotherapy despite decades of research in pursuit of effective treatment approaches. A plausible target for the treatment is the established clinical relationship that the zinc levels in the malignant cells are markedly decreased compared to the normal epithelium in virtually all cases of prostate cancer, and at all stages malignancy. The decrease in zinc results from the downregulation of the functional zinc uptake transporter, ZIP1; which occurs during early development of prostate malignancy. This is an essential requirement for the development of malignancy to prevent the cytotoxic/tumor-suppressor effects of increased zinc on the premalignant and malignant cells. Thus prostate cancer is a ZIP1-deficient malignancy. This relationship provides the basis for a treatment regimen that will facilitate the uptake and accumulation of zinc into the premalignant and malignant cells. In this report we employed a zinc ionophore (clioquinol) approach in the treatment of mice with human ZIP1-deficient prostate tumors (ectopic xenograft model). Clioquinol treatment resulted in 85%inhibition of tumor growth due to the cytotoxic effects of zinc. Coupled with additional results from earlier studies, the compelling evidence provides a plausible approach for the effective treatment of human prostate cancer; including primary site malignancy, hormone-resistant cancer, and metastasis. Additionally, this approach might be effective in preventing the development of malignancy in individuals suspected of presenting with early development of malignancy. Clinical trials are now required in leading to the potential for an efficacious zinc-treatment approach, which is urgently needed for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26878064

  12. Zinc Deficiency With Dermatitis in a Parenteral Nutrition-Dependent Patient Due to National Shortage of Trace Minerals.

    PubMed

    Sant, Vivek R; Arnell, Tracey D; Seres, David S

    2016-05-01

    The shortages of intravenous drugs remains critical, with sterile injectables accounting for 80% of the approximately 300 shortages. The impact is being felt in patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), and severe deficiencies are becoming more commonplace. We report here a man who developed severe zinc deficiency, manifesting as a painful desquamative rash, due to an inability to obtain multi-trace element additives for his PN.

  13. Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes showed differential expression in poplar trees under iron or zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danqiong; Dai, Wenhao

    2015-08-15

    Two iron-regulated transporter (IRT) genes were cloned from the iron chlorosis resistant (PtG) and susceptible (PtY) Populus tremula 'Erecta' lines. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed no significant difference between PtG and PtY. The predicted proteins contain a conserved ZIP domain with 8 transmembrane (TM) regions. A ZIP signature sequence was found in the fourth TM domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PtIRT1 was clustered with tomato and tobacco IRT genes that are highly responsible to iron deficiency. The PtIRT3 gene was clustered with the AtIRT3 gene that was related to zinc and iron transport in plants. Tissue specific expression indicated that PtIRT1 only expressed in the root, while PtIRT3 constitutively expressed in all tested tissues. Under iron deficiency, the expression of PtIRT1 was dramatically increased and a significantly higher transcript level was detected in PtG than in PtY. Iron deficiency also enhanced the expression of PtIRT3 in PtG. On the other hand, zinc deficiency down-regulated the expression of PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 in both PtG and PtY. Zinc accumulated significantly under iron-deficient conditions, whereas the zinc deficiency showed no significant effect on iron accumulation. A yeast complementation test revealed that the PtIRT1 and PtIRT3 genes could restore the iron uptake ability under the iron uptake-deficiency condition. The results will help understand the mechanisms of iron deficiency response in poplar trees and other woody species.

  14. Zinc

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcers and promoting weight gain in people with eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. Some people use zinc ... is abnormal): 25-100 mg zinc. For the eating disorder anorexia nervosa: 100 mg of zinc gluconate daily. ...

  15. Self-catalyzed growth of pure zinc blende 〈110〉 InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia Li, Junshuai; Wu, Yao; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrate the self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth of 〈110〉 InP nanowires (NWs) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The 〈110〉 InP nanowire is formed via a spontaneous kinking from the original 〈111〉 growth direction, which is attributed to instabilities at the liquid/solid interface caused by a fast In incorporation into the droplet. The NW length before kinking has a nearly linear relationship with the diameter, offering a way to control the NW morphology for different applications. The 〈110〉 nanowire exhibits pure zinc blende crystal structure and a narrower emission linewidth in comparison with a typical 〈111〉 nanowire, demonstrating its potential applications in high-performance electronic and photonic devices.

  16. Zinc deficiency exacerbates while zinc supplement attenuates cardiac hypertrophy in high-fat diet-induced obese mice through modulating p38 MAPK-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Gu, Junlian; Chen, Jing; Payne, Kristen McClung; Tan, Yi; Wang, Yuehui; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Gilbert C; Wintergerst, Kupper; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity often leads to cardiovascular diseases, such as obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), in adulthood, due to chronic cardiac inflammation. Zinc is structurally and functionally essential for many transcription factors; however, its role in ORCH and underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear and were explored here in mice with obesity induced with high-fat diet (HFD). Four week old mice were fed on either HFD (60%kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) for 3 or 6 months, respectively. Either diet contained one of three different zinc quantities: deficiency (ZD, 10mg zinc per 4057kcal), normal (ZN, 30mg zinc per 4057kcal) or supplement (ZS, 90mg zinc per 4057kcal). HFD induced a time-dependent obesity and ORCH, which was accompanied by increased cardiac inflammation and p38 MAPK activation. These effects were worsened by ZD in HFD/ZD mice and attenuated by ZS in HFD/ZS group, respectively. Also, administration of a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor in HFD mice for 3 months did not affect HFD-induced obesity, but completely abolished HFD-induced, and zinc deficiency-worsened, ORCH and cardiac inflammation. In vitro exposure of adult cardiomyocytes to palmitate induced cell hypertrophy accompanied by increased p38 MAPK activation, which was heightened by zinc depletion with its chelator TPEN. Inhibition of p38 MAPK with its specific siRNA also prevented the effects of palmitate on cardiomyocytes. These findings demonstrate that ZS alleviates but ZD heightens cardiac hypertrophy in HFD-induced obese mice through suppressing p38 MAPK-dependent cardiac inflammatory and hypertrophic pathways.

  17. Zinc deficiency exacerbates while zinc supplement attenuates cardiac hypertrophy in high-fat diet-induced obese mice through modulating p38 MAPK-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Gu, Junlian; Chen, Jing; Payne, Kristen McClung; Tan, Yi; Wang, Yuehui; Yin, Xia; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Gilbert C; Wintergerst, Kupper; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2016-09-01

    Childhood obesity often leads to cardiovascular diseases, such as obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), in adulthood, due to chronic cardiac inflammation. Zinc is structurally and functionally essential for many transcription factors; however, its role in ORCH and underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear and were explored here in mice with obesity induced with high-fat diet (HFD). Four week old mice were fed on either HFD (60%kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) for 3 or 6 months, respectively. Either diet contained one of three different zinc quantities: deficiency (ZD, 10mg zinc per 4057kcal), normal (ZN, 30mg zinc per 4057kcal) or supplement (ZS, 90mg zinc per 4057kcal). HFD induced a time-dependent obesity and ORCH, which was accompanied by increased cardiac inflammation and p38 MAPK activation. These effects were worsened by ZD in HFD/ZD mice and attenuated by ZS in HFD/ZS group, respectively. Also, administration of a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor in HFD mice for 3 months did not affect HFD-induced obesity, but completely abolished HFD-induced, and zinc deficiency-worsened, ORCH and cardiac inflammation. In vitro exposure of adult cardiomyocytes to palmitate induced cell hypertrophy accompanied by increased p38 MAPK activation, which was heightened by zinc depletion with its chelator TPEN. Inhibition of p38 MAPK with its specific siRNA also prevented the effects of palmitate on cardiomyocytes. These findings demonstrate that ZS alleviates but ZD heightens cardiac hypertrophy in HFD-induced obese mice through suppressing p38 MAPK-dependent cardiac inflammatory and hypertrophic pathways. PMID:27346292

  18. Influence of pH on the toxic effects of zinc, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol on pure cultures of soil microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Beelen, P. van; Fleuren-Kemilae, A.K.

    1997-02-01

    In this study the effect of acidification of soil pore water on the uptake and toxicity of cationic and anionic pollutants was measured in an experimental model system. The influence of pH on the toxic effects of zinc, cadmium, and pentachlorophenol was studied in buffered suspensions of pure cultures of soil microorganisms. In this system the speciation of the toxicant, the pH, and the biomass are defined, constant, and thus easier to study than in a system with the solid soil matrix and pore water. The mineralization of [{sup 14}C]acetate to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was used to measure the toxic effects of pollutants on a fungus (Aspergillus niger CBS 121.49), an actinomycete (Streptomyces lividans 66), two Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida strains (MT-2 and DSM 50026), and a gram-positive strain (Rhodococcus erythropolis A177). Large differences in sensitivity were observed between the species. For pentachlorophenol the highest EC50 was 81 mg/L for Pseudomonas putida at pH 8, whereas the lowest was 0.13 mg/L for Aspergillus niger at pH 6. Aspergillus niger was not sensitive to 1,000 mg Zn/L, whereas Pseudomonas putida at pH 7.8 showed the lowest EC50, 0.14 mg Zn/L. When pH was increased, pentachlorophenol became less toxic and showed less sorption to the biomass, whereas zinc and cadmium became more toxic and showed more sorption to the biomass. The results indicate that higher pore-water concentrations due to acidification of zinc- and cadmium-polluted soils may not be accompanied by increased toxic effects on microorganisms because of the relatively low toxicity of these metals in pore water at low pH.

  19. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age.

  20. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age. PMID:27626474

  1. Deficiency of the zinc finger protein ZFP106 causes motor and sensory neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Peter I.; Fratta, Pietro; Landman, Allison S.; Mcgoldrick, Philip; Wackerhage, Henning; Groves, Michael; Busam, Bharani Shiva; Galino, Jorge; Corrochano, Silvia; Beskina, Olga A.; Esapa, Christopher; Ryder, Edward; Carter, Sarah; Stewart, Michelle; Codner, Gemma; Hilton, Helen; Teboul, Lydia; Tucker, Jennifer; Lionikas, Arimantas; Estabel, Jeanne; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Brandner, Sebastian; Plagnol, Vincent; Bennet, David L. H.; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger motifs are distributed amongst many eukaryotic protein families, directing nucleic acid–protein and protein–protein interactions. Zinc finger protein 106 (ZFP106) has previously been associated with roles in immune response, muscle differentiation, testes development and DNA damage, although little is known about its specific function. To further investigate the function of ZFP106, we performed an in-depth characterization of Zfp106 deficient mice (Zfp106−/−), and we report a novel role for ZFP106 in motor and sensory neuronal maintenance and survival. Zfp106−/− mice develop severe motor abnormalities, major deficits in muscle strength and histopathological changes in muscle. Intriguingly, despite being highly expressed throughout the central nervous system, Zfp106−/− mice undergo selective motor and sensory neuronal and axonal degeneration specific to the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. Neurodegeneration does not occur during development of Zfp106−/− mice, suggesting that ZFP106 is likely required for the maintenance of mature peripheral motor and sensory neurons. Analysis of embryonic Zfp106−/− motor neurons revealed deficits in mitochondrial function, with an inhibition of Complex I within the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our results highlight a vital role for ZFP106 in sensory and motor neuron maintenance and reveal a novel player in mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration. PMID:26604141

  2. Electron-microscopy study of the microstructures in oxygen-deficient pure zirconia and yttrium-doped zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.M.

    1988-01-01

    The microstructures of oxygen-deficient pure zirconia and 5 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} made by skull melting and/or vacuum sintering were studied by conventional transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and image simulation with multislice calculation. Oxygen-deficient pure zirconia shows heavy twinning and a high density of stacking faults and dislocations. The atomic nature of the (100) twin interface in monoclinic zirconia was determined using HREM and simulation. The fault vectors of the stacking faults lying on the (010) plane were determined. The stacking faults seem to accommodate part of the nonstoichiometry. Zirconia that was reduced to a greater extent by vacuum annealing and quenching from 2000{degree}C has many twinning dislocations at the (100) twin interfaces. The growth tips of the twins have regularly spaced fringes. The HREM study has shown that both of these features are zonal twinning dislocations of height three times d{sub 100}. The twin growth has been explained in terms of lattice shearing by zonal twinning dislocations and lattice shuffling. The range of microstructural features observed provides a means to interpret the kinetics of decomposition of the cubic phase.

  3. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-02-02

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  4. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas. PMID:25648596

  5. Zinc deficiency (ZD) without starvation affects thyroid hormone metabolism of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaski, H.C.; Smith, S.M.; Hall, C.B.; Bucher, D.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Young rats fed diets severely deficient in Zn exhibit impaired growth and endocrine function. These hormone effects may be confounded by cyclical feeding and starvation. To examine the effects of zinc deficiency (ZD) with and without starvation, 40 male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a semipurified diet containing all essential nutrients and 30 ppm Zn until they weighed 150 g, then were matched by weight into four groups and were fed one of the following diets for 28d: ad lib control Zn diet, marginal ZD diet, severe ZD diet, and C diet pair-fed (PF) in amounts consumed by matched ZD1 rat. Food intake was depressed in ZD1; body weights were reduced in ZD1 and PF. There was no difference in either food intake or weight gain between C and ZD6. ZD reduced liver and femur Zn concentrations. Plasma thyroxine (T{sub 4}) concentration was greater in ZD6 then ZD1 or PF, but less than C; triodothyronine concentration was less in PF than C, but similar to ZD1 and ZD6. Hepatic T{sub 4}-5{prime}-deiodinase activity was greater in ZD6 than ZD1 or PF, but less than C. These findings indicate that altered thyroid hormone metabolism of severe ZD is related to Zn intake and starvation, whereas ZD uncomplicated by starvation affects peripheral deiodination of T{sub 4}, and suggests altered rates of thyroid hormone synthesis or degradation.

  6. From the Cover: Zinc Deficiency Worsens and Supplementation Prevents High-Fat Diet Induced Vascular Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Pathological Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Shudong; Luo, Manyu; Zhang, Zhiguo; Dai, Xiaozhen; Kong, Maiying; Cai, Lu; Wang, Yuehui; Shi, Bingyin; Tan, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become a common public health problem in the world and raises the risk of various cardiovascular diseases. Zinc is essential for multiple organs in terms of normal structure and function. The present study investigated the effects of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity on the aorta in mice, and evaluated whether it can be affected by zinc deficiency or supplementation. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed HFD with varied amounts of zinc (deficiency, adequate and supplementation) for 3 and 6 months. Results showed that HFD feeding induced a time-dependent aortic remodeling, demonstrated by increased vessel wall thickness, tunica cell proliferation and fibrotic responses, and inflammatory response, reflected by increased expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). HFD feeding also caused aortic oxidative damage, reflected by 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal accumulation, and down-regulated nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression and function, shown by down-regulation of its downstream antioxidants, catalase, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1), and metallothionein expression. The vascular effects of obesity-induced by HFD was exacerbated by zinc deficiency but significantly improved by zinc supplementation. In addition, down-regulation of Nrf2 function and associated antioxidants expression were also worsened by zinc deficiency but improved by zinc supplementation. These results suggest that HFD induces aortic remodeling, which can be exacerbated by zinc deficiency and improved by zinc supplementation. PMID:27370414

  7. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. PMID:27013778

  8. MicroRNA dysregulation and esophageal cancer development depend on the extent of zinc dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Louise Y.; Taccioli, Cristian; Jing, Ruiyan; Smalley, Karl J.; Alder, Hansjuerg; Jiang, Yubao; Fadda, Paolo; Farber, John L.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and marginal ZD is prevalent in humans. In rats, marked-ZD (3 mg Zn/kg diet) induces a proliferative esophagus with a 5-microRNA signature (miR-31, -223, -21, -146b, -146a) and promotes ESCC. Here we report that moderate and mild-ZD (6 and 12 mg Zn/kg diet) also induced esophageal hyperplasia, albeit less pronounced than induced by marked-ZD, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, -146a). On exposure to an environmental carcinogen, ∼16% of moderate/mild-ZD rats developed ESCC, a cancer incidence significantly greater than for Zn-sufficient rats (0%) (P ≤ 0.05), but lower than marked-ZD rats (68%) (P < 0.001). Importantly, the high ESCC, marked-ZD esophagus had a 15-microRNA signature, resembling the human ESCC miRNAome, with miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 as the top-up-regulated species. This signature discriminated it from the low ESCC, moderate/mild-ZD esophagus, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, miR-223). Additionally, Fbxw7, Pdcd4, and Stk40 (tumor-suppressor targets of miR-223, -21, and -31) were downregulated in marked-ZD cohort. Bioinformatics analysis predicted functional relationships of the 3 tumor-suppressors with other cancer-related genes. Thus, microRNA dysregulation and ESCC progression depend on the extent of dietary Zn deficiency. Our findings suggest that even moderate ZD may promote esophageal cancer and dietary Zn has preventive properties against ESCC. Additionally, the deficiency-associated miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 may be useful therapeutic targets in ESCC. PMID:26918602

  9. Zinc deficiency impairs the renewal of hippocampal neural stem cells in adult rats: involvement of FoxO3a activation and downstream p27(kip1) expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingling; Zhao, Jianya; Jiang, Junkang; Ma, Xia; Liu, Xinhang; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Shengyang; Wan, Chunhua

    2015-09-01

    Zinc plays an important role in the development and maintenance of central neural system. Zinc deficiency has been known to alter normal brain function, whose molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In the present study, we established a zinc deficiency-exposed rat model, and, using western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, found that the expression of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) was remarkably up-regulated in the rat brain hippocampus. Immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO3a and p27(kip1) were significantly co-localized with nestin, the marker of neural stem cells (NSCs). Furthermore, we identified that the proportion of proliferating NSCs was markedly decreased in zinc-deficient rat hippocampaus. Using C17.2 neural stem cells, it was revealed that exposure to zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethy) ethylenediamine induced the expression of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) , which coincided with reduced NSC proliferation. Furthermore, depletion of FoxO3a inhibited p27(kip1) expression and restored the growth of NSCs. On the basis of these data, we concluded that FoxO3a/p27(kip1) signaling might play a significant role in zinc deficiency-induced growth impairment of NSCs and consequent neurological disorders. We describe here that zinc deficiency induces the proliferative impairment of hippocampal neural stem cells partially through the activation of FOXO3a-p27 axis in rats. Neural progenitor cells exhibited significantly up-regulated expression of FOXO3a and p27 after zinc deficiency in vivo and in vitro. Depletion of FOXO3a ameliorates zinc deficiency-induced expression of p27 and growth impairment of neural stem cells. We provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying zinc deficiency-induced neurological deficits.

  10. Iron, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Zinc Deficiencies in Children Presenting with Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Villagomez, Amelia; Ramtekkar, Ujjwal

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder increasing in prevalence. Although there is limited evidence to support treating ADHD with mineral/vitamin supplements, research does exist showing that patients with ADHD may have reduced levels of vitamin D, zinc, ferritin, and magnesium. These nutrients have important roles in neurologic function, including involvement in neurotransmitter synthesis. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of each of these nutrients in the brain, the possible altered levels of these nutrients in patients with ADHD, possible reasons for a differential level in children with ADHD, and safety and effect of supplementation. With this knowledge, clinicians may choose in certain patients at high risk of deficiency, to screen for possible deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin D, zinc, and iron by checking RBC-magnesium, 25-OH vitamin D, serum/plasma zinc, and ferritin. Although children with ADHD may be more likely to have lower levels of vitamin D, zinc, magnesium, and iron, it cannot be stated that these lower levels caused ADHD. However, supplementing areas of deficiency may be a safe and justified intervention. PMID:27417479

  11. Effects of cooking methods on the iron and zinc contents in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) to combat nutritional deficiencies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elenilda J.; Carvalho, Lucia M. J.; Dellamora-Ortiz, Gisela M.; Cardoso, Flávio S. N.; Carvalho, José L. V.; Viana, Daniela S.; Freitas, Sidinea C.; Rocha, Maurisrael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Because iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in developing countries, determining the levels of iron and zinc in beans, the second most consumed staple food in Brazil, is essential, especially for the low-income people who experience a deficiency of these minerals in their diet. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effect of cooking methods by measuring the iron and zinc contents in cowpea cultivars before and after soaking to determine the retention of these minerals. Methods The samples were cooked in both regular pans and pressure cookers with and without previous soaking. Mineral analyses were carried out by Spectrometry of Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Results The results showed high contents of iron and zinc in raw samples as well as in cooked ones, with the use of regular pan resulting in greater percentage of iron retention and the use of pressure cooker ensuring higher retention of zinc. Conclusions The best retention of iron was found in the BRS Aracê cultivar prepared in a regular pan with previous soaking. This cultivar may be indicated for cultivation and human consumption. The best retention of zinc was found for the BRS Tumucumaque cultivar prepared in a pressure cooker without previous soaking. PMID:24624050

  12. Zinc.

    PubMed

    Barceloux, D G

    1999-01-01

    The use of zinc in metal alloys and medicinal lotions dates back before the time of Christ. Currently, most of the commercial production of zinc involves the galvanizing of iron and the manufacture of brass. Some studies support the use of zinc gluconate lozenges to treat the common cold, but there are insufficient data at this time to recommend the routine use of these lozenges. Zinc is an essential co-factor in a variety of cellular processes including DNA synthesis, behavioral responses, reproduction, bone formation, growth, and wound healing. Zinc is a relatively common metal with an average concentration of 50 mg/kg soil and a range of 10-300 mg/kg soil. Meat, seafood, dairy products, nuts, legumes, and whole grains contain relatively high concentrations of zinc. The mobility of zinc in anaerobic environments is poor and therefore severe zinc contamination occurs primarily near points sources of zinc release. The recommended daily allowance for adults is 15 mg zinc. The ingestion of 1-2 g zinc sulfate produces emesis. Zinc compounds can produce irritation and corrosion of the gastrointestinal tract, along with acute renal tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc chloride from smoke bombs detonated in closed spaces may cause chemical pneumonitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the occupational setting inhalation of fumes from zinc oxide is the most common cause of metal fume fever (fatigue, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis, thirst, metallic taste, salivation). Zinc compounds are not suspected carcinogens. Treatment of zinc toxicity is supportive. Calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (CaNa2EDTA) is the chelator of choice based on case reports that demonstrate normalization of zinc concentrations, but there are few clinical data to confirm the efficacy of this agent. PMID:10382562

  13. Non-invasive detection of iron deficiency by fluorescence measurement of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin in the lip

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Georg; Homann, Christian; Teksan, Ilknur; Hasbargen, Uwe; Hasmüller, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca M.; Khaled, Nadia; Sroka, Ronald; Stauch, Thomas; Stepp, Herbert; Vogeser, Michael; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, more individuals have iron deficiency than any other health problem. Most of those affected are unaware of their lack of iron, in part because detection of iron deficiency has required a blood sample. Here we report a non-invasive method to optically measure an established indicator of iron status, red blood cell zinc protoporphyrin, in the microcirculation of the lower lip. An optical fibre probe is used to illuminate the lip and acquire fluorescence emission spectra in ∼1 min. Dual-wavelength excitation with spectral fitting is used to distinguish the faint zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence from the much greater tissue background fluorescence, providing immediate results. In 56 women, 35 of whom were iron-deficient, the sensitivity and specificity of optical non-invasive detection of iron deficiency were 97% and 90%, respectively. This fluorescence method potentially provides a rapid, easy to use means for point-of-care screening for iron deficiency in resource-limited settings lacking laboratory infrastructure. PMID:26883939

  14. Non-invasive detection of iron deficiency by fluorescence measurement of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin in the lip.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Georg; Homann, Christian; Teksan, Ilknur; Hasbargen, Uwe; Hasmüller, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca M; Khaled, Nadia; Sroka, Ronald; Stauch, Thomas; Stepp, Herbert; Vogeser, Michael; Brittenham, Gary M

    2016-02-17

    Worldwide, more individuals have iron deficiency than any other health problem. Most of those affected are unaware of their lack of iron, in part because detection of iron deficiency has required a blood sample. Here we report a non-invasive method to optically measure an established indicator of iron status, red blood cell zinc protoporphyrin, in the microcirculation of the lower lip. An optical fibre probe is used to illuminate the lip and acquire fluorescence emission spectra in ∼1 min. Dual-wavelength excitation with spectral fitting is used to distinguish the faint zinc protoporphyrin fluorescence from the much greater tissue background fluorescence, providing immediate results. In 56 women, 35 of whom were iron-deficient, the sensitivity and specificity of optical non-invasive detection of iron deficiency were 97% and 90%, respectively. This fluorescence method potentially provides a rapid, easy to use means for point-of-care screening for iron deficiency in resource-limited settings lacking laboratory infrastructure.

  15. Activation of the Yeast UBI4 Polyubiquitin Gene by Zap1 Transcription Factor via an Intragenic Promoter Is Critical for Zinc-deficient Growth.

    PubMed

    MacDiarmid, Colin W; Taggart, Janet; Jeong, Jeeyon; Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Eide, David J

    2016-09-01

    Stability of many proteins requires zinc. Zinc deficiency disrupts their folding, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system may help manage this stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UBI4 encodes five tandem ubiquitin monomers and is essential for growth in zinc-deficient conditions. Although UBI4 is only one of four ubiquitin-encoding genes in the genome, a dramatic decrease in ubiquitin was observed in zinc-deficient ubi4Δ cells. The three other ubiquitin genes were strongly repressed under these conditions, contributing to the decline in ubiquitin. In a screen for ubi4Δ suppressors, a hypomorphic allele of the RPT2 proteasome regulatory subunit gene (rpt2(E301K)) suppressed the ubi4Δ growth defect. The rpt2(E301K) mutation also increased ubiquitin accumulation in zinc-deficient cells, and by using a ubiquitin-independent proteasome substrate we found that proteasome activity was reduced. These results suggested that increased ubiquitin supply in suppressed ubi4Δ cells was a consequence of more efficient ubiquitin release and recycling during proteasome degradation. Degradation of a ubiquitin-dependent substrate was restored by the rpt2(E301K) mutation, indicating that ubiquitination is rate-limiting in this process. The UBI4 gene was induced ∼5-fold in low zinc and is regulated by the zinc-responsive Zap1 transcription factor. Surprisingly, Zap1 controls UBI4 by inducing transcription from an intragenic promoter, and the resulting truncated mRNA encodes only two of the five ubiquitin repeats. Expression of a short transcript alone complemented the ubi4Δ mutation, indicating that it is efficiently translated. Loss of Zap1-dependent UBI4 expression caused a growth defect in zinc-deficient conditions. Thus, the intragenic UBI4 promoter is critical to preventing ubiquitin deficiency in zinc-deficient cells. PMID:27432887

  16. The effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats receiving a diet containing coconut oil or fish oil.

    PubMed

    Eder, K; Kirchgessner, M

    1994-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids of force-fed rats that received either a diet with coconut oil and safflower oil (86:14, w/w) or a diet with fish oil and safflower oil (91:9, w/w) was investigated. Zinc deficiency caused in the rats fed both types of dietary fat an increase in the amounts of total phospholipids and individual phospholipid classes in erythrocyte membranes. In the rats fed the coconut oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) in phosphatidylcholine (PC), diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS), and in total erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. In contrast, in the rats fed the fish oil diet, zinc deficiency caused an increase in the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid only in PC, but not in the other phospholipids. However, in these rats, changes in the ratio between eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5) and the n-3 fatty acids with 20 and 22 carbon atoms were observed in PC, diacyl PE and plasmalogen PE. The most pronounced changes in fatty acid composition due to zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of fat occurred in PC. There was a relationship between the changes in the composition of plasma total fatty acids and the changes in fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membrane PC caused by zinc deficiency in the rats fed both types of dietary fat. The amount of cholesterol was similar in all treatment groups. However, zinc-deficient rats fed the coconut oil diet-but not those fed the fish oil diet-had an increased ratio between total phospholipids and cholesterol. Thus, the study shows that the effect of zinc deficiency on erythrocyte membrane lipids is to some degree similar for rats fed a coconut oil diet and rats fed a fish oil diet, and to some degree different.

  17. The efficacy of micronutrient supplementation in reducing the prevalence of anaemia and deficiencies of zinc and iron among adolescents in Sri Lanka

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of combined iron and zinc over the iron- or zinc-only supplementation in correcting deficiency and possible interactive effects in a group of adolescent school children. Subjects and methods: Schoolchildren (n=821) of 12–16 years of age were randomized into ...

  18. Zinc

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc was recognized as an essential trace metal for humans during the studies of Iranian adolescent dwarfs in the early 1960s. Zinc metal existing as Zn2+ is a strong electron acceptor in biological systems without risks of oxidant damage to cells. Zn2+ functions in the structure of proteins and is ...

  19. In vivo iron and zinc deficiency diminished T- and B-selective mitogen stimulation of murine lymphoid cells through protein kinase C-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Klecha, A J; Salgueiro, J; Wald, M; Boccio, J; Zubillaga, M; Leonardi, N M; Gorelik, G; Cremaschi, G A

    2005-05-01

    Zinc and iron are crucial mineral components of human diet, because their deficiency leads to several disorders, including alterations of the immune function. It has been demonstrated, in both humans and rodents, that a diminished number of lymphoid cells and a loss of lymphocyte activity accompany deprivation of these essential minerals. The aim of this work was to analyze if iron and/or zinc imbalances regulate lymphocyte activity and the intracellular signals involved in the effect. Mice from the BALB/c strain were fed with iron- and/or zinc-deficient or mineral-supplemented diets, according to the American Institute of Nutrition Rodent Diets. Levels of iron and zinc were assessed in blood, liver, or bone samples. Selective mitogen stimulation of T- and B-lymphocytes were performed. We found a diminished proliferative response in T- and B-lymphocytes from zinc- and/or iron-deficient animals with respect to controls. These effects were related to decreased mitogen-induced translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity to cell membranes on both cell types from all animals fed with deficient diets. Our results demonstrate that iron and zinc deficiencies affect both T- and B-lymphocyte function by PKC-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  1. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  2. From soil to brain: zinc deficiency increases the neurotoxicity of Lathyrus sativus and may affect the susceptibility for the motorneurone disease neurolathyrism.

    PubMed

    Lambein, F; Haque, R; Khan, J K; Kebede, N; Kuo, Y H

    1994-04-01

    Zinc deficiency and oversupply of iron to the roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) induce increases in the content of the neurotoxin beta-L-ODAP (3-oxalyl-L-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid) in the ripe seeds. The transport of zinc to the shoots is enhanced by the addition of beta-L-ODAP. The neurotoxin of L. sativus is proposed to function as a carrier molecule for zinc ions. Soils, depleted in micronutrients from flooding by monsoon rains (Indian subcontinent) or otherwise poor in available zinc and with high iron content (Ethiopian vertisols), may be responsible for higher incidence of human lathyrism, one of the oldest neurotoxic diseases known to man. A role for brain zinc deficiency in the susceptibility for lathyrism is postulated. PMID:8053001

  3. The downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is associated with zinc deficiency-induced proliferative deficit of C17.2 neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianya; Han, Jingling; Jiang, Junkang; Shi, Shangshi; Ma, Xia; Liu, Xinhang; Wang, Cheng; Nie, Xiaoke; He, Yunhua; Jiang, Shengyang; Wan, Chunhua

    2015-07-30

    Zinc is an essential nutrient that is important for normal brain development. Zinc deficiency has been linked to aberrant neurological development and functioning. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zinc deficiency-induced neurological disorders remain largely elusive. In the present study, we showed that the proliferation of C17.2 neural stem cells (NSCs) was evidently impaired after exposed to low levels of Zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethy) ethylenediamine (TPEN). In addition, we found that TPEN-induced proliferative deficit of NSCs was related with significant downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Zinc deficiency impaired the proliferation of neural stem cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Western blot revealed that the levels of p-Ser9-glycogensynthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β) and β-catenin were remarkably downregulated during TPEN-induced C17.2 proliferative impairment. Moreover, immunofluorescent analysis indicated that the level of nuclear β-catenin was apparently decreased following TPEN exposure. Furthermore, application with GSK-3β inhibitor lithium chloride (LiCl) reversed TPEN-induced downregulation of β-catenin and impairment of cell proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis also showed that TPEN-induced impairment of NSC proliferation could be reversed by LiCl. Taken together, these findings suggested that the disturbance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway partially accounted for Zinc deficiency-induced proliferative impairment of NSCs.

  4. The effect of iron and zinc supplementation and discontinuation of this practice on iron and zinc level in tissues in rats fed deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Joanna; Madej, Dawid; Brzozowska, Anna

    2013-10-01

    The effect of iron and iron/zinc supplementation on their levels in tissues of rats fed initially one of the three following regimen: C - control AIN-93 diet, D - iron deficient diet and R - diet with 50% reduction of all vitamins and minerals was investigated. The study was conducted on 6-week male Wistar rats, in 3 stages: (1) 4-week adaptation to the diets (C, D or R); (2) 4-week supplementation with the same regimen enriched with 10-times more iron (CSFe, DSFe, RSFe) or iron/zinc (CSFeZn, DSFeZn, RSFeZn); (3) 2-week post-supplementation period (the same diets as the stage I). Iron and zinc content in serum, the initial segment of intestine, liver and kidney were measured using FAAS method. After supplementation period (stage II) the content of iron in the intestine, liver and kidney in groups of rats fed DSFe and DSFeZn-diet were significantly higher (all p-values≤0.05) than in rats fed D-diet (intestine: DSFe=50.1±9.0 μg/g wet weight, DSFeZn=43.0±9.9 μg/g vs. D=16.5±2.1 μg/g; liver: DSFe=149±30 μg/g, DSFeZn=152±25 μg/g vs. D=56±13 μg/g; kidney: DSFe=74.0±8.1 μg/g, DSFeZn=72.7±6.6 μg/g vs. D=59.3±9.5 μg/g). The same significant associations (all p-values≤0.05) were observed in R rats in the intestine and liver (intestine: RSFe=60.8±6.6 μg/g, RSFeZn=54.8±6.6 μg/g vs. R=31.5±8.2 μg/g; liver: RSFe=161±10 μg/g, RSFeZn=166±21 μg/g vs. R=136±24μg/g). After post-supplementation period the statistically significant differences between supplemented and non-supplemented rats fed D- and R-diets were still observed. There was not found the effect of applied treatments on zinc status. In conclusion, iron or iron/zinc supplementation increased similarly iron level in tissues of rats fed D-diet or R-diet with prolonged effect after supplementation discontinuation.

  5. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:26556796

  6. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions.

  7. Zinc deficiency and the Euglena gracilis chromatin: formation of an alpha-amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Falchuk, K H; Mazus, B; Ber, E; Ulpino-Lobb, L; Vallee, B L

    1985-05-01

    Both the single DNA-dependent RNA polymerase found in zinc-deficient (-Zn) Euglena gracilis and the RNA polymerase III from zinc-sufficient (+Zn) cells have been isolated by methods previously used to purify polymerases I and II [Falchuk, K. H., Mazus, B., Ulpino, L., & Vallee, B. L. (1976) Biochemistry 15, 4468; Falchuk, K. H., Mazus, B., Ulpino, L., & Vallee, B. L. (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 74, 1206]. Like class II polymerases, the enzyme from -Zn organisms elutes from DNA-cellulose and phosphocellulose with 0.6 M NaCl and 0.35 M NH4Cl, respectively. It is inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, alpha,alpha'-bipyridyl, dipicolinic acid, and 1,10-phenanthroline (OP); 4,7-phenanthroline, the nonchelating analogue, does not inhibit. The pKI(OP) of this enzyme is identical with that of polymerase II but distinct from those of polymerases I and III. Elemental analysis confirms that zinc is the functional metal while copper, manganese, iron, and magnesium are absent. However, the -Zn enzyme is at least 4 orders of magnitude more resistant to alpha-amanitin (alpha-A) than the class II polymerase. Further, its response to alpha-A is unlike that of either polymerase I or polymerase III. Thus, -Zn cells contain a single, alpha-amanitin-resistant (alpha-Ar) RNA polymerase, whose behavior otherwise resembles that of the alpha-amanitin-sensitive polymerase II.

  8. Growth, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies on NLO active pure and metal ion doped single crystals of bis-thiourea zinc chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parasuraman, K.; Sakthi Murugesan, K.; Uthrakumar, R.; Jerome Das, S.; Milton Boaz, B.

    2011-10-01

    Good quality single crystals of pure and metal ion (Ni 2+) doped bis-thiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) possessing excellent nonlinear optical properties have been grown from aqueous solution by the slow solvent evaporation technique. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals are determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The well defined sharp peaks in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern reveals the crystalline perfection and the EDAX spectrum confirms the presence of dopant in the lattice of the parent crystal. The DRS UV-visible spectral study reveals improved transparency for the doped crystal, ascertaining the inclusion of metal ion in the lattice. The optical band gap of the pure and doped crystals was calculated to be 4.8 and 5.2 eV respectively from the UV transmission spectrum. The vickers hardness test brings forth higher hardness value for Ni 2+doped BTZC as compared to pure BTZC crystal. The dielectric measurement exhibits very low dielectric constant and dielectric loss at higher frequencies for both the pure and Ni 2+doped BTZC. The existence of second harmonic generation signals in the crystal also has been confirmed by performing the Kurtz powder test.

  9. The Influence of Iron and Zinc Supplementation on the Bioavailability of Provitamin A Carotenoids from Papaya Following Consumption of a Vitamin A-Deficient Diet.

    PubMed

    Kana-Sop, Marie Modestine; Gouado, Inocent; Achu, Mercy Bih; Van Camp, John; Amvam Zollo, Paul Henri; Schweigert, Florian J; Oberleas, Donald; Ekoe, Tetanye

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies are serious public health problems in Cameroon, as in many developing countries. Local vegetables which are sources of provitamin A carotenoids (PACs) can be used to improve vitamin A intakes. However, traditional meals are often unable to cover zinc and iron needs. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of 3 PACs (α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) in young men, who were fed with a vitamin A-free diet and received iron and zinc supplementation. Twelve healthy participants were divided into three groups and were supplemented with elemental iron (20 mg of iron fumarate), 20 mg of zinc sulfate or iron+zinc (20 mg of iron in the morning and 20 mg of zinc in the evening) for 11 d. They were given a vitamin A- and PAC-free diet from the 6th to the 11th day, followed by a test meal containing 0.55 kg of freshly peeled papaya as a source of PACs. Blood samples were collected four times successively on the 11th day (the test meal day), at T0 (just after the test meal), after 2 h (T2), after 4 h (T4) and after 7 h (T7). Ultracentrifugation was used to isolate serum chylomicrons. Retinol appearance and PAC postprandial concentrations were determined. The supplementation with zinc, iron and iron+zinc influenced the chylomicron appearance of retinol and PACs differently as reflected by retention times and maximum absorption peaks. Iron led to highest retinol levels in the chylomicron. Zinc and iron+zinc supplements were best for optimal intact appearance of α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin respectively. Supplementation with iron led to the greatest bioavailability of PACs from papaya and its conversion to retinol.

  10. Zinc deficiency and supplementation in ovariectomized rats: their effect on serum estrogen and progesterone levels and their relation to calcium and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sunar, Fusun; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Ergene, Neyhan; Mogulkoc, Rasim

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine how zinc deficiency or supplementation affects estrogen and progesterone and calcium and phosphorus levels in the serum. The study was carried out on 40 adult female rats of Sprague-Dawley species. The rats were allocated to four groups: Group 1: Control, Group 2: Ovariectomized (OVX) control. Group 3: OVX-Zinc-supplemented. Group 4: OVX-Zinc-deficient. Blood samples were taken from the experimental animals by decapitation method and analyzed in terms of estrogen, progesterone, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc levels. Group 1 had the highest estrogen levels (p<0.05). Estrogen levels in group 3 were higher than those in groups 2 and 4 (p<0.05). The lowest estrogen levels were found in group 4 (p<0.05). Progesterone levels were higher in group 1 than in groups 2, 3 and 4 and the same parameter in group 3 was higher than those in groups 2 and 4. The highest calcium and phosphorus levels were obtained in groups 1 and 3 (p<0.05). Calcium and phosphorus levels in group 2 were higher than those in group 4 (p<0.05). There was no difference among groups with regard to magnesium levels. Group 3 had the highest serum zinc levels (p<0.05). Zinc levels in group 1 were higher than those in groups 2 and 4 and the levels in group 2 were higher than those in group 4. Findings of the study show that zinc deficiency causes a significant decrease in calcium and phosphorus levels and that zinc supplementation prevents these adversities in ovariectomized rats.

  11. Rapid screening for zinc deficiency using portable x-ray fluorescence in fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elemental composition of fingernails is a useful indicator of micronutrient status and may reflect an individual’s intake over time. Our objective was to determine if portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a viable method to assess zinc content in fingernails in the field. Human fingernail samples ran...

  12. ZINC-DEFICIENCY ENHANCES PRO-INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES AFTER OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that humans are differentially susceptible to adverse health effects induced by exposure to ozone. Serum analysis of vitamins and trace elements have shown that the elderly (people >65 years) are deficient in sever...

  13. Microstructure, corrosion properties and bio-compatibility of calcium zinc phosphate coating on pure iron for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance in the initial stage of implantation, a phosphate (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O) coating was obtained on the surface of pure iron by a chemical reaction method. The anti-corrosion property, the blood compatibility and the cell toxicity of the coated pure iron specimens were investigated. The coating was composed of some fine phosphate crystals and the surface of coating was flat and dense enough. The electrochemical data indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated pure iron was improved with the increase of phosphating time. When the specimen was phosphated for 30min, the corrosion resistance (Rp) increased to 8006 Ω. Compared with that of the naked pure iron, the anti-hemolysis property and cell compatibility of the coated specimen was improved significantly, while the anti-coagulant property became slightly worse due to the existence of element calcium. It was thought that phosphating treatment might be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility of pure iron for biomedical application.

  14. Apparent zinc absorption and zinc status of weanling rats fed moderately zinc-deficient diets enriched with beef tallow or sunflower oil.

    PubMed

    Weigand, E; Boesch-Saadatmandi, C

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare apparent Zn absorption and Zn status of weanling rats fed diets that differed in Zn level, fat level and fat source. Semi-synthetic diets, which were about isoenergetic and contained 3% soyabean oil, were supplemented with 7 or 100 mg Zn/kg to create a mild Zn deficiency (LZ) or a high Zn supply (HZ) and with 0 (LF), 22% beef tallow (BT) or 22% sunflower oil (SF) according to a 2 × 3 factorial design of treatments. They were fed ad libitum to 6 × 8 rats for 28 days. Energy intake and growth rates were comparable among the HZ groups. Weight gains in the LZ-LF, LZ-BT and LZ-SF groups averaged 5.54, 4.95 and 4.15 g/day, and apparent Zn absorption averaged 79.4, 60.3 and 48.0 μg Zn/day, respectively, whereas faecal Zn excretion was comparable among these groups. Apparent Zn absorption, and plasma and femur Zn concentrations were lower in the high-fat groups than in the LF group, possibly due to the high cellulose content of the BT and SF diets. Plasma Zn concentrations were higher in the animals fed the BT-based than in the SF-based diets, whereas femur and soft tissue Zn concentrations were comparable among these groups. The differences between the LZ-BT and LZ-SF groups in growth rate, Zn absorption rate and Zn status were confirmed in a second experiment. The results indicate that moderately Zn-deficient diets enriched with SF in relation to BT affect Zn metabolism of weanling rats by a yet unknown mechanism. PMID:22672508

  15. Vacuolar Nicotianamine Has Critical and Distinct Roles under Iron Deficiency and for Zinc Sequestration in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Michael J.; Kawachi, Miki; Wirtz, Markus; Hillmer, Stefan; Hell, Rüdiger; Krämer, Ute

    2012-01-01

    The essential micronutrients Fe and Zn often limit plant growth but are toxic in excess. Arabidopsis thaliana ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR1 (ZIF1) is a vacuolar membrane major facilitator superfamily protein required for basal Zn tolerance. Here, we show that overexpression of ZIF1 enhances the partitioning into vacuoles of the low molecular mass metal chelator nicotianamine and leads to pronounced nicotianamine accumulation in roots, accompanied by vacuolar buildup of Zn. Heterologous ZIF1 protein localizes to vacuolar membranes and enhances nicotianamine contents of yeast cells engineered to synthesize nicotianamine, without complementing a Zn-hypersensitive mutant that additionally lacks vacuolar membrane Zn2+/H+ antiport activity. Retention in roots of Zn, but not of Fe, is enhanced in ZIF1 overexpressors at the expense of the shoots. Furthermore, these lines exhibit impaired intercellular Fe movement in leaves and constitutive Fe deficiency symptoms, thus phenocopying nicotianamine biosynthesis mutants. Hence, perturbing the subcellular distribution of the chelator nicotianamine has profound, yet distinct, effects on Zn and Fe with respect to their subcellular and interorgan partitioning. The zif1 mutant is also hypersensitive to Fe deficiency, even in media lacking added Zn. Therefore, accurate levels of ZIF1 expression are critical for both Zn and Fe homeostasis. This will help to advance the biofortification of crops. PMID:22374397

  16. Flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle stages in zinc deficient fetal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, M.S.; Rogers, J.M.; Zucker, R.M.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1986-03-05

    The authors are currently studying the effects of Zn deficiency on chromatin structure, DNA synthesis, protein synthesis and cell division in the rat. Here the authors present preliminary results of nuclear DNA measurement by flow cytometry. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a fluorescent probe for total nuclear DNA isolated from Day 18 fetal rat brain. Previously, dams were fed a control (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet), restricted (50 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) or a Zn deficient (0.5 ..mu..g Zn/g diet) diet. Fetuses were taken at Day 18 of gestation by casaerean section. Whole brain was quickly excised and frozen rapidly in a plastic vial which was subsequently immersed in an alcohol/dry ice bath at -80/sup 0/C. Brain was thawed at 37/sup 0/C in a citrate/DMSO/pH 7.6 buffer and dissociated by several passes through a 26 gauge needle. Nuclei were isolated and stained by incubating in 50 ..mu..g/ml PI, 0.125 ..mu..g/ml RNA-ASE, 0.1% NP-40 at 25/sup 0/C. Zn deficiency resulted in a larger coefficient of variation (CV) for the Go/Gi DNA peak in fetal brain nuclei. The DNA profile of these nuclei is suggestive of a possible block at the Go/Gi-S interphase; restricted fed and ad lib fed controls showed no such blockage.

  17. Response to zinc deficiency of two rice lines with contrasting tolerance is determined by root growth maintenance and organic acid exudation rates, and not by zinc-transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Widodo, Basuki; Broadley, Martin R; Rose, Terry; Frei, Michael; Pariasca-Tanaka, Juan; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Thomson, Michael; Hammond, John P; Aprile, Alessio; Close, Timothy J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    *Zinc (Zn)-deficient soils constrain rice (Oryza sativa) production and cause Zn malnutrition. The identification of Zn-deficiency-tolerant rice lines indicates that breeding might overcome these constraints. Here, we seek to identify processes underlying Zn-deficiency tolerance in rice at the physiological and transcriptional levels. *A Zn-deficiency-tolerant line RIL46 acquires Zn more efficiently and produces more biomass than its nontolerant maternal line (IR74) at low [Zn](ext) under field conditions. We tested if this was the result of increased expression of Zn(2+) transporters; increased root exudation of deoxymugineic acid (DMA) or low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs); and/or increased root production. Experiments were performed in field and controlled environment conditions. *There was little genotypic variation in transcript abundance of Zn-responsive root Zn(2+)-transporters between the RIL46 and IR74. However, root exudation of DMA and LMWOA was greater in RIL46, coinciding with increased root expression of putative ligand-efflux genes. Adventitious root production was maintained in RIL46 at low [Zn](ext), correlating with altered expression of root-specific auxin-responsive genes. *Zinc-deficiency tolerance in RIL46 is most likely the result of maintenance of root growth, increased efflux of Zn ligands, and increased uptake of Zn-ligand complexes at low [Zn](ext); these traits are potential breeding targets. PMID:20100202

  18. Moderate Zinc Deficiency Reduces Testicular Zip6 and Zip10 Abundance and Impairs Spermatogenesis in Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Croxford, Thomas P.; McCormick, Nicholas H.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2011-01-01

    Male infertility accounts for ~40% of cases of failure to conceive. Testes have a strict zinc (Zn) requirement and severe Zn deficiency compromises spermatogenesis, sperm viability, and motility, compromising fertility in men. Despite the high prevalence of marginal Zn deficiency in humans, less emphasis has been placed on understanding the consequences on male reproduction. Swiss Webster mice were used to visualize Zip protein expression during spermatogenesis using immunohistochemistry. Data suggest Zip5 imports Zn into Sertoli cells and spermatocytes, augmented by Zip10 (primary spermatocytes) and Zip8 (secondary spermatocytes). Zip6, 8, and 10 expression was retained in round spermatids, although Zip8 and Zip10 expression disappears during spermatid maturation. Zip1 and Zip6 expression was detected in mature, elongated spermatids. Zip14 was detected in undifferentiated spermatogonia and Leydig cells. Mice fed diets (n = 10/group) reduced in Zn concentration [marginal-Zn diet (MZD), 10 mg Zn/kg; low-Zn diet (ZD), 7 mg Zn/kg] for 30 d had >35% lower liver Zn concentrations than mice fed the control diet (C; 30 mg Zn/kg) (P < 0.05). Plasma Zn and testosterone concentrations and the testes Zn concentration and weight were not significantly lower than in controls. Plasma Zn was greater in the ZD group than in the C and MZD groups. Mice fed ZD had a reduced number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells (~50%; P < 0.05), compromised seminiferous tubule structure, and reduced Zip10 and Zip6 abundance (>50%; P < 0.5) compared with mice fed C. Our data provide compelling evidence that reduced Zn intake may be associated with infertility in men, perhaps independent of decreased levels of circulating Zn or testosterone, which warrants further investigation in human populations. PMID:21248196

  19. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Resistance through Activation of a Zinc Deficiency Transcription Factor in Brachypodium distachyon1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E.; Martin, Ruth C.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  20. Zinc: the neglected nutrient.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E

    1989-03-01

    Zinc was first recognized as essential for animals at the University of Illinois School of Agriculture in 1916, when it was found that zinc-deficient baby pigs were runty, developed dermatitis on their legs, and were sterile. Zinc deficiency was first recognized in man by Dr. Ananda Prasad of Detroit 26 years ago when he measured serum and hair zinc levels in young male Egyptian dwarfs who had failed to mature and were small in stature. By simply adding zinc to their regular diet, they grew in height and became sexually mature. It is now recognized that dwarfism in males is frequent around the Mediterranean, where wheat is the staple of life and has been grown for 4,000 years on the same soil, thereby resulting in the depletion of zinc. Professor Robert Henkin first suggested that zinc deficiency might cause hearing-nerve impairment. Assay of the soft tissues of the cochlea and vestibule revealed a zinc level higher than that of any other part of the body. Previously, the eye was considered to have the highest level of zinc of any organ. To diagnose zinc deficiency clinically, we use serum zinc assays made at the Mayo Clinic Trace Element Laboratory. With zinc supplementation in patients who are marginally zinc deficient, there has been improvement in tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in about one-third of elderly adults. We believe zinc deficiency is one causation of presbycusis; by recognizing and correcting it, a progressive hearing loss can be arrested.

  1. Zinc: the neglected nutrient.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E

    1989-03-01

    Zinc was first recognized as essential for animals at the University of Illinois School of Agriculture in 1916, when it was found that zinc-deficient baby pigs were runty, developed dermatitis on their legs, and were sterile. Zinc deficiency was first recognized in man by Dr. Ananda Prasad of Detroit 26 years ago when he measured serum and hair zinc levels in young male Egyptian dwarfs who had failed to mature and were small in stature. By simply adding zinc to their regular diet, they grew in height and became sexually mature. It is now recognized that dwarfism in males is frequent around the Mediterranean, where wheat is the staple of life and has been grown for 4,000 years on the same soil, thereby resulting in the depletion of zinc. Professor Robert Henkin first suggested that zinc deficiency might cause hearing-nerve impairment. Assay of the soft tissues of the cochlea and vestibule revealed a zinc level higher than that of any other part of the body. Previously, the eye was considered to have the highest level of zinc of any organ. To diagnose zinc deficiency clinically, we use serum zinc assays made at the Mayo Clinic Trace Element Laboratory. With zinc supplementation in patients who are marginally zinc deficient, there has been improvement in tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in about one-third of elderly adults. We believe zinc deficiency is one causation of presbycusis; by recognizing and correcting it, a progressive hearing loss can be arrested. PMID:2786676

  2. Increased expression of six ZIP family genes by zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with enhanced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Tiong, Jingwen; McDonald, Glenn; Genc, Yusuf; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Huang, Chun Y

    2015-09-01

    Low zinc (Zn) in soils reduces yield and grain Zn content. Regulation of ZRT/IRT-like protein (ZIP) family genes is a major mechanism in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil. Although several Zn deficiency-inducible ZIP genes are identified in cereals, there has been no systematic study on the association of Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation with expression of ZIP family genes. We measured Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants by resupplying 0.5 μM Zn, and quantified the transcripts of thirteen HvZIP genes. Subcellular localization and tissue-specific expression were also determined for Zn deficiency-inducible HvZIP genes. Zn deficiency enhanced the capacity of uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn, and sustained the enhanced capacity for 6 d after Zn resupply. Six HvZIP genes were highly induced in roots of Zn-deficient plants, and their proteins were localized in the plasma membrane. Tissue-specific expression in roots supports their roles in uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn under low Zn conditions. Our results provide a comprehensive view on the physiological roles of ZIP genes in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil, and pave the way for development of new strategies to improve Zn-deficiency tolerance and biofortification in cereals. PMID:25904503

  3. Increased expression of six ZIP family genes by zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with enhanced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Tiong, Jingwen; McDonald, Glenn; Genc, Yusuf; Shirley, Neil; Langridge, Peter; Huang, Chun Y

    2015-09-01

    Low zinc (Zn) in soils reduces yield and grain Zn content. Regulation of ZRT/IRT-like protein (ZIP) family genes is a major mechanism in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil. Although several Zn deficiency-inducible ZIP genes are identified in cereals, there has been no systematic study on the association of Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation with expression of ZIP family genes. We measured Zn deficiency-induced uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn in barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants by resupplying 0.5 μM Zn, and quantified the transcripts of thirteen HvZIP genes. Subcellular localization and tissue-specific expression were also determined for Zn deficiency-inducible HvZIP genes. Zn deficiency enhanced the capacity of uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn, and sustained the enhanced capacity for 6 d after Zn resupply. Six HvZIP genes were highly induced in roots of Zn-deficient plants, and their proteins were localized in the plasma membrane. Tissue-specific expression in roots supports their roles in uptake and root-to-shoot translocation of Zn under low Zn conditions. Our results provide a comprehensive view on the physiological roles of ZIP genes in plant adaptation to low and fluctuating Zn in soil, and pave the way for development of new strategies to improve Zn-deficiency tolerance and biofortification in cereals.

  4. Defect of mitochondrial respiratory chain is a mechanism of ROS overproduction in a rat model of alcoholic liver disease: role of zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2016-02-01

    Morphological and functional alterations of hepatic mitochondria have been documented in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Our recent study demonstrated that zinc level was decreased in whole liver and mitochondria by chronic alcohol feeding. The present study was undertaken to determine whether zinc deficiency mediates alcohol-induced mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) defect and whether defective ETC function may lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Male Wistar rats were pair fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diet for 5 mo. Chronic alcohol exposure increased hepatic triglyceride, free fatty acid, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) levels; meanwhile hepatic mitochondrial 4HNE level was also increased. Moreover, hepatic mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, IV, and V and hepatic ATP production were decreased by chronic alcohol exposure. Chronic alcohol feeding decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and mitochondrial DNA. HepG2 cells were treated with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) for 6 h. Zinc deficiency significantly decreased mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, and IV. In addition, PGC1α, NRF1, and TFAM levels as well as mitochondrial DNA were significantly decreased by TPEN treatment. Knockdown of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I, III, or IV by shRNA caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in ROS production. These results suggest that alcohol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency could inactivate mitochondrial biogenesis pathway and decrease mitochondrial DNA replication, which, in turn, decreases mitochondrial complex protein expression. The defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes may worsen alcohol-induced ROS production.

  5. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Impair Gene Expression of PPARα, PPARγ, and Mitochondrial Enoyl-CoA Delta Isomerase in the Liver of Growing Rats.

    PubMed

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and mitochondrial Δ3Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver. Weanling rats were assigned to five groups (eight animals each) and fed semi-synthetic, low-carbohydrate diets containing 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (low-Zn (LZ) or high-Zn (HZ)) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower (SF) oil for four weeks. One group each was fed the LZ-CB, LZ-SF, or HZ-SF diet free choice, and one group each was fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in restricted amounts according to intake of the respective LZ diets. The LZ diets markedly lowered growth and zinc concentrations in plasma and femur. Hepatic mRNA levels of PPARα, PPARγ, and ECI were not reduced by the moderate zinc deficiency. Overall, ECI-mRNA abundance was marginally higher in the SF-fed than in the CB-fed animals. PMID:24855375

  6. Functional analysis of the zinc cluster domain of the CYP1 (HAP1) complex regulator in heme-sufficient and heme-deficient yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Defranoux, N; Gaisne, M; Verdière, J

    1994-03-01

    CYP1 determines the expression of several genes whose transcription is heme-dependent in yeast. It exerts regulatory functions even in the absence of heme, usually considered to be its effector. It mediates both positive and negative effects, depending on the target gene and on the redox state of the cell. In the presence of heme, it binds through a cysteine-rich domain in which a histidine residue occupies the position of the sixth and essential cysteine of the otherwise classical zinc cluster DNA-binding domain exemplified by GAL4. We constructed specific missense mutations in the potential CYP1 zinc cluster domain by site-directed mutagenesis and looked for regulatory effects of the mutated proteins under specific physiological conditions. We show that CYP1 does belong to the zinc cluster regulatory family since a sixth essential cysteine residue is indeed present, albeit at a modified position when compared to the consensus sequence. We also show that the amino acid preceding the first cysteine residue of the DNA-binding domain critically affects the efficiency of regulation both in the presence and in the absence of heme: mutations known to affect DNA binding under heme-sufficient conditions also affect regulation under heme-deficient conditions. We therefore surmise that regulation under heme-deficient conditions is dependent upon DNA binding. PMID:8152420

  7. Rice Genotype Differences in Tolerance of Zinc-Deficient Soils: Evidence for the Importance of Root-Induced Changes in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Asako; Kirk, Guy J. D.; Lee, Jae-Sung; Morete, Mark J.; Nanda, Amrit K.; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E.; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major constraint to rice production and Zn is also often deficient in humans with rice-based diets. Efforts to breed more Zn-efficient rice are constrained by poor understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to deficiency. Here we assess the contributions of root growth and root Zn uptake efficiency, and we seek to explain the results in terms of specific mechanisms. We made a field experiment in a highly Zn-deficient rice soil in the Philippines with deficiency-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes, and measured growth, Zn uptake and root development. We also measured the effect of planting density. Tolerant genotypes produced more crown roots per plant and had greater uptake rates per unit root surface area; the latter was at least as important as root number to overall tolerance. Tolerant and sensitive genotypes took up more Zn per plant at greater planting densities. The greater uptake per unit root surface area, and the planting density effect can only be explained by root-induced changes in the rhizosphere, either solubilizing Zn, or neutralizing a toxin that impedes Zn uptake (possibly HCO3− or Fe2+), or both. Traits for these and crown root number are potential breeding targets. PMID:26793198

  8. Rice Genotype Differences in Tolerance of Zinc-Deficient Soils: Evidence for the Importance of Root-Induced Changes in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asako; Kirk, Guy J D; Lee, Jae-Sung; Morete, Mark J; Nanda, Amrit K; Johnson-Beebout, Sarah E; Wissuwa, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major constraint to rice production and Zn is also often deficient in humans with rice-based diets. Efforts to breed more Zn-efficient rice are constrained by poor understanding of the mechanisms of tolerance to deficiency. Here we assess the contributions of root growth and root Zn uptake efficiency, and we seek to explain the results in terms of specific mechanisms. We made a field experiment in a highly Zn-deficient rice soil in the Philippines with deficiency-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes, and measured growth, Zn uptake and root development. We also measured the effect of planting density. Tolerant genotypes produced more crown roots per plant and had greater uptake rates per unit root surface area; the latter was at least as important as root number to overall tolerance. Tolerant and sensitive genotypes took up more Zn per plant at greater planting densities. The greater uptake per unit root surface area, and the planting density effect can only be explained by root-induced changes in the rhizosphere, either solubilizing Zn, or neutralizing a toxin that impedes Zn uptake (possibly [Formula: see text] or Fe(2+)), or both. Traits for these and crown root number are potential breeding targets. PMID:26793198

  9. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  10. [Zinc and gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Higashimura, Yasuki; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, affects immune responses, skin metabolism, hormone composition, and some sensory function, so that the deficiency presents various symptoms such as immunodeficiency and taste obstacle. Further, the zinc deficiency also considers as a risk of various diseases. Recent reports demonstrated that -20% of the Japanese population was marginally zinc deficiency, and over 25% of the global population is at high risk of zinc deficiency. In gastrointestinal disorders, zinc plays an important role in the healing of mucosal and epithelial damage. In fact, polaprezinc, a chelate compound of zinc and L-carnosine, has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. We describe here the therapeutic effect of zinc on gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27455800

  11. Studies on cell migration, adenylate cyclase and membrane-coating granules in the buccal epithelium of the zinc-deficient rabbit, including the influence of isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y

    1988-01-01

    Cell migration was slightly increased; cytochemical reaction deposits of adenylate cyclase and the area density of membrane-coating granules (MCG) were significantly increased. Upon isoproterenol stimulation, the MCG area density was significantly increased, whereas the cell migration rate was unchanged. Thus in zinc deficiency, there may be a simultaneous increase in the production and secretion of MCGs, in adenylate cyclase activity, and in cell migration. The non-significantly increased cell migration rate may not keep pace with the significantly increased cell-production rate, resulting in thickening of the epithelium.

  12. The co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation has the opposite effects on mood compared with either condition alone due to changes in the central norepinephrine system.

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Hironori; Omata, Naoto; Kiyono, Yasushi; Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Mita, Kayo; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Wada, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Nutritional and social environmental problems during the early stages of life are closely associated with the pathophysiology of mood disorders such as depression. Disruption or dysfunction of the central norepinephrine (NE) system is also considered to play a role in mood disorders. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of zinc deficiency and/or social isolation on mood and changes in the central NE system using rats. Compared with the controls, the rats subjected to zinc deficiency or social isolation alone exhibited increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and greater depression-like behavior in the forced swim test. However, the co-occurrence of zinc deficiency and social isolation resulted in decreased anxiety-related behavior and control levels of depression-like behavior. Social isolation alone decreased the rats' cerebral NE concentrations. The expression of the NE transporter was not affected by social isolation alone, but its expression in the locus coeruleus was markedly decreased by the co-occurrence of social isolation and zinc deficiency, and this change was accompanied by an increase in the blood concentration of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, which is a marker of central NE system activity. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency or social isolation alone induce anxious or depressive symptoms, but the presence of both conditions has anxiolytic or antidepressive effects. Furthermore, these opposing effects of mood-related behaviors were found to be associated with changes in the central NE system.

  13. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  14. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  15. Fructose consumption and moderate zinc deficiency influence growth and adipocyte metabolism in young rats prone to adult-onset obesity.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Erin L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J; King, Janet C

    2007-07-01

    The effects of low zinc, high fructose diet on growth and adipocyte metabolism were examined in rats. At 28 days of age, animals were assigned to diets either adequate in zinc (30 ppm) with water (AZW) or fructose solution (AZF), or low in zinc (5 ppm) with water (LZW) or fructose solution (LZF). Body weight and food and fructose solution intake were measured three times a week. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks, and energy expenditure was measured. The rats were killed at 12 weeks. Adipocytes were cultured in medium containing C14-glucose and physiological insulin concentrations. The animals in the LZF group consumed less energy and gained less weight than the other groups. Serum zinc concentrations were lower in the LZF than the AZF group. Energy expenditure over a 24-h period did not differ between groups; however, the respiratory quotient in the fed state was higher in the groups consuming fructose solution than in those consuming water. The mesenteric adipocytes from the animals in the LZF group utilized more glucose. Thus, the addition of fructose to a LZ diet reduced energy intake and growth and altered adipocyte fuel metabolism in young growing rats.

  16. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  17. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:26556796

  18. The Involvement of OsPHO1;1 in the Regulation of Iron Transport Through Integration of Phosphate and Zinc Deficiency Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Saenchai, Chorpet; Bouain, Nadia; Kisko, Mushtak; Prom-u-thai, Chanakan; Doumas, Patrick; Rouached, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Plants survival depends on their ability to cope with multiple nutrient stresses that often occur simultaneously, such as the limited availability of essential elements inorganic phosphate (Pi), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe). Previous research has provided information on the genes involved in efforts by plants to maintain homeostasis when a single nutrient (Pi, Zn, or Fe) is depleted. Recent findings on nutritional stress suggest that plant growth capacity is influenced by a complex tripartite interaction between Pi, Zn, and Fe homeostasis. However, despite its importance, how plants integrate multiple nutritional stimuli into complex developmental programs, and which genes are involved in this tripartite (Pi ZnFe) interaction is still not clear. The aim of this study was to examine the physiological and molecular responses of rice (Oriza sativa L.) to a combination of Pi, Zn, and/or Fe deficiency stress conditions. Results showed that Fe deficiency had the most drastic single-nutrient effect on biomass, while the Zn deficiency-effect depended on the presence of Pi in the medium. Interestingly, the observed negative effect of Fe starvation was alleviated by concomitant Pi or PiZn depletion. Members of the OsPHO1 family showed a differential transcriptional regulation in response PiZnFe combinatory stress conditions. Particularly, the transcripts of the OsPHO1;1 sense and its natural antisense cis-NatPHO1;1 showed the highest accumulation under PiZn deficiency. In this condition, the Ospho1;1 mutants showed over-accumulation of Fe in roots compared to wild type plants. These data reveal coordination between pathways involved in Fe transport and PiZn signaling in rice which involves the OsPHO1; 1, and support the hypothesis of a genetic basis for Pi, Zn, and Fe signaling interactions in plants. PMID:27092147

  19. Estrogen retention and estrogen receptor distribution in uterus of rats deficient in zinc and/or vitamin B/sub 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.E.; Vessal, M.

    1986-03-01

    Holley et al have reported that uptake and retention of a tracer dose of (/sup 3/H)-estradiol (E/sub 2/) by rat uteri nuclei was increased four-fold in pyridoxine-deprived young rats as compared to controls. The diet lacked a specific input of zinc, a nutrient which may also influence estrogen impact on target cells. The authors have tested the effect of diets restricted in either zinc or pyridoxine singly or in combination upon both retention of estrogen and subcellular distribution of estrogen receptor in rat uterus. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed their respective diets for five weeks. Stage of estrous cycle was determined by examination of vaginal smears. On the morning of estrous, each rat was given an IP injection of (/sup 3/H) E/sub 2/. Nuclear and cytosolic E/sub 2/ was determined after 20 minutes. A second series of animals were killed at estrous after the same period of dietary treatment and nuclear and cytosolic estradiol receptors were measured. Uterine retention of injected E/sub 2/ was increased 2-fold when Zn was limiting (3 ppm), 1.5-fold when B/sub 6/ was low and 3.5-fold when both were low. Dually deficient rats displayed a 10-fold increase in nuclear content of E/sub 2/ receptor but no significant change in total cellular receptor content.

  20. Oxidase-deficient neutrophils from X-linked chronic granulomatous disease iPS cells: functional correction by zinc finger nuclease–mediated safe harbor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jizhong; Sweeney, Colin L.; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Choi, Uimook; Pan, Jason; Wang, Hongmei; Dowey, Sarah N.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), a defect of neutrophil microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulting from gp91phox deficiency. We demonstrated that mature neutrophils differentiated from X-CGD iPSCs lack ROS production, reproducing the pathognomonic CGD cellular phenotype. Targeted gene transfer into iPSCs, with subsequent selection and full characterization to ensure no off-target changes, holds promise for correction of monogenic diseases without the insertional mutagenesis caused by multisite integration of viral or plasmid vectors. Zinc finger nuclease–mediated gene targeting of a single-copy gp91phox therapeutic minigene into one allele of the “safe harbor” AAVS1 locus in X-CGD iPSCs without off-target inserts resulted in sustained expression of gp91phox and substantially restored neutrophil ROS production. Our findings demonstrate how precise gene targeting may be applied to correction of X-CGD using zinc finger nuclease and patient iPSCs. PMID:21411759

  1. Zinc and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Angela V; Craig, Winston J; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    Well planned vegetarian diets can provide adequate amounts of zinc from plant sources. Vegetarians appear to adapt to lower zinc intakes by increased absorption and retention of zinc. Good sources of zinc for vegetarians include whole grains, tofu, tempeh, legumes, nuts and seeds, fortified breakfast cereals and dairy products. The inhibitory effects of phytate on absorption of zinc can be minimised by modern food-processing methods such as soaking, heating, sprouting, fermenting and leavening. Absorption of zinc can be improved by using yeast-based breads and sourdough breads, sprouts, and presoaked legumes. Studies show vegetarians have similar serum zinc concentrations to, and no greater risk of zinc deficiency than, non-vegetarians (despite differences in zinc intake).

  2. A novel zinc finger protein encoded by a couch potato homologue from Solanum tuberosum enables a sucrose transport-deficient yeast strain to grow on sucrose.

    PubMed

    Kühn, C; Frommer, W B

    1995-06-25

    A yeast strain deficient in secreted invertase but expressing a cytoplasmic sucrose synthase has been used to select for potato genes that enable growth on sucrose as the sole carbon source by suppressing the sucrose uptake deficiency. Besides the already known sucrose transporter gene (StSUT1), ten different suppressor clones were identified and characterized. One of these cDNAs (PCP1) enabled efficient growth of the mutant yeast strain and mediated uptake of radiolabeled sucrose. The cDNA encodes a protein of 509 amino acids which is highly hydrophilic and thus does not seem to represent a transporter. Sequence comparisons show that the protein contains zinc finger motifs and shares weak homologies with the Drosophila couch potato gene, which serves as a transcriptional regulator, indicating that PCP1 activates a silent endogenous sucrose uptake system. The other suppressor clones encode either putative transcriptional regulators, protein kinases or enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis, ferredoxin reduction or glutamyl tRNA reduction and suppress the phenotype by unknown mechanisms.

  3. Iron Availability Affects Phosphate Deficiency-Mediated Responses, and Evidence of Cross-Talk with Auxin and Zinc in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandna; Sanagala, Raghavendrarao; Sinilal, Bhaskaran; Yadav, Sandeep; Sarkar, Ananda K; Dantu, Prem Kumar; Jain, Ajay

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate (Pi) is pivotal for plant growth and development. Pi deficiency triggers local and systemically regulated adaptive responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Inhibition of primary root growth (PRG) and retarded development of lateral roots (LRs) are typical local Pi deficiency-mediated responses of the root system. Expression of Pi starvation-responsive (PSR) genes is regulated systemically. Here, we report the differential influence of iron (Fe) availability on local and systemic sensing of Pi by Arabidopsis. P-Fe- condition disrupted local Pi sensing, resulting in an elongated primary root (PR). Altered Fe homeostasis in the lpsi mutant with aberration in local Pi sensing provided circumstantial evidence towards the role of Fe in the maintenance of Pi homeostasis. Reporter gene assays, expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes (ARGs) and root phenotyping of the arf7arf19 mutant demonstrated the role of Fe availability on local Pi deficiency-mediated LR development. In addition, Fe availability also exerted a significant influence on PSR genes belonging to different functional categories. Together, these results demonstrated a substantial influence of Fe availability on Pi deficiency-mediated responses of ontogenetically distinct traits of the root system and PSR genes. The study also provided evidence of cross-talk between Pi, Fe and Zn, highlighting a complex tripartite interaction amongst them for maintaining Pi homeostasis.

  4. Mapping of iron and zinc quantitative trait loci in soybean for association to iron deficiency chlorosis resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a nutritional disease of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) which when left unchecked can result in a severe yield penalty or even death in the most extreme cases. In order to curb these effects, resistance to the disease is needed. Breeding for resistance has been ...

  5. Common Bean: A Legume Model on the Rise for Unraveling Responses and Adaptations to Iron, Zinc, and Phosphate Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma A; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G; Valdés-López, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was domesticated ∼8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein) and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development, and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals.

  6. Common Bean: A Legume Model on the Rise for Unraveling Responses and Adaptations to Iron, Zinc, and Phosphate Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma A.; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C.; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was domesticated ∼8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein) and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development, and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals. PMID:27200068

  7. Common Bean: A Legume Model on the Rise for Unraveling Responses and Adaptations to Iron, Zinc, and Phosphate Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma A; Isidra-Arellano, Mariel C; Mendoza-Cozatl, David G; Valdés-López, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was domesticated ∼8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein) and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development, and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals. PMID:27200068

  8. [Zinc deficiency and associated factors in colombian children; results from the 2010 national nutrition survey; a cross sectional study].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Javier; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2014-04-01

    Introducción: El zinc (Zn) es un micronutriente esencial en el crecimiento celular, la síntesis proteica y la diferenciación celular. La deficiencia de Zn afecta el crecimiento y desarrollo del niño, el metabolismo energético y la respuesta inmune. Objetivo: Examinar los factores asociados a la deficiencia de Zn en una muestra representativa de colombianos niños. Pacientes y métodos: Estudio descriptivo transversal, secundario de la información obtenida en la Encuesta Nacional de la Situación Nutricional 2010 (ENSIN 2010), en 4.279 niños entre 12 y 59 meses. Los niveles plasmáticos de Zn se determinaron por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica, y los factores asociados (sexo, edad, etnia, puntaje de SISBEN, región y área geográfica) se recogieron por encuesta estructurada. Se establecieron asociaciones mediante la construcción de modelos de regresión y factores asociados. Resultados: Se encontró un valor promedio de Zinc de 78,5 μg/dl (IC 95% = 76,7-80,4 μg/dl). El 43,3% (IC 95% 42,2-44,3%) de los niños presentaron niveles de Zn menores a 65 μg/dl. Los niños pertenecientes a grupos étnicos (indígena) o que residen en áreas rurales; presentaron mayor déficit de Zn (56,3% y 47,8%) respectivamente. Los modelos de regresión muestran que; ser indígena (OR 1,76 IC 95% 1,29-2,41); y residir en zonas rurales (OR 1,39 IC 95% 1,16-1,67), se asociaron al déficit de Zn. Conclusiones: La población estudiada presenta una alta prevalencia de déficit de Zn, por lo que se recomienda intervenciones integrales donde estén involucrados el componente nutricional y educativo.

  9. Innovative uses for zinc in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bae, Yoon Soo; Hill, Nikki D; Bibi, Yuval; Dreiher, Jacob; Cohen, Arnon D

    2010-07-01

    Severe zinc deficiency states, such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, are associated with a variety of skin manifestations, such as perioral, acral, and perineal dermatitis. These syndromes can be reversed with systemic zinc repletion. In addition to skin pathologies that are clearly zinc-dependent, many dermatologic conditions (eg, dandruff, acne, and diaper rash) have been associated and treated with zinc. Success rates for treatment with zinc vary greatly depending on the disease, mode of administration, and precise zinc preparation used. With the exception of systemic zinc deficiency states, there is little evidence that convincingly demonstrates the efficacy of zinc as a reliable first-line treatment for most dermatologic conditions. However, zinc may be considered as an adjunctive treatment modality. Further research is needed to establish the indications for zinc treatment in dermatology, optimal mode of zinc delivery, and best type of zinc compound to be used. PMID:20510767

  10. Zinc: An Essential Micronutrient

    PubMed Central

    SAPER, ROBERT B.; RASH, REBECCA

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for human metabolism that catalyzes more than 100 enzymes, facilitates protein folding, and helps regulate gene expression. Patients with malnutrition, alcoholism, inflammatory bowel disease, and malabsorption syndromes are at an increased risk of zinc deficiency. Symptoms of zinc deficiency are nonspecific, including growth retardation, diarrhea, alopecia, glossitis, nail dystrophy, decreased immunity, and hypogonadism in males. In developing countries, zinc supplementation may be effective for the prevention of upper respiratory infection and diarrhea, and as an adjunct treatment for diarrhea in malnourished children. Zinc in combination with antioxidants may be modestly effective in slowing the progression of intermediate and advanced age-related macular degeneration. Zinc is an effective treatment for Wilson disease. Current data do not support zinc supplementation as effective for upper respiratory infection, wound healing, or human immunodeficiency virus. Zinc is well tolerated at recommended dosages. Adverse effects of long-term high-dose zinc use include suppressed immunity, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, anemia, copper deficiency, and possible genitourinary complications. PMID:20141096

  11. History of Zinc in Agriculture12

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Forrest H.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc was established as essential for green plants in 1926 and for mammals in 1934. However, >20 y would pass before the first descriptions of zinc deficiencies in farm animals appeared. In 1955, it was reported that zinc supplementation would cure parakeratosis in swine. In 1958, it was reported that zinc deficiency induced poor growth, leg abnormalities, poor feathering, and parakeratosis in chicks. In the 1960s, zinc supplementation was found to alleviate parakeratosis in grazing cattle and sheep. Within 35 y, it was established that nearly one half of the soils in the world may be zinc deficient, causing decreased plant zinc content and production that can be prevented by zinc fertilization. In many of these areas, zinc deficiency is prevented in grazing livestock by zinc fertilization of pastures or by providing salt licks. For livestock under more defined conditions, such as poultry, swine, and dairy and finishing cattle, feeds are easily supplemented with zinc salts to prevent deficiency. Today, the causes and consequences of zinc deficiency and methods and effects of overcoming the deficiency are well established for agriculture. The history of zinc in agriculture is an outstanding demonstration of the translation of research into practical application. PMID:23153732

  12. Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Roohani, Nazanin; Hurrell, Richard; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Since its first discovery in an Iranian male in 1961, zinc deficiency in humans is now known to be an important malnutrition problem world-wide. It is more prevalent in areas of high cereal and low animal food consumption. The diet may not necessarily be low in zinc, but its bio-availability plays a major role in its absorption. Phytic acid is the main known inhibitor of zinc. Compared to adults, infants, children, adolescents, pregnant, and lactating women have increased requirements for zinc and thus, are at increased risk of zinc depletion. Zinc deficiency during growth periods results in growth failure. Epidermal, gastrointestinal, central nervous, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems are the organs most affected clinically by zinc deficiency. Clinical diagnosis of marginal Zn deficiency in humans remains problematic. So far, blood plasma/serum zinc concentration, dietary intake, and stunting prevalence are the best known indicators of zinc deficiency. Four main intervention strategies for combating zinc deficiency include dietary modification/diversification, supplementation, fortification, and bio-fortification. The choice of each method depends on the availability of resources, technical feasibility, target group, and social acceptance. In this paper, we provide a review on zinc biochemical and physiological functions, metabolism including, absorption, excretion, and homeostasis, zinc bio-availability (inhibitors and enhancers), human requirement, groups at high-risk, consequences and causes of zinc deficiency, evaluation of zinc status, and prevention strategies of zinc deficiency. PMID:23914218

  13. Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Roohani, Nazanin; Hurrell, Richard; Kelishadi, Roya; Schulin, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    Since its first discovery in an Iranian male in 1961, zinc deficiency in humans is now known to be an important malnutrition problem world-wide. It is more prevalent in areas of high cereal and low animal food consumption. The diet may not necessarily be low in zinc, but its bio-availability plays a major role in its absorption. Phytic acid is the main known inhibitor of zinc. Compared to adults, infants, children, adolescents, pregnant, and lactating women have increased requirements for zinc and thus, are at increased risk of zinc depletion. Zinc deficiency during growth periods results in growth failure. Epidermal, gastrointestinal, central nervous, immune, skeletal, and reproductive systems are the organs most affected clinically by zinc deficiency. Clinical diagnosis of marginal Zn deficiency in humans remains problematic. So far, blood plasma/serum zinc concentration, dietary intake, and stunting prevalence are the best known indicators of zinc deficiency. Four main intervention strategies for combating zinc deficiency include dietary modification/diversification, supplementation, fortification, and bio-fortification. The choice of each method depends on the availability of resources, technical feasibility, target group, and social acceptance. In this paper, we provide a review on zinc biochemical and physiological functions, metabolism including, absorption, excretion, and homeostasis, zinc bio-availability (inhibitors and enhancers), human requirement, groups at high-risk, consequences and causes of zinc deficiency, evaluation of zinc status, and prevention strategies of zinc deficiency.

  14. Production of optically pure L-lactic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysate by using a newly isolated and D-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient Lactobacillus paracasei strain.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yang-Cheng; Yuan, Shuo-Fu; Wang, Chun-An; Huang, Yin-Jung; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2015-12-01

    The use of lignocellulosic feedstock for lactic acid production with a difficulty is that the release of inhibitory compounds during the pretreatment process which inhibit the growth of microorganism. Thus we report a novel lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus paracasei 7 BL, that has a high tolerance to inhibitors and produced optically pure l-lactic acid after the interruption of ldhD gene. The strain 7 BL fermented glucose efficiently and showed high titer of l-lactic acid (215 g/l) by fed-batch strategy. In addition, 99 g/l of l-lactic acid with high yield (0.96 g/g) and productivity (2.25-3.23 g/l/h) was obtained by using non-detoxified wood hydrolysate. Rice straw hydrolysate without detoxification was also tested and yielded a productivity rate as high as 5.27 g/l/h. Therefore, L. paracasei 7 BL represents a potential method of l-lactic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass and has attractive application for industries. PMID:26433790

  15. Evidence that Human Prostate Cancer is a ZIP1-Deficient Malignancy that could be Effectively Treated with a Zinc Ionophore (Clioquinol) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B; Zou, Jing; Naslund, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of research, no efficacious chemotherapy exists for the treatment of prostate cancer. Malignant prostate zinc levels are markedly decreased in all cases of prostate cancer compared to normal/benign prostate. ZIP1 zinc transporter down regulation decreases zinc to prevent its cytotoxic effects. Thus, prostate cancer is a “ZIP1-deficient” malignancy. A zinc ionophore (e.g. Clioquinol) treatment to increase malignant zinc levels is a plausible treatment of prostate cancer. However, skepticism within the clinical/biomedical research community impedes significant progress leading to such a zinc treatment. This report reviews the clinical and experimental background, and presents new experimental data showing Clioquinol suppression of prostate malignancy; which provides strong support for a zinc ionophore treatment for prostate cancer. Evaluation of often-raised opposing issues is presented. These considerations lead to the conclusion that the compelling evidence dictates that a zinc-treatment approach for prostate cancer should be pursued with additional research leading to clinical trials. PMID:26273543

  16. Zinc Inhibits Hedgehog Autoprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Owen, Timothy; Xia, Ke; Singh, Ajay Vikram; Tou, Emiley; Li, Lingyun; Arduini, Brigitte; Li, Hongmin; Wan, Leo Q.; Callahan, Brian; Wang, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with wide-ranging biological functions, whereas the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in both development and disease. Here we show that there is a mechanistic link between zinc and Hh signaling. The upstream activator of Hh signaling, the Hh ligand, originates from Hh autoprocessing, which converts the Hh precursor protein to the Hh ligand. In an in vitro Hh autoprocessing assay we show that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing with a Ki of 2 μm. We then demonstrate that zinc inhibits Hh autoprocessing in a cellular environment with experiments in primary rat astrocyte culture. Solution NMR reveals that zinc binds the active site residues of the Hh autoprocessing domain to inhibit autoprocessing, and isothermal titration calorimetry provided the thermodynamics of the binding. In normal physiology, zinc likely acts as a negative regulator of Hh autoprocessing and inhibits the generation of Hh ligand and Hh signaling. In many diseases, zinc deficiency and elevated level of Hh ligand co-exist, including prostate cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, and autism. Our data suggest a causal relationship between zinc deficiency and the overproduction of Hh ligand. PMID:25787080

  17. Zinc, the brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C C; Braverman, E R

    1982-04-01

    The total content of zinc in the adult human body averages almost 2 g. This is approximately half the total iron content and 10 to 15 times the total body copper. In the brain, zinc is with iron, the most concentrated metal. The highest levels of zinc are found in the hippocampus in synaptic vesicles, boutons, and mossy fibers. Zinc is also found in large concentrations in the choroid layer of the retina which is an extension of the brain. Zinc plays an important role in axonal and synaptic transmission and is necessary for nucleic acid metabolism and brain tubulin growth and phosphorylation. Lack of zinc has been implicated in impaired DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis during brain development. For these reasons, deficiency of zinc during pregnancy and lactation has been shown to be related to many congenital abnormalities of the nervous system in offspring. Furthermore, in children insufficient levels of zinc have been associated with lowered learning ability, apathy, lethargy, and mental retardation. Hyperactive children may be deficient in zinc and vitamin B-6 and have an excess of lead and copper. Alcoholism, schizophrenia, Wilson's disease, and Pick's disease are brain disorders dynamically related to zinc levels. Zinc has been employed with success to treat Wilson's disease, achrodermatitis enteropathica, and specific types of schizophrenia.

  18. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  19. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  20. The relevance of the colon to zinc nutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globally, zinc deficiency is widespread, despite decades of research highlighting its negative effects on health, and in particular upon child health in low-income countries. Apart from inadequate dietary intake of bioavailable zinc, other significant contributors to zinc deficiency include the exce...

  1. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  2. Zinc, aging, and immunosenescence: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Ángel Julio Romero

    2015-01-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in many biochemical pathways and participates in several cell functions, including the immune response. This review describes the role of zinc in human health, aging, and immunosenescence. Zinc deficiency is frequent in the elderly and leads to changes similar to those that occur in oxidative inflammatory aging (oxi-inflamm-aging) and immunosenescence. The possible benefits of zinc supplementation to enhance immune function are discussed. PMID:25661703

  3. Zinc, aging, and immunosenescence: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Ángel Julio Romero

    2015-01-01

    Zinc plays an essential role in many biochemical pathways and participates in several cell functions, including the immune response. This review describes the role of zinc in human health, aging, and immunosenescence. Zinc deficiency is frequent in the elderly and leads to changes similar to those that occur in oxidative inflammatory aging (oxi-inflamm-aging) and immunosenescence. The possible benefits of zinc supplementation to enhance immune function are discussed.

  4. Association between Maternal Zinc Status, Dietary Zinc Intake and Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rebecca L.; Grieger, Jessica A.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    Adequate zinc stores in the body are extremely important during periods of accelerated growth. However, zinc deficiency is common in developing countries and low maternal circulating zinc concentrations have previously been associated with pregnancy complications. We reviewed current literature assessing circulating zinc and dietary zinc intake during pregnancy and the associations with preeclampsia (PE); spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB); low birthweight (LBW); and gestational diabetes (GDM). Searches of MEDLINE; CINAHL and Scopus databases identified 639 articles and 64 studies were reviewed. In 10 out of 16 studies a difference was reported with respect to circulating zinc between women who gave birth to a LBW infant (≤2500 g) and those who gave birth to an infant of adequate weight (>2500 g), particularly in populations where inadequate zinc intake is prevalent. In 16 of our 33 studies an association was found between hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and circulating zinc; particularly in women with severe PE (blood pressure ≥160/110 mmHg). No association between maternal zinc status and sPTB or GDM was seen; however; direct comparisons between the studies was difficult. Furthermore; only a small number of studies were based on women from populations where there is a high risk of zinc deficiency. Therefore; the link between maternal zinc status and pregnancy success in these populations cannot be established. Future studies should focus on those vulnerable to zinc deficiency and include dietary zinc intake as a measure of zinc status. PMID:27754451

  5. Zinc poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... other materials to make industrial items such as paint, dyes, and more. These combination substances can be ... Compounds used to make paint, rubber, dyes, wood preservatives, and ... Zinc chloride Zinc oxide (relatively nonharmful) Zinc ...

  6. Associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after a zinc supplementation program in Guatemalan schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vinh Q.; Marcinkevage, Jessica; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C.; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo; DiGirolamo, Ann M.; Stein, Aryeh D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The associations among dietary zinc intakes and biomarkers of zinc status are unknown in apparently healthy children at high risk for zinc deficiency. Objective To assess associations among zinc-related parameters in a sample of Guatemalan school-aged children. Methods We assessed total dietary intakes and biomarkers of zinc status before and after receiving 6 months of zinc supplementation or placebo in 691 Guatemalan schoolchildren aged 6 to 11 years. Most of the children also received zinc-fortified milk from a government program that started shortly after the trial began. We assessed associations between zinc intakes and serum zinc, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and albumin. Results At baseline, the prevalence of serum zinc < 65 μg/dL and dietary zinc intake below Estimated Average Requirements (EAR) (< 4 and < 7 mg/day for children < 9 and ≥ 9 years, respectively) were 21.6% and 39.4%, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and dietary zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were r = 0.07, 0.15, and 0.07, respectively. At the 6-month follow-up, low serum zinc and low total (diet plus fortified milk) zinc intakes were observed in 1.2% and 0.0% of children in the zinc-supplemented group and 4.0% and 34.1% in the placebo group, respectively. Pearson correlations between serum zinc concentration and total zinc intake, serum ALP, and serum albumin were 0.10, 0.06, and −0.11 in the zinc-supplemented group and −0.04, 0.05, and 0.01 in the placebo group, respectively. Conclusions Zinc intake was inconsistently associated with markers of serum zinc concentration. Zinc fortification or supplementation attenuated the associations. PMID:23964387

  7. Oral plasma zinc tolerance test in patients with protein energy malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Y; Arcasoy, A; Kürkçüoğlu, M

    1989-01-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 37 children with malnutrition using the oral zinc tolerance test (22.5 mg elementary zinc) and the results compared with those of a group of healthy control subjects. The increase in plasma zinc was significantly lower in patients with marasmic kwashiorkor than in the control group. The zinc tolerance test was, however, normal in marasmic patients. We conclude that zinc deficiency occurs in some types of protein energy malnutrition, and that malabsorption may aggravate zinc deficiency. It is reasonable to give higher doses of zinc than are usually recommended during oral zinc supplementation in patients with protein energy malnutrition. PMID:2513780

  8. Levels of iron, silver, zinc, and lead in oranges and avocados from two gold-rich towns compared with levels in an adjacent gold-deficient town

    SciTech Connect

    Golow, A.A.; Laryea, J.N. )

    1994-09-01

    Fruits such as oranges and avocados are important sources of drinks and food in the Ghanaian Society. If such fruits contain various types of metals they may augument the types and amounts of them in the human body. The metals in fruits may depend on what is in the soils from which they are grown. If the soils contain toxic metals like lead, mercury and cadmium then the consumers may be poisoned as happened in the [open quotes]Ouchi - ouchi[close quotes], disease in Japan and similar episodes. In the area under study, the Geological Survey indicates the presence of 2.5 ppm of lead, 10 - 20 ppm of copper and less than 15 ppm of nickel. Silver, not reported in commercial amounts, is a byproduct of gold productions at Obuasi. Since copper and nickel are presented in the area traces of silver will certainly occur. In the same manner zinc is usually associated with lead as sulphide of zinc blend trace amounts of it are likely to occur in the area. Of the four metals measured, iron and zinc essential for citrus. The extractable iron and zinc in the area of study were 90 and 1.8 mg/kg, levels on the low side for the healthy growth of crops. The investigation reported here is the comparison of the levels of some metals in oranges and avocados from farms in Obuasi and Konongo with those from farms in Kumasi City. This is a part of a project aimed at finding out differences in the metal contents of various food crops grown in various regions of the country. Konongo and Obuasi have soils which are rich in gold but Kumasi city, which is not too distant from these towns, does not have gold in its soil. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Isotopic discrimination of zinc during root-uptake and cellular incorporation in higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. F.; Weiss, D. J.; Coles, B. J.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R. R.; Zhao, F. J.; Kirk, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Isotopic variability of terrestrial zinc offers a unique tool for studying the geochemical and biochemical cycling of zinc through natural ecosystems. However, to realise this potential, the mechanisms controlling the isotopic composition of zinc during geosphere-biosphere interactions must first be understood. The uptake of zinc by plants involves a variety of abiotic and biochemical reactions, and can provide insights into the types of processes that may fractionate zinc isotopes within living systems. We therefore present an experimental study to quantify if and how zinc isotopes are fractionated during uptake in higher plants. Methodology: Two experimental approaches were taken: (1) a hydroponic study in which rice, lettuce, and tomato cultivars were grown in one of two nutrient solutions (a HEDTA + NTA buffered system, and an EDTA buffered system), and (2) a field-based study in which rice plants were grown in experimental paddy fields under both zinc-sufficient and zinc-deficient conditions. Upon harvest, roots, shoots, nutrient solutions and soils were acid digested, and matrix components were removed from the zinc fraction using anion exchange procedures. For soils the 'bioavailble' zinc fraction was abstracted using a 1 N HCl leaching step. Zinc isotopic compositions were determined on a ThermoElemental Axiom MC-ICP-MS, using copper as an internal reference to correct for mass discrimination effects. Combined measurement errors based on repeated analyses of ultra-pure standards and plant reference materials were <0.035 ppm per atomic mass unit (pamu) (2σ) for 66Zn/64Zn measurements. Results: Under hydroponic condisions, all three plant species exhibit a similar pattern of zinc isotopic discrimination, with a small enrichment from nutrient solution to root of +0.04 to +0.09 ppm pamu, followed by an isotopic depletion from root to shoot of -0.13 to -0.26 ppm pamu. While the same trend is observed with the HEDTA + NTA and EDTA nutrient

  10. Zinc and copper: proposed fortification levels and recommended zinc compounds.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2003-09-01

    Micronutrient fortification of foods is now a highly relevant tool worldwide for overcoming micronutrient deficiency. Recent data show that subclinical zinc deficiency is widespread; in Mexico a national survey showed that 25% of children less than age 11 y had plasma zinc concentrations below 10.0 micromol/L (65 microg/dL). Copper deficiency in populations is unknown but copper supplementation is recommended to accompany zinc supplementation. Of the foods available for fortification, staple cereals are very good candidates for reducing micronutrient deficiencies. Because of its higher stability and lower cost, we recommend fortification of cereal flours with zinc oxide, which is absorbed as well as the less stable and more expensive forms of zinc. Depending on the amount of the food that is expected to be eaten, zinc fortification of staple foods could be 20-50 mg/kg of flour. For copper fortification the safer compound is copper gluconate. Copper sulfate is significantly less expensive, but an evaluation of potential physicochemical reactions that affect the final food product is recommended. The suggested amount of copper added to staple foods is 1.2-3.0 mg/kg of flour. For food supplements designed as part of supplementation programs to reduce micronutrient deficiency in children less than age 3 y, a dose of the final product (usually approximately 40-50 g) should contain approximately 4-5 mg of zinc and approximately 0.2-0.4 mg of copper depending on the habitual diet, magnitude of deficiencies and period of supplementation. PMID:12949397

  11. [Changes of cellular zinc content during stress].

    PubMed

    Ieshchenko, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    It was shown by using elaborated method of cell zinc quantitative determination that phase alterations in cell zinc content occurs during stress. Zinc accumulation in cells in the first phase was accompanied by the increase of blood corticosterone and corticotropine levels. A decrease of zinc concentrations in cells in second phase was accompanied by a decrease in the levels of these hormones. Zinc deficiency in cells was observed after adrenalectomy and insular apparatus function removal. Cell zinc deficiency correction was achieved in the first phase by adrenaline and prednisolone injections and in second one--by insuline administration. Positive correlation of the changes of zinc content in hippocampus and blood corticotropine level indicates possible functional connection between hippocampus and hypophysis. PMID:20095387

  12. Zinc Absorption by Young Adults from Supplemental Zinc Citrate Is Comparable with That from Zinc Gluconate and Higher than from Zinc Oxide123

    PubMed Central

    Wegmüller, Rita; Tay, Fabian; Zeder, Christophe; Brnić, Marica; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble zinc salts gluconate, sulfate, and acetate are commonly used as supplements in tablet or syrup form to prevent zinc deficiency and to treat diarrhea in children in combination with oral rehydration. Zinc citrate is an alternative compound with high zinc content, slightly soluble in water, which has better sensory properties in syrups but no absorption data in humans. We used the double-isotope tracer method with 67Zn and 70Zn to measure zinc absorption from zinc citrate given as supplements containing 10 mg of zinc to 15 healthy adults without food and compared absorption with that from zinc gluconate and zinc oxide (insoluble in water) using a randomized, double-masked, 3-way crossover design. Median (IQR) fractional absorption of zinc from zinc citrate was 61.3% (56.6–71.0) and was not different from that from zinc gluconate with 60.9% (50.6–71.7). Absorption from zinc oxide at 49.9% (40.9–57.7) was significantly lower than from both other supplements (P < 0.01). Three participants had little or no absorption from zinc oxide. We conclude that zinc citrate, given as a supplement without food, is as well absorbed by healthy adults as zinc gluconate and may thus be a useful alternative for preventing zinc deficiency and treating diarrhea. The more insoluble zinc oxide is less well absorbed when given as a supplement without food and may be minimally absorbed by some individuals. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01576627. PMID:24259556

  13. Zinc absorption by young adults from supplemental zinc citrate is comparable with that from zinc gluconate and higher than from zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Wegmüller, Rita; Tay, Fabian; Zeder, Christophe; Brnic, Marica; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-02-01

    The water-soluble zinc salts gluconate, sulfate, and acetate are commonly used as supplements in tablet or syrup form to prevent zinc deficiency and to treat diarrhea in children in combination with oral rehydration. Zinc citrate is an alternative compound with high zinc content, slightly soluble in water, which has better sensory properties in syrups but no absorption data in humans. We used the double-isotope tracer method with (67)Zn and (70)Zn to measure zinc absorption from zinc citrate given as supplements containing 10 mg of zinc to 15 healthy adults without food and compared absorption with that from zinc gluconate and zinc oxide (insoluble in water) using a randomized, double-masked, 3-way crossover design. Median (IQR) fractional absorption of zinc from zinc citrate was 61.3% (56.6-71.0) and was not different from that from zinc gluconate with 60.9% (50.6-71.7). Absorption from zinc oxide at 49.9% (40.9-57.7) was significantly lower than from both other supplements (P < 0.01). Three participants had little or no absorption from zinc oxide. We conclude that zinc citrate, given as a supplement without food, is as well absorbed by healthy adults as zinc gluconate and may thus be a useful alternative for preventing zinc deficiency and treating diarrhea. The more insoluble zinc oxide is less well absorbed when given as a supplement without food and may be minimally absorbed by some individuals. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01576627.

  14. Zinc absorption by young adults from supplemental zinc citrate is comparable with that from zinc gluconate and higher than from zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Wegmüller, Rita; Tay, Fabian; Zeder, Christophe; Brnic, Marica; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-02-01

    The water-soluble zinc salts gluconate, sulfate, and acetate are commonly used as supplements in tablet or syrup form to prevent zinc deficiency and to treat diarrhea in children in combination with oral rehydration. Zinc citrate is an alternative compound with high zinc content, slightly soluble in water, which has better sensory properties in syrups but no absorption data in humans. We used the double-isotope tracer method with (67)Zn and (70)Zn to measure zinc absorption from zinc citrate given as supplements containing 10 mg of zinc to 15 healthy adults without food and compared absorption with that from zinc gluconate and zinc oxide (insoluble in water) using a randomized, double-masked, 3-way crossover design. Median (IQR) fractional absorption of zinc from zinc citrate was 61.3% (56.6-71.0) and was not different from that from zinc gluconate with 60.9% (50.6-71.7). Absorption from zinc oxide at 49.9% (40.9-57.7) was significantly lower than from both other supplements (P < 0.01). Three participants had little or no absorption from zinc oxide. We conclude that zinc citrate, given as a supplement without food, is as well absorbed by healthy adults as zinc gluconate and may thus be a useful alternative for preventing zinc deficiency and treating diarrhea. The more insoluble zinc oxide is less well absorbed when given as a supplement without food and may be minimally absorbed by some individuals. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01576627. PMID:24259556

  15. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described.

  16. The Potential for Zinc Stable Isotope Techniques and Modelling to Determine Optimal Zinc Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cuong D.; Gopalsamy, Geetha L.; Mortimer, Elissa K.; Young, Graeme P.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognised that zinc deficiency is a major global public health issue, particularly in young children in low-income countries with diarrhoea and environmental enteropathy. Zinc supplementation is regarded as a powerful tool to correct zinc deficiency as well as to treat a variety of physiologic and pathologic conditions. However, the dose and frequency of its use as well as the choice of zinc salt are not clearly defined regardless of whether it is used to treat a disease or correct a nutritional deficiency. We discuss the application of zinc stable isotope tracer techniques to assess zinc physiology, metabolism and homeostasis and how these can address knowledge gaps in zinc supplementation pharmacokinetics. This may help to resolve optimal dose, frequency, length of administration, timing of delivery to food intake and choice of zinc compound. It appears that long-term preventive supplementation can be administered much less frequently than daily but more research needs to be undertaken to better understand how best to intervene with zinc in children at risk of zinc deficiency. Stable isotope techniques, linked with saturation response and compartmental modelling, also have the potential to assist in the continued search for simple markers of zinc status in health, malnutrition and disease. PMID:26035248

  17. Zinc as an appetite stimulator - the possible role of zinc in the progression of diseases such as cachexia and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hajime; Asakawa, Akihiro; Li, Jiang B; Tsai, Minglun; Amitani, Haruka; Ohinata, Kousaku; Komai, Michio; Inui, Akio

    2011-09-01

    Zinc is required by humans and animals for many physiological functions, such as growth, immune function, and reproduction. Zinc deficiency induces a number of physiological problems, including anorexia, growth retardation, dermatitis, taste disorder, and hypogonadism. Although it is clear that zinc deficiency produces specific and profound anorexia in experimental animals, the connection between zinc deficiency and anorexia is less certain. We were the first to show that orally, but not intraperitoneally, administered zinc rapidly stimulates food intake through orexigenic peptides coupled to the afferent vagus nerve using rats during early-stage zinc deficiency without decreased zinc concentrations in plasma and tissues. We confirmed that a zinc-sufficient diet containing zinc chloride acutely stimulated food intake after short-term zinc deprivation. We also found that orally administered zinc sulfate increased the expression of NPY and orexin mRNA after administration. Using vagotomized rats, we tested whether the increase in food intake after oral administration of zinc was mediated by the vagus nerve. In sham-operated rats, the oral administration of zinc stimulated food intake, whereas zinc and saline administrations did not exhibit differing effects in vagotomized rats. We conclude that zinc stimulates food intake in short-term zinc-deficient rats through the afferent vagus nerve with subsequent effects on hypothalamic peptides associated with food intake regulation. In this review, we describe recent research investigating the roles of zinc as an appetite stimulator in food intake regulation, along with research about hypothalamus, ghrelin, leptin and zinc receptor, and clinical application about anorexia nervosa, cachexia and sarcopenia. The article also presents some promising patents on zinc. PMID:21846317

  18. Method of preparing zinc orthotitanate pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Harada, Y.; Logan, W. R.; Gilligan, J. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Zinc orthotitanate suitable for use as a pigment for spacecraft thermal control coatings is prepared by heating a slightly zinc deficient reaction mixture of precipitated oxalates of zinc and titanium. The reaction mixture can be formed by coprecipitation of zinc and titanium oxalates from chloride solution or by mixing separately precipitated oxalates. The mixture is first heated to 400 to 600 C to remove volatiles and is then rapidly heated at 900 to 1200 C. Zinc orthotitanate produced by this method exhibits the very fine particle size needed for thermal control coatings as well as stability in a space environment.

  19. Expression of HMA4 cDNAs of the zinc hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens from endogenous NcHMA4 promoters does not complement the zinc-deficiency phenotype of the Arabidopsis thaliana hma2hma4 double mutant

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Mazhar; Nawaz, Ismat; Hassan, Zeshan; Hakvoort, Henk W. J.; Bliek, Mattijs; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Schat, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (Nc) exhibits a very high constitutive expression of the heavy metal transporting ATPase, HMA4, as compared to the non-hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana (At), due to copy number expansion and altered cis-regulation. We screened a BAC library for HMA4 and found that HMA4 is triplicated in the genome of a N. caerulescens accession from a former Zn mine near La Calamine (LC), Belgium. We amplified multiple HMA4 promoter sequences from three calamine N. caerulescens accessions, and expressed AtHMA4 and different NcHMA4 cDNAs under At and Nc HMA4 promoters in the A. thaliana (Col) hma2hma4 double mutant. Transgenic lines expressing HMA4 under the At promoter were always fully complemented for root-to-shoot Zn translocation and developed normally at a 2-μM Zn supply, whereas the lines expressing HMA4 under Nc promoters usually showed only slightly enhanced root to shoot Zn translocation rates in comparison with the double mutant, probably owing to ectopic expression in the roots, respectively. When expression of the Zn deficiency responsive marker gene ZIP4 was tested, the transgenic lines expressing AtHMA4 under an NcHMA4-1-LC promoter showed on average a 7-fold higher expression in the leaves, in comparison with the double hma2hma4 mutant, showing that this construct aggravated, rather than alleviated the severity of foliar Zn deficiency in the mutant, possible owing to expression in the leaf mesophyll. PMID:24187545

  20. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  1. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  2. 46 CFR 148.330 - Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings... Materials § 148.330 Zinc ashes; zinc dross; zinc residues; zinc skimmings. (a) The shipper must inform the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port in advance of any cargo transfer operations involving zinc...

  3. Iron and zinc supplementation improved iron and zinc status, but not physical growth, of apparently healthy, breast-fed infants in rural communities of northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wasantwisut, Emorn; Winichagoon, Pattanee; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Yamborisut, Uruwan; Boonpraderm, Atitada; Pongcharoen, Tippawan; Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Russameesopaphorn, Wanphen

    2006-09-01

    Iron deficiency is prevalent in children and infants worldwide. Zinc deficiency may be prevalent, but data are lacking. Both iron and zinc deficiency negatively affect growth and psychomotor development. Combined iron and zinc supplementation might be beneficial, but the potential interactions need to be verified. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial using 2 x 2 factorial design, 609 Thai infants aged 4-6 mo were supplemented daily with 10 mg of iron and/or 10 mg of zinc for 6 mo to investigate effects and interactions on micronutrient status and growth. Iron supplementation alone increased hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations more than iron and zinc combined. Anemia prevalence was significantly lower in infants receiving only iron than in infants receiving iron and zinc combined. Baseline iron deficiency was very low, and iron deficiency anemia was almost nil. After supplementation, prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia were significantly higher in infants receiving placebo and zinc than in those receiving iron or iron and zinc. Serum zinc was higher in infants receiving zinc (16.7 +/- 5.2 micromol/L), iron and zinc (12.1 +/- 3.8 micromol/L) or iron alone (11.5 +/- 2.5 micromol/L) than in the placebo group (9.8 +/- 1.9 micromol/L). Iron and zinc interacted to affect iron and zinc status, but not hemoglobin. Iron supplementation had a small but significant effect on ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation did not. To conclude, in Thai infants, iron supplementation improved hemoglobin, iron status, and ponderal growth, whereas zinc supplementation improved zinc status. Overall, for infants, combined iron and zinc supplementation is preferable to iron or zinc supplementation alone.

  4. Inheritance of seed iron and zinc concentrations in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrients are essential elements needed in small amounts for adequate human nutrition and include the elements iron and zinc. Both of these minerals are essential to human well-being, and an adequate supply of iron and zinc helps to prevent iron deficiency anemia and zinc deficiency, two preva...

  5. Zinc - an indispensable micronutrient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Patni, Babita; Shankhdhar, Deepti; Shankhdhar, S C

    2013-01-01

    Availability of Zn to plant is hampered by its immobile nature and adverse soil conditions. Thus, Zn deficiency is observed even though high amount is available in soil. Root-shoot barrier, a major controller of zinc transport in plant is highly affected by changes in the anatomical structure of conducting tissue and adverse soil conditions like pH, clay content, calcium carbonate content, etc. Zn deficiency results in severe yield losses and in acute cases plant death. Zn deficiency in edible plant parts results in micronutrient malnutrition leading to stunted growth and improper sexual development in humans. To overcome this problem several strategies have been used to enrich Zn availability in edible plant parts, including nutrient management, biotechnological tools, and classical and molecular breeding approaches. PMID:24381434

  6. Micronutrient deficiency in children.

    PubMed

    Bhan, M K; Sommerfelt, H; Strand, T

    2001-05-01

    Malnutrition increases morbidity and mortality and affects physical growth and development, some of these effects resulting from specific micronutrient deficiencies. While public health efforts must be targeted to improve dietary intakes in children through breast feeding and appropriate complementary feeding, there is a need for additional measures to increase the intake of certain micronutrients. Food-based approaches are regarded as the long-term strategy for improving nutrition, but for certain micronutrients, supplementation, be it to the general population or to high risk groups or as an adjunct to treatment must also be considered. Our understanding of the prevalence and consequences of iron, vitamin A and iodine deficiency in children and pregnant women has advanced considerably while there is still a need to generate more knowledge pertaining to many other micronutrients, including zinc, selenium and many of the B-vitamins. For iron and vitamin A, the challenge is to improve the delivery to target populations. For disease prevention and growth promotion, the need to deliver safe but effective amounts of micronutrients such as zinc to children and women of fertile age can be determined only after data on deficiency prevalence becomes available and the studies on mortality reduction following supplementation are completed. Individual or multiple micronutrients must be used as an adjunct to treatment of common infectious diseases and malnutrition only if the gains are substantial and the safety window sufficiently wide. The available data for zinc are promising with regard to the prevention of diarrhea and pneumonia. It should be emphasized that there must be no displacement of important treatment such as ORS in acute diarrhea by adjunct therapy such as zinc. Credible policy making requires description of not only the clinical effects but also the underlying biological mechanisms. As findings of experimental studies are not always feasible to extrapolate to

  7. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  8. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  9. Zinc-The key to preventing corrosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff L.

    2011-01-01

    Centuries before it was identified as an element, zinc was used to make brass (an alloy of zinc and copper) and for medicinal purposes. Metallic zinc and zinc oxide were produced in India sometime between the 11th and 14th centuries and in China in the 17th century, although the discovery of pure metallic zinc is credited to the German chemist Andreas Marggraf, who isolated the element in 1746. Refined zinc metal is bluish-white when freshly cast; it is hard and brittle at most temperatures and has relatively low melting and boiling points. Zinc alloys readily with other metals and is chemically active. On exposure to air, it develops a thin gray oxide film (patina), which inhibits deeper oxidation (corrosion) of the metal. The metal's resistance to corrosion is an important characteristic in its use.

  10. Zinc: an important cofactor in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Vu, Trang T; Fredenburgh, James C; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2013-03-01

    There is mounting evidence that zinc, the second most abundant transition metal in blood, is an important mediator of haemostasis and thrombosis. Prompted by the observation that zinc deficiency is associated with bleeding and clotting abnormalities, there now is evidence that zinc serves as an effector of coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Zinc binds numerous plasma proteins and modulates their structure and function. Because activated platelets secrete zinc into the local microenvironment, the concentration of zinc increases in the vicinity of a thrombus. Consequently, the role of zinc varies depending on the microenvironment; a feature that endows zinc with the capacity to spatially and temporally regulate haemostasis and thrombosis. This paper reviews the mechanisms by which zinc regulates coagulation, platelet aggregation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis and outlines how zinc serves as a ubiquitous modulator of haemostasis and thrombosis.

  11. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  12. Effect of Prenatal Zinc Supplementation on Birthweight

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, Jacques; Beatty, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    Although iron and zinc deficiencies are known to occur together and also appear to be high in Ghana, a few supplementation studies addressed this concurrently in pregnancy. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial, 600 pregnant women in Ghana were randomly assigned to receive either a combined supplement of 40 mg of zinc as zinc gluconate and 40 mg of iron as ferrous sulphate or 40 mg of elemental iron as ferrous sulphate. Overall, there was no detectable difference in the mean birthweight between the study groups, although the effect of iron-zinc supplementation on the mean birthweight was masked by a strong interaction between the type of supplement and the iron status of participants [F (1,179)=5.614, p=0.019]. Prenatal iron-zinc supplementation was effective in increasing the mean birthweight among anaemic and iron-deficient women but not among women with elevated iron stores in early pregnancy. PMID:19902797

  13. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  14. Galvanizing action: conclusions and next steps for mainstreaming zinc interventions in public health programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kenneth H; Baker, Shawn K

    2009-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the foregoing reviews of the impact of different intervention strategies designed to enhance zinc nutrition, including supplementation, fortification, and dietary diversification or modification. Current evidence indicates a beneficial impact of such interventions on zinc status and zinc-related functional outcomes. Preventive zinc supplementation reduces the incidence of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory tract infection among young children, decreases mortality of children over 12 months of age, and increases growth velocity. Therapeutic zinc supplementation during episodes of diarrhea reduces the duration and severity of illness. Zinc fortification increases zinc intake and total absorbed zinc, and recent studies are beginning to confirm a positive impact of zinc fortification on indicators of population zinc status. To assist with the development of zinc intervention programs, more information is needed on the prevalence of zinc deficiency in different countries, and rigorous evaluations of the effectiveness of large-scale zinc intervention programs should be planned. Recommended steps for scaling up zinc intervention programs, with or without other micronutrients, are described. In summary, there is now clear evidence of the benefit of selected interventions to reduce the risk of zinc deficiency, and a global commitment is urgently needed to conduct systematic assessments of population zinc status and to develop interventions to control zinc deficiency in the context of existing public health and nutrition programs.

  15. Zinc Bells Rang in Jerusalem!

    PubMed Central

    Hershfinkel, Michal; Aizenman, Elias; Andrews, Glen; Sekler, Israel

    2010-01-01

    “Oh, Jerusalem of gold, and of light, and of bronze…” goes the popular song. But it was another metal that towered above the Jerusalem landscape during the meeting of the International Society for Zinc Biology (ISZB; http://www.iszb.org/), held at Mishkenot Sha’ananim, a whisper away from the Old City walls. More than 100 scientists gathered on 1 to 5 December 2009 to discuss their research on the biology of this metal. Zinc is a double-edged sword. Zinc supplementation accelerates wound healing and growth and promotes an effective immune response. On the other hand, zinc deficiency leads to growth retardation and impaired learning and memory function, and has been linked to mood disorders. At the cellular level, however, uncontrolled increases in zinc concentrations can lead to neuronal cell death and may be involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Through regulation of various intracellular signaling pathways, zinc can accelerate cell growth and possibly contribute to cancer. However, despite the physiological and clinical importance of this metal, research on the molecular basis of these effects is still in its infancy. The 2009 ISZB meeting provided a venue for investigators working on various zinc-related issues to share their thoughts and ideas and to promote the growth of this field. PMID:20606213

  16. Trace elements in head and neck cancer patients: zinc status and immunologic functions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Kaplan, J; Beck, F W; Penny, H S; Shamsa, F H; Salwen, W A; Marks, S C; Mathog, R H

    1997-06-01

    In this study we have assessed zinc status and zinc-dependent cell-mediated immune functions (interleukin-2 production by mononuclear cells, natural killer cell lytic activity, and interleukin-1 beta production by mononuclear cells) in adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract at diagnosis and before any therapy was instituted. Inasmuch as significant interactions between zinc, copper, and iron exist, we also assayed the plasma copper level, serum iron level, and total iron-binding capacity in our patients. We recruited 30 cancer subjects and 21 control subjects. On the basis of cellular zinc criteria, we diagnosed a mild deficiency of zinc in 53% of cancer subjects. The plasma zinc level was not decreased in our subjects. A univariate analysis was applied by use of one-way analysis of variance comparing study variables among the three study groups (controls and zinc-deficient and zinc-sufficient cancer patients) and Tukey's multiple comparison test, and we showed that interleukin-2 production and natural killer lytic activity were decreased in zinc-deficient cancer patients. Interleukin-1 beta production (ELISA assay) was increased in both zinc-deficient and zinc-sufficient groups. Plasma copper level was not different, but the iron utilization was decreased in both groups of cancer subjects. We conclude that zinc deficiency and zinc-dependent immunologic dysfunctions are present in more than half of the patients with head and neck cancer in the Detroit area.

  17. Zinc regulation of food intake: new insights on the role of neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Cathy W

    2003-07-01

    The role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in feeding behavior and zinc deficiency-induced anorexia has been controversial because hypothalamic NPY levels are elevated in both zinc deficiency and food restriction. A recent report shows that while NPY is released from terminals in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of food-restricted animals, this release is significantly impaired in zinc-deficient animals. Zinc deficiency may therefore cause anorexia by inhibiting the release of NPY that is required for receptor activation. PMID:12918877

  18. The Essential Toxin: Impact of Zinc on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Plum, Laura M.; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    Compared to several other metal ions with similar chemical properties, zinc is relatively harmless. Only exposure to high doses has toxic effects, making acute zinc intoxication a rare event. In addition to acute intoxication, long-term, high-dose zinc supplementation interferes with the uptake of copper. Hence, many of its toxic effects are in fact due to copper deficiency. While systemic homeostasis and efficient regulatory mechanisms on the cellular level generally prevent the uptake of cytotoxic doses of exogenous zinc, endogenous zinc plays a significant role in cytotoxic events in single cells. Here, zinc influences apoptosis by acting on several molecular regulators of programmed cell death, including caspases and proteins from the Bcl and Bax families. One organ where zinc is prominently involved in cell death is the brain, and cytotoxicity in consequence of ischemia or trauma involves the accumulation of free zinc. Rather than being a toxic metal ion, zinc is an essential trace element. Whereas intoxication by excessive exposure is rare, zinc deficiency is widespread and has a detrimental impact on growth, neuronal development, and immunity, and in severe cases its consequences are lethal. Zinc deficiency caused by malnutrition and foods with low bioavailability, aging, certain diseases, or deregulated homeostasis is a far more common risk to human health than intoxication. PMID:20617034

  19. The role of zinc in anorexia nervosa: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bakan, R

    1979-07-01

    Zinc deficiency may play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa. The symptoms of anorexia nervosa and zinc deficiency are similar in a number of respects, e.g., weight loss, loss of appetite, amenorrhea in females, impotence in males, nausea and skin lesions. In both conditions females under 25 are most at risk. Stress, estrogen and dietary habits may also be involved in the complex of factors which create or exacerbate a zinc deficiency and result in anorexia nervosa. It is proposed that effectiveness in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. PMID:514114

  20. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  1. Excessive zinc ingestion: A reversible cause of sideroblastic anemia and bone marrow depression

    SciTech Connect

    Broun, E.R.; Greist, A.; Tricot, G.; Hoffman, R. )

    1990-09-19

    Two patients with sideroblastic anemia secondary to zinc-induced copper deficiency absorbed excess zinc secondary to oral ingestion. The source of excess zinc was a zinc supplement in one case; in the other, ingested coins. In each case, the sideroblastic anemia was corrected promptly after removal of the source of excess zinc. These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing this clinical entity, since the myelodysplastic features are completely reversible.

  2. [Function of zinc in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Zinc deficiency is highly prevalent in cirrhotic patients, and contributes to several clinical symptoms such as hepatic encephalopathy and liver fibrosis. Ammonia is detoxified in liver to urea through urea cycle, and is also detoxified in extrahepatic tissue to glutamine through glutamine synthetase. The reduced ability of ammonia detoxification in liver cirrhosis is ascribed to zinc deficiency, because a member of urea cycle, ornithine transcarbamylase is a zinc enzyme. In this condition, glutamine synthesis is enhanced, which enables the body, at least temporarily, to suppress the increase of ammonia. However, the glutamine is metabolized predominantly in enterocyte to ammomia and glutamate, indicating that a vicious cycle in glutamine synthesis and glutamine breakdown occurs in liver cirrhosis. Attention should be given to the clinical significance of zinc in liver diseases. PMID:27455801

  3. Microcalcifications in atherosclerotic lesion of apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse

    PubMed Central

    Debernardi, Nicola; Roijers, Ruben B; Krams, Rob; de Crom, Rini; Mutsaers, Peter HA; van der Vusse, Ger J

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that calcium-rich microdeposits in the vascular wall might play a crucial role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we investigated an atherosclerotic lesion of the carotid artery in an established murine model, i.e. the apolipoprotein E-deficient (APOE−/−) mouse to identify (i) the presence of microcalcifications, if any, (ii) the elemental composition of microcalcifications with special reference to calcium/phosphorus mass ratio and (iii) co-localization of increased concentrations of iron and zinc with microcalcifications. Atherosclerosis was induced by a flow-divider placed around the carotid artery resulting in low and high shear-stress regions. Element composition was assessed with a proton microprobe. Microcalcifications, predominantly present in the thickened intima of the low shear-stress region, were surrounded by areas with normal calcium levels, indicating that calcium-precipitation is a local event. The diameter of intimal microcalcifications varied from 6 to 70 μm. Calcium/phosphorus ratios of microcalcifications varied from 0.3 to 4.8, mainly corresponding to the ratio of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Increased iron and zinc concentrations commonly co-localized with microcalcifications. Our findings indicate that the atherosclerotic process in the murine carotid artery is associated with locally accumulated calcium, iron and zinc. The calcium-rich deposits resemble amorphous calcium phosphate rather than pure hydroxyapatite. We propose that the APOE−/− mouse, in which atherosclerosis was evoked by a flow-divider, offers a useful model to investigate the pathophysiological significance of accumulation of elements such as calcium, iron and zinc. PMID:20804542

  4. Cell-mediated immunity in nutritional deficiency.

    PubMed

    McMurray, D N

    1984-01-01

    Dietary deficiencies of specific nutrients profoundly alter cell-mediated immune responses in man and experimental animals. Both moderate and severe deficiencies are associated with significant changes in immunocompetence. Diets with inadequate levels of protein, calories, vitamin A, pyridoxine, biotin and zinc result in loss of thymic cellularity. Secondary to thymic atrophy, the production of thymic hormones critical for the differentiation of T lymphocytes is reduced, especially in protein-calorie malnutrition and zinc deficiency. Confirmation of a T cell maturational defect in nutritional deprivation comes from the observations of decreased total (T3 and rosette-forming) T cells in the peripheral blood of children with kwashiorkor and marasmus, with preferential loss of helper/inducer (T4) T cell subsets. Reduced number and in vitro function of T cells have also been reported in experimental deficiencies of iron, zinc, copper, and vitamins A and E. Loss of cutaneous hypersensitivity to mitogens and antigens is a consistent sequela of dietary deficiencies of protein, vitamins A and C, pyridoxine, iron and zinc. Cell-mediated immunity directed against allogeneic histocompatibility antigens (e.g. mixed leukocyte cultures, graft versus host, skin graft rejection) may actually be enhanced by experimental protein and polyunsaturated fat deficiencies. Alternatively, pyridoxine, ascorbate and biotin deficiencies resulted in delayed rejection of skin allografts. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity is impaired in zinc-, iron- and copper-deficient mice, as well as in scorbutic guinea pigs. Natural killer (NK) cell function may be either enhanced or depressed, depending upon the nutrient and its effects on interferon production. Several authors have demonstrated normal or enhanced macrophage activity in a variety of experimental deficiencies. The extrapolation of these observations to infectious disease resistance is not straightforward, and depends upon the nature of

  5. Influence of phytase, EDTA, and polyphenols on zinc absorption in adults from porridges fortified with zinc sulfate or zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Marica; Wegmüller, Rita; Zeder, Christophe; Senti, Gabriela; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    Fortification of cereal staples with zinc is recommended to combat zinc deficiency. To optimize zinc absorption, strategies are needed to overcome the inhibitory effect of phytic acid (PA) and perhaps polyphenols. Five zinc absorption studies were conducted in young adults consuming maize or sorghum porridges fortified with 2 mg zinc as zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) or zinc oxide (ZnO) and containing combinations of PA or polyphenols as potential inhibitors and EDTA and phytase as potential enhancers. Fractional absorption of zinc (FAZ) was measured by using the double isotopic tracer ratio method. Adding phytase to the maize porridge immediately before consumption or using phytase for dephytinization during meal preparation both increased FAZ by >80% (both P < 0.001). Adding Na2EDTA at an EDTA:zinc molar ratio of 1:1 increased FAZ from maize porridge fortified with ZnSO4 by 30% (P = 0.01) but had no influence at higher EDTA ratios or on absorption from ZnO. FAZ was slightly higher from ZnSO4 than from ZnO (P = 0.02). Sorghum polyphenols had no effect on FAZ from dephytinized sorghum porridges but decreased FAZ by 20% from PA-rich sorghum porridges (P < 0.02). The combined inhibitory effect of polyphenols and PA was overcome by EDTA. In conclusion, ZnSO4 was better absorbed than ZnO, phytase used to degrade PA during digestion or during food preparation substantially increased zinc absorption from zinc-fortified cereals, EDTA at a 1:1 molar ratio modestly enhanced zinc absorption from ZnSO4-fortified cereals but not ZnO-fortified cereals, and sorghum polyphenols inhibited zinc absorption in the presence, but not absence, of PA. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01210794.

  6. Production of nano zinc, zinc sulphide and nanocomplex of magnetite zinc oxide by Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, Mansoureh; Emtiazi, Giti; Roghanian, Rasoul

    2013-12-01

    ZnO (Zincite) nanoparticle has many industrial applications and is mostly produced by chemical reactions, usually prepared by decomposition of zinc acetate or hot-injection and heating-up method. Synthesis of semi-conductor nanoparticles such as ZnS (Sphalerite) by ultrasonic was previously reported. In this work, high-zinc tolerant bacteria were isolated and used for nano zinc production. Among all isolated microorganisms, a gram negative bacterium which was identified as Brevundimonas diminuta could construct nano magnetite zinc oxide on bacterial surface with 22 nm in size and nano zinc with 48.29 nm in size. A piece of zinc metal was immersed in medium containing of pure culture of B. diminuta. Subsequently, a yellow-white biofilm was formed which was collected from the surface of zinc. It was dried at room temperature. The isolated biofilm was analysed by X-ray diffractometer. Interestingly, the yield of these particles was higher in the light, with pH 7 at 23°C. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first report about the production of nano zinc metal and nano zinc oxide that are stable and have anti-bacterial activities with magnetite property. Also ZnS (sized 12 nm) produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri, was studied by photoluminescence and fluorescent microscope.

  7. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  8. Zinc in Early Life: A Key Element in the Fetus and Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Terrin, Gianluca; Berni Canani, Roberto; Di Chiara, Maria; Pietravalle, Andrea; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Conte, Francesca; De Curtis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is a key element for growth and development. In this narrative review, we focus on the role of dietary zinc in early life (including embryo, fetus and preterm neonate), analyzing consequences of zinc deficiency and adequacy of current recommendations on dietary zinc. We performed a systematic search of articles on the role of zinc in early life. We selected and analyzed 81 studies. Results of this analysis showed that preservation of zinc balance is of critical importance for the avoidance of possible consequences of low zinc levels on pre- and post-natal life. Insufficient quantities of zinc during embryogenesis may influence the final phenotype of all organs. Maternal zinc restriction during pregnancy influences fetal growth, while adequate zinc supplementation during pregnancy may result in a reduction of the risk of preterm birth. Preterm neonates are at particular risk to develop zinc deficiency due to a combination of different factors: (i) low body stores due to reduced time for placental transfer of zinc; (ii) increased endogenous losses; and (iii) marginal intake. Early diagnosis of zinc deficiency, through the measurement of serum zinc concentrations, may be essential to avoid severe prenatal and postnatal consequences in these patients. Typical clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency are growth impairment and dermatitis. Increasing data suggest that moderate zinc deficiency may have significant subclinical effects, increasing the risk of several complications typical of preterm neonates (i.e., necrotizing enterocolitis, chronic lung disease, and retinopathy), and that current recommended intakes should be revised to meet zinc requirements of extremely preterm neonates. Future studies evaluating the adequacy of current recommendations are advocated. PMID:26690476

  9. Zinc in Early Life: A Key Element in the Fetus and Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Terrin, Gianluca; Berni Canani, Roberto; Di Chiara, Maria; Pietravalle, Andrea; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Conte, Francesca; De Curtis, Mario

    2015-12-11

    Zinc is a key element for growth and development. In this narrative review, we focus on the role of dietary zinc in early life (including embryo, fetus and preterm neonate), analyzing consequences of zinc deficiency and adequacy of current recommendations on dietary zinc. We performed a systematic search of articles on the role of zinc in early life. We selected and analyzed 81 studies. Results of this analysis showed that preservation of zinc balance is of critical importance for the avoidance of possible consequences of low zinc levels on pre- and post-natal life. Insufficient quantities of zinc during embryogenesis may influence the final phenotype of all organs. Maternal zinc restriction during pregnancy influences fetal growth, while adequate zinc supplementation during pregnancy may result in a reduction of the risk of preterm birth. Preterm neonates are at particular risk to develop zinc deficiency due to a combination of different factors: (i) low body stores due to reduced time for placental transfer of zinc; (ii) increased endogenous losses; and (iii) marginal intake. Early diagnosis of zinc deficiency, through the measurement of serum zinc concentrations, may be essential to avoid severe prenatal and postnatal consequences in these patients. Typical clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency are growth impairment and dermatitis. Increasing data suggest that moderate zinc deficiency may have significant subclinical effects, increasing the risk of several complications typical of preterm neonates (i.e., necrotizing enterocolitis, chronic lung disease, and retinopathy), and that current recommended intakes should be revised to meet zinc requirements of extremely preterm neonates. Future studies evaluating the adequacy of current recommendations are advocated.

  10. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  11. Pure-quartic solitons.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; de Sterke, C Martijn; Martijn, de Sterke C; Sipe, J E; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  12. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  13. The role of zinc in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Grüngreiff, Kurt; Reinhold, Dirk; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element playing fundamental roles in cellular metabolism. It acts mostly by binding a wide range of proteins, thus affecting a broad spectrum of biological processes, which include cell division, growth and differentiation. Zinc is critical to a large number of structural proteins, enzymatic processes, and transcription factors. Zinc deficiency can result in a spectrum of clinical manifestations, such as poor of appetite, loss of body hair, altered taste and smell, testicular atrophy, cerebral and immune dysfunction, and diminished drug elimination capacity. These are common symptoms in patients with chronic liver diseases, especially liver cirrhosis. The liver is the main organ responsible for the zinc metabolism which can be affected by liver diseases. On the other hand, zinc deficiency may alter hepatocyte functions and also immune responses in inflammatory liver diseases. Liver cirrhosis represents the most advanced stage of chronic liver diseases and is the common outcome of chronic liver injury. It is associated with energy malnutrition, with numerous metabolic disorders, such as hypoalbuminemia, with imbalance between branched-chain amino acids and aromatic amino acids, and with reduced zinc serum concentrations. All these processes can influence the clinical outcome of patients, such ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the present review, we summarize the emerging evidence on the pitoval role of zinc in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

  14. Daily supplementation with iron plus folic acid, zinc, and their combination is not associated with younger age at first walking unassisted in malnourished preschool children from a deficient population in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joanne; Khatry, Subarna K; Leclerq, Steven C; Mullany, Luke C; Yanik, Elizabeth L; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Siegel, Emily H; Tielsch, James M

    2010-07-01

    A community-based, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial of daily zinc and/or iron+folic acid supplementation was conducted in rural southern Nepal to examine motor milestone attainment among 3264 children 1-36 mo of age between 2001 and 2006. Treatment groups included placebo, zinc (10 mg), iron+folic acid (12.5 mg iron + 50 microg folic acid), and zinc+iron+folic acid (10 mg zinc + 12.5 mg iron + 50 microg folic acid). Infants received half of these doses. The iron arms were stopped November 2003 by recommendation of the Data Safety and Monitoring Board; zinc and placebo continued until January 2006. A total of 2457 children had not walked at the time of entry into the trial and 1775 were followed through 36 mo. Mean age at first walking unassisted did not differ among groups and was 444 +/- 81 d (mean +/- SD) in the placebo group, 444 +/- 81 d in the zinc group, 464 +/- 85 d in the iron+folic acid group, and 446 +/- 87 d in the iron+folic acid+zinc group. Results were similar after adjustment for age at enrollment, asset ownership, maternal literacy, and prior child deaths in the household and in children who consumed at least 60 tablets. Compared with placebo, iron+folic acid was associated with an adjusted mean delay of 28.0 d (95% CI: 11.3, 44.7) in time to walking among infants and the delay was more pronounced with mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) < 9.5 cm [60.6 d, (95% CI: 28.5, 92.6)]. Risks and benefits of universal iron+folic acid supplementation of infants beyond improved hematologic status deserve further consideration.

  15. Daily supplementation with iron plus folic acid, zinc, and their combination is not associated with younger age at first walking unassisted in malnourished preschool children from a deficient population in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Katz, Joanne; Khatry, Subarna K; Leclerq, Steven C; Mullany, Luke C; Yanik, Elizabeth L; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Siegel, Emily H; Tielsch, James M

    2010-07-01

    A community-based, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial of daily zinc and/or iron+folic acid supplementation was conducted in rural southern Nepal to examine motor milestone attainment among 3264 children 1-36 mo of age between 2001 and 2006. Treatment groups included placebo, zinc (10 mg), iron+folic acid (12.5 mg iron + 50 microg folic acid), and zinc+iron+folic acid (10 mg zinc + 12.5 mg iron + 50 microg folic acid). Infants received half of these doses. The iron arms were stopped November 2003 by recommendation of the Data Safety and Monitoring Board; zinc and placebo continued until January 2006. A total of 2457 children had not walked at the time of entry into the trial and 1775 were followed through 36 mo. Mean age at first walking unassisted did not differ among groups and was 444 +/- 81 d (mean +/- SD) in the placebo group, 444 +/- 81 d in the zinc group, 464 +/- 85 d in the iron+folic acid group, and 446 +/- 87 d in the iron+folic acid+zinc group. Results were similar after adjustment for age at enrollment, asset ownership, maternal literacy, and prior child deaths in the household and in children who consumed at least 60 tablets. Compared with placebo, iron+folic acid was associated with an adjusted mean delay of 28.0 d (95% CI: 11.3, 44.7) in time to walking among infants and the delay was more pronounced with mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) < 9.5 cm [60.6 d, (95% CI: 28.5, 92.6)]. Risks and benefits of universal iron+folic acid supplementation of infants beyond improved hematologic status deserve further consideration. PMID:20484548

  16. Zinc and Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiao; Sun, Weixia; Miao, Lining; Fu, Yaowen; Wang, Yonggang; Su, Guanfang; Liu, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an important nutrient that is involved in various physiological metabolisms. Zn dyshomeostasis is often associated with various pathogeneses of chronic diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and related complications. Zn is present in ocular tissue in high concentrations, particularly in the retina and choroid. Zn deficiencies have been shown to affect ocular development, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, and even diabetic retinopathy. However, the mechanism by which Zn deficiency increases the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy remains unclear. In addition, due to the negative effect of Zn deficiency on the eye, Zn supplementation should prevent diabetic retinopathy; however, limited available data do not always support this notion. Therefore, the goal of this paper was to summarize these pieces of available information regarding Zn prevention of diabetic retinopathy. Current theories and possible mechanisms underlying the role of Zn in the eye-related diseases are discussed. The possible factors that affect the preventive effect of Zn supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were also discussed. PMID:23671870

  17. Role of zinc in the pathogenesis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: implications for research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lepping, Peter; Huber, Markus

    2010-09-01

    The dopamine transporter is regulated by zinc (Zn2+), which directly interacts with the transporter protein as a potent non-competitive blocker of substrate translocation (dopamine transport inward and outward). The fact that dysfunction of the dopamine transporter is involved in the pathogenesis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is interesting in the context of studies that suggest the involvement of zinc deficiency in patients with ADHD. In this article, we present a hypothesis exploring the causative mechanism of zinc deficiency in ADHD and why zinc might be beneficial as a supplementary medication and/or adjunct to psychostimulants (methylphenidate, amfetamine) in zinc-deficient ADHD patients. The hypothesis is based on published in vitro observations that the human dopamine transporter contains a high-affinity zinc binding site (His-193, His-375, Glu-396) on its extracellular face that modulates transporter function, and in vivo studies suggesting that response to stimulants is reduced in zinc-deficient ADHD patients. It seems likely that zinc supplementation in zinc-deficient ADHD patients improves the binding status of insufficiently occupied zinc binding sites on the dopamine transporter. We propose to test our hypothesis by recruiting zinc-deficient ADHD patients who will undergo positron emission tomography with the 11C-raclopride displacement method to investigate whether zinc increases extracellular dopamine levels. PMID:20806985

  18. Rising atmospheric CO2 lowers food zinc, iron, and protein concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a major global public health problem. Most people who experience these deficiencies depend on agricultural crops for zinc and iron. In this context, the influence of rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 on the availability of these nutrients from crops i...

  19. Zinc phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc phoshide ; CASRN 1314 - 84 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  20. Zinc cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc cyanide ; CASRN 557 - 21 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  1. Zinc in soils, crops, and meals in the Niger Inland Delta, Mali.

    PubMed

    Gårdestedt, Caroline; Plea, Mama; Nilsson, Gertrud; Jacks, Birgitta; Jacks, Gunnar

    2009-09-01

    Zinc deficiency is a problem in developing countries and not least so in Africa. This concerns both agriculture and human food provision. Zinc deficiency in soils may severely decrease yields, whereas insufficient zinc in food intake primarily affects the immune defense, notably in children. The present investigation concerned zinc availability in soils, crops, and food in the Niger inland delta in Mali. Agricultural soils are largely deficient in plant-available zinc, however, soils in close vicinity to habitation show elevated zinc concentrations. The zinc concentrations in crops are low; in rice, they are about half of reference ranges. Zinc intake assessed from a number of sampled meals was about half the recommended requirement. When zinc concentration is higher phytate was also high, which made the zinc less available. In spite of a recorded sufficient intake of iron, anemia is common and is most likely because of the high phytate concentration in the cereal-dominated diet. Increasing zinc and iron availability would be possible through the use of malting, fermentation, and soaking in food preparation. Finally, in the long run, any trace element deficiency, especially that of zinc in agricultural soils needs to be amended by addition of appropriate amounts in commercial fertilizers. PMID:19860157

  2. Resistant starch does not affect zinc homeostasis in rural Malawian children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study tested the hypothesis that Malawian children at risk for zinc deficiency will have reduced endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) and increased net absorbed zinc (NAZ) following the addition of high amylose maize resistant starch (RS) to their diet. This was a small controlled clinical trial to dete...

  3. ZINC ABSORPTION IN GUATEMALAN SCHOOL CHILDREN FED NORMAL OR LOW-PHYTATE MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Poor bioavailability of zinc from high-phytate diets is an important contributory factor to zinc deficiency in low-income populations. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effect on zinc absorption of consumption of low-phytate maize. Design: The participants ...

  4. Behavior in the forced swim test and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus in young rats after 2-week zinc deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Kan, Fumika; Kawamura, Mika; Oku, Naoto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Abnormal behavior in zinc deficiency and its cause are poorly understood. In the present paper, behavior in the forced swim test and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with its behavior were studied focused on abnormal corticosterone secretion in zinc deficiency. The effect of chronic corticosterone treatment was also studied. Immobility time in the forced swim test was increased in young rats fed a zinc-deficient diet for 2 weeks, as well as corticosterone (40mg/kg/dayx14 days)-treated control rats. The basal Ca(2+) levels in the hippocampus, which were determined by fluo-4FF, AM, were increased in both brain slices from zinc-deficient and corticosterone-treated rats. Serum glucose level was decreased in zinc deficiency and hippocampal glucose metabolism, which is determined by [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose uptake, was elevated. Hippocampal ATP level was not decreased, whereas, the concentrations of glutamate, GABA and glutamine in the hippocampus, unlike the whole brain, were decreased in zinc deficiency. However, the decrease in these amino acids was restored by adrenalectomy prior to zinc deficiency. These results suggest that glucose is insufficient for the synthesis of amino acids in the hippocampus of zinc-deficient rats. It is likely that the neurochemical and metabolic changes in the hippocampus, which may be associated with abnormal corticosterone secretion, is the base of abnormal behavior associated with neuropsychological symptoms in zinc deficiency. PMID:19463882

  5. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  6. Zinc nutrition and apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells: implications in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, B; Meerarani, P; Ramadass, P; Toborek, M; Malecki, A; Slim, R; McClain, C J

    1999-10-01

    Little is known about the requirements and function of zinc in maintaining endothelial cell integrity, especially during stressful conditions, such as the inflammatory response in cardiovascular disease. There is evidence that zinc requirements of the vascular endothelium are increased during inflammatory conditions such as atherosclerosis, where apoptotic cell death is also prevalent. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct mechanism of programmed cell death which involves the activation of a cell-intrinsic suicide program, and there is evidence that factors such as inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) and pure or oxidized lipids are necessary to induce the cell death pathway. Because of its constant exposure to blood components, including prooxidants, diet-derived fats, and their derivatives, the endothelium is very susceptible to oxidative stress and to apoptotic injury mediated by blood lipid components, prooxidants, and cytokines. Thus, it is likely that the cellular lipid environment, primarily polyunsaturated fatty acids, can potentiate the overall endothelial cell injury by increasing cellular oxidative stress and cytokine release in proximity to the endothelium, which then could further induce apoptosis and disrupt endothelial barrier function. Our data suggest that zinc deficiency exacerbates the detrimental effects of specific fatty acids (e.g., linoleic acid) and inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, on vascular endothelial functions. We propose that a major mechanism of zinc protection against disruption of endothelial cell integrity during inflammatory conditions, is by the ability of zinc to inhibit the pathways of signal transduction leading to apoptosis and especially mechanisms that lead to upregulation of caspase genes. PMID:10501286

  7. Zinc: health effects and research priorities for the 1990s.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, C T; Sandstead, H H; Prasad, A S; Newberne, P M; Fraker, P J

    1994-01-01

    This review critically summarizes the literature on the spectrum of health effects of zinc status, ranging from symptoms of zinc deficiency to excess exposure. Studies on zinc intake are reviewed in relation to optimum requirements as a function of age and sex. Current knowledge on the biochemical properties of zinc which are critical to the essential role of this metal in biological systems is summarized. Dietary and physiological factors influencing the bioavailability and utilization of zinc are considered with special attention to interactions with iron and copper status. The effects of zinc deficiency and toxicity are reviewed with respect to specific organs, immunological and reproductive function, and genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. Finally, key questions are identified where research is needed, such as the risks to human health of altered environmental distribution of zinc, assessment of zinc status in humans, effects of zinc status in relation to other essential metals on immune function, reproduction, neurological function, and the cardiovascular system, and mechanistic studies to further elucidate the biological effects of zinc at the molecular level. PMID:7925188

  8. Crosstalk between Zinc Status and Giardia Infection: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Iñigo-Figueroa, Gemma; Quihui-Cota, Luis; Anduro-Corona, Iván

    2015-06-03

    Zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diarrhea; however, its anti-diarrheal effect remains only partially understood. There is now growing evidence that zinc can have pathogen-specific protective effects. Giardiasis is a common yet neglected cause of acute-chronic diarrheal illness worldwide which causes disturbances in zinc metabolism of infected children, representing a risk factor for zinc deficiency. How zinc metabolism is compromised by Giardia is not well understood; zinc status could be altered by intestinal malabsorption, organ redistribution or host-pathogen competition. The potential metal-binding properties of Giardia suggest unusual ways that the parasite may interact with its host. Zinc supplementation was recently found to reduce the rate of diarrhea caused by Giardia in children and to upregulate humoral immune response in Giardia-infected mice; in vitro and in vivo, zinc-salts enhanced the activity of bacitracin in a zinc-dose-dependent way, and this was not due to zinc toxicity. These findings reflect biological effect of zinc that may impact significantly public health in endemic areas of infection. In this paper, we shall explore one direction of this complex interaction, discussing recent information regarding zinc status and its possible contribution to the outcome of the encounter between the host and Giardia.

  9. Crosstalk between Zinc Status and Giardia Infection: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Astiazarán-García, Humberto; Iñigo-Figueroa, Gemma; Quihui-Cota, Luis; Anduro-Corona, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Zinc supplementation has been shown to reduce the incidence and prevalence of diarrhea; however, its anti-diarrheal effect remains only partially understood. There is now growing evidence that zinc can have pathogen-specific protective effects. Giardiasis is a common yet neglected cause of acute-chronic diarrheal illness worldwide which causes disturbances in zinc metabolism of infected children, representing a risk factor for zinc deficiency. How zinc metabolism is compromised by Giardia is not well understood; zinc status could be altered by intestinal malabsorption, organ redistribution or host-pathogen competition. The potential metal-binding properties of Giardia suggest unusual ways that the parasite may interact with its host. Zinc supplementation was recently found to reduce the rate of diarrhea caused by Giardia in children and to upregulate humoral immune response in Giardia-infected mice; in vitro and in vivo, zinc-salts enhanced the activity of bacitracin in a zinc-dose-dependent way, and this was not due to zinc toxicity. These findings reflect biological effect of zinc that may impact significantly public health in endemic areas of infection. In this paper, we shall explore one direction of this complex interaction, discussing recent information regarding zinc status and its possible contribution to the outcome of the encounter between the host and Giardia. PMID:26046395

  10. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  11. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  12. Hemimorphite Ores: A Review of Processing Technologies for Zinc Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ailiang; Li, Mengchun; Qian, Zhen; Ma, Yutian; Che, Jianyong; Ma, Yalin

    2016-10-01

    With the gradual depletion of zinc sulfide ores, exploration of zinc oxide ores is becoming more and more important. Hemimorphite is a major zinc oxide ore, attracting much attention in the field of zinc metallurgy although it is not the major zinc mineral. This paper presents a critical review of the treatment for extraction of zinc with emphasis on flotation, pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods based on the properties of hemimorphite. The three-dimensional framework structure of hemimorphite with complex linkage of its structural units lead to difficult desilicification before extracting zinc in the many metallurgical technologies. It is found that the flotation method is generally effective in enriching zinc minerals from hemimorphite ores into a high-grade concentrate for recovery of zinc. Pure zinc can be produced from hemimorphite or/and willemite with a reducing reagent, like methane or carbon. Leaching reagents, such as acid and alkali, can break the complex structure of hemimorphite to release zinc in the leached solution without generation of silica gel in the hydrometallurgical process. For optimal zinc extraction, combing flotation with pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical methods may be required.

  13. Hemimorphite Ores: A Review of Processing Technologies for Zinc Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ailiang; Li, Mengchun; Qian, Zhen; Ma, Yutian; Che, Jianyong; Ma, Yalin

    2016-08-01

    With the gradual depletion of zinc sulfide ores, exploration of zinc oxide ores is becoming more and more important. Hemimorphite is a major zinc oxide ore, attracting much attention in the field of zinc metallurgy although it is not the major zinc mineral. This paper presents a critical review of the treatment for extraction of zinc with emphasis on flotation, pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods based on the properties of hemimorphite. The three-dimensional framework structure of hemimorphite with complex linkage of its structural units lead to difficult desilicification before extracting zinc in the many metallurgical technologies. It is found that the flotation method is generally effective in enriching zinc minerals from hemimorphite ores into a high-grade concentrate for recovery of zinc. Pure zinc can be produced from hemimorphite or/and willemite with a reducing reagent, like methane or carbon. Leaching reagents, such as acid and alkali, can break the complex structure of hemimorphite to release zinc in the leached solution without generation of silica gel in the hydrometallurgical process. For optimal zinc extraction, combing flotation with pyrometallurgical or hydrometallurgical methods may be required.

  14. The Relevance of the Colon to Zinc Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Gopalsamy, Geetha Lavaniya; Alpers, David H; Binder, Henry J; Tran, Cuong D; Ramakrishna, B S; Brown, Ian; Manary, Mark; Mortimer, Elissa; Young, Graeme P

    2015-01-01

    Globally, zinc deficiency is widespread, despite decades of research highlighting its negative effects on health, and in particular upon child health in low-income countries. Apart from inadequate dietary intake of bioavailable zinc, other significant contributors to zinc deficiency include the excessive intestinal loss of endogenously secreted zinc and impairment in small intestinal absorptive function. Such changes are likely to occur in children suffering from environmental (or tropical) enteropathy (EE)—an almost universal condition among inhabitants of developing countries characterized by morphologic and functional changes in the small intestine. Changes to the proximal gut in environmental enteropathy will likely influence the nature and amount of zinc delivered into the large intestine. Consequently, we reviewed the current literature to determine if colonic absorption of endogenous or exogenous (dietary) zinc could contribute to overall zinc nutriture. Whilst we found evidence that significant zinc absorption occurs in the rodent colon, and is favoured when microbially-fermentable carbohydrates (specifically resistant starch) are consumed, it is unclear whether this process occur in humans and/or to what degree. Constraints in study design in the few available studies may well have masked a possible colonic contribution to zinc nutrition. Furthermore these few available human studies have failed to include the actual target population that would benefit, namely infants affected by EE where zinc delivery to the colon may be increased and who are also at risk of zinc deficiency. In conducting this review we have not been able to confirm a colonic contribution to zinc absorption in humans. However, given the observations in rodents and that feeding resistant starch to children is feasible, definitive studies utilising the dual stable isotope method in children with EE should be undertaken. PMID:25594440

  15. Adhesin competence repressor (AdcR) from Streptococcus pyogenes controls adaptive responses to zinc limitation and contributes to virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Flores, Anthony R.; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2015-01-01

    Altering zinc bioavailability to bacterial pathogens is a key component of host innate immunity. Thus, the ability to sense and adapt to the alterations in zinc concentrations is critical for bacterial survival and pathogenesis. To understand the adaptive responses of group A Streptococcus (GAS) to zinc limitation and its regulation by AdcR, we characterized gene regulation by AdcR. AdcR regulates the expression of 70 genes involved in zinc acquisition and virulence. Zinc-bound AdcR interacts with operator sequences in the negatively regulated promoters and mediates differential regulation of target genes in response to zinc deficiency. Genes involved in zinc mobilization and conservation are derepressed during mild zinc deficiency, whereas the energy-dependent zinc importers are upregulated during severe zinc deficiency. Further, we demonstrated that transcription activation by AdcR occurs by direct binding to the promoter. However, the repression and activation by AdcR is mediated by its interactions with two distinct operator sequences. Finally, mutational analysis of the metal ligands of AdcR caused impaired DNA binding and attenuated virulence, indicating that zinc sensing by AdcR is critical for GAS pathogenesis. Together, we demonstrate that AdcR regulates GAS adaptive responses to zinc limitation and identify molecular components required for GAS survival during zinc deficiency. PMID:25510500

  16. Nutritional and zinc status of head and neck cancer patients: an interpretive review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S; Beck, F W; Doerr, T D; Shamsa, F H; Penny, H S; Marks, S C; Kaplan, J; Kucuk, O; Mathog, R H

    1998-10-01

    In this review, we provide evidence based on our studies, for zinc deficiency and cell mediated immune disorders, and the effects of protein and zinc status on clinical morbidities in patients with head and neck cancer. We investigated subjects with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. Patients with metastatic disease and with severe co-morbidity were excluded. Nutritional assessment included dietary history, body composition, and prognostic nutritional index (PNI) determination. Zinc status was determined by zinc assay in plasma, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Pretreatment zinc status and nutritional status were correlated with clinical outcomes in 47 patients. Assessment of immune functions included production of TH1 and TH2 cytokines, T cell subpopulations and cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction to common antigens. At baseline approximately 50% of our subjects were zinc-deficient based on cellular zinc criteria and had decreased production of TH1 cytokines but not TH2 cytokines, decreased NK cell lytic activity and decreased proportion of CD4+ CD45RA+ cells in the peripheral blood. The tumor size and overall stage of the disease correlated with baseline zinc status but not with PNI, alcohol intake, or smoking. Zinc deficiency was associated with increased unplanned hospitalizations. The disease-free interval was highest for the group which had both zinc sufficient and nutrition sufficient status. Zinc deficiency and cell mediated immune dysfunctions were frequently present in patients with head and neck cancer when seen initially. Zinc deficiency resulted in an imbalance of TH1 and TH2 functions. Zinc deficiency was associated with increased tumor size, overall stage of the cancer and increased unplanned hospitalizations. These observations have broad implications in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:9791836

  17. Zinc and the ERK Kinases in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews evidence in support of the hypothesis that impaired activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) contributes to the disruptions in neurodevelopment associated with zinc deficiency. These kinases are implicated in major events of brain development, including proliferation of progenitor cells, neuronal migration, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. In humans, mutations in ERK1/2 genes have been associated with neuro-cardio-facial-cutaneous syndromes. ERK1/2 deficits in mice have revealed impaired neurogenesis, altered cellularity, and behavioral abnormalities. Zinc is an important modulator of ERK1/2 signaling. Conditions of both zinc deficiency and excess affect ERK1/2 phosphorylation in fetal and adult brains. Hypophosphorylation of ERK1/2, associated with decreased zinc availability in cell cultures, is accompanied by decreased proliferation and an arrest of the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Zinc and ERK1/2 have both been shown to modulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and cell death in the brain. Furthermore, behavioral deficits resulting from developmental zinc deficiency are similar to those observed in mice with decreased ERK1/2 signaling. For example, impaired performance on behavioral tests of learning and memory; such as the Morris water maze, fear conditioning, and the radial arm maze; has been reported in both animals exposed to developmental zinc deficiency and transgenic mice with decreased ERK signaling. Future study should clarify the mechanisms through which a dysregulation of ERK1/2 may contribute to altered brain development associated with dietary zinc deficiency and with conditions that limit zinc availability. PMID:22095091

  18. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  19. Purely cortical anaplastic ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  20. Clioquinol Synergistically Augments Rescue by Zinc Supplementation in a Mouse Model of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, Jim; De Lisle, Robert C.; Finkelstein, David; Adlard, Paul A.; Bush, Ashley I.; Andrews, Glen K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency due to poor nutrition or genetic mutations in zinc transporters is a global health problem and approaches to providing effective dietary zinc supplementation while avoiding potential toxic side effects are needed. Methods/Principal Findings Conditional knockout of the intestinal zinc transporter Zip4 (Slc39a4) in mice creates a model of the lethal human genetic disease acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE). This knockout leads to acute zinc deficiency resulting in rapid weight loss, disrupted intestine integrity and eventually lethality, and therefore provides a model system in which to examine novel approaches to zinc supplementation. We examined the efficacy of dietary clioquinol (CQ), a well characterized zinc chelator/ionophore, in rescuing the Zip4intest KO phenotype. By 8 days after initiation of the knockout neither dietary CQ nor zinc supplementation in the drinking water was found to be effective at improving this phenotype. In contrast, dietary CQ in conjunction with zinc supplementation was highly effective. Dietary CQ with zinc supplementation rapidly restored intestine stem cell division and differentiation of secretory and the absorptive cells. These changes were accompanied by rapid growth and dramatically increased longevity in the majority of mice, as well as the apparent restoration of the homeostasis of several essential metals in the liver. Conclusions These studies suggest that oral CQ (or other 8-hydroxyquinolines) coupled with zinc supplementation could provide a facile approach toward treating zinc deficiency in humans by stimulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24015258

  1. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  2. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  3. Zinc Levels Modulate Lifespan through Multiple Longevity Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jitendra; Barhydt, Tracy; Awasthi, Anjali; Lithgow, Gordon J.; Killilea, David W.; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace metal that has integral roles in numerous biological processes, including enzymatic function, protein structure, and cell signaling pathways. Both excess and deficiency of zinc can lead to detrimental effects on development and metabolism, resulting in abnormalities and disease. We altered the zinc balance within Caenorhabditis elegans to examine how changes in zinc burden affect longevity and healthspan in an invertebrate animal model. We found that increasing zinc levels in vivo with excess dietary zinc supplementation decreased the mean and maximum lifespan, whereas reducing zinc levels in vivo with a zinc-selective chelator increased the mean and maximum lifespan in C. elegans. We determined that the lifespan shortening effects of excess zinc required expression of DAF-16, HSF-1 and SKN-1 proteins, whereas the lifespan lengthening effects of the reduced zinc may be partially dependent upon this set of proteins. Furthermore, reducing zinc levels led to greater nuclear localization of DAF-16 and enhanced dauer formation compared to controls, suggesting that the lifespan effects of zinc are mediated in part by the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. Additionally, zinc status correlated with several markers of healthspan in worms, including proteostasis, locomotion and thermotolerance, with reduced zinc levels always associated with improvements in function. Taken together, these data support a role for zinc in regulating both development and lifespan in C. elegans, and that suggest that regulation of zinc homeostasis in the worm may be an example of antagonistic pleiotropy. PMID:27078872

  4. Zinc Levels Modulate Lifespan through Multiple Longevity Pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Barhydt, Tracy; Awasthi, Anjali; Lithgow, Gordon J; Killilea, David W; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace metal that has integral roles in numerous biological processes, including enzymatic function, protein structure, and cell signaling pathways. Both excess and deficiency of zinc can lead to detrimental effects on development and metabolism, resulting in abnormalities and disease. We altered the zinc balance within Caenorhabditis elegans to examine how changes in zinc burden affect longevity and healthspan in an invertebrate animal model. We found that increasing zinc levels in vivo with excess dietary zinc supplementation decreased the mean and maximum lifespan, whereas reducing zinc levels in vivo with a zinc-selective chelator increased the mean and maximum lifespan in C. elegans. We determined that the lifespan shortening effects of excess zinc required expression of DAF-16, HSF-1 and SKN-1 proteins, whereas the lifespan lengthening effects of the reduced zinc may be partially dependent upon this set of proteins. Furthermore, reducing zinc levels led to greater nuclear localization of DAF-16 and enhanced dauer formation compared to controls, suggesting that the lifespan effects of zinc are mediated in part by the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. Additionally, zinc status correlated with several markers of healthspan in worms, including proteostasis, locomotion and thermotolerance, with reduced zinc levels always associated with improvements in function. Taken together, these data support a role for zinc in regulating both development and lifespan in C. elegans, and that suggest that regulation of zinc homeostasis in the worm may be an example of antagonistic pleiotropy.

  5. Nutrition and hair: deficiencies and supplements.

    PubMed

    Finner, Andreas M

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicle cells have a high turnover. A caloric deprivation or deficiency of several components, such as proteins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and vitamins, caused by inborn errors or reduced uptake, can lead to structural abnormalities, pigmentation changes, or hair loss, although exact data are often lacking. The diagnosis is established through a careful history, clinical examination of hair loss activity, and hair quality and confirmed through targeted laboratory tests. Examples of genetic hair disorders caused by reduced nutritional components are zinc deficiency in acrodermatitis enteropathica and copper deficiency in Menkes kinky hair syndrome.

  6. Zinc-regulated genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed by transposon tagging.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, D S

    2000-01-01

    The biochemistry of human nutritional zinc deficiency remains poorly defined. To characterize in genetic terms how cells respond to zinc deprivation, zinc-regulated genes (ZRG's) were identified in yeast. Gene expression was probed using random lacZ reporter gene fusions, integrated by transposon tagging into a diploid genome as previously described. About half of the genome was examined. Cells exhibiting differences in lacZ expression on low or moderate ( approximately 0. 1 vs. 10 microm) zinc media were isolated and the gene fusions were sequenced. Ribonuclease protection assays demonstrated four- to eightfold increases for the RNAs of the ZAP1, ZRG17 (YNR039c), DPP1, ADH4, MCD4, and YEF3B genes in zinc-deficient cells. All but YEF3B were shown through reporter gene assays to be controlled by a master regulator of zinc homeostasis now known to be encoded by ZAP1. ZAP1 mutants lacked the flocculence and distended vacuoles characteristic of zinc-deficient cells, suggesting that flocculation and vacuolation serve homeostatic functions in zinc-deficient cells. ZRG17 mutants required extra zinc supplementation to repress these phenotypes, suggesting that ZRG17 functions in zinc uptake. These findings illustrate the utility of transposon tagging as an approach for studying regulated gene expression in yeast. PMID:10978274

  7. Enhanced zinc consumption causes memory deficits and increased brain levels of zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinn, J.M.; Hunter, D.; Linkous, D.H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Smith, L.N.; Brightwell, J.; Jones, B.F.

    2005-01-01

    Zinc deficiency has been shown to impair cognitive functioning, but little work has been done on the effects of elevated zinc. This research examined the effect on memory of raising Sprague-Dawley rats on enhanced levels of zinc (10 ppm ZnCO3; 0.153 mM) in the drinking water for periods of 3 or 9 months, both pre- and postnatally. Controls were raised on lab water. Memory was tested in a series of Morris Water Maze (MWM) experiments, and zinc-treated rats were found to have impairments in both reference and working memory. They were significantly slower to find a stationary platform and showed greater thigmotaxicity, a measure of anxiety. On a working memory task, where the platform was moved each day, zinc-treated animals had longer latencies over both trials and days, swam further from the platform, and showed greater thigmotaxicity. On trials using an Atlantis platform, which remained in one place but was lowered on probe trials, the zinc-treated animals had significantly fewer platform crossings, spent less time in the target quadrant, and did not swim as close to the platform position. They had significantly greater latency on nonprobe trials. Microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (??SXRF) confirmed that brain zinc levels were increased by adding ZnCO 3 to the drinking water. These data show that long-term dietary administration of zinc can lead to impairments in cognitive function. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioavailability of zinc in Wistar rats fed with rice fortified with zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Della Lucia, Ceres Mattos; Santos, Laura Luiza Menezes; Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina da Cruz; Rodrigues, Vivian Cristina da Cruz; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Sant'Ana, Helena Maria Pinheiro

    2014-06-01

    The study of zinc bioavailability in foods is important because this mineral intake does not meet the recommended doses for some population groups. Also, the presence of dietary factors that reduce zinc absorption contributes to its deficiency. Rice fortified with micronutrients (Ultra Rice®) is a viable alternative for fortification since this cereal is already inserted into the population habit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) in rice fortified with zinc oxide. During 42 days, rats were divided into four groups and fed with diets containing two different sources of Zn (test diet: UR® fortified with zinc oxide, or control diet: zinc carbonate (ZnCO3)), supplying 50% or 100%, respectively, of the recommendations of this mineral for animals. Weight gain, food intake, feed efficiency ratio, weight, thickness and length of femur; retention of zinc, calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in the femur and the concentrations of Zn in femur, plasma and erythrocytes were evaluated. Control diet showed higher weight gain, feed efficiency ratio, retention of Zn and Zn concentration in the femur (p < 0.05). However, no differences were observed (p > 0.05) for dietary intake, length and thickness of the femur, erythrocyte and plasmatic Zn between groups. Although rice fortified with zinc oxide showed a lower bioavailability compared to ZnCO3, this food can be a viable alternative to be used as a vehicle for fortification.

  9. Bioavailability of Zinc in Wistar Rats Fed with Rice Fortified with Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Della Lucia, Ceres Mattos; Santos, Laura Luiza Menezes; Rodrigues, Kellen Cristina da Cruz; Rodrigues, Vivian Cristina da Cruz; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Pinheiro Sant’Ana, Helena Maria

    2014-01-01

    The study of zinc bioavailability in foods is important because this mineral intake does not meet the recommended doses for some population groups. Also, the presence of dietary factors that reduce zinc absorption contributes to its deficiency. Rice fortified with micronutrients (Ultra Rice®) is a viable alternative for fortification since this cereal is already inserted into the population habit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of zinc (Zn) in rice fortified with zinc oxide. During 42 days, rats were divided into four groups and fed with diets containing two different sources of Zn (test diet: UR® fortified with zinc oxide, or control diet: zinc carbonate (ZnCO3)), supplying 50% or 100%, respectively, of the recommendations of this mineral for animals. Weight gain, food intake, feed efficiency ratio, weight, thickness and length of femur; retention of zinc, calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in the femur and the concentrations of Zn in femur, plasma and erythrocytes were evaluated. Control diet showed higher weight gain, feed efficiency ratio, retention of Zn and Zn concentration in the femur (p < 0.05). However, no differences were observed (p > 0.05) for dietary intake, length and thickness of the femur, erythrocyte and plasmatic Zn between groups. Although rice fortified with zinc oxide showed a lower bioavailability compared to ZnCO3, this food can be a viable alternative to be used as a vehicle for fortification. PMID:24932657

  10. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  11. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  12. Does zinc moderate essential fatty acid and amphetamine treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

    PubMed

    Arnold, L E; Pinkham, S M; Votolato, N

    2000-01-01

    Zinc is an important co-factor for metabolism relevant to neurotransmitters, fatty acids, prostaglandins, and melatonin, and indirectly affects dopamine metabolism, believed intimately involved in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To explore the relationship of zinc nutrition to essential fatty acid supplement and stimulant effects in treatment of ADHD, we re-analyzed data from an 18-subject double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover treatment comparison of d-amphetamine and Efamol (evening primrose oil, rich in gamma-linolenic acid). Subjects were categorized as zinc-adequate (n = 5), borderline zinc (n = 5), and zinc-deficient (n = 8) by hair, red cell, and urine zinc levels; for each category, placebo-active difference means were calculated on teachers' ratings. Placebo-controlled d-amphetamine response appeared linear with zinc nutrition, but the relationship of Efamol response to zinc appeared U-shaped; Efamol benefit was evident only with borderline zinc. Placebo-controlled effect size (Cohen's d) for both treatments ranged up to 1.5 for borderline zinc and dropped to 0.3-0.7 with mild zinc deficiency. If upheld by prospective research, this post-hoc exploration suggests that zinc nutrition may be important for treatment of ADHD even by pharmacotherapy, and if Efamol benefits ADHD, it likely does so by improving or compensating for borderline zinc nutrition. PMID:10933121

  13. Zinc Induced G2/M Blockage is p53 and p21 Dependent in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of the p53 and p21 signal pathway in the G2/M cell cycle progression of zinc supplemented normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells was examined using the siRNA approach. Cells were cultured for one passage in different concentrations of zinc: <0.4 microM (ZD) as zinc-deficient;...

  14. Zinc and zinc transporters in prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kolenko, Vladimir; Teper, Ervin; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The healthy human prostate accumulates the highest level of zinc of any soft tissue in the body. This unique property is retained in BPH, but is lost in prostatic malignancy, which implicates changes in zinc and its transporters in carcinogenesis. Indeed, zinc concentrations diminish early in the course of prostate carcinogenesis, preceding histopathological changes, and continue to decline during progression toward castration-resistant disease. Numerous studies suggest that increased zinc intake might protect against progression of prostatic malignancy. Despite increased dietary intake, zinc accumulation might be limited by the diminished expression of zinc uptake transporters, resulting in decreased intratumoural zinc levels. This finding can explain the conflicting results of various epidemiological studies evaluating the role of zinc supplementation on primary and secondary prostate cancer prevention. Overall, more research into the mechanisms of zinc homeostasis are needed to fully understand its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Only then can the potential of zinc and zinc transport proteins be harnessed in the diagnosis and treatment of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23478540

  15. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ruobing; Li, Jun; Zhuge, Fei; Zhu, Liqiang; Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Cao, Hongtao; Fu, Bing; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs.

  16. Viscosity of pure hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Knapstad, B.; Skjolsvik, P.A.; Oye, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate viscosity measurements have been performed on eight pure hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 20-150/sup 0/C, or up to approximately 20/sup 0/C below the boiling point of the hydrocarbon, by use of an absolute oscillating viscometer. The hydrocarbons are cyclohexane and benzene and the n-alkanes of hexane, heptane, octane, decane, dodecane, and tetradecane. The viscosities are described with a modified Arrhenius equation, and the deviation in fit is 0.12% or less. The accuracy is estimated to be 0.33-0.56%. The lowest viscosities are assumed to have the highest deviation. Literature data reported by Dymond and Young normally fit our viscosities within our estimated accuracy. Other literature viscosities tend to be higher than our results, especially for the n-alkanes.

  17. Effect of ZIP2 Gln/Arg/Leu (rs2234632) polymorphism on zinc homeostasis and inflammatory response following zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Giacconi, Robertina; Costarelli, Laura; Malavolta, Marco; Cardelli, Maurizio; Galeazzi, Roberta; Piacenza, Francesco; Gasparini, Nazzarena; Basso, Andrea; Mariani, Erminia; Fulop, Tamas; Rink, Lothar; Dedoussis, George; Herbein, Georges; Jajte, Jolanta; Provinciali, Mauro; Busco, Franco; Mocchegiani, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Zinc dyshomeostasis may lead to an augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines promoting chronic inflammation and increasing the susceptibility to age-related diseases. Several studies suggest that the zinc transporter protein ZIP2 may play a relevant role in the immune system especially during zinc deficiency, while a polymorphism on the coding region of ZIP2 gene (Gln/Arg/Leu) has been associated with severe carotid artery disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of ZIP2 SNP on zinc and inflammatory status in 1090 elderly healthy free-living subjects enrolled in the ZincAge project and to assess the effect of zinc supplementation on zinc status, inflammatory mediators, and zinc transporter expression depending on ZIP2 genotype. ZIP2 Leu- (Arg43Arg) carriers showed enhanced IL-6, TNF-α, and RANTES plasma levels associated with decreased free cytosolic zinc in PBMCs and an upregulation of zinc transporters ZIP2, ZIP8, and Znt1. Moreover, Leu- subjects displayed significant decrement of inflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and RANTES following zinc supplementation. In summary, this investigation provides new evidence on the effect of ZIP2 Gln/Arg/Leu polymorphism on proinflammatory mediators and zinc homeostasis in elderly population with a more pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of zinc supplementation in subjects carrying ZIP2 Leu- (Arg43Arg) genotype. These novel findings could be useful in identifying elderly subjects who may benefit of zinc intervention to decrease the inflammatory status and to prevent or delay the development of age-related diseases.

  18. Zinc: dietary intake and impact of supplementation on immune function in elderly.

    PubMed

    Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Romeo, Javier; Malavolta, Marco; Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Diaz, Ligia-Esperanza; Marcos, Ascension

    2013-06-01

    The diet in the elderly does not provide a sufficient level of nutrients needed to maintain an adequate healthy status leading to micronutrient deficiencies and impaired immune response with subsequent development of degenerative diseases. Nutrient "zinc" is a relevant micronutrient involved in maintaining a good integrity of many body homeostatic mechanisms, including immune efficiency, owing to its requirement for the biological activity of many enzymes, proteins and for cellular proliferation and genomic stability. Old people aged 60-65 years and older have zinc intakes below 50% of the recommended daily allowance on a given day. Many causes can be involved: among them, altered intestinal absorption, inadequate mastication, psychosocial factors, drugs interactions, altered subcellular processes (zinc transporters (Zip and ZnT family), metallothioneins, divalent metal transporter-1). Zinc supplementation may remodel the immune alterations in elderly leading to healthy ageing. Several zinc trials have been carried out with contradictory data, perhaps due to incorrect choice of an effective zinc supplementation in old subjects showing subsequent zinc toxic effects on immunity. Old subjects with specific IL-6 polymorphism (GG allele carriers; named C-) are more prone for zinc supplementation than the entire old population, in whom correct dietary habits with foods containing zinc (Mediterranean diet) may be sufficient in restoring zinc deficiency and impaired immune response. We summarise the main causes of low zinc dietary intake in elderly reporting an update on the impact of zinc supplementation upon the immune response also on the basis of individual IL-6 polymorphism. PMID:22222917

  19. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  20. Genomic analysis, cytokine expression, and microRNA profiling reveal biomarkers of human dietary zinc depletion and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Langkamp-Henken, Bobbi; Chang, Shou-Mei; Shankar, Meena N.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of zinc interventions for subjects suspected of being zinc-deficient is a global need, but is limited due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To discover molecular signatures of human zinc deficiency, a combination of transcriptome, cytokine, and microRNA analyses was applied to a dietary zinc depletion/repletion protocol with young male human subjects. Concomitant with a decrease in serum zinc concentration, changes in buccal and blood gene transcripts related to zinc homeostasis occurred with zinc depletion. Microarray analyses of whole blood RNA revealed zinc-responsive genes, particularly, those associated with cell cycle regulation and immunity. Responses of potential signature genes of dietary zinc depletion were further assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The diagnostic properties of specific serum microRNAs for dietary zinc deficiency were identified by acute responses to zinc depletion, which were reversible by subsequent zinc repletion. Depression of immune-stimulated TNFα secretion by blood cells was observed after low zinc consumption and may serve as a functional biomarker. Our findings introduce numerous novel candidate biomarkers for dietary zinc status assessment using a variety of contemporary technologies and which identify changes that occur prior to or with greater sensitivity than the serum zinc concentration which represents the current zinc status assessment marker. In addition, the results of gene network analysis reveal potential clinical outcomes attributable to suboptimal zinc intake including immune function defects and predisposition to cancer. These demonstrate through a controlled depletion/repletion dietary protocol that the illusive zinc biomarker(s) can be identified and applied to assessment and intervention strategies. PMID:22171008

  1. Genomic analysis, cytokine expression, and microRNA profiling reveal biomarkers of human dietary zinc depletion and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Langkamp-Henken, Bobbi; Chang, Shou-Mei; Shankar, Meena N; Cousins, Robert J

    2011-12-27

    Implementation of zinc interventions for subjects suspected of being zinc-deficient is a global need, but is limited due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To discover molecular signatures of human zinc deficiency, a combination of transcriptome, cytokine, and microRNA analyses was applied to a dietary zinc depletion/repletion protocol with young male human subjects. Concomitant with a decrease in serum zinc concentration, changes in buccal and blood gene transcripts related to zinc homeostasis occurred with zinc depletion. Microarray analyses of whole blood RNA revealed zinc-responsive genes, particularly, those associated with cell cycle regulation and immunity. Responses of potential signature genes of dietary zinc depletion were further assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The diagnostic properties of specific serum microRNAs for dietary zinc deficiency were identified by acute responses to zinc depletion, which were reversible by subsequent zinc repletion. Depression of immune-stimulated TNFα secretion by blood cells was observed after low zinc consumption and may serve as a functional biomarker. Our findings introduce numerous novel candidate biomarkers for dietary zinc status assessment using a variety of contemporary technologies and which identify changes that occur prior to or with greater sensitivity than the serum zinc concentration which represents the current zinc status assessment marker. In addition, the results of gene network analysis reveal potential clinical outcomes attributable to suboptimal zinc intake including immune function defects and predisposition to cancer. These demonstrate through a controlled depletion/repletion dietary protocol that the illusive zinc biomarker(s) can be identified and applied to assessment and intervention strategies.

  2. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Disease Information > Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Explore this section to learn more about alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including a description of the disorder ...

  3. Bioavailability of zinc in fiber-enriched bread fortified with zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mona M

    2002-12-01

    The present study aimed to reduce the caloric value of bread by substituting a part of wheat flour with artichoke bracts at levels of 5%, 10% and 15% without sacrificing taste, texture or acceptability. Moreover, considerable trials had been made to reduce zinc deficiency in wheat bread and fiber-enriched bread and also to study the effect of fiber on zinc bioavailability. Therefore, zinc sulphate was added to bread at levels of 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 mg/100 g edible portion. The results from this study show that: (i) The addition of artichoke bracts to wheat flour increased the water absorption, arrival time, development time, and weakening of the dough as the level of artichoke bracts increased, while dough stability decreased. (ii) Mixing wheat flour with increasing amount of artichoke bracts increased the content of protein, fiber and total essential amino acids, also all essential amino acids increased in wheat bread and fiber-enriched bread after fortification with zinc sulphate at a level of 100 mg/100 g edible portion except methionine, threonine and tyrosine. (iii) The best level of zinc sulphate to give the best bioavailability for zinc is 100 mg/100 g edible portion. (iv) Evaluation of fortified wheat bread and fiber-enriched bread with zinc sulphate showed no significant difference by test panel.

  4. [Influence of zinc complex with enzymatic hydrolyzate of mussels meat on absorption in of gastroenteric tract potential allergenic food proteins].

    PubMed

    Zorin, S N; Buchanova, A V; Matiash, A I; Peneva, V V; Gmoshinskiĭ, I V; Mazo, V K

    2010-01-01

    There was investigated the influence of zinc complex with enzymatic hydrolyzate of mussels' meat added into zinc-deficient diet on a body mass rats, contents in blood alimentary antigen and activity alkalis phosphatase The results obtained showed a good advance of mussels' meat enzymatic hydrolyzate complex with zinc use in food supplements and dietary (clinical and preventive) products as a new food source of bioavailable zinc. issels' ntents and wfood

  5. Zinc Extraction from Zinc Plants Residue Using Selective Alkaline Leaching and Electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtari, Pedram; Pourghahramani, Parviz

    2015-10-01

    Annually, a great amount of zinc plants residue is produced in Iran. One of them is hot filter cake (known as HFC) which can be used as a secondary resource of zinc, cobalt and manganese. Unfortunately, despite its heavy metal content, the HFC is not treated. For the first time, zinc was selectively leached from HFC employing alkaline leaching. Secondly, leaching was optimized to achieve maximum recovery using this method. Effects of factors like NaOH concentration (C = 3, 5, 7 and 9 M), temperature (T = 50, 70, 90 and 105 °C), solid/liquid ratio (weight/volume, S/L = 1/10 and 1/5 W/V) and stirring speed (R = 500 and 800 rpm) were studied on HFC leaching. L16 orthogonal array (OA, two factors in four levels and two factors in two levels) was applied to determine the optimum condition and the most significant factor affecting the overall zinc extraction. As a result, maximum zinc extraction was 83.4 %. Afterwards, a rough test was conducted for zinc electrowinning from alkaline solution according to the common condition available in literature by which pure zinc powder (99.96 %) was successfully obtained.

  6. Measurements of plasma zinc

    PubMed Central

    Davies, I. J. T.; Musa, M.; Dormandy, T. L.

    1968-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element. Previous methods of measuring zinc in clinical material have been difficult and reported findings must be treated with caution. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy it has been established that plasma zinc is one of the most uniform biochemical characteristics of normal adult blood. Sex and age differences in adult life are insignificant. Increased metabolic activity, on the other hand, induces a marked, immediate fall in plasma zinc level. The possible implications of this are discussed. Zinc levels in patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and anaemia due to acute blood loss have been within normal limits. Plasma zinc is low in certain types of liver disease. PMID:5303355

  7. Is zinc a neuromodulator?

    PubMed

    Kay, Alan R; Tóth, Katalin

    2008-01-01

    The vesicles of certain glutamatergic terminals in the mammalian forebrain are replete with ionic zinc. It is believed that during synaptic transmission zinc is released, binds to receptors on the pre- or postsynaptic membranes, and hence acts as a neuromodulator. Although exogenous zinc modulates a wide variety of channels, whether synaptic zinc transits across the synaptic cleft and alters the response of channels has been difficult to establish. We will review the evidence for zinc as a neuromodulator and propose diagnostic criteria for establishing whether it is indeed one. Moreover, we will delineate alternative ways in which zinc might act at synapses.

  8. Decreased brain zinc availability reduces hippocampal neurogenesis in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sang Won; Won, Seok Joon; Hamby, Aaron M; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Fan, Yang; Sheline, Christian T; Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi; Liu, Jialing

    2009-09-01

    In the adult brain, neurogenesis occurs in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), where high levels of vesicular zinc are localized in the presynaptic terminals. To determine whether zinc has a role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis under normal or pathologic conditions, we manipulated the level of vesicular zinc experimentally. To reduce hippocampal vesicular zinc, rats were either fed a zinc-deficient diet or treated with a zinc chelator, clioquinol (CQ). The number of progenitor cells and immature neurons was decreased significantly in the DG after 6 weeks of dietary zinc deprivation. Conversely, the number of progenitor cells and immature neurons was restored after a 2-week reversal to a normal zinc-containing diet. Similarly, a 1-week treatment with the zinc chelator, CQ, reduced the number of progenitor cells. The results of our previous study showed that hypoglycemia increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This study shows that zinc chelation reduced hypoglycemia-induced progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Finally, the role of vesicular zinc on neurogenesis was further assessed in zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) gene deleted mice. Zinc transporter 3 knockout (KO) mice had significantly fewer proliferating progenitor cells and immature neurons after hypoglycemia. Our data provide converging evidence in support of the essential role zinc has in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis.

  9. Cellular Zinc Homeostasis Contributes to Neuronal Differentiation in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pfaender, Stefanie; Föhr, Karl; Lutz, Anne-Kathrin; Putz, Stefan; Achberger, Kevin; Linta, Leonhard; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in neuronal differentiation and function are an underlying factor of many brain disorders. Zinc homeostasis and signaling are important mediators for a normal brain development and function, given that zinc deficiency was shown to result in cognitive and emotional deficits in animal models that might be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. One underlying mechanism of the observed detrimental effects of zinc deficiency on the brain might be impaired proliferation and differentiation of stem cells participating in neurogenesis. Thus, to examine the molecular mechanisms regulating zinc metabolism and signaling in differentiating neurons, using a protocol for motor neuron differentiation, we characterized the expression of zinc homeostasis genes during neurogenesis using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and evaluated the influence of altered zinc levels on the expression of zinc homeostasis genes, cell survival, cell fate, and neuronal function. Our results show that zinc transporters are highly regulated genes during neuronal differentiation and that low zinc levels are associated with decreased cell survival, altered neuronal differentiation, and, in particular, synaptic function. We conclude that zinc deficiency in a critical time window during brain development might influence brain function by modulating neuronal differentiation. PMID:27247802

  10. Cellular Zinc Homeostasis Contributes to Neuronal Differentiation in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Stefanie; Föhr, Karl; Lutz, Anne-Kathrin; Putz, Stefan; Achberger, Kevin; Linta, Leonhard; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in neuronal differentiation and function are an underlying factor of many brain disorders. Zinc homeostasis and signaling are important mediators for a normal brain development and function, given that zinc deficiency was shown to result in cognitive and emotional deficits in animal models that might be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. One underlying mechanism of the observed detrimental effects of zinc deficiency on the brain might be impaired proliferation and differentiation of stem cells participating in neurogenesis. Thus, to examine the molecular mechanisms regulating zinc metabolism and signaling in differentiating neurons, using a protocol for motor neuron differentiation, we characterized the expression of zinc homeostasis genes during neurogenesis using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and evaluated the influence of altered zinc levels on the expression of zinc homeostasis genes, cell survival, cell fate, and neuronal function. Our results show that zinc transporters are highly regulated genes during neuronal differentiation and that low zinc levels are associated with decreased cell survival, altered neuronal differentiation, and, in particular, synaptic function. We conclude that zinc deficiency in a critical time window during brain development might influence brain function by modulating neuronal differentiation. PMID:27247802

  11. Fluorescence assay for monitoring Zn-deficient superoxide dismutase in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyshkin, D. V.; Mirov, S. B.; Zhuang, Y.-X.; Crow, J. P.; Ermilov, V.; Beckman, J. S.

    2003-11-01

    A method has been developed for selective detection of the zinc-deficient form of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) in vitro. Zinc-deficient SOD1 mutants have been implicated in the death of motor neurons leading in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gerhig's disease). Thus, this method may have applicability for detecting zinc-deficient SOD1 mutants in human ALS patients samples as well as in a transgenic mouse model of ALS and in cultured motor neurons. We determined previously that structural analogs of 1,10 phenanthroline, which react specifically with Cu(I), react with the active Cu(I) of SOD1 when zinc is absent, but not when zinc is also bound, as evidenced by the fact that the reaction is inhibited by pretreatment of the enzyme with zinc. We report herein that bathocuproine, or its water-soluble derivative bathocuproine disulfonate, react with zinc-deficient SOD1 to form a complex which fluoresces at 734 nm when excited at 482 nm. Fluorescent intensity is concentration dependent, thus we propose to use fluorescent confocal microscopy to measure intracellular levels of zinc-deficient SOD1 in situ.

  12. Developmental delays in offspring of rats undernourished or zinc deprived during lactation.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, M J; Halas, E S

    1987-01-01

    Offspring of rats who were zinc or calorie deprived during lactation were administered a battery of reflex and motor tests from postnatal Day 4 to Day 21. Compared to offspring of ad lib-fed control rats, both zinc deprived and undernourished offspring exhibited developmental delays in reflexes which appeared after the first postnatal week (auditory startle, air righting, and rope descent). As the deficiencies continued the delays appeared to be more pronounced. The zinc deficiency did not add to the deficits associated with calorie restriction alone because there were no significant differences between the zinc deficient and undernourished pups on any of the measures except eye opening. When rehabilitated offspring were tested at 45 and 60 days of age for motor deficits there were no significant impairments resulting from preweaning dietary conditions. However, the growth retardation of zinc deprived and undernourished rats persisted long after dietary rehabilitation was implemented. PMID:3432383

  13. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  14. Bacitracin zinc overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small amounts of bacitracin zinc are dissolved in petroleum jelly to create antibiotic ointments. Bacitracin zinc overdose ... is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation ...

  15. Zinc Modulates Nanosilver-Induced Toxicity in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NAg) have recently become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials. Since the ability of nanosilver to enter the brain has been confirmed, there has been a need to investigate mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. We previously showed that primary neuronal cultures treated with nanosilver undergo destabilization of calcium homeostasis via a mechanism involving glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Considering the fact that zinc interacts with these receptors, the aim of the present study was to examine the role of zinc in mechanisms of neuronal cell death in primary cultures. In cells treated with nanosilver, we noted an imbalance between extracellular and intracellular zinc levels. Thus, the influence of zinc deficiency and supplementation on nanosilver-evoked cytotoxicity was investigated by treatment with TPEN (a chelator of zinc ions), or ZnCl(2), respectively. Elimination of zinc leads to complete death of nanosilver-treated CGCs. In contrast, supplementation with ZnCl(2) increases viability of CGCs in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of zinc provided protection against the extra/intracellular calcium imbalance in a manner similar to MK-801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. Zinc chelation by TPEN decreases the mitochondrial potential and dramatically increases the rate of production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that zinc supplementation positively influences nanosilver-evoked changes in CGCs. This is presumed to be due to an inhibitory effect on NMDA-sensitive calcium channels.

  16. Euglena gracilis DNA dependent RNA polymerase II: a zinc metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Falchuk, K H; Mazus, B; Ulpino, L; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-01

    Zinc is essential for cellular proliferation. Zinc deficiency of Euglena gracilis results in arrest of cell division and deranges nucleic acid and protein metabolism pointing to a decisive role of zinc in transcription and translation. We have, therefore, investigated the role of zinc in the function of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of this organism. Two RNA polymerases from zinc sufficient organisms were purified first by affinity chromatography on a DNA cellulose column and subsequently separated on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephadex A-25. The two fractions were characterized as polymerase I and II by their elution pattern from DEAE-Sephadex and sensitivity to alpha-amanitin. RNA polymerase II has a provisional molecular weight of 700 000 and contains an average of 2.2 g=atoms of zinc per mol of enzyme, but not Mn, Cu, or Fe, as measured by microwave emission spectroscopy. Chelating agents, such as 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, and lomofungin, inhibit activity. In contrast, the nonchelating analogues, 1,7-and 4,7-phenanthroline, do not affect activity. Inhibition by 1,10-phenanthroline is instantaneous and fully reversible by dilution. 1,10-Phenanthroline also inhibits RNA polymerase I, suggesting a role of zinc in its function. The demonstration that RNA polymerase II is a zinc enzyme indicates the involvement of zinc in eukaryotic RNA synthesis and serves as a further basis for the definition of the role of this element in eukaryotic cell growth, division, and differentiation.

  17. Relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Tu, D N; Li, H; Cao, X; Jiang, J X; Shi, Y; Zhou, X Q; You, J B

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children. The parents of 8102 young children were surveyed in person by a trained surveyor using structured questionnaires. The hair zinc concentration of the children was determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The height, weight, sitting height, and head circumference of the children were measured at follow-up visits. There was a positive correlation between hair zinc concentration and adaptive developmental quotient (ADQ; r = 0.3164, P = 0.0272) while no correlation was found between hair zinc concentration and body measurement Z scores or intelligence quotient (IQ). There was a strong positive correlation between hair zinc concentration and weight-for-age Z scores (r = 0.3618, P = 0.0416) and ADQ (r = 0.2761, P = 0.0387) in boys; there was no correlation between hair zinc concentration and body measurement Z scores, IQ, and ADQ in girls. In boys with normal hair zinc levels, ADQ was 9.58 (P = 0.0392), higher than in boys who had zinc-deficient hair. In girls with normal hair zinc levels, ADQ was 2.52 (P = 0.0296), lower than in girls with zinc-deficient hair. In conclusion, there is no significant correlation between hair zinc levels and IQ or Z scores for all body measurements in young children.

  18. Relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Tu, D N; Li, H; Cao, X; Jiang, J X; Shi, Y; Zhou, X Q; You, J B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children. The parents of 8102 young children were surveyed in person by a trained surveyor using structured questionnaires. The hair zinc concentration of the children was determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The height, weight, sitting height, and head circumference of the children were measured at follow-up visits. There was a positive correlation between hair zinc concentration and adaptive developmental quotient (ADQ; r = 0.3164, P = 0.0272) while no correlation was found between hair zinc concentration and body measurement Z scores or intelligence quotient (IQ). There was a strong positive correlation between hair zinc concentration and weight-for-age Z scores (r = 0.3618, P = 0.0416) and ADQ (r = 0.2761, P = 0.0387) in boys; there was no correlation between hair zinc concentration and body measurement Z scores, IQ, and ADQ in girls. In boys with normal hair zinc levels, ADQ was 9.58 (P = 0.0392), higher than in boys who had zinc-deficient hair. In girls with normal hair zinc levels, ADQ was 2.52 (P = 0.0296), lower than in girls with zinc-deficient hair. In conclusion, there is no significant correlation between hair zinc levels and IQ or Z scores for all body measurements in young children. PMID:26345905

  19. PGK deficiency.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Ernest

    2007-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) deficiency is one of the relatively uncommon causes of hereditary non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia (HNSHA). The gene encoding the erythrocyte enzyme PGK1, is X-linked. Mutations of this gene may cause chronic haemolysis with or without mental retardation and they may cause myopathies, often with episodes of myoglobinuria, or a combination of these clinical manifestations. Twenty-six families have been described and in 20 of these the mutations are known. The reason for different clinical manifestations of mutations of the same gene remains unknown. PMID:17222195

  20. Zinc hazards to plants and animals with emphasis on fishery and wildlife resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.; Cheremisinoff, Paul N.

    1997-01-01

    Ecological and toxicological aspects of zinc in the environment are reviewed with emphasis on natural resources. Subtopics include sources and uses; chemical and biochemical properties; carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity; background concentrations in biological and nonbiological compartments; effects of zinc deficiency; toxic and sublethal effects on terrestrial plants and invertebrates, aquatic organisms, birds, and mammals; and recommendations for the protection of sensitive resources.

  1. The effects of zinc status on early growth in infants with sickle cell disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth failure, maturational delay, and alterations in body composition occur in older children and adults with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Poor nutritional status, specifically zinc deficiency, has been widely implicated, although infants with SCD have not been studied. We determined zinc status in ...

  2. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented. PMID:23676549

  3. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400 C to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings. 8 figures.

  4. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  5. Combined iron and folic acid supplementation with or without zinc reduces time to walking unassisted among Zanzibari infants 5-11 months old

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron and zinc deficiencies have been associated with delayed motor development in nutritionally at-risk children, albeit inconsistently. In this community-based, randomized double-blind trial, iron+folic acid (FeFA) (12.5 mg Fe + 50 'g folic acid), zinc (Zn) (10 mg), and iron+folic acid+zinc (FeFA+Z...

  6. Zinc bioavailability in rats fed a plant-based diet: a study of fermentation and zinc supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Claudia E.; Vargas, Mirian; Granfeldt, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc deficiency is a significant problem, in developing countries and in vegetarians, which can be caused by plant-based diets. Thus, dietary strategies, such as fermentation, to improve zinc bioavailability of diets should be investigated. Objective To improve zinc bioavailability in a plant-based diet by the inclusion of fermented food. Design Cassava tubers were fermented and made to replace the unfermented cassava in a basal plant-based diet, and compared with plant-based diets with and without zinc supplement. The zinc bioavailability of the diets was evaluated in Wistar rats that were fed these diets for 28 days. The evaluation was for zinc apparent absorption (ZnAA), serum zinc levels, and zinc deposits in liver and femur; in addition, the feed efficiency ratio (FER) of the diets and femur weight (FW) of the rats were evaluated. Results During the cassava fermentation, lactic acid increased and pH decreased (from 6.8 to 3.9), which is favorable for native phytase activity, resulting in a 90.2% reduction of phytate content in cassava. The diet containing fermented cassava showed significantly higher levels of ZnAA, FER, and FW (p<0.001). Moreover, the zinc levels in serum and femur were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared with the results of the diet with unfermented cassava. The results clearly show a higher zinc bioavailability in the diet containing fermented cassava and are comparable with the results obtained with the plant-based diet with zinc supplement. Conclusions In conclusion, the fermentation of cassava reduces the phytate content. The diet containing the fermented cassava represents a better nutritional alternative than the diet with unfermented cassava and is comparable with the zinc-supplemented diets. PMID:26626410

  7. Role of zinc in chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Ksenija; Dovhanj, Jasna; Kljaić, Ksenija; Sakić, Katarina; Kondza, Goran; Tadzić, Refmir; Vcev, Aleksandar

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in inflammation of gastric mucosa. The role of zinc in modulating oxidative stress has recently been recognized. Zn deficiency results in an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and have a higher risk of musoca damage in inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine wheather chronic inflammation affects on the concentration of Zn2+ ions in gastric mucosa of patients with chronic gastritis. Forthy-three patients with chronic gastitis were enrolled. Patients were endoscoped. Histology and scoring of gastritis was performed following the guidelines of the updated Sydney system. Endoscopic finding of mucosa were scored according to a Lanza scoring system. The diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, histopathologic changes, intensity of inflammation and zinc concentration were determined from biopsies of gastric mucosa. The atomic absorption spectrophotometer was used to determine tissue concentrations of zinc. Twenty of 43 patients with chronic gastritis were uninfected by H. pylori. There was no statistically significant difference in tissue concentrations of zinc between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients. From those infected patients 53.3% had chronic active gastritis. There was no statistically significant difference in tissue concentrations of zinc between patients with chronic active gastritis and patients with chronic inactive gastritis (p = 0.966). Zn in antrum showed positive correlation with density of H. pylori in antrum (Spearman' rho = 0.481, p = 0.020), negative correlation with density of H. pylori in corpus (Spearman' rho = -0.492, p = 0.017) and with zinc in corpus (Spearman' rho = 0.631, p =0.001). Tissue concentration of zinc was not affected by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa in patients with chronic gastritis.

  8. Local and systemic effects of targeted zinc redistribution in Drosophila neuronal and gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    While the effects of systemic zinc ion deficiency and toxicity on animal health are well documented, the impacts of localized, tissue-specific disturbances in zinc homeostasis are less well understood. Previously we have identified zinc dyshomeostasis scenarios caused by the targeted manipulation of zinc transport genes in the Drosophila eye. Over expression of the uptake transporter dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) combined with knockdown of the efflux transporter dZNT63C (dZNT1) causes a zinc toxicity phenotype, as does over expression of dZIP71B or dZNT86D. However, all three genotypes result in different morphologies, responses to dietary zinc, and genetic interactions with the remaining zinc transport genes, indicating that each causes a different redistribution of zinc within affected cells. dZNT86D (eGFP) over expression generates a completely different phenotype, interpreted as a Golgi zinc deficiency. Here we assess the effect of each of these transgenes when targeted to a range of Drosophila tissues. We find that dZIP71B is a particularly potent zinc uptake gene, causing early developmental lethality when targeted to multiple different tissue types. dZNT86D over expression (Golgi-only zinc toxicity) is less deleterious, but causes highly penetrant adult cuticle, sensory bristle and wing expansion defects. The dZIP42C.1 over expression, dZNT63C knockdown combination causes only moderate adult cuticle defects and sensitivity to dietary zinc when expressed in the midgut. The Golgi-only zinc deficiency caused by dZNT86D (eGFP) expression results in mild cuticle defects, highly penetrant wing expansion defects and developmental lethality when targeted to the central nervous system and, uniquely, the fat bodies.

  9. Local and systemic effects of targeted zinc redistribution in Drosophila neuronal and gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    While the effects of systemic zinc ion deficiency and toxicity on animal health are well documented, the impacts of localized, tissue-specific disturbances in zinc homeostasis are less well understood. Previously we have identified zinc dyshomeostasis scenarios caused by the targeted manipulation of zinc transport genes in the Drosophila eye. Over expression of the uptake transporter dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) combined with knockdown of the efflux transporter dZNT63C (dZNT1) causes a zinc toxicity phenotype, as does over expression of dZIP71B or dZNT86D. However, all three genotypes result in different morphologies, responses to dietary zinc, and genetic interactions with the remaining zinc transport genes, indicating that each causes a different redistribution of zinc within affected cells. dZNT86D (eGFP) over expression generates a completely different phenotype, interpreted as a Golgi zinc deficiency. Here we assess the effect of each of these transgenes when targeted to a range of Drosophila tissues. We find that dZIP71B is a particularly potent zinc uptake gene, causing early developmental lethality when targeted to multiple different tissue types. dZNT86D over expression (Golgi-only zinc toxicity) is less deleterious, but causes highly penetrant adult cuticle, sensory bristle and wing expansion defects. The dZIP42C.1 over expression, dZNT63C knockdown combination causes only moderate adult cuticle defects and sensitivity to dietary zinc when expressed in the midgut. The Golgi-only zinc deficiency caused by dZNT86D (eGFP) expression results in mild cuticle defects, highly penetrant wing expansion defects and developmental lethality when targeted to the central nervous system and, uniquely, the fat bodies. PMID:26411574

  10. Alcoholic myopathy: lack of effect of zinc supplementation.

    PubMed

    Durán Castellón, M C; González-Reimers, E; López-Lirola, A; Martín Olivera, R; Santolaria-Fernández, F; Galindo-Martín, L; Abreu-González, P; González-Hernández, T

    2005-09-01

    A chronic form of myopathy has been described in alcoholics, characterized by atrophy of type II fibers, due both to reduced protein synthesis and increased protein breakdown. Increased production of reactive oxygen species could probably play a role in increased protein breakdown. In addition, treatment with zinc might be beneficial, since it acts as a cofactor of several enzymes involved in the synthesis of proteins and antioxidants as copper-zinc-superoxidedismutase (SOD) and selenium dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Based on these facts, we analyze the relative and combined effects of ethanol, protein malnutrition and treatment with zinc, 227 mg/l in form of zinc sulphate, on muscle changes in 8 groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats fed following the Lieber-de Carli model during 5 weeks. We also study the association between muscle histological changes and the activity of GPX, SOD and lipid peroxidation products (MDA), with hormones such as IGF-1, and with trace elements involved in antioxidant systems and/or in lipid peroxidation, such as selenium, copper, zinc, and iron. We found type IIa and IIb fiber atrophy in the alcoholic animals, especially in the low-protein fed ones. This effect was mainly due to protein deficiency. Zinc played no role at all. Muscle iron increased in ethanol, low protein fed rats, either with or without zinc, and was directly related with muscle MDA levels, which in turn were related with muscle atrophy, as was also found for serum IGF-1 levels. Ethanol was the main responsible for all these changes, although protein undernutrition also played an independent role in MDA levels. A positive interaction between ethanol and protein deficiency on serum IGF-1 was also detected. These results suggest that both protein deficiency and ethanol contribute to muscle atrophy observed in alcoholized rats; this atrophy is associated with increased lipid peroxidation and muscle iron overload. Treatment with zinc sulphate confers no benefit.

  11. Effect of zinc on in vitro development of porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yubyeol; Yoon, Junchul David; Cai, Lian; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Kim, Eunhye; Lee, Eunsong; Jeung, Eui Bae; Hyun, Sang-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of zinc on in vitro development of porcine embryos. We evaluated the effects of zinc on blastocysts formation and investigated gene expression at zinc-deficient and supplemented conditions. Zinc-deficient in vitro condition was induced by 10-μM N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylendiamine (TPEN) (zinc chelator) treatment during IVC. On parthenogenetic activated embryos, this treatment significantly decreased cleavage rate and blastocyst formation compared with the control (0.0% and 0.0% vs. 69.0% and 36.0%, respectively). And time effect of the zinc deficiency exposure is observed. Blastocyst formation rate was significantly decreased as zinc-deficient time increases (54.1%, 31.0%, 9.0%, and 1.2% for zinc deficiency during 0, 3, 5, and 7 hours). However, zinc supplementation during IVC supported in vitro embryonic development. On parthenogenetic activated embryos, supplementation of 0.8 μg/mL of zinc during IVC significantly increased blastocyst formation compared with other groups (43.9%, 57.8%, 67.1%, 51.4%, and 52.6% for zinc supplementation of 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 μg/mL). In vitro-fertilized (IVF) embryos showed similar results. The blastocyst formation rate was significantly higher in the 0.8 μg/mL of zinc-supplemented group than in the other groups (21.3%, 24.1%, 36.1%, 25.9%, and 25.2% for zinc supplementation of 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 μg/mL). PCNA, POU5F1, and Bcl2 messenger RNA expressions were unregulated in IVF-derived blastocysts in the 0.8 μg/mL of zinc-supplemented group compared with the control. These results suggest that zinc is required for embryonic development, and supplementation with adequate zinc concentrations during IVC improved the viability of porcine embryos, possibly by increasing PCNA, POU5F1, and Bcl2 gene expression of embryos.

  12. Electroplating and corrosion behavior of tin-zinc alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai

    Due to the toxicity of cadmium and its electroplating processes, a replacement to this widely used coating is desired. Electroplated tin-zinc alloy is a good candidate. In this thesis the electroplating of tin-zinc alloy and its corrosion behavior have been studied. Tin-zinc alloy was plated from a commercial, neutral, non-cyanide and non-toxic bath. To get an alloy deposit with a composition of 70%Sn-30%Zn, a plating current density of 5 mA/cm2 should be applied. When plating without agitation, the consumption of the H+ ions by the accompanying hydrogen evolution reaction on the cathode surface caused a local pH increase and then the formation of a hydroxide layer on the outer surface. This can be prevented by agitating the solution with nitrogen gas bubbling during plating. The alloy deposit is a fine mixture of pure zinc and tin phases. The plating current efficiency was calculated to be 71% at the plating current density of 5 mA/cm2. The tin-zinc electrodeposits have both a sacrificial property provided by zinc and a barrier property provided by tin. The open circuit potential (OCP) of the alloy coating is very close to that of zinc, so it acts as a sacrificial anode and provides a cathodic protection to the steel substrate. On the other hand, the anodic polarization current density keeps very small before the potential reaches the OCP of tin. This is because the presence of the tin on the surface forms a barrier layer which retarded the dissolution of zinc and enhanced the durability of the alloy deposit. The OCP of the tin-zinc alloys increases with corrosion duration. It is perhaps due to an IR-drop mechanism. As zinc dissolves into the solution, cavities appear on the surface. Further zinc dissolution only occurs at the bottom of the pores, while the hydrogen evolution reaction mainly occurs on the outer surface. The separation of the anodic and cathodic sites causes an IR drop. An equivalent circuit is devised and the values of the circuit elements are

  13. A role for dZIP89B in Drosophila dietary zinc uptake reveals additional complexity in the zinc absorption process.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher D; Warr, Coral G; Burke, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc is the principal source of zinc in eukaryotes, with its uptake and distribution controlled by a complex network of numerous membrane-spanning transport proteins. Dietary absorption is achieved by members of the SLC39A (ZIP) gene family, which encode proteins that are generally responsible for the movement of zinc into the cytosol. ZIP4 is thought to be the primary mammalian zinc uptake gene in the small intestine, with mutations in this gene causing the zinc deficiency disease Acrodermatitis enteropathica. In Drosophila, dual knockdown of the major dietary zinc uptake genes dZIP42C.1 (dZIP1) and dZIP42C.2 (dZIP2) results in a severe sensitivity to zinc-deficient media. However, the symptoms associated with ZIP4 loss can be reversed by zinc supplementation and dZIP42C.1 and 2 knockdown has minimal effect under normal dietary conditions, suggesting that additional pathways for zinc absorption exist in both mammals and flies. This study provides evidence that dZIP89B is an ideal candidate for this role in Drosophila, encoding a low-affinity zinc uptake transporter active in the posterior midgut. Flies lacking dZIP89B, while viable and apparently healthy, show indications of low midgut zinc levels, including reduced metallothionein B expression and compensatory up-regulation of dZIP42C.1 and 2. Furthermore dZIP89B mutants display a dramatic resistance to toxic dietary zinc levels which is abrogated by midgut-specific restoration of dZIP89B activity. We postulate that dZIP89B works in concert with the closely related dZIP42C.1 and 2 to ensure optimal zinc absorption under a range of dietary conditions.

  14. Accumulation and regulation of zinc in Daphnia magna: links with homeostasis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Muyssen, B T A; Janssen, C R

    2002-11-01

    Zinc accumulation in Daphnia magna was investigated, and the results were linked to the previously established optimal concentration range for zinc and D. magna. It was observed that organisms cultured in this optimal range (300-600 microg Zn/L) contained 212 +/- 57 to 254 +/- 79 microg Zn/g dry weight. Lower and higher zinc contents were obtained after acclimation to previously established culture concentrations inducing deficiency and toxicity, respectively. The calculation of bioconcentration factors indicated that zinc was actively regulated, at least up to a concentration of 600 microg Zn/L. Zinc uptake and elimination are rapid processes; major increases and decreases in body content occurred within 1 day. Zinc concentrations in daphnids exposed to 600 microg Zn/L fluctuated with 2- to 3-day intervals, suggesting a role of molting in the regulation and elimination of zinc. PMID:12399922

  15. Bioavailability of zinc from sweet potato roots and leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Baiden, H.N.; Ercanli-Huffman, F.G.

    1986-03-05

    Bioavailability of zinc from sweet potato (SP) roots and leaves were determined, by extrinsic labeling technique, in rats fed control and zinc deficient diets. Weanling male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats (60-75g) were divided into 4 groups, and fed laboratory chow, a control diet (ad libitum and pair fed) and a zinc deficient diet, for 4 weeks. Each group then was divided into at least 2 sub groups, containing 6 rats, which were intubated with one of 3 tubing solutions extrinsically labeled with /sup 65/Zn; baked sweet potato roots (BSPR), raw sweet potato leaves (RSPL) and cooked sweet potato leaves (CSPL). Five hours after intubation the rats were sacrificed, blood, liver, testes, spleen, heart, brain, thymus and lungs were removed. Feces, urine, and GI tract contents were collected and their /sup 65/Zn activity was determined in a gamma counter. In all treatment groups zinc bioavailability from BSPR, RSPL or CSPL were not significantly different. Zinc deficient rats absorbed significantly more (P < 0.01) /sup 65/Zn (86-90% of the dose), regardless of type of tubing solution than the pairfed or control animals (35-58% of the dose). The highest retention of /sup 65/Zn was found in the liver (12-20% of absorbed dose), GI tract (6-17% of absorbed dose), kidney (2-8% of absorbed dose), and blood (1-5% of absorbed dose). The lowest retention was found in the brain, heart, thymus and testes. (< 1% of absorbed dose).

  16. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  17. The epidemiology of global micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; West, Keith P; Black, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients are essential to sustain life and for optimal physiological function. Widespread global micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) exist, with pregnant women and their children under 5 years at the highest risk. Iron, iodine, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiencies are the most widespread MNDs, and all these MNDs are common contributors to poor growth, intellectual impairments, perinatal complications, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Iron deficiency is the most common MND worldwide and leads to microcytic anemia, decreased capacity for work, as well as impaired immune and endocrine function. Iodine deficiency disorder is also widespread and results in goiter, mental retardation, or reduced cognitive function. Adequate zinc is necessary for optimal immune function, and deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections, major causes of death in those <5 years of age. Folic acid taken in early pregnancy can prevent neural tube defects. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and repair, and deficiency results in macrocytic anemia. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and also impairs immune function and cell differentiation. Single MNDs rarely occur alone; often, multiple MNDs coexist. The long-term consequences of MNDs are not only seen at the individual level but also have deleterious impacts on the economic development and human capital at the country level. Perhaps of greatest concern is the cycle of MNDs that persists over generations and the intergenerational consequences of MNDs that we are only beginning to understand. Prevention of MNDs is critical and traditionally has been accomplished through supplementation, fortification, and food-based approaches including diversification. It is widely accepted that intervention in the first 1,000 days is critical to break the cycle of malnutrition; however, a coordinated, sustainable commitment to scaling up nutrition at the

  18. Effect of zinc supplementation in pregnant mice during experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves-Neto, Janaína Fernanda; Alonso Toldo, Míriam Paula; Santos, Carla Domingues; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis; Fonseca, Colete; Albuquerque, Sérgio

    2011-04-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient and has significant effects on human growth, development, and immune function. Zinc supplementation or deficiency may affect the course of infection. Zinc enhances immune response against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the effects of zinc sulphate (ZnSO(4)) supplementation (20mg/kg/day) during pregnancy in mice, Swiss Webster strain infected by the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Oral supplementation of zinc sulphate in pregnant and non-pregnant infected animals did not affect the count of blood parasites as well as tissue parasitism in the heart, liver, and spleen. Zinc supplementation did not alter female body weight, the length of fetuses and neonates, placental size/weight and mortality rate. Among zinc supplied animals, no significant plasmatic zinc concentrations were observed. Concerning to tissue zinc concentrations, only the liver displayed enhanced values as compared to other organs. For placental parasitism, zinc supplied group displayed a significant decrease in amastigote burdens (P<0.05). However due to the reduced number of parasite burdens in placenta of animals supplied with zinc, these data suggest that zinc was partially effective in up-regulating the host's immune response against parasite, probably attenuating the infection in fetuses.

  19. A novel hydrothermal method for zinc extraction and separation from zinc ferrite and electric arc furnace dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui-gang; Li, Yang; Gao, Jian-ming; Zhang, Mei; Guo, Min

    2016-02-01

    A novel hydrothermal process was developed to extract zinc from pure zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) nanopowder and zinc-containing electric arc furnace (EAF) dust using hexahydrated ferric chloride (FeCl3·6H2O) as a decomposing agent. The effects of solid FeCl3·6H2O to ZnFe2O4 ratio by mass ( R F/Z), hydrothermal reaction temperature, and time on zinc extraction were systematically investigated. In the results, when the hydrothermal reaction is conducted at 150°C for 2 h with R F/Z of 15:20, the efficiency of zinc extraction from ZnFe2O4 reaches 97.2%, and the concentration of ferric ions (Fe3+) in the leaching solution is nearly zero, indicating a high selectivity for zinc. In addition, the zinc extraction efficiency from the EAF dust reaches 94.5% in the case of the hydrothermal reaction performed at 200°C for 10 h with the solid FeCl3·6H2O to EAF dust ratio by mass ( R F/EAF dust) of 15:10. Zinc and iron separation is achieved by adjusting the pH value of the leaching solution according to the different precipitation pH values of metal hydroxides.

  20. Improved zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    DOEpatents

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1988-06-21

    The invention comprises an improved rechargeable zinc-air cell/battery having recirculating alkaline electrolyte and a zinc electrode comprising a porous foam support material which carries the active zinc electrode material. 5 figs.

  1. Alzheimer's disease causation by copper toxicity and treatment with zinc.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J

    2014-01-01

    Evidence will be presented that the Alzheimer's disease (AD) epidemic is new, the disease being very rare in the 1900s. The incidence is increasing rapidly, but only in developed countries. We postulate that the new emerging environmental factor partially causal of the AD epidemic is ingestion of inorganic copper from drinking water and taking supplement pills, along with a high fat diet. Inorganic copper can be partially directly absorbed and elevate the serum free copper pool. The Squitti group has shown that serum free copper is elevated in AD, correlates with cognition, and predicts cognition loss. Thus, our inorganic copper hypothesis fits well with the Squitti group data. We have also shown that AD patients are zinc deficient compared to age-matched controls. Because zinc is a neuronal protective factor, we postulate that zinc deficiency may also be partially causative of AD. We carried out a small 6 month double blind study of a new zinc formulation and found that in patients age 70 and over, it protected against cognition loss. Zinc therapy also significantly reduced serum free copper in AD patients, so efficacy may come from restoring normal zinc levels, or from lowering serum free copper, or from both. PMID:24860501

  2. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  3. [Zinc and autophagy].

    PubMed

    Qiaoyun, Liu; Hanming, Shen; Dajing, Xia

    2016-05-25

    Autophagy refers to a catabolic process,in which the damaged organelles or biological macromolecules, such as protein aggregates, are degraded via lysosome. The completion of autophagy depends on a series of autophagy-related genes (Atgs) and many upstream regulatory molecules. Zinc is an essential trace element, and plays an important role in the process of autophagy as a component of enzymes and structural proteins like zinc transporters or zinc finger protein. The regulation of autophagy is closely associated with the zinc ion homeostasis. In addition, many studies suggest that the protective effects of zinc on cells are likely to be done by autophagy. This review aims to summarize the current research progress and discuss the reciprocal regulation mechanism between zinc and autophagy, which may provide insights into the intricate roles of autophagy in diseases and find novel strategies for treatment and prevention of human diseases. PMID:27651198

  4. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: ZINC CASE EXAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element. Maternal Zn deficiency can result in complications of pregnancy and inadequate supply of Zn to the conceptus can interfere with the development of numerous organ systems. Maternal dietary Zn deficiency has been shown to be teratogenic in a...

  5. Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, P.N. Jr.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes an improved zinc electrode for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed.

  6. Zinc and inflammatory/immune response in aging.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Malavolta, Marco; Cuppari, Irene; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Ditta, Vito; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Life-long antigenic burden determines a condition of chronic inflammation, with increased lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. A large number of studies have documented changes in zinc metabolism in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflammation and in human chronic inflammatory conditions. In particular, modification of zinc plasma concentration, as well as intracellular disturbance of antioxidant intracellular pathways, has been found in aging and in some age-related diseases. Zinc deficiency is diffused in aged individuals in order to avoid meat and other high zinc content foods due to fear of cholesterol. Rather, they increase the consumption of refined wheat products that lack zinc and other critical nutrients as a consequence of the refining process. On the other hand, plasma zinc concentration is influenced by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and by metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis, which is in turn affected by proinflammatory cytokines. MT increase in aging and chronic inflammation allowing a continuous sequestration of intracellular zinc with subsequent low zinc ion availability against stressor agents and inflammation. This phenomenon leads to an impaired inflammatory/immune response in the elderly. A major target of zinc is NF-kappaB, a transcription factor critical for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines whose production is regulated by extra- and intracellular activating and inhibiting factors interacting with the regulatory elements on cytokine genes. Effects of zinc on translocation of NF-kappaB have been attributed to the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitory proteins (A20) that normally sequester it in the cytoplasm. Moreover, this factor and A20 are regulated by specific genes involved in inflammation and by intracellular zinc ion availability. So, it is not so surprising that zinc deficiency is constantly observed in chronic inflammation, such as in old

  7. Zinc and inflammatory/immune response in aging.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Malavolta, Marco; Cuppari, Irene; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Ditta, Vito; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Life-long antigenic burden determines a condition of chronic inflammation, with increased lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. A large number of studies have documented changes in zinc metabolism in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflammation and in human chronic inflammatory conditions. In particular, modification of zinc plasma concentration, as well as intracellular disturbance of antioxidant intracellular pathways, has been found in aging and in some age-related diseases. Zinc deficiency is diffused in aged individuals in order to avoid meat and other high zinc content foods due to fear of cholesterol. Rather, they increase the consumption of refined wheat products that lack zinc and other critical nutrients as a consequence of the refining process. On the other hand, plasma zinc concentration is influenced by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and by metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis, which is in turn affected by proinflammatory cytokines. MT increase in aging and chronic inflammation allowing a continuous sequestration of intracellular zinc with subsequent low zinc ion availability against stressor agents and inflammation. This phenomenon leads to an impaired inflammatory/immune response in the elderly. A major target of zinc is NF-kappaB, a transcription factor critical for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines whose production is regulated by extra- and intracellular activating and inhibiting factors interacting with the regulatory elements on cytokine genes. Effects of zinc on translocation of NF-kappaB have been attributed to the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitory proteins (A20) that normally sequester it in the cytoplasm. Moreover, this factor and A20 are regulated by specific genes involved in inflammation and by intracellular zinc ion availability. So, it is not so surprising that zinc deficiency is constantly observed in chronic inflammation, such as in old

  8. Zinc in Entamoeba invadens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. S.; Sattilaro, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and dithizone staining of trophozoites and cysts of Entamoeba invadens demonstrate that these cells have a high concentration of zinc (approximately one picogram per cell or 1% of their dry weight). In the cysts of this organism, the zinc is confined to the chromatoid bodies, which previous work has shown to contain crystals of ribosomes. The chemical state and function of this zinc are unknown.

  9. Zinc acclimation and its effect on the zinc tolerance of Raphidocelis subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Muyssen, B T; Janssen, C R

    2001-11-01

    The effect of zinc acclimation of Raphidocelis subcapitata (syn. Selenastrum capricornutum) and Chlorella vulgaris on their sensitivity towards this metal was examined in a series of laboratory experiments. These two commonly used algal species were acclimated to 65 microg Zn/l and changes in zinc tolerance were monitored using standard growth inhibition tests. The chemically defined ISO medium was used as a control culture medium. Both species demonstrated a maximum increase in zinc tolerance of a factor of 3 after 100 days of acclimation. Shifts in the shape of the concentration-response curve due to acclimation were observed for R. subcapitata. Compared to non-acclimated algae, acclimated R. subcapitata exhibited higher growth rates in all zinc treatments as well as in the controls. This suggests that the use of ISO-medium results in sub-optimal growth due to zinc deficiency. These effects could not be demonstrated for C. vulgaris. The zinc tolerance of both species decreased significantly one week after returning the acclimated algae to control (ISO) medium. 72hEC50 values based on growth rate were two to four times higher than those calculated using biomass measurements. Algal toxicity test results, particularly if used for metal risk assessments, must not be conducted using nutrient deficient media. PMID:11680746

  10. Zinc and Chlamydia trachomatis

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, B.; Epps, L.R.

    1985-07-01

    Zinc was noted to have significant effects upon the infection of McCoy cells by each of two strains of Chlamydia trachomatis. With a high or low Chlamydia inoculant, the number of infected cells increased up to 200% utilizing supplemental zinc (up to 1 x 10/sup -4/ M) in the inoculation media compared with standard Chlamydia cultivation media (8 x 10/sup -6/ M zinc). Ferric chloride and calcium chloride did not effect any such changes. Higher concentrations of zinc, after 2 hr of incubation with Chlamydia, significantly decreased the number of inclusions. This direct effect of zinc on the Chlamydia remained constant after further repassage of the Chlamydia without supplemental zinc, suggesting a lethal effect of the zinc. Supplemental zinc (up to 10/sup -4/ M) may prove to be a useful addition to inoculation media to increase the yield of culturing for Chlamydia trachomatis. Similarly, topical or oral zinc preparations used by people may alter their susceptibility to Chamydia trachomatis infections.

  11. Bioavailability of zinc oxide added to corn tortilla is similar to that of zinc sulfate and is not affected by simultaneous addition of iron

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Jorge L.; Díaz, Margarita; Muñoz, Elsa; Westcott, Jamie L.; González, Karla E.; Krebs, Nancy F.; Caamaño, María C.; Hambidge, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Corn tortilla is the staple food of Mexico and its fortification with zinc, iron, and other micronutrients is intended to reduce micronutrient deficiencies. However, no studies have been performed to determine the relative amount of zinc absorbed from the fortified product and whether zinc absorption is affected by the simultaneous addition of iron. Objective To compare zinc absorption from corn tortilla fortified with zinc oxide versus zinc sulfate and to determine the effect of simultaneous addition of two doses of iron on zinc bioavailability. Methods A randomized, double-blind, crossover design was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, 10 adult women received corn tortillas with either 20 mg/kg of zinc oxide added, 20 mg/kg of zinc sulfate added, or no zinc added. In the second phase, 10 adult women received corn tortilla with 20 mg/kg of zinc oxide added and either with no iron added or with iron added at one of two different levels. Zinc absorption was measured by the stable isotope method. Results The mean (± SEM) fractional zinc absorption from unfortified tortilla, tortilla fortified with zinc oxide, and tortilla fortified with zinc sulfate did not differ among treatments: 0.35 ± 0.07, 0.36 ± 0.05, and 0.37 ± 0.07, respectively. The three treatment groups with 0, 30, and 60 mg/kg of added iron had similar fractional zinc absorption (0.32 ± 0.04, 0.33 ± 0.02, and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively) and similar amounts of zinc absorbed (4.8 ± 0.7, 4.5 ± 0.3, and 4.8 ± 0.7 mg/day, respectively). Conclusions Since zinc oxide is more stable and less expensive and was absorbed equally as well as zinc sulfate, we suggest its use for corn tortilla fortification. Simultaneous addition of zinc and iron to corn tortilla does not modify zinc bioavailability at iron doses of 30 and 60 mg/kg of corn flour. PMID:23424892

  12. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes’ expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice. PMID:27092162

  13. Expression of Zinc Transporter Genes in Rice as Influenced by Zinc-Solubilizing Enterobacter cloacae Strain ZSB14.

    PubMed

    Krithika, Selvaraj; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency in major food crops has been considered as an important factor affecting the crop production and subsequently the human health. Rice (Oryza sativa) is sensitive to Zn deficiency and thereby causes malnutrition to most of the rice-eating Asian populations. Application of zinc solubilizing bacteria (ZSB) could be a sustainable agronomic approach to increase the soil available Zn which can mitigate the yield loss and consequently the nutritional quality of rice. Understanding the molecular interactions between rice and unexplored ZSB is useful for overcoming Zn deficiency problems. In the present study, the role of zinc solubilizing bacterial strain Enterobacter cloacae strain ZSB14 on regulation of Zn-regulated transporters and iron (Fe)-regulated transporter-like protein (ZIP) genes in rice under iron sufficient and deficient conditions was assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. The expression patterns of OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 in root and shoot of rice were altered due to the Zn availability as dictated by Zn sources and ZSB inoculation. Fe sufficiency significantly reduced the root and shoot OsZIP1 expression, but not the OsZIP4 and OsZIP5 levels. Zinc oxide in the growth medium up-regulated all the assessed ZIP genes in root and shoot of rice seedlings. When ZSB was inoculated to rice seedlings grown with insoluble zinc oxide in the growth medium, the expression of root and shoot OsZIP1, OsZIP4, and OsZIP5 was reduced. In the absence of zinc oxide, ZSB inoculation up-regulated OsZIP1 and OsZIP5 expressions. Zinc nutrition provided to the rice seedling through ZSB-bound zinc oxide solubilization was comparable to the soluble zinc sulfate application which was evident through the ZIP genes' expression and the Zn accumulation in root and shoot of rice seedlings. These results demonstrate that ZSB could play a crucial role in zinc fertilization and fortification of rice. PMID:27092162

  14. Finger millet (Eleucine coracana) flour as a vehicle for fortification with zinc.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Bhumika; Platel, Kalpana

    2010-01-01

    Millets, being less expensive compared to cereals and the staple for the poorer sections of population, could be the choice for fortification with micronutrients such as zinc. In view of this, finger millet, widely grown and commonly consumed in southern India, was explored as a vehicle for fortification with zinc in this investigation. Finger millet flour fortified with either zinc oxide or zinc stearate so as to provide 50mg zinc per kg flour, was specifically examined for the bioaccessibility of the fortified mineral, as measured by in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion procedure and storage stability. Addition of the zinc salts increased the bioaccessible zinc content by 1.5-3 times that of the unfortified flour. Inclusion of EDTA along with the fortified salt significantly enhanced the bioaccessibility of zinc from the fortified flours, the increase being three-fold. Inclusion of citric acid along with the zinc salt and EDTA during fortification did not have any additional beneficial effect on zinc bioaccessiblity. Moisture and free fatty acid contents of the stored fortified flours indicated the keeping quality of the same, up to 60 days. Both zinc oxide and zinc stearate were equally effective as fortificants, when used in combination with EDTA as a co-fortificant. The preparation of either roti or dumpling from the fortified flours stored up to 60 days did not result in any significant compromise in the bioaccessible zinc content. Thus, the present study has revealed that finger millet flour can effectively be used as a vehicle for zinc fortification to derive additional amounts of bioaccessible zinc, with reasonably good storage stability, to combat zinc deficiency.

  15. Multigeneration zinc acclimation and tolerance in Daphnia magna: implications for water-quality guidelines and ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Muyssen, B T; Janssen, C R

    2001-09-01

    Development of zinc tolerance is described for the cladoceran Daphnia magna Straus. Zinc tolerance (i.e., toxicity and deficiency) was monitored during successive generations of D. magna acclimated to different zinc concentrations. Survival, reproduction, carapax length measurements, and cellular energy allocation assessments were used as test endpoints. Special attention was paid to the consequences of zinc deficiency. The zinc acclimation concentration clearly influenced the overall fitness of the organism. After several generations of acclimation, an optimal concentration curve was observed, with an optimum zinc concentration between 300 and 450 microg/L. Zinc deficiency resulted in a lower zinc tolerance, a higher coefficient of variation for brood size, and an increased pH sensitivity. These results clearly indicate that (background) zinc concentrations present in test and culture media have to be considered in the evaluation of toxicity test results, especially when the toxicity data are used for water-quality guideline derivation and/or ecological risk assessment. Culture and test media containing very little or no zinc do not provide a basis for useful ecotoxicological data. PMID:11521834

  16. Chelators for investigating zinc metalloneurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Radford, Robert J; Lippard, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    The physiology and pathology of mobile zinc signaling has become an important topic in metalloneurochemistry. To study the action of mobile zinc effectively, specialized tools are required that probe the temporal and positional changes of zinc ions within live tissue and cells. In the present article we describe the design and implementation of selective zinc chelators as antagonists to interrogate the function of mobile zinc, with an emphasis on the pools of vesicular zinc in the terminals of hippocampal mossy fiber buttons.

  17. Is iron and zinc nutrition a concern for vegetarian infants and young children in industrialized countries?

    PubMed

    Gibson, Rosalind S; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2014-07-01

    Well-planned vegetarian diets are considered adequate for all stages of the life cycle, despite limited data on the zinc status of vegetarians during early childhood. The bioavailability of iron and zinc in vegetarian diets is poor because of their higher content of absorption inhibitors such as phytate and polyphenols and the absence of flesh foods. Consequently, children as well as adult vegetarians often have lower serum ferritin concentrations than omnivores, which is indicative of reduced iron stores, despite comparable intakes of total iron; hemoglobin differences are small and rarely associated with anemia. However, data on serum zinc concentrations, the recommended biomarker for identifying population groups at elevated risk of zinc deficiency, are sparse and difficult to interpret because recommended collection and analytic procedures have not always been followed. Existing data indicate no differences in serum zinc or growth between young vegetarian and omnivorous children, although there is some evidence of low serum zinc concentrations in vegetarian adolescents. Some vegetarian immigrants from underprivileged households may be predisposed to iron and zinc deficiency because of nondietary factors such as chronic inflammation, parasitic infections, overweight, and genetic hemoglobin disorders. To reduce the risk of deficiency, the content and bioavailability of iron and zinc should be enhanced in vegetarian diets by consumption of fortified cereals and milk, by consumption of leavened whole grains, by soaking dried legumes before cooking and discarding the soaking water, and by replacing tea and coffee at meals with vitamin C-rich drinks, fruit, or vegetables. Additional recommended practices include using fermented soy foods and sprouting at least some of the legumes consumed. Fortified foods can reduce iron deficiency, but whether they can also reduce zinc deficiency is less certain. Supplements may be necessary for vegetarian children following very

  18. Mother-plant-mediated pumping of zinc into the developing seed.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lene Irene; Hansen, Thomas H; Larue, Camille; Østerberg, Jeppe Thulin; Hoffmann, Robert D; Liesche, Johannes; Krämer, Ute; Surblé, Suzy; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Samson, Vallerie Ann; Grolimund, Daniel; Husted, Søren; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient intake of zinc and iron from a cereal-based diet is one of the causes of 'hidden hunger' (micronutrient deficiency), which affects some two billion people(1,2). Identifying a limiting factor in the molecular mechanism of zinc loading into seeds is an important step towards determining the genetic basis for variation of grain micronutrient content and developing breeding strategies to improve this trait(3). Nutrients are translocated to developing seeds at a rate that is regulated by transport processes in source leaves, in the phloem vascular pathway, and at seed sinks. Nutrients are released from a symplasmic maternal seed domain into the seed apoplasm surrounding the endosperm and embryo by poorly understood membrane transport processes(4-6). Plants are unique among eukaryotes in having specific P1B-ATPase pumps for the cellular export of zinc(7). In Arabidopsis, we show that two zinc transporting P1B-ATPases actively export zinc from the mother plant to the filial tissues. Mutant plants that lack both zinc pumps accumulate zinc in the seed coat and consequently have vastly reduced amounts of zinc inside the seed. Blockage of zinc transport was observed at both high and low external zinc supplies. The phenotype was determined by the mother plant and is thus due to a lack of zinc pump activity in the seed coat and not in the filial tissues. The finding that P1B-ATPases are one of the limiting factors controlling the amount of zinc inside a seed is an important step towards combating nutritional zinc deficiency worldwide.

  19. Mother-plant-mediated pumping of zinc into the developing seed.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Lene Irene; Hansen, Thomas H; Larue, Camille; Østerberg, Jeppe Thulin; Hoffmann, Robert D; Liesche, Johannes; Krämer, Ute; Surblé, Suzy; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Samson, Vallerie Ann; Grolimund, Daniel; Husted, Søren; Palmgren, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient intake of zinc and iron from a cereal-based diet is one of the causes of 'hidden hunger' (micronutrient deficiency), which affects some two billion people(1,2). Identifying a limiting factor in the molecular mechanism of zinc loading into seeds is an important step towards determining the genetic basis for variation of grain micronutrient content and developing breeding strategies to improve this trait(3). Nutrients are translocated to developing seeds at a rate that is regulated by transport processes in source leaves, in the phloem vascular pathway, and at seed sinks. Nutrients are released from a symplasmic maternal seed domain into the seed apoplasm surrounding the endosperm and embryo by poorly understood membrane transport processes(4-6). Plants are unique among eukaryotes in having specific P1B-ATPase pumps for the cellular export of zinc(7). In Arabidopsis, we show that two zinc transporting P1B-ATPases actively export zinc from the mother plant to the filial tissues. Mutant plants that lack both zinc pumps accumulate zinc in the seed coat and consequently have vastly reduced amounts of zinc inside the seed. Blockage of zinc transport was observed at both high and low external zinc supplies. The phenotype was determined by the mother plant and is thus due to a lack of zinc pump activity in the seed coat and not in the filial tissues. The finding that P1B-ATPases are one of the limiting factors controlling the amount of zinc inside a seed is an important step towards combating nutritional zinc deficiency worldwide. PMID:27243644

  20. Resistant starch does not affect zinc homeostasis in rural Malawian children☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Maleta, Ken; Westcott, Jamie; Ryan, Kelsey; Hambidge, K. Michael; Miller, Leland V.; Young, Graeme; Mortimer, Elissa; Manary, Mark J.; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that Malawian children at risk for zinc deficiency will have reduced endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) and increased net absorbed zinc (NAZ) following the addition of high amylose maize resistant starch (RS) to their diet. Methods This was a small controlled clinical trial to determine the effects of added dietary RS on zinc homeostasis among 17 stunted children, aged 3–5 years consuming a plant-based diet and at risk for perturbed zinc homeostasis. Dual zinc stable isotope studies were performed before and after 28 d of intervention with RS, so that each child served as their own control. The RS was incorporated into fried wheat flour dough and given under direct observation twice daily for 28 d. Changes in zinc homeostatic measures were compared using paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results Children had a mean height-for-age Z-score of −3.3, and consumed animal source foods ≤twice per month. Their habitual diet contained a phytate:zinc molar ratio of 34:1. Children avidly consumed the RS without complaints. EFZ was 0.8±0.4 mg/d (mean±SD) both before and after the intervention. Fractional absorption of zinc was 0.38±0.08 and 0.35±0.06 before and after the RS intervention respectively. NAZ was 1.1±0.5 and 0.6±0.7 before and after the RS intervention. This reduction of NAZ corresponded with diminished dietary zinc intake on the study day following intervention with RS. Regression analysis indicated no change in zinc absorption relative to dietary intake as a result of the RS intervention. Conclusion Consumption of RS did not improve zinc homeostasis in rural African children without zinc deficiency. RS was well tolerated in this setting. PMID:25744509

  1. Solubility of Zinc Silicate and Zinc Ferrite in Aqueous Solution to High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Donald; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M

    2009-07-01

    Crystalline zinc silicate, Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and zinc ferrite, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, were prepared and characterized. The solubilities of these phases were measured using flow-through apparatus from 50 to 350 C in 100 C intervals over a wide range of pH. Both solid phases dissolve incongruently, presumably to form ZnO(s) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) (or the corresponding hydroxide phases at low temperature), respectively. The respective concentrations of zinc(II) and iron(III) matched those of ZnO(cr) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) ({ge}150 C) reported in the literature, whereas the corresponding Si(IV) and Zn(II) concentrations were at least an order of magnitude below the solubility limits for their pure oxide phases. Therefore, the solubility constants for zinc silicate and ferrite were determined with respect to the known solubility constants for ZnO(cr) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) ({ge}150 C), respectively, and the corresponding concentrations of Si(IV) and Zn(II) measured in this study. The results of independent experiments, as well as those reported in the literature provide insights into the mechanism(s) of formation of zinc silicate and ferrite in the primary circuits of nuclear reactors.

  2. "Pure" cutaneous histiocytosis-X.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, S L; Botero, F; Hurwitz, S; Pearson, H A

    1981-11-15

    The case histories of two young children who experienced skin rashes involving various areas of the body are reported. The diagnosis of pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X was established after extensive studies revealed no other organ involvement. The patients were treated with oral corticosteroids. Currently, both children are in good health, show no evidence of disease, and have been followed over a four-to-five-year period. Therapy with corticosteroids may not be indicated with pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X unless there is evidence of extracutaneous dissemination or rapid progression of the disease.

  3. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans.

  4. Zinc as a micronutrient and its preventive role of oxidative damage in cells.

    PubMed

    Kloubert, Veronika; Rink, Lothar

    2015-10-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element with special importance in the immune system. Deficiencies of zinc are seen in the course of ageing and in various diseases, such as diabetes mellitus or rheumathoid arthritis. The trace element is essential for a variety of basic cellular functions and especially important for various enzymes participating in the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are normally produced by the cell. Under normal conditions ROS are neutralized and are not able to harm the cell, but in case of ROS elevation, oxidative damage within the cell is the result. Interestingly, zinc deficiency is directly associated with oxidative stress. Thus, control and regulation of the intracellular zinc content is essential with participation of various transporter and zinc-binding proteins, such as metallothionein. Oxidative stress is mainly caused by elevated ROS production and a decrease of antioxidant mechanisms. Zinc partly functions as an antioxidant although it is redox inert. Zinc supplementation is associated with decreased ROS formation exhibiting beneficial effects especially in ageing and diabetes mellitus. This review summarizes current findings concerning zinc as a micronutrient and its actions as a pro-antioxidant, and the association between zinc and oxidative stress under various conditions is highlighted. PMID:26286461

  5. Involvement of zinc in cell-free protein synthesizing systems from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, S.E.; Wallwork, J.C.

    1986-03-05

    There are conflicting reports in the literature concerning the role of zinc in protein synthesis. This study presents evidence for the direct involvement of zinc in the translation of polypeptide chains in rats. Cell-free systems for incorporation of amino acids into acid-insoluble proteins were prepared from livers of three populations of rats: (1) rats fed ad libitum a diet containing 25 ppm zinc; (2) rats fed a diet containing less than 1 ppm zinc and (3) rats pair-fed a diet containing 25 ppm zinc. The diets contained 20% egg white and were enriched with biotin. Distilled deionized drinking water was given. The animals were maintained on the regimen for 45 days with precautions to limit zinc contamination. Group 2 showed typical signs of zinc deficiency, including decreased bone zinc. In vitro systems containing liver polysomes and a pH5 precipitate enzyme fraction indicated that the synthetic ability of systems isolated from zinc-deficient rats was considerably depressed, resulting in incorporation of amino acids 15 to 30% less than systems from pair-fed rats and 30 to 50% less than ad libitum-fed control animals. The results of crossover experiments performed by mixing polysome and enzyme fractions from the different groups indicated that the defect is due primarily to the pH precipitate enzyme fraction and not the polysomes.

  6. Height, zinc and soil-transmitted helminth infections in schoolchildren: a study in Cuba and Cambodia.

    PubMed

    de Gier, Brechje; Mpabanzi, Liliane; Vereecken, Kim; van der Werff, Suzanne D; D'Haese, Patrick C; Fiorentino, Marion; Khov, Kuong; Perignon, Marlene; Chamnan, Chhoun; Berger, Jacques; Parker, Megan E; Díaz, Raquel Junco; Núñez, Fidel Angel; Rivero, Lázara Rojas; Gorbea, Mariano Bonet; Doak, Colleen M; Ponce, Maiza Campos; Wieringa, Frank T; Polman, Katja

    2015-04-20

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections and zinc deficiency are often found in low- and middle-income countries and are both known to affect child growth. However, studies combining data on zinc and STH are lacking. In two studies in schoolchildren in Cuba and Cambodia, we collected data on height, STH infection and zinc concentration in either plasma (Cambodia) or hair (Cuba). We analyzed whether STH and/or zinc were associated with height for age z-scores and whether STH and zinc were associated. In Cuba, STH prevalence was 8.4%; these were mainly Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infections. In Cambodia, STH prevalence was 16.8%, mostly caused by hookworm. In Cuban children, STH infection had a strong association with height for age (aB-0.438, p = 0.001), while hair zinc was significantly associated with height for age only in STH uninfected children. In Cambodian children, plasma zinc was associated with height for age (aB-0.033, p = 0.029), but STH infection was not. Only in Cambodia, STH infection showed an association with zinc concentration (aB-0.233, p = 0.051). Factors influencing child growth differ between populations and may depend on prevalences of STH species and zinc deficiency. Further research is needed to elucidate these relationships and their underlying mechanisms.

  7. Preparation of zinc orthotitanate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.; Logan, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Use of decomposable precursors to enhance zinc oxide-titanium dioxide reaction and rapid fixing results in rapid preparation of zinc orthotitanate powder pigment. Preparation process allows production under less stringent conditions. Elimination of powder grinding results in purer that is less susceptible to color degradation.

  8. The healing of gastric ulcers by zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Frommer, D J

    1975-11-22

    A double-blind trial of zinc sulphate given by mouth (220 mg, three times a day) and placebo was undertaken in patients with benign gastric ulcers. The drug was given for a three-week period and the healing of the ulcers was estimated from results of barium-meal X-ray films taken immediately before and after this period. There were ten patients taking zinc sulphate and eight patients taking placebo. The two groups of patients were comparable in all respects, including initial ulcer size. Patients taking zinc sulphate had an ulcer healing rate three times that of patients treated with placebo. This difference was significant (P less than 0-05). Complete healing of ulcers occurred more frequently in the patients taking zinc sulphate than in patients treated with placebo. The placebo group contained more patients whose ulcers did not heal at all, than the group taking zinc sulphate. No side effects from zinc sulphate were noted. There was no evidence of zinc deficiency in any of the patients.

  9. Status of Serum Zinc in Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Barman, N; Haque, M A; Uddin, M N; Ghosh, D; Rahman, M W; Islam, M T; Rahman, M Q; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    Zinc plays a vital role in the immune status. Its deficiency affects host defense by reducing the number of circulating T cells and phagocytosis activity of other cells which ultimately impair cell mediated immunity. The cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in the causation of pulmonary tuberculosis. The present study was carried out to estimate serum zinc level in newly detected multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in adult population. In this study total fifty (50) MDR-TB patients were enrolled conveniently from the in-patients departments of National Institute of Diseases of the Chest Hospital (NIDCH), Bangladesh. Serum zinc was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method from early morning fasting blood sample. Serum zinc level was assessed according to normal cut-off value 70-120 μgm/dl and 76% studied population were found lower than this value. The mean±SD serum zinc level was observed 60.40±8.91 μgm/dl. No associations were found between serum zinc level with age (p=0.11) and with sex (p=0.085) of the study population respectively. The low level of serum zinc in MDR-TB patients suggested impaired immune status of our study population.

  10. Effect of zinc concentration on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme in human plasma and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, P.G.; Carl, G.F.; Smith, D.K.; O'Dell, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The activity of angiotensin converting enzyme is measured clinically to assist in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and to monitor therapy with steroids, and with antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the enzyme. Even though it has been known for some time that ACE is a zinc dependent enzyme, it was discovered only recently that zinc, in addition to endogenous levels in the assay mixture, is required for maximal activity of rat serum ACE. The present experiment was designed to determine if additional zinc is required for maximal activation of ACE in plasma and serum of human subjects. Plasma or serum samples were incubated at 37/sup 0/ in a zinc-free medium, pH 7.4, containing hippurylglyclglycine as the substrate. The addition of 20 ..mu..M zinc significantly increased ACE activity in plasma (95.4 +/- 11.9 vs 192.8 +/- 24.3 U/L) and in serum (89.9 +/- 5.6 vs 195.7 +/- 9.3 U/L) compared to samples without added zinc. Enzyme activity was increased 2.4-fold when zinc was added to plasma from a patient with low plasma zinc. These data suggest that the endogenous level of zinc in the assay mixture resulting from the addition of an aliquot of plasma or serum is insufficient to obtain maximal activity of ACE. The addition of zinc to zinc deficient plasma increased ACE activity even more.

  11. Maternal diets, nutritional status, and zinc in contemporary Mexican infants' teeth: Implications for reconstructing paleodiets.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Alexis E; Goodman, Alan H

    2009-11-01

    Despite attempts to use zinc (Zn) concentrations in hard tissues to comment upon the degree of carnivory in past populations, zinc has yielded inconsistent trophic level effects. The question of what, if anything, zinc in human enamel reveals regarding past diets is the focus of this research. We test whether the zinc content of deciduous tooth enamel from contemporary Mexican infants varies by maternal dietary variables such as zinc intake, proportion of animal products consumed, and dietary components that are known to impact zinc absorption. Deciduous teeth were collected from former participants in a longitudinal study of maternal and infant diet and function in highland Mexico. The Zn/Ca ratios of both prenatal and postnatal regions of 37 anterior teeth representing 26 individuals were assessed via laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Maternal dietary data collected during lactation were not correlated with zinc levels in the early postnatal enamel of infants' teeth, which were forming at the same time. In the case of prenatal enamel, zinc values were correlated with the consumption of foods known to influence Zn bioavailability, most notably tortillas (P = 0.008; r = 0.510), but not with meat consumption. Unexpectedly, women who consumed diets with poor zinc bioavailability during pregnancy gave birth to infants whose prenatal enamel demonstrated the highest Zn/Ca ratios, possibly due to enhanced zinc absorption during pregnancy for those mothers suffering most from long-term micronutrient deficiency. These results would suggest that zinc is not a reliable trophic level indicator.

  12. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  13. Exploring zinc coordination in novel zinc battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2014-06-14

    The coordination of zinc ions by tetraglyme has been investigated here to support the development of novel electrolytes for rechargeable zinc batteries. Zn(2+) reduction is electrochemically reversible from tetraglyme. The spectroscopic data, molar conductivity and thermal behavior as a function of zinc composition, between mole ratios [80 : 20] and [50 : 50] [tetraglyme : zinc chloride], all suggest that strong interactions take place between chloro-zinc complexes and tetraglyme. Varying the concentration of zinc chloride produces a range of zinc-chloro species (ZnClx)(2-x) in solution, which hinder full interaction between the zinc ion and tetraglyme. Both the [70 : 30] and [50 : 50] mixtures are promising electrolyte candidates for reversible zinc batteries, such as the zinc-air device.

  14. Exploring zinc coordination in novel zinc battery electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2014-06-14

    The coordination of zinc ions by tetraglyme has been investigated here to support the development of novel electrolytes for rechargeable zinc batteries. Zn(2+) reduction is electrochemically reversible from tetraglyme. The spectroscopic data, molar conductivity and thermal behavior as a function of zinc composition, between mole ratios [80 : 20] and [50 : 50] [tetraglyme : zinc chloride], all suggest that strong interactions take place between chloro-zinc complexes and tetraglyme. Varying the concentration of zinc chloride produces a range of zinc-chloro species (ZnClx)(2-x) in solution, which hinder full interaction between the zinc ion and tetraglyme. Both the [70 : 30] and [50 : 50] mixtures are promising electrolyte candidates for reversible zinc batteries, such as the zinc-air device. PMID:24760367

  15. Vimentin filament organization and stress sensing depend on its single cysteine residue and zinc binding

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Oeste, Clara L.; Martínez, Alma E.; Carrasco, M. Jesús; Garzón, Beatriz; Cañada, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    The vimentin filament network plays a key role in cell architecture and signalling, as well as in epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Vimentin C328 is targeted by various oxidative modifications, but its role in vimentin organization is not known. Here we show that C328 is essential for vimentin network reorganization in response to oxidants and electrophiles, and is required for optimal vimentin performance in network expansion, lysosomal distribution and aggresome formation. C328 may fulfil these roles through interaction with zinc. In vitro, micromolar zinc protects vimentin from iodoacetamide modification and elicits vimentin polymerization into optically detectable structures; in cells, zinc closely associates with vimentin and its depletion causes reversible filament disassembly. Finally, zinc transport-deficient human fibroblasts show increased vimentin solubility and susceptibility to disruption, which are restored by zinc supplementation. These results unveil a critical role of C328 in vimentin organization and open new perspectives for the regulation of intermediate filaments by zinc. PMID:26031447

  16. Interstitial zinc clusters in zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluba, M. A.; Nickel, N. H.; Karpensky, N.

    2013-12-01

    Doped zinc oxide (ZnO) exhibits anomalous Raman modes in the range of 270 to 870 cm-1. Commonly, the resonance at 275 cm-1 is attributed to the local vibration of Zn atoms in the vicinity of extrinsic dopants. We revisit this assignment by investigating the influence of isotopically purified zinc oxide thin films on the frequency of the vibrational mode around 275 cm-1. For this purpose, undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO thin-films with Zn isotope compositions of natural Zn, 64Zn, 68Zn, and a 1:1 mixture of 64Zn and 68Zn were grown by pulsed laser deposition. The isotopic shift and the line shape of the Raman resonance around 275 cm-1 are analyzed in terms of three different microscopic models, which involve the vibration of (i) interstitial zinc atoms bound to extrinsic defects, (ii) interstitial diatomic Zn molecules, and (iii) interstitial zinc clusters. The energy diagram of interstitial Zn-Zn bonds in a ZnO matrix is derived from density functional theory calculations. The interstitial Zn-Zn bond is stabilized by transferring electrons from the antibonding orbital into the ZnO conduction band. This mechanism facilitates the formation of interstitial Zn clusters and fosters the common n-type doping asymmetry of ZnO.

  17. Designing hydrolytic zinc metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Zastrow, Melissa L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2014-02-18

    Zinc is an essential element required for the function of more than 300 enzymes spanning all classes. Despite years of dedicated study, questions regarding the connections between primary and secondary metal ligands and protein structure and function remain unanswered, despite numerous mechanistic, structural, biochemical, and synthetic model studies. Protein design is a powerful strategy for reproducing native metal sites that may be applied to answering some of these questions and subsequently generating novel zinc enzymes. From examination of the earliest design studies introducing simple Zn(II)-binding sites into de novo and natural protein scaffolds to current studies involving the preparation of efficient hydrolytic zinc sites, it is increasingly likely that protein design will achieve reaction rates previously thought possible only for native enzymes. This Current Topic will review the design and redesign of Zn(II)-binding sites in de novo-designed proteins and native protein scaffolds toward the preparation of catalytic hydrolytic sites. After discussing the preparation of Zn(II)-binding sites in various scaffolds, we will describe relevant examples for reengineering existing zinc sites to generate new or altered catalytic activities. Then, we will describe our work on the preparation of a de novo-designed hydrolytic zinc site in detail and present comparisons to related designed zinc sites. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the significant progress being made toward building zinc metalloenzymes from the bottom up. PMID:24506795

  18. Designing Hydrolytic Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential element required for the function of more than 300 enzymes spanning all classes. Despite years of dedicated study, questions regarding the connections between primary and secondary metal ligands and protein structure and function remain unanswered, despite numerous mechanistic, structural, biochemical, and synthetic model studies. Protein design is a powerful strategy for reproducing native metal sites that may be applied to answering some of these questions and subsequently generating novel zinc enzymes. From examination of the earliest design studies introducing simple Zn(II)-binding sites into de novo and natural protein scaffolds to current studies involving the preparation of efficient hydrolytic zinc sites, it is increasingly likely that protein design will achieve reaction rates previously thought possible only for native enzymes. This Current Topic will review the design and redesign of Zn(II)-binding sites in de novo-designed proteins and native protein scaffolds toward the preparation of catalytic hydrolytic sites. After discussing the preparation of Zn(II)-binding sites in various scaffolds, we will describe relevant examples for reengineering existing zinc sites to generate new or altered catalytic activities. Then, we will describe our work on the preparation of a de novo-designed hydrolytic zinc site in detail and present comparisons to related designed zinc sites. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the significant progress being made toward building zinc metalloenzymes from the bottom up. PMID:24506795

  19. Transcriptomic profiling of Arabidopsis gene expression in response to varying micronutrient zinc supply

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Herlânder; Azinheiro, Sarah Gaspar; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Castro, Pedro Humberto; Huettel, Bruno; Aarts, Mark G.M.; Assunção, Ana G.L.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of the micronutrient zinc is a widespread condition in agricultural soils, causing a negative impact on crop quality and yield. Nevertheless, there is an insufficient knowledge on the regulatory and molecular mechanisms underlying the plant response to inadequate zinc nutrition [1]. This information should contribute to the development of plant-based solutions with improved nutrient-use-efficiency traits in crops. Previously, the transcription factors bZIP19 and bZIP23 were identified as essential regulators of the response to zinc deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana [2]. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression between roots of wild-type and the mutant bzip19 bzip23, exposed to zinc deficiency, led to the identification of differentially expressed genes related with zinc homeostasis, namely its transport and plant internal translocation [2]. Here, we provide the detailed methodology, bioinformatics analysis and quality controls related to the microarray gene expression profiling published by Assunção and co-workers [2]. Most significantly, the present dataset comprises new experimental variables, including analysis of shoot tissue, and zinc sufficiency and excess supply. Thus, it expands from 8 to 42 microarrays hybridizations, which have been deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the accession number GSE77286. Overall, it provides a resource for research on the molecular basis and regulatory events of the plant response to zinc supply, emphasizing the importance of Arabidopsis bZIP19 and bZIP23 transcription factors. PMID:26981422

  20. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  1. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  2. Canonical Thermal Pure Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2013-07-01

    A thermal equilibrium state of a quantum many-body system can be represented by a typical pure state, which we call a thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state. We construct the canonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the canonical ensemble of the conventional statistical mechanics. It is related to the microcanonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the microcanonical ensemble, by simple analytic transformations. Both TPQ states give identical thermodynamic results, if both ensembles do, in the thermodynamic limit. The TPQ states corresponding to other ensembles can also be constructed. We have thus established the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, according to which all quantities of statistical-mechanical interest are obtained from a single realization of any TPQ state. We also show that it has great advantages in practical applications. As an illustration, we study the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  3. Zinc fingers, zinc clusters, and zinc twists in DNA-binding protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Coleman, J E; Auld, D S

    1991-01-01

    We now recognize three distinct motifs of DNA-binding zinc proteins: (i) zinc fingers, (ii) zinc clusters, and (iii) zinc twists. Until very recently, x-ray crystallographic or NMR three-dimensional structure analyses of DNA-binding zinc proteins have not been available to serve as standards of reference for the zinc binding sites of these families of proteins. Those of the DNA-binding domains of the fungal transcription factor GAL4 and the rat glucocorticoid receptor are the first to have been determined. Both proteins contain two zinc binding sites, and in both, cysteine residues are the sole zinc ligands. In GAL4, two zinc atoms are bound to six cysteine residues which form a "zinc cluster" akin to that of metallothionein; the distance between the two zinc atoms of GAL4 is approximately 3.5 A. In the glucocorticoid receptor, each zinc atom is bound to four cysteine residues; the interatomic zinc-zinc distance is approximately 13 A, and in this instance, a "zinc twist" is represented by a helical DNA recognition site located between the two zinc atoms. Zinc clusters and zinc twists are here recognized as two distinctive motifs in DNA-binding proteins containing multiple zinc atoms. For native "zinc fingers," structural data do not exist as yet; consequently, the interatomic distances between zinc atoms are not known. As further structural data become available, the structural and functional significance of these different motifs in their binding to DNA and other proteins participating in the transmission of the genetic message will become apparent. Images PMID:1846973

  4. Control of zinc transfer between thionein, metallothionein, and zinc proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Claus; Maret, Wolfgang; Vallee, Bert L.

    1998-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT), despite its high metal binding constant (KZn = 3.2 × 1013 M−1 at pH 7.4), can transfer zinc to the apoforms of zinc enzymes that have inherently lower stability constants. To gain insight into this paradox, we have studied zinc transfer between zinc enzymes and MT. Zinc can be transferred in both directions—i.e., from the enzymes to thionein (the apoform of MT) and from MT to the apoenzymes. Agents that mediate or enhance zinc transfer have been identified that provide kinetic pathways in either direction. MT does not transfer all of its seven zinc atoms to an apoenzyme, but apparently contains at least one that is more prone to transfer than the others. Modification of thiol ligands in MT zinc clusters increases the total number of zinc ions released and, hence, the extent of transfer. Aside from disulfide reagents, we show that selenium compounds are potential cellular enhancers of zinc transfer from MT to apoenzymes. Zinc transfer from zinc enzymes to thionein, on the other hand, is mediated by zinc-chelating agents such as Tris buffer, citrate, or glutathione. Redox agents are asymmetrically involved in both directions of zinc transfer. For example, reduced glutathione mediates zinc transfer from enzymes to thionein, whereas glutathione disulfide oxidizes MT with enhanced release of zinc and transfer of zinc to apoenzymes. Therefore, the cellular redox state as well as the concentration of other biological chelating agents might well determine the direction of zinc transfer and ultimately affect zinc distribution. PMID:9520393

  5. Inhibitory zinc sites in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Several pathways increase the concentrations of cellular free zinc(II) ions. Such fluctuations suggest that zinc(II) ions are signalling ions used for the regulation of proteins. One function is the inhibition of enzymes. It is quite common that enzymes bind zinc(II) ions with micro- or nanomolar affinities in their active sites that contain catalytic dyads or triads with a combination of glutamate (aspartate), histidine and cysteine residues, which are all typical zinc-binding ligands. However, for such binding to be physiologically significant, the binding constants must be compatible with the cellular availability of zinc(II) ions. The affinity of inhibitory zinc(II) ions for receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β is particularly high (K i = 21 pM, pH 7.4), indicating that some enzymes bind zinc almost as strongly as zinc metalloenzymes. The competitive pattern of zinc inhibition for this phosphatase implicates its active site cysteine and nearby residues in the coordination of zinc. Quantitative biophysical data on both affinities of proteins for zinc and cellular zinc(II) ion concentrations provide the basis for examining the physiological significance of inhibitory zinc-binding sites in proteins and the role of zinc(II) ions in cellular signalling. Regulatory functions of zinc(II) ions add a significant level of complexity to biological control of metabolism and signal transduction and embody a new paradigm for the role of transition metal ions in cell biology.

  6. Fishy business: effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and free zinc availability in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-08-15

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration.

  7. Fishy Business: Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Zinc Transporters and Free Zinc Availability in Human Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Mel, Damitha; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids are one of the two main families of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The main omega-3 fatty acids in the mammalian body are α-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Central nervous tissues of vertebrates are characterized by a high concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Moreover, in the human brain, DHA is considered as the main structural omega-3 fatty acid, which comprises about 40% of the PUFAs in total. DHA deficiency may be the cause of many disorders such as depression, inability to concentrate, excessive mood swings, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, dry skin and so on. On the other hand, zinc is the most abundant trace metal in the human brain. There are many scientific studies linking zinc, especially excess amounts of free zinc, to cellular death. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, are characterized by altered zinc metabolism. Both animal model studies and human cell culture studies have shown a possible link between omega-3 fatty acids, zinc transporter levels and free zinc availability at cellular levels. Many other studies have also suggested a possible omega-3 and zinc effect on neurodegeneration and cellular death. Therefore, in this review, we will examine the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on zinc transporters and the importance of free zinc for human neuronal cells. Moreover, we will evaluate the collective understanding of mechanism(s) for the interaction of these elements in neuronal research and their significance for the diagnosis and treatment of neurodegeneration. PMID:25195602

  8. Influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in Bangladeshi women

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Ekstroem, Eva-Charlotte; Loennerdal, Bo; Goessler, Walter; Akesson, Agneta; El Arifeen, Shams; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie . E-mail: Marie.Vahter@ki.se

    2007-07-15

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental contaminant present in food. The absorption in the intestine increases in individuals with low iron stores, but the effect of zinc deficiency is not clear. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in pregnant Bangladeshi women. We measured cadmium in urine from 890 women using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Further, we also measured ferritin and zinc in plasma. The median cadmium concentration in urine was 0.59 {mu}g/L (adjusted to mean specific gravity of 1.012 g/mL). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that urinary cadmium was associated with plasma ferritin and plasma zinc via a significant interaction between dichotomized plasma ferritin and plasma zinc. The analysis was adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women with low iron stores and adequate zinc status had significantly higher urinary cadmium compared to women with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. There was no difference in urinary cadmium between women with both low iron stores and zinc status compared to those with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. In conclusion, low iron stores were associated with increased cadmium accumulation, but only at adequate zinc status.

  9. Zinc in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zinc is also needed for the senses of smell and taste. During pregnancy, infancy, and childhood the ... sense of taste Problems with the sense of smell Skin sores Slow growth Trouble seeing in the ...

  10. Zinc electrode and rechargeable zinc-air battery

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Jr., Philip N.

    1989-01-01

    An improved zinc electrode is disclosed for a rechargeable zinc-air battery comprising an outer frame and a porous foam electrode support within the frame which is treated prior to the deposition of zinc thereon to inhibit the formation of zinc dendrites on the external surface thereof. The outer frame is provided with passageways for circulating an alkaline electrolyte through the treated zinc-coated porous foam. A novel rechargeable zinc-air battery system is also disclosed which utilizes the improved zinc electrode and further includes an alkaline electrolyte within said battery circulating through the passageways in the zinc electrode and an external electrolyte circulation means which has an electrolyte reservoir external to the battery case including filter means to filter solids out of the electrolyte as it circulates to the external reservoir and pump means for recirculating electrolyte from the external reservoir to the zinc electrode.

  11. Enteral Zinc Supplementation and Growth in Extremely-Low-Birth-Weight Infants With Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaikhkhalil, Ala K.; Curtiss, Jennifer; Puthoff, Teresa D.; Valentine, Christina J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Zinc deficiency causes growth deficits. Extremely-low-birth-weight (ELBW) infants with chronic lung disease (CLD), also known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, experience growth failure and are at risk for zinc deficiency. We hypothesized that enteral zinc supplementation would increase weight gain and linear growth. Methods A cohort of infants was examined retrospectively at a single center between January 2008 and December 2011. CLD was defined as the need for oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Zinc supplementation was started in infants who had poor weight gain. Infants’ weight gain and linear growth were compared before and after zinc supplementation using the paired t test. Results A total of 52 ELBW infants with CLD met entry criteria. Mean birth weight was 682 ± 183 g, and gestational age was 25.3 ± 2 weeks. Zinc supplementation started at postmenstrual age 33 ± 2 weeks. Most infants received fortified human milk. Weight gain increased from 10.9 before supplementation to 19.9 g · kg−1 · day−1 after supplementation (P < 0.0001). Linear growth increased from 0.7 to 1.1 cm/week (P = 0.001). Conclusions Zinc supplementation improved growth in ELBW infants with CLD receiving human milk. Further investigation is warranted to reevaluate zinc requirements, markers, and balance. PMID:24121149

  12. Effects of zinc, iron, cobalt, and manganese on Fusarium moniliforme NRRL 13616 growth and fusarin C biosynthesis in submerged cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.A.; Slininger, P.J.; Bothast, R.J. )

    1989-03-01

    The influence of zinc, iron, cobalt, and manganese on submerged cultures of Fusarium moniliforme NRRL 13616 was assessed by measuring dry weight accumulation, fusarin C biosynthesis, and ammonia assimilation. Shake flask cultures were grown in a nitrogen-limited defined medium supplemented with various combinations of metal ions according to partial-factorial experimental designs. Zinc (26 to 3,200 ppb (26 to 3,200 ng/ml)) inhibited fusarin C biosynthesis, increased dry weight accumulation, and increased ammonia assimilation. Carbohydrate was found to be the principal component of the increased dry weight in zinc-supplemented cultures. Zinc-deficient cultures synthesized more lipid and lipidlike compounds, such as fusarin C, than did zinc-supplemented cultures. Microscopic examination showed that zinc-deficient hyphae contained numerous lipid globules which were not present in zinc-supplemented cultures. Addition of zinc (3,200 ppb) to 2- and 4-day-old cultures inhibited further fusarin C biosynthesis but did not stimulate additional dry weight accumulation. Iron (10.0 ppm) and cobalt (9.0 ppm) did not affect fusarin C biosynthesis or dry weight accumulation. Manganese (5.1 ppm) did not affect dry weight accumulation but did increase fusarin C biosynthesis in the absence of zinc. Maximum fusarin C levels, 32.3 {mu}g/mg (dry weight), were produced when cultures were supplied manganese, whereas minimum fusarin C levels, 0.07 {mu}g/mg (dry weight), were produced when zinc, iron, cobalt, and manganese were supplied.

  13. [Micronutrient deficiencies and linear growth: a systematic review of observational studies].

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; Rocha, Ana Carolina Dantas; Sales, Márcia Cristina

    2013-11-01

    This article seeks to evaluate the association of iron, vitamin A and zinc deficiencies with linear growth retardation. A systematic review of electronic databases in PubMed, LILACS and SciELO was conducted. Scientific papers published between January 1995 and March 2010 were selected, inserting the key words: (growth OR nutritional status) AND (child, preschool OR infant) AND (zinc AND iron AND vitamin A) OR (zinc AND iron) OR (zinc AND vitamin A) OR (iron AND vitamin A). Fourteen observational design studies were reviewed. In the cohort studies (two), one indicated a statistical association between iron levels and stunting; and the other revealed a statistical association between serum ferritin concentrations and an increase in height. Ten cross-sectional studies investigated the statistical association between micronutrient deficiencies and stunting, three of which resulted in an association with iron, two with vitamin A and none with zinc. Elucidation of the association between stunting and iron, vitamin A and zinc deficiencies involves difficulties of a biological nature and also related to the magnitude of these deficiencies, indicating the importance of a methodological standardization of the studies.

  14. Tolerance and acclimation to zinc of Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Muyssen, Brita T A; Janssen, Colin R

    2002-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal for all living organisms. However, so far, little or no attention has been paid to the consequences of zinc deficiency or acclimation to this metal during culturing and testing on toxicity test results. In this study, the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia was acclimated for 10 generations to four zinc concentrations ranging from 0 to 100 microg Zn/l and changes in zinc tolerance were monitored using acute (48 h) and chronic (9 days) assays. C. dubia deprived of zinc and acclimated to 13 microg Zn/l had a lower fitness in comparison with organisms acclimated to 50 and 100 microg Zn/l. In the two lowest versus the two highest acclimation concentrations the 9dEC50 values (on immobility) were 358-387 microg Zn/l versus 486-489 microg Zn/l; the mean number of young per female was 11-18 versus 25-32; and the time to first brood was 4.7-5.0 days versus 4.0-4.3 days. Moreover, the coefficient of variation of all parameters tested was highest in the two lowest acclimation concentrations. The results indicate that culturing test animals in media lacking trace metals such as zinc could give rise to animals that are unnaturally sensitive to those same metals daring toxicity tests. PMID:11924550

  15. Zinc acetate for the treatment of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brewer, G J

    2001-09-01

    Zinc acetate (Galzin, Gate Pharmaceutical Co.) has been developed for the treatment of Wilson's disease, an inherited disease of copper accumulation and copper toxicity in brain and liver. Zinc acetate has been approved by the US FDA for maintenance therapy of adult and paediatric Wilson's disease patients but also has efficacy in the treatment of pregnant patients and presymptomatic patients from the beginning. It also has value as adjunctive therapy for the initial treatment of symptomatic patients. Zinc's mechanism of action involves induction of intestinal cell metallothionein (Mt), which blocks copper absorption from the intestinal track. A negative copper balance is caused by blockade not only of absorption of food copper but the blockade of reabsorption of the considerable amount of endogenously secreted copper in saliva, gastric juice and intestinal secretions. Zinc is completely effective in controlling copper levels and toxicity in Wilson's disease, as are other anticopper agents. Zinc's major advantage over other anticopper agents is its extremely low level of toxicity. The only side effect is some degree of initial gastric irritation in approximately10% of patients, which usually decreases and becomes insignificant over time. As with all long-term therapies, compliance is a problem in some patients and dictates regular monitoring with 24 h urine copper and zinc measurements. As with all anticopper therapies, over a long period of time, overtreatment and induction of copper deficiency can occur. This is to be avoided particularly in children because copper is required for growth.

  16. The role of zinc in neurodegenerative inflammatory pathways in depression.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kubera, Marta; Nowak, Gabriel

    2011-04-29

    According to new hypothesis, depression is characterized by decreased neurogenesis and enhanced neurodegeneration which, in part, may be caused by inflammatory processes. There is much evidence indicating that depression, age-related changes often associated with impaired brain function and cognitive performances or neurodegenerative processes could be related to dysfunctions affecting the zinc ion availability. Clinical studies revealed that depression is accompanied by serum hypozincemia, which can be normalized by successful antidepressant treatment. In patients with major depression, a low zinc serum level was correlated with an increase in the activation of markers of the immune system, suggesting that this effect may result in part from a depression-related alteration in the immune-inflammatory system. Moreover, a preliminary clinical study demonstrated the benefit of zinc supplementation in antidepressant therapy in both treatment non-resistant and resistant patients. In the preclinical study, the antidepressant activity of zinc was observed in the majority of rodent tests and models of depression and revealed a causative role for zinc deficiency in the induction of depressive-like symptoms, the reduction of neurogenesis and neuronal survival or impaired learning and memory ability. This paper provides an overview of the clinical and experimental evidence that implicates the role of zinc in the pathophysiology and therapy of depression within the context of the inflammatory and neurodegenerative hypothesis of this disease. PMID:20156515

  17. Factor V deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors. Factor V deficiency is caused by a ... Gailani D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: ... HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and ...

  18. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (an-tee-TRIP-sin) deficiency, or AAT ... as it relates to lung disease. Overview Alpha-1 antitrypsin, also called AAT, is a protein made ...

  19. Zinc and Taste Disturbances in Older Adults: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Michele; Hilas, Olga

    2016-05-01

    According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 35% to 45% of adults 60 years of age or older had zinc intakes below the estimated average requirement of 6.8 mg/day for elderly females and 9.4 mg/day for elderly males. Zinc deficiency may lead to loss of appetite, impaired immune function, weight loss, delayed healing of wounds, eye and skin lesions, and smell and taste disturbances. Older adults are especially affected by changes in taste sensations because of age-related gustatory dysfunction, use of multiple medications, increased frailty, and zinc deficiency. This article reviews the finding of clinical studies investigating the use of zinc supplementation for improvement with taste disturbances in older adults.

  20. DOCK8 Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... on ClinicalTrials.gov . Related Links Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases (PIDDs) Immune System ​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned ... Scientists Identify Genetic Cause of Previously Undefined Primary Immune Deficiency Disease Signs and Symptoms DOCK8 deficiency causes persistent skin ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  2. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  3. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  4. [Diminished zinc plasma concentrations and alterations in the number of lymphocyte subpopulations in Down's syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Soto-Quintana, Marisol; Alvarez-Nava, Francisco; Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Granadillo, Victor; Fernández, Denny; Ocando, Ana; López, Ealys; Fulcado, Waleska

    2003-03-01

    Alterations of plasma levels of zinc and in the immune system in Down's syndrome (DS) have been reported. These alterations have been associated with a high rate of infectious diseases, which represent the main cause of mortality in affected individuals. The objectives of this study were to determine plasma zinc levels and to evaluate the immune system in DS patients. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 43 DS patients examined at the Unidad de Genética Médica, Universidad del Zulia in Maracaibo, Venezuela. Their mean age (+/- SD) was 2.3 +/- 2.0 years. As control group, 40 healthy children were studied (mean +/- SD 2.3 +/- 2.0 years). Karyotypes by a standard technique, the determination of plasma levels of zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and the evaluation of the immune system by flow cytometry were carried out in the study groups. All DS patients had free trisomy 21. Significantly disminished zinc plasma levels, helper T lymphocyte (CD4) percentage, helper/cytotoxic (CD4/CD8) ratio and B-cells (CD19) were found in DS patients by matching with control group. An increase in CD8 was also found. No significative difference in the lymphocyte subpopulations between DS patients with disminished plasma levels of zinc and DS patients with normal zinc were found. These findings suggest that zinc deficiency is not the sole etiology involved in the disorders of immune system seen in DS patients. Other factors, such as thymic alterations and molecular abnormalities due to gene overexpression of loci located on chromosome 21 could be involved. Although, zinc supplementation is recommended in these patients with zinc deficiency, further studies with a double-blind, placebo versus zinc design are needed to evaluate the potentially beneficial effects of zinc treatment in DS patients.

  5. Interference in the development of a secondary immune response in mice by zinc deprivation: persistence of effects

    SciTech Connect

    DePasquale-Jardieu, P.; Fraker, P.J.

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a moderate period of zinc deficiency on the secondary responses of mice primed with antigen prior to nutritional insufficiency. Adult A/J mice were primed with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) 2 weeks prior to being placed on zinc-deficient, zinc-adequate or intake-restricted diets. After 28 days some of the mice in each treatment group were given a second injection of SRBC. Deficient mice could produce only 43% as many IgG anti-SRBC plaque-forming cells (PFC) per spleen as could the zinc-adequate or restricted-fed mice. To compare the secondary response of cells from each dietary group in a uniform environment, additional mice were killed as a source of primed splenocyte for transfer to irradiated hosts. Compared to controls, splenocytes from deficient mice gave suboptimal secondary responses even in normal irradiated hosts. Finally, the remaining mice were provided with zinc-adequate diet for a period of 4 weeks to allow for repair of the memory response, but it was only partially restored by this means. The data suggest that zinc deficiency may have destroyed a substantial portion of SRBC memory cells.

  6. Phytotoxicity of zinc and manganese to seedlings grown in soil contaminated by zinc smelting.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W N; Green, C E; Beyer, M; Chaney, R L

    2013-08-01

    Historic emissions from two zinc smelters have injured the forest on Blue Mountain near Palmerton, Pennsylvania, USA. Seedlings of soybeans and five tree species were grown in a greenhouse in a series of mixtures of smelter-contaminated and reference soils and then phytotoxic thresholds were calculated. As little as 10% Palmerton soil mixed with reference soil killed or greatly stunted seedlings of most species. Zinc was the principal cause of the phytotoxicity to the tree seedlings, although Mn and Cd may also have been phytotoxic in the most contaminated soil mixtures. Calcium deficiency seemed to play a role in the observed phytotoxicity. Exposed soybeans showed symptoms of Mn toxicity. A test of the effect of liming on remediation of the Zn and Mn phytotoxicity caused a striking decrease in Sr-nitrate extractable metals in soils and demonstrated that liming was critical to remediation and restoration.

  7. Phytotoxicity of zinc and manganese to seedlings grown in soil contaminated by zinc smelting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Green, C.E.; Beyer, M.; Chaney, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Historic emissions from two zinc smelters have injured the forest on Blue Mountain near Palmerton, Pennsylvania, USA. Seedlings of soybeans and five tree species were grown in a greenhouse in a series of mixtures of smelter-contaminated and reference soils and then phytotoxic thresholds were calculated. As little as 10% Palmerton soil mixed with reference soil killed or greatly stunted seedlings of most species. Zinc was the principal cause of the phytotoxicity to the tree seedlings, although Mn and Cd may also have been phytotoxic in the most contaminated soil mixtures. Calcium deficiency seemed to play a role in the observed phytotoxicity. Exposed soybeans showed symptoms of Mn toxicity. A test of the effect of liming on remediation of the Zn and Mn phytotoxicity caused a striking decrease in Sr-nitrate extractable metals in soils and demonstrated that liming was critical to remediation and restoration.

  8. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  9. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  10. ZINC ROUGHER CELLS ON LEFT, ZINC CLEANER CELLS ON RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ZINC ROUGHER CELLS ON LEFT, ZINC CLEANER CELLS ON RIGHT, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE ONE STYLE OF DENVER AGITATOR IN LOWER RIGHT CELL. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  11. Suppression of zinc dendrites in zinc electrode power cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damjanovic, A.; Diggle, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Addition of various tetraalkyl quarternary ammonium salts, to alkaline zincate electrolyte of cell, prevents formation of zinc dendrites during charging of zinc electrode. Electrode capacity is not impaired and elimination of dendrites prolongs cell life.

  12. Relationship between zinc malnutrition and alterations in murine peripheral blood leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    King, L.E.; Morford, L.A.; Fraker, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Studies using a murine model have shown that the immune system responds rapidly and adversely to zinc deficiency. The extent of alteration of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and immunoglobulin levels were investigated in four zinc dietary groups: zinc adequate (ZA); restricted fed zinc adequate (RZA); marginal zinc deficient (MZD, 72-76% of ZA mouse weight); and severely zinc deficient. The peripheral white blood cell count was 3.66 {plus minus} 1.08 {times} 10{sup 6} cells/ml for ZA mice decreasing by 21%, 28% and 54% for RZA, MZD and SZD mice respectively. An equally dramatic change in the flow cytometric light scatter profile was found. ZA mice had 66% lymphocytes and 21% polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) in their peripheral blood while MZD and SZD mice contained 43% and 30% lymphocytes and 40% and 60% PMNs respectively. Analysis of the phenotypic distribution of specific classes of lymphocytes revealed ZA blood contained 25% B-cells and 40% T-cells (CD5{sup +}). B-cells decreased 40-50% for RZA and MZD mice and 60-70% for SZD mice. The decline in CD5{sup +} T-cells was more modest at 30% and 45% for MZD and SZD mice. A nearly 40% decline in both T{sub h} and T{sub c/s} cells was noted for both MZD and SZD mice. Radioimmunoassay of serum for changes in IgM and IgG content revealed no change among dietary groups while serum zinc decreased 10% for RZA mice and 50% for both MZD and SZD mice. The authors conclude that peripheral blood differential counts in concert with total B and T-cell phenotype may serve as indicators of zinc status while serum zinc and Ig will not.

  13. Zinc bioavailability in pork loin

    SciTech Connect

    Hortin, A.E.; Bechtel, P.J. Baker, D.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Pork loins were uniformly trimmed and divided into three groups: raw, roasted and braised. Following cooking, the loins were freeze dried and then ground to a fine granular consistency. Zinc levels of 51, 60 and 63 mg/kg dry matter (DM) were contained in the raw, roasted and braised products, respectively. The chick bioavailability (BV) assay employed a Zn-deficient soy isolate basal diet that was supplemented with 0, 5 or 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O to produce a standard straight-line response in tibia Zn as a function of supplemental Zn intake. Experimental Zn sources were also added to the basal diet to provide 10 mg Zn/kg. Standard curve methodology indicated that Zn BV was unaffected by cooking. Roasted pork lion had a Zn BV of 184% relative to ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O. Addition of 0.40% L-cysteine to the diet containing 10 mg Zn/kg from ZnSO{sub 4}{center dot}H{sub 2}O increased Zn BV to 175%. Results with histidine as a Zn-enhancing factor were variable. It is apparent that pork loin is an excellent source of bioavailable Zn, and SH-containing compounds such as cysteine and glutathione that are present in meat may contribute to enhanced gut absorption of meat-source Zn.

  14. The potential of lentil (Lens culinaris L.) as a whole food for increased selenium, iron, and zinc intake: Preliminary results from a three year study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrient malnutrition, especially selenium (Se), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) deficiency, is a major global health problem. Previous attempts to prevent micronutrient malnutrition through food fortification, supplementation, and enrichment of staple crops has had limited success. Canadian grown len...

  15. Compromised zinc status of experimental rats as a consequence of prolonged iron & calcium supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Platel, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Iron supplementation is usually given to pregnant and lactating women who may also have marginal deficiency of zinc. The negative impact of supplemental iron and calcium on zinc status is a cause of concern. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effect of inclusion of iron and calcium in the diet at supplementary levels on zinc status of experimental rats. Methods: Groups of experimental rats were maintained on diets supplemented with iron (Molar ratio - Zn:Fe 1:30) and calcium (Molar ratio - Zn:Ca 1:667) both individually and in combination for six weeks. Zinc status of these rats was assessed by determining zinc concentration in circulation and in organs, and the activities of zinc containing enzymes in serum and liver. Results: The zinc status of experimental rats receiving supplemental levels of iron and calcium was significantly compromised. Zinc concentration in serum, kidney, spleen and liver was reduced significantly by both these minerals. Six weeks of supplementation of iron and calcium individually, significantly reduced the activity of liver and serum superoxide dismutase and alkaline phosphatase. Activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase was lowered in calcium supplemented group and in calcium + iron supplemented group, while that of carbonic anhydrase was significantly reduced by iron, calcium and their combination. Interpretation & conclusions: Supplemental levels of iron and calcium, both individually and in combination, significantly compromised the zinc status of experimental rats. This negative effect of these two minerals was more prominent when these were supplemented for a period of six weeks. PMID:27121523

  16. Hypertension in rats deficient in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Klevay, L.M.

    1986-03-01

    Male weanling rats were matched into two groups of equal mean weight (48 g), were fed a diet low in copper and zinc and were supplemented with a drinking solution with 10..mu..gZn and 2/sup +/gCu per ml until they grew to approximately 300 g. Systolic blood pressure (mmHg) was measured without anesthesia with an Electro-Sphygmomanometer and pneumatic pulse transducer; no significant difference between groups was found (0 > 0.05). Then copper was omitted from the solution of the group with lower blood pressure in each of two experiments. Plasma cholesterol (mg/dl) was measured by fluorometry and blood pressure was measured again 53 to 86 days later; mean (SE), n = 14, 15. Hypercholesterolemia verified deficiency. Hypotension in copper deficient rats in experiments of others probably was the result of cardiac defects induced in weanling animals. Hypertension joins hypercholesterolemia, hyperuricemia, glucose intolerance and abnormal electrocardiograms as a stigma of copper deficiency. Copper deficiency is the only nutritional insult that induces all of these characteristics useful in predicting risk of ischemic heart disease.

  17. [The role of zinc in the treatment of hyperactivity disorder in children].

    PubMed

    Dodig-Curković, Katarina; Dovhanj, Jasna; Curković, Mario; Dodig-Radić, Josipa; Degmecić, Dunja

    2009-10-01

    reaction in childhood. Recent studies estimate its prevalence to three of ten hyperactive children, and there are data that about 4% of children have the complete frame of the disorder. The condition is more common in boys than in girls. The reason probably lies in the fact that girls primarily develop attention disorder and cognitive problems (concentration, memory, thinking), and less often have symptoms of aggressive and impulsive behavior, thus boys being earlier referred for examination. There are many theories about the possible origin of hyperactive disorder, and one of the most widely studied is the theory of the role of dopamine, which is supported by the results of treatment in these children with dopamine agonists like methylphenidate and amphetamines. Recent studies do not neglect the influence of maternal intake of food and drink additives, alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy, soil contamination, and low birth weight. Zinc is a coenzyme of the enzyme delta-6 desaturase, which is important in the anabolism of polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, linolic and linolenic acids that constitute neuronal membrane. Studies point to the possible association of zinc deficiency and ADHD pathophysiology. In ADHD children with zinc deficiency or low plasma zinc concentration, zinc dietary supplementation or during therapy for ADHD may be of great benefit. A study of ADHD treatment with zinc sulfate as a supplement to methylphenidate showed beneficial effects of zinc supplementation in the treatment of children with ADHD. The dose of zinc sulfate used was 55 mg/day, which is equivalent to 15 mg zinc. The improvement achieved in ADHD children with the use of zinc sulfate appears to confirm the role of zinc deficiency in the etiopathogenesis of ADHD. Additional studies are needed to identify the real and efficient dose of zinc.

  18. [The role of zinc in the treatment of hyperactivity disorder in children].

    PubMed

    Dodig-Curković, Katarina; Dovhanj, Jasna; Curković, Mario; Dodig-Radić, Josipa; Degmecić, Dunja

    2009-10-01

    reaction in childhood. Recent studies estimate its prevalence to three of ten hyperactive children, and there are data that about 4% of children have the complete frame of the disorder. The condition is more common in boys than in girls. The reason probably lies in the fact that girls primarily develop attention disorder and cognitive problems (concentration, memory, thinking), and less often have symptoms of aggressive and impulsive behavior, thus boys being earlier referred for examination. There are many theories about the possible origin of hyperactive disorder, and one of the most widely studied is the theory of the role of dopamine, which is supported by the results of treatment in these children with dopamine agonists like methylphenidate and amphetamines. Recent studies do not neglect the influence of maternal intake of food and drink additives, alcohol consumption and smoking during pregnancy, soil contamination, and low birth weight. Zinc is a coenzyme of the enzyme delta-6 desaturase, which is important in the anabolism of polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, linolic and linolenic acids that constitute neuronal membrane. Studies point to the possible association of zinc deficiency and ADHD pathophysiology. In ADHD children with zinc deficiency or low plasma zinc concentration, zinc dietary supplementation or during therapy for ADHD may be of great benefit. A study of ADHD treatment with zinc sulfate as a supplement to methylphenidate showed beneficial effects of zinc supplementation in the treatment of children with ADHD. The dose of zinc sulfate used was 55 mg/day, which is equivalent to 15 mg zinc. The improvement achieved in ADHD children with the use of zinc sulfate appears to confirm the role of zinc deficiency in the etiopathogenesis of ADHD. Additional studies are needed to identify the real and efficient dose of zinc. PMID:20034331

  19. A zinc transporter gene required for development of the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Graham, David M; Keen, Carl L; Rucker, Robert B; Messerli, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The essentiality of zinc for normal brain development is well established. It has been suggested that primary and secondary zinc deficiencies can contribute to the occurrence of numerous human birth defects, including many involving the central nervous system. In a recent study, we searched for zinc transporter genes that were critical for neurodevelopment. We confirmed that ZIP12 is a zinc transporter encoded by the gene slc39a12 that is highly expressed in the central nervous systems of human, mouse, and frog (Xenopus tropicalis).Using loss-of-function methods, we determined that ZIP12 is required for neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth and necessary for neurulation and embryonic viability. These results highlight an essential need for zinc regulation during embryogenesis and nervous system development. We suggest that slc39a12 is a candidate gene for inherited neurodevelopmental defects in humans. PMID:24567773

  20. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  1. Low Zinc Status and Absorption Exist in Infants with Jejunostomies or Ileostomies Which Persists after Intestinal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Balay, Kimberly S.; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Hicks, Penni D.; Chen, Zhensheng; Griffin, Ian J.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer stable isotope technique at two different time points when possible. The first study was conducted when the subject was receiving maximal tolerated feeds enterally while the ostomy remained in place. A second study was performed as soon as feasible after full feeds were achieved after intestinal repair. We found biochemical evidence of deficiencies of both zinc and copper in infants with small intestinal ostomies at both time points. Fractional zinc absorption with an ostomy in place was 10.9% ± 5.3%. After reanastamosis, fractional zinc absorption was 9.4% ± 5.7%. Net zinc balance was negative prior to reanastamosis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that infants with a jejunostomy or ileostomy are at high risk for zinc and copper deficiency before and after intestinal reanastamosis. Additional supplementation, especially of zinc, should be considered during this time period. PMID:23112915

  2. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Raghubir P.; Gangwal, Santosh K.; Jain, Suresh C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 .mu., and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 .mu.. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  3. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  4. Micronutrients and kelp cultures: Evidence for cobalt and manganese deficiency in Southern California deep seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that naturally occurring copper and zinc concentrations in deep seawater are toxic to marine organisms when the free ion forms are overabundant. The effects of micronutrients on the growth of gametophytes of the ecologically and commercially significant giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) were studied in defined media. The results indicate that toxic copper and zinc ion concentrations as well as cobalt and manganese deficiencies may be among the factors controlling the growth of marine organisms in nature. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  5. An assessment of zinc oxide nanosheets as a selective adsorbent for cadmium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanosheet is assessed as a selective adsorbent for the detection and adsorption of cadmium using simple eco-friendly extraction method. Pure zinc oxide nanosheet powders were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The zinc oxide nanosheets were applied to different metal ions, including Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), La(III), Mn(II), Pb(II), Pd(II), and Y(III). Zinc oxide nanosheets were found to be selective for cadmium among these metal ions when determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Moreover, adsorption isotherm data provided that the adsorption process was mainly monolayer on zinc oxide nanosheets. PMID:24011201

  6. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in zinc-blende and deformed CrAs thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, J. F.; Zhao, J. H.; Deng, J. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Li, S. S.; Wu, X. G.; Jia, Q. J.

    2006-04-01

    We try to clarify the controversy about the origin of room-temperature ferromagnetism in a CrAs compound. Two kinds of CrAs thin films were grown on GaAs by molecular-beam epitaxy. Structural analyses confirm that the as-grown CrAs film is a pure zinc-blende phase. Magnetic measurements suggest that room-temperature ferromagnetism exists in zinc-blende CrAs. In contrast, the CrAs film turns into a mixture of zinc-blende and deformed CrAs after annealing. A ferromagnetic signal measured at room temperature demonstrates that zinc-blende CrAs remains room-temperature ferromagnetism even when it is partly deformed into a non-zinc-blende phase.

  7. Characterization of the histidine-rich loop of Arabidopsis vacuolar membrane zinc transporter AtMTP1 as a sensor of zinc level in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Natsuki; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tomioka, Rie; Krämer, Ute; Kawachi, Miki; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    The vacuolar Zn(2+)/H(+) antiporter of Arabidopsis thaliana, AtMTP1, has a long cytosolic histidine-rich loop. A mutated AtMTP1 in which the first half of the loop (His-half) was deleted exhibited a 11-fold higher transport velocity in yeast cells. Transgenic lines overexpressing the His-half-deleted AtMTP1 in the loss-of-function mutant were evaluated for growth and metal content in the presence of various zinc concentrations. These overexpressing lines (35S-AtMTP1 and 35S-His-half lines) showed high tolerance to excess concentrations of zinc at 150 µM, as did the wild type, compared with the loss-of-function line. The His-half AtMTP1 transported cobalt in a heterologous expression assay in yeast, but the cumulative amount of cobalt in 35S-His-half plants was not increased. Moreover, the accumulation of calcium and iron was not changed in plants. Under zinc-deficient conditions, growth of 35S-His-half lines was markedly suppressed. Under the same conditions, the 35S-His-half lines accumulated larger amounts of zinc in roots and smaller amounts of zinc in shoots compared with the other lines, suggesting an abnormal accumulation of zinc in the roots of 35S-His-half lines. As a result, the shoots may exhibit zinc deficiency. Taken together, these results suggest that the His-loop acts as a sensor of cytosolic zinc to maintain an essential level in the cytosol and that the dysfunction of the loop results in an uncontrolled accumulation of zinc in the vacuoles of root cells.

  8. Nutritional deficiencies in the pediatric age group in a multicultural developed country, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Haimi, Motti; Lerner, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient deficiencies are prevalent worldwide. Diseases and morbid conditions have been described to result from nutritional deficiencies. It is essential to address nutrient deficiencies as these may lead to chronic long-term health problems such as rickets, iron deficiency anemia, goiter, obesity, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer and osteoporosis. In the present review we surveyed the extent and severity of nutritional deficiencies in Israel through a selective and comprehensive Medline review of previous reports and studies performed during the last 40 years. Israeli populations have multiple nutritional deficiencies, including iron, calcium, zinc, folic acid, and vitamins B12, C, D and E, spanning all age groups, several minorities, and specific regions. In Israel, some of the nutrients are mandatorily implemented and many of them are implemented voluntarily by local industries. We suggest ways to prevent and treat the nutritional deficiencies, as a step to promote food fortification in Israel. PMID:24868510

  9. Nutritional deficiencies in the pediatric age group in a multicultural developed country, Israel.

    PubMed

    Haimi, Motti; Lerner, Aaron

    2014-05-16

    Nutrient deficiencies are prevalent worldwide. Diseases and morbid conditions have been described to result from nutritional deficiencies. It is essential to address nutrient deficiencies as these may lead to chronic long-term health problems such as rickets, iron deficiency anemia, goiter, obesity, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer and osteoporosis. In the present review we surveyed the extent and severity of nutritional deficiencies in Israel through a selective and comprehensive Medline review of previous reports and studies performed during the last 40 years. Israeli populations have multiple nutritional deficiencies, including iron, calcium, zinc, folic acid, and vitamins B12, C, D and E, spanning all age groups, several minorities, and specific regions. In Israel, some of the nutrients are mandatorily implemented and many of them are implemented voluntarily by local industries. We suggest ways to prevent and treat the nutritional deficiencies, as a step to promote food fortification in Israel.

  10. Zinc status affects glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in patients with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Fung, Ellen B; Gildengorin, Ginny; Talwar, Siddhant; Hagar, Leah; Lal, Ashutosh

    2015-06-02

    Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal) live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years) with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05) and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048). Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (-19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL), showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL) and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient.

  11. Bioavailability of iron, zinc, and other trace minerals from vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Janet R

    2003-09-01

    Iron and zinc are currently the trace minerals of greatest concern when considering the nutritional value of vegetarian diets. With elimination of meat and increased intake of phytate-containing legumes and whole grains, the absorption of both iron and zinc is lower with vegetarian than with nonvegetarian, diets. The health consequences of lower iron and zinc bioavailability are not clear, especially in industrialized countries with abundant, varied food supplies, where nutrition and health research has generally supported recommendations to reduce meat and increase legume and whole-grain consumption. Although it is clear that vegetarians have lower iron stores, adverse health effects from lower iron and zinc absorption have not been demonstrated with varied vegetarian diets in developed countries, and moderately lower iron stores have even been hypothesized to reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Premenopausal women cannot easily achieve recommended iron intakes, as modified for vegetarians, with foods alone; however, the benefit of routine iron supplementation has not been demonstrated. It may be prudent to monitor the hemoglobin of vegetarian children and women of childbearing age. Improved assessment methods are required to determine whether vegetarians are at risk of zinc deficiency. In contrast with iron and zinc, elements such as copper appear to be adequately provided by vegetarian diets. Although the iron and zinc deficiencies commonly associated with plant-based diets in impoverished nations are not associated with vegetarian diets in wealthier countries, these nutrients warrant attention as nutritional assessment methods become more sensitive and plant-based diets receive greater emphasis.

  12. Zinc Status Affects Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Ellen B.; Gildengorin, Ginny; Talwar, Siddhant; Hagar, Leah; Lal, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal) live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years) with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05) and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048). Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (−19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL), showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL) and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient. PMID:26043030

  13. The preparation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles and their use as an efficient UV absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Podbrscek, Peter; Drazic, Goran; Anzlovar, Alojz; Orel, Zorica Crnjak

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We used innovative gel-route in order to prepare zinc silicate/ZnO nano-particles. {yields} Continuous reactor was efficient for synthesizing ZnO and zinc silicate/ZnO precursors. {yields} Introduction of Si into reaction mixture influenced on particle size and their photoactivity. {yields} Prepared particles are appropriate for UV absorbers in polymers. -- Abstract: The formation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles synthesized by a two-step method and their incorporation into PMMA is presented. In the first step a segmented-flow tubular reactor was used for the continuous room-temperature preparation of a zinc silicate/Zn(OH){sub 2} gel that was thermally treated after rinsing and drying in the second step. The same preparation procedure was also employed for the synthesis of pure ZnO and pure zinc silicate particles. It was found that the presence of the zinc silicate phase significantly influenced the final particle size, decreased the degree of crystallization and reduced the particles' UV absorption capabilities. The reduced photocatalytic activity of the zinc silicate/ZnO particles indicated that the majority of ZnO crystallites were formed inside the zinc silicate matrix. The nanocomposite prepared from zinc silicate/ZnO particles (0.04 wt.%) and PMMA showed high UV shielding and at the same time sufficient transmittance in the visible-light region.

  14. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of interstellar zinc toward 10 stars are examined. It is found that zinc is at most only slightly depleted in the interstellar medium; its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. The local interstellar medium has abundances that apparently are homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc, and this result is important for understanding the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood. The intrinsic errors in detecting weak interstellar lines are analyzed and suggestions are made as to how this error limit may be lowered to 5 mA per target observation.

  15. Differential effects of in vitro zinc treatment on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from young and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Mazzatti, D J; Malavolta, M; White, A J; Costarelli, L; Giacconi, R; Muti, E; Cipriano, C; Powell, J R; Mocchegiani, E

    2007-12-01

    Mild zinc deficiency, which is prevalent in vegetarians, diseased individuals, and the general aging population, depresses immunity and increases risk of disease in later life. However, human zinc intervention trials have produced conflicting results, perhaps because many of these trials included young or zinc-sufficient subjects. Since heterogeneity of the adult population may impact on response to dietary zinc, nutrigenomic approaches aimed at understanding the impact of zinc on modulation of gene and protein activities may aid in identifying subsets of the population-in particular the aging population-with increased risk of zinc deficiency who might receive benefit from a dietary zinc intervention and in this way may influence the success of the intervention. In the current study we used nutrigenomic approaches to investigate the impact of age on zinc-regulated gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Ingenuity Systems, Redwood City, CA) identified several genetic networks and functional canonical pathways which appeared responsive to zinc that were differentially regulated in young and elderly individuals. These include tryptophan metabolism, eicosanoid signaling, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, integrin signaling, purine metabolism, G-protein-coupled receptor signaling, and most significantly, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling. These data suggest that age impacts strongly on the transcriptional effects of zinc and provides evidence to support the hypothesis that young and elderly individuals may respond differentially to zinc intervention.

  16. Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Allen M.; Catalano, Anthony W.; Dalal, Vikram L.; Masi, James V.; Meakin, John D.; Hall, Robert B.

    1984-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

  17. Recovering Zinc From Discarded Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Zinc sulfate monohydrate sold at profit. Shredded tire material steeped in three sulfuric acid baths to extract zinc. Final product removed by evaporating part of solution until product crystallizes out. Recovered as zinc sulfate monohydrate and sold as fertilizer or for general use.

  18. Photovoltaic cells employing zinc phosphide

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.M.; Catalano, A.W.; Dalal, V.L.; Hall, R.B.; Masi, J.V.; Meakin, J.D.

    1984-10-16

    A photovoltaic cell having a zinc phosphide absorber. The zinc phosphide can be a single or multiple crystal slice or a thin polycrystalline film. The cell can be a Schottky barrier, heterojunction or homojunction device. Methods for synthesizing and crystallizing zinc phosphide are disclosed as well as a method for forming thin films.

  19. Trace element deficiencies and fertility in ruminants: a review.

    PubMed

    Hidiroglou, M

    1979-08-01

    Various minerals (copper, cobalt, selenium, manganese, iodine, zinc, and iron) can influence reproductive performance of ruminants. Reproductive failure may be induced by deficiencies of single or combined trace elements and by imbalances. This review is focused on maladjustments of trace elements leading to impaired breeding performance. Opinion is diverse as to the existence of various reproductive disturbances from either a severe copper depletion or a marginal dietary copper deficiency. Field experience suggests that administration of cobalt to ruminants on cobalt-deficient diets improves their impaired breeding performance. Selenium infertility in ewes is more prevalent in some areas and in some seasons, but the actual cause of this malady and the continuing role of additional factors are unknown. Manganese is necessary for normal fertility in ruminants, and feeding low-manganese rations depresses conception rates. Lack of iodine impairs thyroid activity and also ovarian function. Reproductive failure in the female and in spermatogenesis are manifestations of zinc deficiency. Despite forages rich in iron, low availability in certain instances could affect adversely ruminant reproduction. Knowledge of biochemical dysfunctions from trace element deficiencies is essential to determine the role which trace elements play in fertility of ruminant animals.

  20. Zinc treatment increases the titre of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Huanglongbing-affected citrus plants while affecting the bacterial microbiomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus often display zinc deficiency symptoms. In this study, supplemental zinc was applied to citrus to determine its effect on Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) titer, HLB symptoms, and leaf microbiome. HLB-affected citrus were treated with various amounts of zi...

  1. Zinc requirements and zinc intakes of breast-fed infants.

    PubMed

    Krebs, N F; Hambidge, K M

    1986-02-01

    Longitudinal changes in dietary zinc requirements for infants at different levels of net absorption were estimated using a factorial approach. Apart from variations in net absorption, the zinc needed for new lean body mass is the major determinant of requirements. As growth velocity declines progressively, estimated zinc requirements for growth and for replacement of urine and sweat losses decrease from a high for male infants of 780 micrograms/day at 1 mo to 480 micrograms/day in the 5th mo and then remain quite constant through the 1st yr. Calculated percentage absorption of zinc from human milk necessary to meet estimated requirements increases with duration of lactation. For infants of mothers whose zinc intake approximated 25 mg/day the calculated percentage absorption remained within plausible limits. It is suggested that the progressive decrease in milk zinc concentrations provides a mechanism for conserving maternal zinc while meeting infant needs. PMID:3946293

  2. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  3. Colour vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  4. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  5. α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Umur; Stoller, James K

    2016-09-01

    α1-Antitrypsin deficiency is an autosomal codominant condition that predisposes to emphysema and cirrhosis. The condition is common but grossly under-recognized. Identifying patients' α1-antitrypsin deficiency has important management implications (ie, smoking cessation, genetic and occupational counseling, and specific treatment with the infusion of pooled human plasma α1-antitrypsin). The weight of evidence suggests that augmentation therapy slows the progression of emphysema in individuals with severe α1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:27514595

  6. Evaluation of zinc electrodeposition kinetics from acidic zinc sulfate solutions using a UPD-modified platinum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Eduard

    In general, underpotential deposition, UPD, describes the formation of a two-dimensional layer of metal onto a foreign substrate at a potential more positive than that for overpotential deposition, OPD, of the metal. Use of this phenomenon is proposed as a novel technique for generating smooth and reproducible electrode surfaces of reactive metals, using zinc UPD on platinum as a model case. The technique involves polarization of a polished platinum electrode to cause zinc UPD followed by a pulsed polarization step to grow a bulk zinc metal deposit on the electrode. The steady-state zinc deposition rate is recorded as a function of the applied potential. Mass transfer effects are controlled by the use of a rotating disc electrode. After each potential step, the electrode is polarized to a potential near the UPD potential, which dissolves the bulk zinc and regenerates the original smooth electrode. In this manner the voltage-current density relationship for the zinc deposition reaction may be mapped for a particular solution composition. Experiments were conducted to characterize UPD of zinc on platinum in magnesium sulphate and sulphuric acid supporting electrolytes. UPD of zinc on platinum occurs at a voltage approximately 1 V more positive than that of bulk zinc deposition with an estimated charge density of 260 +/- 30 muC cm-2, which is in the order of a monolayer of zinc. The UPD layer was determined to evolve into a Pt-Zn alloy which further inhibited hydrogen evolution, relative to the freshly deposited UPD layer. Bulk zinc deposition experiments were carried out in pure zinc sulphate solutions at 25°C, using the developed technique, and kinetic parameters were evaluated and compared to previously reported values. The Tafel slope for zinc deposition from pH neutral electrolytes was determined to be ca. 60 mV dec-1, while in highly acid electrolytes was ca. 30 mV dec-1, due to the inhibiting effect of hydrogen adsorption. The transition of zinc deposit

  7. Imaging Mobile Zinc in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Tomat, Elisa; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Trafficking and regulation of mobile zinc pools influence cellular functions and pathological conditions in multiple organs, including brain, pancreas, and prostate. The quest for a dynamic description of zinc distribution and mobilization in live cells fuels the development of increasingly sophisticated probes. Detection systems that respond to zinc binding with changes of their fluorescence emission properties have provided sensitive tools for mobile zinc imaging, and fluorescence microscopy experiments have afforded depictions of zinc distribution within live cells and tissues. Both small-molecule and protein-based fluorescent probes can address complex imaging challenges, such as analyte quantification, site-specific sensor localization, and real-time detection. PMID:20097117

  8. Zinc and Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc and Compounds ; CASRN 7440 - 66 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  9. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  10. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  11. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1993-12-14

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  12. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  13. Toddler diets in the U.K.: deficiencies and imbalances. 1. Risk of micronutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Bianca; Lanigan, Julie; Singhal, Atul

    2007-01-01

    The toddler diet in the U.K. changed considerably during the 25 years between the last two national dietary surveys, and these and other reports suggest that the nutritional intake of many toddlers does not comply with national recommendations. This is a concern for parents and health care workers because both deficiencies and excesses in nutrition are associated with increased risk of diseases, such as iron deficiency anaemia, rickets, dental caries and diseases related to obesity. Paradoxically, a decrease in energy intake has been accompanied by a rise in obesity, while a parallel fall in vitamin and mineral intake has been seen in tandem with an increase in diseases associated with nutritional deficiency. Establishing good dietary habi in early childhood is therefore important for short-term health. Dietary patterns at this time may be crucial to later behaviour and, if carried through to adulthood, may affect long-term health. In particular, deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, zinc and vitamin D are a cause for con cern. Childhood diseases such as rickets, which affects bone development and was thought to have been eradicated, have re-emerged in recent years and the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia has increased, particularly among migrant populations among migrant populations. Part 1 of this review considers the relationship between current toddler diet and micronutrient deficiencies, focusing on the impact of deficiency on both short- and longterm health. In Part 2 (to be published in Journal of Family Health Care 2007; 17[6]), the authors will consider effects on health of nutritional imbalance resulting from overconsumption of energy and nutrients. PMID:17990656

  14. Isomerically Pure Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.

    PubMed

    Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W

    2016-07-27

    We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically pure tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores. PMID:27428174

  15. Bringing Planctomycetes into pure culture

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Olga M.; Bondoso, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Planctomycetes have been known since the description of Planctomyces bekefii by Gimesi at the beginning of the twentieth century (1924), although the first axenic cultures were only obtained in the 1970s. Since then, 11 genera with 14 species have been validly named and five candidatus genera belonging to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox bacteria have also been discovered. However, Planctomycetes diversity is much broader than these numbers indicate, as shown by environmental molecular studies. In recent years, the authors have attempted to isolate and cultivate additional strains of Planctomycetes. This paper provides a summary of the isolation work that was carried out to obtain in pure culture Planctomycetes from several environmental sources. The following strains of planctomycetes have been successfully isolated: two freshwater strains from the sediments of an aquarium, which were described as a new genus and species, Aquisphaera giovannonii; several Rhodopirellula strains from the sediments of a water treatment recycling tank of a marine fish farm; and more than 140 planctomycetes from the biofilm community of macroalgae. This collection comprises several novel taxa that are being characterized and described. Improvements in the isolation methodology were made in order to optimize and enlarge the number of Planctomycetes isolated from the macroalgae. The existence of an intimate and an important relationship between planctomycetes and macroalgae reported before by molecular studies is therefore supported by culture-dependent methods. PMID:23335915

  16. Increasing iron and zinc in pre-menopausal women and its effects on mood and cognition: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lomagno, Karla A; Hu, Feifei; Riddell, Lynn J; Booth, Alison O; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Nowson, Caryl A; Byrne, Linda K

    2014-11-01

    Iron and zinc are essential minerals often present in similar food sources. In addition to the adverse effects of frank iron and zinc-deficient states, iron insufficiency has been associated with impairments in mood and cognition. This paper reviews current literature on iron or zinc supplementation and its impact on mood or cognition in pre-menopausal women. Searches included MEDLINE complete, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), psychINFO, psychARTICLES, pubMED, ProQuest Health and Medical Complete Academic Search complete, Scopus and ScienceDirect. Ten randomized controlled trials and one non-randomized controlled trial were found to meet the inclusion criteria. Seven studies found improvements in aspects of mood and cognition after iron supplementation. Iron supplementation appeared to improve memory and intellectual ability in participants aged between 12 and 55 years in seven studies, regardless of whether the participant was initially iron insufficient or iron-deficient with anaemia. The review also found three controlled studies providing evidence to suggest a role for zinc supplementation as a treatment for depressive symptoms, as both an adjunct to traditional antidepressant therapy for individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and as a therapy in its own right in pre-menopausal women with zinc deficiency. Overall, the current literature indicates a positive effect of improving zinc status on enhanced cognitive and emotional functioning. However, further study involving well-designed randomized controlled trials is needed to identify the impact of improving iron and zinc status on mood and cognition.

  17. Overexpression of the transporters AtZIP1 and AtMTP1 in cassava changes zinc accumulation and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Siritunga, Dimuth; Stevens, William; Schachtman, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is a serious problem worldwide with an estimated one third of populations at risk for insufficient zinc in diet, which leads to impairment of cognitive abilities and immune system function. The goal of this research was to increase the bioavailable zinc in the edible portion of cassava roots to improve the overall zinc nutrition of populations that rely on cassava as a dietary staple. To increase zinc concentrations, two Arabidopsis thaliana genes coding for ZIP1 and MTP1 were overexpressed with a tuber-specific or constitutive promoter. Eighteen transgenic events from four constructs, out of a total of 73 events generated, showed significantly higher zinc concentrations in the edible portion of the storage root compared to the non-transgenic controls. The zinc content in the transgenic lines ranged from 4 to 73 mg/kg dry weight (DW) as compared to the non-transgenic control which contained 8 mg/kg. Striking changes in whole plant phenotype such as smaller plant size and chlorotic leaves were observed in transgenic lines that over accumulated zinc. In a confined field trial five transgenic events grown for 12 months showed a range of zinc concentrations from 18 to 217 mg/kg DW. Although the overexpression of zinc transporters was successful in increasing the zinc concentrations in 25% of the transgenic lines generated, it also resulted in a decrease in plant and tuber size and overall yield due to what appears to be zinc deficiency in the aerial parts of the plant.

  18. Overexpression of the transporters AtZIP1 and AtMTP1 in cassava changes zinc accumulation and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Siritunga, Dimuth; Stevens, William; Schachtman, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is a serious problem worldwide with an estimated one third of populations at risk for insufficient zinc in diet, which leads to impairment of cognitive abilities and immune system function. The goal of this research was to increase the bioavailable zinc in the edible portion of cassava roots to improve the overall zinc nutrition of populations that rely on cassava as a dietary staple. To increase zinc concentrations, two Arabidopsis thaliana genes coding for ZIP1 and MTP1 were overexpressed with a tuber-specific or constitutive promoter. Eighteen transgenic events from four constructs, out of a total of 73 events generated, showed significantly higher zinc concentrations in the edible portion of the storage root compared to the non-transgenic controls. The zinc content in the transgenic lines ranged from 4 to 73 mg/kg dry weight (DW) as compared to the non-transgenic control which contained 8 mg/kg. Striking changes in whole plant phenotype such as smaller plant size and chlorotic leaves were observed in transgenic lines that over accumulated zinc. In a confined field trial five transgenic events grown for 12 months showed a range of zinc concentrations from 18 to 217 mg/kg DW. Although the overexpression of zinc transporters was successful in increasing the zinc concentrations in 25% of the transgenic lines generated, it also resulted in a decrease in plant and tuber size and overall yield due to what appears to be zinc deficiency in the aerial parts of the plant. PMID:26217349

  19. Overexpression of the transporters AtZIP1 and AtMTP1 in cassava changes zinc accumulation and partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J.; Siritunga, Dimuth; Stevens, William; Schachtman, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc deficiency in humans is a serious problem worldwide with an estimated one third of populations at risk for insufficient zinc in diet, which leads to impairment of cognitive abilities and immune system function. The goal of this research was to increase the bioavailable zinc in the edible portion of cassava roots to improve the overall zinc nutrition of populations that rely on cassava as a dietary staple. To increase zinc concentrations, two Arabidopsis thaliana genes coding for ZIP1 and MTP1 were overexpressed with a tuber-specific or constitutive promoter. Eighteen transgenic events from four constructs, out of a total of 73 events generated, showed significantly higher zinc concentrations in the edible portion of the storage root compared to the non-transgenic controls. The zinc content in the transgenic lines ranged from 4 to 73 mg/kg dry weight (DW) as compared to the non-transgenic control which contained 8 mg/kg. Striking changes in whole plant phenotype such as smaller plant size and chlorotic leaves were observed in transgenic lines that over accumulated zinc. In a confined field trial five transgenic events grown for 12 months showed a range of zinc concentrations from 18 to 217 mg/kg DW. Although the overexpression of zinc transporters was successful in increasing the zinc concentrations in 25% of the transgenic lines generated, it also resulted in a decrease in plant and tuber size and overall yield due to what appears to be zinc deficiency in the aerial parts of the plant. PMID:26217349

  20. Effect of iron and zinc supplementation and its discontinuation on lipid profile in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Joanna; Madej, Dawid

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate whether combined iron/zinc supplementation is more beneficial than iron supplementation alone from the perspective of the lipid profile in rats. The study was conducted on 6-week male Wistar rats in 3 stages: (1) 4-week adaptation to the diets: C (AIN-93M) and D (mineral mix without iron); (2) 4-week supplementation: 10-times more iron or iron and zinc compared to C; (3) 2-week post-supplementation period (the same diets as in the first stage). The iron and zinc content in serum was measured using ASA. Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) were determined. After 4-week supplementation (stage II) and post-supplementation (stage III) periods combined iron/zinc supplementation decreased HDL-C and increased non-HDL-C concentrations in control rats, and in contrast to iron supplementation alone TG concentration decreased. After stage II combined iron/zinc supplementation did not result in increased non-HDL-C and TG concentrations in iron deficient rats in contrast to iron supplementation alone. After stage III both iron and simultaneous iron/zinc supplementation were the cause of TC increase which was the result of the increase of non-HDL-C but not HDL-C concentration in iron deficient rats. In conclusion, there were no beneficial effects of simultaneous iron and zinc supplementation on the lipid profile of rats fed control and iron deficient diets. Combined iron and zinc supplementation may contribute to lower HDL-C and higher non-HDL-C concentrations.

  1. Comparative toxicity of a zinc salt, zinc powder and zinc oxide to Eisenia fetida, Enchytraeus albidus and Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Lock, Koen; Janssen, Colin R

    2003-12-01

    The pore water zinc concentration and the calcium chloride extracted zinc fraction are higher in the soils spiked with a zinc salt (ZnCl2) compared to soils spiked with zinc oxide or zinc powder. Based on total zinc concentrations in the soil, the acute toxicity of zinc salt to the compost worm Eisenia fetida, the potworm Enchytraeus albidus and the springtail Folsomia candida was lower compared to zinc oxide and zinc powder. However, when expressed on the basis of pore water concentrations or calcium chloride extracted fractions, acute toxicity was higher for zinc salt, which indicated that dermal uptake via the pore water is not the only route of uptake. Chronic toxicity of zinc salt, zinc oxide and zinc powder was similar when based on total concentrations in the soil which again indicates that the pore water route of uptake is not the only route of exposure but that oral uptake is also important.

  2. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  3. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  4. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder affecting at least one third of world's population. Though anemia is common manifestation of iron deficiency, other effects of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems are usually under recognized. Impaired brain development and cognitive, behavioural and psychomotor impairment are most worrisome manifestations of iron deficiency. Studies have demonstrated that some of these changes occurring during period of brain growth spurt (<2 years age) may be irreversible. Association of iron deficiency with febrile seizures, pica, breath holding spells, restless leg syndrome and thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. Impaired cell-mediated immunity and bactericidal function are generally noted in iron-deficient persons; however, the findings are inconsistent. Despite proven reversible functional immunological defects in vitro studies, a clinically important relationship between states of iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections remains controversial. Studies from malaria endemic regions have reported increased incidence of malaria in association with iron supplementation. These and some other aspects of iron deficiency are reviewed in this article.

  5. Iodine-deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Jooste, Pieter L; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2008-10-01

    2 billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed iodine-deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental impairment worldwide. Assessment methods include urinary iodine concentration, goitre, newborn thyroid-stimulating hormone, and blood thyroglobulin. In nearly all countries, the best strategy to control iodine deficiency is iodisation of salt, which is one of the most cost-effective ways to contribute to economic and social development. When iodisation of salt is not possible, iodine supplements can be given to susceptible groups. Introduction of iodised salt to regions of chronic iodine-deficiency disorders might transiently increase the proportion of thyroid disorders, but overall the small risks of iodine excess are far outweighed by the substantial risks of iodine deficiency. International efforts to control iodine-deficiency disorders are slowing, and reaching the third of the worldwide population that remains deficient poses major challenges. PMID:18676011

  6. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  7. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  8. Multiple congenital coagulation deficiencies.

    PubMed

    BONNIN, J A; HICKS, N D; INNIS, M D; SIMPSON, D A

    1960-07-01

    A 6-week-old infant is presented who suffered from a congenital haemorrhagic disorder which caused death from subdural haemorrhage following mild trauma. Haematological investigation revealed deficiencies of factor VII and Christmas factor. Prower-Stuart factor was probably also deficient although investigation of this clotting factor was carried out only on serum obtained at necropsy.

  9. Acute changes in cellular zinc alters zinc uptake rates prior to zinc transporter gene expression in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Holland, Tai C; Killilea, David W; Shenvi, Swapna V; King, Janet C

    2015-12-01

    A coordinated network of zinc transporters and binding proteins tightly regulate cellular zinc levels. Canonical responses to zinc availability are thought to be mediated by changes in gene expression of key zinc transporters. We investigated the temporal relationships of actual zinc uptake with patterns of gene expression in membrane-bound zinc transporters in the human immortalized T lymphocyte Jurkat cell line. Cellular zinc levels were elevated or reduced with exogenous zinc sulfate or N,N,N',N-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN), respectively. Excess zinc resulted in a rapid 44 % decrease in the rate of zinc uptake within 10 min. After 120 min, the expression of metallothionein (positive control) increased, as well as the zinc exporter, ZnT1; however, the expression of zinc importers did not change during this time period. Zinc chelation with TPEN resulted in a rapid twofold increase in the rate of zinc uptake within 10 min. After 120 min, the expression of ZnT1 decreased, while again the expression of zinc importers did not change. Overall, zinc transporter gene expression kinetics did not match actual changes in cellular zinc uptake with exogenous zinc or TPEN treatments. This suggests zinc transporter regulation may be the initial response to changes in zinc within Jurkat cells.

  10. Absorbed zinc and exchangeable zinc pool size are greater in Pakistani infants receiving traditional complementary foods with zinc-fortified micronutrient powder.

    PubMed

    Ariff, Shabina; Krebs, Nancy F; Soofi, Sajid; Westcott, Jamie; Bhatti, Zaid; Tabassum, Farhana; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    Adequacy of zinc intake from breast milk alone becomes marginal in relation to infant requirements by around 6 mo of age. Simple and cost-effective strategies are needed at the population level to ensure adequate intakes of zinc in infants and toddlers in populations at risk of zinc deficiency. We determined the amount of absorbed zinc (AZ) from a micronutrient powder (MNP) without and with 10 mg of zinc (MNP+Zn) added to local complementary foods used in Pakistan and the impact on the exchangeable zinc pool (EZP) size. As a nested study within a large, prospective, cluster randomized trial, 6-mo-old infants were randomly assigned to receive MNP or MNP+Zn. Stable isotope methodology was applied after ∼3 and 9 mo of use to measure AZ from MNP-fortified test meals of rice-lentils (khitchri) and EZP. Nineteen infants per group completed the first metabolic studies and 14 and 17 infants in the MNP and MNP+Zn groups, respectively, completed the follow-up studies. AZs were (mean ± SD) 0.1 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.5 mg at the first point for the MNP and MNP+Zn groups, respectively (P < 0.001); results were nearly identical at the follow-up measurement. EZP did not differ between groups at the first measurement but was less in the MNP group (3.7 ± 0.6 mg/kg) than in the MNP+Zn group (4.5 ± 1.0 mg/kg) at the second measurement (P = 0.01). These data confirm that the MNP+Zn in khitchri were well absorbed and after 1 y of home fortification, zinc status assessed by EZP was significantly better for the MNP+Zn group. Additional field studies may be necessary to ascertain the adequacy of this dose for infants at high risk of deficiency. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00705445.

  11. Zinc and homocysteine levels in polycystic ovarian syndrome patients with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ismail; Himmetoglu, Ozdemir; Turp, Ahmet; Erdem, Ahmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Onan, M Anıl; Taskiran, Cagatay; Taslipinar, Mine Yavuz; Guner, Haldun

    2014-06-01

    In this study, our objective was to evaluating the value of serum zinc levels as an etiologic and prognostic marker in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome. We conducted a prospective study, including 53 women with polycystic ovarian syndrome and 33 healthy controls. We compared serum zinc levels, as well as clinical and metabolic features, of the cases. We also compared serum zinc levels between patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome with insulin resistance. Mean zinc levels were found to be significantly lower in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome than healthy controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis of significant metabolic variables between polycystic ovarian syndrome and control groups (serum zinc level, body mass index, the ratio of triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and homocysteine) revealed that zinc level was the most significant variable to predict polycystic ovarian syndrome. Mean serum zinc levels tended to be lower in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome with impaired glucose tolerance than patients with normal glucose tolerance, but the difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, zinc deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome and may be related with its long-term metabolic complications.

  12. Molecular logic of the Zur-regulated zinc deprivation response in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Helmann, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria respond dynamically to the changes in zinc availability. Repression by the Bacillus subtilis transcription factor Zur requires Zn(II), which binds with negative cooperativity to two regulatory sites per dimer to form, sequentially, Zur2:Zn3 and Zur2:Zn4 forms of the repressor. Here we show that, as cells transition from zinc sufficiency to deficiency, operons regulated by Zur are derepressed in three distinct waves. The first includes the alternative RpmEB(L31*) and RpmGC(L33*) ribosomal proteins, which mobilize zinc from the ribosome, whereas the second includes the ZnuACB uptake system and the YciC metallochaperone. Finally, as zinc levels decrease further, the Zur2:Zn3 form loses Zn(II) leading to derepression of RpsNB(S14*) and FolE2, which allow continued ribosome assembly and folate synthesis, respectively. We infer that zinc mobilization from intracellular zinc stores takes priority over energy-dependent import, and our results link the biochemistry of zinc sensing by Zur to the molecular logic of the zinc deprivation response. PMID:27561249

  13. Predictive clinical and laboratory parameters for serum zinc and copper in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H; Konttinen, Y T; Lehto, J; Honkanen, V

    1988-01-01

    Zinc and copper have important effects on T cell mediated immunity and on neutrophil function, but it is not known how the causes or effects, of low serum zinc and high serum copper relate to the clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study serum zinc and copper determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry and 30 other clinical, immunological, and laboratory parameters in 60 patients with RA were analysed by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Joint score index, rheumatoid factor titre, seropositivity, haemoglobin, and C reactive protein (CRP) were among the nine independent variables which together predicted 73% of the serum zinc variation. This suggests that there is an association between the immune-inflammatory rheumatoid process and the serum zinc concentration. CRP alone had only a 3% independent predicting value for serum zinc, however. This suggests that metallothionein mediated sequestration in the liver, induced by interleukin 1, is not an important explanatory factor in a cross sectional study of chronic inflammation. Furthermore, serum zinc did not have any predictive value at all for serum copper concentration. This does not support the hypothesis suggesting that serum zinc deficiency leads to high serum copper by inducing gastrointestinal metallothionein and high caeruloplasmin. PMID:3196083

  14. Molecular logic of the Zur-regulated zinc deprivation response in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Ho; Helmann, John D

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria respond dynamically to the changes in zinc availability. Repression by the Bacillus subtilis transcription factor Zur requires Zn(II), which binds with negative cooperativity to two regulatory sites per dimer to form, sequentially, Zur2:Zn3 and Zur2:Zn4 forms of the repressor. Here we show that, as cells transition from zinc sufficiency to deficiency, operons regulated by Zur are derepressed in three distinct waves. The first includes the alternative RpmEB(L31*) and RpmGC(L33*) ribosomal proteins, which mobilize zinc from the ribosome, whereas the second includes the ZnuACB uptake system and the YciC metallochaperone. Finally, as zinc levels decrease further, the Zur2:Zn3 form loses Zn(II) leading to derepression of RpsNB(S14*) and FolE2, which allow continued ribosome assembly and folate synthesis, respectively. We infer that zinc mobilization from intracellular zinc stores takes priority over energy-dependent import, and our results link the biochemistry of zinc sensing by Zur to the molecular logic of the zinc deprivation response. PMID:27561249

  15. Genome-Wide Functional Profiling Identifies Genes and Processes Important for Zinc-Limited Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Loguinov, Alex V.; Zimmerman, Ginelle R.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Eide, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because it is a required cofactor for many enzymes and transcription factors. To discover genes and processes in yeast that are required for growth when zinc is limiting, we used genome-wide functional profiling. Mixed pools of ∼4,600 deletion mutants were inoculated into zinc-replete and zinc-limiting media. These cells were grown for several generations, and the prevalence of each mutant in the pool was then determined by microarray analysis. As a result, we identified more than 400 different genes required for optimal growth under zinc-limiting conditions. Among these were several targets of the Zap1 zinc-responsive transcription factor. Their importance is consistent with their up-regulation by Zap1 in low zinc. We also identified genes that implicate Zap1-independent processes as important. These include endoplasmic reticulum function, oxidative stress resistance, vesicular trafficking, peroxisome biogenesis, and chromatin modification. Our studies also indicated the critical role of macroautophagy in low zinc growth. Finally, as a result of our analysis, we discovered a previously unknown role for the ICE2 gene in maintaining ER zinc homeostasis. Thus, functional profiling has provided many new insights into genes and processes that are needed for cells to thrive under the stress of zinc deficiency. PMID:22685415

  16. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  17. Zinc hydroxide sulphate and its transformation to crystalline zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Moezzi, Amir; Cortie, Michael B; McDonagh, Andrew M

    2013-10-28

    The thermal transformation of zinc hydroxide sulphate hydrate to zinc oxide has been examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and surface area measurements. By collecting X-ray diffraction data in situ, we found that the dehydration of zinc hydroxide sulphate pentahydrate proceeded in discrete steps to form anhydrous zinc hydroxide sulphate. This compound then decomposed to a mixture of zinc oxide and a compound tentatively identified as Zn3(OH)2(SO4)2 at ~235 °C. At ~360 °C, the final dehydroxylation occurred with the formation of zinc oxy-sulphate, Zn3O(SO4)2, which then decomposed to ZnO at about ~800 °C. Interruption of the dehydration process can be used to synthesize the intermediate compounds.

  18. Corrosion-induced release of Cu and Zn into rainwater from brass, bronze and their pure metals. A 2-year field study.

    PubMed

    Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Leygraf, Christofer

    2008-09-01

    A 2-year field study has been conducted in an urban environment to provide annual release rates of copper and zinc from brass (20 wt% Zn) and copper and tin from bronze (6 wt% Sn) compared to sheets of their pure alloy constituents, copper and zinc. Despite relatively low nominal bulk alloy content, substantially more zinc was released from brass compared to copper. Both metals were released at a significantly slower rate from the brass alloy, compared to the pure metals. The proportion of release rates of copper and zinc from the alloy differed significantly from their proportions in the bulk alloy. Bronze showed relatively constant release rates of copper, being similar to that of pure copper sheet. The release of tin from bronze was negligible. The results clearly show that alloys and the pure metals behave very differently when exposed to rainwater. Accordingly, release rates from pure metals cannot be used to predict release rates of individual constituents from their alloys. Generated data are of importance within REACH, the new chemical policy of the European commission, where metal alloys erroneously are being treated as mixtures of chemical substances.

  19. Experimental phasing using zinc anomalous scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sun-Shin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2012-09-01

    The surface of proteins can be charged with zinc ions and the anomalous signals from these zinc ions can be used for structure determination of proteins. Zinc is a suitable metal for anomalous dispersion phasing methods in protein crystallography. Structure determination using zinc anomalous scattering has been almost exclusively limited to proteins with intrinsically bound zinc(s). Here, it is reported that multiple zinc ions can easily be charged onto the surface of proteins with no intrinsic zinc-binding site by using zinc-containing solutions. Zn derivatization of protein surfaces appears to be a largely unnoticed but promising method of protein structure determination.

  20. Dietary zinc and BCG injection influence macrophage function

    SciTech Connect

    Briske-Anderson, M.J.; Kramer, T.R.

    1986-03-05

    Weanling male Lewis rats were fed ad-libitum for 21-25 days a diet based on AIN standards containing 20% egg-white protein and deficient (2 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (20 ..mu..g/g) zinc. A pair-fed (PF) group was fed a Zn-adequate diet, equal to the amount consumed by Zn-deficient rats. Zn-deficient rats exhibited typical signs of Zn deficiency. Seven days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group (N=10) were injected in the forelimb footpads with 250 ..mu..g of BCG (Cell wall skeleton of bacille Calmette Guerin) in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant (IFA), or with IFA alone. Three days prior to completion of dietary regimen rats from each group were injected intraperitoneally with sterile paraffin oil. Upon completion of dietary regimen peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) were collected. Equivalent phagocytic activity (chemiluminescence) was exhibited by PEC from Zn-deficient and PF rats injected with BCG or IFA, and by PEC from Zn-adequate rats injected with IFA. Phagocytic activity by PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats was significantly higher than in PEC of the other groups. PEC from BCG injected Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient and PF rats, however, equivalently suppressed the proliferation of Con-A stimulated SLC from control (noninjected, Zn-adequate) rats. The findings suggest that PEC of BCG injected Zn-adequate rats produce elevated hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals.

  1. Maternal diets, nutritional status, and zinc in contemporary Mexican infants' teeth: Implications for reconstructing paleodiets.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Alexis E; Goodman, Alan H

    2009-11-01

    Despite attempts to use zinc (Zn) concentrations in hard tissues to comment upon the degree of carnivory in past populations, zinc has yielded inconsistent trophic level effects. The question of what, if anything, zinc in human enamel reveals regarding past diets is the focus of this research. We test whether the zinc content of deciduous tooth enamel from contemporary Mexican infants varies by maternal dietary variables such as zinc intake, proportion of animal products consumed, and dietary components that are known to impact zinc absorption. Deciduous teeth were collected from former participants in a longitudinal study of maternal and infant diet and function in highland Mexico. The Zn/Ca ratios of both prenatal and postnatal regions of 37 anterior teeth representing 26 individuals were assessed via laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Maternal dietary data collected during lactation were not correlated with zinc levels in the early postnatal enamel of infants' teeth, which were forming at the same time. In the case of prenatal enamel, zinc values were correlated with the consumption of foods known to influence Zn bioavailability, most notably tortillas (P = 0.008; r = 0.510), but not with meat consumption. Unexpectedly, women who consumed diets with poor zinc bioavailability during pregnancy gave birth to infants whose prenatal enamel demonstrated the highest Zn/Ca ratios, possibly due to enhanced zinc absorption during pregnancy for those mothers suffering most from long-term micronutrient deficiency. These results would suggest that zinc is not a reliable trophic level indicator. PMID:19373846

  2. Zinc Levels in Seminal Fluid in Infertile Males and its Relation with Serum Free Testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Ajay Rajeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The role of zinc is critical to reproduction potential. Seminal zinc is thought to be derived almost exclusively from prostatic secretions. Sperm motility is significantly influenced by zinc. Zinc deficiency has been linked with male sterility and subfertility. Aim To assess the influence of seminal plasma zinc on seminogram characteristics and whether endogenous testosterone affects the seminal levels of zinc. Materials and Methods The semen samples were obtained from 150 male partners of infertile couples who attended the Reproductive Biology Unit of the Department of Physiology, within the age 21-50 years and semen samples were analysed for the routine seminogram parameters. All the subjects were classified into two main groups, A- the subjects with normal ejaculates (n=62) and B- the subjects with abnormal ejaculates, who were further sub divided into the following groups: i) Asthenoteratozoospermics (n=43); ii) Oligoasthenoteratozoospermics (n=24); and iii) Azoospermics (n=21). The seminal plasma zinc was measured spectrophotometrically. The sample for serum free testosterone was sent to Thyrocare laboratory. Results The seminal plasma zinc was found to be significantly lower in the abnormal ejaculates than in the normal ejaculates. A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between the seminal plasma zinc and serum free testosterone (p<0.05, r=0.449). Statistically significant correlation was also found between seminal plasma zinc and all the seminogram parameters such as the sperm concentration, sperm motility and sperm morphology (p<0.05, r= 0.86, 0.87 and 0.86 respectively). Conclusion Low seminal plasma zinc might be a significant causative factor in impairing sperm functions and its dependence on endogenous free testosterone, is observed from a positive correlation between the two. PMID:27437207

  3. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc... indirect process whereby zinc metal isolated from the zinc-containing ore is vaporized and then...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc... indirect process whereby zinc metal isolated from the zinc-containing ore is vaporized and then...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc... indirect process whereby zinc metal isolated from the zinc-containing ore is vaporized and then...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc... indirect process whereby zinc metal isolated from the zinc-containing ore is vaporized and then...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc... indirect process whereby zinc metal isolated from the zinc-containing ore is vaporized and then...

  8. Biofortified indica rice attains iron and zinc nutrition dietary targets in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiencies are the most prevalent micronutrient malnutrition globally1. Fe in rice has proven efficacious in improving serum ferritin concentration and body Fe levels2. Rapid progress in biofortification demonstrates the feasibility to enhance Fe in polished rice by expre...

  9. Observations of interstellar zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.; Jura, M.

    1982-01-01

    IUE observations toward 10 stars have shown that zinc is not depleted in the interstellar medium by more than a factor of two, suggesting that its abundance may serve as a tracer of the true metallicity in the gas. A result pertinent to the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood is that the local interstellar medium has abundances that appear to be homogeneous to within a factor of two, when integrated over paths of about 500 pc.

  10. Uptake epithelia behave in a cell-centric and not systems homeostatic manner in response to zinc depletion and supplementation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3mt00212h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongling; Feeney, Graham P.; Handy, Richard D.; Kille, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Much remains to be understood about systemic regulation of zinc uptake in vertebrates, and adequate zinc status is far from always achieved in animals or human. In addition to absorbing zinc from the diet, fish are able to take up zinc directly from the water with the gills. This provides an elegant system to study zinc uptake, how it relates to zinc status, and the expression of genes for proteins involved in zinc acquisition. A 21-day experiment was conducted in which zebrafish were acclimated to deficient, control or excess zinc concentrations in the water and feed. Deficient provision of zinc reduced whole body zinc, potassium, sodium and calcium levels whilst zinc concentrations in the uptake epithelia (gills and gut) remained unchanged. Excess levels of zinc caused accumulation of zinc in the gills, intestine and carcass, but impaired whole body iron, sodium and calcium concentrations. Fish subjected to zinc deficiency had, surprisingly, a reduced zinc influx across the gill epithelium, even when tested at a high concentration of zinc in the water. Zinc influx in the excess group was indistinct from the control. Expression of genes for metallothionein-2 (Mt2) and zinc transporters-1, -2, and -8 (Znt1, Znt2, Znt8) in uptake epithelia showed in general a direct relationship with zinc supply, while mRNA for Zip4 was inversely related to zinc supply. Transcripts for the epithelial calcium channel (Ecac/Trpv6) showed time-dependent increased expression in the gills of the deficiency group, and a transient decrease of expression during zinc excess. Transcriptome profiling by microarrays showed that in both gills and intestine, the most markedly affected biological functions were those related to cell growth, proliferation and cancer, closely followed by processes of gene transcription and protein synthesis in general. Whilst changes in zinc supply had profound effects in the intestine on genes associated with uptake and metabolism of macronutrients, many of the

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    G6PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... Saunders; 2016:chap 161. Janz TG, Hamilton GC. Anemia, polycythemia, and white blood cell disorders. In: Marx ...

  12. Surface energy of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, J.C.; Dew-Hughes, D.; Pucino, A.T.

    1983-04-01

    The influence of temperature and associated dislocation microstructure on the energetics of basal plane cleavage in zinc crystals has been investigated using the method of Hull, Beardmore, and Valentine (HBV). A marked temperature dependence was observed in the zinc surface energy, over the range 77--298 /sup 0/K, contrary to previous expectations. Plastic relaxation was associated with crack initiation at 77 /sup 0/K, but not propagation; while at room temperature a plastic zone of 1200--1500 ..mu..m in depth was produced by crack extension. The surface energy could be estimated, independent of the usual Griffith analysis, by measuring the energy dissipation in a fully relaxed deformed zone associated with an explosively formed precursor crack. This method yielded surface energies of 0.066 to 0.079 J m/sup -2/ which was in good agreement with previous work. It is demonstrated that the cleavage surface energy of zinc is well below the thermodynamic surface energy and that this discrepancy is not related to plastic deformation.

  13. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the content of chemical elements in the soil and thyroid morbidity in the population of the region. The assessment of the prevalence of iodine deficiency and iodine deficiency diseases was carried out on the basis of the impact of the priority environmental toxic (strontium, nickel, cadmium, lead, arsenic, tin) and essential (nickel, iron, germanium, molybdenum, zinc, selenium) trace elements on the level of iodine deficiency diseases. The level of thyroid pathology in the territory of Primorye was established to be the highest one in areas characterized by the severe iodine deficiency (Northwest geochemical zones), where the structure of thyroid diseases is presented mainly by diffuse nontoxic goiter. Thyroid diseases associated with iodine deficiency in the population of different age groups are the result of multiple and combined imbalance of trace elements, which causes a relative (secondary) iodine deficiency. Thyroid disease in Primorye are environmentally caused diseases of technogenic origin, they are a consequence of the relative iodine deficiency, when on the background of normal iodine supply an imbalance of zinc, iron, cobalt, manganese with excess of such toxic trace elements as lead, strontium, nickel and chromium takes place. Thyroid pathology associated with iodine deficiency, along with other environmentally dependent diseases can be considered as a marker of ecological environment trouble. PMID:25831939

  14. [Distribution iodine deficiency diseases in coastal areas depending on geochemical conditions].

    PubMed

    Kiku, P F; Andryukov, B G

    2014-01-01

    In the Primorsky Krai there was performed a population ecological and hygienic analysis of the relationship between the conten