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Sample records for purebred dog breeds

  1. Owner perceived differences between mixed-breed and purebred dogs.

    PubMed

    Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Studies about the behaviours of mixed-breed dogs are rare, although mixed-breeds represent the majority of the world's dog population. We have conducted two surveys to investigate the behavioural, demographic, and dog keeping differences between purebred and mixed-breed companion dogs. Questionnaire data were collected on a large sample of dogs living in Germany (N = 7,700 purebred dogs representing more than 200 breeds, and N = 7,691 mixed-breeds). We found that according to their owners, mixed-breeds were (1) less calm, (2) less sociable toward other dogs, and (3) showed more problematic behaviour than purebreds (p < 0.001 for all). Mixed-breeds and purebreds were similar in trainability and boldness scores. However, twelve out of 20 demographic and dog keeping factors differed between purebred and mixed-breed dogs, and two factors showed considerable (> 10%) differences: neutering was more frequent among mixed-breeds, and they were acquired at older ages than purebreds (p < 0.001 for both), which could result in the observed behaviour differences. After controlling for the distribution of the demographic and dog keeping factors, we found that mixed-breeds were (1) more trainable than purebreds, (2) less calm, and (3) showed more problematic behaviour than purebreds (p < 0.001 for all). We discuss that these differences at least partly might be due to selective forces. Our results suggest that instead of being the "average" dogs, mixed-breeds represent a special group with characteristic behavioural traits.

  2. Owner perceived differences between mixed-breed and purebred dogs

    PubMed Central

    Turcsán, Borbála; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Studies about the behaviours of mixed-breed dogs are rare, although mixed-breeds represent the majority of the world’s dog population. We have conducted two surveys to investigate the behavioural, demographic, and dog keeping differences between purebred and mixed-breed companion dogs. Questionnaire data were collected on a large sample of dogs living in Germany (N = 7,700 purebred dogs representing more than 200 breeds, and N = 7,691 mixed-breeds). We found that according to their owners, mixed-breeds were (1) less calm, (2) less sociable toward other dogs, and (3) showed more problematic behaviour than purebreds (p < 0.001 for all). Mixed-breeds and purebreds were similar in trainability and boldness scores. However, twelve out of 20 demographic and dog keeping factors differed between purebred and mixed-breed dogs, and two factors showed considerable (> 10%) differences: neutering was more frequent among mixed-breeds, and they were acquired at older ages than purebreds (p < 0.001 for both), which could result in the observed behaviour differences. After controlling for the distribution of the demographic and dog keeping factors, we found that mixed-breeds were (1) more trainable than purebreds, (2) less calm, and (3) showed more problematic behaviour than purebreds (p < 0.001 for all). We discuss that these differences at least partly might be due to selective forces. Our results suggest that instead of being the “average” dogs, mixed-breeds represent a special group with characteristic behavioural traits. PMID:28222103

  3. Selection of Breeding Stock among Australian Purebred Dog Breeders, with Particular Emphasis on the Dam.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Veronika; McArthur, Michelle; Smith, Bradley; Hynd, Philip; Hazel, Susan

    2016-11-16

    Every year, thousands of purebred domestic dogs are bred by registered dog breeders. Yet, little is known about the rearing environment of these dogs, or the attitudes and priorities surrounding breeding practices of these dog breeders. The objective of this study was to explore some of the factors that dog breeders consider important for stock selection, with a particular emphasis on issues relating to the dam. Two-hundred and seventy-four Australian purebred dog breeders, covering 91 breeds across all Australian National Kennel Club breed groups, completed an online survey relating to breeding practices. Most breeders surveyed (76%) reported specialising in one breed of dog, the median number of dogs and bitches per breeder was two and three respectively, and most breeders bred two litters or less a year. We identified four components, relating to the dam, that were considered important to breeders. These were defined as Maternal Care, Offspring Potential, Dam Temperament, and Dam Genetics and Health. Overall, differences were observed in attitudes and beliefs across these components, showing that there is variation according to breed/breed groups. In particular, the importance of Maternal Care varied according to dog breed group. Breeders of brachycephalic breeds tended to differ the most in relation to Offspring Potential and Dam Genetics and Health. The number of breeding dogs/bitches influenced breeding priority, especially in relation to Dam Temperament, however no effect was found relating to the number of puppies bred each year. Only 24% of breeders used their own sire for breeding. The finding that some breeders did not test for diseases relevant to their breed, such as hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherds, provides important information on the need to educate some breeders, and also buyers of purebred puppies, that screening for significant diseases should occur. Further research into the selection of breeding dams and sires will

  4. Selection of Breeding Stock among Australian Purebred Dog Breeders, with Particular Emphasis on the Dam

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinski, Veronika; McArthur, Michelle; Smith, Bradley; Hynd, Philip; Hazel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary One of the most important factors influencing the health and welfare of puppies is the decision made by the breeder on which dam and sire they will breed from. Unfortunately, our understanding of what dog breeders consider important when selecting their dogs, particularly the dam, is limited. In order to bridge this gap, we conducted an online survey of Australian purebred dog breeders. We identified four major factors that the breeder considered important in relation to the dam: Maternal Care; Offspring Potential; Dam Temperament; and Dam Genetics and Health. Overall, the priorities and practices of dog breeders surveyed were variable across breeds. Importantly, it seemed that not all breeders understood the importance of maternal care behaviour, despite the significant role it may play on future puppy behaviour. Abstract Every year, thousands of purebred domestic dogs are bred by registered dog breeders. Yet, little is known about the rearing environment of these dogs, or the attitudes and priorities surrounding breeding practices of these dog breeders. The objective of this study was to explore some of the factors that dog breeders consider important for stock selection, with a particular emphasis on issues relating to the dam. Two-hundred and seventy-four Australian purebred dog breeders, covering 91 breeds across all Australian National Kennel Club breed groups, completed an online survey relating to breeding practices. Most breeders surveyed (76%) reported specialising in one breed of dog, the median number of dogs and bitches per breeder was two and three respectively, and most breeders bred two litters or less a year. We identified four components, relating to the dam, that were considered important to breeders. These were defined as Maternal Care, Offspring Potential, Dam Temperament, and Dam Genetics and Health. Overall, differences were observed in attitudes and beliefs across these components, showing that there is variation according to

  5. Frequency and distribution of 152 genetic disease variants in over 100,000 mixed breed and purebred dogs.

    PubMed

    Donner, Jonas; Anderson, Heidi; Davison, Stephen; Hughes, Angela M; Bouirmane, Julia; Lindqvist, Johan; Lytle, Katherine M; Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Ottka, Claudia; Ruotanen, Päivi; Kaukonen, Maria; Forman, Oliver P; Fretwell, Neale; Cole, Cynthia A; Lohi, Hannes

    2018-04-30

    Knowledge on the genetic epidemiology of disorders in the dog population has implications for both veterinary medicine and sustainable breeding. Limited data on frequencies of genetic disease variants across breeds exists, and the disease heritage of mixed breed dogs remains poorly explored to date. Advances in genetic screening technologies now enable comprehensive investigations of the canine disease heritage, and generate health-related big data that can be turned into action. We pursued population screening of genetic variants implicated in Mendelian disorders in the largest canine study sample examined to date by examining over 83,000 mixed breed and 18,000 purebred dogs representing 330 breeds for 152 known variants using a custom-designed beadchip microarray. We further announce the creation of MyBreedData (www.mybreeddata.com), an online updated inherited disorder prevalence resource with its foundation in the generated data. We identified the most prevalent, and rare, disease susceptibility variants across the general dog population while providing the first extensive snapshot of the mixed breed disease heritage. Approximately two in five dogs carried at least one copy of a tested disease variant. Most disease variants are shared by both mixed breeds and purebreds, while breed- or line-specificity of others is strongly suggested. Mixed breed dogs were more likely to carry a common recessive disease, whereas purebreds were more likely to be genetically affected with one, providing DNA-based evidence for hybrid vigor. We discovered genetic presence of 22 disease variants in at least one additional breed in which they were previously undescribed. Some mutations likely manifest similarly independently of breed background; however, we emphasize the need for follow up investigations in each case and provide a suggested validation protocol for broader consideration. In conclusion, our study provides unique insight into genetic epidemiology of canine disease risk

  6. Proportion of litters of purebred dogs born by caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Evans, Katy M; Adams, Vicki J

    2010-02-01

    To describe the frequency of caesarean sections in a large sample of pedigree dogs in the UK. Data on the numbers of litters born in the previous 10 years were available from a cross-sectional study of dogs belonging to breed club members (2004 Kennel Club/BSAVA Scientific Committee Purebred Dog Health Survey). In this survey 151 breeds were represented with data for households that had reported on at least 10 litters (range 10-14,15): this represented 13,141 bitches which had whelped 22,005 litters. The frequency of caesarean sections was estimated as the percentage of litters that were reported to be born by caesarean section (caesarean rates) and are reported by breed. The dogs were categorised into brachycephalic, mesocephalic and dolicocephalic breeds. The 10 breeds with the highest caesarean rates were the Boston terrier, bulldog, French bulldog, mastiff, Scottish terrier, miniature bull terrier, German wirehaired pointer, Clumber spaniel, Pekingese and Dandie Dinmont terrier. In the Boston terrier, bulldog and French bulldog, the rate was > 80%. These data provide evidence for the need to monitor caesarean rates in certain breeds of dog.

  7. The Influence of Materialism on Purebred Dogs' Welfare Among Two Different Generations in Colombia (South America).

    PubMed

    Luna-Cortés, Gonzalo

    2018-03-27

    Some consumers in Colombia show a clear preference for purebred dogs. At the same time, there are many abandoned dogs on the streets and in shelters in this country. Previous research has revealed that appearances of the breeds influence the caregivers' (owners') choice. A choice based on appearances has been connected with materialism in the psychology and consumer behavior literature. Buying purebred dogs based on materialistic standards could affect the welfare of these nonhuman animals. With the use of quantitative research and the methodology of structural equation modeling, this research demonstrated that more materialistic consumers in Colombia have purebred dogs who, in the owners' opinions, show more behavioral problems. Furthermore, the results showed that materialism influenced the owners' intentions to abandon their companion animals when they perceived these problems. Finally, this research examined the moderating effect of generational segmentation regarding these relationships. It was observed that the intention to abandon the dogs was greater among members of Generation X than among members of Generation Y.

  8. A National Census of Birth Weight in Purebred Dogs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Groppetti, Debora; Pecile, Alessandro; Palestrini, Clara; Marelli, Stefano P.; Boracchi, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Birth weight is a key factor for neonatal mortality and morbidity in most mammalian species. The great morphological variability in size, body weight and breed, as well as in skeletal and cranial conformation makes it challenging to define birth weight standards in dogs. A total of 3293 purebred pups were surveyed to study which maternal aspects can determine birth weight considering head and body shape, size, body weight and breed in bitches, as well as litter size and sex in pups. In our sample, multivariate analysis outcomes suggested that birth weight and litter size were directly proportional to maternal size. The maternal body shape influenced both birth weight and litter size, whereas the maternal head shape had impact only on birth weight. Sex differences in birth weight were found. Birth weight and litter size also varied among breeds. The results of the present study could have practical implications allowing one to identify pups in need of admission to intensive nursing care, as occurs in humans. A deeper knowledge of the factors that significantly influence birth weight could positively affect the canine breeding management helping to prevent and reduce neonatal mortality. Abstract Despite increasing professionalism in dog breeding, the physiological range of birth weight in this species remains unclear. Low birth weight can predispose to neonatal mortality and growth deficiencies in humans. To date, the influence of the morphotype on birth weight has never been studied in dogs. For this purpose, an Italian census of birth weight was collected from 3293 purebred pups based on maternal morphotype, size, body weight and breed, as well as on litter size and sex of pups. Multivariate analysis outcomes showed that birth weight (p < 0.001) and litter size (p < 0.05) increased with maternal size and body weight. Birth weight was also influenced by the maternal head and body shape, with brachycephalic and brachymorph dogs showing the heaviest and

  9. On biomechanical properties of the sacroiliac joint in purebred dogs.

    PubMed

    Breit, S; Künzel, W

    2001-03-01

    Relative to the Yorkshire Terriers and Maltese dogs the mean expected sacroiliac joint load was calculated to be 1.4-1.6 times higher in other small breeds and 1.7-2.7 times higher in large breeds. The statistically significantly different (p < 0.01, p < 0.001) and mechanically less efficient inclination angles of the wings of the sacrum in adult large breeds (especially German Shepherd Dogs) suggest even higher forces acting on their sacroiliac ligaments. Unlike the case in small breeds, the sacral auricular surface was concave in large dogs to improve interlocking between sacrum and ilium and to reduce craniocaudal translation. An additional ossification center forming the ventral aspect of the transverse process of the second sacral vertebra was present in large breeds, occasionally in midsized and small, but never in toy breeds. This and the relationship between age and inclination angles of the wings of the sacrum in juvenile specimens indicate an affection of the three-dimensional modeling of the wings of the sacrum by formative stimuli such as body weight and locomotion.

  10. 19 CFR 10.70 - Purebred animals for breeding purposes; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General... Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), no claim for free entry shall be allowed in liquidation of the entry... purebred of a recognized breed and duly registered in a book of record recognized by the Secretary of...

  11. 19 CFR 10.70 - Purebred animals for breeding purposes; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General... Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), no claim for free entry shall be allowed in liquidation of the entry... purebred of a recognized breed and duly registered in a book of record recognized by the Secretary of...

  12. 19 CFR 10.70 - Purebred animals for breeding purposes; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General... Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), no claim for free entry shall be allowed in liquidation of the entry... purebred of a recognized breed and duly registered in a book of record recognized by the Secretary of...

  13. 19 CFR 10.70 - Purebred animals for breeding purposes; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General... Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), no claim for free entry shall be allowed in liquidation of the entry... purebred of a recognized breed and duly registered in a book of record recognized by the Secretary of...

  14. 19 CFR 10.70 - Purebred animals for breeding purposes; certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General... Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), no claim for free entry shall be allowed in liquidation of the entry... purebred of a recognized breed and duly registered in a book of record recognized by the Secretary of...

  15. Breed-Predispositions to Cancer in Pedigree Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a common problem in dogs and although all breeds of dog and crossbred dogs may be affected, it is notable that some breeds of pedigree dogs appear to be at increased risk of certain types of cancer suggesting underlying genetic predisposition to cancer susceptibility. Although the aetiology of most cancers is likely to be multifactorial, the limited genetic diversity seen in purebred dogs facilitates genetic linkage or association studies on relatively small populations as compared to humans, and by using newly developed resources, genome-wide association studies in dog breeds are proving to be a powerful tool for unravelling complex disorders. This paper will review the literature on canine breed susceptibility to histiocytic sarcoma, osteosarcoma, haemangiosarcoma, mast cell tumours, lymphoma, melanoma, and mammary tumours including the recent advances in knowledge through molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and genome wide association studies. PMID:23738139

  16. Breed Characteristics of Abandoned and Lost Dogs in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Voslarova, Eva; Zak, Jiri; Vecerek, Vladimir; Bedanova, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    Records on sheltered dogs were collected from 3 municipal dog shelters situated in different regions of the Czech Republic from 2010 to 2013. A total of 3,875 dogs were analyzed in this study. Among these, 1,614 dogs were subsequently reclaimed (lost dogs) and 2,261 dogs were abandoned and offered for adoption. The ratio of purebred dogs and crossbred dogs differed significantly when comparing lost (66.4% vs. 33.6%) and abandoned dogs (35.0% vs. 65.0%). The median time until lost dogs were reclaimed was 1 day, and it was not affected by purebred status. The median time until abandoned dogs were adopted was 23 days. In abandoned dogs, purebred status had a significant effect on the time the dog spent at the shelter before adoption. The median time until adoption for crossbred dogs was 27 days, whereas the median time until adoption for purebred dogs was 19 days. The breed group influenced the length of stay (LOS) in abandoned dogs. Small companion dogs had the shortest LOS (median = 15 days) and guard dogs had the longest LOS (median = 25 days).

  17. Disease burden in four populations of dog and cat breeds compared to mixed-breed dogs and European shorthair cats.

    PubMed

    Keijser, S F A; Meijndert, L E; Fieten, H; Carrière, B J; van Steenbeek, F G; Leegwater, P A J; Rothuizen, J; Nielen, M

    2017-05-01

    Current public and professional opinion is that many dog breeds suffer from health issues related to inherited diseases or extreme phenotypes. The aim of this historical comparative observational study was to evaluate the breed-related disease burden in three purebred dog populations (Chihuahua, French bulldog, Labrador retriever) and one purebred cat breed (Persian cats) in the Netherlands by comparison to a control population of mixed-breed dogs and European Shorthair cats. A qualitative query was performed, consisting of a literature review and collecting the expert opinions of University veterinary specialists, to gather insight into potential diseases of the study population. Next, a referral clinic case control study of the patients referred to specific medical disciplines in the University Clinic was performed. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated to determine the likelihood of a patient referred to a particular medical discipline being a certain breed. Together, the qualitative query and the case control study resulted in a list of potentially relevant diseases limited to five organ systems per breed. These were analysed in data from primary practices. Patient files from ten primary practices over a period of two years were manually extracted and examined. Four-hundred individual patient records per breed as well as 1000 non-breed records were randomly selected from the 10 practices, weighted per practice size. Records were then examined and the presence or absence of certain diseases was identified. To evaluate the disease burden per breed, proportional difference (PD) was estimated, as well as the animal's age at presentation in months. The results of the referral clinic case control study showed an overrepresentation (Odds Ratio>1.5) of the selected breeds in several medical specialties, while median age at presentation was in some cases significantly lower than in the non-breed animals. Results of the practice-based extended cross-sectional study showed

  18. Breed distribution of the nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gramer, Irina; Leidolf, Regina; Döring, Barbara; Klintzsch, Stefanie; Krämer, Eva-Maria; Yalcin, Ebru; Petzinger, Ernst; Geyer, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    A 4-bp deletion mutation associated with multiple drug sensitivity exists in the canine multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene. This mutation has been detected in more than 10 purebred dog breeds as well as in mixed breed dogs. To evaluate the breed distribution of this mutation in Germany, 7378 dogs were screened, including 6999 purebred and 379 mixed breed dogs. The study included dog breeds that show close genetic relationship or share breeding history with one of the predisposed breeds but in which the occurrence of the MDR1 mutation has not been reported. The breeds comprised Bearded Collies, Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Greyhound, Belgian Tervuren, Kelpie, Borzoi, Australian Cattle Dog and the Irish Wolfhound. The MDR1 mutation was not detected is any of these breeds, although it was found as expected in the Collie, Longhaired Whippet, Shetland Sheepdog, Miniature Australian Shepherd, Australian Shepherd, Wäller, White Swiss Shepherd, Old English Sheepdog and Border Collie with varying allelic frequencies for the mutant MDR1 allele of 59%, 45%, 30%, 24%, 22%, 17%, 14%, 4% and 1%, respectively. Allelic frequencies of 8% and 2% were determined in herding breed mixes and unclassified mixed breeds, respectively. Because of its widespread breed distribution and occurrence in many mixed breed dogs, it is difficult for veterinarians and dog owners to recognise whether MDR1-related drug sensitivity is relevant for an individual animal. This study provides a comprehensive overview of all affected dog breeds and many dog breeds that are probably unaffected on the basis of ∼15,000 worldwide MDR1 genotyping data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dog Breed Differences in Visual Communication with Humans.

    PubMed

    Konno, Akitsugu; Romero, Teresa; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed communicative signals is influenced by domestication history, from wolves to dogs, as well as by recent breed selection for particular working purposes. To test the genetic basis for such abilities in purebred dogs, we examined gazing behavior towards humans using two types of behavioral experiments: the 'visual contact task' and the 'unsolvable task'. A total of 125 dogs participated in the study. Based on the genetic relatedness among breeds subjects were classified into five breed groups: Ancient, Herding, Hunting, Retriever-Mastiff and Working). We found that it took longer time for Ancient breeds to make an eye-contact with humans, and that they gazed at humans for shorter periods of time than any other breed group in the unsolvable situation. Our findings suggest that spontaneous gaze behavior towards humans is associated with genetic similarity to wolves rather than with recent selective pressure to create particular working breeds.

  20. Dog Breed Differences in Visual Communication with Humans

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Akitsugu; Romero, Teresa; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed communicative signals is influenced by domestication history, from wolves to dogs, as well as by recent breed selection for particular working purposes. To test the genetic basis for such abilities in purebred dogs, we examined gazing behavior towards humans using two types of behavioral experiments: the ‘visual contact task’ and the ‘unsolvable task’. A total of 125 dogs participated in the study. Based on the genetic relatedness among breeds subjects were classified into five breed groups: Ancient, Herding, Hunting, Retriever-Mastiff and Working). We found that it took longer time for Ancient breeds to make an eye-contact with humans, and that they gazed at humans for shorter periods of time than any other breed group in the unsolvable situation. Our findings suggest that spontaneous gaze behavior towards humans is associated with genetic similarity to wolves rather than with recent selective pressure to create particular working breeds. PMID:27736990

  1. Reproductive performance and pre-weaning mortality: Preliminary analysis of 27,221 purebred female dogs and 204,537 puppies in France.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Guillemot, C; Feugier, A; Mariani, C; Grellet, A; Mila, H

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe efficiency of reproduction of purebred dogs in field breeding conditions, from mating to weaning in France. Data were collected between 2010 and 2014 in 5,667 French breeding kennels via a reproduction management software (Breeding Management System, Royal Canin, Aimargues, France). Effect of breed size (Mini: adult body weight <10 kg; Medium: 10-25 kg; Maxi: 25-40 kg; Giant: >40 kg), age of dam and male on pregnancy rate, abortion rate and litter size were evaluated by multivariable models. Data on 45,913 heats (all with mating), from 27,221 bitches from 248 breeds, were analysed. At mating, mean age (±SD) was 3.1 ± 1.8 years for bitches and 3.3 ± 2.0 for males. Males originated from the same kennel as the females in 88.5% of the matings. Based on breeder's evaluation of the pregnancy status, pregnancy rate (number of pregnant females based on breeders declaration/number of heats) was 87.8% and abortion rate was 6.8%. Finally, 81.9% of the mated females gave birth to a litter. On 37,946 litters (204,537 puppies), mean litter size was 5.4 ± 2.8 puppies (range 1-24), which was influenced by breed size and dam age (p < .0001). Stillbirth rate was 7.4% and puppy mortality rate (stillbirth + mortality until 2 months of age) was 13.4%. Prolificacy and puppy mortality rates were affected by breed size and within a breed size, by breed. Despite probable approximations (as data originate from breeders declaration), this large-scale analysis provides reference values on reproductive performance in dogs. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Frequency of five disease-causing genetic mutations in a large mixed-breed dog population (2011–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Zierath, Sharon; Hughes, Angela M.; Fretwell, Neale; Dibley, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background A large and growing number of inherited genetic disease mutations are now known in the dog. Frequencies of these mutations are typically examined within the breed of discovery, possibly in related breeds, but nearly always in purebred dogs. No report to date has examined the frequencies of specific genetic disease mutations in a large population of mixed-breed dogs. Further, veterinarians and dog owners typically dismiss inherited/genetic diseases as possibilities for health problems in mixed-breed dogs, assuming hybrid vigor will guarantee that single-gene disease mutations are not a cause for concern. Therefore, the objective of this study was to screen a large mixed-breed canine population for the presence of mutant alleles associated with five autosomal recessive disorders: hyperuricosuria and hyperuricemia (HUU), cystinuria (CYST), factor VII deficiency (FVIID), myotonia congenita (MYC) and phosphofructokinase deficiency (PKFD). Genetic testing was performed in conjunction with breed determination via the commercially-available Wisdom PanelTM test. Results From a population of nearly 35,000 dogs, homozygous mutant dogs were identified for HUU (n = 57) and FVIID (n = 65). Homozygotes for HUU and FVIID were identified even among dogs with highly mixed breed ancestry. Carriers were identified for all disorders except MYC. HUU and FVIID were of high enough frequency to merit consideration in any mixed-breed dog, while CYST, MYC, and PKFD are vanishingly rare. Conclusions The assumption that mixed-breed dogs do not suffer from single-gene genetic disorders is shown here to be false. Within the diseases examined, HUU and FVIID should remain on any practitioner’s rule-out list, when clinically appropriate, for all mixed-breed dogs, and judicious genetic testing should be performed for diagnosis or screening. Future testing of large mixed-breed dog populations that include additional known canine genetic mutations will refine our knowledge of which

  3. Radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs versus other dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jihye; Keh, Seoyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Junyoung; Yoon, Junghee

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnoses for canine liver disease are commonly based on radiographic estimates of liver size, however little has been published on breed variations. Aims of this study were to describe normal radiographic liver size in Pekingese dogs and to compare normal measurements for this breed with other dog breeds and Pekingese dogs with liver disease. Liver measurements were compared for clinically normal Pekingese (n = 61), normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic (n = 45), normal nonbrachycephalic (n = 71), and Pekingese breed dogs with liver disease (n = 22). For each dog, body weight, liver length, T11 vertebral length, thoracic depth, and thoracic width were measured on right lateral and ventrodorsal abdominal radiographs. Liver volume was calculated using a formula and ratios of liver length/T11 vertebral length and liver volume/body weight ratio were determined. Normal Pekingese dogs had a significantly smaller liver volume/body weight ratio (16.73 ± 5.67, P < 0.05) than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (19.54 ± 5.03) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (18.72 ± 6.52). The liver length/T11 vertebral length ratio in normal Pekingese (4.64 ± 0.65) was significantly smaller than normal non-Pekingese brachycephalic breed dogs (5.16 ± 0.74) and normal nonbrachycephalic breed dogs (5.40 ± 0.74). Ratios of liver volume/body weight and liver length/T11 vertebral length in normal Pekingese were significantly different from Pekingese with liver diseases (P < 0.05). Findings supported our hypothesis that Pekingese dogs have a smaller normal radiographic liver size than other breeds. We recommend using 4.64× the length of the T11 vertebra as a radiographic criterion for normal liver length in Pekingese dogs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  4. Comparison of growth performance of Berkshire purebreds and crossbreds sired by Hereford and Tamworth breeds raised in alternative production system.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeon-Suk; Spann, Kristal; Whitley, Niki; Oh, Sang-Hyon

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare growth performance of Berkshire purebred pigs (BB), Hereford (HB) and/or Tamworth (TB) sired Berkshire crossbred pigs reared in a hoop structure in two experiments. In the first experiment, BB was compared to TB while HB and TB were compared in the second. Body weights (BW) were recorded at 3 days of age and every 28 days from birth until 140 days of age. There was no significant difference between the BW of BB and TB, but HB was heavier than TB by 84 days of age. Least square means of average daily gain (ADG) were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance. The mean parity (±standard deviation) of the sows was 3.42±2.14 and a total of 45 farrowing occurred from year 2012 to 2014. The mean number of total born, number born alive, number of mummies, and number weaned were 9.23±2.52, 7.87±2.53, 0.04±0.21, and 5.94±2.74, respectively. Parity did not have a significant effect on the growth performance of the pigs. For BB and TB, there was only one time frame in which there was a significant difference in the ADG: between 28 and 56 days of age. For HB and TB, the overall ADG of HB was significantly greater than the total ADG of TB. The breed of the sire did not affect the growth performance of the progeny between Berkshire purebreds and Tamworth×Berkshire crossbreds. The breed of the sire did have an effect between Hereford and Tamworth sired Berkshire crossbreds (p<0.05). The Hereford sired pigs were found to have increased growth performance compared to Tamworth sired.

  5. Comparison of growth performance of Berkshire purebreds and crossbreds sired by Hereford and Tamworth breeds raised in alternative production system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeon-Suk; Spann, Kristal; Whitley, Niki; Oh, Sang-Hyon

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to compare growth performance of Berkshire purebred pigs (BB), Hereford (HB) and/or Tamworth (TB) sired Berkshire crossbred pigs reared in a hoop structure in two experiments. Methods In the first experiment, BB was compared to TB while HB and TB were compared in the second. Body weights (BW) were recorded at 3 days of age and every 28 days from birth until 140 days of age. There was no significant difference between the BW of BB and TB, but HB was heavier than TB by 84 days of age. Least square means of average daily gain (ADG) were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance. Results The mean parity (±standard deviation) of the sows was 3.42±2.14 and a total of 45 farrowing occurred from year 2012 to 2014. The mean number of total born, number born alive, number of mummies, and number weaned were 9.23±2.52, 7.87±2.53, 0.04±0.21, and 5.94±2.74, respectively. Parity did not have a significant effect on the growth performance of the pigs. For BB and TB, there was only one time frame in which there was a significant difference in the ADG: between 28 and 56 days of age. For HB and TB, the overall ADG of HB was significantly greater than the total ADG of TB. Conclusion The breed of the sire did not affect the growth performance of the progeny between Berkshire purebreds and Tamworth×Berkshire crossbreds. The breed of the sire did have an effect between Hereford and Tamworth sired Berkshire crossbreds (p<0.05). The Hereford sired pigs were found to have increased growth performance compared to Tamworth sired. PMID:28423883

  6. Genomic analyses of modern dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heidi G

    2012-02-01

    A rose may be a rose by any other name, but when you call a dog a poodle it becomes a very different animal than if you call it a bulldog. Both the poodle and the bulldog are examples of dog breeds of which there are >400 recognized worldwide. Breed creation has played a significant role in shaping the modern dog from the length of his leg to the cadence of his bark. The selection and line-breeding required to maintain a breed has also reshaped the genome of the dog, resulting in a unique genetic pattern for each breed. The breed-based population structure combined with extensive morphologic variation and shared human environments have made the dog a popular model for mapping both simple and complex traits and diseases. In order to obtain the most benefit from the dog as a genetic system, it is necessary to understand the effect structured breeding has had on the genome of the species. That is best achieved by looking at genomic analyses of the breeds, their histories, and their relationships to each other.

  7. Prevalence of congenital heart disease in 76,301 mixed-breed dogs and 57,025 mixed-breed cats.

    PubMed

    Schrope, Donald P

    2015-09-01

    Assess the prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in a large population of mixed-breed dogs and cats. 76,301 mixed-breed dogs and 57,025 mixed-breed cats. Retrospective review of records and examinations based on specified diagnostic criteria. Among mixed-breed dogs, the prevalence of CHD was 0.13% (51.4% female) and of innocent murmurs was 0.10% (53.0% male). Pulmonic stenosis was the most common defect followed by patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis, and ventricular septal defect. Among mixed-breed cats, prevalence of CHD was 0.14% (55.2% male) and of innocent murmurs was 0.16% (54.4% male). When the 25 cats with dynamic left or right ventricular outflow obstruction were counted with cases of innocent murmurs, the overall prevalence was 0.2%. Ventricular septal defects were the most common feline CHD followed closely by aortic stenosis and hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. There was no overall sex predilection for CHD in mixed-breed cats or dogs, and no significant difference in CHD prevalence between cats or dogs. Among dogs, subvalvular aortic stenosis and mitral valve dysplasia had a male predisposition while patent ductus arteriosus had a female predisposition. Among cats, valvular pulmonic stenosis, subvalvular and valvular aortic stenosis, and ventricular septal defects had a male predisposition while pulmonary artery stenosis had a female predisposition. The prevalence of CHD in a mixed-breed dogs and cats is lower than for prior studies, perhaps due to the lack of purebreds in the study population or actual changes in disease prevalence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inferior Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation in Purebred Eurasier Dogs with Familial Non-Progressive Ataxia: A Retrospective and Prospective Clinical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernardino, Filipa; Rentmeister, Kai; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bruehschwein, Andreas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Matiasek, Lara A.; Lauda, Alexander; Schoon, Heinz A.; Fischer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar malformations can be inherited or caused by insults during cerebellar development. To date, only sporadic cases of cerebellar malformations have been reported in dogs, and the genetic background has remained obscure. Therefore, this study`s objective was to describe the clinical characteristics, imaging features and pedigree data of a familial cerebellar hypoplasia in purebred Eurasier dogs. A uniform cerebellar malformation characterized by consistent absence of the caudal portions of the cerebellar vermis and, to a lesser degree, the caudal portions of the cerebellar hemispheres in association with large retrocerebellar fluid accumulations was recognized in 14 closely related Eurasier dogs. Hydrocephalus was an additional feature in some dogs. All dogs displayed non-progressive ataxia, which had already been noted when the dogs were 5 – 6 weeks old. The severity of the ataxia varied between dogs, from mild truncal sway, subtle dysmetric gait, dysequilibrium and pelvic limb ataxia to severe cerebellar ataxia in puppies and episodic falling or rolling. Follow-up examinations in adult dogs showed improvement of the cerebellar ataxia and a still absent menace response. Epileptic seizures occurred in some dogs. The association of partial vermis agenesis with an enlarged fourth ventricle and an enlarged caudal (posterior) fossa resembled a Dandy-Walker-like malformation in some dogs. Pedigree analyses were consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. PMID:25668516

  9. Breeding implications resulting from classification of patellae luxation in dogs.

    PubMed

    van Grevenhof, E M; Hazewinkel, H A W; Heuven, H C M

    2016-08-01

    Patellar luxation (PL) is one of the major hereditary orthopaedic abnormalities observed in a variety of dog breeds. When the patellae move sideways out of the trochlear groove, this is called PL. The PL score varies between dogs from normal to very severe. Reducing the prevalence of PL by breeding could prevent surgery, thereby improve welfare. Orthopaedic specialists differentiate between normal and loose patellae, where the patellae can be moved to the edge of the trochlear groove, considering scoring loose patellae as normal in the future. Loose patellae are considered acceptable for breeding so far by the breeding organization. The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic background of PL to decide on the importance of loose patellae when breeding for healthy dogs. Data are available from two dog breeds, that is Flat-coated Retrievers (n = 3808) and Kooiker dogs (n = 794), with a total of 4602 dogs. Results show that loose patellae indicate that dogs are genetically more susceptible to develop PL because family members of the dogs with loose patellae showed more severe PL. In addition, the estimated breeding values for dogs with loose patellae indicate that breeding values of dogs with loose patellae were worse than breeding values obtained for dogs with a normal score. Given these results, it is advised to orthopaedic specialists to continue to score loose patellae as a separate class and to dog breeders to minimize the use of dogs in breeding with a genetically higher susceptibility for PL. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. The prevalence of ABCB1:c.227_230delATAG mutation in affected dog breeds from European countries.

    PubMed

    Firdova, Zuzana; Turnova, Evelina; Bielikova, Marcela; Turna, Jan; Dudas, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    Deletion of 4-base pairs in the canine ABCB1 (MDR1) gene, responsible for encoding P-glycoprotein, leads to nonsense frame-shift mutation, which causes hypersensitivity to macrocyclic lactones drugs (e.g. ivermectin). To date, at least 12 purebred dog breeds have been found to be affected by this mutation. The aim of this study was to update information about the prevalence of ABCB1 mutation (c.227_230delATAG) in predisposed breeds in multiple European countries. This large scale survey also includes countries which were not involved in previous studies. The samples were collected in the period from 2012 to 2014. The overview is based on genotyping data of 4729 individuals. The observed mutant allele frequencies were 58.5% (Smooth Collie), 48.3% (Rough Collie), 35% (Australian Shepherd), 30.3% (Shetland Sheepdog), 28.1% (Silken Windhound), 26.1% (Miniature Australian Shepherd), 24.3% (Longhaired Whippet), 16.2% (White Swiss Shepherd) and 0% (Border Collie). The possible presence of an ABCB1 mutant allele in Akita-Inu breed has been investigated with negative results. This information could be helpful for breeders in optimization of their breeding strategy and for veterinarians when prescribing drug therapy for dogs of predisposed breeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidemiological analysis of reproductive performances and kitten mortality rates in 5,303 purebred queens of 45 different breeds and 28,065 kittens in France.

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Masson, M; Corbière, F; Mila, H; Mariani, C; Grellet, A; Chastant-Maillard, S

    2017-04-01

    Reproduction management and performances are evaluated in the feline species only through a limited number of animals and studies. Our objective was to provide reference figures in purebred cats, from a large-scale sample. Data were collected from an online software dedicated to cattery management (Breeding Management System®, BMS, Royal Canin, Aimargues, France). Information was recorded on a voluntary basis by French breeders between 2011 and 2014. Data were anonymously transferred for analysis. A total of 9,063 oestrous periods (in contact with a male) from 5,303 queens (45 breeds) were recorded from 1,521 breeders. Most matings (70.1%) occurred during increasing day length periods. The mean age at mating (±SD) was 2.7 ± 1.6 years for queens and 2.9 ± 1.9 years for tomcats. Pregnancy rate (based on breeders declaration) was 85.2%. Among queens declared pregnant, 8.4% failed to maintain pregnancy. Globally, 78% of the mated females gave birth to 28,065 kittens within 7,075 L. Mean litter size was 4.0 ± 1.9 kittens among which 8.5% were stillborn. Neonatal and paediatric mortality rate was 8.2%. In total, 16.0% of kittens born died before weaning. The results of this study are based on the largest feline database ever analysed. The figures collected can thus be used as reference to define average reproductive performances in numerous breeds for cat breeders. Further analysis will identify factors influencing reproductive performances and early mortality in the feline species. © 2016 The Authors Reproduction in Domestic Animals Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Whole-genome sequence, SNP chips and pedigree structure: building demographic profiles in domestic dog breeds to optimize genetic-trait mapping

    PubMed Central

    Dreger, Dayna L.; Rimbault, Maud; Davis, Brian W.; Bhatnagar, Adrienne; Parker, Heidi G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the decade following publication of the draft genome sequence of the domestic dog, extraordinary advances with application to several fields have been credited to the canine genetic system. Taking advantage of closed breeding populations and the subsequent selection for aesthetic and behavioral characteristics, researchers have leveraged the dog as an effective natural model for the study of complex traits, such as disease susceptibility, behavior and morphology, generating unique contributions to human health and biology. When designing genetic studies using purebred dogs, it is essential to consider the unique demography of each population, including estimation of effective population size and timing of population bottlenecks. The analytical design approach for genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and analysis of whole-genome sequence (WGS) experiments are inextricable from demographic data. We have performed a comprehensive study of genomic homozygosity, using high-depth WGS data for 90 individuals, and Illumina HD SNP data from 800 individuals representing 80 breeds. These data were coupled with extensive pedigree data analyses for 11 breeds that, together, allowed us to compute breed structure, demography, and molecular measures of genome diversity. Our comparative analyses characterize the extent, formation and implication of breed-specific diversity as it relates to population structure. These data demonstrate the relationship between breed-specific genome dynamics and population architecture, and provide important considerations influencing the technological and cohort design of association and other genomic studies. PMID:27874836

  13. Comparison between cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie; Daniel, Rob; Monteith, Gabrielle

    2013-01-01

    Cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations have been reported to be rare in dogs due to the presence of the intercapital ligament, however some studies have proposed they may not be uncommon in German Shepherd dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare cranial thoracic intervertebral disc herniations in German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs (control group). Medical records at the Ontario Veterinary College were searched for German Shepherd dogs and other large breed dogs that had magnetic resonance imaging studies including the T1-T9 region. For each dog and each disc space from T1-T9, three variables (compression, disc degeneration, and herniation) were recorded and graded based on review of sagittal T2-weighted images. Twenty-three German Shepherd dogs and 47 other large breed dogs met inclusion criteria. The German Shepherd dog group had higher scores than the control group for compression (P = 0.0099) and herniation (P < 0.001), but not disc degeneration (P = 0.97). In the German Shepherd dog group, intervertebral discs T2-T3 and T4-T5 had an increased risk for compression and T3-T4 had an increased risk for compression and herniation. Findings from this study indicated that German Shepherd dogs may be more likely than other large breed dogs to have spinal cord compression due to cranial thoracic disc herniations. Imaging of the cranial thoracic spine, including T2-T3, is recommended for German Shepherd dogs with T3-L3 neurological signs. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  14. Genetic characterization of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds and analysis of their relationship to cosmopolitan dog breeds using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bigi, D; Marelli, S P; Randi, E; Polli, M

    2015-12-01

    Very little research into genetic diversity of Italian native dog breeds has been carried out so far. In this study we aimed to estimate and compare the genetic diversity of four native Italian shepherd dog breeds: the Maremma, Bergamasco, Lupino del Gigante and Oropa shepherds. Therefore, some cosmopolitan dog breeds, which have been widely raised in Italy for a long time past, have also been considered to check possible influence of these dog populations on the Italian autochthonous breeds considered here. A total of 212 individuals, belonging to 10 different dog breeds, were sampled and genotyped using 18 autosomal microsatellite loci. We analyzed the genetic diversity of these breeds, within breed diversity, breed relationship and population structure. The 10 breeds considered in this study were clearly genetically differentiated from each other, regardless of current population sizes and the onset of separate breeding history. The level of genetic diversity explained 20% of the total genetic variation. The level of H E found here is in agreement with that found by other studies. The native Italian breeds showed generally higher genetic diversity compared with the long established, well-defined cosmopolitan dog breeds. As the Border Collie seems closer to the Italian breeds than the other cosmopolitan shepherd dogs considered here, a possible utilization of this breed to improve working performance in Italian traditional working shepherd dogs cannot be ignored. The data and information found here can be utilized in the organization of conservation programs planned to reduce inbreeding and to minimize loss of genetic variability.

  15. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I in a mixed-breed dog.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Kurt L; McMillan, Kate; Monroe, William E; Sponenberg, D Phillip; Evans, Nick; Makris, Melissa; Hammond, Sarah H; Kanevsky Mullarky, Isis; Boudreaux, Mary K

    2013-03-01

    A 6-month-old, neutered male, mixed-breed dog was examined for a 2-month persistent fever, nonhealing dermal metacarpal area wound, and leukocytosis (47.0-198.0 × 10(3)/μl). Serum chemistry findings included hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperphosphatasemia. Complete blood cell count results revealed a moderate microcytic, hypochromic nonregenerative anemia with a profound leukocytosis (198.5 × 10(3)/μl), characterized by neutrophilia with toxicity and hypersegmentation, and significant band cells. Tick-borne disease titers (genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Borrelia) were negative, as were polymerase chain reaction for other infectious agents (genera Hepatozoon, Mycobacterium, Mycoplasma; and Canine distemper virus). No agents were identified in a deep dermal biopsy (conventional and special histochemical stains) of the chronic draining, metacarpal region lesion. Cytology of the draining tract revealed numerous mixed bacteria and a surprising lack of neutrophils. Chronic occult blood loss with iron deficiency was considered a possible cause of the anemia. Differentials for the leukon were chronic established inflammation (occult infectious agent), chronic neutrophilic leukemia, paraneoplastic leukocytosis (neoplastic source of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] or granulocyte-macrophage CSF), and leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). The possibility of a LAD disorder was further investigated because of the noted hypersegmented neutrophils, absence of neutrophils in the cytology sample, the animal's young age, and persistence of clinical and laboratory signs. Flow cytometry of blood neutrophils showed a 60% reduction in surface expression of the β2-integrin (CD18) subunit, whereas neutrophil function tests (oxidative burst and phagocytosis) were normal. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous missense mutation in the β2-integrin subunit gene, previously recognized only in purebred Irish Setters, leading to a diagnosis of LAD

  16. Milk oligosaccharides over time of lactation from different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Macias Rostami, Shirin; Bénet, Thierry; Spears, Julie; Reynolds, Arleigh; Satyaraj, Ebenezer; Sprenger, Norbert; Austin, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The partnership of humans and dogs goes back to over 10'000 years, yet relatively little is known about a dog's first extra-uterine nutrition particularly when it comes to milk oligosaccharides. We set out to identify and quantify milk oligosaccharides over the course of lactation from different dog breeds (Labrador retriever, Schnauzer and 3 Alaskan husky crossbreeds). To this end, 2 different chromatographic methods with fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection were developed and one was validated for quantification. Besides lactose and lactose-sulphate, we identified 2 different trisaccharides composed of 3 hexose units, 3'sialyllactose (3'SL), 6'sialyllactose (6'SL), 2'fucosyllactose (2'FL), and a tetrasaccharide composed of 2 hexoses, an N-acetylhexosamine and a deoxyhexose. 3'SL was present at the highest levels in milk of all dog breeds starting at around 7.5 g/L and dropping to about 1.5 g/L in the first 10 days of lactation. 6'SL was about 10 times less abundant and 2'FL and the tetrasaccharide had rather varying levels in the milk of the different breeds with the tetrasaccharide only detectable in the Alaskan husky crossbreeds. The longitudinal and quantitative data of milk oligosaccharides from different dog breeds are an important basis to further our understanding on their specific biological roles and also on the specific nutritional requirements of lactating puppies.

  17. Milk Oligosaccharides over Time of Lactation from Different Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Macias Rostami, Shirin; Bénet, Thierry; Spears, Julie; Reynolds, Arleigh; Satyaraj, Ebenezer; Sprenger, Norbert; Austin, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The partnership of humans and dogs goes back to over 10'000 years, yet relatively little is known about a dog's first extra-uterine nutrition particularly when it comes to milk oligosaccharides. We set out to identify and quantify milk oligosaccharides over the course of lactation from different dog breeds (Labrador retriever, Schnauzer and 3 Alaskan husky crossbreeds). To this end, 2 different chromatographic methods with fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection were developed and one was validated for quantification. Besides lactose and lactose-sulphate, we identified 2 different trisaccharides composed of 3 hexose units, 3′sialyllactose (3′SL), 6′sialyllactose (6′SL), 2′fucosyllactose (2′FL), and a tetrasaccharide composed of 2 hexoses, an N-acetylhexosamine and a deoxyhexose. 3′SL was present at the highest levels in milk of all dog breeds starting at around 7.5 g/L and dropping to about 1.5 g/L in the first 10 days of lactation. 6′SL was about 10 times less abundant and 2′FL and the tetrasaccharide had rather varying levels in the milk of the different breeds with the tetrasaccharide only detectable in the Alaskan husky crossbreeds. The longitudinal and quantitative data of milk oligosaccharides from different dog breeds are an important basis to further our understanding on their specific biological roles and also on the specific nutritional requirements of lactating puppies. PMID:24924915

  18. Dog allergen levels in homes with hypoallergenic compared with nonhypoallergenic dogs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Charlotte E; Wegienka, Ganesa R; Havstad, Suzanne L; Zoratti, Edward M; Ownby, Dennis R; Johnson, Christine Cole

    2011-01-01

    Despite the public interest in hypoallergenic dogs, few scientific, including epidemiological studies have attempted to evaluate claims of hypoallergenicity. This study was designed to determine whether dog breeds reported as hypoallergenic correspond to lower dog allergen in the home versus nonhypoallergenic dogs. A web search was conducted to identify breeds cited as hypoallergenic. Four separate classification schemes using combinations of purebred and mixed breed dogs were used to compare the levels of Canis familiaris 1 in dust samples collected from homes with hypoallergenic versus nonhypoallergenic dogs from an established birth cohort. No classification scheme showed that the level of dog allergen in homes with hypoallergenic dogs differed from other homes. Dog-allergic individuals should have access to scientifically valid information on the level of allergen shedding of different breeds of dogs.

  19. Breed-Specific Ancestry Studies and Genome-Wide Association Analysis Highlight an Association Between the MYH9 Gene and Heat Tolerance in Alaskan Sprint Racing Sled Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Huson, Heather J.; vonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Rimbault, Maud; Byers, Alexandra M.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Parker, Heidi G.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Alaskan sled dogs are a genetically distinct population shaped by generations of selective interbreeding with purebred dogs to create a group of high performance athletes. As a result of selective breeding strategies, sled dogs present a unique opportunity to employ admixture-mapping techniques to investigate how breed composition and trait selection impact genomic structure. We used admixture mapping to investigate genetic ancestry across the genomes of two classes of sled dogs, sprint and long distance racers, and combined that with genome wide association studies (GWAS) to identify regions correlating with performance enhancing traits. The sled dog genome is enhanced by differential contributions from four non-admixed breeds (Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, German Shorthaired Pointer, and Borzoi). A principle components analysis (PCA) of 115,000 genome-wide SNPs clearly resolved the sprint and distance populations as distinct genetic groups, with longer blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) observed in the distance versus sprint dogs (7.5–10 and 2.5–3.75 kb, respectively). Further, we identified eight regions with the genomic signal either from a selective sweep or an association analysis, corroborated by an excess of ancestry when comparing sprint and distance dogs. A comparison of elite and poor performing sled dogs identified a single region significantly association with heat tolerance. Within the region we identified seven SNPs within the myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) that were significantly associated with heat tolerance in sprint dogs, two of which correspond to conserved promoter and enhancer regions in the human ortholog. PMID:22105876

  20. Breed-specific ancestry studies and genome-wide association analysis highlight an association between the MYH9 gene and heat tolerance in Alaskan sprint racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Huson, Heather J; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Rimbault, Maud; Byers, Alexandra M; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Parker, Heidi G; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    Alaskan sled dogs are a genetically distinct population shaped by generations of selective interbreeding with purebred dogs to create a group of high-performance athletes. As a result of selective breeding strategies, sled dogs present a unique opportunity to employ admixture-mapping techniques to investigate how breed composition and trait selection impact genomic structure. We used admixture mapping to investigate genetic ancestry across the genomes of two classes of sled dogs, sprint and long-distance racers, and combined that with genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify regions that correlate with performance-enhancing traits. The sled dog genome is enhanced by differential contributions from four non-admixed breeds (Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, German Shorthaired Pointer, and Borzoi). A principal components analysis (PCA) of 115,000 genome-wide SNPs clearly resolved the sprint and distance populations as distinct genetic groups, with longer blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) observed in the distance versus sprint dogs (7.5-10 and 2.5-3.75 kb, respectively). Furthermore, we identified eight regions with the genomic signal from either a selective sweep or an association analysis, corroborated by an excess of ancestry when comparing sprint and distance dogs. A comparison of elite and poor-performing sled dogs identified a single region significantly associated with heat tolerance. Within the region we identified seven SNPs within the myosin heavy chain 9 gene (MYH9) that were significantly associated with heat tolerance in sprint dogs, two of which correspond to conserved promoter and enhancer regions in the human ortholog.

  1. The bald and the beautiful: hairlessness in domestic dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Alexander; Dreger, Dayna L.; Davis, Brian W.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    An extraordinary amount of genomic variation is contained within the chromosomes of domestic dogs, manifesting as dramatic differences in morphology, behaviour and disease susceptibility. Morphology, in particular, has been a topic of enormous interest as biologists struggle to understand the small window of dog domestication from wolves, and the division of dogs into pure breeding, closed populations termed breeds. Many traits related to morphology, including body size, leg length and skull shape, have been under selection as part of the standard descriptions for the nearly 400 breeds recognized worldwide. Just as important, however, are the minor traits that have undergone selection by fanciers and breeders to define dogs of a particular appearance, such as tail length, ear position, back arch and variation in fur (pelage) growth patterns. In this paper, we both review and present new data for traits associated with pelage including fur length, curl, growth, shedding and even the presence or absence of fur. Finally, we report the discovery of a new gene associated with the absence of coat in the American Hairless Terrier breed. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evo-devo in the genomics era, and the origins of morphological diversity’. PMID:27994129

  2. Extent of linkage disequilibrium in large breed dogs: chromosomal and breed variation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purpose: Understanding extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is a crucial component for successful utilization of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The extent of LD in the dog has been described based upon small marker sets in multiple breeds and studies. Understanding variation in LD on a per...

  3. [Demographic characteristics of dog population in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Horisberger, U; Stärk, K D; Rüfenacht, J; Pillonel, C; Steiger, A

    2004-05-01

    Dog Registration data from three Cantons, patient data of 13 veterinary practices and registrations in the Swiss Dog Pedigree Book were collected, analysed and compared to results of a commercial household survey, to assess demographic characteristics of dog population in Switzerland. The proportion of "pure-bred" dogs was different depending on how the term was used, varying from 24% regarding registrations in the Swiss Dog Pedigree Book, to 75% regarding dogs with only one breed recorded in Veterinarian's patient-history-management systems. Most popular breeds were dogs called "German Shepherd/Shepherd", followed by the Labrador and Golden Retriever. Comparison of different data sources suggested regional differences in popularity of breeds. The average life expectancy was estimated on 10.5 and 11 years. Sex distribution was equal. One third of all male dogs and half of the female dogs were neutered. Regardless sex, neutering was more common in cross-bred dogs than in "pure-bred" dogs (OR = 1.9). Some bias in all sources had to be considered and there was a major concern regarding definition of breeds. However, the study was able to add different parameters out of different sources to a homogenous picture of demographic data of dog population in Switzerland.

  4. MtDNA diversity among four Portuguese autochthonous dog breeds: a fine-scale characterisation

    PubMed Central

    van Asch, Barbara; Pereira, Luísa; Pereira, Filipe; Santa-Rita, Pedro; Lima, Manuela; Amorim, António

    2005-01-01

    Background The picture of dog mtDNA diversity, as obtained from geographically wide samplings but from a small number of individuals per region or breed, has revealed weak geographic correlation and high degree of haplotype sharing between very distant breeds. We aimed at a more detailed picture through extensive sampling (n = 143) of four Portuguese autochthonous breeds – Castro Laboreiro Dog, Serra da Estrela Mountain Dog, Portuguese Sheepdog and Azores Cattle Dog-and comparatively reanalysing published worldwide data. Results Fifteen haplotypes belonging to four major haplogroups were found in these breeds, of which five are newly reported. The Castro Laboreiro Dog presented a 95% frequency of a new A haplotype, while all other breeds contained a diverse pool of existing lineages. The Serra da Estrela Mountain Dog, the most heterogeneous of the four Portuguese breeds, shared haplotypes with the other mainland breeds, while Azores Cattle Dog shared no haplotypes with the other Portuguese breeds. A review of mtDNA haplotypes in dogs across the world revealed that: (a) breeds tend to display haplotypes belonging to different haplogroups; (b) haplogroup A is present in all breeds, and even uncommon haplogroups are highly dispersed among breeds and continental areas; (c) haplotype sharing between breeds of the same region is lower than between breeds of different regions and (d) genetic distances between breeds do not correlate with geography. Conclusion MtDNA haplotype sharing occurred between Serra da Estrela Mountain dogs (with putative origin in the centre of Portugal) and two breeds in the north and south of the country-with the Castro Laboreiro Dog (which behaves, at the mtDNA level, as a sub-sample of the Serra da Estrela Mountain Dog) and the southern Portuguese Sheepdog. In contrast, the Azores Cattle Dog did not share any haplotypes with the other Portuguese breeds, but with dogs sampled in Northern Europe. This suggested that the Azores Cattle Dog

  5. Genetic screening for PRA-associated mutations in multiple dog breeds shows that PRA is heterogeneous within and between breeds.

    PubMed

    Downs, Louise M; Hitti, Rebekkah; Pregnolato, Silvia; Mellersh, Cathryn S

    2014-03-01

    To assess the extent of progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) genetic heterogeneity within and between domestic dog breeds. DNA from 231 dogs with PRA, representing 36 breeds, was screened for 17 mutations previously associated with PRA in at least one breed of dog. Screening methods included amplified fragment size discrimination using gel electrophoresis or detection of fluorescence, (TaqMan(®) ; Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA, USA) allelic discrimination, and Sanger sequencing. Of the 231 dogs screened, 129 were homozygous for a PRA-associated mutation, 29 dogs were carriers, and 73 were homozygous for the wild-type allele at all loci tested. In two of the 129 dogs, homozygous mutations were identified that had not previously been observed in the respective breeds: one Chinese Crested dog was homozygous for the RCD3-associated mutation usually found in the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, and one Standard Poodle was homozygous for the RCD4-associated mutation previously reported to segregate in Gordon and Irish Setters. In the majority of the breeds (15/21) in which a PRA-associated mutation is known to segregate, cases were identified that did not carry any of the known PRA-associated mutations. Progressive retinal atrophy in the dog displays significant genetic heterogeneity within as well as between breeds. There are also several instances where PRA-associated mutations segregate among breeds with no known close ancestry. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration in dogs: breed distribution of 495 canines.

    PubMed

    Heller, Amanda R; van der Woerdt, Alexandra; Gaarder, James E; Sapienza, John S; Hernandez-Merino, Elena; Abrams, Kenneth; Church, Melanie L; La Croix, Noelle

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe breed, age, gender, and weight distribution of dogs affected with sudden acquired retinal degeneration (SARD) and to investigate whether SARD is more common in small breed dogs. Medical records of dogs diagnosed with SARD confirmed by an electroretinogram were reviewed. Breed, age, gender, and weight were recorded when available. The same data were obtained for dogs with SARD described in the veterinary literature. Three hundred and two dogs were included from the ophthalmology practices and 193 dogs from the veterinary literature. Sixty breeds were present in the study. Mixed-breed dogs were the most common at 108 dogs (21.8%), followed by the Dachshund (68, 13.7%), Chinese Pug (44, 8.9%), Miniature Schnauzer (39, 7.9%), Maltese (23, 4.6%), Cocker Spaniel (22, 4.4%), Bichon Frise (18, 3.6%), Beagle (16, 3.2%), Brittany (15, 3.0%), and Pomeranian (10, 2.0%). Fifty other breeds were represented by 1-9 dogs each. The median age was 9 years (range = 10 months-16 years). The weight was known for 197 dogs. About 60.9% of dogs were less than 25 pounds, 31.5% were between 25 and 50 pounds, and 7.6% were greater than 50 pounds. Gender was recorded in 393 dogs: 217 female dogs and 176 male dogs. As previously reported, SARD is most common in middle-aged to older dogs. Smaller dogs of less than 25 pounds appear overrepresented, while large/giant breed dogs of greater than 50 pounds are infrequently diagnosed. In this study, there was no statistical significance between female and male dogs. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Sex, skull length, breed, and age predict how dogs look at faces of humans and conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Bognár, Zsófia; Iotchev, Ivaylo B; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2018-04-17

    The gaze of other dogs and humans is informative for dogs, but it has not been explored which factors predict face-directed attention. We used image presentations of unfamiliar human and dog heads, facing the observer (portrait) or facing away (profile), and measured looking time responses. We expected dog portraits to be aversive, human portraits to attract interest, and tested dogs of different sex, skull length and breed function, which in previous work had predicted human-directed attention. Dog portraits attracted longer looking times than human profiles. Mesocephalic dogs looked at portraits longer than at profiles, independent of the species in the image. Overall, brachycephalic dogs and dogs of unspecified breed function (such as mixed breeds) displayed the longest looking times. Among the latter, females observed the images for longer than males, which is in line with human findings on sex differences in processing faces. In a subsequent experiment, we tested whether dog portraits functioned as threatening stimuli. We hypothesized that dogs will avoid food rewards or approach them more slowly in the presence of a dog portrait, but found no effect of image type. In general, older dogs took longer to approach food placed in front of the images and mesocephalic dogs were faster than dogs of other skull length types. The results suggest that short-headed dogs are more attentive to faces, while sex and breed function predict looking times through complex interactions.

  8. Comparative analyses of genetic trends and prospects for selection against hip and elbow dysplasia in 15 UK dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hip dysplasia remains one of the most serious hereditary diseases occurring in dogs despite long-standing evaluation schemes designed to aid selection for healthy joints. Many researchers have recommended the use of estimated breeding values (EBV) to improve the rate of genetic progress from selection against hip and elbow dysplasia (another common developmental orthopaedic disorder), but few have empirically quantified the benefits of their use. This study aimed to both determine recent genetic trends in hip and elbow dysplasia, and evaluate the potential improvements in response to selection that publication of EBV for such diseases would provide, across a wide range of pure-bred dog breeds. Results The genetic trend with respect to hip and elbow condition due to phenotypic selection had improved in all breeds, except the Siberian Husky. However, derived selection intensities are extremely weak, equivalent to excluding less than a maximum of 18% of the highest risk animals from breeding. EBV for hip and elbow score were predicted to be on average between 1.16 and 1.34 times more accurate than selection on individual or both parental phenotypes. Additionally, compared to the proportion of juvenile animals with both parental phenotypes, the proportion with EBV of a greater accuracy than selection on such phenotypes increased by up to 3-fold for hip score and up to 13-fold for elbow score. Conclusions EBV are shown to be both more accurate and abundant than phenotype, providing more reliable information on the genetic risk of disease for a greater proportion of the population. Because the accuracy of selection is directly related to genetic progress, use of EBV can be expected to benefit selection for the improvement of canine health and welfare. Public availability of EBV for hip score for the fifteen breeds included in this study will provide information on the genetic risk of disease in nearly a third of all dogs annually registered by the UK Kennel

  9. Non-dietary risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus in large and giant breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Glickman, L T; Glickman, N W; Schellenberg, D B; Raghavan, M; Lee, T

    2000-11-15

    To identify non-dietary risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in large breed and giant breed dogs. Prospective cohort study. 1,637 dogs > or = 6 months old of the following breeds: Akita, Bloodhound, Collie, Great Dane, Irish Setter, Irish Wolfhound, Newfoundland, Rottweiler, Saint Bernard, Standard Poodle, and Weimaraner. Owners of dogs that did not have a history of GDV were recruited at dog shows, and the dog's length and height and the depth and width of its thorax and abdomen were measured. Information concerning the dog's medical history, genetic background, personality, and diet was obtained from the owners, and owners were contacted by mail and telephone at approximately 1-year intervals to determine whether dogs had developed GDV or died. Incidence of GDV, calculated on the basis of dog-years at risk for dogs that were or were not exposed to potential risk factors, was used to calculate the relative risk of GDV. Cumulative incidence of GDV during the study was 6% for large breed and giant breed dogs. Factors significantly associated with an increased risk of GDV were increasing age, having a first-degree relative with a history of GDV, having a faster speed of eating, and having a raised feeding bowl. Approximately 20 and 52% of cases of GDV among the large breed and giant breed dogs, respectively, were attributed to having a raised feed bowl.

  10. Comparison of owner-reported behavioral characteristics among genetically clustered breeds of dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Tonoike, Akiko; Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Serpell, James A; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2015-12-18

    During the domestication process, dogs were selected for their suitability for multiple purposes, resulting in a variety of behavioral characteristics. In particular, the ancient group of breeds that is genetically closer to wolves may show different behavioral characteristics when compared to other breed groups. Here, we used questionnaire evaluations of dog behavior to investigate whether behavioral characteristics of dogs were different among genetically clustered breed groups. A standardized questionnaire, the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ), was used, and breed group differences of privately-owned dogs from Japan (n = 2,951) and the United States (n = 10,389) were analyzed. Results indicated that dogs in the ancient and spitz breed group showed low attachment and attention-seeking behavior. This characteristic distinguished the ancient group from any other breed groups with presumed modern European origins, and may therefore, be an ancestral trait.

  11. Comparison of owner-reported behavioral characteristics among genetically clustered breeds of dog (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed Central

    Tonoike, Akiko; Nagasawa, Miho; Mogi, Kazutaka; Serpell, James A.; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2015-01-01

    During the domestication process, dogs were selected for their suitability for multiple purposes, resulting in a variety of behavioral characteristics. In particular, the ancient group of breeds that is genetically closer to wolves may show different behavioral characteristics when compared to other breed groups. Here, we used questionnaire evaluations of dog behavior to investigate whether behavioral characteristics of dogs were different among genetically clustered breed groups. A standardized questionnaire, the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ), was used, and breed group differences of privately-owned dogs from Japan (n = 2,951) and the United States (n = 10,389) were analyzed. Results indicated that dogs in the ancient and spitz breed group showed low attachment and attention-seeking behavior. This characteristic distinguished the ancient group from any other breed groups with presumed modern European origins, and may therefore, be an ancestral trait. PMID:26680442

  12. Incidence of and breed-related risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Glickman, L T; Glickman, N W; Schellenberg, D B; Raghavan, M; Lee, T L

    2000-01-01

    To compare incidence of and breed-related risk factors for gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) among 11 dog breeds (Akita, Bloodhound, Collie, Great Dane, Irish Setter, Irish Wolfhound, Newfoundland, Rottweiler, Saint Bernard, Standard Poodle, and Weimaraner). Prospective cohort study. 1,914 dogs. Owners of dogs that did not have a history of GDV were recruited at dog shows, and the dog's length and height and depth and width of the thorax and abdomen were measured. Information concerning the dogs' medical history, genetic background, personality, and diet was obtained from owners, and owners were contacted by mail and telephone at approximately 1-year intervals to determine whether dogs had developed GDV or died. Incidence of GDV based on the number of dog-years at risk was calculated for each breed, and breed-related risk factors were identified. Incidence of GDV for the 7 large (23 to 45 kg [50 to 99 lb]) and 4 giant (> 45 kg [> 99 lb]) breeds was 23 and 26 cases/1,000 dog-years at risk, respectively. Of the 105 dogs that developed GDV, 30 (28.6%) died. Incidence of GDV increased with increasing age. Cumulative incidence of GDV was 5.7% for all breeds. The only breed-specific characteristic significantly associated with a decreased incidence of GDV was an owner-perceived personality trait of happiness.

  13. Increased prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi infections in Bernese Mountain Dogs: a possible breed predisposition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Bernhard; Eichenberger, Simone; Wittenbrink, Max M; Reusch, Claudia E

    2007-07-12

    Glomerulonephritis in dogs has been associated with B. burgdorferi infections. In Bernese Mountain Dogs with glomerulonephritis antibodies against B. burgdorferi have been found in most dogs, raising the question if the breed is predisposed to infections with B. burgdorferi. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies against B. burgdorferi sensu lato in a well defined population of Bernese Mountain Dogs and to compare this prevalence with data from dogs of other breeds. 160 Bernese Mountain Dogs and 62 control dogs (large breed dogs with long hair) were included. All dogs were considered healthy according to a questionnaire filled out by the owner, complete blood count, chemistry panel, urinalysis and urine culture. Bernese Mountain Dogs and control dogs were kept in similar environments. Seroprevalence of B. burgdorferi was assessed by ELISA and Western blot and was 58% in Bernese Mountain Dogs compared to 15% in control dogs. This difference was significant. Neither antibodies against leptospires nor vaccination or hair coat color influenced the results. The cause of the considerably higher prevalence of antibodies against B. burgdorferi in Bernese Mountain Dogs and it's consequences are not known. A breed predisposition can be suspected.

  14. Fashion vs. Function in Cultural Evolution: The Case of Dog Breed Popularity

    PubMed Central

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Acerbi, Alberto; Herzog, Harold; Serpell, James A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between characteristics of dog breeds and their popularity between years 1926 and 2005. We consider breed health, longevity, and behavioral qualities such as aggressiveness, trainability, and fearfulness. We show that a breed's overall popularity, fluctuations in popularity, and rates of increase and decrease around popularity peaks show typically no correlation with these breed characteristics. One exception is the finding that more popular breeds tend to suffer from more inherited disorders. Our results support the hypothesis that dog breed popularity has been primarily determined by fashion rather than function. PMID:24040341

  15. Isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from breeding dogs.

    PubMed

    Rota, Ada; Milani, Chiara; Drigo, Ilenia; Drigo, Michele; Corrò, Michela

    2011-01-01

    The overuse of antimicrobials can select resistant bacteria strains; staphylococci have the ability to become resistant to all beta-lactam antimicrobials and are a significant concern in human medicine and a growing issue for veterinary medicine. Because antimicrobials are sometimes incorrectly used in breeding kennels, the objective of the work was to assess the occurrence of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci in breeding dogs. The research was carried out in 13 kennels that were allotted to three categories according to the intensity of antimicrobial use. Vaginal and milk swabs were taken from 87 healthy bitches around parturition and also from multiple organs of 27 of their pups that died within the first 2 weeks. Standard bacteriological examinations were carried out and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified. All the coagulase-positive staphylococci resulted to be Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. Susceptibility to oxacillin and the presence of the mecA gene were tested. Nine out of 89 strains (six isolated from the bitches' milk and three from dead puppies, all belonging to kennels characterized by an excessive use of antimicrobials) were multidrug-resistant, methicillin-resistant and mecA positive. Our results confirm that excessive use of antimicrobials entails the risk of selecting resistant staphylococci strains. Our data also indicate that the bacterial flora of healthy dogs belonging to specific populations may act as a reservoir of resistance genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Belgian canine population and purebred study for forensics by improved mitochondrial DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Desmyter, Stijn; Gijsbers, Leonie

    2012-01-01

    In canine population studies for forensics, the mitochondrial DNA is profiled by sequencing the two hyper variable regions, HV1 and HV2 of the control region. In a first effort to create a Belgian population database some samples showed partially poor sequence quality. We demonstrated that a nuclear pseudogene was co-amplified with the mtDNA control region. Using a new combination of primers this adverse result was no longer observed and sequencing quality was improved. All former samples with poor sequence data were reanalyzed. Furthermore, the forensic canine population study was extended to 208 breed and mixed dogs. In total, 58 haplotypes were identified, resulting in an exclusion capacity of 0.92. The profile distribution of the Belgian population sample was not significantly different from those observed in population studies of three other countries. In addition to the total population study 107 Belgian registered pedigree dogs of six breeds were profiled. Per breed, the obtained haplotypes were supplemented with those from population and purebred studies. The combined data revealed that some haplotypes were more or less prominent present in particular dog breeds. The statistically significant differences in haplotype distribution between breeds and population sample can have consequences on mtDNA databasing and matching probabilities in forensics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of training and breed group on problem-solving behaviours in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Frazzi, Chiara; Valsecchi, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Dogs have become the focus of cognitive studies looking at both their physical and social problem-solving abilities (Bensky et al. in Adv Stud Behav, 45:209-387, 2013), but very little is known about the environmental and inherited factors that may affect these abilities. In the current study, we presented a manipulation task (a puzzle box) and a spatial task (the detour) to 128 dogs belonging to four different breed groups: Herding, Mastiff-like, Working and Retrievers (von Holdt et al. in Nature 464:898-902, 2010). Within each group, we tested highly trained and non-trained dogs. Results showed that trained dogs were faster at obtaining the reward in the detour task. In the manipulation task, trained dogs approached the apparatus sooner in the first familiarization trial, but no effect of breed emerged on this variable. Furthermore, regardless of breed, dogs in the trained group spent proportionally more time interacting with the apparatus and were more likely to succeed in the test trial than dogs in the non-trained group, whereas regardless of training, dogs in the working breed group were more likely to succeed than dogs in the retriever and herding breed groups (but not the mastiff-like group). Finally, trained dogs were less likely to look at a person than non-trained dogs during testing, but dogs in the herding group more likely to do so than dogs in the retriever and working but not the mastiff-like breed groups. Overall, results reveal a strong influence of training experience but less consistent differences between breed groups on different components thought to affect problem solving.

  18. Associations of diet and breed with recurrence of calcium oxalate cystic calculi in dogs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Heidi S; Swecker, William S; Becvarova, Iveta; Weeth, Lisa P; Werre, Stephen R

    2015-05-15

    To evaluate the long-term risk of recurrence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) cystic calculi in dogs of various breeds fed 1 of 2 therapeutic diets. Retrospective cohort study. Animals-135 dogs with a history of CaOx cystic calculi. Medical records for 4 referral hospitals were searched to identify dogs that had had CaOx cystic calculi removed. Owners were contacted and medical records evaluated to obtain information on postoperative diet, recurrence of signs of lower urinary tract disease, and recurrence of cystic calculi. Dogs were grouped on the basis of breed (high-risk breeds, low-risk breeds, and Miniature Schnauzers) and diet fed after removal of cystic calculi (diet A, diet B, and any other diet [diet C], with diets A and B being therapeutic diets formulated to prevent recurrence of CaOx calculi). Breed group was a significant predictor of calculi recurrence (as determined by abdominal radiography or ultrasonography), with Miniature Schnauzers having 3 times the risk of recurrence as did dogs of other breeds. Dogs in diet group A had a lower prevalence of recurrence than did dogs in diet group C, but this difference was not significant in multivariable analysis. Results indicated that Miniature Schnauzers had a higher risk of CaOx cystic calculi recurrence than did dogs of other breeds. In addition, findings suggested that diet may play a role in decreasing recurrence, but future prospective studies are needed to validate these observations.

  19. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs. PMID:26863414

  20. Phylogenetic studies of dogs with emphasis on Japanese and Asian breeds

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yuichi

    2006-01-01

    The first domestication of the dog occurred in East Asia, and major ancestor of the dog was a wolf subspecies, Canis lupus chanco. This finding derives from data on the nucleotide sequences of mtDNA and the frequency of genes controlling blood protein polymorphisms in various subspecies of wolves and dog breeds around the world. The results of the allele frequency distribution of genes controlling 16 blood protein polymorphisms, and the incidence of dogs possessing erythrocytes with high potassium (HK) in Japan, East Asia and Europe allowed us to posturate the following hypothesis about the origins of Japanese dogs and the history of their development. In the Jomon period the first dogs entered the Japanese archipelago from southern or northern continental Asia. These dogs eventually spread throughout Japan. Then, during the Yayoi and Kofun periods, other dogs were brought over via the Korean Peninsula, and crossbreeding occurred with the original dogs. The resulted offspring can be assumed to be the ancestors of most of the Japanese breeds that exist today. Ethological studies have revealed a significant breed difference in behavioral traits among canine breeds with Japanese dogs, showing more aggressive dispositions than most of European dogs. PMID:25792769

  1. Variation of BMP3 Contributes to Dog Breed Skull Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J.; Hutchinson, Sarah A.; Byers, Alexandra; Beale, Holly C.; Carrington, Blake; Faden, Daniel L.; Rimbault, Maud; Decker, Brennan; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Sood, Raman; Boyko, Adam R.; Fondon, John W.; Wayne, Robert K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Ciruna, Brian; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginnings of domestication, the craniofacial architecture of the domestic dog has morphed and radiated to human whims. By beginning to define the genetic underpinnings of breed skull shapes, we can elucidate mechanisms of morphological diversification while presenting a framework for understanding human cephalic disorders. Using intrabreed association mapping with museum specimen measurements, we show that skull shape is regulated by at least five quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Our detailed analysis using whole-genome sequencing uncovers a missense mutation in BMP3. Validation studies in zebrafish show that Bmp3 function in cranial development is ancient. Our study reveals the causal variant for a canine QTL contributing to a major morphologic trait. PMID:22876193

  2. Intake and digestibility of low and high quality forage diets by purebred and cross-bred steers of tropically adapted breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To improve the overall value of calves from the southern US cow herds, while maintaining tropical adaptation, tropically adapted Bos indicus and Bos taruus breeds are being evaluated. The objectives of these studies were to determine the impact of tropical adapted breed type on DMI and digestibility...

  3. Evaluation of the Criollo breed Romosinuano as purebred and crossbred cows with Brahman and Angus in Florida. I. Reproduction and parturition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of this work were to compare reproduction and parturition traits of the Criollo breed Romosinuano as straightbred and crossbred cows with Angus and Brahman, to estimate heterosis and direct and maternal genetic breed effects, and to describe calf loss, cow removals from the project, t...

  4. Diversifying Selection Between Pure-Breed and Free-Breeding Dogs Inferred from Genome-Wide SNP Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilot, Małgorzata; Malewski, Tadeusz; Moura, Andre E; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Oleński, Kamil; Kamiński, Stanisław; Fadel, Fernanda Ruiz; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Mohammed, Osama B; Bogdanowicz, Wiesław

    2016-08-09

    Domesticated species are often composed of distinct populations differing in the character and strength of artificial and natural selection pressures, providing a valuable model to study adaptation. In contrast to pure-breed dogs that constitute artificially maintained inbred lines, free-ranging dogs are typically free-breeding, i.e., unrestrained in mate choice. Many traits in free-breeding dogs (FBDs) may be under similar natural and sexual selection conditions to wild canids, while relaxation of sexual selection is expected in pure-breed dogs. We used a Bayesian approach with strict false-positive control criteria to identify FST-outlier SNPs between FBDs and either European or East Asian breeds, based on 167,989 autosomal SNPs. By identifying outlier SNPs located within coding genes, we found four candidate genes under diversifying selection shared by these two comparisons. Three of them are associated with the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway regulating vertebrate morphogenesis. A comparison between FBDs and East Asian breeds also revealed diversifying selection on the BBS6 gene, which was earlier shown to cause snout shortening and dental crowding via disrupted HH signaling. Our results suggest that relaxation of natural and sexual selection in pure-breed dogs as opposed to FBDs could have led to mild changes in regulation of the HH signaling pathway. HH inhibits adhesion and the migration of neural crest cells from the neural tube, and minor deficits of these cells during embryonic development have been proposed as the underlying cause of "domestication syndrome." This suggests that the process of breed formation involved the same genetic and developmental pathways as the process of domestication. Copyright © 2016 Pilot et al.

  5. Diversifying Selection Between Pure-Breed and Free-Breeding Dogs Inferred from Genome-Wide SNP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pilot, Małgorzata; Malewski, Tadeusz; Moura, Andre E.; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Oleński, Kamil; Kamiński, Stanisław; Fadel, Fernanda Ruiz; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N.; Mohammed, Osama B.; Bogdanowicz, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Domesticated species are often composed of distinct populations differing in the character and strength of artificial and natural selection pressures, providing a valuable model to study adaptation. In contrast to pure-breed dogs that constitute artificially maintained inbred lines, free-ranging dogs are typically free-breeding, i.e., unrestrained in mate choice. Many traits in free-breeding dogs (FBDs) may be under similar natural and sexual selection conditions to wild canids, while relaxation of sexual selection is expected in pure-breed dogs. We used a Bayesian approach with strict false-positive control criteria to identify FST-outlier SNPs between FBDs and either European or East Asian breeds, based on 167,989 autosomal SNPs. By identifying outlier SNPs located within coding genes, we found four candidate genes under diversifying selection shared by these two comparisons. Three of them are associated with the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway regulating vertebrate morphogenesis. A comparison between FBDs and East Asian breeds also revealed diversifying selection on the BBS6 gene, which was earlier shown to cause snout shortening and dental crowding via disrupted HH signaling. Our results suggest that relaxation of natural and sexual selection in pure-breed dogs as opposed to FBDs could have led to mild changes in regulation of the HH signaling pathway. HH inhibits adhesion and the migration of neural crest cells from the neural tube, and minor deficits of these cells during embryonic development have been proposed as the underlying cause of “domestication syndrome.” This suggests that the process of breed formation involved the same genetic and developmental pathways as the process of domestication. PMID:27233669

  6. Evaluation of the Criollo breed Romosinuano as purebred and crossbred cows with Brahman and Angus in Florida: I. Reproduction and parturition.

    PubMed

    Riley, D G; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Olson, T A

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this work were to compare reproduction and parturition traits of the Criollo breed Romosinuano as straightbred and crossbred cows with Angus and Brahman, to estimate heterosis and direct and maternal genetic breed effects, and to describe calf loss, cow removals from the project, the occurrence of calving difficulty, inadequate calf vigor at birth, and udder problems by cow breed groups. Cows (n = 404) were born from 2002 to 2005. After their first exposure to bulls as young cows, in all subsequent breeding seasons crossbred cows were bred to bulls of the third breed, and straightbred cows were bred to bulls of the other two breeds. Calving records (n = 1,484) from 2005 to 2011 were used to create calving and weaning rate and calving interval (excluding the interval between 2 and 3 yr of age). Final models for these traits included sire breed-dam breed interaction, cow age within year, and random animal effects. Heterosis estimates for Romosinuano-Brahman calving and weaning rate were 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.07 ± 0.03 (P < 0.05); those for Brahman-Angus were twice as large (0.13 ± 0.03 and 0.14 ± 0.03, respectively; P < 0.001). Estimates of Brahman direct effects on calving and weaning rate were -0.12 ± 0.04 and -0.14 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05); however, Angus direct effects were beneficial for both traits (0.1 ± 0.05, P < 0.05). The effect of heterosis was to reduce calving interval by -49.2 ± 9.9 and -37.2 ± 9.7 d for Romosinuano-Brahman and Brahman-Angus, respectively (P < 0.001). Romosinuano and F1 cows sired by Romosinuano and out of Angus dams had the most occurrences of difficult births as a proportion of cows that calved (0.028 and 0.025, P = 0.04). Angus-sired crossbred cows and Brahman cows had the most occurrences of udder problems as a proportion of lactating cows (0.14 to 0.21, P < 0.04). There were more Brahman-sired cows that died or were culled as a proportion of those cows that began the project (0.1 to 0.28, P < 0.02) than cows in the

  7. Domestic Dogs and Cancer Research: A Breed-Based Genomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian W.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic dogs are unique from other animal models of cancer in that they generally experience spontaneous disease. In addition, most types of cancer observed in humans are found in dogs, suggesting that canines may be an informative system for the study of cancer genetics. Domestic dogs are divided into over 175 breeds, with members of each breed sharing significant phenotypes. The breed barrier enhances the utility of the model, especially for genetic studies where small numbers of genes are hypothesized to account for the breed cancer susceptibility. These facts, combined with recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies allows for an unrivaled ability to use pet dog populations to find often subtle mutations that promote cancer susceptibility and progression in dogs as a whole. The meticulous record keeping associated with dog breeding makes the model still more powerful, as it facilitates both association analysis and family-based linkage studies. Key to the success of these studies is their cooperative nature, with owners, scientists, veterinarians and breed clubs working together to avoid the cost and unpopularity of developing captive populations. In this article we explore these principals and advocate for colony-free, genetic studies that will enhance our ability to diagnose and treat cancer in dogs and humans alike. PMID:24936030

  8. Domestic dogs and cancer research: a breed-based genomics approach.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brian W; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    Domestic dogs are unique from other animal models of cancer in that they generally experience spontaneous disease. In addition, most types of cancer observed in humans are found in dogs, suggesting that canines may be an informative system for the study of cancer genetics. Domestic dogs are divided into over 175 breeds, with members of each breed sharing significant phenotypes. The breed barrier enhances the utility of the model, especially for genetic studies where small numbers of genes are hypothesized to account for the breed cancer susceptibility. These facts, combined with recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies allows for an unrivaled ability to use pet dog populations to find often subtle mutations that promote cancer susceptibility and progression in dogs as a whole. The meticulous record keeping associated with dog breeding makes the model still more powerful, as it facilitates both association analysis and family-based linkage studies. Key to the success of these studies is their cooperative nature, with owners, scientists, veterinarians and breed clubs working together to avoid the cost and unpopularity of developing captive populations. In this article we explore these principals and advocate for colony-free, genetic studies that will enhance our ability to diagnose and treat cancer in dogs and humans alike. Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Is That Dog a Pit Bull? A Cross-Country Comparison of Perceptions of Shelter Workers Regarding Breed Identification

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Christy L.; Harrison, Natalie; Wolff, London; Westgarth, Carri

    2014-01-01

    Bull breeds are commonly kept as companion animals, but the pit bull terrier is restricted by breed-specific legislation (BSL) in parts of the United States and throughout the United Kingdom. Shelter workers must decide which breed(s) a dog is. This decision may influence the dog's fate, particularly in places with BSL. In this study, shelter workers in the United States and United Kingdom were shown pictures of 20 dogs and were asked what breed each dog was, how they determined each dog's breed, whether each dog was a pit bull, and what they expected the fate of each dog to be. There was much variation in responses both between and within the United States and United Kingdom. UK participants frequently labeled dogs commonly considered by U.S. participants to be pit bulls as Staffordshire bull terriers. UK participants were more likely to say their shelters would euthanize dogs deemed to be pit bulls. Most participants noted using dogs' physical features to determine breed, and 41% affected by BSL indicated they would knowingly mislabel a dog of a restricted breed, presumably to increase the dog's adoption chances. PMID:24673506

  10. Longevity of Cane Corso Italiano dog breed and its relationship with hair colour

    PubMed Central

    Korec, Evžen; Chalupa, Ondřej; Hančl, Matyáš; Korcová, Jana; Bydžovská, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The Cane Corso Italiano belongs among the new dog breeds that were fully recognised by Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 2007. For the first time, this study describes a median lifespan using the data of 232 dogs of the Cane Corso Italiano breed collected from kennels and individual owners from 25 countries. The median lifespan of the whole examined group is 9.29 years (IQR 6.98-11.12, IQR = Interquartile Range). This paper is the first to describe the possible relationship between median lifespan and hair colour within one breed. The longest living group is formed by black brindle coloured dogs, with a median of 10.30 years (IQR 8.33-13.00), and brindle coloured dogs, with a median of 10.13 years (IQR 7.12-11.25). The median lifespan of black brindle dogs exceeded the overall median lifespan of all dogs by 1.01 year and the median lifespan of other colour dogs by 2.21 years. Our results suggest a possible way for a prolongation of age at death of the Cane Corso Italiano breed using appropriate breeding. The median lifespan of male Cane Corso Italiano dogs is 9.25 years (IQR 6.97-11.00) and female Cane Corso Italiano dogs 9.33 years (IQR 7.00-11.31). The statistical analysis using the Independent Samples Student’s t test confirmed that the lifespan of female dogs did not exceed the median lifespan of male dogs (P>0.01). PMID:28652985

  11. Longevity of Cane Corso Italiano dog breed and its relationship with hair colour.

    PubMed

    Korec, Evžen; Chalupa, Ondřej; Hančl, Matyáš; Korcová, Jana; Bydžovská, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The Cane Corso Italiano belongs among the new dog breeds that were fully recognised by Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 2007. For the first time, this study describes a median lifespan using the data of 232 dogs of the Cane Corso Italiano breed collected from kennels and individual owners from 25 countries. The median lifespan of the whole examined group is 9.29 years (IQR 6.98-11.12, IQR = Interquartile Range). This paper is the first to describe the possible relationship between median lifespan and hair colour within one breed. The longest living group is formed by black brindle coloured dogs, with a median of 10.30 years (IQR 8.33-13.00), and brindle coloured dogs, with a median of 10.13 years (IQR 7.12-11.25). The median lifespan of black brindle dogs exceeded the overall median lifespan of all dogs by 1.01 year and the median lifespan of other colour dogs by 2.21 years. Our results suggest a possible way for a prolongation of age at death of the Cane Corso Italiano breed using appropriate breeding. The median lifespan of male Cane Corso Italiano dogs is 9.25 years (IQR 6.97-11.00) and female Cane Corso Italiano dogs 9.33 years (IQR 7.00-11.31). The statistical analysis using the Independent Samples Student's t test confirmed that the lifespan of female dogs did not exceed the median lifespan of male dogs ( P >0.01).

  12. Intranasal Oxytocin Treatment Increases Eye-Gaze Behavior toward the Owner in Ancient Japanese Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Miho; Ogawa, Misato; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2017-01-01

    Dogs acquired unique cognitive abilities during domestication, which is thought to have contributed to the formation of the human-dog bond. In European breeds, but not in wolves, a dog's gazing behavior plays an important role in affiliative interactions with humans and stimulates oxytocin secretion in both humans and dogs, which suggests that this interspecies oxytocin and gaze-mediated bonding was also acquired during domestication. In this study, we investigated whether Japanese breeds, which are classified as ancient breeds and are relatively close to wolves genetically, establish a bond with their owners through gazing behavior. The subject dogs were treated with either oxytocin or saline before the starting of the behavioral testing. We also evaluated physiological changes in the owners during mutual gazing by analyzing their heart rate variability (HRV) and subsequent urinary oxytocin levels in both dogs and their owners. We found that oxytocin treatment enhanced the gazing behavior of Japanese dogs and increased their owners' urinary oxytocin levels, as was seen with European breeds; however, the measured durations of skin contact and proximity to their owners were relatively low. In the owners' HRV readings, inter-beat (R-R) intervals (RRI), the standard deviation of normal to normal inter-beat (R-R) intervals (SDNN), and the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences (RMSSD) were lower when the dogs were treated with oxytocin compared with saline. Furthermore, the owners of female dogs showed lower SDNN than the owners of male dogs. These results suggest that the owners of female Japanese dogs exhibit more tension during interactions, and apart from gazing behavior, the dogs may show sex differences in their interactions with humans as well. They also suggest that Japanese dogs use eye-gazing as an attachment behavior toward humans similar to European breeds; however, there is a disparity between the dog sexes when it comes to the

  13. Dog movie stars and dog breed popularity: a case study in media influence on choice.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Acerbi, Alberto; Herzog, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Fashions and fads are important phenomena that influence many individual choices. They are ubiquitous in human societies, and have recently been used as a source of data to test models of cultural dynamics. Although a few statistical regularities have been observed in fashion cycles, their empirical characterization is still incomplete. Here we consider the impact of mass media on popular culture, showing that the release of movies featuring dogs is often associated with an increase in the popularity of featured breeds, for up to 10 years after movie release. We also find that a movie's impact on breed popularity correlates with the estimated number of viewers during the movie's opening weekend--a proxy of the movie's reach among the general public. Movies' influence on breed popularity was strongest in the early 20th century, and has declined since. We reach these conclusions through a new, widely applicable method to measure the cultural impact of events, capable of disentangling the event's effect from ongoing cultural trends.

  14. Dog Movie Stars and Dog Breed Popularity: A Case Study in Media Influence on Choice

    PubMed Central

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Acerbi, Alberto; Herzog, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Fashions and fads are important phenomena that influence many individual choices. They are ubiquitous in human societies, and have recently been used as a source of data to test models of cultural dynamics. Although a few statistical regularities have been observed in fashion cycles, their empirical characterization is still incomplete. Here we consider the impact of mass media on popular culture, showing that the release of movies featuring dogs is often associated with an increase in the popularity of featured breeds, for up to 10 years after movie release. We also find that a movie's impact on breed popularity correlates with the estimated number of viewers during the movie's opening weekend—a proxy of the movie's reach among the general public. Movies' influence on breed popularity was strongest in the early 20th century, and has declined since. We reach these conclusions through a new, widely applicable method to measure the cultural impact of events, capable of disentangling the event's effect from ongoing cultural trends. PMID:25208271

  15. Degenerative myelopathy in two Boxer dogs.

    PubMed

    Miller, A D; Barber, R; Porter, B F; Peters, R M; Kent, M; Platt, S R; Schatzberg, S J

    2009-07-01

    Degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a common, slowly progressive, debilitating disease reported in several dog breeds, including the German Shepherd Dog and Pembroke Welsh Corgi. Boxer dogs present occasionally for a thoracolumbar myelopathy for which no cause is identified on MRI or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Despite a lack of a histologic description of DM in the Boxer in the veterinary literature, such dogs are presumed to have DM. Here we report 2 histologically confirmed cases of DM in the Boxer breed in which histologic studies disclosed marked degenerative changes in the spinal cord that were most prominent in the thoracic and cranial lumbar segments. Lesions consisted of myelin vacuolation and degeneration, myelophagocytosis, reactive astrocytosis, and ellipsoid formation most prominent in the lateral and ventral funiculi. We present a detailed histologic description of DM in the Boxer dog and compare it to DM in other purebred dogs.

  16. Genetic characterization, at the mitochondrial and nuclear DNA levels, of five Canary Island dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Suárez, N M; Betancor, E; Fregel, R; Pestano, J

    2013-08-01

    Many studies presenting genetic analysis of dog breeds have been conducted without the inclusion of island dog breeds, although isolation can be one of the main factors in their origin. Here we report the genetic analysis at the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA levels of five Canary Island dog breeds (Canarian Warren Hound, Canary Island Mastiff, Garafiano Shepherd, La Palma Rat-Hunter and El Hierro Wolfhound) to fill this gap and, at the same time, genetically characterize these breeds. We identified 168 alleles in autosomal microsatellites and 16 mitochondrial haplotypes. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.556 to 0.783 and from 0.737 to 0.943 respectively. Furthermore, three haplotypes were newly described and exclusive to a particular breed (A17+ in the Canary Island Mastiff; A33+ in the Canarian Warren Hound; Bi in the La Palma Rat-Hunter). The outcome of our analyses also revealed different breed histories consistent with historical documents and hypothetical origin designations. Although mtDNA haplotypes showed poor breed discriminating power, autosomal markers allowed a clear clustering of each single population. We expect that our results, together with further analyses, will help to make the population histories of island dog breeds clearer. © 2013 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  17. Intranasal Oxytocin Treatment Increases Eye-Gaze Behavior toward the Owner in Ancient Japanese Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Miho; Ogawa, Misato; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2017-01-01

    Dogs acquired unique cognitive abilities during domestication, which is thought to have contributed to the formation of the human-dog bond. In European breeds, but not in wolves, a dog’s gazing behavior plays an important role in affiliative interactions with humans and stimulates oxytocin secretion in both humans and dogs, which suggests that this interspecies oxytocin and gaze-mediated bonding was also acquired during domestication. In this study, we investigated whether Japanese breeds, which are classified as ancient breeds and are relatively close to wolves genetically, establish a bond with their owners through gazing behavior. The subject dogs were treated with either oxytocin or saline before the starting of the behavioral testing. We also evaluated physiological changes in the owners during mutual gazing by analyzing their heart rate variability (HRV) and subsequent urinary oxytocin levels in both dogs and their owners. We found that oxytocin treatment enhanced the gazing behavior of Japanese dogs and increased their owners’ urinary oxytocin levels, as was seen with European breeds; however, the measured durations of skin contact and proximity to their owners were relatively low. In the owners’ HRV readings, inter-beat (R-R) intervals (RRI), the standard deviation of normal to normal inter-beat (R-R) intervals (SDNN), and the root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences (RMSSD) were lower when the dogs were treated with oxytocin compared with saline. Furthermore, the owners of female dogs showed lower SDNN than the owners of male dogs. These results suggest that the owners of female Japanese dogs exhibit more tension during interactions, and apart from gazing behavior, the dogs may show sex differences in their interactions with humans as well. They also suggest that Japanese dogs use eye-gazing as an attachment behavior toward humans similar to European breeds; however, there is a disparity between the dog sexes when it comes to the

  18. Conventional bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J M; Macías, C

    2016-03-01

    To describe the outcome of bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs treated with conventional bone plates. Records of 15 toy breed dogs with distal radius and ulna fractures were retrospectively reviewed for signalment, method of fixation, complications and clinical and radiographic assessments. A telephone-based owner questionnaire was conducted to determine long-term function and client satisfaction. Age ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Body weight ranged from 1 to 4 kg. Dynamic compression plates were used in 13 dogs and veterinary cuttable plates were used in 2 dogs as the means of fixation. Full radiographic and clinical follow-up data were available for 10 dogs and follow-up was performed between 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. At that time, all fractures had healed and return to function was considered excellent in all 10 dogs. Five dogs did not return for hospital evaluation because they were judged by their owners to be free of lameness. In two cases, owners could not be contacted by telephone, but the referring veterinarians reported the dogs to be asymptomatic. No major complications occurred. Conventional bone plates are suitable choices for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs and are not necessarily correlated with high rates of complication. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  19. Recent breeding history of dog breeds in Sweden: modest rates of inbreeding, extensive loss of genetic diversity and lack of correlation between inbreeding and health

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, M; Laikre, L

    2014-01-01

    One problem in modern dogs is a high occurrence of physical diseases, defects and disorders. Many breeds exhibit physical problems that affect individual dogs throughout life. A potential cause of these problems is inbreeding that is known to reduce the viability of individuals. We investigated the possible correlation between recent inbreeding and health problems in dogs and used studbook data from 26 breeds provided by the Swedish Kennel Club for this purpose. The pedigrees date back to the mid-20th century and comprise 5–10 generations and 1 000–50 000 individuals per pedigree over our study period of 1980–2010. We compared levels of inbreeding and loss of genetic variation measured in relation to the number of founding animals during this period in the investigated dog breeds that we classified as ‘healthy’ (11 breeds) or ‘unhealthy’ (15) based on statistics on the extent of veterinary care obtained from Sweden's four largest insurance companies for pets. We found extensive loss of genetic variation and moderate levels of recent inbreeding in all breeds examined, but no strong indication of a difference in these parameters between healthy versus unhealthy breeds over this period. Thus, recent breeding history with respect to rate of inbreeding does not appear to be a main cause of poor health in the investigated dog breeds in Sweden. We identified both strengths and weaknesses of the dog pedigree data important to consider in future work of monitoring and conserving genetic diversity of dog breeds. PMID:24289536

  20. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, S; Valdés, J; Alonso, R A

    2000-01-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene from the dachshund, basset hound, bulldog, and German shepherd dogs. All 4 breeds showed no mutation in the evaluated region. This indicates that the mutation responsible for the osteochondrodysplastic phenotype in the tested dog breeds lies either elsewhere in the FGFR-3 gene or in other ones involved in the formation and development of endochondral bone. PMID:11041504

  1. Relationships between heart rate and age, bodyweight and breed in 10,849 dogs.

    PubMed

    Hezzell, M J; Dennis, S G; Humm, K; Agee, L; Boswood, A

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate relationships between heart rate and clinical variables in healthy dogs and dogs examined at a referral hospital. Clinical data were extracted from the electronic patient records of a first opinion group (5000 healthy dogs) and a referral hospital (5849 dogs). Univariable and multi-variable general linear models were used to assess associations between heart rate and clinical characteristics. Separate multi-variable models were constructed for first opinion and referral populations. In healthy dogs, heart rate was negatively associated with bodyweight (P<0.001) but was higher in Chihuahuas. The mean difference in heart rate between a 5 and 55 kg dog was 10.5 beats per minute. In dogs presenting to a referral hospital, heart rate was negatively associated with bodyweight (P<0.001) and the following breeds; border collie, golden retriever, Labrador retriever, springer spaniel and West Highland white terrier and positively associated with age, admitting service (emergency and critical care, emergency first opinion and cardiology) and the following breeds; Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Staffordshire bull terrier and Yorkshire terrier. Bodyweight, age, breed and disease status all influence heart rate in dogs, although these factors account for a relatively small proportion of the overall variability in heart rate. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Diabetes mellitus in a population of 180,000 insured dogs: incidence, survival, and breed distribution.

    PubMed

    Fall, Tove; Hamlin, Helene Hansson; Hedhammar, Ake; Kämpe, Olle; Egenvall, Agneta

    2007-01-01

    Canine diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrinopathy with an unclear etiology. For a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, there is a need for comprehensive epidemiologic studies. Earlier studies have shown that the risk of disease is higher in certain dog breeds. Incidence, age of onset, survival and sex proportion of DM vary by breed. Data from a cohort of 182,087 insured dogs aged 5-12 years accounting for 652,898 dog-years at risk were studied retrospectively. Incidence rates by sex, breed, and geography were calculated with exact denominators. Age-specific incidence and survival after 1st DM claim were computed with Cox's regression and Kaplan-Meier survival function. Multivariable survival analysis was performed for the outcome diagnosis of DM with age, sex, and geography tested as fixed effects, previous endocrine or pancreatic diseases tested as time-dependent covariates, and breed tested as a random effect. The mean age at 1st insurance claim for the 860 DM dogs (72% females) was 8.6 years. The incidence of DM was 13 cases per 10,000 dog-years at risk. Australian Terriers, Samoyeds, Swedish Elkhounds, and Swedish Lapphunds were found to have the highest incidence. The proportion of females with DM varied significantly among breeds. Swedish Elkhounds, Beagles, Norwegian Elkhounds, and Border Collies that developed DM were almost exclusively females. The multivariable model showed that breed, previous hyperadrenocorticism, and female sex were risk factors for developing DM. Median survival time was 57 days after 1st claim. Excluding the 223 dogs that died within 1 day, the median survival time was 2 years after 1st claim of DM. The significant breed-specific sex and age differences shown in this study indicate that genetic variation could make breeds more or less susceptible to different types of DM.

  3. Comparison of goniometric measurements of the stifle joint in seven breeds of normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Sabanci, Seyyid S; Ocal, Mehmet K

    2016-05-18

    To compare the goniometric measurements of the stifle joint in seven dog breeds, and to determine the relationship among goniometric measurements, age, body weight, tibial plateau angle, crus and thigh circumferences, and widths of quadriceps, hamstring, and gastrocnemius muscles in healthy dogs. We used a total of 126 dogs from seven different breeds, and recorded the angle of the stifle joint at standing, extension, and flexion together with the range of motion (ROM). The circumferences of the thigh and crus were also measured. Mediolateral radiographic projections of the tibia and the femur were obtained from the dogs, and the tibial plateau angles, as well as the widths of quadriceps, hamstring, and gastrocnemius muscles, were measured from these images. Neither the sex of the dog nor the differences in the side measured affected the goniometric measurements of the stifle joint. The standing, extension, flexion, and ROM angles were different among the breeds. The standard deviations of the standing and extension angles were small relative to their means, but the standard deviations of the flexion angle were large relative to their means in all breeds. Body weight and muscular measurements were the most influential factors on the stifle flexion angle and ROM. Breed differences, body weights, and muscle mass should be taken into consideration during assessment of the stifle function using goniometric measurements.

  4. Seasonality in oestrus and litter size in an assistance dog breeding colony in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Wigham, Eleanor E; Moxon, Rachel S; England, Gary C W; Wood, James L N; Morters, Michelle K

    2017-10-07

    Evidence of seasonality in oestrus in bitches within specialist breeding programmes, such as those for assistance dogs, may support colony management through tailoring the distribution of resources required for breeding throughout the year. However, at present there are conflicting data regarding seasonality in oestrus (and litter size) in domestic dogs. The primary objective of this study was to investigate seasonal variations in oestrus and litter size in a large assistance dog breeding colony in the UK in order to optimise colony management. The authors analysed the annual distribution of 3624 observations of oestrus collected from 568 brood bitches from January 2005 to June 2014. The authors also evaluated the relationship between month and litter size for 1609 litters observed during the same period. There was no evidence of regular seasonal variations in oestrus or litter size by meteorological season or month. The lack of seasonality in oestrus may be a function of dogs in the UK, particularly valuable breeding bitches, being exposed to fairly constant environmental conditions throughout the year as a consequence of artificial light and heating during the winter months. The authors' findings suggest that special consideration of the annual distribution of oestrus and litter size is unnecessary for the management of assistance dog breeding colonies similar to those in the UK. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Dorsal stabilization of atlantoaxial subluxation using non-absorbable sutures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Masian, D; Luján-Feliu-Pascual, A; Font, C; Mascort, J

    2014-01-01

    To describe a novel dorsal technique for stabilization of atlantoaxial subluxation in toy breed dogs using 3-metric nylon suture. Retrospective study. Fifteen toy breed dogs with a body weight of 2 kg or less with atlantoaxial subluxation. The atlantoaxial joint of each dog was surgically stabilized through a dorsal approach by placing a double strand of non-absorbable, 3-metric, nylon suture material between the dorsal muscles of the atlanto-occipital and the atlantoaxial joint muscles. Pre- and postoperative neurological status, diagnostic imaging, and complications were reviewed. Clinical follow-up examination was performed at six months. For long-term assessment, a telephone follow-up was performed. No intra-operative complications were observed. Functional improvement occurred in 12 dogs. One dog did not improve and four dogs required revision surgery. In two of those four cases, suture material breakage was proven and it was suspected in the other two. Two cases underwent a second dorsal approach with the same suture material and two cases underwent a ventral approach (transarticular fixation and multiple implants embedded with polymethylmethacrylate). Dorsal stabilization using 3-metric nylon may be adequate as a safe, effective, and simple alternative technique for atlantoaxial stabilization in toy breed dogs of ≤1.5 kg of weight, in which the use of ventral screws and pins is challenging.

  6. Differential effects of oxytocin on social sensitivity in two distinct breeds of dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztina; Kis, Anna; Pogány, Ákos; Koller, Dóra; Topál, József

    2016-12-01

    Dogs have been proven to show several human-analogue social behaviors, and recent research raises the possibility that the oxytocin system is related to these. However, despite dogs' general tendency to excel in the domain of social cognition, there is increasing evidence that dogs' ability to utilize human signals may vary with breed. Moreover, breeds may show differences not only in their 'inborn' communicative abilities, but also in their learning skills related to these. The aim of the present study was to explore breed differences and breed-specific effects of oxytocin administration on different aspects of social responsiveness. Dogs from two markedly different breeds, Border Collies (cooperative workers) and Siberian Huskies (independent workers) were tested. After having received intranasal administration of oxytocin or placebo, subjects participated in three behavioral tests measuring social responsiveness. Our results show that there are several behavioral differences between the two breeds and also that there are differential effects of the oxytocin treatment. Border Collies were in general more susceptible to the 'social' effects of oxytocin compared to Siberian Huskies: after oxytocin administration they (1) looked more at the experimenter in the 'Unreachable food' situation, (2) looked more at the owner and shifted their gaze more between the sound source and the owner in a potentially dangerous situation, and (3) looked longer at the experimenter's eyes in the 'Tolerance of prolonged eye contact' test. These findings suggest that selection for enhanced cooperative abilities, possibly complemented by the effect of different social environments the two breeds experience, affects dogs' performance in several behavioral tests and that the neurohormonal background differently modulates social behavior in different working breeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of Intramedullary Spinal Pressure in Small Breed Dogs With Thoracolumbar Disk Extrusion Undergoing Hemilaminectomy.

    PubMed

    Noussitou, Fiammetta L; Gorgas, Daniela; Rohrbach, Helene; Henke, Diana; Howard, Judith; Forterre, Franck

    2015-11-01

    To assess intramedullary spinal pressure (IMP) in small breed dogs with thoracolumbar disk extrusion. Prospective cohort study. Small breed dogs (n = 14) with thoracolumbar disk extrusion undergoing hemilaminectomy and healthy chondrodystrophic laboratory dogs (control; n = 3) without spinal disease. Diagnosis was based on clinical and neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and was confirmed intraoperatively. A standardized anesthesia protocol and surgical procedure were used to minimize factors that could influence IMP. Intramedullary pressure was measured through a minidurotomy at the site of spinal cord compression using a fiber optic catheter inserted perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the spinal cord. Measurements were taken after hemilaminectomy and again after removal of extruded disk material. Affected dogs had significantly higher IMP compared to control dogs (P = .008) and IMP decreased significantly post-decompression compared with initial values (P < .001). No correlation was found between IMP and neurologic grade, degree of spinal cord compression on MRI, or signal intensity changes on MRI. Acute thoracolumbar disk extrusion is associated with increased IMP in small breed dogs and surgical decompression results in an immediate decrease of IMP. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis.

    PubMed

    van Asch, Barbara; Zhang, Ai-bing; Oskarsson, Mattias C R; Klütsch, Cornelya F C; Amorim, António; Savolainen, Peter

    2013-09-07

    Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and perro sín pelo del Peru, by comparing to extensive samples of East Asian (n = 984) and European dogs (n = 639), and previously published pre-Columbian sequences. Evidence for a pre-Columbian origin was found for all these breeds, except Alaskan Malamute for which results were ambigous. No European influence was indicated for the Arctic breeds Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dog, and North/South American breeds had at most 30% European female lineages, suggesting marginal replacement by European dogs. Genetic continuity through time was shown by the sharing of a unique haplotype between the Mexican breed Chihuahua and ancient Mexican samples. We also analysed free-ranging dogs, confirming limited pre-Columbian ancestry overall, but also identifying pockets of remaining populations with high proportion of indigenous ancestry, and we provide the first DNA-based evidence that the Carolina dog, a free-ranging population in the USA, may have an ancient Asian origin.

  9. Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Asch, Barbara; Zhang, Ai-bing; Oskarsson, Mattias C. R.; Klütsch, Cornelya F. C.; Amorim, António; Savolainen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and perro sín pelo del Peru, by comparing to extensive samples of East Asian (n = 984) and European dogs (n = 639), and previously published pre-Columbian sequences. Evidence for a pre-Columbian origin was found for all these breeds, except Alaskan Malamute for which results were ambigous. No European influence was indicated for the Arctic breeds Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dog, and North/South American breeds had at most 30% European female lineages, suggesting marginal replacement by European dogs. Genetic continuity through time was shown by the sharing of a unique haplotype between the Mexican breed Chihuahua and ancient Mexican samples. We also analysed free-ranging dogs, confirming limited pre-Columbian ancestry overall, but also identifying pockets of remaining populations with high proportion of indigenous ancestry, and we provide the first DNA-based evidence that the Carolina dog, a free-ranging population in the USA, may have an ancient Asian origin. PMID:23843389

  10. Why do people buy dogs with potential welfare problems related to extreme conformation and inherited disease? A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Sandøe, P; Kondrup, S V; Bennett, P C; Forkman, B; Meyer, I; Proschowsky, H F; Serpell, J A; Lund, T B

    2017-01-01

    A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to re-procure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog's personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems.

  11. Canine tumor development and crude incidence of tumors by breed based on domestic dogs in Gifu prefecture.

    PubMed

    Komazawa, Satoshi; Sakai, Hiroki; Itoh, Yusuke; Kawabe, Mifumi; Murakami, Mami; Mori, Takashi; Maruo, Kohji

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed the status of tumor development in dogs by breed based on tumor cases that presented to the Department of Veterinary Pathology of the Gifu University for diagnostic examinations over eight years (2005-2012). We also calculated the crude incidence of tumors in dogs by breed based on the results of a survey conducted in 2011 in Gifu Prefecture. The most common sites of tumor development included the skin, digestive organs and mammary glands. Smaller dogs showed a tendency to have a higher incidence of breast tumors. We thus identified dog breeds with a higher crude incidence of tumors (Bernese mountain dog, golden retriever, corgi, etc.) and those with a lower crude incidence of tumors (Pomeranian, poodle, Chihuahua, etc.). Unlike the current trends for domestic dogs in the US and Europe, Japan has a higher number of small dogs as pets; it is therefore necessary to develop a policy for canine cancer specific to Japan.

  12. Canine tumor development and crude incidence of tumors by breed based on domestic dogs in Gifu prefecture

    PubMed Central

    KOMAZAWA, Satoshi; SAKAI, Hiroki; ITOH, Yusuke; KAWABE, Mifumi; MURAKAMI, Mami; MORI, Takashi; MARUO, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the status of tumor development in dogs by breed based on tumor cases that presented to the Department of Veterinary Pathology of the Gifu University for diagnostic examinations over eight years (2005–2012). We also calculated the crude incidence of tumors in dogs by breed based on the results of a survey conducted in 2011 in Gifu Prefecture. The most common sites of tumor development included the skin, digestive organs and mammary glands. Smaller dogs showed a tendency to have a higher incidence of breast tumors. We thus identified dog breeds with a higher crude incidence of tumors (Bernese mountain dog, golden retriever, corgi, etc.) and those with a lower crude incidence of tumors (Pomeranian, poodle, Chihuahua, etc.). Unlike the current trends for domestic dogs in the US and Europe, Japan has a higher number of small dogs as pets; it is therefore necessary to develop a policy for canine cancer specific to Japan. PMID:27150207

  13. Breed variations in the incidence of pyometra and mammary tumours in Swedish dogs.

    PubMed

    Jitpean, S; Hagman, R; Ström Holst, B; Höglund, O V; Pettersson, A; Egenvall, A

    2012-12-01

    Dogs enrolled in a Swedish insurance company (during 1995-2006) were studied for development of pyometra and mammary tumours (MTs), with special attention to breed and age. There were over 260,000 female dogs with over 1,000,000 dog-years at risk (DYAR) in the database, using data on bitches up to 10 years of age and 110 breeds with over 1000 DYAR. In total, 20 423 bitches were diagnosed with pyometra and 11,758 with MTs and 30,131 with either or both of the two diseases. The incidence rate (IR) for pyometra was 199 (95% CI 196-202), for MTs 112 (95% CI 110-114) and for either or both of the two diseases 297 (95% CI 294-301) dogs per 10,000 DYAR. The mean age of diagnosis pyometra was 7.0 years (SD ± 2.2), MTs 8.0 years (SD ± 1.6). In all breeds, the overall proportion of the bitches that developed disease by 10 years of age was for pyometra 19%, MTs 13%, and either or both of two diseases 30%. The top 10 breeds diagnosed with either or both of the two diseases were the Leonberger (73%), Irish Wolfhound (69%), Bernese Mountain Dog (69%), Great Dane (68%), Staffordshire Bull Terrier (66%), Rottweiler (65%), Bullterrier (62%), Doberman (62%), Bouvier des Flandres (60%), Airdaleterrier (60%). These data provide information of the combined disease incidence in a large number of different breeds. Breed variations in incidence rate suggests genetic components in disease development. Our study may be valuable in the search for genetic risk-factors or protective factors. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. The influence of breed and environmental factors on social and solitary play in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris).

    PubMed

    Mehrkam, Lindsay R; Hall, Nathaniel J; Haitz, Chelsea; Wynne, Clive D L

    2017-12-01

    The domestic dog is an ideal model species in which to study the genetic and environmental factors that influence play behavior. Dogs exist in a wide variety of breeds and frequently engage in multiple forms of play. In the present study, we investigated whether the levels of solitary and social play differed between dogs of three breed types with distinct predatory motor pattern sequences (herding dogs, retrievers, and livestock guarding dogs [LGDs]). Furthermore, we investigated how environmental factors (social and nonsocial contexts) influenced play in dogs of these breed types. Groups of breed-matched dyads with working experience and of equivalent age, sex, and neuter status ratios were exposed to four experimental test conditions and two control conditions in randomized orders. With respect to solitary play, environmental context did have a significant effect, with toys reliably producing the highest levels of solitary play across all breed types. Retrievers engaged in significantly higher levels of solitary play overall than LGDs, and there was a trend in comparison to herding dogs. In contrast, neither environmental context nor breed had a significant effect on social play levels; however, neuter status of the dyads did have a significant effect on social play, with mixed-status dyads engaging in significantly higher levels of social play than same-status dyads. Our findings provide experimental evidence for identifying proximate, environmental stimuli that reliably facilitate social and solitary play and discuss possible genetic (i.e., breed type) and lifetime influences on the form of play in domestic dogs.

  15. Identification of Genomic Regions Associated with Phenotypic Variation between Dog Breeds using Selection Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Thomas; Axelsson, Erik; Rosengren Pielberg, Gerli; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Fall, Tove; Seppälä, Eija H.; Hansen, Mark S. T.; Lawley, Cindy T.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Bannasch, Danika; Vilà, Carles; Lohi, Hannes; Galibert, Francis; Fredholm, Merete; Häggström, Jens; Hedhammar, Åke; André, Catherine; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hitte, Christophe; Webster, Matthew T.

    2011-01-01

    The extraordinary phenotypic diversity of dog breeds has been sculpted by a unique population history accompanied by selection for novel and desirable traits. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis using multiple test statistics to identify regions under selection in 509 dogs from 46 diverse breeds using a newly developed high-density genotyping array consisting of >170,000 evenly spaced SNPs. We first identify 44 genomic regions exhibiting extreme differentiation across multiple breeds. Genetic variation in these regions correlates with variation in several phenotypic traits that vary between breeds, and we identify novel associations with both morphological and behavioral traits. We next scan the genome for signatures of selective sweeps in single breeds, characterized by long regions of reduced heterozygosity and fixation of extended haplotypes. These scans identify hundreds of regions, including 22 blocks of homozygosity longer than one megabase in certain breeds. Candidate selection loci are strongly enriched for developmental genes. We chose one highly differentiated region, associated with body size and ear morphology, and characterized it using high-throughput sequencing to provide a list of variants that may directly affect these traits. This study provides a catalogue of genomic regions showing extreme reduction in genetic variation or population differentiation in dogs, including many linked to phenotypic variation. The many blocks of reduced haplotype diversity observed across the genome in dog breeds are the result of both selection and genetic drift, but extended blocks of homozygosity on a megabase scale appear to be best explained by selection. Further elucidation of the variants under selection will help to uncover the genetic basis of complex traits and disease. PMID:22022279

  16. Why do people buy dogs with potential welfare problems related to extreme conformation and inherited disease? A representative study of Danish owners of four small dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Kondrup, S. V.; Bennett, P. C.; Forkman, B.; Meyer, I; Proschowsky, H. F.; Serpell, J. A.; Lund, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    A number of dog breeds suffer from welfare problems due to extreme phenotypes and high levels of inherited diseases but the popularity of such breeds is not declining. Using a survey of owners of two popular breeds with extreme physical features (French Bulldog and Chihuahua), one with a high load of inherited diseases not directly related to conformation (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel), and one representing the same size range but without extreme conformation and with the same level of disease as the overall dog population (Cairn Terrier), we investigated this seeming paradox. We examined planning and motivational factors behind acquisition of the dogs, and whether levels of experienced health and behavior problems were associated with the quality of the owner-dog relationship and the intention to re-procure a dog of the same breed. Owners of each of the four breeds (750/breed) were randomly drawn from a nationwide Danish dog registry and invited to participate. Of these, 911 responded, giving a final sample of 846. There were clear differences between owners of the four breeds with respect to degree of planning prior to purchase, with owners of Chihuahuas exhibiting less. Motivations behind choice of dog were also different. Health and other breed attributes were more important to owners of Cairn Terriers, whereas the dog’s personality was reported to be more important for owners of French Bulldogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels but less important for Chihuahua owners. Higher levels of health and behavior problems were positively associated with a closer owner-dog relationship for owners of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Chihuahuas but, for owners of French Bulldogs, high levels of problems were negatively associated with an intention to procure the same breed again. In light of these findings, it appears less paradoxical that people continue to buy dogs with welfare problems. PMID:28234931

  17. Variation in activity levels amongst dogs of different breeds: results of a large online survey of dog owners from the UK.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Emily; German, Alexander J; Blackwell, Emily; Evans, Mark; Westgarth, Carri

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical activity is an important means of promoting health, both in people and their pets. Walking is the most common method used for dogs, but there is a lack of clarity on how much daily activity different breeds of dog require. Data from an online survey of UK dog owners were collected between June and August in 2014. The University of Liverpool Ethics Committee approved the project, and owners consented to data use. The initial dataset (17 028 dogs) was first cleaned to remove erroneous data, and then edited to remove mixed breed dogs, leaving a total of 12 314 dogs from known pedigree breeds. Other information collected included sex, age, neuter status, breed, and amount and frequency of exercise. Exercise frequency and duration were estimated across different breeds, and compared with Kennel Club recommendations, using χ 2 tests and binary logistic regression. The online survey data indicated differences amongst breeds in the amount of walking reported ( P  < 0·001). Afghan hounds were the least exercised breed, whilst breeds reportedly exercised most included: English setter, foxhound, Irish setter and Old English sheepdog. Gundogs were most likely to be walked once per d or more ( P  < 0·001), whilst smaller dogs were more likely to meet their UK Kennel Club guidelines for dog walking ( P  < 0·001). The frequency of dog walking varies both within and amongst breeds, and many do not currently receive the recommended amount of exercise. This may constitute a canine welfare problem and also have an impact on the physical activity levels of their owners.

  18. Bilateral ectrodactyly and spinal deformation in a mixed-breed dog.

    PubMed

    Carvallo, Francisco R; Domínguez, Antonio S; Morales, Pamela C

    2011-01-01

    A 3-year-old, female mixed-breed dog had malformations of both thoracic limbs and the vertebral column. Radiographs of the forelimbs showed bilateral development of 2 digits and aplasia of 3 carpal bones. Kyphosis, scoliosis, and deformed vertebrae were present in the thoracolumbar vertebral column.

  19. Using multiple markers to elucidate the ancient, historical and modern relationships among North American Arctic dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S K; Darwent, C M; Wictum, E J; Sacks, B N

    2015-01-01

    Throughout most of the Americas, post-colonial dogs largely erased the genetic signatures of pre-historical dogs. However, the North American Arctic harbors dogs that are potentially descended from pre-historical ancestors, as well as those affected by post-colonial translocations and admixtures. In particular, Inuit dogs from Canada and Greenland are thought to descend from dogs associated with Thule peoples, who relied on them for transportation ca. 1000 years ago. Whether Thule dogs reflected an earlier colonization by Paleoeskimo dogs ca. 4500 years ago is unknown. During the Alaskan Gold Rush, additional sled dogs, possibly of post-colonial derivation, the Alaskan Husky, Malamute and Siberian Husky, were used in the Arctic. The genealogical relationships among and origins of these breeds are unknown. Here we use autosomal, paternal and maternal DNA markers to (1) test the hypothesis that Inuit dogs have retained their indigenous ancestry, (2) characterize their relationship to one another and to other Arctic breeds, and (3) estimate the age of North American indigenous matrilines and patrilines. On the basis of the agreement of all three markers we determined that Inuit dogs have maintained their indigenous nature, and that they likely derive from Thule dogs. In addition, we provide support for previous research that the Inuit dogs from Canada and Greenland dog should not be distinguished as two breeds. The Alaskan Husky displayed evidence of European introgression, in contrast to the Malamute and Siberian Husky, which appear to have maintained most of their ancient Siberian ancestry. PMID:26103948

  20. Two years of combined high-intensity physical training and heat acclimatization affect lymphocyte and serum HSP70 in purebred military working dogs.

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Yaron; Aroch, Itamar; Eliav, Ady; Abbas, Atallah; Frank, Ilan; Kelmer, Efrat; Codner, Carolina; Segev, Gilad; Epstein, Yoram; Horowitz, Michal

    2014-07-15

    Military working dogs in hot countries undergo exercise training at high ambient temperatures for at least 9 mo annually. Physiological adaptations to these harsh conditions have been extensively studied; however, studies focusing on the underlying molecular adaptations are limited. In the current study, military working dogs were chosen as a model to examine the effects of superimposing endurance exercise on seasonal acclimatization to environmental heat stress. The lymphocyte HSP70 profile and extracellular HSP70 were studied in tandem with physiological performance in the dogs from their recruitment for the following 2 yr. Aerobic power and heat shock proteins were measured at the end of each summer, with physical performance tests (PPTs) in an acclimatized room (22°C). The study shows that together with a profound enhancement of aerobic power and physical performance, hsp72 mRNA induction immediately post-PPT and 45 min later, progressively increased throughout the study period (relative change in median lymphocyte hsp72 mRNA first PPT, 4.22 and 12.82; second PPT, 17.19 and 109.05, respectively), whereas induction of HSP72 protein was stable. These responses suggest that cellular/molecular adaptive tools for maintaining HSP72 homeostasis exist. There was also a significant rise in basal and peak median optical density extracellular HSP at the end of each exercise test (first PPT, 0.13 and 0.15; second PPT, 1.04 and 1.52, respectively). The relationship between these enhancements and improved aerobic power capacity is not yet fully understood. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Cuttable plate fixation for small breed dogs with radius and ulna fractures: Retrospective study of 31 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Gwyneth K.; Moens, Noel M.M.

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated complication rates for radius and ulna fractures in small breed dogs in which 1.5 mm to 2.7 mm cuttable bone plates were used for internal fixation. The medical records of all cases from 2004 to 2011 that were presented to our clinic were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: dogs with body weight < 9 kg, fracture of the radius and ulna with open reduction, and internal fixation utilizing a cuttable bone plate. Thirty-four fractures in 31 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Of 25 dogs that were available for follow-up, all achieved union, minor complications occurred in 9, and major complications occurred in 8. External coaptation was responsible for complications in 8 cases and the need for coaptation needs to be investigated. Excluding minor complications, 32% of patients required at least 1 additional surgery or additional hospitalization. All but 2 of the dogs returned to full function. The 1.5 mm straight plate was successfully used in all dogs with a body weight of 0.9 to 2.6 kg. PMID:28373730

  2. Cuttable plate fixation for small breed dogs with radius and ulna fractures: Retrospective study of 31 dogs.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Gwyneth K; Moens, Noel M M

    2017-04-01

    This retrospective study evaluated complication rates for radius and ulna fractures in small breed dogs in which 1.5 mm to 2.7 mm cuttable bone plates were used for internal fixation. The medical records of all cases from 2004 to 2011 that were presented to our clinic were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: dogs with body weight < 9 kg, fracture of the radius and ulna with open reduction, and internal fixation utilizing a cuttable bone plate. Thirty-four fractures in 31 dogs met the inclusion criteria. Of 25 dogs that were available for follow-up, all achieved union, minor complications occurred in 9, and major complications occurred in 8. External coaptation was responsible for complications in 8 cases and the need for coaptation needs to be investigated. Excluding minor complications, 32% of patients required at least 1 additional surgery or additional hospitalization. All but 2 of the dogs returned to full function. The 1.5 mm straight plate was successfully used in all dogs with a body weight of 0.9 to 2.6 kg.

  3. Frequency of DEA 1 antigen in 1037 mongrel and PUREBREED dogs in ITALY.

    PubMed

    Carli, E; Carminato, A; Ravagnan, S; Capello, K; Antognoni, M T; Miglio, A; Furlanello, T; Proverbio, D; Spada, E; Stefani, A; Mutinelli, F; Vascellari, M

    2017-11-29

    The prevalence of dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA 1) in canine population is approximately 40-60%. Often data are limited to a small number of breeds and/or dogs. The aims of this study were to evaluate frequency of DEA 1 in a large population of purebred and mongrel dogs including Italian native breeds and to recognize a possible association between DEA 1 and breed, sex, and genetic and phenotypical/functional classifications of breeds. Frequencies of DEA 1 blood group collected from screened/enrolled blood donors and from healthy and sick dogs were retrospectively evaluated. The breed and the sex were recorded when available. DEA 1 blood typing was assessed by immunocromatographic test on K3EDTA blood samples. The prevalence of DEA 1 antigen was statistically related to breed, gender, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) and genotypic grouping. Sixty-two per cent dogs resulted DEA 1+ and 38% DEA 1-. DEA 1- was statistically associated with Dogo Argentino, Dobermann, German Shepherd, Boxer, Corso dogs, the molossian dogs, the FCI group 1, 2 and 3 and the genetic groups "working dogs" and "mastiff". DEA 1+ was statistically associated with Rottweiler, Briquet Griffon Vendéen, Bernese mountain dog, Golden Retriever, the hunting breeds, the FCI group 4, 6, 7 and 8 and the genetic groups "scent hounds" and "retrievers". No gender association was observed. Data obtained by this work may be clinically useful to drive blood donor enrollment and selection among different breeds.

  4. Deafness prevalence and pigmentation and gender associations in dog breeds at risk.

    PubMed

    Strain, George M

    2004-01-01

    Hearing function was tested in dogs from breeds at risk for pigment-associated congenital sensorineural deafness - Dalmatian, English setter (ES), English cocker spaniel (ECS), bull terrier (BT), Australian cattle dog (ACD), whippet, Catahoula leopard dog, and Jack Russell terrier. Deafness prevalence was highest in Dalmatians and lowest in ECS. Phenotype correlation studies were performed in breeds with >100 brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) tested subjects. No gender differences were observed. No differences were seen between black- and liver-spotted Dalmatians, among the ES roan colour varieties, among the ECS parti varieties, or among the ACD colour varieties. Blue eyes were positively associated and patches were negatively associated with deafness in the Dalmatian. Blue eyes were also associated with deafness in the ES and ECS. White BT were more likely than coloured BT to be deaf. Having one or more parent's ear deaf was positively associated with deafness in Dalmatians, ES, and ECS.

  5. Breeding policies and management of pedigree dogs in 15 national kennel clubs.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Laloë, D; Missant, F M; Malm, S; Lewis, T; Verrier, E; Strandberg, E; Bonnett, B N; Leroy, G

    2018-04-01

    To improve the health and welfare of pedigree dogs, national kennel clubs (KCs) are key players in the governance and regulation of dog breeding. In a survey conducted to investigate differences between KCs in breeding policies and management of pedigree dogs, a questionnaire was completed by 15 KCs from 11 European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom) and four non-European countries (Australia, Mexico, Uruguay and the USA). The most important concerns reported by KCs were exaggerated morphological features and inherited disorders. A wide variety of information, tools and strategies was used to address these issues, with implementation differing across countries and breeds. KCs reported progress in the collection and provision of information related to canine health and welfare. Implementation of advanced breeding tools, such as genetic evaluation and online advisory mating tools, and balanced breeding strategies, endorsed by clubs and breeders, remain challenging and require further development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Commonalities in Development of Pure Breeds and Population Isolates Revealed in the Genome of the Sardinian Fonni's Dog

    PubMed Central

    Dreger, Dayna L.; Davis, Brian W.; Cocco, Raffaella; Sechi, Sara; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Parker, Heidi G.; Polli, Michele; Marelli, Stefano P.; Crepaldi, Paola; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    The island inhabitants of Sardinia have long been a focus for studies of complex human traits due to their unique ancestral background and population isolation reflecting geographic and cultural restriction. Population isolates share decreased genomic diversity, increased linkage disequilibrium, and increased inbreeding coefficients. In many regions, dogs and humans have been exposed to the same natural and artificial forces of environment, growth, and migration. Distinct dog breeds have arisen through human-driven selection of characteristics to meet an ideal standard of appearance and function. The Fonni’s Dog, an endemic dog population on Sardinia, has not been subjected to an intensive system of artificial selection, but rather has developed alongside the human population of Sardinia, influenced by geographic isolation and unregulated selection based on its environmental adaptation and aptitude for owner-desired behaviors. Through analysis of 28 dog breeds, represented with whole-genome sequences from 13 dogs and ∼170,000 genome-wide single nucleotide variants from 155 dogs, we have produced a genomic illustration of the Fonni’s Dog. Genomic patterns confirm within-breed similarity, while population and demographic analyses provide spatial identity of Fonni’s Dog to other Mediterranean breeds. Investigation of admixture and fixation indices reveals insights into the involvement of Fonni’s Dogs in breed development throughout the Mediterranean. We describe how characteristics of population isolates are reflected in dog breeds that have undergone artificial selection, and are mirrored in the Fonni’s Dog through traditional isolating factors that affect human populations. Lastly, we show that the genetic history of Fonni’s Dog parallels demographic events in local human populations. PMID:27519604

  7. Commonalities in Development of Pure Breeds and Population Isolates Revealed in the Genome of the Sardinian Fonni's Dog.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Dayna L; Davis, Brian W; Cocco, Raffaella; Sechi, Sara; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Parker, Heidi G; Polli, Michele; Marelli, Stefano P; Crepaldi, Paola; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-10-01

    The island inhabitants of Sardinia have long been a focus for studies of complex human traits due to their unique ancestral background and population isolation reflecting geographic and cultural restriction. Population isolates share decreased genomic diversity, increased linkage disequilibrium, and increased inbreeding coefficients. In many regions, dogs and humans have been exposed to the same natural and artificial forces of environment, growth, and migration. Distinct dog breeds have arisen through human-driven selection of characteristics to meet an ideal standard of appearance and function. The Fonni's Dog, an endemic dog population on Sardinia, has not been subjected to an intensive system of artificial selection, but rather has developed alongside the human population of Sardinia, influenced by geographic isolation and unregulated selection based on its environmental adaptation and aptitude for owner-desired behaviors. Through analysis of 28 dog breeds, represented with whole-genome sequences from 13 dogs and ∼170,000 genome-wide single nucleotide variants from 155 dogs, we have produced a genomic illustration of the Fonni's Dog. Genomic patterns confirm within-breed similarity, while population and demographic analyses provide spatial identity of Fonni's Dog to other Mediterranean breeds. Investigation of admixture and fixation indices reveals insights into the involvement of Fonni's Dogs in breed development throughout the Mediterranean. We describe how characteristics of population isolates are reflected in dog breeds that have undergone artificial selection, and are mirrored in the Fonni's Dog through traditional isolating factors that affect human populations. Lastly, we show that the genetic history of Fonni's Dog parallels demographic events in local human populations. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Modification of the contact area of a standard force platform and runway for small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Kapatkin, A S; Kim, J Y W; Garcia-Nolan, T C; Kim, S Y; Hayashi, K; Hitchens, P L; Stover, S M

    2014-01-01

    To develop a platform that used standard size force plates for large breed dogs to capture ground reaction force data from any size dog. A walkway platform was constructed to accommodate two force plates (60 cm x 40 cm) positioned in series to a variety of smaller sizes. It was constructed from a custom wood frame with thick aluminium sheet force plate covers that prevented transfer of load to the force plate, except for rectangular windows of three different dimensions. A friction study was performed to ensure plates did not translate relative to one another during gait trials. A prospective, observational, single crossover study design was used to compare the effect of force platform configuration (full plate size [original plate], half plate size [modified plate]) on ground reaction forces using eight adult healthy Labrador Retriever dogs. Slippage of the steel plate on the force plate did not occur. Peak propulsion force was the only kinetic variable statistically different between the full size and half sized platforms. There were no clinically significant differences between the full and half force platforms for the variables and dogs studied. The modified force platform allows the original 60 x 40 cm force plate to be adjusted effectively to a 30 x 40 cm, 20 x 40 cm and 15 x 40 cm sized plate with no clinically significant change in kinetic variables. This modification that worked for large breed dogs will potentially allow kinetic analysis of a large variety of dogs with different stride lengths.

  9. Genomic evaluation of both purebred and crossbred performances

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background For a two-breed crossbreeding system, Wei and van der Werf presented a model for genetic evaluation using information from both purebred and crossbred animals. The model provides breeding values for both purebred and crossbred performances. Genomic evaluation incorporates marker genotypes into a genetic evaluation system. Among popular methods are the so-called single-step methods, in which marker genotypes are incorporated into a traditional animal model by using a combined relationship matrix that extends the marker-based relationship matrix to non-genotyped animals. However, a single-step method for genomic evaluation of both purebred and crossbred performances has not been developed yet. Results An extension of the Wei and van der Werf model that incorporates genomic information is presented. The extension consists of four steps: (1) the Wei van der Werf model is reformulated using two partial relationship matrices for the two breeds; (2) marker-based partial relationship matrices are constructed; (3) marker-based partial relationship matrices are adjusted to be compatible to pedigree-based partial relationship matrices and (4) combined partial relationship matrices are constructed using information from both pedigree and marker genotypes. The extension of the Wei van der Werf model can be implemented using software that allows inverse covariance matrices in sparse format as input. Conclusions A method for genomic evaluation of both purebred and crossbred performances was developed for a two-breed crossbreeding system. The method allows information from crossbred animals to be incorporated in a coherent manner for such crossbreeding systems. PMID:24666469

  10. Effect of breed on body composition and comparison between various methods to estimate body composition in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jeusette, I; Greco, D; Aquino, F; Detilleux, J; Peterson, M; Romano, V; Torre, C

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this clinical study were firstly, to assess the effects of breed/genetic group on body composition in dogs using Dual-X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) as the reference method and secondly, to check, in clinical field conditions, if methods easy to apply in veterinary practice [bioelectrical impedance (BIA), morphometric equations, body condition score and body mass index] can give similar body composition results to DEXA results, using canine breeds with very different genetic and morphologic backgrounds. 19 dogs from 6 breeds with different genetic origin were used. Results showed that breed differences exist regarding body composition in dogs. Body condition score and morphometric equation should be developed by breed or by groups of breeds for an accurate estimation of body composition of the various breeds of dogs with a different genetic background or morphology. Any of the other tested methodologies (BIA or morphometric equations) gave results in agreement with DEXA value, when dogs with different genetic background and morphologic characteristics are used, but BIA, eventually in combination with morphometric measurements, could be a method to develop to estimate fat-free mass in dogs of different breeds. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Test of Canine Olfactory Capacity: Comparing Various Dog Breeds and Wolves in a Natural Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, Zita; Kinnunen, Mari; Újváry, Dóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Many dog breeds are bred specifically for increased performance in scent-based tasks. Whether dogs bred for this purpose have higher olfactory capacities than other dogs, or even wolves with whom they share a common ancestor, has not yet been studied. Indeed, there is no standard test for assessing canine olfactory ability. This study aimed to create a simple procedure that requires no pre-training and to use it to measure differences in olfactory capacity across four groups of canines: (1) dog breeds that have been selected for their scenting ability; (2) dog breeds that have been bred for other purposes; (3) dog breeds with exaggerated short-nosed features; and (4) hand-reared grey wolves. The procedure involved baiting a container with raw turkey meat and placing it under one of four identical ceramic pots. Subjects were led along the row of pots and were tasked with determining by olfaction alone which of them contained the bait. There were five levels of increasing difficulty determined by the number of holes on the container’s lid. A subsample of both dogs and wolves was retested to assess reliability. The results showed that breeds selected for scent work were better than both short-nosed and non-scent breeds. In the most difficult level, wolves and scenting breeds performed better than chance, while non-scenting and short-nosed breeds did not. In the retested samples wolves improved their success; however, dogs showed no change in their performances indicating that a single test may be reliable enough to assess their capacity. Overall, we revealed measurable differences between dog breeds in their olfactory abilities and suggest that the Natural Detection Task is a good foundation for developing an efficient way of quantifying them. PMID:27152412

  12. A Test of Canine Olfactory Capacity: Comparing Various Dog Breeds and Wolves in a Natural Detection Task.

    PubMed

    Polgár, Zita; Kinnunen, Mari; Újváry, Dóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta

    2016-01-01

    Many dog breeds are bred specifically for increased performance in scent-based tasks. Whether dogs bred for this purpose have higher olfactory capacities than other dogs, or even wolves with whom they share a common ancestor, has not yet been studied. Indeed, there is no standard test for assessing canine olfactory ability. This study aimed to create a simple procedure that requires no pre-training and to use it to measure differences in olfactory capacity across four groups of canines: (1) dog breeds that have been selected for their scenting ability; (2) dog breeds that have been bred for other purposes; (3) dog breeds with exaggerated short-nosed features; and (4) hand-reared grey wolves. The procedure involved baiting a container with raw turkey meat and placing it under one of four identical ceramic pots. Subjects were led along the row of pots and were tasked with determining by olfaction alone which of them contained the bait. There were five levels of increasing difficulty determined by the number of holes on the container's lid. A subsample of both dogs and wolves was retested to assess reliability. The results showed that breeds selected for scent work were better than both short-nosed and non-scent breeds. In the most difficult level, wolves and scenting breeds performed better than chance, while non-scenting and short-nosed breeds did not. In the retested samples wolves improved their success; however, dogs showed no change in their performances indicating that a single test may be reliable enough to assess their capacity. Overall, we revealed measurable differences between dog breeds in their olfactory abilities and suggest that the Natural Detection Task is a good foundation for developing an efficient way of quantifying them.

  13. Genetic structure in village dogs reveals a Central Asian domestication origin

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Laura M.; Boyko, Ryan H.; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Elizabeth; Hayward, Jessica J.; McLean, Corin; White, Michelle E.; Abi Said, Mounir; Anita, Baddley A.; Bondjengo, Nono Ikombe; Calero, Jorge; Galov, Ana; Hedimbi, Marius; Imam, Bulu; Khalap, Rajashree; Lally, Douglas; Masta, Andrew; Oliveira, Kyle C.; Pérez, Lucía; Randall, Julia; Tam, Nguyen Minh; Trujillo-Cornejo, Francisco J.; Valeriano, Carlos; Sutter, Nathan B.; Todhunter, Rory J.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Dogs were the first domesticated species, originating at least 15,000 y ago from Eurasian gray wolves. Dogs today consist primarily of two specialized groups—a diverse set of nearly 400 pure breeds and a far more populous group of free-ranging animals adapted to a human commensal lifestyle (village dogs). Village dogs are more genetically diverse and geographically widespread than purebred dogs making them vital for unraveling dog population history. Using a semicustom 185,805-marker genotyping array, we conducted a large-scale survey of autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y chromosome diversity in 4,676 purebred dogs from 161 breeds and 549 village dogs from 38 countries. Geographic structure shows both isolation and gene flow have shaped genetic diversity in village dog populations. Some populations (notably those in the Neotropics and the South Pacific) are almost completely derived from European stock, whereas others are clearly admixed between indigenous and European dogs. Importantly, many populations—including those of Vietnam, India, and Egypt—show minimal evidence of European admixture. These populations exhibit a clear gradient of short-range linkage disequilibrium consistent with a Central Asian domestication origin. PMID:26483491

  14. Congenital heart disease in boxer dogs: results of 6 years of breed screening.

    PubMed

    Bussadori, Claudio; Pradelli, Danitza; Borgarelli, Michele; Chiavegato, David; D'Agnolo, Gino; Menegazzo, Lucia; Migliorini, Francesco; Santilli, Roberto; Zani, Alessandro; Quintavalla, Cecilia

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the results of 6years (1999-2004) of mandatory breed screening for congenital heart disease in Boxer dogs using physical examination and echocardiography. Records of 1283 Boxers were reviewed and 165 dogs (12.86%) were found to be affected by heart disease, with aortic and pulmonic stenosis being the most frequent cardiac lesions. Comparison of these results with those of a previous survey showed a lower overall prevalence of both outflow obstructions, particularly of the more severe forms. A male predisposition for both aortic and pulmonic stenosis was evident from the study. Consistent with reports from other countries, soft left basilar heart murmurs were detected in both healthy dogs and dogs affected with congenital heart disease.

  15. A longitudinal study on diarrhoea and vomiting in young dogs of four large breeds.

    PubMed

    Sævik, Bente K; Skancke, Ellen M; Trangerud, Cathrine

    2012-02-02

    Prospective studies to document the occurrence of canine diarrhoea and vomiting are relatively scarce in dogs, and the majority of published studies are based on information from clinical records. This study investigates the incidence risk of diarrhoea and vomiting as well as potential risk factors. A cohort study of 585 privately owned dogs of four breeds: Newfoundland, Labrador retriever, Leonberger, and Irish wolfhound. The owners maintained a continuous log regarding housing, exercise, nutrition, and health of their dogs. Episodes of diarrhoea and vomiting were recorded in a consecutive manner in a booklet. The owners completed the questionnaires and reported information at three, four, six, 12, 18, and 24/25 months of age, called observational ages.Associations with potential risk factors for diarrhoea and vomiting were investigated in separate generalized estimating equation analyses. The incidence of both diarrhoea and vomiting was influenced by breed. Both diarrhoea and vomiting were relatively common in young dogs, occurring most frequently during the first months of life. After three months of age, the odds of diarrhoea were significantly lower when compared to the observational period seven weeks to three months (OR ranging from 0.31 to 0.70 depending on the period). More males than females suffered from diarrhoea (OR = 1.42). The occurrence of diarrhoea was more common in dogs that also experienced episode(s) of vomiting during the study period (OR = 5.43) and vice versa (OR = 5.50). In the majority of dogs episodes of diarrhoea and vomiting did not occur at the same time. Dogs in urban areas had higher odds (OR = 1.88) of getting diarrhoea compared to dogs living in rural areas. The occurrence of both diarrhoea and vomiting demonstrated a seasonal variation with higher incidence during the summer months. Both diarrhoea and vomiting occurred most frequently during the first months of life. The incidence of diarrhoea and vomiting was significantly

  16. A longitudinal study on diarrhoea and vomiting in young dogs of four large breeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prospective studies to document the occurrence of canine diarrhoea and vomiting are relatively scarce in dogs, and the majority of published studies are based on information from clinical records. This study investigates the incidence risk of diarrhoea and vomiting as well as potential risk factors. Methods A cohort study of 585 privately owned dogs of four breeds: Newfoundland, Labrador retriever, Leonberger, and Irish wolfhound. The owners maintained a continuous log regarding housing, exercise, nutrition, and health of their dogs. Episodes of diarrhoea and vomiting were recorded in a consecutive manner in a booklet. The owners completed the questionnaires and reported information at three, four, six, 12, 18, and 24/25 months of age, called observational ages. Associations with potential risk factors for diarrhoea and vomiting were investigated in separate generalized estimating equation analyses. Results The incidence of both diarrhoea and vomiting was influenced by breed. Both diarrhoea and vomiting were relatively common in young dogs, occurring most frequently during the first months of life. After three months of age, the odds of diarrhoea were significantly lower when compared to the observational period seven weeks to three months (OR ranging from 0.31 to 0.70 depending on the period). More males than females suffered from diarrhoea (OR = 1.42). The occurrence of diarrhoea was more common in dogs that also experienced episode(s) of vomiting during the study period (OR = 5.43) and vice versa (OR = 5.50). In the majority of dogs episodes of diarrhoea and vomiting did not occur at the same time. Dogs in urban areas had higher odds (OR = 1.88) of getting diarrhoea compared to dogs living in rural areas. The occurrence of both diarrhoea and vomiting demonstrated a seasonal variation with higher incidence during the summer months. Conclusion Both diarrhoea and vomiting occurred most frequently during the first months of life. The incidence of

  17. Spatial assessment of wolf-dog hybridization in a single breeding period

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, C.; López-Bao, J. V.; García, E. J.; Lema, F. J.; Llaneza, L.; Palacios, V.; Godinho, R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of wolf-dog hybridization and delineating evidence-based conservation strategies requires information on the spatial extent of wolf-dog hybridization in real-time, which remains largely unknown. We collected 332 wolf-like scats over ca. 5,000km2 in the NW Iberian Peninsula to evaluate wolf-dog hybridization at population level in a single breeding/pup-rearing season. Mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) and 18 ancestry informative markers were used for species and individual identification, and to detect wolf-dog hybrids. Genetic relatedness was assessed between hybrids and wolves. We identified 130 genotypes, including 67 wolves and 7 hybrids. Three of the hybrids were backcrosses to dog whereas the others were backcrosses to wolf, the latter accounting for a 5.6% rate of introgression into the wolf population. Our results show a previously undocumented scenario of multiple and widespread wolf-dog hybridization events at the population level. However, there is a clear maintenance of wolf genetic identity, as evidenced by the sharp genetic identification of pure individuals, suggesting the resilience of wolf populations to a small amount of hybridization. We consider that real-time population level assessments of hybridization provide a new perspective into the debate on wolf conservation, with particular focus on current management guidelines applied in wolf-dog hybridization events. PMID:28195213

  18. Plasma lipoprotein concentrations in the dog: the effects of gender, age, breed and diet.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, A; Luchetti, E; Cardini, G

    2008-12-01

    Earlier studies of canine lipoprotein metabolism have frequently not taken into account such variables as age, gender, lifestyle or feeding status. In the last years, many changes to lifestyle and feeding of dogs have occurred. In this study, C-tot, C-HDL, C-LDL, triglycerides and lipoprotein fractions were determined in 251 healthy dogs by means of enzymatic methods and through the electrophoretic technique. All data were analysed by multifactor anova test to determine which factors (age, gender, breed and diet) have a statistically significant effect (p < 0.05) on the determined parameter and subsequently Bonferroni's test was applied where necessary. Gender, age, breed and diet can significantly affect lipid metabolism, in particular lipoproteins involved in cholesterol plasma transport; on the contrary, triglycerides are not influenced by the same factors. The most important observation about age is the high level of C-LDL in puppies under 1 year of age. The highest cholesterol concentrations are found in Rottweiler but high values of plasma cholesterol are found also in Pyrenees Mountain dog and a great level of C-LDL in Labrador. Diet has shown a great influence on lipidic metabolism: dogs fed with different high-quality dry foods had significant differences in plasma cholesterol values (C-tot, C-HDL, C-LDL,), in particular, dogs fed with a diet rich in fish and fish-by-products have shown the lowest levels of C-tot, C-HDL and C-LDL.

  19. Clinical and Breed Characteristics of Idiopathic Head Tremor Syndrome in 291 Dogs: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Linda G.; Berezowski, John; Rishniw, Mark; Nibblett, Belle M.; Kelly, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To establish signalment and phenomenology of canine idiopathic head tremor syndrome (IHTS), an episodic head movement disorder of undetermined pathogenesis. Design. Retrospective case series. Animals. 291 dogs with IHTS diagnosed between 1999 and 2013. Procedures. Clinical information was obtained from an online community of veterinary information aggregation and exchange (Veterinary Information Network, 777 W Covell Boulevard, Davis, CA 95616) and conducted with their approval. Information on breed, sex, age of onset, tremor description, mentation during the event, effect of distractions and drugs, diagnostics, presence of other problems, and outcome was analyzed. Results. IHTS was found in 24 pure breeds. Bulldogs, Labrador Retrievers, Boxers, and Doberman Pinschers comprised 69%; mixed breeds comprised 17%. Average onset age was 29 months (range: 3 months to 12 years). First episode occurred before 48 months of age in 88%. Vertical (35%), horizontal (50%), and rotational (15%) movements were documented. Possible trigger events were found in 21%. Mentation was normal in 93%. Distractions abated the tremor in 87%. Most dogs did not respond to antiepileptic drugs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance. This retrospective study documents IHTS in many breeds including Labrador Retrievers, Boxers, and mixed breeds. PMID:26064776

  20. Long-term genetic selection reduced prevalence of hip and elbow dysplasia in 60 dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Keller, G. G.; Famula, T. R.

    2017-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and elbow dysplasia (ED) impact the health and welfare of all dogs. The first formally organized assessment scheme to improve canine health centered on reducing the prevalence of these orthopedic disorders. Phenotypic screening of joint conformation remains the currently available strategy for breeders to make selection decisions. The present study evaluated the efficacy of employing phenotypic selection on breed improvement of hips and elbows using the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals complete database spanning the 1970–2015 time period. Sixty breeds having more than 1000 unique hip evaluations and 500 elbow evaluations (1,056,852 and 275,129 hip and elbow records, respectively) were interrogated to derive phenotypic improvement, sex and age at time of assessment effects, correlation between the two joints, heritability estimates, estimated breeding values (EBV), and effectiveness of maternal/paternal selection. The data demonstrated that there has been overall improvement in hip and elbow conformation with a reduction in EBV for disease liability, although the breeds differed in the magnitude of the response to selection. Heritabilities also differed substantially across the breeds as did the correlation of the joints; in the absence of a universal association of these differences with breed size, popularity, or participation in screening, it appears that the breeds themselves vary in genetic control. There was subtle, though again breed specific, impact of sex and older ages on CHD and ED. There was greater paternal impact on a reduction of CHD. In the absence of direct genetic tests for either of these two diseases, phenotypic selection has proven to be effective. Furthermore, the data underscore that selection schemes must be breed specific and that it is likely the genetic profiles will be unique across the breeds for these two conditions. Despite the advances achieved with phenotypic selection, incorporation of EBVs into

  1. An International Genetic Survey of Breed-Specific Diseases in Working Dogs from the United States, Israel, and Poland.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Lisa G; Ramirez, Christina J; Phelps, Patricia; Aviram, Maya; Walczak, Marta; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila; Ballif, Blake C

    2017-01-01

    Genetic diseases occur in breeds used for law enforcement. As important team members, dogs are expected to operate at peak performance for several years and are significant investments for both the initial purchase and extensive, specialized training. Previous studies have not focused on causes for retirement or euthanasia as genetic (inherited) versus acquired (environmental). We performed direct mutational analysis for breed-specific conditions on samples from 304 dogs including 267 law enforcement (122 US, 87 Israeli, and 58 Polish) and 37 search and rescue dogs. Genetic testing identified 29% (n = 89) of the dogs tested to be carriers of a genetic mutation and 6% (n = 19) to be at risk for a debilitating inherited condition that may eventually impair the dog's ability to work. At-risk dogs included Labrador Retrievers (n = 4) with exercise-induced collapse, Bloodhounds (n = 2) with degenerative myelopathy (DM), and German Shepherd dogs with DM (n = 12) or leukocyte adhesion deficiency, type III (n = 1). A substantial number of working dogs were shown to be at risk for genetic conditions that may shorten the dog's career. The loss of dogs, due to early retirement or euthanasia, as a result of preventable genetic conditions has an emotional cost to handlers and financial cost to service organizations that can be avoided with genetic screening prior to breeding, buying, or training. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Characterization of human-dog social interaction using owner report.

    PubMed

    Lit, Lisa; Schweitzer, Julie B; Oberbauer, Anita M

    2010-07-01

    Dog owners were surveyed for observations of social behaviors in their dogs, using questions adapted from the human Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) pre-verbal module. Using 939 responses for purebred and mixed-breed dogs, three factors were identified: initiation of reciprocal social behaviors (INIT), response to social interactions (RSPNS), and communication (COMM). There were small or no effects of sex, age, breed group or training. For six breeds with more than 35 responses (Border Collie, Rough Collie, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Standard Poodle), the behaviors eye contact with humans, enjoyment in interactions with human interaction, and name recognition demonstrated little variability across breeds, while asking for objects, giving/showing objects to humans, and attempts to direct humans' attention showed higher variability across these breeds. Breeds with genetically similar backgrounds had similar response distributions for owner reports of dog response to pointing. When considering these breeds according to the broad categories of "herders" and "retrievers," owners reported that the "herders" used more eye contact and vocalization, while the "retrievers" used more body contact. Information regarding social cognitive abilities in dogs provided by owner report suggest that there is variability across many social cognitive abilities in dogs and offers direction for further experimental investigations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterisation of the main drivers of intra- and inter- breed variability in the plasma metabolome of dogs.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Amanda J; Beckmann, Manfred; Tailliart, Kathleen; Brown, Wendy Y; Draper, John; Allaway, David

    Dog breeds are a consequence of artificial selection for specific attributes. These closed genetic populations have metabolic and physiological characteristics that may be revealed by metabolomic analysis. To identify and characterise the drivers of metabolic differences in the fasted plasma metabolome and then determine metabolites differentiating breeds. Fasted plasma samples were collected from dogs maintained under two environmental conditions (controlled and client-owned at home). The former (n = 33) consisted of three breeds (Labrador Retriever, Cocker Spaniel and Miniature Schnauzer) fed a single diet batch, the latter (n = 96), client-owned dogs consisted of 9 breeds (Beagle, Chihuahua, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Golden Retriever, Greyhound, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever and Maltese) consuming various diets under differing feeding regimens. Triplicate samples were taken from Beagle (n = 10) and Labrador Retriever (n = 9) over 3 months. Non-targeted metabolite fingerprinting was performed using flow infusion electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry which was coupled with multivariate data analysis. Metadata factors including age, gender, sexual status, weight, diet and breed were investigated. Breed differences were identified in the plasma metabolome of dogs housed in a controlled environment. Triplicate samples from two breeds identified intra-individual variability, yet breed separation was still observed. The main drivers of variance in dogs maintained in the home environment were associated with breed and gender. Furthermore, metabolite signals were identified that discriminated between Labrador Retriever and Cocker Spaniels in both environments. Metabolite fingerprinting of plasma samples can be used to investigate breed differences in client-owned dogs, despite added variance of diet, sexual status and environment.

  4. Geometric analysis of macronutrient selection in breeds of the domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although many herbivores and omnivores have been shown to balance their intake of macronutrients when faced with nutritionally variable foods, study of this ability has been relatively neglected in carnivores, largely on the assumption that prey are less variable in nutrient composition than the foods of herbivores and omnivores and such mechanisms therefore unnecessary. We performed diet selection studies in 5 breeds of adult dog (Canis lupus familiaris) to determine whether these domesticated carnivores regulate macronutrient intake. Using nutritional geometry, we show that the macronutrient content of the diet was regulated to a protein:fat:carbohydrate ratio of approximately 30%:63%:7% by energy, a value that was remarkably similar across breeds. These values, which the analysis suggests are dietary target values, are based on intakes of dogs with prior experience of the respective experimental food combinations. On initial exposure to the diets (i.e., when naive), the same dogs self-selected a diet that was marginally but significantly lower in fat, suggesting that learning played a role in macronutrient regulation. In contrast with the tight regulation of macronutrient ratios, the total amount of food and energy eaten was far higher than expected based on calculated maintenance energy requirements. We interpret these results in relation to the evolutionary history of domestic dogs and compare them to equivalent studies on domestic cats. PMID:23243377

  5. Similar recent selection criteria associated with different behavioural effects in two dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Sundman, A-S; Johnsson, M; Wright, D; Jensen, P

    2016-11-01

    Selection during the last decades has split some established dog breeds into morphologically and behaviourally divergent types. These breed splits are interesting models for behaviour genetics since selection has often been for few and well-defined behavioural traits. The aim of this study was to explore behavioural differences between selection lines in golden and Labrador retriever, in both of which a split between a common type (pet and conformation) and a field type (hunting) has occurred. We hypothesized that the behavioural profiles of the types would be similar in both breeds. Pedigree data and results from a standardized behavioural test from 902 goldens (698 common and 204 field) and 1672 Labradors (1023 and 649) were analysed. Principal component analysis revealed six behavioural components: curiosity, play interest, chase proneness, social curiosity, social greeting and threat display. Breed and type affected all components, but interestingly there was an interaction between breed and type for most components. For example, in Labradors the common type had higher curiosity than the field type (F 1,1668 = 18.359; P < 0.001), while the opposite was found in goldens (F 1,897 = 65.201; P < 0.001). Heritability estimates showed considerable genetic contributions to the behavioural variations in both breeds, but different heritabilities between the types within breeds was also found, suggesting different selection pressures. In conclusion, in spite of similar genetic origin and similar recent selection criteria, types behave differently in the breeds. This suggests that the genetic architecture related to behaviour differs between the breeds. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  6. Cervical spine locking plate fixation for treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy in large breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    To describe indirect decompression by means of cervical spine locking plate (CSLP) fixation with vertebral distraction, discectomy, and cancellous block bone grafting in large breed dogs with single caudal cervical dynamic spondylotic lesions diagnosed by myelography with linear traction to the cervical spine, and contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Prospective clinical study. Dogs (n=12) with caudal cervical spondylotic myelopathy because of a single dynamic, traction-responsive lesion. Single, traction-responsive, caudal cervical spondylotic lesions were treated by vertebral distraction, discectomy, cancellous block bone grafting, and CSLP fixation. Follow-up was obtained by sequential recheck examination by the author or referring veterinarian or by telephone inquiries. Ten dogs had neurologic improvement after surgery. Indirect decompression by maintained distraction with cancellous block grafting and CSLP fixation was readily accomplished with less risk of blood loss or iatrogenic spinal cord injury than that associated with direct (ventral) decompression. There were no complications of graft intrusion, extrusion or subsidence, implant loosening, foraminal impingement, or end-plate failure. Two dogs that had satisfactory short-term recoveries developed clinical signs associated with adjacent segment disease and were euthanatized. At long-term follow-up, 8 dogs had satisfactory function, either a normal gait or one with slight to moderate proprioceptive deficits. CSLP fixation with cancellous block interbody grafting is an effective and perhaps safer method of treating single-level, traction-responsive cervical spondylosis in large breed dogs. CSLP fixation with interbody bone grafting is a viable alternative to other techniques for treatment of single-level, traction-responsive cervical spondylosis.

  7. The effect of radiological hip dysplasia and breed on survival in a prospective cohort study of four large dog breeds followed over a 10 year period.

    PubMed

    Krontveit, Randi I; Trangerud, Cathrine; Nødtvedt, Ane; Dohoo, Ian; Moe, Lars; Sævik, Bente K

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the effect of radiological hip and elbow dysplasia status and breed on overall survival in a cohort of four large dog breeds in Norway. Privately owned dogs of the Newfoundland (NF), Labrador Retriever (LR), Leonberger (LEO), and Irish Wolfhound (IW) breeds were followed prospectively from birth to 10 years of age. The age of death/euthanasia was registered. A total of 501 dogs from 103 litters were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to describe breed differences in survival times. The effects of radiological hip and elbow dysplasia status as well as breed were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. The variables 'sex' and 'living region' were explored as potential confounders. Among LRs, 60.2% of the dogs were still alive at 10 years of age, and the corresponding figures for NFs, LEOs, and IWs were 28.8%, 16.11%, and 6.4%, respectively. Radiological hip dysplasia status and breed were found to influence overall survival. Two different time-varying effects were observed in that with the IW the hazard of death increased linearly through time, while the effect of severe radiological hip dysplasia decreased logarithmically with time. Location influenced the death hazard and dogs living in suburban areas or cities had longer mean time to death and a lower hazard compared to dogs living in the countryside. Radiological elbow dysplasia status was not found to have an effect on overall survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MR-imaging of lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration in clinically sound German shepherd dogs compared to other breeds.

    PubMed

    Amort, Kerstin H; Ondreka, Nele; Rudorf, Heike; Stock, Kathrin F; Distl, Ottmar; Tellhelm, Bernd; Kramer, Martin; Wigger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    German shepherd dogs are overrepresented in the group of dogs with cauda equina compression syndrome due to degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. A congenital predisposition for early degeneration of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc has been suspected. Our aims were to assess the morphologic appearance of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc and the lumbosacral junction in healthy German shepherd dogs compared to other breeds and to evaluate for an early onset of degenerative changes. The lumbosacral spine of 110 clinically sound German shepherd dogs and 47 healthy dogs of other large breeds was examined using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The degeneration of every intervertebral disc was graded using an established classification system. Signal intensity of the entire lumbosacral disc and the nucleus pulposus was determined independently. Lumbosacral malalignment was assessed according to a previously described method. The findings for the German shepherd dogs were compared to those of the other breeds. Although most dogs were younger than 18 months at the date of examination, significantly higher grades of degeneration were detected for the lumbosacral intervertebral disc of German shepherd dogs (P < 0.003). Degeneration of the lumbosacral intervertebral disc was independent from findings in the other lumbar discs. We conclude that the German shepherd dog has a predisposition for degenerative changes in the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  9. Longevity and mortality of owned dogs in England.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D G; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of longevity represents a significant welfare opportunity for the domestic dog, given its unparalleled morphological diversity. Epidemiological research using electronic patient records (EPRs) collected from primary veterinary practices overcomes many inherent limitations of referral clinic, owner questionnaire and pet insurance data. Clinical health data from 102,609 owned dogs attending first opinion veterinary practices (n=86) in central and southeast England were analysed, focusing on 5095 confirmed deaths. Of deceased dogs with information available, 3961 (77.9%) were purebred, 2386 (47.0%) were female, 2528 (49.8%) were neutered and 1105 (21.7%) were insured. The overall median longevity was 12.0 years (IQR 8.9-14.2). The longest-lived breeds were the Miniature poodle, Bearded collie, Border collie and Miniature dachshund, while the shortest-lived were the Dogue de Bordeaux and Great Dane. The most frequently attributed causes of death were neoplastic, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The results of multivariable modelling indicated that longevity in crossbred dogs exceeded purebred dogs by 1.2 years (95% confidence interval 0.9-1.4; P<0.001) and that increasing bodyweight was negatively correlated with longevity. The current findings highlight major breed differences for longevity and support the concept of hybrid vigour in dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic and phenotypic variations of inherited retinal diseases in dogs: the power of within- and across-breed studies.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-01

    Considerable clinical and molecular variations have been known in retinal blinding diseases in man and also in dogs. Different forms of retinal diseases occur in specific breed(s) caused by mutations segregating within each isolated breeding population. While molecular studies to find genes and mutations underlying retinal diseases in dogs have benefited largely from the phenotypic and genetic uniformity within a breed, within- and across-breed variations have often played a key role in elucidating the molecular basis. The increasing knowledge of phenotypic, allelic, and genetic heterogeneities in canine retinal degeneration has shown that the overall picture is rather more complicated than initially thought. Over the past 20 years, various approaches have been developed and tested to search for genes and mutations underlying genetic traits in dogs, depending on the availability of genetic tools and sample resources. Candidate gene, linkage analysis, and genome-wide association studies have so far identified 24 mutations in 18 genes underlying retinal diseases in at least 58 dog breeds. Many of these genes have been associated with retinal diseases in humans, thus providing opportunities to study the role in pathogenesis and in normal vision. Application in therapeutic interventions such as gene therapy has proven successful initially in a naturally occurring dog model followed by trials in human patients. Other genes whose human homologs have not been associated with retinal diseases are potential candidates to explain equivalent human diseases and contribute to the understanding of their function in vision.

  11. Genetic and phenotypic variations of inherited retinal diseases in dogs: the power of within- and across-breed studies

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable clinical and molecular variations have been known in retinal blinding diseases in man and also in dogs. Different forms of retinal diseases occur in specific breed(s) caused by mutations segregating within each isolated breeding population. While molecular studies to find genes and mutations underlying retinal diseases in dogs have benefited largely from the phenotypic and genetic uniformity within a breed, within- and across-breed variations have often played a key role in elucidating the molecular basis. The increasing knowledge of phenotypic, allelic, and genetic heterogeneities in canine retinal degeneration has shown that the overall picture is rather more complicated than initially thought. Over the past 20 years, various approaches have been developed and tested to search for genes and mutations underlying genetic traits in dogs, depending on the availability of genetic tools and sample resources. Candidate gene, linkage analysis, and genome-wide association studies have so far identified 24 mutations in 18 genes underlying retinal diseases in at least 58 dog breeds. Many of these genes have been associated with retinal diseases in humans, thus providing opportunities to study the role in pathogenesis and in normal vision. Application in therapeutic interventions such as gene therapy has proven successful initially in a naturally occurring dog model followed by trials in human patients. Other genes whose human homologs have not been associated with retinal diseases are potential candidates to explain equivalent human diseases and contribute to the understanding of their function in vision. PMID:22065099

  12. Breed relationships facilitate fine-mapping studies: A 7.8-kb deletion cosegregates with Collie eye anomaly across multiple dog breeds

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Kukekova, Anna V.; Akey, Dayna T.; Goldstein, Orly; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Baysac, Kathleen C.; Mosher, Dana S.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2007-01-01

    The features of modern dog breeds that increase the ease of mapping common diseases, such as reduced heterogeneity and extensive linkage disequilibrium, may also increase the difficulty associated with fine mapping and identifying causative mutations. One way to address this problem is by combining data from multiple breeds segregating the same trait after initial linkage has been determined. The multibreed approach increases the number of potentially informative recombination events and reduces the size of the critical haplotype by taking advantage of shortened linkage disequilibrium distances found across breeds. In order to identify breeds that likely share a trait inherited from the same ancestral source, we have used cluster analysis to divide 132 breeds of dog into five primary breed groups. We then use the multibreed approach to fine-map Collie eye anomaly (cea), a complex disorder of ocular development that was initially mapped to a 3.9-cM region on canine chromosome 37. Combined genotypes from affected individuals from four breeds of a single breed group significantly narrowed the candidate gene region to a 103-kb interval spanning only four genes. Sequence analysis revealed that all affected dogs share a homozygous deletion of 7.8 kb in the NHEJ1 gene. This intronic deletion spans a highly conserved binding domain to which several developmentally important proteins bind. This work both establishes that the primary cea mutation arose as a single disease allele in a common ancestor of herding breeds as well as highlights the value of comparative population analysis for refining regions of linkage. PMID:17916641

  13. Breed relationships facilitate fine-mapping studies: a 7.8-kb deletion cosegregates with Collie eye anomaly across multiple dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heidi G; Kukekova, Anna V; Akey, Dayna T; Goldstein, Orly; Kirkness, Ewen F; Baysac, Kathleen C; Mosher, Dana S; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2007-11-01

    The features of modern dog breeds that increase the ease of mapping common diseases, such as reduced heterogeneity and extensive linkage disequilibrium, may also increase the difficulty associated with fine mapping and identifying causative mutations. One way to address this problem is by combining data from multiple breeds segregating the same trait after initial linkage has been determined. The multibreed approach increases the number of potentially informative recombination events and reduces the size of the critical haplotype by taking advantage of shortened linkage disequilibrium distances found across breeds. In order to identify breeds that likely share a trait inherited from the same ancestral source, we have used cluster analysis to divide 132 breeds of dog into five primary breed groups. We then use the multibreed approach to fine-map Collie eye anomaly (cea), a complex disorder of ocular development that was initially mapped to a 3.9-cM region on canine chromosome 37. Combined genotypes from affected individuals from four breeds of a single breed group significantly narrowed the candidate gene region to a 103-kb interval spanning only four genes. Sequence analysis revealed that all affected dogs share a homozygous deletion of 7.8 kb in the NHEJ1 gene. This intronic deletion spans a highly conserved binding domain to which several developmentally important proteins bind. This work both establishes that the primary cea mutation arose as a single disease allele in a common ancestor of herding breeds as well as highlights the value of comparative population analysis for refining regions of linkage.

  14. Breed differences in development of anti-insulin antibodies in diabetic dogs and investigation of the role of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Angela L; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Administration of insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs can stimulate an immune response, with a proportion of animals developing anti-insulin antibodies (AIA). For an IgG antibody response to occur, this would require B cell presentation of insulin peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes, in order to receive T-cell help for class switching. DLA genes are highly polymorphic in the dog population and vary from breed to breed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate AIA reactivity in diabetic dogs of different breeds and to investigate whether DLA genes influence AIA status. Indirect ELISA was used to determine serological reactivity to insulin in diabetic dogs, treated with either a porcine or bovine insulin preparation. DLA haplotypes for diabetic dogs were determined by sequence-based typing of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci. Significantly greater insulin reactivity was seen in treated diabetic dogs (n=942) compared with non-diabetic dogs (n=100). Relatively few newly diagnosed diabetic dogs (3/109) were found to be AIA positive, although this provides evidence that insulin autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in some cases. Of the diabetic dogs treated with a bovine insulin preparation, 52.3% (182/348) were AIA positive, compared with 12.6% (75/594) of dogs treated with a porcine insulin preparation, suggesting that bovine insulin is more immunogenic. Breeds such as dachshund, Cairn terrier, miniature schnauzer and Tibetan terrier were more likely to develop AIA, whereas cocker spaniels were less likely to develop AIA, compared with crossbreed dogs. In diabetic dogs, DLA haplotype DRB1*0015--DQA1*006--DQB1*023 was associated with being AIA positive, whereas the haplotype DLA-DRB1*006--DQA1*005--DQB1*007 showed an association with being AIA negative. These research findings suggest that DLA genes influence AIA responses in treated diabetic

  15. 9 CFR 151.3 - Application for certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... breeding. 151.3 Section 151.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Certification of Purebred Animals § 151.3 Application for certificate of pure breeding. An application for a...

  16. 9 CFR 151.3 - Application for certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... breeding. 151.3 Section 151.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Certification of Purebred Animals § 151.3 Application for certificate of pure breeding. An application for a...

  17. 9 CFR 151.3 - Application for certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... breeding. 151.3 Section 151.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Certification of Purebred Animals § 151.3 Application for certificate of pure breeding. An application for a...

  18. 9 CFR 151.3 - Application for certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... breeding. 151.3 Section 151.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Certification of Purebred Animals § 151.3 Application for certificate of pure breeding. An application for a...

  19. 9 CFR 151.3 - Application for certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... breeding. 151.3 Section 151.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Certification of Purebred Animals § 151.3 Application for certificate of pure breeding. An application for a...

  20. Prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1 in 7,414 Dogs in Italy.

    PubMed

    Medina Valentin, Anyela Andrea; Gavazza, Alessandra; Lubas, George

    2017-01-01

    The study aim was to establish the prevalence of DEA 1, the most immunogenic and clinically important blood group in canine blood transfusion, in 7,414 dogs from Italy. The potential sensitization risk following a first transfusion and the acute reaction risk following a second transfusion given without a cross-matching and blood typing test were also calculated. Dogs tested were purebred (4,798) and mongrel (2,616); 38.8% were DEA 1 negative and 61.2% were DEA 1 positive. High prevalence for DEA 1 positive blood type was found in Ariegeois and English Setter, whereas German Shepherd and Boxer had higher DEA 1 negative blood type. Breeds with blood type never reported before included French Brittany Spaniel and Pug showing a high prevalence of DEA 1 positive type, while French Bulldog and West Highland White Terrier were more often DEA 1 negative. Just 48.8% of purebred and 13.9% of mongrel dogs were considered as prospective blood donors based upon their blood type. Most of the breeds had a sensitization risk of 20.0-25.0%. Rottweiler and Ariegeois had less risk of sensitization (9.4 and 4.2%) and the minor risk of an acute transfusional reaction (0.9-0.2%). The prevalence of DEA 1 positive and negative dogs in Italy agrees with most of the data already reported in the literature.

  1. Prevalence of Dog Erythrocyte Antigen 1 in 7,414 Dogs in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The study aim was to establish the prevalence of DEA 1, the most immunogenic and clinically important blood group in canine blood transfusion, in 7,414 dogs from Italy. The potential sensitization risk following a first transfusion and the acute reaction risk following a second transfusion given without a cross-matching and blood typing test were also calculated. Dogs tested were purebred (4,798) and mongrel (2,616); 38.8% were DEA 1 negative and 61.2% were DEA 1 positive. High prevalence for DEA 1 positive blood type was found in Ariegeois and English Setter, whereas German Shepherd and Boxer had higher DEA 1 negative blood type. Breeds with blood type never reported before included French Brittany Spaniel and Pug showing a high prevalence of DEA 1 positive type, while French Bulldog and West Highland White Terrier were more often DEA 1 negative. Just 48.8% of purebred and 13.9% of mongrel dogs were considered as prospective blood donors based upon their blood type. Most of the breeds had a sensitization risk of 20.0–25.0%. Rottweiler and Ariegeois had less risk of sensitization (9.4 and 4.2%) and the minor risk of an acute transfusional reaction (0.9–0.2%). The prevalence of DEA 1 positive and negative dogs in Italy agrees with most of the data already reported in the literature. PMID:29147599

  2. What’s in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Lisa M.; Barber, Rebecca T.; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  3. What's in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Lisa M; Barber, Rebecca T; Wynne, Clive D L

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters.

  4. Whole-genome sequencing of six dog breeds from continuous altitudes reveals adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Xiao; Wang, Zhen; Li, Ning; Qiu, Feng; Xu, Ze; Yan, Dawei; Yang, Shuli; Jia, Jia; Kong, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zehui; Lu, Shaoxiong; Lian, Linsheng; Wu, Changxin; Wang, Xueyan; Li, Guozhi; Ma, Teng; Jiang, Qiang; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Jiaqiang; Liu, Baohong; Wei, Dongkai; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianfa; Yan, Yulin; Zhao, Guiying; Dong, Xinxing; Li, Mingli; Deng, Weidong; Leng, Jing; Wei, Chaochun; Wang, Chuan; Mao, Huaming; Zhang, Hao; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic environment imposes severe selective pressure on species living at high altitude. To understand the genetic bases of adaptation to high altitude in dogs, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 60 dogs including five breeds living at continuous altitudes along the Tibetan Plateau from 800 to 5100 m as well as one European breed. More than 150× sequencing coverage for each breed provides us with a comprehensive assessment of the genetic polymorphisms of the dogs, including Tibetan Mastiffs. Comparison of the breeds from different altitudes reveals strong signals of population differentiation at the locus of hypoxia-related genes including endothelial Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein 1 (EPAS1) and beta hemoglobin cluster. Notably, four novel nonsynonymous mutations specific to high-altitude dogs are identified at EPAS1, one of which occurred at a quite conserved site in the PAS domain. The association testing between EPAS1 genotypes and blood-related phenotypes on additional high-altitude dogs reveals that the homozygous mutation is associated with decreased blood flow resistance, which may help to improve hemorheologic fitness. Interestingly, EPAS1 was also identified as a selective target in Tibetan highlanders, though no amino acid changes were found. Thus, our results not only indicate parallel evolution of humans and dogs in adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, but also provide a new opportunity to study the role of EPAS1 in the adaptive processes. PMID:24721644

  5. Neuropharmacological lesion localization in idiopathic Horner's syndrome in Golden Retrievers and dogs of other breeds.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Katherine M; Williams, David L; Cherubini, Giunio B

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether idiopathic Horner's syndrome (HS) in Golden Retrievers is an exclusively preganglionic disorder based on denervation hypersensitivity pharmacological testing with phenylephrine. Medical records of dogs presented with HS between 2000 and 2012. Dogs presented with additional ocular or systemic signs were excluded. Clinical data examined included age, sex, duration of clinical signs, ancillary diagnostic test results, and time to mydriasis on topical ocular application of 1% phenylephrine. Lesions were diagnosed as postganglionic (mydriasis within 20 min) or preganglionic (mydriasis between 20 and 45 min). Medical records of 21 dogs of nine different breeds were included. An etiopathogenesis for Horner's syndrome was determined in five dogs, none of which were Golden Retrievers. All diagnoses correlated with pharmacological lesion localization. Ten Golden Retrievers were included (eight male and two female) with a mean age of 8.5 years (range: 4-13). Lesion localization was diagnosed as postganglionic in eight (mean: 10 min [range: 6-18]) and preganglionic in two Golden Retrievers (20 and 24 min). All cases were unilateral and had completely resolved within 15 weeks (range: 11-20). Recurrence was not reported in any of the patients. Idiopathic postganglionic HS was diagnosed in eight of 10 Golden Retrievers contradicting previous reports of a purely preganglionic localization. Etiopathogenesis of canine idiopathic HS remains to be determined; nevertheless, a vascular etiology cannot be excluded. Future studies using magnetic resonance angiography may aid in clarifying the pathogenesis. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  6. Anterior uveal spindle cell tumor in a blue-eyed mixed-breed dog.

    PubMed

    Olbertz, Letícia; Langohr, Ingeborg; Werner, Juliana; Pessoa, Lenita; Kiupel, Matti; Agnew, Dalen; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2013-07-01

    A female, eight-year-old, mixed-breed blue-eyed dog was presented for ophthalmic evaluation because its left eye had "changed color" one year previously. The before left eye was enucleated and submitted for evaluation. Histopathological analysis revealed an invasive neoplastic mass effacing most of the ventral aspect of the iris stroma. A diagnosis of an anterior uveal spindle cell tumor was made. Immunohistochemical results were strongly suggestive of a schwannoma, but some smooth muscle differentiation was also observed. Two and a half years after therapeutic enucleation there was no evidence of neoplasm recurrence or metastasis. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Candidate gene analysis of osteochondrosis in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Sevane, N; Dunner, S; Boado, A; Cañon, J

    2016-10-01

    Equine osteochondrosis (OC) is a frequent developmental orthopaedic disease with high economic impact on the equine industry and may lead to premature retirement of the animal as a result of chronic pain and lameness. The genetic background of OC includes different genes affecting several locations; however, these genetic associations have been tested in only one or few populations, lacking the validation in others. The aim of this study was to identify the genetic determinants of OC in the Spanish Purebred horse breed. For that purpose, we used a candidate gene approach to study the association between loci previously implicated in the onset and development of OC in other breeds and different OC locations using radiographic data from 144 individuals belonging to the Spanish Purebred horse breed. Of the 48 polymorphisms analysed, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the FAF1, FCN3 and COL1A2 genes were found to be associated with different locations of OC lesions. These data contribute insights into the complex gene networks underlying the multifactorial disease OC, and the associated SNPs could be used in a marker-assisted selection strategy to improve horse health, welfare and competitive lifespan. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  8. Birth weight and postnatal growth of pure-bred kittens.

    PubMed

    Moik, Katja; Kienzle, Ellen

    2011-10-01

    Data on body weight of pure-bred kittens (Maine Coon, Norwegian Forest Cat, Birman, Persian, Siamese/Oriental Shorthair Cat) from birth (n 245) to 12 weeks of age (n 135) were obtained from breeders. Absolute birth weight (in g) was higher in larger breeds than in smaller breeds, whereas relative birth weight (in % of mature female weight) tended to be higher in smaller breeds (Maine Coon 115 g, 2.3 %; Norwegian Forest Cat 106 g, 2.7 %; Birman 97 g, 2.8 %; Siamese 92 g, 2.8 %; Persian 82 g, 3.2 %). Relative birth weight was lower than that described in the literature for colony cats. Relative litter weight was highest in Norwegian Forest Cats (14.6 (SD 1.8) %; n 10) and lowest in Birmans (8.8 (SD 3.1) %, n 7; P < 0.05); the other breeds were in-between (11.9 (SD 2.0) %; n 19). Absolute growth was faster in larger breeds than in smaller breeds. In relation to expected mature weight, there was good agreement with data from colony cats but no clear-cut effect of breed size. There appeared to be a trend to an earlier onset of sexual dimorphism in larger breeds.

  9. Identification of novel genetic risk loci in Maltese dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and evidence of a shared genetic risk across toy dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Porter, Brian F; Vernau, Karen M; Keesler, Rebekah I; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L; Johnson, Gayle C; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10-7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10-7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10-11 and p = 2.5×10-7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated.

  10. Breed-specific incidence rates of canine primary bone tumors — A population based survey of dogs in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Anfinsen, Kristin P.; Grotmol, Tom; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Jonasdottir, Thora J.

    2011-01-01

    This is one of few published population-based studies describing breed specific rates of canine primary bone tumors. Incidence rates related to dog breeds could help clarify the impact of etiological factors such as birth weight, growth rate, and adult body weight/height on development of these tumors. The study population consisted of dogs within 4 large/giant breeds; Irish wolfhound (IW), Leonberger (LB), Newfoundland (NF), and Labrador retriever (LR), born between January 1st 1989 and December 31st 1998. Questionnaires distributed to owners of randomly selected dogs — fulfilling the criteria of breed, year of birth, and registration in the Norwegian Kennel Club — constituted the basis for this retrospective, population-based survey. Of the 3748 questionnaires received by owners, 1915 were completed, giving a response rate of 51%. Forty-three dogs had been diagnosed with primary bone tumors, based upon clinical examination and x-rays. The breeds IW and LB, with 126 and 72 cases per 10 000 dog years at risk (DYAR), respectively, had significantly higher incidence rates of primary bone tumors than NF and LR (P < 0.0001). Incidence rates for the latter were 11 and 2 cases per 10 000 DYAR, respectively. Pursuing a search for risk factors other than body size/weight is supported by the significantly different risks of developing primary bone tumors between similarly statured dogs, like NF and LB, observed in this study. Defining these breed-specific incidence rates enables subsequent case control studies, ultimately aiming to identify specific etiological factors for developing primary bone tumors. PMID:22210997

  11. Breed-specific incidence rates of canine primary bone tumors--a population based survey of dogs in Norway.

    PubMed

    Anfinsen, Kristin P; Grotmol, Tom; Bruland, Oyvind S; Jonasdottir, Thora J

    2011-07-01

    This is one of few published population-based studies describing breed specific rates of canine primary bone tumors. Incidence rates related to dog breeds could help clarify the impact of etiological factors such as birth weight, growth rate, and adult body weight/height on development of these tumors. The study population consisted of dogs within 4 large/giant breeds; Irish wolfhound (IW), Leonberger (LB), Newfoundland (NF), and Labrador retriever (LR), born between January 1st 1989 and December 31st 1998. Questionnaires distributed to owners of randomly selected dogs--fulfilling the criteria of breed, year of birth, and registration in the Norwegian Kennel Club--constituted the basis for this retrospective, population-based survey. Of the 3748 questionnaires received by owners, 1915 were completed, giving a response rate of 51%. Forty-three dogs had been diagnosed with primary bone tumors, based upon clinical examination and x-rays. The breeds IW and LB, with 126 and 72 cases per 10 000 dog years at risk (DYAR), respectively, had significantly higher incidence rates of primary bone tumors than NF and LR (P < 0.0001). Incidence rates for the latter were 11 and 2 cases per 10 000 DYAR, respectively. Pursuing a search for risk factors other than body size/weight is supported by the significantly different risks of developing primary bone tumors between similarly statured dogs, like NF and LB, observed in this study. Defining these breed-specific incidence rates enables subsequent case control studies, ultimately aiming to identify specific etiological factors for developing primary bone tumors.

  12. Key determinants of dog and cat welfare: behaviour, breeding and household lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Q; Overall, K L

    2014-04-01

    The changing role of companion animals, accompanied by changes in human lifestyle and demands, places them at risk of poor welfare. They are increasingly subjected to stressors that prevent the adequate expression of normal behaviour. Fear and anxiety often go unrecognised, leading to behavioural disorders that are accompanied by negative affective states and poor welfare. Irresponsible breeding practices result in increased incidences of inherited defects in pets, which adversely affect physical and mental aspects of welfare, either directly, through the anomaly itself, or indirectly, due to secondary effects. Increased urbanisation has resulted in smaller living spaces, higher population densities and longer working hours, all factors that affect the well-being of pets. A better understanding of animal behaviour by both pet owners and professionals, to more effectively meet the needs of dogs and cats and recognise their problems, should inform the formulation of objective welfare assessments to ensure a better quality of life for the animals. Responsible breeding practices that increase genetic diversity and select for traits that help dogs and cats fill their niche in a changing world should be based on evidence to minimise welfare risk.

  13. BOARD INVITED REVIEW: The purebred-crossbred correlation in pigs: A review of theory, estimates, and implications.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Y C J; Calus, M P L

    2017-08-01

    Pig and poultry production relies on crossbreeding of purebred populations to produce production animals. In those breeding schemes, selection takes place within the purebred population to improve crossbred performance (CB performance). The genetic correlation between purebred performance (PB performance) and CB performance () is, however, lower than unity for many traits. When is low, the use of CB performance in selection is required to achieve sizable genetic progress. The objectives of this paper were to describe the different components and importance of , and to review existing literature that report estimates in pigs. The has 3 components: 1) genotype by genotype interactions, 2) genotype by environment interactions, and 3) differences in trait measurements. We theoretically showed that direct selection for CB performance reduces the response to selection in purebreds for.

  14. Novel lipoprotein density profiling in healthy dogs of various breeds, healthy miniature schnauzers, and miniature schnauzers with hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism in clinical canine medicine, the fact that most previously used methods for lipoprotein profiling are rather laborious and time-consuming has been a major obstacle to the wide clinical application and use of lipoprotein profiling in this species. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of a continuous lipoprotein density profile (CLPDP) generated within a bismuth sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaBiEDTA) density gradient to characterize and compare the lipoprotein profiles of healthy dogs of various breeds, healthy Miniature Schnauzers, and Miniature Schnauzers with primary hypertriacylglycerolemia. A total of 35 healthy dogs of various breeds with serum triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesterol concentrations within their respective reference intervals were selected for use as a reference population. Thirty-one Miniature Schnauzers with serum TAG and cholesterol concentrations within their respective reference intervals and 31 Miniature Schnauzers with hypertriacylglyceridemia were also included in the study. Results The results suggest that CLPDP using NaBiEDTA provides unique diagnostic information in addition to measurements of serum TAG and cholesterol concentrations and that it is a useful screening method for dogs with suspected lipoprotein metabolism disorders. Using the detailed and continuous density distribution information provided by the CLPDP, important differences in lipoprotein profiles can be detected even among dogs that have serum TAG and cholesterol concentrations within the reference interval. Miniature Schnauzers with serum TAG and cholesterol concentrations within the reference interval had significantly different lipoprotein profiles than dogs of various other breeds. In addition, it was further established that specific lipoprotein fractions are associated with hypertriacylglyceridemia in Miniature Schnauzers. Conclusions The results of the

  15. Retinal dysplasia in American pit bull terriers--phenotypic characterization and breeding study.

    PubMed

    Rodarte-Almeida, Ana Carolina Veiga; Petersen-Jones, Simon; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Occelli, Laurence; Dornbusch, Peterson T; Shiokawa, Naoye; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inheritance and phenotype of retinal dysplasia (RD) in the American pit bull terrier. A breeding colony established from a single female pure-bred American pit bull terrier dog with RD. A female pure-bred American pit bull terrier with RD was donated to the Veterinary Hospital of Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil. A breeding colony was established and the phenotype and inheritance of the condition investigated. Regular ophthalmic examinations and fundus photography were performed on three generations of offspring from the founder animal. Some animals were additionally studied by optical coherence tomography. Ocular histopathology was performed on some animals from the colony. Fifty-seven offspring were produced in two generations from the affected founder female. Thirty-two were diagnosed with RD and showed a spectrum of severity of lesions including multifocal, and or geographic lesions and some developed retinal detachment. Histologic examination demonstrated retinal folds, rosettes, and areas of retinal detachment. The affected dogs were shorter in stature than the unaffected littermates. Breeding studies suggested the trait has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. DNA testing showed that the affected dogs were negative for the known gene mutations for canine dwarfism with RD. This is a report of a novel inherited form of RD that affects American pit bull terriers. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  16. 9 CFR 151.2 - Issuance of a certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS... issue a certificate of pure breeding for an animal claimed to be entitled to free entry under the act...

  17. 9 CFR 151.2 - Issuance of a certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS... issue a certificate of pure breeding for an animal claimed to be entitled to free entry under the act...

  18. 9 CFR 151.2 - Issuance of a certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS... issue a certificate of pure breeding for an animal claimed to be entitled to free entry under the act...

  19. 9 CFR 151.2 - Issuance of a certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS... issue a certificate of pure breeding for an animal claimed to be entitled to free entry under the act...

  20. 9 CFR 151.2 - Issuance of a certificate of pure breeding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS... issue a certificate of pure breeding for an animal claimed to be entitled to free entry under the act...

  1. Growth plate expression profiling: Large and small breed dogs provide new insights in endochondral bone formation.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Michelle; Riemers, Frank M; van Leenen, Dik; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Meij, Björn P; Alblas, Jacqueline; Penning, Louis C; Miranda-Bedate, Alberto; Tryfonidou, Marianna A

    2018-01-01

    The difference in the adult height of mammals, and hence in endochondral bone formation, is not yet fully understood and may serve to identify targets for bone and cartilage regeneration. In line with this hypothesis, the intra-species disparity between the adult height of Great Danes and Miniature Poodles was investigated at a transcriptional level. Microarray analysis of the growth plate of five Great Danes and five Miniature Poodles revealed 2,981 unique genes that were differentially expressed, including many genes with an unknown role in skeletal development. A signaling pathway impact analysis indicated activation of the cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction and the tight junction pathway, and inhibition of pathways associated with inflammation and the complement cascade. In additional validation steps, the gene expression profile of the separate growth plate zones for both dog breeds were determined. Given that the BMP signaling is known for its crucial role in skeletal development and fracture healing, and BMP-2 is used in orthopaedic and spine procedures for bone augmentation, further investigations concentrated on the BMP pathway.The canonical BMP-2 and BMP-6 signaling pathway was activated in the Great Danes compared to Miniature Poodles. In conclusion, investigating the differential expression of genes involved in endochondral bone formation in small and large breed dogs, could be a game changing strategy to provide new insights in growth plate development and identify new targets for bone and cartilage regeneration. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 36:138-148, 2018. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research® Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Influence of leash side and handlers on pressure mat analysis of gait characteristics in small-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Keebaugh, Audrey E; Redman-Bentley, Donna; Griffon, Dominique J

    2015-06-01

    To characterize the gait of small-breed dogs walked on a pressure walkway by handlers moving at a metronome-set tempo and to determine the influence of handler and leash side on gait characteristics. Prospective study. 5 healthy adult small-breed dogs weighing < 11.4 kg (25 lb). Dogs were walked by each of 5 handlers moving at a metronome-set tempo (100 beats/min). Velocity, cadence, stance time, number of activated sensors, total pressure index (TPI), left or right hind reach, and symmetry indices were obtained with the leash on the left and right sides of each dog for each handler. Coefficients of variation for TPI and stance time approximated 30%, whereas coefficients of variation for symmetry indices remained < 20%. Changing handlers and leash side did not influence hind limb variables. Changing handlers influenced the TPI of the forelimbs, inducing changes of up to 8%. Leash side accounted for 12% and 14% of the variation in symmetry indices of TPI and number of sensors activated between forelimbs, respectively (mean alterations for recorded variables, 9%). Symmetry indices appeared to vary less than variables obtained for individual dog limbs, and it may therefore be advantageous to determine those indices during large trials. Handlers or leash side may be changed in studies focusing on dogs' hind limbs without affecting results. Use of symmetry indices is recommended in forelimb studies requiring multiple handlers. Pressure walkway analyses of the forelimbs should include equal distribution of left- and right-sided leash-led trials, given that small-breed dogs tended to shift weight toward the forelimb opposite the leash.

  3. Breed distribution and history of canine mdr1-1Δ, a pharmacogenetic mutation that marks the emergence of breeds from the collie lineage

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Mark W.; Robertson, Kathryn R.; Wong, Aaron K.; Safra, Noa; Broman, Karl W.; Slatkin, Montgomery; Mealey, Katrina L.; Pedersen, Niels C.

    2004-01-01

    A mutation in the canine multidrug resistance gene, MDR1, has previously been associated with drug sensitivities in two breeds from the collie lineage. We exploited breed phylogeny and reports of drug sensitivity to survey other purebred populations that might be genetically at risk. We found that the same allele, mdr1-1Δ, segregated in seven additional breeds, including two sighthounds that were not expected to share collie ancestry. A mutant haplotype that was conserved among affected breeds indicated that the allele was identical by descent. Based on breed histories and the extent of linkage disequilibrium, we conclude that all dogs carrying mdr1-1Δ are descendants of a dog that lived in Great Britain before the genetic isolation of breeds by registry (ca. 1873). The breed distribution and frequency of mdr1-1Δ have applications in veterinary medicine and selective breeding, whereas the allele's history recounts the emergence of formally recognized breeds from an admixed population of working sheepdogs. PMID:15289602

  4. Serological and biomolecular survey on canine herpesvirus-1 infection in a dog breeding kennel

    PubMed Central

    BOTTINELLI, Marco; RAMPACCI, Elisa; STEFANETTI, Valentina; MARENZONI, Maria Luisa; MALMLOV, Ashley M; COLETTI, Mauro; PASSAMONTI, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Canine herpesvirus-1 (CaHV-1) is a globally distributed pathogen causing reproductive, respiratory, ocular and neurological disorders in adult dogs and neonatal death in puppies. This pathogen is considered poorly immunogenic, and neutralizing antibodies are found for only a short time following exposure. Further, seroprevalence can be affected by several epidemiological factors. A virological survey was conducted in a high-density population breeding kennel in Central Italy. There were several factors predisposing animals to CaHV-1 infection, such as age, number of pregnancies, experience with mating and dog shows, cases of abortion, management and environmental hygiene. Serum neutralization (SN) and nested PCR assays were used to estimate prevalence of CaHV-1. None of the submitted samples tested positive for nested PCR, and none of the sera tested CaHV-1 positive. No association was observed between antibody titers and risk factors, and no sign of viral reactivation was detected in either males or females. These results suggest that CaHV-1 is not circulating within this kennel and that further studies are needed in order to better understand the distribution of the virus within Italy. PMID:26726105

  5. Aging of Attentiveness in Border Collies and Other Pet Dog Breeds: The Protective Benefits of Lifelong Training.

    PubMed

    Chapagain, Durga; Virányi, Zsófia; Wallis, Lisa J; Huber, Ludwig; Serra, Jessica; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Aging of attentiveness affects cognitive functions like perception and working memory, which can seriously impact communication between dogs and humans, potentially hindering training and cooperation. Previous studies have revealed that aged laboratory beagles and pet Border collies (BC) show a decline in selective attention. However, much less is known about the aging of attentiveness in pet dogs in general rather than in specific breeds. Using 185 pet dogs (75 BC and 110 dogs of other breeds) divided into three age groups [late adulthood (6- < 8 year), senior (8- < 10 year) and geriatric (≥10 year)], we assessed the progress of aging of attentional capture, sustained and selective attention in older dogs in order to explore if prior results in BC are generalizable and to evaluate the influence of lifelong training on measures of attention. Each dog's lifelong training score (ranging from 0 to 52) was calculated from a questionnaire filled in by the owners listing what kinds of training the dog participated in during its entire life. Dogs were tested in two tasks; the first, measuring attentional capture and sustained attention toward two stimuli (toy and human); and the second, measuring selective attention by means of clicker training for eye contact and finding food on the floor. In the first task, results revealed a significant effect of age but no effect of lifelong training on latency to orient to the stimuli. Duration of looking decreased with age and increased with lifelong training. In the second task, while lifelong training decreased the latency of dogs to form eye contact, aged dogs needed longer to find food. BC did not differ from other dogs in any measures of attention except latency to find food. In conclusion, aged dogs showed a decline in attentional capture and sustained attention demonstrating that these tests are sensitive to detect aging of attentiveness in older pet dogs. Importantly, selective attention remained unchanged with age and

  6. Balanced selection on purebred and crossbred performance increases gain in crossbreds.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari, Hadi; Berg, Peer; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    2018-03-22

    Genomic selection can be applied to select purebreds for crossbred performance (CP). The average performance of crossbreds can be considered as the summation of two components, i.e. the breed average (BA) of the parental breeds and heterosis (H) present in crossbreds. Selection of pure breeds for CP based on genomic estimated breeding values for crossbred performance (GEBV-C) or for purebred performance (GEBV-P) may differ in their ability to exploit BA and H and can affect the merit of crossbreds in both the short and long term. Selection based on GEBV-C is beneficial for CP, because H in crossbreds is efficiently exploited, whereas selection on GEBV-P results in more genetic progress in pure breeds, which increases the BA component of CP. To investigate the outcome of selection on GEBV-C and GEBV-P in both the short and long term, a two-way crossbreeding program was simulated to test the following hypotheses: (1) does selection on GEBV-P result in higher long-term CP compared to selection on GEBV-C and (2) does selection on a combination of GEBV-P and GEBV-C lead to more long-term gain in CP than selection on either separately. We investigated the performance of crossbreds in a two-way crossbreeding program across 40 generations and considered different criteria to select purebred parents that ranged from selection on purebred performance to selection for CP with different weights on genomic evaluations based on purebred and CP. These criteria were compared under three genetic models to investigate the effects of the amount of dominance variance, absence of over-dominance, and the structure of the reference population on CP, both in the short and long term. Although beneficial in the short to medium term, genomic selection in pure breeds on a criterion that specifically targets CP was inferior to selection for purebred performance in the long term. A selection criterion that maximizes a combination of short- and long-term responses in CP, should improve the

  7. Human hospitalisations due to dog bites in Ireland (1998-2013): Implications for current breed specific legislation.

    PubMed

    Ó Súilleabháin, Páraic

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of the current breed specific legislation in Ireland by investigating all dog bite hospital admissions throughout Ireland since that legislation was introduced. Data for statistical analyses were acquired through the National Hospital In-Patient Enquiry Scheme. In years 1998-2013, a total of 3164 human hospitalisations (admissions for dog bite) occurred in Ireland. Incidence of hospitalisations increased over this period (P <0.001). Male humans were at greater risk than females of dog bite hospitalisation (P = 0.015). Children under 10 years were identified as an at-risk group. The present legislation is not effective as a dog bite mitigation strategy in Ireland and may be contributing to a rise in hospitalisations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the Criollo breed Romosinuano as purebred and crossbred cows with Brahman and Angus in Florida. II. Maternal influence on calf traits, cow weight, and measures of maternal efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objectives of this work were to compare the Criollo breed Romosinuano as straightbred and crossbred cows with Angus and Brahman in subtropical Florida and to estimate heterosis for size traits of their calves, their own weight, and maternal efficiency traits. Cows (n = 404) were born from 2002 ...

  9. Breed-Specific Hematological Phenotypes in the Dog: A Natural Resource for the Genetic Dissection of Hematological Parameters in a Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Szladovits, Balazs; Davison, Lucy J.; Garden, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    Remarkably little has been published on hematological phenotypes of the domestic dog, the most polymorphic species on the planet. Information on the signalment and complete blood cell count of all dogs with normal red and white blood cell parameters judged by existing reference intervals was extracted from a veterinary database. Normal hematological profiles were available for 6046 dogs, 5447 of which also had machine platelet concentrations within the reference interval. Seventy-five pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by 10 or more dogs. All measured parameters except mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) varied with age. Concentrations of white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, eosinophils and platelets, but not red blood cell parameters, all varied with sex. Neutering status had an impact on hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), MCHC, and concentrations of WBCs, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes and platelets. Principal component analysis of hematological data revealed 37 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, all hematological parameters except MCHC showed significant differences between specific individual breeds and the mixed breed group. Twenty-nine breeds had distinctive phenotypes when assessed in this way, of which 19 had already been identified by principal component analysis. Tentative breed-specific reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis. This study represents the first large-scale analysis of hematological phenotypes in the dog and underlines the important potential of this species in the elucidation of genetic determinants of hematological traits, triangulating phenotype, breed and genetic predisposition. PMID:24282579

  10. A proposed radiographic classification scheme for congenital thoracic vertebral malformations in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guevar, Julien; Stalin, Catherine; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Penderis, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations are common in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds such as French bulldogs, English bulldogs, Boston terriers, and pugs. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether a radiographic classification scheme developed for use in humans would be feasible for use in these dog breeds. Inclusion criteria were hospital admission between September 2009 and April 2013, neurologic examination findings available, diagnostic quality lateral and ventro-dorsal digital radiographs of the thoracic vertebral column, and at least one congenital vertebral malformation. Radiographs were retrieved and interpreted by two observers who were unaware of neurologic status. Vertebral malformations were classified based on a classification scheme modified from a previous human study and a consensus of both observers. Twenty-eight dogs met inclusion criteria (12 with neurologic deficits, 16 with no neurologic deficits). Congenital vertebral malformations affected 85/362 (23.5%) of thoracic vertebrae. Vertebral body formation defects were the most common (butterfly vertebrae 6.6%, ventral wedge-shaped vertebrae 5.5%, dorsal hemivertebrae 0.8%, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae 0.5%). No lateral hemivertebrae or lateral wedge-shaped vertebrae were identified. The T7 vertebra was the most commonly affected (11/28 dogs), followed by T8 (8/28 dogs) and T12 (8/28 dogs). The number and type of vertebral malformations differed between groups (P = 0.01). Based on MRI, dorsal, and dorso-lateral hemivertebrae were the cause of spinal cord compression in 5/12 (41.6%) of dogs with neurologic deficits. Findings indicated that a modified human radiographic classification system of vertebral malformations is feasible for use in future studies of brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  11. Is a local sample internationally representative? Reproducibility of four cognitive tests in family dogs across testing sites and breeds.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Dóra; Mills, Daniel S; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia; Miklósi, Ádám

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental precept of the scientific method is reproducibility of methods and results, and there is growing concern over the failure to reproduce significant results. Family dogs have become a favoured species in comparative cognition research, but they may be subject to cognitive differences arising from genetic (breeding lines) or cultural differences (e.g. preferred training methods). Such variation is of concern as it affects the validity and generalisability of experimental results. Despite its importance, this problem has not been specifically addressed to date. Therefore, we aimed to test the influence of three factors on reproducibility: testing site (proximal environment), breed and sex (phenotype). The same experimenter tested cognitive performance by more than 200 dogs in four experiments. Additionally, dogs' performance was tested in an obedience task administered by the owner. Breed of dog and testing site were found to influence the level of performance only mildly, and only in a means-end experiment and the obedience task. Our findings demonstrate that by applying the same test protocols on sufficiently large samples, the reported phenomena in these cognitive tests can be reproduced, but slight differences in performance levels can occur between different samples. Accordingly, we recommend the utilisation of well-described protocols supported by video examples of the whole experimental procedure. Findings should focus on the main outcome variables of the experiments, rather than speculating about the general importance of small or secondary performance outcomes which are more susceptible to random or local noise.

  12. Genetic and environmental effects on early growth and performance in purebred Holstein, Jersey, and reciprocal crossbred calves.

    PubMed

    Ware, J V; Franklin, S T; Jackson, J; McAllister, A J; Cassell, B G

    2015-02-01

    For this designed experiment, Holstein × Holstein (n=28), Jersey × Jersey (n=10), Holstein × Jersey (n=15), and Jersey × Holstein (n=15) bull and heifer calves were compared for body weight (BW), dry matter intake, feed efficiency, hip height, BW gain to 42 and 56 d, and days to weaning from birth to 8 wk. All traits were examined for purebred, maternal, and heterotic genetic effects. Purebred genetic effects significantly favored the Holstein breed for BW, dry matter intake, hip height, and BW gain to 42 and 56 d. Heterotic genetic effects were present for dry matter intake and hip height. Calf sex affected BW and BW gain to 56 d. Our results indicate that early calf growth is influenced primarily by purebred effects favoring the Holstein breed and to a lesser extent heterosis. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aging of Attentiveness in Border Collies and Other Pet Dog Breeds: The Protective Benefits of Lifelong Training

    PubMed Central

    Chapagain, Durga; Virányi, Zsófia; Wallis, Lisa J.; Huber, Ludwig; Serra, Jessica; Range, Friederike

    2017-01-01

    Aging of attentiveness affects cognitive functions like perception and working memory, which can seriously impact communication between dogs and humans, potentially hindering training and cooperation. Previous studies have revealed that aged laboratory beagles and pet Border collies (BC) show a decline in selective attention. However, much less is known about the aging of attentiveness in pet dogs in general rather than in specific breeds. Using 185 pet dogs (75 BC and 110 dogs of other breeds) divided into three age groups [late adulthood (6- < 8 year), senior (8- < 10 year) and geriatric (≥10 year)], we assessed the progress of aging of attentional capture, sustained and selective attention in older dogs in order to explore if prior results in BC are generalizable and to evaluate the influence of lifelong training on measures of attention. Each dog’s lifelong training score (ranging from 0 to 52) was calculated from a questionnaire filled in by the owners listing what kinds of training the dog participated in during its entire life. Dogs were tested in two tasks; the first, measuring attentional capture and sustained attention toward two stimuli (toy and human); and the second, measuring selective attention by means of clicker training for eye contact and finding food on the floor. In the first task, results revealed a significant effect of age but no effect of lifelong training on latency to orient to the stimuli. Duration of looking decreased with age and increased with lifelong training. In the second task, while lifelong training decreased the latency of dogs to form eye contact, aged dogs needed longer to find food. BC did not differ from other dogs in any measures of attention except latency to find food. In conclusion, aged dogs showed a decline in attentional capture and sustained attention demonstrating that these tests are sensitive to detect aging of attentiveness in older pet dogs. Importantly, selective attention remained unchanged with age and

  14. A Missense Mutation in SLC45A2 Is Associated with Albinism in Several Small Long Haired Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Wijesena, Hiruni R; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for a large deletion in the solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2) gene causes oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in the Doberman Pinscher breed. An albino Lhasa Apso did not have this g.27141_31223del (CanFam2) deletion in her SLC45A2 sequence. Therefore, SLC45A2 was investigated in this female Lhasa Apso to search for other possible variants that caused her albinism. The albino Lhasa Apso was homozygous for a nonsynonymous substitution in the seventh exon, a c.1478G>A base change that resulted in a glycine to aspartic acid substitution (p.G493D). This mutation was not found in a wolf, a coyote, or any of the 15 other Lhasa Apso dogs or 32 other dogs of breeds related to the Lhasa Apso. However, an albino Pekingese, 2 albino Pomeranians, and an albino mixed breed dog that was small and long haired were also homozygous for the 493D allele. The colored puppies of the albino Lhasa Apso and the colored dam of the 2 albino Pomeranians were heterozygous for this allele. However, an albino Pug was homozygous for the 493G allele and therefore although we suggest the 493D allele causes albinism when homozygous in several small, long haired dog breeds, it does not explain all albinism in dogs. A variant effect prediction for the albino Lhasa Apso confirms that p.G493D is a deleterious substitution, and a topology prediction for SLC45A2 suggests that the 11th transmembrane domain where the 493rd amino acid was located, has an altered structure. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A longitudinal study on growth and growth variables in dogs of four large breeds raised in domestic environments.

    PubMed

    Trangerud, C; Grøndalen, J; Indrebø, A; Tverdal, A; Ropstad, E; Moe, L

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to describe the growth patterns of 4 large dog breeds [Newfoundland (NF), Labrador retriever (LR), Leonberger (LEO), and Irish wolfhound (IW)] raised in domestic environments and concomitant changes in 2 growth-related clinical variables: total serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the circumference of the distal radius and ulna (CDRU). The second objective was to investigate whether these measurements were affected by a range of independent variables like age, sex, litter number, and birth weight. Seven hundred dogs were included in the study, and BW data, separated by breed and sex, were fitted to the Gompertz function. Birth weight, adjusted for litter number, differed significantly between sexes for 3 breeds (LEO, P = 0.004; NF, P = 0.02; LR, P = 0.009) and approached significance for IW (P = 0.07). Estimated mean BW increased rapidly during the first 100 d after birth in all 4 breeds, then plateaued, with maturity being reached between 351 (female LR) and 413 d (male NF). Estimated mature BW ranged from 30.8 kg for the female LR up to 65.7 kg for the male IW. Weight gain, as expressed by the derivative of the Gompertz function, reached its peak in the smallest breed (LR) at the youngest age, 89 d for the females and 95 d for males. Log-transformed BW was significantly related to age, breed, and sex, and the age x sex and age x breed interactions. Within breeds, age, birth weight, and litter number had a significant effect on log-transformed BW. The estimated average CDRU increased from 90 d of age toward a peak at 180 d. Thereafter, CDRU declined and stabilized at about 1 yr of age. The estimated total ALP concentrations decreased from 90 to 360 d of age, after which they stabilized, at mean concentrations varying among breeds from 98 to 131 IU/L. Maximum least squares mean total ALP concentrations were found at 3 mo of age in all breeds, with the greatest least squares mean concentration in the IW breed (713 IU/L). In a

  16. Using the incidence and impact of health conditions in guide dogs to investigate healthy ageing in working dogs.

    PubMed

    Caron-Lormier, G; England, G C W; Green, M J; Asher, L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to use retirement data from working guide dogs to investigate healthy ageing in dogs and the demographic factors that influence ageing. Using a dataset of 7686 dogs spanning 20 years, dogs withdrawn for health reasons before they reached retirement were identified. Cases of retirement for old age, rather than for health reasons, were also recorded, as was the length of working life for all dogs. Specific health reasons were grouped into 14 different health categories. The influence of purebred or crossbreed, breed, and sex on the incidence of these health categories and the length of working life within each health category was considered. The majority (n = 6465/7686; 84%) of working guide dogs were able to function as guide dogs until they had worked for 8.5 years, when they retired. This working life might constitute a reference for the different breeds considered, with the exception of the German shepherd dog, which had a shorter working life. The most common reason for health withdrawals was musculoskeletal conditions (n = 387/1362; 28%), mostly arthritis. Skin conditions (mostly comprised of cases of atopic dermatitis) reduced working life most commonly (mean, approximately 5 years). Nervous sensory conditions (35% of which were cases of epilepsy) reduced working life by 3 years. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetics of canine diabetes mellitus: are the diabetes susceptibility genes identified in humans involved in breed susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs?

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Brian; Adams, Jamie P; Holder, Angela L; Short, Andrea D; Ollier, William E R; Kennedy, Lorna J

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in companion animals, characterised by hyperglycaemia, glycosuria and weight loss, resulting from an absolute or relative deficiency in the pancreatic hormone insulin. There are breed differences in susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs, with the Samoyed breed being overrepresented, while Boxers are relatively absent in the UK population of diabetic dogs, suggesting that genetic factors play an important role in determining susceptibility to the disease. A number of genes, linked with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in humans, are associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus in dogs, some of which appear to be relatively breed-specific. Diabetes mellitus in dogs has been associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes (dog leucocyte antigen; DLA), with similar haplotypes and genotypes being identified in the most susceptible breeds. A region containing a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and several polymorphisms have been identified in the canine insulin gene, with some alleles associated with susceptibility or resistance to diabetes mellitus in a breed-specific manner. Polymorphisms in the canine CTLA4 promoter and in other immune response genes are associated with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in a number of pedigree breeds. Genome wide association studies are currently underway that should shed further light on the genetic factors responsible for the breed profile seen in the diabetic dog population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the occurrence of canine congenital sensorineural deafness in puppies of predisposed dog breeds using the brainstem auditory evoked response.

    PubMed

    Płonek, Marta; Giza, Elżbieta; Niedźwiedź, Artur; Kubiak, Krzysztof; Nicpoń, Józef; Wrzosek, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Canine congenital sensorineural deafness (CCSD) affects predisposed breeds of dogs and is primarily caused by an atrophy of the stria vascularis of the organ of Corti. The analysis of the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) is a reliable method for the evaluation of hearing in animals as it allows an accurate detection of unilateral or bilateral deafness. The occurrence of unilateral and bilateral deafness using the BAER was determined in a representative group of dogs in Poland, including Bull Terriers (n = 117), Australian Cattle Dogs (n = 62), English Setters (n = 32) and the Dogo Argentino (n = 32). Overall deafness, deafness in each dog breed and an association between deafness and phenotype were studied. Among the 243 dogs tested, 156 (81%) had a normal BAER, 27 (11%) were unilaterally deaf, and 12 (5%) were bilaterally deaf. The amplitudes and latencies of waves I, II, III, V, the V/I wave amplitude ratio, and wave I-V, I-III and III-V inter-peak intervals were recorded for each dog. Unilaterally and bilaterally deaf dogs were present in all the dog breeds studied. There were 17 (14.5%) deaf Bull Terriers, three (4.8%) deaf Australian Cattle Dogs, seven (21.9%) deaf English Setters, and 12 (37.5%) deaf Dogos Argentinos. Preventive BAER screening should be routinely performed in these four breeds to prevent the spread of genes responsible for deafness.

  19. Individualized mini-hemilaminectomy-corpectomy (iMHC) for treatment of thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation in large breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Medl, Susanne C; Reese, Sven; Medl, Nikola S

    2017-04-01

    To assess the short-term, mid-term, and long-term results after an individualized mini-hemilaminectomy-corpectomy (iMHC) procedure for treatment of acute and chronic thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease in non-chondrodystrophic dogs. Prospective study. Client-owned non-chondrodystrophic large breed dogs (n = 57). The iMHC procedure, combining mini-hemilaminectomy (MH) and partial lateral corpectomy, was performed on non-chondrodystrophic dogs with thoracolumbar disc disease. Neurological status was evaluated before surgery, for short-term outcome on days 1 and 7 after surgery, for mid-term outcome at 6 months after surgery, and for long-term outcome at the conclusion of the study. Prognostic factors were statistically evaluated. P < .05 was considered significant. iMHC was performed on 57 dogs, with minimal intraoperative and postoperative complications. Short-term neurological improvement was observed in 85.7% of dogs. Median hospitalization time after surgery was 2 days (range 0-14) and was significantly shorter for dogs with a chronic history of clinical signs (1 day, range 0-5) compared to acute onset (3 days, range 0-14) and for those that were ambulatory at initial presentation (1 day, range 0-5) compared to those that were not (3 days, range 0-14). Long-term evaluation included 53 surgeries with a mean follow-up time of 29.4 months. Outcome was excellent in 19 dogs and good in 29 dogs (90.6% success rate). Excellent mid-term and long-term results were significantly more common in the dogs with only 1 affected disc space. The iMHC procedure resulted in a short hospitalization time, minimal postoperative deterioration, and a high success rate. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. Differences in the histochemical properties of skeletal muscles of different breeds of horses and dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, H M

    1978-01-01

    Histochemical profiles of individual muscle fibres were established using myosin adenosine triphosphatase (myosin ATPase), succinate dehydrogenase (SDHase), and glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) reactions in three muscles (semitendinosus, diaphragm, and pectoralis transversus) of the horse and dog. The major histochemical difference between fibres lies in their myosin ATPase activity; fibres can be subdivided into those with a high and those with a low activity. In horse muscle, all fibres have a high activity of GPase. In the diaphragm and pectoralis transversus, all fibres have a high SDHase activity, but fibres with a low activity of SDHase are also present in samples of the semitendinosus. In dog muscle, all fibres have a high SDHase activity; myosin ATPase low-reacting fibres also have a low activity of GPase. There is a greater fractional area of myosin ATPase high-reacting fibres in the pectoralis transversus and semitendinosus of thoroughbred horses and greyhounds (breeds selected for high speed running) and in the diaphragm of greyhounds. In adults this feature does not appear to be due to training, as are the differences in aerobic and anaerobic capacity (shown in other studies). The preponderance of myosin Atpase high-reacting fibres suggests that there may be differences in the nervous systems of athletes and non-athletes. It is concluded that the proportions of fibre types in muscles are related to the functions of muscles and of their parts. No sex differences or detraining effects were apparent, although the value for the proportion of fibre types (as differentiated by the myosin ATPase reaction) in the limb muscles of thoroughbred crosses lies between those of thoroughbreds and non-thoroughbreds. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:154495

  1. Similar genomic proportions of copy number variation within gray wolves and modern dog breeds inferred from whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Serres-Armero, Aitor; Povolotskaya, Inna S; Quilez, Javier; Ramirez, Oscar; Santpere, Gabriel; Kuderna, Lukas F K; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Gomez-Sanchez, Daniel; Freedman, Adam H; Fan, Zhenxin; Novembre, John; Navarro, Arcadi; Boyko, Adam; Wayne, Robert; Vilà, Carles; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2017-12-19

    Whole genome re-sequencing data from dogs and wolves are now commonly used to study how natural and artificial selection have shaped the patterns of genetic diversity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites and variants in mitochondrial DNA have been interrogated for links to specific phenotypes or signals of domestication. However, copy number variation (CNV), despite its increasingly recognized importance as a contributor to phenotypic diversity, has not been extensively explored in canids. Here, we develop a new accurate probabilistic framework to create fine-scale genomic maps of segmental duplications (SDs), compare patterns of CNV across groups and investigate their role in the evolution of the domestic dog by using information from 34 canine genomes. Our analyses show that duplicated regions are enriched in genes and hence likely possess functional importance. We identify 86 loci with large CNV differences between dogs and wolves, enriched in genes responsible for sensory perception, immune response, metabolic processes, etc. In striking contrast to the observed loss of nucleotide diversity in domestic dogs following the population bottlenecks that occurred during domestication and breed creation, we find a similar proportion of CNV loci in dogs and wolves, suggesting that other dynamics are acting to particularly select for CNVs with potentially functional impacts. This work is the first comparison of genome wide CNV patterns in domestic and wild canids using whole-genome sequencing data and our findings contribute to study the impact of novel kinds of genetic changes on the evolution of the domestic dog.

  2. DNA methylation patterns of behavior-related gene promoter regions dissect the gray wolf from domestic dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Banlaki, Zsofia; Cimarelli, Giulia; Viranyi, Zsofia; Kubinyi, Eniko; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Ronai, Zsolt

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of evidence highlights the relationship between epigenetics, especially DNA methylation, and population divergence as well as speciation. However, little is known about how general the phenomenon of epigenetics-wise separation of different populations is, or whether population assignment is, possible based on solely epigenetic marks. In the present study, we compared DNA methylation profiles between four different canine populations: three domestic dog breeds and their ancestor the gray wolf. Altogether, 79 CpG sites constituting the 65 so-called CpG units located in the promoter regions of genes affecting behavioral and temperamental traits (COMT, HTR1A, MAOA, OXTR, SLC6A4, TPH1, WFS1)-regions putatively targeted during domestication and breed selection. Methylation status of buccal cells was assessed using EpiTYPER technology. Significant inter-population methylation differences were found in 52.3% of all CpG units investigated. DNA methylation profile-based hierarchical cluster analysis indicated an unambiguous segregation of wolf from domestic dog. In addition, one of the three dog breeds (Golden Retriever) investigated also formed a separate, autonomous group. The findings support that population segregation is interrelated with shifts in DNA methylation patterns, at least in putative selection target regions, and also imply that epigenetic profiles could provide a sufficient basis for population assignment of individuals.

  3. A high-resolution integrated map of copy number polymorphisms within and between breeds of the modern domesticated dog

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Structural variation contributes to the rich genetic and phenotypic diversity of the modern domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, although compared to other organisms, catalogs of canine copy number variants (CNVs) are poorly defined. To this end, we developed a customized high-density tiling array across the canine genome and used it to discover CNVs in nine genetically diverse dogs and a gray wolf. Results In total, we identified 403 CNVs that overlap 401 genes, which are enriched for defense/immunity, oxidoreductase, protease, receptor, signaling molecule and transporter genes. Furthermore, we performed detailed comparisons between CNVs located within versus outside of segmental duplications (SDs) and find that CNVs in SDs are enriched for gene content and complexity. Finally, we compiled all known dog CNV regions and genotyped them with a custom aCGH chip in 61 dogs from 12 diverse breeds. These data allowed us to perform the first population genetics analysis of canine structural variation and identify CNVs that potentially contribute to breed specific traits. Conclusions Our comprehensive analysis of canine CNVs will be an important resource in genetically dissecting canine phenotypic and behavioral variation. PMID:21846351

  4. Prevalence and breed distribution of chronic pancreatitis at post-mortem examination in first-opinion dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, P J; Roulois, A J A; Scase, T; Johnston, P E J; Thompson, H; Herrtage, M E

    2007-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of canine chronic pancreatitis in first-opinion practice and identify breed associations or other risk factors. Three sections of pancreas were taken from 200 unselected canine post-mortem examinations from first-opinion practices. Sections were graded for inflammation, fibrosis and other lesions. Prevalence and relative risks of chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic diseases were calculated. The prevalence of chronic pancreatitis was 34 per cent omitting the autolysed cases. Cavalier King Charles spaniels, collies and boxers had increased relative risks of chronic pancreatitis; cocker spaniels had an increased relative risks of acute and chronic pancreatitis combined. Fifty-seven per cent of cases of chronic pancreatitis were classified histologically as moderate or marked. Forty-one per cent of cases involved all three sections. Dogs with chronic pancreatitis were more commonly female and overweight, but neither factor increased the relative risk of chronic pancreatitis. There were breed differences in histological appearances and 24.5 per cent of cases were too autolysed to interpret with an increased relative risk of autolysis in a number of large breeds. Chronic pancreatitis is a common, under-estimated disease in the first-opinion dog population with distinctive breed risks and histological appearances.

  5. Incidence and breed predilection for dystocia and risk factors for cesarean section in a Swedish population of insured dogs.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Annika; Nødtvedt, Ane; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie; Egenvall, Agneta

    2006-12-01

    To estimate the incidence and breed predilection for canine dystocia using data from insurance claims. The risk factors for cesarean section (CS) were assessed for bitches with dystocia. Retrospective, longitudinal study. Insurance claims records (1995-2002) from a Swedish animal insurance database (Agria), including approximately 200,000 bitches. The overall incidence rate of dystocia in insured bitches was calculated by dividing the number of reimbursed dystocia claims with the number of dog years at risk. Subsequently, incidence rates were stratified by breed, region, and habitat. The proportion of bitches with a dystocia claim that had CS were calculated, and risk factors for CS were assessed using a logistic regression model. Between 1995 and 2002, 3894 (2%) of 195,931 Swedish bitches included in the study had a reimbursed insurance claim for dystocia. The overall incidence rate of dystocia was 5.7 cases/ 1000 dog years at risk. Some breeds like the Scottish terrier were at increased risk of dystocia. Among bitches with dystocia, 63.8% were treated by CS. Dystocia in the bitch is more common than reported earlier. The risk of developing dystocia varies by breed, and a high percentage (63.8%) of affected bitches undergo CS. Clinical Relevance- Breeders and veterinarians could use this information to better predict which bitches are likely to experience dystocia and/or CS.

  6. The prevalence of the electrocardiographic J wave in the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen compared to 10 different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Rudling, E H; Schlamowitz, S; Pipper, C B; Nilsson, E; Höllmer, M; Willesen, J L; Berendt, M; Fredholm, M; Gulløv, C H; Christiansen, M; Koch, J

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence and amplitudes of the electrocardiographic J wave in the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen compared to 10 other dog breeds. Electrocardiograms from 206 healthy dogs representing 11 dog breeds were included in the study. Besides Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen (PBGV; n = 23) 10 other dog breeds were included. An electrocardiogram ruler was used for measuring the amplitudes of the J waves. The definition of a J wave was a positive deflection at the J point of ≥0.1 mV in more than 1 lead of the bipolar standard limb leads (I, II, III) or the unipolar standard limb leads (aVL and aVF). The prevalence of J waves in the PBGV (n = 23) was 91% (n = 21, standard error (SE) = 5.9%), which was significantly higher compared to seven other dog breeds (p < 0.05). The overall prevalence of J waves in all 11 dog breeds (n = 206) was 43% (n = 89, robust SE = 7.8%). There was no significant difference in the prevalence between male and female dogs (p = 0.79). Neither did age (p = 0.22) nor heart rate (p = 0.25) significantly affect the prevalence of J wave. The PBGV had the highest prevalence of J waves and the highest amplitudes compared to 10 other dog breeds. However J waves were also seen in other breeds. Therefore, J waves may be considered a normal variant on the canine electrocardiogram and should not be interpreted as cardiac disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Shepherds’ Tale: A Genome-Wide Study across 9 Dog Breeds Implicates Two Loci in the Regulation of Fructosamine Serum Concentration in Belgian Shepherds

    PubMed Central

    Ljungvall, Ingrid; Merveille, Anne-Christine; Gouni, Vassiliki; Wiberg, Maria; Lundgren Willesen, Jakob; Hanås, Sofia; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Mejer Sørensen, Louise; Tiret, Laurent; McEntee, Kathleen; Seppälä, Eija; Koch, Jørgen; Battaille, Géraldine; Lohi, Hannes; Fredholm, Merete; Chetboul, Valerie; Häggström, Jens; Carlborg, Örjan; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Höglund, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia, where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds. Considering all breeds together, we did not find any genome-wide significant associations to fructosamine serum concentration. However, by performing breed-specific analyses we revealed an association on chromosome 3 (pcorrected ≈ 1:68 × 10-6) in Belgian shepherd dogs of the Malinois subtype. The associated region and its close neighbourhood harbours interesting candidate genes such as LETM1 and GAPDH that are important in glucose metabolism and have previously been implicated in the aetiology of diabetes mellitus. To further explore the genetics of this breed specificity, we screened the genome for reduced heterozygosity stretches private to the Belgian shepherd breed. This revealed a region with reduced heterozygosity that shows a statistically significant interaction (p = 0.025) with the association region on chromosome 3. This region also harbours some interesting candidate genes and regulatory regions but the exact mechanisms underlying the interaction are still unknown. Nevertheless, this finding provides a plausible explanation for breed-specific genetic effects for complex traits in dogs. Shepherd breeds are at low risk of developing diabetes mellitus. The findings in Belgian shepherds could be connected to a protective mechanism against the disease. Further insight into the regulation of glucose metabolism could improve diagnostic and therapeutic methods for diabetes mellitus. PMID:25970163

  8. Risk factors for hip-related clinical signs in a prospective cohort study of four large dog breeds in Norway.

    PubMed

    Krontveit, Randi I; Trangerud, Cathrine; Sævik, Bente K; Skogmo, Hege K; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2012-02-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study including privately owned dogs from the breeds Newfondland (NF), Labrador Retriever (LR), Leonberger (LEO), and Irish Wolfhound (IW) followed from birth until age 9 yrs. We wanted to investigate whether radiological hip dysplasia status given at approximately age 12-18 mos and other factors during growth influenced development of clinical signs due to hip-joint disease necessitating veterinary consultation. Whether or not such signs occurred due to hip dysplasia or due to secondary or primary DJD could not be distinguished, and we therefore used the term "owner-reported veterinary-diagnosed hip-related clinical signs" ("the event"). The included dogs were followed from birth to the event or until a maximum of 9 yrs of age. Our objectives were to describe breed differences in time to incidence and to evaluate potential risk factors for the time to event. We used Kaplan-Meier curves to describe time to incidence, and potential risk factors were assessed by use of a Cox proportional-hazards model. We enrolled 494 dogs from 103 litters, and 46 dogs were reported as having had the event during the observation period. We observed a significant time-varying effect (TVE): LR and LEO developed clinical signs later in life than NF. If the radiological hip status was either mild, moderate, or severe the hazard of experiencing the event was significantly increased. Access to off-leash exercise at age 12 mos decreased the hazard of the event, and the hazard varied by litter. The findings supported the hypothesis that radiological hip status at screening and exercise conditions during growth influenced the time to incidence of the event and that there were breed differences in time to the event. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimated breeding values for canine hip dysplasia radiographic traits in a cohort of Australian German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bethany J; Nicholas, Frank W; James, John W; Wade, Claire M; Thomson, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a serious and common musculoskeletal disease of pedigree dogs and therefore represents both an important welfare concern and an imperative breeding priority. The typical heritability estimates for radiographic CHD traits suggest that the accuracy of breeding dog selection could be substantially improved by the use of estimated breeding values (EBVs) in place of selection based on phenotypes of individuals. The British Veterinary Association/Kennel Club scoring method is a complex measure composed of nine bilateral ordinal traits, intended to evaluate both early and late dysplastic changes. However, the ordinal nature of the traits may represent a technical challenge for calculation of EBVs using linear methods. The purpose of the current study was to calculate EBVs of British Veterinary Association/Kennel Club traits in the Australian population of German Shepherd Dogs, using linear (both as individual traits and a summed phenotype), binary and ordinal methods to determine the optimal method for EBV calculation. Ordinal EBVs correlated well with linear EBVs (r = 0.90-0.99) and somewhat well with EBVs for the sum of the individual traits (r = 0.58-0.92). Correlation of ordinal and binary EBVs varied widely (r = 0.24-0.99) depending on the trait and cut-point considered. The ordinal EBVs have increased accuracy (0.48-0.69) of selection compared with accuracies from individual phenotype-based selection (0.40-0.52). Despite the high correlations between linear and ordinal EBVs, the underlying relationship between EBVs calculated by the two methods was not always linear, leading us to suggest that ordinal models should be used wherever possible. As the population of German Shepherd Dogs which was studied was purportedly under selection for the traits studied, we examined the EBVs for evidence of a genetic trend in these traits and found substantial genetic improvement over time. This study suggests the use of ordinal EBVs could increase the

  10. Breed-specific fetal biometry and factors affecting the prediction of whelping date in the German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Groppetti, D; Vegetti, F; Bronzo, V; Pecile, A

    2015-01-01

    To date many studies have been published about predicting parturition by ultrasonographic fetal measurements in the bitch. Given that accuracy in such prediction is a key point for clinicians and breeders, formulas to calculate the whelping date were mainly obtained from small and medium sized dogs, which means poor accuracy when applied to large or giant breeds. Based on the evidence that ethnicity significantly affects fetal biometry in humans, this study aimed at developing a breed-specific linear regression model for estimating parturition date in the German shepherd dog. For this purpose, serial ultrasonographic measurements of the inner chorionic cavity diameter (ICC) and the fetal biparietal diameter (BP) were collected in 40 pregnant German shepherd bitches. The quality of the regression models for estimating parturition date was further verified in 22 other pregnant German shepherd bitches. Accuracy related to the prediction of parturition date was higher than previously reported: 94.5% and 91.7% within ±2 days interval based on ICC and BP measurements, respectively. Additional investigation was performed on the effects of maternal weight, age and litter size in relation to fetal biometry and to accuracy of parturition estimation. Moreover, the study included a comparison between hormonal and fetal ultrasound (ICC and BP) measurements connected to the estimation of whelping date. We suggest that specific equations from a single breed are likely to offer excellent accuracy, comparable to that of periovulatory progesteronemia, in parturition prediction and to avoid morphological variables present in dogs of different breeds even with the same size/weight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The relevance of echocardiography heart measures for breeding against the risk of subaortic and pulmonic stenosis in Boxer dogs.

    PubMed

    Menegazzo, L; Bussadori, C; Chiavegato, D; Quintavalla, C; Bonfatti, V; Guglielmini, C; Sturaro, E; Gallo, L; Carnier, P

    2012-02-01

    (2) estimates and exploitable additive genetic variation. The estimated h(2) was 36, 24, and 20% for aortic annulus area, aortic peak velocity, and cardiac murmur score, respectively. For the area of the pulmonary annulus and peak pulmonary velocity, the estimated h(2) were smaller, ranging from 9.5 to 12.8%. These measures are candidate indicator traits that might be effectively used in dog breeding to reduce the prevalence and severity of cardiac defects.

  12. Barcoded pyrosequencing-based metagenomic analysis of the faecal microbiome of three purebred pig lines after cohabitation.

    PubMed

    Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Chae, Jong Pyo; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Kim, In Ho; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The microbial communities in the pig gut perform a variety of beneficial functions. Along with host genetics and diet, farm management practices are an important aspect of agricultural animal production that could influence gut microbial diversity. In this study, we used barcoded pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes to characterise the faecal microbiome of three common commercial purebred pig lines (Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire) before and after cohabitation. The diversity of faecal microbiota was characterised by employing phylogenetic, distance-based and multivariate-clustering approaches. Bacterial diversity tended to become more uniform after mixing of the litters. Age-related shifts were also observed at various taxonomic levels, with an increase in the proportion of the phylum Firmicutes and a decrease in Bacteroidetes over time, regardless of the purebred group. Cohabitation had a detectable effect on the microbial shift among purebred pigs. We identified the bacterial genus Parasutterella as having utility in discriminating pigs according to time. Similarly, Dialister and Bacteroides can be used to differentiate the purebred lines used. The microbial communities of the three purebred pigs became more similar after cohabitation, but retained a certain degree of breed specificity, with the microbiota of Landrace and Yorkshire remaining distinct from that of their distant relative, Duroc.

  13. Effective population size, extended linkage disequilibrium and signatures of selection in the rare dog breed lundehund.

    PubMed

    Pfahler, Sophia; Distl, Ottmar

    2015-01-01

    The Lundehund is an old dog breed with remarkable anatomical features including polydactyly in all four limbs and extraordinary flexibility of the spine. We genotyped 28 Lundehund using the canine Illumina high density beadchip to estimate the effective population size (Ne) and inbreeding coefficients as well as to identify potential regions of positive selection. The decay of linkage disequilibrium was slow with r2 = 0.95 in 50 kb distance. The last 7-200 generations ago, Ne was at 10-13. An increase of Ne was noted in the very recent generations with a peak value of 19 for Ne at generation 4. The FROH estimated for 50-, 65- and 358-SNP windows were 0.87, 087 and 0.81, respectively. The most likely estimates for FROH after removing identical-by-state segments due to linkage disequilibria were at 0.80-0.81. The extreme loss of heterozygosity has been accumulated through continued inbreeding over 200 generations within a probably closed population with a small effective population size. The mean inbreeding coefficient based on pedigree data for the last 11 generations (FPed = 0.10) was strongly biased downwards due to the unknown coancestry of the founders in this pedigree data. The long-range haplotype test identified regions with genes involved in processes of immunity, olfaction, woundhealing and neuronal development as potential targets of selection. The genes QSOX2, BMPR1B and PRRX2 as well as MYOM1 are candidates for selection on the Lundehund characteristics small body size, increased number of digits per paw and extraordinary mobility, respectively.

  14. 9 CFR 151.9 - Recognized breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recognized breeds and books of record... OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.9 Recognized breeds and books of record. Breeds of animals and...

  15. 9 CFR 151.9 - Recognized breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recognized breeds and books of record... OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.9 Recognized breeds and books of record. Breeds of animals and...

  16. 9 CFR 151.9 - Recognized breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recognized breeds and books of record... OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.9 Recognized breeds and books of record. Breeds of animals and...

  17. CT scan based determination of optimal bone corridor for atlantoaxial ventral screw fixation in miniature breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno Revés, Núria; Stahl, Cristina; Stoffel, Michael; Bali, Monty; Forterre, Franck

    2013-10-01

    To describe the most reliable insertion angle, corridor length and width to place a ventral transarticular atlantoaxial screw in miniature breed dogs. Retrospective CT imaging study. Cervical CT scans of toy breed dogs (n = 21). Dogs were divided into 2 groups--group 1: no atlantoaxial abnormalities; group 2: atlantoaxial instability. Insertion angle in medial to lateral and ventral to dorsal direction was measured in group 1. Corridor length and width were measured in groups 1 and 2. Corridor width was measured at 3 points of the corridor. Each variable was measured 3 times and the mean used for statistical analysis. Mean ± SD optimal transarticular atlantoaxial insertion angle was determined to be 40 ± 1° in medial to lateral direction from the midline and 20 ± 1° in ventral to dorsal direction from the floor of the neural canal of C2. Mean corridor length was 7 mm (range, 4.5-8.0 mm). Significant correlation was found between corridor length, body weight, and age. Mean bone corridor width ranged from 3 to 5 mm. Statistically significant differences were found between individuals, gender and measured side. Optimal placement of a transarticular screw for atlantoaxial joint stabilization is very demanding because the screw path corridor is very narrow. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Effect of supplementation of organic manganese on reproductive performance of female Ussuri raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) during the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Bao, K; Xu, C; Wang, K Y; Liu, H L; Zhao, J B; Zhang, T T; Sun, W L; Zhong, W; Li, G Y; Zhao, J P

    2014-10-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary manganese (Mn) on reproductive performance of female Ussuri raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) during the breeding season. Healthy female Ussuri raccoon dogs (n=72) were randomly divided into six groups of twelve each. The six experimental diets were formulated to contain graded amounts of Mn (0, 40, 80, 120, 200 and 400mg/kg of diet; Groups A through F, respectively). Litter size of Group D was greater than that of Groups A, B, C and E (P<0.05), with Group E having the smallest litter size. Values of number born alive were affected by different amounts of organic Mn. Number of pups born alive in Group D was greater than that of Groups B, C, E and F (P<0.05). Number of pups weaned alive for Group D was greater than that of Groups A, B, C and E (P<0.05). Mn supplementation of the control diet (containing 24.32 mg/kg from raw materials) with 120 mg/kg of Mn was adequate for female Ussuri raccoon dogs during the breeding season, based on positive effects of reproduction performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Canine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potential and the Importance of Dog Breed: Implication for Cell-Based Therapies.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Steffen, Frank; Malonzo-Marty, Cherry; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    The study of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a prominent position in veterinary cell-based applications. Yet the plethora of breeds, their different life spans, and interbreed variations provide unclearness on what can be achieved specifically by such therapies. In this study, we compared a set of morphological, physiological, and genetic markers of MSCs derived from large dog breeds, namely, Border collie, German shepherd, Labrador, Malinois, Golden retriever, and Hovawart. We compared colony-forming units (CFUs) assay, population doubling time (PDT), senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, telomere length, and gene expression of MSCs, as well as the ability of cells to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic phenotypes. The influence of the culture media α-MEM, low-glucose DMEM, and high-glucose DMEM, used in cell isolation and expansion, was investigated in the presence and absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Initial cell yield was not affected by culturing medium, but MSCs expanded best in α-MEM supplemented with bFGF. After isolation, the number of MSCs was similar among breeds--as shown by equivalent CFUs--except in the Hovawart samples, which had fivefold less CFU. Telomere lengths were similar among breeds. MSCs divided actively only for 4 weeks in culture (PDT = ∼50 h/division), except Border collie cells divided for a longer time than cells from other groups. The percentage of senescent cells increased linearly in all breeds with time, with a faster rate in German shepherd, Labrador, and Golden retriever. Border collie cells underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation, Hovawart cells performed the best in chondrogenic differentiation, and Labrador cells in both, while German shepherd cells had the lower differentiation potential. MSCs from all breeds preserved the same adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, despite variations, isolated MSCs can be

  20. CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CHARACTERISTICS OF THORACOLUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISK EXTRUSIONS AND PROTRUSIONS IN LARGE BREED DOGS.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sergio A; Volk, Holger A; Packer, Rowena Ma; Kenny, Patrick J; Beltran, Elsa; De Decker, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Treatment recommendations differ for dogs with intervertebral disk extrusion vs. intervertebral disk protrusion. The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine whether clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables could be used to predict a diagnosis of thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion in dogs. Dogs were included if they were large breed dogs, had an MRI study of the thoracolumbar or lumbar vertebral column, had undergone spinal surgery, and had the type of intervertebral disk herniation (intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion) clearly stated in surgical reports. A veterinary neurologist unaware of surgical findings reviewed MRI studies and recorded number, location, degree of degeneration and morphology of intervertebral disks, presence of nuclear clefts, disk space narrowing, extent, localization and lateralization of herniated disk material, degree of spinal cord compression, intraparenchymal intensity changes, spondylosis deformans, spinal cord swelling, spinal cord atrophy, vertebral endplate changes, and presence of extradural hemorrhage. Ninety-five dogs were included in the sample. Multivariable statistical models indicated that longer duration of clinical signs (P = 0.01), midline instead of lateralized disk herniation (P = 0.007), and partial instead of complete disk degeneration (P = 0.01) were associated with a diagnosis of intervertebral disk protrusion. The presence of a single intervertebral herniation (P = 0.023) and dispersed intervertebral disk material not confined to the disk space (P = 0.06) made a diagnosis of intervertebral disk extrusion more likely. Findings from this study identified one clinical and four MRI variables that could potentially facilitate differentiating intervertebral disk extrusions from protrusions in dogs. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  1. Prevalence of twin foaling and blood chimaerism in purebred Spanish horses.

    PubMed

    Anaya, G; Fernández, M E; Valera, M; Molina, A; Azcona, F; Azor, P; Solé, M; Moreno-Millán, M; Demyda-Peyrás, S

    2018-04-01

    Twin foaling is associated with chimaerism in several domestic species and is recognised in horses. In this study, 21,097 purebred Spanish (Pura Raza Español) horse births from the 2015 to 2016 breeding season were investigated for chimaerism. Twin foaled and chimaeric individuals were assessed on the basis of foaling records, short-tandem repeat (STR) parentage test results and a sex-linked STR-based technique. Fourteen twin pregnancies with 23 twin foals born alive were identified (0.066% twin foaling prevalence), including five blood chimaeric cases (21.7%; overall prevalence 0.011%), suggesting that this genetic condition is extremely low in horses. Furthermore, no true chimaeras were detected. This is the first large scale study analysing the occurrence of chimaerism in a horse population and the first assessment of twin foaling in purebred Spanish horses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymorphisms within the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase gene (TERT) in four breeds of dogs selected for difference in lifespan and cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    McAloney, Camille A; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Modiano, Jaime F; Bagchi, Anindya

    2014-01-14

    Enzymatic activity of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) is important in maintaining the telomere length and has been implicated in cancer and aging related pathology. Since cancer susceptibility as well as longevity of dogs vary between breeds, this study involved sequencing the entire TERT gene of Canis familiaris from DNA samples obtained from forty dogs, with ten dogs each of four breeds: Shih Tzu, Dachshund, Irish Wolfhound, and Newfoundland, each with different life expectancies and susceptibility to cancer. We compared the sequences of all forty individuals amongst one another and with the published sequence of canine TERT, and analyzed relationships between members of the same or different breeds. Two separate phylogenetic trees were generated and analyzed from these individuals. Polymorphisms were found most frequently in intronic regions of the gene, although exonic polymorphisms also were observed. In many locations genotypes were observed that were either homozygous for the reference sequence or heterozygous, but the variant homozygous genotype was not observed. We propose that these homozygous variants are likely to have adverse effects in dogs. It was also found that the polymorphisms did not segregate by breed. Because the four breeds chosen come from geographically and physiologically distinct backgrounds, it can be inferred that the polymorphic diversification of TERT preceded breed derivation.

  3. Evaluation of body composition and cartilage biomarkers in large-breed dogs fed two foods designed for growth.

    PubMed

    Schoenherr, William D; Macleay, Jennifer M; Yamka, Ryan M

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate cartilage and bone biomarkers and body composition in growing large-breed dogs consuming a diet designed for growth. 43 large-breed 2 month-old-puppies. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 2 foods until 18 months of age. Dogs were evaluated at 2, 5, 12, and 18 months of age via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), CBC, serum biochemical profile, and concentrations or activities of taurine, vitamin E, fatty acids, glutathione peroxidase, C-propeptide of type II collagen (CPII), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), carboxy-terminal cross-linked fragment of type II collagen (CTXII), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin, ghrelin, and growth hormone. Blood components largely reflected the composition of the foods. Dogs fed the food with a higher concentration of protein, calcium, n-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants had a lower percentage of body fat and greater percentage of lean body mass at 5, 12, and 18 months of age, and higher CPII:CTXII ratio and lower COMP at 18 months of age. The BAP activity, osteocalcin concentration, and CTXII concentration declined with age, whereas COMP concentration and CPII concentration were similar at all time points for both foods. The BAP activity, osteocalcin concentration, and CTXII concentration were greater during growth than at 18 months of age. The food that was proportionately higher in protein, calcium, n-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants increased lean body mass and may have positively affected cartilage turnover as maturity was attained. Whether the rate of cartilage turnover during growth affects development of orthopedic disease or arthritis in adulthood has yet to be determined.

  4. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations.

  5. Age, breed, sex distribution and nutrition of a population of working farm dogs in New Zealand: results of a cross-sectional study of members of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Tucker, L A; Gendall, P; Rutherfurd-Markwick, K J; Cline, J; Thomas, D G

    2011-05-01

    To establish baseline information about age, breed, sex distribution and feeding practices for a population of working farm dogs owned by members of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association (NZSDTA) throughout New Zealand. Questionnaires were sent to members of the NZSDTA in August 2007, requesting information on the size and terrain of the farms where they worked, as well as the breed, weight, age and sex of each working dog they owned, feeding regime employed, diet fed, work levels, and general health of their dogs. The survey was completed by 542/676 (81%) of the eligible sample population, and provided information on 2,861 dogs, excluding those <1 year old. All of the dog owners surveyed worked on sheep and beef-cattle farms. The median farm size was 440 [Inter-quartile range (IQR) 132-1,200] ha and varied with region. The majority of farms were situated on either hill country (184/542; 34%) or a mixture of hilly and flat terrain (260/542; 48%), and had a median of six (IQR 5-8) working dogs per farm. The median age of dogs was 3.0 (IQR 2.0-6.0) years. Heading dogs were the most common type of working dog (1,510/2,861; 52.8%), followed by Huntaways (1,161/2,861; 40.6%). The gender distribution of all dogs was biased towards males (57%), but this decreased with age. There was a positive association between the number of dogs on a farm and perceived level of tiredness of dogs (p<0.001), but there were no differences in levels of tiredness between farms of different terrain. Most owners (526/542; 97%) fed their dogs once a day. The most common diet fed was a combination of dry food and homekill, which was fed by 328/542 (61%) owners during peak and 313/542 (58%) during off-peak periods of work. This study has established baseline information on the age, breed, gender and nutrition of a large population of working farm dogs in New Zealand. Current feeding practices employed by owners include offering a substantial amount of homekill to their animals. Homekill

  6. Simulation study on the effects of excluding offspring information for genetic evaluation versus using genomic markers for selection in dog breeding.

    PubMed

    Stock, K F; Distl, O

    2010-02-01

    Different modes of selection in dogs were studied with a special focus on the availability of disease information. Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) in the German shepherd dog was used as an example. The study was performed using a simulation model, comparing cases when selection was based on phenotype, true or predicted breeding value, or genomic breeding value. The parameters in the simulation model were drawn from the real population data. The data on all parents and 40% of their progeny were assumed to be available for the genetic evaluation carried out by Gibbs sampling. With respect to the use of disease records on progeny, three scenarios were considered: random exclusion of disease data (no restrictions, N), general exclusion of disease data (G) and exclusion of disease data for popular sires (P). One round of selection was considered, and the response was expressed as change of mean CHD score, proportion of dogs scored as normal, proportion of dogs scored as clearly affected and true mean breeding value in progeny of popular sires in comparison with all sires. When no restrictions on data were applied, selection on breeding value was three times more efficient than when some systematic exclusion was practised. Higher selection response than in the exclusion cases was achieved by selecting on the basis of genomic breeding value and CHD score. Genomic selection would therefore be the method of choice in the future.

  7. Retrospective study on the occurrence of canine lymphoma and associated breed risks in a population of dogs in NSW (2001-2009).

    PubMed

    Yau, Ppy; Dhand, N K; Thomson, P C; Taylor, R M

    2017-05-01

    To identify risk factors for canine lymphoma in dogs from New South Wales, Australia, and to compare factors affecting remission duration. Client-owned dogs diagnosed with lymphoma presented to the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (UVTH), University of Sydney, between 2001 and 2009 (n = 134) were compared with a control population of dogs seen in that period of time with a diagnosis other than lymphoma to evaluate association of explanatory variables (breed, age and sex) with the outcome (case or control status). The Australian Cattle Dog (odds ratio (OR) = 4.71; 95% confidence interval (Cl) 2.31-9.62; P < 0.001), Doberman (OR = 7.64; 95% Cl 2.87-20.34; P = 0.001) and Rottweiler (OR = 4.52; 95% Cl 2.09-9.73; P = 0.001) had increased odds of lymphoma among dogs attending the UVTH compared with crossbreds. The results suggested that the Border Collie (OR = 3.38; 95% Cl 1.52-7.53; P = 0.008) and Boxer (OR = 3.85; 95% Cl 1.65-8.95; P = 0.006) also have increased odds of lymphoma among the pure-breed dogs attending the UVTH when compared with crossbred dogs. The results of this study confirmed a breed predilection for lymphoma in dogs, with the Australian Cattle Dog and Doberman having increased odds of lymphoma. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  8. Monitoring Hip and Elbow Dysplasia Achieved Modest Genetic Improvement of 74 Dog Breeds over 40 Years in USA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Qian; Todhunter, Rory J.; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2013-01-01

    Hip (HD) and Elbow Dysplasia (ED) are two common complex developmental disorders of dogs. In order to decrease their prevalence and severity, the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) has a voluntary registry of canine hip and elbow conformation certified by boarded radiologists. However, the voluntarily reports have been severely biased against exposing dogs with problems, especially at beginning period. Fluctuated by additional influential factors such as age, the published raw scores barely showed trends of improvement. In this study, we used multiple-trait mixed model to simultaneously adjust these factors and incorporate pedigree to derive Estimated Breeding Values (EBV). A total of 1,264,422 dogs from 74 breeds were evaluated for EBVs from 760,455 hip scores and 135,409 elbow scores. These EBVs have substantially recovered the reporting bias and the other influences. Clear and steady trends of genetic improvement were observed over the 40 years since 1970. The total genetic improvements were 16.4% and 1.1% of the phenotypic standard deviation for HD and ED, respectively. The incidences of dysplasia were 0.83% and 2.08%, and the heritabilities were estimated as 0.22 and 0.17 for hip and elbow scores, respectively. The genetic correlation between them was 0.12. We conclude that EBV is more effective than reporting raw phenotype. The weak genetic correlation suggested that selection based on hip scores would also slightly improve elbow scores but it is necessary to allocate effort toward improvement of elbow scores alone. PMID:24124555

  9. Breed-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characteristics of Necrotizing Encephalitis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosing necrotizing encephalitis, with its subcategories of necrotizing leukoencephalitis and necrotizing meningoencephalitis, based on magnetic resonance imaging alone can be challenging. However, there are breed-specific imaging characteristics in both subcategories that allow establishing a clinical diagnosis with a relatively high degree of certainty. Typical breed specific imaging features, such as lesion distribution, signal intensity, contrast enhancement, and gross changes of brain structure (midline shift, ventriculomegaly, and brain herniation) are summarized here, using current literature, for the most commonly affected canine breeds: Yorkshire Terrier, French Bulldog, Pug, and Chihuahua. PMID:29255715

  10. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs.

    PubMed

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D; Green, Martin; England, Gary C W

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided.

  11. Application of Survival Analysis and Multistate Modeling to Understand Animal Behavior: Examples from Guide Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Lucy; Harvey, Naomi D.; Green, Martin; England, Gary C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of patterns of health-related states or events in populations. Statistical models developed for epidemiology could be usefully applied to behavioral states or events. The aim of this study is to present the application of epidemiological statistics to understand animal behavior where discrete outcomes are of interest, using data from guide dogs to illustrate. Specifically, survival analysis and multistate modeling are applied to data on guide dogs comparing dogs that completed training and qualified as a guide dog, to those that were withdrawn from the training program. Survival analysis allows the time to (or between) a binary event(s) and the probability of the event occurring at or beyond a specified time point. Survival analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards model, was used to examine the time taken to withdraw a dog from training. Sex, breed, and other factors affected time to withdrawal. Bitches were withdrawn faster than dogs, Labradors were withdrawn faster, and Labrador × Golden Retrievers slower, than Golden Retriever × Labradors; and dogs not bred by Guide Dogs were withdrawn faster than those bred by Guide Dogs. Multistate modeling (MSM) can be used as an extension of survival analysis to incorporate more than two discrete events or states. Multistate models were used to investigate transitions between states of training to qualification as a guide dog or behavioral withdrawal, and from qualification as a guide dog to behavioral withdrawal. Sex, breed (with purebred Labradors and Golden retrievers differing from F1 crosses), and bred by Guide Dogs or not, effected movements between states. We postulate that survival analysis and MSM could be applied to a wide range of behavioral data and key examples are provided. PMID:28804710

  12. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  13. Ultrasonographic fetometry formulas of inner chorionic cavity diameter and biparietal diameter for medium-sized dogs can be used in giant breeds.

    PubMed

    Socha, Piotr; Janowski, Tomasz; Bancerz-Kisiel, Agata

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of the ultrasonographic fetometry method, involving inner chorionic cavity diameter (ICC) and biparietal diameter (BP) measurements, to predict the parturition date in giant breed dogs. Overall, 30 ICC and 24 BP measurements were taken on 24 giant breed bitches. The measured values were substituted into Luvoni and Grioni (2000) formulas for medium-sized bitches because formulas with ICC and BP to dogs with a body mass greater than 40 kg have not been defined. The accuracy of the parturition date predictions proved the method to be highly useful in the observed group of dogs. Prediction accuracy in the giants ranged between 54.16% (± 1 day, using BP) and 90% (± 2 days, using ICC), depending on the parameter measured and precision levels used. Numerically, the results obtained using ICC were better; however, no statistically significant differences between ICC and BP accuracy were found when comparing the effectiveness of the parturition date predictions. Regression lines based on the own fetometric measurements were highly convergent with the lines defined by Luvoni and Grioni (2000) formulas for medium-sized bitches. This outcome suggests a similar gestational development of fetuses in giant dogs and the possible use of Luvoni and Grioni (2000) formulas for medium-sized dogs with breeds weighing greater than 40 kg. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer-Assisted Radiographic Calculation of Spinal Curvature in Brachycephalic “Screw-Tailed” Dog Breeds with Congenital Thoracic Vertebral Malformations: Reliability and Clinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guevar, Julien; Penderis, Jacques; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Stalin, Catherine; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009–2013) to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations. PMID:25198374

  15. Computer-assisted radiographic calculation of spinal curvature in brachycephalic "screw-tailed" dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations: reliability and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guevar, Julien; Penderis, Jacques; Faller, Kiterie; Yeamans, Carmen; Stalin, Catherine; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: To investigate computer-assisted digital radiographic measurement of Cobb angles in dogs with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations, to determine its intra- and inter-observer reliability and its association with the presence of neurological deficits. Medical records were reviewed (2009-2013) to identify brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with radiographic studies of the thoracic vertebral column and with at least one vertebral malformation present. Twenty-eight dogs were included in the study. The end vertebrae were defined as the cranial end plate of the vertebra cranial to the malformed vertebra and the caudal end plate of the vertebra caudal to the malformed vertebra. Three observers performed the measurements twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate the intra- and inter-observer reliabilities. The intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for all intra- and inter-observer measurements using this method. There was a significant difference in the kyphotic Cobb angle between dogs with and without associated neurological deficits. The majority of dogs with neurological deficits had a kyphotic Cobb angle higher than 35°. No significant difference in the scoliotic Cobb angle was observed. We concluded that the computer assisted digital radiographic measurement of the Cobb angle for kyphosis and scoliosis is a valid, reproducible and reliable method to quantify the degree of spinal curvature in brachycephalic screw-tailed dog breeds with congenital thoracic vertebral malformations.

  16. Criterion analysis and content validity for standardized behavioral tests in a detector-dog breeding program.

    PubMed

    Rocznik, Dorothee; Sinn, David L; Thomas, Scott; Gosling, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Many working-dog programs assess behavior during a dog's first year of life with the aim of predicting success in the field. However, decisions about which tests to administer are frequently made on the basis of tradition or intuition. This study reports results from a survey given to U.S.A.'s Transportation Security Administration (TSA) detection-dog handlers (N = 34). We categorized and summarized handlers' responses regarding traits they felt were important for work. We used this criterion analysis to examine the content validity of the TSA's puppy tests. Results indicate that 13 of 15 traits that are currently being measured are relevant. However, several traits not currently measured were identified as being highly important, notably "play" and off-duty "calmness." These results provide support that the TSA tests are measuring traits relevant to operational search team performance but also highlight other traits that may be profitable to assess in this and other detection-dog programs. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Molecular Detection of Giardia intestinalis from Stray Dogs in Animal Shelters of Gyeongsangbuk-do (Province) and Daejeon, Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Cheol; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Kim, Sang-Hun; Kim, Suk; Park, Hyung-Jin; Seo, Kyoung-Won; Song, Kun-Ho

    2015-08-01

    Giardia is a major public health concern and considered as reemerging in industrialized countries. The present study investigated the prevalence of giardiosis in 202 sheltered dogs using PCR. The infection rate was 33.2% (67/202); Gyeongsangbuk-do and Daejeon showed 25.7% (39/152, P<0.0001) and 56% (28/50), respectively. The prevalence of infected female dogs (46.7%, P<0.001) was higher than in male dogs (21.8%). A higher prevalence (43.5%, P<0.0001) was observed in mixed breed dogs than purebred (14.1%). Although most of the fecal samples collected were from dogs of ≥1 year of age which showed only 27.4% positive rate, 61.8% (P<0.001) of the total samples collected from young animals (<1 year of age) were positive for G. intestinalis. A significantly higher prevalence in symptomatic dogs (60.8%, P<0.0001) was observed than in asymptomatic dogs (23.8%). Furthermore, the analysis of nucleotide sequences of the samples revealed that G. intestinalis Assemblages A and C were found in the feces of dogs from Gyeongsangbuk-do and Daejeon. Since G. intestinalis Assemblage A has been known to infect humans, our results suggest that dogs can act as an important reservoir of giardiosis in Korea. Hence, hygienic management should be given to prevent possible transmission to humans.

  18. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.10 Recognition of additional breeds and books of...

  19. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.10 Recognition of additional breeds and books of...

  20. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.10 Recognition of additional breeds and books of...

  1. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED ANIMALS Recognition of Breeds and Books of Record § 151.10 Recognition of additional breeds and books of...

  2. Efficacy of drug detection by fully-trained police dogs varies by breed, training level, type of drug and search environment.

    PubMed

    Jezierski, Tadeusz; Adamkiewicz, Ewa; Walczak, Marta; Sobczyńska, Magdalena; Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra; Ensminger, John; Papet, Eugene

    2014-04-01

    Some recent publications claim that the effectiveness of police canine drug detection is uncertain and likely minimal, and that the deterrent effect of dogs on drug users is low. It is also claimed that more scientific evidence is needed to demonstrate to what extent dogs actually detect drugs. The aim of this research was to assess experimentally, but in actual training and testing environments used by the Polish police, how effective dogs trained by the police were at illicit substance detection depending on factors such as type of drug, dog breed, dog experience with the searching site, and drug odor residuals. 68 Labrador retrievers, 61 German shepherds, 25 Terriers and 10 English Cocker Spaniels, of both sexes in each breed, were used. Altogether 1219 experimental searching tests were conducted. On average, hidden drug samples were indicated by dogs after 64s searching time, with 87.7% indications being correct and 5.3% being false. In 7.0% of trials dogs failed to find the drug sample within 10min. The ranking of drugs from the easiest to the most difficult to detect was: marijuana, hashish, amphetamine, cocaine, heroin. German shepherds were superior to other breeds in giving correct indications while Terriers showed relatively poor detection performance. Dogs were equally efficient at searching in well-known vs. unknown rooms with strange (i.e., non-target novelty) odors (83.2% correct indications), but they were less accurate when searching outside or inside cars (63.5% and 57.9% correct indications respectively). During police examination trials the dogs made more false alerts, fewer correct indications and searching time was longer compared to the final stage of the training. The drug odor may persist at a site for at least 48h. Our experiments do not confirm the recent reports, based on drug users' opinions, of low drug detection efficiency. Usefulness of drug detection dogs has been demonstrated here, even if their effectiveness may not be 100%, but

  3. Genome-wide diversity and runs of homozygosity in the "Braque Français, type Pyrénées" dog breed.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Biscarini, Filippo; Auzino, Barbara; Ragatzu, Marco; Spaterna, Andrea; Ciampolini, Roberta

    2018-01-09

    Braque Français, type Pyrénées is a French hunting-dog breed whose origin is traced back to old pointing gun-dogs used to assist hunters in finding and retrieving game. This breed is popular in France, but seldom seen elsewhere. Despite the ancient background, the literature on its genetic characterization is surprisingly scarce. A recent study looked into the demography and inbreeding using pedigree records, but there is yet no report on the use of molecular markers in this breed. The aim of this work was to genotype a population of Braque Français, type Pyrénées dogs with the high-density SNP array to study the genomic diversity of the breed. The average observed ([Formula: see text]) and expected ([Formula: see text]) heterozygosity were 0.371 ([Formula: see text]) and 0.359 ([Formula: see text]). Effective population size ([Formula: see text]) was 27.5635 runs of homozygosity (ROH) were identified with average length of 2.16 MB. A ROH shared by [Formula: see text] of the dogs was detected at the beginning of chromosome 22. Inbreeding coefficients from marker genotypes were in the range [Formula: see text]. Inbreeding estimated from ROH ([Formula: see text]) had mean [Formula: see text]), with range [0.0526, 0.225]. These results show that the Braque Français, type Pyrénées breed is a relatively inbred population, but with still sufficient genetic variability for conservation and genetic improvement.

  4. Dogs

    MedlinePlus

    ... bull's eye" rash at the site of the tick bite that appears about 7 days after being bitten. ... a Dog American Veterinary Medical Association Websites Preventing ticks on your pets CDC Key Facts about Canine Influenza (Dog Flu) CDC Preventing Dog Bites CDC Feature Pet Safety in Emergencies CDC Podcasts ...

  5. [Spontaneous models of human diseases in dogs: ichthyoses as an example].

    PubMed

    André, Catherine; Grall, Anaïs; Guaguere, Éric; Thomas, Anne; Galibert, Francis

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyoses encompass a heterogeneous group of genodermatoses characterized by abnormal desquamation over the entire body due to defects of the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and desquamation, which occur in the upper layer of the epidermis. Even though in humans more than 40 genes have already been identified, the genetic causes of several forms remain unknown and are difficult to identify in Humans. Strikingly, several purebred dogs are also affected by specific forms of ichthyoses. In the Golden retriever dog breed, an autosomal recessive form of ichthyosis, resembling human autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses, has recently been diagnosed with a high incidence. We first characterized the disease occurring in the golden retriever breed and collected cases and controls. A genome-wide association study on 40 unrelated Golden retriever dogs, using the canine 49.000 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) array (Affymetrix v2), followed by statistical analyses and candidate gene sequencing, allowed to identify the causal mutation in the lipase coding PNPLA1 gene (patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein). Screening for alterations in the human ortholog gene in 10 autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses families, for which no genetic cause has been identified thus far, allowed to identify two recessive mutations in the PNPLA1 protein in two families. This collaborative work between "human" and "canine" geneticists, practicians, histopathologists, biochemists and electron microscopy experts not only allowed to identify, in humans, an eighth gene for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses, but also allowed to highlight the function of this as-yet-unknown skin specific lipase in the lipid metabolism of the skin barrier. For veterinary medicine and breeding practices, a genetic test has been developed. These findings illustrate the importance of the discovery of relevant human orthologous canine genetic diseases, whose causes can be tracked

  6. Clinical Outcomes and Complications after Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Utilizing Conventional Plates in 65 Distal Radial and Ulnar Fractures of Miniature- and Toy-Breed Dogs.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Shimatsu, Taichi; Iizuka, Kyoko; Nishimura, Masaaki

    2018-04-23

     This article aims to evaluate clinical outcomes and complications of distal radial and ulnar fractures in miniature- and toy-breed dogs treated with conventional bone plate fixation.  Medical records (2001-2010) of miniature- and toy-breed dogs with distal radial and ulnar fractures repaired with open reduction and internal fixation utilizing conventional plates were reviewed. The inclusion criteria were body weight of <7 kg, fracture located in the distal antebrachium (distal-to-total radial length ratio < 0.4) and follow-up radiographs available.  All 65 fractures healed without developing non-union, and had a successful return to normal function (median follow-up: 73 months; range: 2-149 months). Minor complication in seven fractures and major complication in four fractures were identified.  Open reduction and conventional plate fixation of distal radial and ulnar fractures in miniature- and toy-breed dogs are effective means of fixation that result in normal functional outcome without developing non-union. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  7. Genetic parameters for egg production traits in purebred and hybrid chicken in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Tongsiri, S; Jeyaruban, M G; Van Der Werf, J H J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic parameters were estimated for 5 economically important egg production traits using records collected over 9 years in chickens reared under tropical conditions in Thailand. The data were from two purebred lines and two hybrid lines of layer parent stocks. The two purebred lines were Rhode Island Red (RIR) and White Plymouth Rock (WPR) and the hybrid lines were formed by crossing a commercial brown egg laying strain to Rhode Island Red (RC) and White Plymouth Rock (WC), respectively. Five egg production traits were analysed, including age at first egg (AFE), body weight at first egg (BWT), egg weight at first egg (EWFE), number of eggs from the first 17 weeks of lay (EN) and average egg weight over the 17th week of lay (EW). Fixed effects of year and hatch within year were significant for all 5 traits and were included in the model. Maternal genetic and permanent environmental effects of the dam were not significant, except for EN and EW in RIR and BWT and EW in WPR. Estimated heritability of AFE, BWT, EWFE, EN and EW were 0.45, 0.50, 0.29, 0.19 and 0.43 in RIR; 0.44, 0.38, 0.33, 0.20 and 0.38 in WPR; 0.37, 0.41, 0.38, 0.18 and 0.36 in RC; and 0.46, 0.53, 0.36, 0.38 and 0.45 in WC lines, respectively. The EN was negatively correlated with other traits, except for BWT in RC and AFE and BWT in WC. It was concluded that selection for increased EN will reduce other egg production traits in purebred and hybrid chicken and therefore EN needs to be combined with other egg production traits in a multi-trait selection index to improve all traits optimally according to a defined breeding objective.

  8. Online Relinquishments of Dogs and Cats in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Jenvey, Caitlin J.; Tuke, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary The aim of this study was to analyze dog and cat advertisements on a popular online trading website in Australia in February 2016. A total of 2640 ads for dogs and 2093 ads for cats were classified as being relinquished on Gumtree. A total of 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads were for free animals. The median age was 1.42 years in dogs and 0.9 years in cats. Compared to the human population there were proportionately more ads in Queensland and fewer ads in Victoria. In comparison to pets from animal shelters advertised on PetRescue, there were more purebred dogs on Gumtree, although the common breeds were similar. Fifteen people who had relinquished a dog or cat on Gumtree were interviewed. They used Gumtree because they believed shelters were full, they wanted to see/interview the new owner, or because they originally got the animal on Gumtree and it works. These results shed light on a hitherto under-studied population of relinquished dogs and cats. Abstract While traditionally people relinquish their pets to an animal shelter or pound, the internet provides a newer method to re-home. We analyzed advertisements (ads) on the largest website in Australia for trading dogs and cats: Gumtree. Data was collected in 2016. Dogs were sampled on 7, 16 and 24 February 2016 and cats on 9, 19 and 26 February 2016, with 2640 ads for relinquished dogs, and 2093 ads for relinquished cats. It was estimated >31,000 puppies/dogs and >24,000 kittens/cats are relinquished on Gumtree per year. The median age of dogs was 1.42 and cats 0.9 years of age. There were 23% of dog ads and 62% of cat ads for free animals. Compared to the human population, there were proportionately more ads in Queensland and fewer ads in Victoria. A total of 15 people were surveyed who had relinquished a dog or cat using Gumtree. The dog owners used Gumtree for two reasons: because they believed the shelters were full (n = 4); and they wanted to see/interview the new owner (n = 2). For cat

  9. Merging pedigree databases to describe and compare mating practices and gene flow between pedigree dogs in France, Sweden and the UK.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Leroy, G; Malm, S; Lewis, T; Strandberg, E; Fikse, W F

    2017-04-01

    Merging pedigree databases across countries may improve the ability of kennel organizations to monitor genetic variability and health-related issues of pedigree dogs. We used data provided by the Société Centrale Canine (France), Svenska Kennelklubben (Sweden) and the Kennel Club (UK) to study the feasibility of merging pedigree databases across countries and describe breeding practices and international gene flow within the following four breeds: Bullmastiff (BMA), English setter (ESE), Bernese mountain dog (BMD) and Labrador retriever (LBR). After merging the databases, genealogical parameters and founder contributions were calculated according to the birth period, breed and registration country of the dogs. Throughout the investigated period, mating between close relatives, measured as the proportion of inbred individuals (considering only two generations of pedigree), decreased or remained stable, with the exception of LBR in France. Gene flow between countries became more frequent, and the origins of populations within countries became more diverse over time. In conclusion, the potential to reduce inbreeding within purebred dog populations through exchanging breeding animals across countries was confirmed by an improved effective population size when merging populations from different countries. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. A survey of polymorphisms detected from sequences of popular beef breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome sequence was obtained from 270 sires used in the Germplasm Evaluation project (GPE). These bulls included 154 purebred AI sires from GPE Cycle VII breeds (Hereford, Angus, Simmental, Limousin, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Red Angus), 83 F1 crosses of those breeds, and 33 AI sires from 8 other breeds...

  11. 9 CFR 151.10 - Recognition of additional breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recognition of additional breeds and books of record. 151.10 Section 151.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL BREEDS RECOGNITION OF BREEDS AND BOOKS OF RECORD OF PUREBRED...

  12. A cross-sectional study to estimate prevalence of periodontal disease in a population of dogs (Canis familiaris) in commercial breeding facilities in Indiana and Illinois

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence and characterize the severity of periodontal disease in a population of dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities; 2) to characterize PD preventive care utilized by facility owners; and 3) to assess inter-rater reliability of a visual scoring assessment tool. Adult dogs (N = 445) representing 42 breeds at 24 CB facilities in Indiana and Illinois were assessed. Periodontal disease was scored visually using the American Veterinary Dental Collage 0-IV scale. Inter-rater reliability was assessed on 198 dogs and facility owners were asked to provide information about the preventive care utilized. The overall prevalence of periodontal disease (Grades I-IV) was 86.3% (95% CI: 82.9, 89.3). An ordered logistic regression analysis found age (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.24, 1.54; P<0.0001), facility (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.09, 1.18; P<0.0001), sex (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.12, 2.65; P = 0.013), and non-professional dental scaling (OR = 2.82; 95% CI 1.34, 5.91; P = 0.006) to be statistically significant. Inter-rater reliability analysis found agreement to be 86.2%, with a weighted kappa of 0.4731 (95% CI 0.3847, 0.5615) indicating moderate agreement. Risk of periodontal disease increased with increasing age. Additionally, a trend toward decreasing risk with increasing weight was also found, although it was not statistically significant. The trends identified agree with studies that have evaluated periodontal disease in the companion dog population and do not support the assumption that the dental health of dogs in commercial breeding facilities is worse than that of the population as a whole. Although there were few cases of severe periodontal disease and all facilities employed some type of preventive care in this sample, the large number of dogs with some degree of disease (Grades I-IV) suggests that further investigation of preventive care is warranted. PMID:29346448

  13. A cross-sectional study to estimate prevalence of periodontal disease in a population of dogs (Canis familiaris) in commercial breeding facilities in Indiana and Illinois.

    PubMed

    Stella, Judith L; Bauer, Amy E; Croney, Candace C

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence and characterize the severity of periodontal disease in a population of dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities; 2) to characterize PD preventive care utilized by facility owners; and 3) to assess inter-rater reliability of a visual scoring assessment tool. Adult dogs (N = 445) representing 42 breeds at 24 CB facilities in Indiana and Illinois were assessed. Periodontal disease was scored visually using the American Veterinary Dental Collage 0-IV scale. Inter-rater reliability was assessed on 198 dogs and facility owners were asked to provide information about the preventive care utilized. The overall prevalence of periodontal disease (Grades I-IV) was 86.3% (95% CI: 82.9, 89.3). An ordered logistic regression analysis found age (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.24, 1.54; P<0.0001), facility (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.09, 1.18; P<0.0001), sex (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.12, 2.65; P = 0.013), and non-professional dental scaling (OR = 2.82; 95% CI 1.34, 5.91; P = 0.006) to be statistically significant. Inter-rater reliability analysis found agreement to be 86.2%, with a weighted kappa of 0.4731 (95% CI 0.3847, 0.5615) indicating moderate agreement. Risk of periodontal disease increased with increasing age. Additionally, a trend toward decreasing risk with increasing weight was also found, although it was not statistically significant. The trends identified agree with studies that have evaluated periodontal disease in the companion dog population and do not support the assumption that the dental health of dogs in commercial breeding facilities is worse than that of the population as a whole. Although there were few cases of severe periodontal disease and all facilities employed some type of preventive care in this sample, the large number of dogs with some degree of disease (Grades I-IV) suggests that further investigation of preventive care is warranted.

  14. Age-associated and breed-associated variations in haematological and biochemical variables in young labrador retriever and miniature schnauzer dogs.

    PubMed

    Brenten, Thomas; Morris, Penelope J; Salt, Carina; Raila, Jens; Kohn, Barbara; Schweigert, Florian J; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Breed, sex and age effects on haematological and biochemical variables were investigated in 24 labrador retriever and 25 miniature schnauzer dogs during the first year of life. Blood samples were taken regularly between weeks 8 and 52. White blood cell and red blood cell counts, haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, platelet count as well as total protein, albumin, calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatine and urea were evaluated. For all haematological and biochemical parameters, there were significant effects of age on test results. Statistically significant effects for breed and the breed×age interaction on test results were observed for most of the parameters with the exception of haemoglobin. Variations in test results illustrate growth related alterations in body tissue and metabolism leading to dynamic and marked changes in haematological and biochemical parameters, which have to be considered for the interpretation of clinical data obtained from dogs in the first year of life.

  15. Age-associated and breed-associated variations in haematological and biochemical variables in young labrador retriever and miniature schnauzer dogs

    PubMed Central

    Brenten, Thomas; Morris, Penelope J.; Salt, Carina; Raila, Jens; Kohn, Barbara; Schweigert, Florian J.; Zentek, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Breed, sex and age effects on haematological and biochemical variables were investigated in 24 labrador retriever and 25 miniature schnauzer dogs during the first year of life. Blood samples were taken regularly between weeks 8 and 52. White blood cell and red blood cell counts, haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean cell volume, mean cell haemoglobin, mean cell haemoglobin concentration, platelet count as well as total protein, albumin, calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, total cholesterol, triglycerides, creatine and urea were evaluated. For all haematological and biochemical parameters, there were significant effects of age on test results. Statistically significant effects for breed and the breed×age interaction on test results were observed for most of the parameters with the exception of haemoglobin. Variations in test results illustrate growth related alterations in body tissue and metabolism leading to dynamic and marked changes in haematological and biochemical parameters, which have to be considered for the interpretation of clinical data obtained from dogs in the first year of life. PMID:27252875

  16. A retrospective study of female reproductive parameters in the Kunming dog.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yun-Fang; Wan, Jiu-Sheng; Chen, Fang-Liang; Chen, Chao; Li, Jing; Cheng, Lu-Guang; Mao, Ai-Guo; Li, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Bin; Huang, Qing-Guo; Tang, Shu-Sheng; Wei, Hong-Jiang

    2018-01-01

    The Kunming dog is the first and only working dog breed from China to be recognized worldwide. As a domestic working dog, its excellent working performance has been well established; however, its normal reproductive parameters are not well understood. Therefore, this study was conducted to document the main reproductive parameters of this purebred working dog in field breeding conditions. Data on 1004 heats (753 with mating) from 203 bitches between 2008 to 2014, were collected and analyzed. The pregnancy rate and whelping rate was 79.42% and 75.30%, respectively. Finally, for 567 litters (4298 puppies), the mean litter size was 7.19 ± 0.12 puppies (range 1-15). The mean gestation period and birth weight were approximately 61.64 ± 0.10 days and 407.25 ± 1.21 g. The mean sex ratio was 1.03 males to 1.00 female. Estrus occurred throughout the year with no significant differences between seasons and months (P > 0.05), which confirms that Kunming dogs are non-seasonal breeders; births occurred in every month of the year. Pregnant bitches exhibited significantly longer inter-estrus intervals than non-pregnant bitches (220.85 ± 2.05 vs. 180.19 ± 2.94 days, P < 0.05). Bitch parity influenced litter size, and the gestation length and birth weight of the puppies were negatively affected by litter size. This study helps elucidate the reproductive potential of this breed and provides reference values for reproductive performance in the Kunming dog. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Demographics of dogs, cats, and rabbits attending veterinary practices in Great Britain as recorded in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Noble, Peter-John M; Jones, Phil H; Menacere, Tarek; Buchan, Iain; Reynolds, Suzanna; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind M; Everitt, Sally; Radford, Alan D

    2017-07-11

    Understanding the distribution and determinants of disease in animal populations must be underpinned by knowledge of animal demographics. For companion animals, these data have been difficult to collect because of the distributed nature of the companion animal veterinary industry. Here we describe key demographic features of a large veterinary-visiting pet population in Great Britain as recorded in electronic health records, and explore the association between a range of animal's characteristics and socioeconomic factors. Electronic health records were captured by the Small Animal Veterinary Surveillance Network (SAVSNET), from 143 practices (329 sites) in Great Britain. Mixed logistic regression models were used to assess the association between socioeconomic factors and species and breed ownership, and preventative health care interventions. Dogs made up 64.8% of the veterinary-visiting population, with cats, rabbits and other species making up 30.3, 2.0 and 1.6% respectively. Compared to cats, dogs and rabbits were more likely to be purebred and younger. Neutering was more common in cats (77.0%) compared to dogs (57.1%) and rabbits (45.8%). The insurance and microchipping relative frequency was highest in dogs (27.9 and 53.1%, respectively). Dogs in the veterinary-visiting population belonging to owners living in least-deprived areas of Great Britain were more likely to be purebred, neutered, insured and microchipped. The same association was found for cats in England and for certain parameters in Wales and Scotland. The differences we observed within these populations are likely to impact on the clinical diseases observed within individual veterinary practices that care for them. Based on this descriptive study, there is an indication that the population structures of companion animals co-vary with human and environmental factors such as the predicted socioeconomic level linked to the owner's address. This 'co-demographic' information suggests that further

  18. Randomized, controlled, prospective clinical trial of autologous greater omentum free graft versus autogenous cancellous bone graft in radial and ulnar fractures in miniature breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Baltzer, Wendy I; Nemanic, Sarah

    2018-02-19

    To determine the rate of radiographic healing, complications, vascularization, and bone density after repair of radial and ulnar fractures in dogs <6 kg that were treated with an autogenous cancellous bone graft (BG) or free autologous omentum graft (OG). Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial with owners/radiologists blinded to treatment. 25 dogs with naturally occurring traumatic radial/ulnar fractures. Fractures underwent plate fixation with OG or BG. Power Doppler ultrasonographic, computed tomographic (CT), and radiographic examinations of the affected antebrachium were performed preoperatively and every 3 weeks postoperatively until healed. Pressure-sensitive walkway gait analysis and owner and veterinarian assessments were obtained preoperatively (0 weeks) and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 weeks postoperatively. Owner/veterinarian assessments improved postoperatively but did not differ significantly between groups. The improvement in peak vertical force/vertical impulse was greater in dogs with OG than in those with BG, beginning 3 weeks postoperatively. Radiographic healing occurred earlier in bones treated with OG (median, 9 weeks) than in those treated with BG (12 weeks). Cortical bone density derived from CT of the distal ulna was higher in bones with BG compared with bones with OG. Signal intensity and the number of vessels in the fracture callus declined over time in both groups, according to results of ultrasonography. However, bones retained more vessels and greater signal intensity when treated with OG compared with treatment with BG, according to multiple views at 6 and 9 weeks postoperatively. Omental grafting was not associated with major complications, and it accelerated bone healing and return to weight bearing in dogs. Omental grafting should be considered as an adjunct to stabilization of antebrachial fractures in toy and small breed dogs. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Investigation of breeding strategies to increase the probability that German shepherd dog and Labrador retriever dog guides would attain optimum size.

    PubMed

    Helmink, S K; Shanks, R D; Leighton, E A

    2003-12-01

    An optimum-sized dog guide weighs 18 to 32 kg and measures 53 to 64 cm in height at the withers when mature body size is attained. Effects of selection index with and without restrictions, independent trait selection, directional selection, stabilizing selection, and negative assortative mating were modeled using data from German shepherd dogs and Labrador retrievers raised by the Seeing Eye, Inc., Morristown, NJ from 1979 to 1997. The selection goals were to decrease mature weight and mature height in German shepherd dogs and to decrease mature weight and increase mature height in Labrador retrievers. Mature weights were recorded for 1,333 German shepherd dog offspring and their 69 dams and 17 sires, and 1,081 Labrador retriever offspring and their 51 dams and 13 sires. Mature heights also were recorded for offspring and parents, including 871 German shepherd dogs from 70 dams and 15 sires, and 793 Labrador retrievers from 40 dams and 13 sires. Selecting on mature weight alone produced the highest aggregate genetic-economic gain for German shepherd dogs compared with the selection indices with and without restrictions, generating a 2.10-kg decrease in mature weight and a correlated 0.36-cm decrease in mature height. In Labrador retrievers, selecting for mature height alone produced the highest aggregate genetic-economic gain but caused an increase in mature weight. Weighting the two traits equally but in the opposite direction without restrictions was the only index that produced the desired effect of decreasing mature weight and increasing mature height in Labrador retrievers. Response to selection for one generation of directional selection for a single trait included a 0.50-kg decrease in mature weight for German shepherd dogs, a 0.59-kg decrease in mature weight for Labrador retrievers, a 0.18-cm decrease in mature height for German shepherd dogs, and a 0.91-cm increase in mature height for Labrador retrievers. Increasing the percentage of dogs attaining

  20. Seroprevalence and factors associated with seropositivity to equine arteritis virus in Spanish Purebred horses in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F; Fores, P; Mughini-Gras, L; Ireland, J; Moreno, M A; Newton, R

    2016-09-01

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA), a disease caused by infection with the equine arteritis virus (EAV), is present in many European countries. In Spain, the last confirmed outbreak was reported in 1992 and there is a paucity of seroprevalence studies. The disease has a major impact on the equine breeding industry, which is mainly represented by Spanish Purebred (SP) horses in Spain. To estimate the seroprevalence of EAV in the breeding SP horse population in central Spain and identify potential horse and studfarm level factors associated with seropositivity to EAV. Cross-sectional study. Individual serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013 at 35 studfarms, were tested using a commercially available EAV antibody ELISA and seroneutralisation as the World Organisation for Animal Health reference confirmation test for samples with positive and equivocal results. Data on factors putatively associated with seropositivity to EAV were collected via a questionnaire and examined using random effects logistic regression for analysis of clustered data. Equine arteritis virus seroprevalence in the SP breeding population in central Spain standardised for the sex distribution of the reference horse population, was estimated to be 16.8% (95% confidence interval 5.2-28.5%). Increasing numbers of breeding mares on the studfarm and increasing percentage of mares with reproductive problems during the last 12 months were identified as being positively associated with EAV seropositivity. Mares vaccinated against Equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) and/or -4 (EHV-4) were also positively associated with EAV seropositivity. These findings are of importance to ensure appropriate biosecurity measures for studfarms are carried out and may help facilitate the development of an EVA surveillance programme in the SP breeding horse population. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Comparison of molecular breeding values based on within- and across-breed training in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of genomic predictors based on within-breed training looks promising, it is necessary to develop and evaluate across-breed predictors for the technology to be fully applied in the beef industry. The efficacies of genomic predictors trained in one breed and utilized to predict genetic merit in differing breeds based on simulation studies have been reported, as have the efficacies of predictors trained using data from multiple breeds to predict the genetic merit of purebreds. However, comparable studies using beef cattle field data have not been reported. Methods Molecular breeding values for weaning and yearling weight were derived and evaluated using a database containing BovineSNP50 genotypes for 7294 animals from 13 breeds in the training set and 2277 animals from seven breeds (Angus, Red Angus, Hereford, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Limousin, and Simmental) in the evaluation set. Six single-breed and four across-breed genomic predictors were trained using pooled data from purebred animals. Molecular breeding values were evaluated using field data, including genotypes for 2227 animals and phenotypic records of animals born in 2008 or later. Accuracies of molecular breeding values were estimated based on the genetic correlation between the molecular breeding value and trait phenotype. Results With one exception, the estimated genetic correlations of within-breed molecular breeding values with trait phenotype were greater than 0.28 when evaluated in the breed used for training. Most estimated genetic correlations for the across-breed trained molecular breeding values were moderate (> 0.30). When molecular breeding values were evaluated in breeds that were not in the training set, estimated genetic correlations clustered around zero. Conclusions Even for closely related breeds, within- or across-breed trained molecular breeding values have limited prediction accuracy for breeds that were not in the training set. For breeds in the training

  2. Meat and nutritional quality comparison of purebred and crossbred pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Chai, Jie; Luo, Zonggang; He, Hang; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xueqin; Zhou, Qinfei

    2018-01-01

    Crossbreeding is an effective method of improving the efficiency and profit of production in commercial pig operations. To understand the effect of crossbreeding on meat and nutrient quality, a combination including three purebred (Duroc, D; Landrace, L; Yorkshire, Y) and two crossbred pig lines (Landrace × Yorkshire, LY; Duroc × (Landrace × Yorkshire), DLY) frequently used internationally were studied. The results showed that meat from the LY and DLY crosses had lower values for lightness L24h∗, shear force and epinephrine and higher values for drip loss, C18:1, insulin, glucagon and monounsaturated fatty acids than D, L and Y pigs. Moreover, LY had higher values for post mortem pH and lower values for a* and b* than the purebreds. In contrast, DLY had lower values for pH and higher values for a* and b* than the purebreds. Meat quality-related gene analysis showed that the CAST, IGF2 and MC4R gene expression levels in the LY and DLY pigs were significantly higher than those in the D, L and Y pigs. These results indicate that crossbreeding can alter the meat quality, nutritive value, energy metabolism and gene expression of pigs. Future research should focus on microRNA expression and DNA methylation that regulate gene expression and thus affect the meat quality. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Simpson's method of discs for measurement of echocardiographic end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes: breed-specific reference ranges in Boxer dogs.

    PubMed

    Smets, P; Daminet, S; Wess, G

    2014-01-01

    Boxer dogs are predisposed to congenital and adult onset cardiac diseases. Breed-specific reference values for M-mode and Doppler echocardiographic measurements previously have been established. Left ventricular (LV) end-systolic (ESV) and end-diastolic volumes (EDV) can be measured by M-mode or two-dimensional methods, such as Simpson's method of discs (SMOD). Reference ranges for SMOD-derived LV volumes are lacking. To determine reference intervals for EDV and ESV in Boxer dogs. Previously collected data from 85 healthy Boxers (37 males and 48 females) were used for analysis. Simpson's method of discs-derived EDV and ESV were measured using offline analysis by 1 observer, in both the right parasternal and the left apical views. Measurements were compared between both views and between male and female dogs using a t-test. Reference intervals were established using the mean + 2 × SD. Measurements obtained from both views showed good agreement, and mean EDVI and ESVI, indexed to body surface area (BSA), were calculated. Reference intervals were 49-93 mL/m² for EDVI, and 22-50 mL/m² for ESVI. EDV and ESV were significantly higher in males compared with females, when indexing to BSA, but not when indexing to body weight. The upper limit for ESVI exceeds the previously suggested cut-off of 30 mL/m² for detection of systolic dysfunction. The reference intervals generated in this study should be useful clinically in the assessment of LV size and function in Boxer dogs. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs: 102 cases (2008-2015).

    PubMed

    De Arburn Parent, Rebecca; Benamou, Jérôme; Gatineau, Matthieu; Clerfond, Pierre; Planté, Jérôme

    2017-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine outcomes and complication rates of open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 102 miniature- and toy-breed dogs (105 fractures) weighing ≤ 7 kg (15.4 lb) that had undergone open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of a fracture involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna from 2008 through 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and information extracted regarding dog and fracture characteristics, surgical variables, and follow-up examination data (including postoperative complications). Postoperative radiographs were examined for distal fragment size, implant placement, apposition, alignment, and healing stage. A long-term follow-up questionnaire was completed by telephone interview with dog owners at least 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Mean length of the distal bone fragment in all fractures was 19.2 mm, with a mean distal-to-total radial length ratio of 0.21. At last follow-up examination (typically 6 weeks after surgery), 97 (95%) dogs had no signs of lameness; minor lameness was identified in 5 (5%) dogs. Complications developed in 26 (25%) fractures (23 [22%] minor and 3 [3%] major complications). Sixty-eight of 71 (96%) owners rated the overall and long-term outcome as excellent and 3 (4%) as good; 68 of 71 (96%) dogs reportedly had no signs of residual lameness. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation for the treatment of radius-ulna fractures in miniature- and toy-breed dogs provided an excellent outcome with a low complication rate.

  5. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries.

  6. Freedom from equine infectious anaemia virus infection in Spanish Purebred horses

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fatima; Fores, Paloma; Ireland, Joanne; Moreno, Miguel A.; Newton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction No cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) have been reported in Spain since 1983. Factors that could increase the risk of reintroducing equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) into Spain include the recent occurrence of the disease in Europe and the absence of compulsory serological testing before importation into Spain. Aims and objectives Given the importance of the Spanish Purebred (SP) horse breeding industry in Spain, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide evidence of freedom from EIAV in SP stud farms in Central Spain. Materials and methods Serum samples from 555 SP horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercially available EIAV ELISA with a published sensitivity of 100 per cent. Results All 555 samples were negative for antibody to EIAV, providing evidence of a true EIAV seroprevalence between 0 per cent and 0.53 per cent (95% CIs of the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA technique used Q10 were 100 per cent and 99.3 per cent, respectively) among the SP breeding population in Central Spain. Conclusions These findings should serve to increase confidence when exporting SP horses to other countries. PMID:26392894

  7. No Dog Left Behind: A Hedonic Pricing Model for Animal Shelters.

    PubMed

    Reese, Laura A; Skidmore, Mark; Dyar, William; Rosebrook, Erika

    2017-01-01

    Companion animal overpopulation is a growing problem in the United States. In addition to strays, an average of 324,500 nonhuman animals are relinquished to shelters yearly by their caregivers due to family disruption (divorce, death), foreclosure, economic problems, or minor behavioral issues. As a result, estimates of animals in shelters range from 3 million to 8 million, and due to overcrowding, euthanasia is common. This analysis seeks to determine the appropriate pricing mechanisms to clear animal shelters of dogs in the manner most desirable-that is, through adoption. Based on a survey of Michigan residents, it is clear there are a number of correlations between the traits of dogs and the individuals who care for them. Hedonic pricing models indicate that animal shelters need to proactively vary their pricing systems to discount particular traits, specifically for mixed-breed, older, and black dogs. Premiums can be charged for puppies, purebred dogs, and those who have received specific services such as microchipping.

  8. Genomic deletion of CNGB3 is identical by descent in multiple canine breeds and causes achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Achromatopsia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the loss of cone photoreceptor function that results in day-blindness, total colorblindness, and decreased central visual acuity. The most common causes for the disease are mutations in the CNGB3 gene, coding for the beta subunit of the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in cones. CNGB3-achromatopsia, or cone degeneration (cd), is also known to occur in two canine breeds, the Alaskan malamute (AM) and the German shorthaired pointer. Results Here we report an in-depth characterization of the achromatopsia phenotype in a new canine breed, the miniature Australian shepherd (MAS). Genotyping revealed that the dog was homozygous for a complete genomic deletion of the CNGB3 gene, as has been previously observed in the AM. Identical breakpoints on chromosome 29 were identified in both the affected AM and MAS with a resulting deletion of 404,820 bp. Pooled DNA samples of unrelated purebred Australian shepherd, MAS, Siberian husky, Samoyed and Alaskan sled dogs were screened for the presence of the affected allele; one Siberian husky and three Alaskan sled dogs were identified as carriers. The affected chromosomes from the AM, MAS, and Siberian husky were genotyped for 147 SNPs in a 3.93 Mb interval within the cd locus. An identical shared affected haplotype, 0.5 Mb long, was observed in all three breeds and defined the minimal linkage disequilibrium (LD) across breeds. This supports the idea that the mutated allele was identical by descent (IBD). Conclusion We report the occurrence of CNGB3-achromatopsia in a new canine breed, the MAS. The CNGB3-deletion allele previously described in the AM was also observed in a homozygous state in the affected MAS, as well as in a heterozygous carrier state in a Siberian husky and Alaskan sled dogs. All affected alleles were shown to be IBD, strongly suggesting an affected founder effect. Since the MAS is not known to be genetically related to the AM, other

  9. Effect of pre-warming on perioperative hypothermia and anesthetic recovery in small breed dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Aarnes, Turi K.; Bednarski, Richard M.; Lerche, Phillip; Hubbell, John A.E.

    2017-01-01

    This study compared perianesthetic body temperatures and times to recovery from general anesthesia in small dogs that were either warmed for 20 minutes prior to anesthesia or not warmed. Twenty-eight client-owned dogs that were presented for ovariohysterectomy were included in the study. Small (<10 kg body weight) dogs with normal circulatory status were randomly assigned to receive pre-warming for 20 minutes or no treatment. Body temperature was measured during the procedure using a calibrated rectal probe. Duration of anesthesia and surgery, time to rescue warming, time to extubation, presence and duration of shivering, and time to return to normal temperature were recorded. Temperature at the end of surgery was significantly higher in the control group than the pre-warmed group. There was no difference in time to extubation or duration of postoperative shivering between groups. Pre-warming did not result in improved temperature or recovery from anesthesia. PMID:28216687

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of canine distemper virus strains detected from breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Jun; Yan, Xi-Jun; Chai, Xiu-Li; Martella, Vito; Luo, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Gao, Han; Liu, Ying-Xue; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Tao; Xu, Lei; Zhao, Chun-Fei; Wang, Feng-Xue; Shao, Xi-Qun; Wu, Wei; Cheng, Shi-Peng

    2010-01-06

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infects a variety of carnivores, including wild and domestic Canidae. Genetic/antigenic heterogeneity has been observed among the various CDV strains, notably in the haemagglutinin (H) gene, that appears as a good target to gather epidemiological information. Based on sequence analysis of the H gene, wild-type CDV strains cluster into distinct geographic lineages (genotypes), irrespective of the species of isolation. The sequence of the H gene of 28 CDV strains detected from both vaccinated and non-vaccinated breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks from different geographical areas of China during the years 2004-2008 was determined. All the CDV strains but two (strains HL and HLJ2) were characterized as Asia-1 genotype and were highly similar to each other (96.2-99.7% at the amino acid [aa] level) and to other Asia-1 strains (96.1-99.5% aa) previously detected in China. The CDV strains HL and HLJ2 were both collected from foxes in Heilongjiang province in 2005. Strain HL resembled CDVs of the Arctic genotype (GR88-like) and displayed high aa identity (98.0%) to the Chinese canine strain Liu. By converse, strain HLJ2 was barely related to CDVs of the Asia-2 genotype (88.7-90.3% aa identity), and could represent a novel CDV genotype, tentatively proposed as Asia-3. These results suggest that at least three different CDV genotypes, distantly related (81.8-91.6% aa identity) to the vaccine strains, Onderstepoort-like (America-1 genotype), are currently circulating in breeding foxes, raccoon dogs and minks in China, and that the genotype Asia-1 is predominant. Whether the diversity between wild-type CDVs and the vaccine strains may affect, to some extent, the efficacy of the vaccines deserves further investigations.

  11. [Raising fighting dogs].

    PubMed

    Wegner, W

    1990-04-01

    Some experience is reported, referring to court trials of accidents involving members of the so-called "fighting dog" breeds. Analysis of the situation makes obvious that many breeders and owners of these or similar dogs demonstrate an irresponsible attitude, thereby fostering breed standards which should be corrected. A future solution of this problem and of others could only be brought about by a law, which would regulate companion animal breeding and ownership. A ban on special breeds or their integration into a "Dangerous animals act" seems for now to be feasible for breeds only which are explicitly standard-bred for aggressiveness against man. Responsible dog breeding and ownership is postulated in order to avoid a growing aversion against dogs in society, which certainly contributed to the stagnation of the dog population in the FRG during the last years.

  12. Epidemiological Study of Mammary Tumors in Female Dogs Diagnosed during the Period 2002-2012: A Growing Animal Health Problem

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Yaritza; Márquez, Adelys; Diaz, Daniel; Romero, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies enable us to analyze disease behavior, define risk factors and establish fundamental prognostic criteria, with the purpose of studying different types of diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological characteristics of canine mammary tumors diagnosed during the period 2002-2012. The study was based on a retrospective study consisting of 1,917 biopsies of intact dogs that presented mammary gland lesions. Biopsies were sent to the Department of Pathology FMVZ-UNAM diagnostic service. The annual incidence of mammary tumors was 16.8%: 47.7% (benign) and 47.5% (malignant). The highest number of cases was epithelial, followed by mixed tumors. The most commonly diagnosed tumors were tubular adenoma, papillary adenoma, tubular carcinoma, papillary carcinoma, solid carcinoma, complex carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. Pure breeds accounted for 80% of submissions, and the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd were consistently affected. Adult female dogs (9 to 12 years old) were most frequently involved, followed by 5- to 8-year-old females. Some association between breeds with histological types of malignant tumors was observed, but no association was found between breeds and BN. Mammary tumors in intact dogs had a high incidence. Benign and malignant tumors had similar frequencies, with an increase in malignant tumors in the past four years of the study. Epithelial tumors were more common, and the most affected were old adult females, purebreds and small-sized dogs. Mammary tumors in dogs are an important animal health problem that needs to be solved by improving veterinary oncology services in Mexico. PMID:25992997

  13. Epidemiological Study of Mammary Tumors in Female Dogs Diagnosed during the Period 2002-2012: A Growing Animal Health Problem.

    PubMed

    Salas, Yaritza; Márquez, Adelys; Diaz, Daniel; Romero, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies enable us to analyze disease behavior, define risk factors and establish fundamental prognostic criteria, with the purpose of studying different types of diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiological characteristics of canine mammary tumors diagnosed during the period 2002-2012. The study was based on a retrospective study consisting of 1,917 biopsies of intact dogs that presented mammary gland lesions. Biopsies were sent to the Department of Pathology FMVZ-UNAM diagnostic service. The annual incidence of mammary tumors was 16.8%: 47.7% (benign) and 47.5% (malignant). The highest number of cases was epithelial, followed by mixed tumors. The most commonly diagnosed tumors were tubular adenoma, papillary adenoma, tubular carcinoma, papillary carcinoma, solid carcinoma, complex carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. Pure breeds accounted for 80% of submissions, and the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and German Shepherd were consistently affected. Adult female dogs (9 to 12 years old) were most frequently involved, followed by 5- to 8-year-old females. Some association between breeds with histological types of malignant tumors was observed, but no association was found between breeds and BN. Mammary tumors in intact dogs had a high incidence. Benign and malignant tumors had similar frequencies, with an increase in malignant tumors in the past four years of the study. Epithelial tumors were more common, and the most affected were old adult females, purebreds and small-sized dogs. Mammary tumors in dogs are an important animal health problem that needs to be solved by improving veterinary oncology services in Mexico.

  14. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  15. Seroprevalence and factors associated with equine herpesvirus type 1 and 4 in Spanish Purebred horses in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F; Fores, P; Mughini-Gras, L; Ireland, J; Moreno, M A; Newton, J R

    2016-04-16

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) and type 4 (EHV-4) have a worldwide distribution and cause respiratory disease, abortion, neonatal death and myeloencephalopathy in susceptible horses. Given the scarcity of serological EHV-1/EHV-4 data in Spain, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the seroprevalence of EHV-1/EHV-4 and to identify potential horse-level and stud farm-level factors associated with EHV-1/EHV-4 in the breeding Spanish Purebred (SP) horse population in central Spain. Serum samples from 334 SP unvaccinated horses, collected between September 2011 and November 2013 at 30 stud farms, were tested using a commercially available EHV-1/EHV-4 antibody ELISA and seroneutralisation as the World Organisation for Animal Health reference confirmation test. Data on factors putatively associated with seropositivity to EHV-1/EHV-4 were collected via a questionnaire and examined using logistic regression analysis. EHV-1/EHV-4 seroprevalence in the SP breeding population in central Spain, standardised for the sex distribution of the reference horse population, was 53.9 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval 44.0 per cent to 63.8 per cent). Increasing age, southern location of the stud farm, temperate climate during the summer, and a smaller surface area used for breeding activities in the farm were associated with increased odds for EHV-1/EHV-4 seropositivity, whereas EHV-1/EHV-4 vaccination of other resident horses and separation of breeding mares from youngsters were protective factors. British Veterinary Association.

  16. Effectiveness of breed-specific legislation in decreasing the incidence of dog-bite injury hospitalisations in people in the Canadian province of Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Malathi; Martens, Patricia J; Chateau, Dan; Burchill, Charles

    2013-06-01

    The city of Winnipeg was the first among several jurisdictions in Manitoba, Canada, to introduce breed specific legislation (BSL) by banning pit-bull type dogs in 1990. The objective of the present work was to study the effectiveness of BSL in Manitoba. Temporal differences in incidence of dog-bite injury hospitalisations (DBIH) within and across Manitoba jurisdictions with and without BSL were compared. Incidence was calculated as the number of unique cases of DBIH divided by the total person-years at risk and expressed as the number per 100000 person-years. Year of implementation determined the pre-BSL and post-BSL period for jurisdictions with BSL; for jurisdictions without BSL to date, the entire study period (1984-2006) was considered as the preimplementation period. The annual number of DBIH, adjusted for total population at risk, was modelled in a negative binomial regression analysis with repeated measures. Year, jurisdiction and BSL implementation were independent variables. An interaction term between jurisdiction and BSL was introduced. A total of 16 urban and rural jurisdictions with pit-bull bans were identified. At the provincial level, there was a significant reduction in DBIH rates from the pre-BSL to post-BSL period (3.47 (95% CI 3.17 to 3.77) per 100000 person-years to 2.84 (95% CI 2.53 to 3.15); p=0.005). In regression restricted to two urban jurisdictions, DBIH rate in Winnipeg relative to Brandon (a city without BSL) was significantly (p<0.001) lower after BSL (rate ratio (RR)=1.10 in people of all ages and 0.92 in those aged <20 years) than before (RR=1.29 and 1.28, respectively). BSL may have resulted in a reduction of DBIH in Winnipeg, and appeared more effective in protecting those aged <20 years.

  17. An Inversion Disrupting FAM134B Is Associated with Sensory Neuropathy in the Border Collie Dog Breed.

    PubMed

    Forman, Oliver P; Hitti, Rebekkah J; Pettitt, Louise; Jenkins, Christopher A; O'Brien, Dennis P; Shelton, G Diane; De Risio, Luisa; Quintana, Rodrigo Gutierrez; Beltran, Elsa; Mellersh, Cathryn

    2016-09-08

    Sensory neuropathy in the Border Collie is a severe neurological disorder caused by the degeneration of sensory and, to a lesser extent, motor nerve cells with clinical signs starting between 2 and 7 months of age. Using a genome-wide association study approach with three cases and 170 breed matched controls, a suggestive locus for sensory neuropathy was identified that was followed up using a genome sequencing approach. An inversion disrupting the candidate gene FAM134B was identified. Genotyping of additional cases and controls and RNAseq analysis provided strong evidence that the inversion is causal. Evidence of cryptic splicing resulting in novel exon transcription for FAM134B was identified by RNAseq experiments. This investigation demonstrates the identification of a novel sensory neuropathy associated mutation, by mapping using a minimal set of cases and subsequent genome sequencing. Through mutation screening, it should be possible to reduce the frequency of or completely eliminate this debilitating condition from the Border Collie breed population. Copyright © 2016 Forman et al.

  18. An Inversion Disrupting FAM134B Is Associated with Sensory Neuropathy in the Border Collie Dog Breed

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Oliver P.; Hitti, Rebekkah J.; Pettitt, Louise; Jenkins, Christopher A.; O’Brien, Dennis P.; Shelton, G. Diane; De Risio, Luisa; Quintana, Rodrigo Gutierrez; Beltran, Elsa; Mellersh, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neuropathy in the Border Collie is a severe neurological disorder caused by the degeneration of sensory and, to a lesser extent, motor nerve cells with clinical signs starting between 2 and 7 months of age. Using a genome-wide association study approach with three cases and 170 breed matched controls, a suggestive locus for sensory neuropathy was identified that was followed up using a genome sequencing approach. An inversion disrupting the candidate gene FAM134B was identified. Genotyping of additional cases and controls and RNAseq analysis provided strong evidence that the inversion is causal. Evidence of cryptic splicing resulting in novel exon transcription for FAM134B was identified by RNAseq experiments. This investigation demonstrates the identification of a novel sensory neuropathy associated mutation, by mapping using a minimal set of cases and subsequent genome sequencing. Through mutation screening, it should be possible to reduce the frequency of or completely eliminate this debilitating condition from the Border Collie breed population. PMID:27527794

  19. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from breeding dogs housed in kennels with differing neonatal mortality and use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Milani, C; Corrò, M; Drigo, M; Rota, A

    2012-10-01

    This work examines the antimicrobial resistance of potentially pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Streptococcus canis, Escherichia coli) found in the vaginal tract in prepartum mammary secretions and postpartum milk of bitches housed in breeding kennels (N = 20; 92 bitches). The kennels were divided into three categories: no routine antimicrobial administration around parturition (category 1); routine administration of one antibiotic around parturition (category 2); routine administration of multiple antimicrobials around parturition (category 3). Bacteriological cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on vaginal specimens, prepartum mammary secretions, and postpartum milk. Stillbirths and neonatal deaths were recorded for each whelping and analyzed as "within-litter stillbirths" and "within-litter neonatal deaths" according to kennel category, by Pearson χ(2) test and the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, respectively. The frequency of isolation and antimicrobial resistance of bacteria were analyzed according to kennel category by Pearson χ(2) test. Kennel category was not significantly associated with differing numbers of stillbirths or neonatal death events, nor was the frequency of isolation of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the three kennel categories significantly different. Kennel category 3 had a significantly higher frequency of isolation of multiresistant gram-positive bacterial strains. Our results show that intense administration of antibiotics to breeding bitches does not effectively reduce neonatal mortality; on the contrary, it induces multiresistance in potentially pathogenic bacteria. Breeders and veterinarians should be aware of the risk of selecting pathogenic bacteria by uncontrolled treatment in prepartum bitches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical Efficacy of Bone Reconstruction Surgery with Frozen Cortical Bone Allografts for Nonunion of Radial and Ulnar Fractures in Toy Breed Dogs.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Shuntaro; Nagahiro, Yukari; Katori, Daichi; Muroi, Norihiro; Akagi, Hiroyuki; Kanno, Nobuo; Harada, Yasuji; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Hayashi, Kei; Hara, Yasushi

    2018-04-23

     To evaluate the effectiveness of frozen cortical bone allografts (FCBA) in the treatment of severe radial and ulnar atrophic nonunion fractures.  Toy breed dogs with nonunion of radial and ulnar fractures ( n  = 15).  Severe atrophic nonunion fractures were treated with FCBA (eight infected and seven non-infected fractures). Radiographs obtained immediately after surgery, and 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months later were evaluated and scored for the periosteal reaction at the bone regeneration sites, the healing process in the bone connection areas at both the proximal and distal sites, and the bone remodelling process within the allografts.  Improvements in the fracture-healing process and weight-bearing function were observed in all cases. Radiographic scores at the bone connection areas and within the allograft improved significantly over time ( p  < 0.05). There were not any significant differences in radiographic scores between the infected and non-infected groups.  Bone reconstruction with FCBA is effective in the treatment of radial and ulnar nonunion fractures associated with large bone defects, regardless of the infection status of the surgical site. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  1. [Dangerous dogs in Berlin in comparison to the dog population--ways to reduce the dangerousness of dogs].

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Franziska; Struwe, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The law for handling and control of dogs in Berlin of September 29, 2004 was enacted to prevent the risks for humans and animals when ever they have contact with dogs. "Dangerous dogs" are defined by this law. There are 10 breeds of dogs supposed to be dangerous due to specific characteristics of their breed ("listed breeds"). The dangerousness of a dog's breed is not identical with the dangerousness of an individual dog. The subject of this study is to examine the potential dangerousness of dog breeds and not the individual dangerousness of a dog. This study refers to statistics of incidents between dogs and humans in Berlin for the years 1998 to 2004. The population density of a breed is based on the dogs assessed for tax purposes in Berlin of January 1, 2005 and on the dog registrations maintained at veterinary hospitals. The fourfold-table-test was used to compare the quantity of the recorded incidents of two statistically independent dog breeds. Of the total population of 107,804 tax assessed dogs in Berlin in 2004, 0.9% was documented as dogs involved in incidents with humans. The incidents per year decreased in the "listed breeds"about 68% and in the "unlisted breeds" about 41% during the last 7 years in Berlin. Therefore, the probability (the odds ratio) of a breed to be conspicuous was analysed. The values for the calculation of this probability were the number of dogs of a breed having been involved in incidents compared to the population of this breed based on tax records. The comparison of the probability of a breed with another to be conspicuous was used to compile a cluster of breeds which had the same probability to be conspicuous in 2004. A cluster was assessed for dogs of the following breeds: Sheep dogs, Rottweiler, Doberman, Pitbull Terrier and American Staffordshire Terrier. A listing of breeds is not the right way to reduce the potential dangerousness of a dog, especially in the private domain of their owners. Most incidents with dogs occur in

  2. Genome-wide mapping for fatty acid composition and melting point of fat in a purebred Duroc pig population.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, Y; Soma, Y; Sato, S; Ishida, M; Shibata, T; Kadowaki, H; Kobayashi, E; Suzuki, K

    2012-02-01

    The fatty acid composition and melting point of fatty tissue are among the most important economic traits in pig breeding because of their influence on the eating quality of meat. Identifying the quantitative trait locus (QTL) of these traits may help reveal the genetic structure of fatty acid composition and the melting point of fatty tissue and improve meat-quality traits by marker-assisted selection. We conducted whole-genome QTL analysis for fatty acid composition and melting point of inner and outer subcutaneous fat and inter- and intramuscular fat in a purebred Duroc population. A total of 129 markers were genotyped and used for QTL analysis. For fatty acid compositions of inner and outer subcutaneous fat, three significant QTL and 17 suggestive QTL were detected on SSC2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14 and 18. For the melting point of inner and outer subcutaneous fat, two significant QTL were detected on the same region of SSC14. For fatty acid compositions of inter- and intramuscular fat, five significant QTL and 13 suggestive QTL were detected on SSC2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 14 and 15. On SSC14, significant QTL for C18:0 and C18:1 of outer subcutaneous fat and intramuscular fat, and melting point of subcutaneous fat, which had high likelihood of odds (LOD) scores (2.67-5.78), were detected in the same region. This study determined QTL affecting fatty acid composition and melting point of different fat tissues in purebred Duroc pigs. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. Effects of low phosphorus supply on the availability of calcium and phosphorus, and musculoskeletal development of growing dogs of two different breeds.

    PubMed

    Kiefer-Hecker, B; Kienzle, E; Dobenecker, B

    2018-02-02

    To investigate the impact of a selective reduction in dietary phosphorus (P) supply on healthy growing dogs, a total of 23 Beagles and 30 Foxhound crossbreds (FBI) were used in a feeding trial between 6 and 24 weeks of age. Sixteen Beagles and 19 FBI were fed with selectively reduced P concentrations (low phosphorus, LP). The remaining puppies received a completely balanced control diet (CON). With these diets, the P supply in the Beagles at the age of 12 weeks added up to 2.5 ± 0.6 (LP) and 9.8 ± 1.4 g P/kg DM (CON), and in the FBI 4.3 ± 0.9 (LP) and 13.0 ± 1.6 g P/kg DM (CON). Therefore, the LP Beagles received an average of 33 ± 11% of the recommended daily allowances (RDA) of P, the LP FBI 41 ± 11%. The calcium (Ca) concentration stayed unaltered and led to a Ca/P ratio above the recommended range of 1.3/1 to 2/1. The apparent digestibility (aD) of phosphorus was reduced in the LP Beagle; otherwise, the aD of both minerals was not affected by the P concentration of the diet. The renal excretion of P was reduced to zero in both LP groups while the renal calcium excretion increased significantly. Several of the puppies from both breeds showed impaired appetite, growth, skin and fur quality, and a few also clinically showed relevant signs of a disturbed musculoskeletal system after the LP feeding. A rapid loss of muscle strength and posture within hours led to severe deviation of the limb axis with hyperflexion of the joints but no radiological aberrations or signs of pain. Immediate transition of affected puppies to a balanced diet with sufficient phosphorus resulted in a complete recovery of the puppies in less than one month. The results demonstrate the importance of an adequate P supply on the healthy development of growing dogs. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. 9 CFR 151.9 - Recognized breeds and books of record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... restricted to Thoroughbreds imported as follows: (a) Horses bred or born in the United States, shipped to a...; (c) horses from countries where a book of purebred registration for Thoroughbreds does not exist; or... following breeds: Provided, That no Belted Galloway cattle, horse of Criolla, Fjordhest (formerly known as...

  5. Milk production and fertility performance of Holstein, Friesian, and Jersey purebred cows and their respective crosses in seasonal-calving commercial farms.

    PubMed

    Coffey, E L; Horan, B; Evans, R D; Berry, D P

    2016-07-01

    There is renewed interest in dairy cow crossbreeding in Ireland as a means to further augment productivity and profitability. The objective of the present study was to compare milk production and fertility performance for Holstein, Friesian, and Jersey purebred cows, and their respective crosses in 40 Irish spring-calving commercial dairy herds from the years 2008 to 2012. Data on 24,279 lactations from 11,808 cows were available. The relationship between breed proportion, as well as heterosis and recombination coefficients with performance, was quantified within a mixed model framework that also contained the fixed effects of parity; cow and contemporary group of herd-year-season of calving were both included as random effects in the mixed model. Breed proportion was associated with all milk production parameters investigated. Milk yield was greatest for Holstein (5,217kg), intermediate for Friesian (4,591kg), and least for Jersey (4,230kg), whereas milk constituents (i.e., fat and protein concentration) were greatest for Jersey (9.38%), intermediate for Friesian (7.91%), and least for Holstein (7.75%). Yield of milk solids in crossbred cows exceeded their respective parental average performance; greatest milk solids yield (i.e., fat kg + protein kg) was observed in the Holstein × Jersey first-cross, yielding 25kg more than the mid-parent mean. There was no consistent breed effect on the reproductive traits investigated. Relative to the mid-parent mean, Holstein × Jersey cows calved younger as heifers and had a shorter calving interval. Friesian × Jersey first-cross cows also had a shorter calving interval relative to their mid-parent mean. Results were consistent with findings from smaller-scale controlled experiments. Breed complementarity and heterosis attainable from crossbreeding resulted in superior animal performance and, consequently, greater expected profitability in crossbred cows compared with their respective purebreds. Copyright © 2016 American

  6. [Assessment of a Bullterrier bloodline in the temperament test of Lower Saxony--comparison with six dog breeds affected by breed specific legislation and a control group of Golden Retrievers].

    PubMed

    Ott, Stefanie; Schalke, Esther; Hirschfeld, Jennifer; Hackbarth, Hansjoachim

    2009-04-01

    The expertise on the interpretation of section 11b TierSchG implies a hypertrophy of aggressive behaviour in some bloodlines of Bullterriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, and Pitbull type dogs. This study aimed at finding out whether a hypertrophy of aggressive behaviour occurred in a certain Bullterrier bloodline. Dogs of this line were tested according to the guidelines of the Dangerous Animals Act of Lower Saxony, Germany (GefTVO) enacted on July 5th 2000. The Bullterriers' test results towards humans and environment were compared to those of 415 dogs affected by the legislation (Mittmann, 2002) and those of 70 Golden Retrievers (Johann, 2004) in order to detect possible differences in the occurrence of inadequate or disturbed aggressive behaviour. Of 38 Bullterriers, ten showed no aggressive behaviour towards humans and the environment. 27 dogs displayed visual or acoustic threats at most. Only one dog reacted by "biting or attacking with preceding threatening behaviour". Thus, according to the test guidelines, 37 dogs (97.37%) reacted appropriately in all test situations. Only one dog (2.63%) displayed inadequate agressive behaviour. No indication for inadequate or disturbed aggressive behaviour in this Bullterrier bloodline was found. Furthermore, no significant differences were found when comparing Bullterriers and dogs of the two others studies concerning inadequate or disturbed aggressive towards humans and the environment. On the contrary, throughout the entire study the broad majority of dogs proved to possess excellent social skills as well as the ability to communicate competently and to solve conflicts appropriately.

  7. Genetic and Non-Genetic Inheritance of Natural Antibodies Binding Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin in a Purebred Layer Chicken Line

    PubMed Central

    Berghof, T. V. L.; van der Klein, S. A. S.; Arts, J. A. J.; Parmentier, H. K.; van der Poel, J. J.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are defined as antibodies present in individuals without known antigenic challenge. Levels of NAb binding keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in chickens were earlier shown to be heritable, and to be associated with survival. Selective breeding may thus provide a strategy to improve natural disease resistance. We phenotyped 3,689 white purebred laying chickens for KLH binding NAb of different isotypes around 16 weeks of age. Heritabilities of 0.12 for the titers of total antibodies (IgT), 0.14 for IgM, 0.10 for IgA, and 0.07 for IgG were estimated. We also estimated high, positive genetic, and moderate to high, positive phenotypic correlations of IgT, IgM, IgA, and IgG, suggesting that selective breeding for NAb can be done on all antibody isotypes simultaneously. In addition, a relatively substantial non-genetic maternal environmental effect of 0.06 was detected for IgM, which may reflect a transgenerational effect. This suggests that not only the genes of the mother, but also the maternal environment affects the immune system of the offspring. Breaking strength and early eggshell whiteness of the mother’s eggs were predictive for IgM levels in the offspring, and partly explained the observed maternal environmental effects. The present results confirm that NAb are heritable, however maternal effects should be taken into account. PMID:26114750

  8. Prevalence and Geographic Distribution of Vector-Borne Pathogens in Apparently Healthy Dogs in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Mrljak, Vladimir; Kuleš, Josipa; Mihaljević, Željko; Torti, Marin; Gotić, Jelena; Crnogaj, Martina; Živičnjak, Tatjana; Mayer, Iva; Šmit, Iva; Bhide, Mangesh; Barić Rafaj, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Vector-borne pathogens (VBPs) are a group of globally extended and quickly spreading pathogens that are transmitted by various arthropod vectors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the seroprevalence against Babesia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Ehrlichia canis in dogs in Croatia. We investigated 435 randomly selected apparently healthy dogs in 13 different locations of Croatia for antibodies to B. canis by indirect immunofluorescence using a commercial IFA IgG Antibody Kit. All samples were also tested for qualitative detection of D. immitis antigen and for antibodies to A. phagocytophilum, B. burgdorferi sensu lato, L. infantum, and E. canis with two point-of-care assays. Overall, 112 dogs (25.74%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 21.70-30.12) were serologically positive for one or more of the pathogens. B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen (20.00%, 95% CI 16.34-24.07), followed by A. phagocytophilum (6.21%, 95% CI 4.12-8.90), L. infantum, (1.38%, 95% CI 0.51-2.97), and B. burgdorferi sensu lato (0.69%, 95% CI 0.01-2.00). The lowest seroprevalence was for D. immitis and E. canis (0.46%, 95% CI 0.01-1.65). Coinfection was determined in 12 dogs (2.76%, 95% CI 1.43-4.77), of which 10 were positive to two pathogens (7 with B. canis and A. phagocytophilum and 1 B. canis with B. burgdorferi sensu lato or L. infantum or E. canis). One dog was positive to three pathogens and another dog to four pathogens. Seroprevalence for babesia was age, breed, and lifestyle/use dependent. Purebred dogs had almost half the chance of developing disease than crossbred (OR = 0.58, p < 0.026, 95% CI 0.37-0.94). Seropositivity to B. canis was 3.41 times higher for dogs that lived outdoors/shelter (p < 0.006) or 4.57 times higher in mixed/hunting (p < 0.001) compared to indoor/companion dogs. This is the first comprehensive survey of VBP seropositivity conducted in Croatia. Some

  9. Breeding replacement gilts for organic pig herds.

    PubMed

    Leenhouwers, J I; Ten Napel, J; Hanenberg, E H A T; Merks, J W M

    2011-02-01

    In this study, breeding structures and commercial sow lines were evaluated by economic and genetic simulation studies for their suitability to provide the Dutch organic pig sector with replacement gilts. Sow and litter performance from over 2000 crossbred sows from 2006 to 2007 were collected on 11 to 14 Dutch organic pig herds, respectively, and compared with conventional herds. Results showed that organic herds had lower farrowing rates (3.6% to 7.5%), more live born piglets per litter (0.4% to 1.2%) and higher preweaning mortality rates (7% to 13%) compared to conventional herds. These results were used to simulate economic performance of various combinations of breeding structures and sow lines under organic conditions, under the assumption of absence of genotype-environment interactions. Sow and litter performance data under organic conditions (total piglets born/litter, stillborn piglets/litter, mortality until weaning, lactation length, interval weaning-oestrus and sow culling rate) and the costprice calculation for the Dutch organic pig sector were used as input for the economic simulation studies. The expected genetic progress was simulated for three potential breeding structures of the organic sector: organic breeding herds producing F1 gilts (OrgBS), a flower breeding system (FlowerBS) and a two-line rotation breeding system (RotBS). In FlowerBS, an organic purebred sow line is bred, using on-farm gilt replacement. The OrgBS with a Yorkshire × Landrace cross had the highest margin per sow place (€779), followed by RotBS with Yorkshire × Landrace cross (€706) and FlowerBS with Yorkshire sow line (€677). In case that an organic purebred sow population of 5000 sows would be available, FlowerBS gave the highest genetic progress in terms of cost price reduction (€3.72/slaughter pig per generation), followed by RotBS and OrgBS (€3.60/slaughter pig per generation). For FlowerBS, additional costs will be involved for maintaining a dedicated breeding

  10. Genetic basis of leg health and its relationship with body weight in purebred turkey lines

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, P. M.; Glover, P. K.; Kremer, V. D.; Avendaño, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to estimate the genetic parameters for leg and foot health and mobility in purebred turkey lines and their genetic correlations with BW. Traits were gait score (GS) as an overall measure of leg health, footpad dermatitis (FPD), and 2 skeletal leg health traits, namely, valgus and varus deformities (VVD) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD). Data from 4 different lines, comprising 3 yr of phenotypic records and 4 yr of pedigree information per line, were used. The sex average BW for the lines at 18 wk ranged from 19.1 kg (line A) to 12.4 kg (line D). The prevalence of VVD ranged from 5.2 to 14.6% and for TD from 4.1 to 23.2%. The average score for FPD on a scale of 0 to 100 ranged from 48.5 to 61.1. Gait Score was scored on a scale of 1 to 5, standardized to a mean of 3 and SD of 1. Heritabilities were estimated at 0.08 to 0.13 for GS, 0.01 to 0.07 for VVD, 0.06 to 0.12 for TD, and 0.10 to 0.15 for FPD (all SE ≤ 0.02). Estimates of the genetic correlations between VVD and TD ranged from 0.03 to 0.21 (all SE ≤ 0.08), and estimates of these with GS ranged from 0.07 to 0.87 (all SE ≤ 0.09). The genetic correlations of FPD with GS ranged from 0.00 to 0.34 (all SE ≤ 0.04), and with the skeletal leg health traits from -0.06 to 0.33 (all SE ≤ 0.06). Body weight showed estimated genetic correlations ranging from 0.28 to 0.51 (all SE ≤ 0.06) with GS, -0.06 to 0.50 (all SE ≤ 0.13) with VVD/TD and 0.05 to 0.34 (all SE ≤ 0.05) with FPD. The results suggest that selection for improved leg health can be incorporated effectively in a commercial turkey breeding program using balanced breeding goals, in which production traits and leg health traits are considered simultaneously. PMID:28339774

  11. A Novel Form of Progressive Retinal Atrophy in Swedish Vallhund Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ann E.; Ahonen, Saija; Rowlan, Jessica S.; Duncan, Alison; Seppälä, Eija H.; Vanhapelto, Päivi; Lohi, Hannes; Komáromy, András M.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), represent leading causes of incurable blindness in humans. This is also true in dogs, where the term progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is used to describe inherited photoreceptor degeneration resulting in progressive vision loss. Because of the similarities in ocular anatomy, including the presence of a cone photoreceptor-rich central retinal region, and the close genotype-phenotype correlation, canine models contribute significantly to the understanding of retinal disease mechanisms and the development of new therapies. The screening of the pure-bred dog population for new forms of PRA represents an important strategy to establish new large animal models. By examining 324 dogs of the Swedish vallhund breed in seven countries and across three continents, we were able to describe a new and unique form of PRA characterized by the multifocal appearance of red and brown discoloration of the tapetal fundus followed over time by thinning of the retina. We propose three stages of the disease based on the appearance of the ocular fundus and associated visual deficits. Electroretinography revealed a gradual loss of both rod and cone photoreceptor-mediated function in Stages 2 and 3 of the disease. In the few dogs that suffered from pronounced vision loss, night-blindness occurred first in late Stage 2, followed by decreased day-vision in Stage 3. Histologic examinations confirmed the loss of photoreceptor cells at Stage 3, which was associated with the accumulation of autofluorescent material in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium. Pedigree analysis was suggestive of an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Mutations in six known canine retinal degeneration genes as well as hypovitaminosis E were excluded as causes of the disease. The observed variability in the age of disease onset and rate of progression suggest the presence of genetic and/or environmental

  12. Fasting urinary calcium-to-creatinine and oxalate-to-creatinine ratios in dogs with calcium oxalate urolithiasis and breed-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Furrow, E; Patterson, E E; Armstrong, P J; Osborne, C A; Lulich, J P

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria are risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolithiasis, but breed-specific reports of urinary metabolites and their relationship with stone status are lacking. To compare urinary metabolites (calcium and oxalate) and blood ionized calcium (iCa) concentrations between CaOx stone formers and breed-matched stone-free controls for the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. Forty-seven Miniature Schnauzers (23 cases and 24 controls), 27 Bichons Frise (14 cases and 13 controls), and 15 Shih Tzus (7 cases and 8 controls). Prospective study. Fasting spot urinary calcium-to-creatinine and oxalate-to-creatinine ratios (UCa/Cr and UOx/Cr, respectively) and blood iCa concentrations were measured and compared between cases and controls within and across breeds. Regression models were used to test the effect of patient and environmental factors on these variables. UCa/Cr was higher in cases than controls for each of the 3 breeds. In addition to stone status, being on a therapeutic food designed to prevent CaOx stone recurrence was associated with higher UCa/Cr. UOx/Cr did not differ between cases and controls for any of the breeds. Blood iCa was higher in cases than controls in the Miniature Schnauzer and Bichon Frise breeds and had a moderate correlation with UCa/Cr. Hypercalciuria is associated with CaOx stone status in the Miniature Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, and Shih Tzu breeds. UOx/Cr did not correlate with stone status in these 3 breeds. These findings may influence breed-specific stone prevention recommendations. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  13. Genomic selection for crossbred performance accounting for breed-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marcos S; Bovenhuis, Henk; Hidalgo, André M; van Arendonk, Johan A M; Knol, Egbert F; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2017-06-26

    Breed-specific effects are observed when the same allele of a given genetic marker has a different effect depending on its breed origin, which results in different allele substitution effects across breeds. In such a case, single-breed breeding values may not be the most accurate predictors of crossbred performance. Our aim was to estimate the contribution of alleles from each parental breed to the genetic variance of traits that are measured in crossbred offspring, and to compare the prediction accuracies of estimated direct genomic values (DGV) from a traditional genomic selection model (GS) that are trained on purebred or crossbred data, with accuracies of DGV from a model that accounts for breed-specific effects (BS), trained on purebred or crossbred data. The final dataset was composed of 924 Large White, 924 Landrace and 924 two-way cross (F1) genotyped and phenotyped animals. The traits evaluated were litter size (LS) and gestation length (GL) in pigs. The genetic correlation between purebred and crossbred performance was higher than 0.88 for both LS and GL. For both traits, the additive genetic variance was larger for alleles inherited from the Large White breed compared to alleles inherited from the Landrace breed (0.74 and 0.56 for LS, and 0.42 and 0.40 for GL, respectively). The highest prediction accuracies of crossbred performance were obtained when training was done on crossbred data. For LS, prediction accuracies were the same for GS and BS DGV (0.23), while for GL, prediction accuracy for BS DGV was similar to the accuracy of GS DGV (0.53 and 0.52, respectively). In this study, training on crossbred data resulted in higher prediction accuracy than training on purebred data and evidence of breed-specific effects for LS and GL was demonstrated. However, when training was done on crossbred data, both GS and BS models resulted in similar prediction accuracies. In future studies, traits with a lower genetic correlation between purebred and crossbred

  14. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  15. Inheritance of cytosine methylation patterns in purebred versus hybrid chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Sun, D X; Li, J L; Liu, R; Wang, Y C; Zhang, Y

    2013-07-30

    We used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism to examine DNA methylation levels and CCGG patterns in parents and offsprings of 3 groups of adult chickens, purebred White Leghorn (AA), White Plymouth Rock (EE), and crossbred individuals (EA) using 10 primer combinations. We found that about 66% of the cytosines at CCGG sites were not methylated. Fully methylated sites were less frequent than hemi-methylated sites in the chicken genome; these frequencies were different from those of plants. We observed that the probability that the offspring would inherit the methylation pattern for any given site from the parents was 88%; consequently, unexpected methylation patterns in offspring occurred at a rate of about 12%. The methylation degree in offspring was lower than in parents, and there were more sites with altered methylation patterns in EA crossbreds compared with AA and EE purebreds. Seven differentially methylated fragments between parental lines and their offspring were isolated, sequenced, and characterized, 4 of which were located in the coding regions. We conclude that most of the methylation status is transferred from parents to offspring in chickens, and that there are differences in the inheritance of methylation status in purebred versus crossbred offspring. We also concluded that methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism is highly efficient for large-scale detection of cytosine methylation in the chicken genome.

  16. Morphometry of skin changes in Newfoundland dogs following coat clipping.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; Regal, Keren; Loeb, Emmanuel

    2013-06-01

    Dog breeds are unique in their coat conformation and quality. Newfoundland dogs have a long and fine hair coat, and clipping may induce changes in newly grown hair. This study examined structural changes in the skin of Newfoundland dogs following clipping. Dogs included in the study had visible coat changes following clipping that appeared as loss of gloss, increased scaling and textural changes. The control groups consisted of two groups of dogs that had never been clipped: Newfoundland dogs served as within-breed controls, and long-haired dogs of other breeds served as between-breed controls. All dogs were healthy with no history of dermatological problems. Two skin biopsies were taken from each dog and evaluated for predetermined parameters. A total of 41 samples were examined: 11 from clipped Newfoundland dogs, 16 from unclipped ones, and 14 from dogs of other breeds. By histopathology, the clipped dogs had a thicker cornified layer (P=0.006) and smaller sebocytes (P=0.022) than the unclipped ones. Newfoundlands had larger and more epitrichial sweat glands than other breeds (P=0.0002, P=0.036, respectively), and those were not affected by clipping. These results suggest that hyperkeratosis and decreased sebocyte size may explain the observed coat changes following clipping in Newfoundland dogs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogenetic Distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian Village Dog Y Chromosomes Illuminates Dog Origins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sarah K.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L.; Ahrens, Kristen D.; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N.

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog. PMID:22194840

  18. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah K; Pedersen, Niels C; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L; Ahrens, Kristen D; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  19. Prediction of the reliability of genomic breeding values for crossbred performance.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Windig, Jack J; Calus, Mario P L

    2017-05-12

    In crossbreeding programs, various genomic prediction models have been proposed for using phenotypic records of crossbred animals to increase the selection response for crossbred performance in purebred animals. A possible model is a model that assumes identical single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects for the crossbred performance trait across breeds (ASGM). Another model is a genomic model that assumes breed-specific effects of SNP alleles (BSAM) for crossbred performance. The aim of this study was to derive and validate equations for predicting the reliability of estimated genomic breeding values for crossbred performance in both these models. Prediction equations were derived for situations when all (phenotyping and) genotyping data have already been collected, i.e. based on the genetic evaluation model, and for situations when all genotyping data are not yet available, i.e. when designing breeding programs. When all genotyping data are available, prediction equations are based on selection index theory. Without availability of all genotyping data, prediction equations are based on population parameters (e.g., heritability of the traits involved, genetic correlation between purebred and crossbred performance, effective number of chromosome segments). Validation of the equations for predicting the reliability of genomic breeding values without all genotyping data was performed based on simulated data of a two-way crossbreeding program, using either two closely-related breeds, or two unrelated breeds, to produce crossbred animals. The proposed equations can be used for an easy comparison of the reliability of genomic estimated breeding values across many scenarios, especially if all genotyping data are available. We show that BSAM outperforms ASGM for a specific breed, if the effective number of chromosome segments that originate from this breed and are shared by selection candidates of this breed and crossbred reference animals is less than half the

  20. Polymorphisms in ten candidate genes are associated with conformational and locomotive traits in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Sevane, Natalia; Dunner, Susana; Boado, Ana; Cañon, Javier

    2017-08-01

    The Spanish Purebred horses, also known as Andalusian horses, compete to the highest standards in international dressage events. Gait and conformation could be used as early selection criteria to detect young horses with promising dressage ability. Although the genetic background of equine size variation has been recently uncovered, the genetic basis of horse conformational and locomotive traits is not known, hampered by the complex genetic architecture underlying quantitative traits and the lack of phenotypic data. The aim of this study was to validate the loci associated with size in 144 Spanish Purebred horses, and to seek novel associations between loci previously associated with the development of osteochondrosis (OC) lesions and 20 conformational and locomotive traits. Ten loci were associated with different conformational and locomotive traits (LCORL/NCAPG, HMGA2, USP31, MECR, COL24A1, MGP, FAM184B, PTH1R, KLF3 and SGK1), and the LCORL/NCAPG association with size in the Spanish Purebred horse was validated. Except for HMGA2, all polymorphisms seem to influence both the prevalence of OC lesions and morphological characters, supporting the link between conformation and OC. Also, the implication of most genes in either immune and inflammatory responses and cellular growth, or ossification processes, reinforces the role that these mechanisms have in the aetiology of OC, as well as their reflection on the general conformation of the individual. These polymorphisms could be used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) programmes to improve desirable conformational traits, but taking into account their possible detrimental effect on OC prevalence.

  1. Gene flow between wolf and shepherd dog populations in Georgia (Caucasus).

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Natia; Shakarashvili, Maia; Gurielidze, Zurab; Qurkhuli, Tamar; Tarkhnishvili, David

    2014-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and microsatellite genotypes at 8 loci in 102 gray wolves, 57 livestock guarding dogs, and 9 mongrel dogs from Georgia (Caucasus). Most of the studied dogs had mitochondrial haplotypes clustered with presumably East Asian dog lineages, and most of the studied wolves had the haplotypes clustered with European wolves, but 20% of wolves and 37% of dogs shared the same mitochondrial haplotypes. Bayesian inference with STRUCTURE software suggested that more than 13% of the studied wolves had detectable dog ancestry and more than 10% of the dogs had detectable wolf ancestry. About 2-3% of the sampled wolves and dogs were identified, with a high probability, as first-generation hybrids. These results were supported by the relatedness analysis, which showed that 10% of wolves and 20% of dogs had closest relatives from an opposite group. The results of the study suggest that wolf-dog hybridization is a common event in the areas where large livestock guarding dogs are held in a traditional way, and that gene flow between dogs and gray wolves was an important force influencing gene pool of dogs for millennia since early domestication events. This process may have been terminated 1) in areas outside the natural range of gray wolves and 2) since very recent time, when humans started to more tightly control contacts of purebred dogs.

  2. XX Disorder of Sex Development is associated with an insertion on chromosome 9 and downregulation of RSPO1 in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris).

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N; Boyko, Adam R; Danko, Charles G; Grenier, Jennifer K; Mezey, Jason G; Hayward, Jessica J; Shannon, Laura M; Gao, Chuan; Shafquat, Afrah; Rice, Edward J; Pujar, Shashikant; Eggers, Stefanie; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Sinclair, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been achieved in understanding the mechanisms controlling sex determination, yet the cause for many Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) remains unknown. Of particular interest is a rare XX DSD subtype in which individuals are negative for SRY, the testis determining factor on the Y chromosome, yet develop testes or ovotestes, and both of these phenotypes occur in the same family. This is a naturally occurring disorder in humans (Homo sapiens) and dogs (C. familiaris). Phenotypes in the canine XX DSD model are strikingly similar to those of the human XX DSD subtype. The purposes of this study were to identify 1) a variant associated with XX DSD in the canine model and 2) gene expression alterations in canine embryonic gonads that could be informative to causation. Using a genome wide association study (GWAS) and whole genome sequencing (WGS), we identified a variant on C. familiaris autosome 9 (CFA9) that is associated with XX DSD in the canine model and in affected purebred dogs. This is the first marker identified for inherited canine XX DSD. It lies upstream of SOX9 within the canine ortholog for the human disorder, which resides on 17q24. Inheritance of this variant indicates that XX DSD is a complex trait in which breed genetic background affects penetrance. Furthermore, the homozygous variant genotype is associated with embryonic lethality in at least one breed. Our analysis of gene expression studies (RNA-seq and PRO-seq) in embryonic gonads at risk of XX DSD from the canine model identified significant RSPO1 downregulation in comparison to XX controls, without significant upregulation of SOX9 or other known testis pathway genes. Based on these data, a novel mechanism is proposed in which molecular lesions acting upstream of RSPO1 induce epigenomic gonadal mosaicism.

  3. XX Disorder of Sex Development is associated with an insertion on chromosome 9 and downregulation of RSPO1 in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Adam R.; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Mezey, Jason G.; Hayward, Jessica J.; Shannon, Laura M.; Gao, Chuan; Shafquat, Afrah; Rice, Edward J.; Eggers, Stefanie; Ohnesorg, Thomas; Sinclair, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been achieved in understanding the mechanisms controlling sex determination, yet the cause for many Disorders of Sex Development (DSD) remains unknown. Of particular interest is a rare XX DSD subtype in which individuals are negative for SRY, the testis determining factor on the Y chromosome, yet develop testes or ovotestes, and both of these phenotypes occur in the same family. This is a naturally occurring disorder in humans (Homo sapiens) and dogs (C. familiaris). Phenotypes in the canine XX DSD model are strikingly similar to those of the human XX DSD subtype. The purposes of this study were to identify 1) a variant associated with XX DSD in the canine model and 2) gene expression alterations in canine embryonic gonads that could be informative to causation. Using a genome wide association study (GWAS) and whole genome sequencing (WGS), we identified a variant on C. familiaris autosome 9 (CFA9) that is associated with XX DSD in the canine model and in affected purebred dogs. This is the first marker identified for inherited canine XX DSD. It lies upstream of SOX9 within the canine ortholog for the human disorder, which resides on 17q24. Inheritance of this variant indicates that XX DSD is a complex trait in which breed genetic background affects penetrance. Furthermore, the homozygous variant genotype is associated with embryonic lethality in at least one breed. Our analysis of gene expression studies (RNA-seq and PRO-seq) in embryonic gonads at risk of XX DSD from the canine model identified significant RSPO1 downregulation in comparison to XX controls, without significant upregulation of SOX9 or other known testis pathway genes. Based on these data, a novel mechanism is proposed in which molecular lesions acting upstream of RSPO1 induce epigenomic gonadal mosaicism. PMID:29053721

  4. Apricot Breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apricot orchard area and fruit production are increasing worldwide. Breeding programs engage in apricot development to provide new varieties to meet needs of producers and consumers. Over the last 20 years, breeders have used new techniques to assist in variety development and to increase breeding...

  5. Molecular breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of molecular and genomic tools to assist selection of parents or progeny has become an integral part of modern cotton breeding. In this chapter, the basic components of molecular cotton breeding are described. These components include: molecular marker development, genetic and physical map const...

  6. Population networks associated with runs of homozygosity reveal new insights into the breeding history of the Haflinger horse.

    PubMed

    Druml, Thomas; Neuditschko, Markus; Grilz-Seger, Gertrud; Horna, Michaela; Ricard, Anne; Mesaric, Matjaz; Cotman, Marco; Pausch, Hubert; Brem, Gottfried

    2017-12-26

    Within the scope of current genetic diversity analyses, population structure and homozygosity measures are independently analysed and interpreted. To enhance analytical power, we combined the visualization of recently described high-resolution population networks with runs of homozygosity (ROH). In this study, we demonstrate that this approach enabled us to reveal important aspects of the breeding history of the Haflinger horse. We collected high-density genotype information of 531 horses originating from seven populations which were involved in the formation of the Haflinger, namely 32 Italian Haflingers, 78 Austrian Haflingers, 190 Noriker, 23 Bosnian Mountain Horses, 20 Gidran, 33 Shagya Arabians, and 155 Purebred Arabians. Model-based cluster analysis identified substructures within Purebred Arabian, Haflinger and Noriker that reflected distinct genealogy (Purebred Arabian), geographic origin (Haflinger) and coat colour patterns (Noriker). Analysis of ROH revealed that the two Arabian populations (Purebred and Shagya Arabians), Gidran and the Bosnian Mountain Horse had the highest genome proportion covered by ROH segments (306Mb - 397Mb). The Noriker and the Austrian Haflinger showed the lowest ROH coverage (228Mb, 282Mb). Our combined visualization approach made it feasible to clearly identify outbred (admixture) and inbred (ROH segments) horses. Genomic inbreeding coefficients (FROH) ranged from 10.1% (Noriker) to 17.7% (Purebred Arabian). Finally it could be demonstrated, that the Austrian Haflinger sample has a lack of longer ROH segments and a deviating ROH spectrum, which is associated with past bottleneck events and the recent mating strategy favouring out-crosses within the breed. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [Lens luxation in dogs: a retrospective study of 134 dogs (2000-2011)].

    PubMed

    Betschart; Hässig; Spiess

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluated cases of lens luxation in dogs that were documented at the University of Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2000 and 2011. A total 134 dogs were included in the study. This population of dogs with lens luxation represents 0.41 % of all dogs presented to the Zurich Veterinary Teaching Hospital (32'523) and 3.02 % of all dogs presented to the ophthalmology service during the same time period. The 134 dogs represented over 40 different breeds, including mixed breeds. 63 of the dogs were male, 71 were female. The 134 dogs were divided in primary lens luxation (86 of the 134 dogs, 64 %) and secondary lens luxation (48 dogs, 36 %). The most frequent causes for secondary lens luxation were glaucoma (58 %), cataract (19 %) and trauma (17 %). This study shows the predisposition for primary lens luxations in terrier breeds, Chinese Crested dogs, Pinscher and Spitz. In contrast, Siberian Huskies, Basset Hounds, Bearded Collies, Cairn Terriers, mixed breed dogs, Bolonka Zwetna, Boston Terriers, Borzoi, Doberman, Eurasian, Leonberg, Luzerner Niederlaufhund and Weimaraner suffered significantly more often from secondary lens luxation. There was no sex predilection for primary or secondary lens luxation. Dogs with primary lens luxation were on average 7.39 ± 3.02 years old, which is significantly younger than the dogs with secondary lens luxation (9.12 ± 3.38 years). Dogs with primary lens luxation showed a significantly higher rate of a bilateral development than those with secondary lens luxation (85.5 % of the dogs with primary lens luxation and only 14.5 % of the dogs with secondary lens luxation showed it in both their eyes).

  8. Effect of 30 months in a locked environment on the microbial flora of dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balish, E.; Shih, C.-N.; Yale, C. E.; Mandel, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    It has been proposed that the microbial flora of mammals would simplify to a few microbial species if the host animal was confined to a 'locked' environment and provided with sterile food, water, and air. This paper updates information on the microbial profile (feces, nose and throat) of purebred beagles housed in the above-mentioned conditions through a 30-month study period and demonstrates that no drastic decrease or simplification of the microbial profile occurred in isolated or control dogs.

  9. Suppurative, nonseptic polyarthropathy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Mark P; Walton, Raquel M; Bissett, Sally; Drobatz, Kenneth J; Washabau, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the historical, physical examination, and clinicopathologic findings in dogs with suppurative, nonseptic polyarthropathy and to identify concurrent disorders associated with this syndrome. Medical records of 52 dogs with cytologic evidence of suppurative inflammation in two or more joints were examined retrospectively. Age of dogs was 4.8 years (median, range: 0.5-12 years). There was no clear breed or sex predilection, but most were large-breed dogs (body weight > or = 20 kg [44.4 lbs] in 40/52). Body temperature was 103.0 degrees F (39.4 degrees C) (median, range: 100.0-105.9 degrees F), with 29 of 52 dogs having a body temperature > or = 103 degrees F (39.4 degrees C). Lameness was identified in 42 of 52 dogs. Erosive changes were found in only 1 of 37 dogs that had radiography performed. A clear underlying disease process was not identified in 34 of 52 dogs. Seven dogs had evidence of infectious or inflammatory processes at extra-articular sites; 4 dogs were diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); 2 dogs had gastrointestinal disease; 2 dogs had been vaccinated within 1 month before onset of polyarthritis; 1 dog had cancer; 1 dog had polyarthritis and meningitis; and 1 dog had erosive polyarthritis. Of the 44 dogs tested, 25 had antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, detected by an ELISA assay, which was significantly greater than the general hospital population (P = .007). Antibodies against Rickettsia rickettsiae and Ehrlichia canis were not definitively identified in the sera of any dog tested in this study (45 and 44 dogs, respectively). We conclude that an underlying disease process is not identified in most cases of suppurative polyarthropathy in dogs and that intestinal disease, neoplasia, and SLE are uncommon causes of polyarthritis. While seropositivity against the causative agent of Lyme disease was common and possibly a cause of polyarthritis in some dogs of our study, evidence of other vector

  10. Gestational diabetes mellitus in 13 dogs.

    PubMed

    Fall, T; Johansson Kreuger, S; Juberget, A; Bergström, A; Hedhammar, A

    2008-01-01

    There are few reports on the clinical appearance, prognosis, and risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in dogs. To describe the clinical characteristics of GDM in dogs. Thirteen dogs with GDM. Retrospective study. Medical records were reviewed and owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up information. Nordic Spitz breeds (11/13 dogs) were overrepresented in the case material. Diagnosis was established at a median of 50 days after mating (range, 32-64). Median glucose concentration at diagnosis was 340 mg/dL (18.9 mmol/L) (range, 203-587). One dog was euthanized at diagnosis, 5 bitches were treated with insulin until whelping, and in 7 dogs, pregnancy was terminated within 4 days of diagnosis. One dog died after surgery. Tight glycemic control was not achieved in any of the insulin-treated dogs during pregnancy. Diabetes mellitus (DM) resolved in 7 dogs at a median of 9 days after the end of their pregnancies and DM was permanent in 4 dogs. Puppy mortality was increased compared with offspring of healthy dams. This report suggests that GDM affects mainly middle-aged bitches in the 2nd half of pregnancy with a breed predisposition toward Nordic Spitz breeds. GDM may resolve within days to weeks after pregnancy has ended. Further research is needed to investigate optimal treatment regimens for dogs with GDM and risk factors for unsuccessful outcome.

  11. Effectiveness of breeding guidelines for reducing the prevalence of syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Knowler, S P; McFadyen, A K; Rusbridge, C

    Several toy breed dogs are predisposed to syringomyelia (SM), a spinal cord disorder, characterised by fluid-filled cavitation. SM is a complex trait with a moderately high heritability. Selective breeding against SM is confounded by its complex inheritance, its late onset nature and high prevalence in some breeds. This study investigated the early outcome of existing SM breeding guidelines. Six hundred and forty-three dogs, 550 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS) and 93 Griffon Bruxellois (GB), were identified as having either one (454 dogs) or both parents (189 dogs) with MRI-determined SM status. Offspring without SM were more common when the parents were both clear of SM (SM-free; CKCS 70 per cent, GB 73 per cent). Conversely, offspring with SM were more likely when both parents had SM (SM-affected; CKCS 92 per cent, GB 100 per cent). A mating of one SM-free parent with an SM-affected parent was risky for SM affectedness with 77 per cent of CKCS and 46 per cent of GB offspring being SM-affected. It is recommended that all breeding dogs from breeds susceptible to SM be MRI screened; that the SM status at five years old is established; and all results submitted to a central database that can be used by dog breeders to better enable mate selection based on estimated breeding values.

  12. How dogs drink water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, Jake; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2014-11-01

    Animals with incomplete cheeks (i.e. dogs and cats) need to move fluid against gravity into the body by means other than suction. They do this by lapping fluid with their tongue. When a dog drinks, it curls its tongue posteriorly while plunging it into the fluid and then quickly withdraws its tongue back into the mouth. During this fast retraction fluid sticks to the ventral part of the curled tongue and is drawn into the mouth due to inertia. We show several variations of this drinking behavior among many dog breeds, specifically, the relationship between tongue dynamics and geometry, lapping frequency, and dog weight. We also compare the results with the physical experiment of a rounded rod impact onto a fluid surface. Supported by NSF PoLS #1205642.

  13. Incidence and impact of dog attacks on guide dogs in the UK.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; Moxon, R; England, G C W

    2010-06-19

    In a retrospective survey, researchers identified 100 incidents of attacks on guide dogs by other dogs. These were reviewed in order to determine the number, severity and impact on the handler and dog, and the characteristics of the aggressors and victims. During the study period there were more than three attacks reported each month, with 61 per cent of the attacks being upon dogs that were in harness and working with an owner or trainer. The majority of the dogs that were attacked were male (62 per cent), and the breeds that were over-represented (relative to their prevalence in the general guide dog population) were the labrador and the golden retriever x flat-coated retriever crossbreed. Most of the attacks occurred in public places between 09.00 and 15.00 and the majority (61 per cent) of the attacking dogs were off the lead at the time of the attack. Thirty-eight per cent of the attacking dogs were of bull breeds, which were over-represented among attackers compared with the proportion of this breed type in the general dog population. Veterinary attention was sought after 41 per cent of the attacks, and in 19 per cent of instances there was injury to the handler or to a member of the public. The attacks were reported to have affected the working performance and behaviour of the victim dog in 45 per cent of the instances, and two dogs had to be subsequently withdrawn from working as guide dogs.

  14. 19 CFR 10.71 - Purebred animals; bond for production of evidence; deposit of estimated duties; stipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Animals and Birds § 10.71 Purebred animals; bond for production of evidence; deposit of estimated duties; stipulation. (a) The animal may be released from Customs custody upon the furnishing by the importer of a bond on Customs Form 301, containing the bond conditions...

  15. 19 CFR 10.71 - Purebred animals; bond for production of evidence; deposit of estimated duties; stipulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Animals and Birds § 10.71 Purebred animals; bond for production of evidence; deposit of estimated duties; stipulation. (a) The animal may be released from Customs custody upon the furnishing by the importer of a bond on Customs Form 301, containing the bond conditions...

  16. Review: Towards the agroecological management of ruminants, pigs and poultry through the development of sustainable breeding programmes. II. Breeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Phocas, F; Belloc, C; Bidanel, J; Delaby, L; Dourmad, J Y; Dumont, B; Ezanno, P; Fortun-Lamothe, L; Foucras, G; Frappat, B; González-García, E; Hazard, D; Larzul, C; Lubac, S; Mignon-Grasteau, S; Moreno, C R; Tixier-Boichard, M; Brochard, M

    2016-11-01

    Agroecology uses ecological processes and local resources rather than chemical inputs to develop productive and resilient livestock and crop production systems. In this context, breeding innovations are necessary to obtain animals that are both productive and adapted to a broad range of local contexts and diversity of systems. Breeding strategies to promote agroecological systems are similar for different animal species. However, current practices differ regarding the breeding of ruminants, pigs and poultry. Ruminant breeding is still an open system where farmers continue to choose their own breeds and strategies. Conversely, pig and poultry breeding is more or less the exclusive domain of international breeding companies which supply farmers with hybrid animals. Innovations in breeding strategies must therefore be adapted to the different species. In developed countries, reorienting current breeding programmes seems to be more effective than developing programmes dedicated to agroecological systems that will struggle to be really effective because of the small size of the populations currently concerned by such systems. Particular attention needs to be paid to determining the respective usefulness of cross-breeding v. straight breeding strategies of well-adapted local breeds. While cross-breeding may offer some immediate benefits in terms of improving certain traits that enable the animals to adapt well to local environmental conditions, it may be difficult to sustain these benefits in the longer term and could also induce an important loss of genetic diversity if the initial pure-bred populations are no longer produced. As well as supporting the value of within-breed diversity, we must preserve between-breed diversity in order to maintain numerous options for adaptation to a variety of production environments and contexts. This may involve specific public policies to maintain and characterize local breeds (in terms of both phenotypes and genotypes), which could

  17. [The smallest toy dog from the Roman empire].

    PubMed

    Boessneck, J

    1989-01-01

    This study deals with osseous remains of the smallest breed of dogs found in deposits related to the Roman Imperial period. The bone material has been collected at the Colonia Ulpia Traiana near Xanten on the Rhine. It has been observed that the bones match in size with the smallest breeds of dogs known today.

  18. Canine Connection: Dog 2--Fun Activities for You and Your Dog. 4-H Skills for Life Animal Series. National 4-H Curriculum. BU-08167

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National 4-H Council, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Youth explore more about dog health, nutrition, and care, genetic problems, population control, showmanship, training, ethics and budgeting. Youth who engage in this curriculum will develop essential dog project skills such as selecting a dog; investigating breeds; appreciating dogs' places and roles in society; practicing grooming, fitting,…

  19. Leading the Pack: Dog 3--Fun Activities for You and Your Dog. 4-H Skills for Life Animal Series. National 4-H Curriculum. BU-08168

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National 4-H Council, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Experienced youth investigate responsible breeding, diseases, caring for geriatric dogs, training, service dogs, dog roles and careers related to dogs. This guide provides youth with numerous leadership opportunities. Because youth development programs help build tomorrow's leaders, leadership is a strong theme in Level 3 activities. One will be…

  20. Effect of a prolonged stay in a locked environment on the microbial flora in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balish, E.; Shih, C.-N.; Yale, C. E.; Mandel, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ten purebred Beagle dogs (all males) were used to determine the effect of a prolonged stay in a locked environment (i.e., no exogenous microbial contamination) on the microbial flora. At monthly intervals the microbial profile (feces, nose, and throat) of each dog was assessed. After 12 months it was found there was no drastic alteration or simplification of the microbial profile of isolated or control dogs. Although isolated dogs had slightly higher levels of anaerobic bacteria and somewhat lower levels of enterococci, the major groups of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria remained qualitatively and quantitatively similar for the 12-month study period. Although they were only minor components of the fecal flora, Candida albicans and Shigella sonnei were consistently isolated in larger numbers from the dogs in the locked environment.

  1. Physiological breeding.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Langridge, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Physiological breeding crosses parents with different complex but complementary traits to achieve cumulative gene action for yield, while selecting progeny using remote sensing, possibly in combination with genomic selection. Physiological approaches have already demonstrated significant genetic gains in Australia and several developing countries of the International Wheat Improvement Network. The techniques involved (see Graphical Abstract) also provide platforms for research and refinement of breeding methodologies. Recent examples of these include screening genetic resources for novel expression of Calvin cycle enzymes, identification of common genetic bases for heat and drought adaptation, and genetic dissection of trade-offs among yield components. Such information, combined with results from physiological crosses designed to test novel trait combinations, lead to more precise breeding strategies, and feed models of genotype-by-environment interaction to help build new plant types and experimental environments for future climates. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Longitudinal study of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system in purebred Spanish broodmares during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Satué, K; Domingo, R

    2011-04-15

    During pregnancy, the coordinated interaction of the components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a vital role in accommodating the cardiovascular, haemodynamic and haematological needs imposed by foetal development and the placenta. This significantly influences the birth weight of the neonate and foetal viability. Although the evolution of each of the components of this system has been widely described in various species, it has not yet been clarified in the mare. Thus, the objectives of the present research were: 1) to establish reference values for renin (REN), angiotensin II (ANG-II) and aldosterone (ALD) concentrations in Spanish broodmares, and 2) to analyse the evolution of the aforementioned components during pregnancy. Thirty-one Purebred Spanish broodmares aged between 5 and 15 years old were studied for 11 months of pregnancy and compared to a control group composed of 11 non-pregnant Spanish mares. Morning venous blood samples were drawn on a monthly basis during pregnancy and pre-treated to prevent degradation until subsequent analysis. Serum REN, ANG-II and ALD concentrations were analysed by competitive immunoassay. This study found that pregnancy in Purebred Spanish broodmares is characterised by a gradual increase in REN concentrations, variable fluctuations in ALD concentrations, and no significant modifications in ANG-II concentrations. These results could provide potentially valuable information in understanding the physiological basis of the RAAS in mares, since we have been able to establish specific reference ranges for these components, as well as obtaining information on their evolution during pregnancy. As is often the case in other animal species, the increase in RAAS activity is a natural physiological process that occurs during pregnancy in Spanish broodmares. This may also be related to certain metabolic and hormone responses that contribute to the control of homeostasis in pregnant mares. Copyright © 2011

  3. Simulated Breeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unemi, Tatsuo

    This chapter describes a basic framework of simulated breeding, a type of interactive evolutionary computing to breed artifacts, whose origin is Blind Watchmaker by Dawkins. These methods make it easy for humans to design a complex object adapted to his/her subjective criteria, just similarly to agricultural products we have been developing over thousands of years. Starting from randomly initialized genome, the solution candidates are improved through several generations with artificial selection. The graphical user interface helps the process of breeding with techniques of multifield user interface and partial breeding. The former improves the diversity of individuals that prevents being trapped at local optimum. The latter makes it possible for the user to fix features he/she already satisfied. These methods were examined through artistic applications by the author: SBART for graphics art and SBEAT for music. Combining with a direct genome editor and exportation to another graphical or musical tool on the computer, they can be powerful tools for artistic creation. These systems may contribute to the creation of a type of new culture.

  4. Identification of the mutation causing progressive retinal atrophy in Old Danish Pointing Dog.

    PubMed

    Karlskov-Mortensen, P; Proschowsky, H F; Gao, F; Fredholm, M

    2018-04-06

    Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) is a common cause of blindness in many dog breeds. It is most often inherited as a simple Mendelian trait, but great genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated both within and between breeds. In many breeds the genetic cause of the disease is not known, and until now, the Old Danish Pointing Dog (ODP) has been one of those breeds. ODP is one of the oldest dog breeds in Europe. Seventy years ago the breed almost vanished, but today a population still exists, primarily in Denmark but with some dogs in Germany and Sweden. PRA has been diagnosed in ODP since the late 1990s. It resembles late onset PRA in other dog breeds, and it is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In the present study, we performed whole-genome sequencing and identified a single base insertion (c.3149_3150insC) in exon 1 of C17H2orf71. This is the same mutation previously found to cause PRA in Gordon Setters and Irish Setters, and it was later found in Tibetan Terrier, Standard Poodle and the Polski Owczarek Nizinny. The presence of the mutation in such a diverse range of breeds indicates an origin preceding creation of modern dog breeds. Hence, we screened 262 dogs from 44 different breeds plus four crossbred dogs, and can subsequently add Miniature Poodle and another polish sheepdog, the Polski Owczarek Podhalanski, to the list of affected breeds. © 2018 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  5. Dog sperm head morphometry: its diversity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Soler, Carles; Alambiaga, Ana; Martí, Maria A; García-Molina, Almudena; Valverde, Anthony; Contell, Jesús; Campos, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Dogs have been under strong artificial selection as a consequence of their relationship with man. Differences between breeds are evident that could be reflected in seminal characteristics. The present study was to evaluate differences in sperm head morphometry between seven well-defined breeds of dog: the British Bulldog, Chihuahua, German Shepherd, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, Staffordshire Terrier, and Valencian Rat Hunting dog. Semen samples were obtained by masturbation and smears stained with Diff-Quik. Morphometric analysis (CASA-Morph) produced four size and four shape parameters. Length, Ellipticity, and Elongation showed higher differences between breeds. MANOVA revealed differences among all breeds. Considering the whole dataset, principal component analysis (PCA) showed that PC1 was related to head shape and PC2 to size. Procluster analysis showed the British Bulldog to be the most isolated breed, followed by the German Shepherd. The PCA breed by breed showed the Chihuahua, Labrador Retriever, Spanish Mastiff, and Staffordshire Terrier to have PC1 related to shape and PC2 to size, whereas the British Bulldog, Valencia Rat Hunting dog, and German Shepherd had PC1 related to size and PC2 to shape. The dendrogram for cluster groupings and the distance between them showed the British Bulldog to be separated from the rest of the breeds. Future work on dog semen must take into account the large differences in the breeds' sperm characteristics. The results provide a base for future work on phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of dogs, based on their seminal characteristics.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10−5 for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes. PMID:26645337

  8. Population genetic study of 10 short tandem repeat loci from 600 domestic dogs in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seo Hyun; Jang, Yoon-Jeong; Han, Myun Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-09-30

    Dogs have long shared close relationships with many humans. Due to the large number of dogs in human populations, they are often involved in crimes. Occasionally, canine biological evidence such as saliva, bloodstains and hairs can be found at crime scenes. Accordingly, canine DNA can be used as forensic evidence. The use of short tandem repeat (STR) loci from biological evidence is valuable for forensic investigations. In Korea, canine STR profiling-related crimes are being successfully analyzed, leading to diverse crimes such as animal cruelty, dog-attacks, murder, robbery, and missing and abandoned dogs being solved. However, the probability of random DNA profile matches cannot be analyzed because of a lack of canine STR data. Therefore, in this study, 10 STR loci were analyzed in 600 dogs in Korea (344 dogs belonging to 30 different purebreds and 256 crossbred dogs) to estimate canine forensic genetic parameters. Among purebred dogs, a separate statistical analysis was conducted for five major subgroups, 97 Maltese, 47 Poodles, 31 Shih Tzus, 32 Yorkshire Terriers, and 25 Pomeranians. Allele frequencies, expected (Hexp) and observed heterozygosity (Hobs), fixation index (F), probability of identity (P(ID)), probability of sibling identity (P(ID)sib) and probability of exclusion (PE) were then calculated. The Hexp values ranged from 0.901 (PEZ12) to 0.634 (FHC2079), while the P(ID)sib values were between 0.481 (FHC2079) and 0.304 (PEZ12) and the P(ID)sib was about 3.35 × 10(-)⁵ for the combination of all 10 loci. The results presented herein will strengthen the value of canine DNA to solving dog-related crimes.

  9. [Testing for general knowledge of dog owners--requirements for courses and examinations].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W D

    2003-05-01

    The expert group of the German Veterinary Chamber has established a frame-work of basic knowledge for education and examination of normal dog owners together with other groups. The most important topics of the theoretical part are: Ethology (social-behaviour, communication dog-human and dog-dog, education, dog-training, learning, psychology, fear, aggression), keeping and caring (prevention, first aid, handling), nutrition and health (diets, vaccination, parasites, diseases), breeding (sexual differences, knowledge about dog-breeds and their needs), dogs in public and family (laws, interaction, obedience, control. The practical part concentrates on the ability of the owner to influence and control his dog, practical handling and the dogs' obedience. Minimum age of owners is 18 years, the dog should be between 18 and 24 months old. The owner has to pass the theoretical exam only once in his/her life, the practical-part has to be repeated with every new dog older than 18 months.

  10. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey.

    PubMed

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1-5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs' behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner's emotion and reactivity to other dogs' behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner's empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog's emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement "My dog is more important for me than any human being". In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose attitudes

  11. [Diseases with relevance to protection of animals with an example of the musculoskeletal system of dogs].

    PubMed

    Petri, S; Distl, O; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Nolte, I

    2000-03-01

    Protection of animals needs major concern in breeding programmes especially if inherited diseases occur which cause pain, suffering and/or damages for the animals. Dogs breeders and people keeping dogs as well as veterinarians should be informed about the etiology on sequels of diseases which cause pain to the animals and from which the animals have to be protected in order to make them more conscious on these problems and to achieve changes in dog breeding programmes. The information system "Inherited Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System of Dogs" should display the already published knowledge about etiology, pathogenesis, appearance, therapy and genetics of these diseases. This information system was built up in such a way that it can be used by students as a learning programme to understand the basic relationships among animal protection, diseases, and dog breeding. The user is also supplied with support for breeding decisions as well as for interpretation of breeding values and genotype probabilities. Additionally, information can be obtained on all in the German Association for Dog Breeding (VDH) represented breeds and breeding clubs. Actions to reduce genetically caused diseases required for members of dog breeding clubs are also available. The information system ist programmed by using HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language). Publication is possible on CD-ROM and on Internet. The supplied hyperlinks allow to make use of other publications on the world wide web related to dog and diseases of dogs.

  12. ADAMTS17 mutation associated with primary lens luxation is widespread among breeds.

    PubMed

    Gould, David; Pettitt, Louise; McLaughlin, Bryan; Holmes, Nigel; Forman, Oliver; Thomas, Anne; Ahonen, Saija; Lohi, Hannes; O'Leary, Caroline; Sargan, David; Mellersh, Cathryn

    2011-11-01

    Primary lens luxation (PLL) is a well-recognized, painful and potentially blinding inherited ocular condition in dogs. We screened PLL-affected dogs of 30 different breeds, to identify those which carried a previously described c.1473+1 G>A mutation in ADAMTS17 that is associated with PLL in Miniature Bull terriers, Lancashire Heelers, and Jack Russell terriers. This ADAMTS17 mutation was identified in PLL-affected dogs from 14 additional breeds. PLL-affected dogs from some breeds (most notably the Shar pei and the Brittany spaniel) did not carry the G1473+1A ADAMTS17 mutation, indicating they must suffer from a genetically distinct form of the condition. We also estimated the frequency of this ADAMTS17 mutation in some of the breeds. Our findings indicate the mutation segregates in a large number of different breeds of dog, many of which are terriers or breeds with terrier co-ancestry, but some of which have more diverse origins. Our results also indicate that the mutation is present at high frequency within most of the breeds in which it segregates. In the miniature bull terrier breed estimates of mutation frequency ranged from 0.27 to 0.39, corresponding to 7.3-15.2% PLL-affected dogs in this breed. We also identified an increased risk of PLL associated with heterozygosity at ADAMTS17, suggesting that carriers carry a low risk of developing PLL. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. Visualization of Genome Diversity in German Shepherd Dogs.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Booth, Rachel; Mazrier, Hamutal; Khatkar, Mehar S; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A loss of genetic diversity may lead to increased disease risks in subpopulations of dogs. The canine breed structure has contributed to relatively small effective population size in many breeds and can limit the options for selective breeding strategies to maintain diversity. With the completion of the canine genome sequencing project, and the subsequent reduction in the cost of genotyping on a genomic scale, evaluating diversity in dogs has become much more accurate and accessible. This provides a potential tool for advising dog breeders and developing breeding programs within a breed. A challenge in doing this is to present complex relationship data in a form that can be readily utilized. Here, we demonstrate the use of a pipeline, known as NetView, to visualize the network of relationships in a subpopulation of German Shepherd Dogs.

  14. Comparison of behavioral characteristics of dogs in the United States and Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Miho; Kanbayashi, Shunichi; Mogi, Kazutaka; Serpell, James A; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the difference in dog owning between Japan and the United States, and the effect of these differences on dogs' behavioral characteristics. Behavioral evaluations of privately-owned dogs were obtained by using online questionnaire. We compared background and demographic information from the two countries and analyzed the effects of these differences on behavioral characteristics in dogs. The results indicated that there was a bias in the dog breeds kept in Japan compared to the United States and that Japanese dogs' body weight was lower than the US dogs. The main source of dog acquisition was pet stores in Japan and breeders and/or shelters in the United States. Multiple linear regression analysis found that Japanese dogs showed more aggression to household members and higher energy, restlessness and fear of non-social stimuli than US dogs, while US dogs showed more fear of unfamiliar persons, separation-related behavior and excitability. US dogs also showed higher levels of trainability and attachment to owners. The lower dog's body weight was, the higher the behavioral scores except for trainability were. When dogs that were obtained under 3 months of age were analyzed, the younger the dogs were when their owners obtained them, the higher the scores on some behavioral problem factors were. The higher rates of problem behaviors among Japanese dogs compared with US dogs suggest that the preference for small breed dogs and poor early development environment influenced the behavioral characteristics of dogs.

  15. Rethinking dog domestication by integrating genetics, archeology, and biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Greger; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Perri, Angela; Webster, Matthew T.; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Peters, Joris; Stahl, Peter W.; Piper, Philip J.; Lingaas, Frode; Fredholm, Merete; Comstock, Kenine E.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Schelling, Claude; Agoulnik, Alexander I.; Leegwater, Peter A.; Dobney, Keith; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Vilà, Carles; Andersson, Leif; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The dog was the first domesticated animal but it remains uncertain when the domestication process began and whether it occurred just once or multiple times across the Northern Hemisphere. To ascertain the value of modern genetic data to elucidate the origins of dog domestication, we analyzed 49,024 autosomal SNPs in 1,375 dogs (representing 35 breeds) and 19 wolves. After combining our data with previously published data, we contrasted the genetic signatures of 121 breeds with a worldwide archeological assessment of the earliest dog remains. Correlating the earliest archeological dogs with the geographic locations of 14 so-called “ancient” breeds (defined by their genetic differentiation) resulted in a counterintuitive pattern. First, none of the ancient breeds derive from regions where the oldest archeological remains have been found. Second, three of the ancient breeds (Basenjis, Dingoes, and New Guinea Singing Dogs) come from regions outside the natural range of Canis lupus (the dog’s wild ancestor) and where dogs were introduced more than 10,000 y after domestication. These results demonstrate that the unifying characteristic among all genetically distinct so-called ancient breeds is a lack of recent admixture with other breeds likely facilitated by geographic and cultural isolation. Furthermore, these genetically distinct ancient breeds only appear so because of their relative isolation, suggesting that studies of modern breeds have yet to shed light on dog origins. We conclude by assessing the limitations of past studies and how next-generation sequencing of modern and ancient individuals may unravel the history of dog domestication. PMID:22615366

  16. Optimizing purebred selection for crossbred performance using QTL with different degrees of dominance

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Jack CM; Chakraborty, Reena

    2004-01-01

    A method was developed to optimize simultaneous selection for a quantitative trait with a known QTL within a male and a female line to maximize crossbred performance from a two-way cross. Strategies to maximize cumulative discounted response in crossbred performance over ten generations were derived by optimizing weights in an index of a QTL and phenotype. Strategies were compared to selection on purebred phenotype. Extra responses were limited for QTL with additive and partial dominance effects, but substantial for QTL with over-dominance, for which optimal QTL selection resulted in differential selection in male and female lines to increase the frequency of heterozygotes and polygenic responses. For over-dominant QTL, maximization of crossbred performance one generation at a time resulted in similar responses as optimization across all generations and simultaneous optimal selection in a male and female line resulted in greater response than optimal selection within a single line without crossbreeding. Results show that strategic use of information on over-dominant QTL can enhance crossbred performance without crossbred testing. PMID:15107268

  17. Changes in salivary and plasma cortisol levels in Purebred Arabian horses during race training session.

    PubMed

    Kędzierski, Witold; Cywińska, Anna; Strzelec, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Sylwester

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity and stress both cause an increase in cortisol release ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of saliva samples for the determination of cortisol concentrations indicating the work-load level in horses during race training. Twelve Purebred Arabian horses aged 3-5 years were studied during the routine training session. After the warm-up, the horses galloped on the 800 m sand track at a speed of 12.8 m/s. Three saliva samples, and three blood samples were collected from each horse. Both types of samples were taken at rest, immediately after return from the track and after 30 min restitution. The concentrations of blood lactic acid (LA), and cortisol in saliva and plasma samples were measured and analyzed. Blood LA, plasma and salivary cortisol levels increased significantly after exercise (P < 0.05). Salivary cortisol concentration determined 30 min after the exercise correlated significantly with plasma cortisol level obtained immediately after exercise (P < 0.05) as well as measured 30 min after the end of exercise (P < 0.05). The determination of cortisol concentration in saliva samples taken from racehorses 30 min after the end of exercise can be recommended to use in field conditions to estimate the work-load in racehorses. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  18. The effect of relaxing massage on heart rate and heart rate variability in purebred Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, Sylwester; Janczarek, Iwona; Kędzierski, Witold; Stachurska, Anna; Wilk, Izabela

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of relaxing massage on the heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in young racehorses during their first racing season. In the study, 72 Purebred Arabian racehorses were included. The study was implemented during the full race season. The horses from control and experimental groups were included in regular race training 6 days a week. The horses from the experimental group were additionally subject to the relaxing massage 3 days a week during the whole study. HR and HRV were assumed as indicators of the emotional state of the horses. The measurements were taken six times, every 4-5 weeks. The HRV parameters were measured at rest, during grooming and saddling the horse and during warm-up walking under a rider. The changes of the parameters throughout the season suggest that the relaxing massage may be effectively used to make the racehorses more relaxed and calm. Moreover, the horses from the experimental group had better race performance records. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Profiling of anthocyanins for the taxonomic assessment of ancient purebred V. vinifera red grape varieties.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; Ferranti, Pasquale; Garro, Giuseppina; Manganiello, Giorgio; Chianese, Lina; Coppola, Raffaele; Addeo, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    For the purpose of a varietal assessment, the berry skin anthocyanin profiles of 11 ancient native red grape varieties, sampled within the Irpinian area (Southern Italy), were compared to those of three reference Vitis vinifera cultivars and of a Kober 5BB rootstook hybrid (Vitisberlandieri×Vitisriparia). The 3,5-O-diglucoside anthocyanins and their acylated derivatives were monitored as signature compounds of non-V. vinifera grapes, using both reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). One variety (i.e. Tenta) was demonstrated to be an interspecific hybrid cross. Three additional varieties, namely Lacrima Nera, Aglianicone and a yet-unnamed variety, were classified as "late generation hybrids" (or non-V. vinifera×V. vinifera hybrids) because of a very diluted hybrid character, that was revealed only by MS methods. Five cultivars, i.e. Aglianico Lasco, Cannella, Coda di Volpe Rossa, Mentuonico, Olivella Nera, were catalogued as purebred V. vinifera. Due to the peculiar anthocyanin profile one variety (Tuccanese) remained unassigned. The methodology is of general applicability to support the process of varietal discrimination on a molecular basis with the objective of classifying autochthonous old grapevine varieties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Population Structure and Genomic Breed Composition in an Angus–Brahman Crossbred Cattle Population

    PubMed Central

    Gobena, Mesfin; Elzo, Mauricio A.; Mateescu, Raluca G.

    2018-01-01

    likely due to inaccuracies in the pedigree-based estimation of breed composition, which supported the case for using genomic information to complement and/or replace pedigree information when estimating breed composition. Comparison with a supervised analysis where purebreds are used as the training set suggest that accurate predictions can be achieved even in the absence of purebred population information. PMID:29636769

  1. Effects of selection for cooperation and attention in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gácsi, Márta; McGreevy, Paul; Kara, Edina; Miklósi, Ádám

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that the functional similarities in the socio-cognitive behaviour of dogs and humans emerged as a consequence of comparable environmental selection pressures. Here we use a novel approach to account for the facilitating effect of domestication in dogs and reveal that selection for two factors under genetic influence (visual cooperation and focused attention) may have led independently to increased comprehension of human communicational cues. Method In Study 1, we observed the performance of three groups of dogs in utilizing the human pointing gesture in a two-way object choice test. We compared breeds selected to work while visually separated from human partners (N = 30, 21 breeds, clustered as independent worker group), with those selected to work in close cooperation and continuous visual contact with human partners (N = 30, 22 breeds, clustered as cooperative worker group), and with a group of mongrels (N = 30). Secondly, it has been reported that, in dogs, selective breeding to produce an abnormal shortening of the skull is associated with a more pronounced area centralis (location of greatest visual acuity). In Study 2, breeds with high cephalic index and more frontally placed eyes (brachycephalic breeds, N = 25, 14 breeds) were compared with breeds with low cephalic index and laterally placed eyes (dolichocephalic breeds, N = 25, 14 breeds). Results In Study 1, cooperative workers were significantly more successful in utilizing the human pointing gesture than both the independent workers and the mongrels. In study 2, we found that brachycephalic dogs performed significantly better than dolichocephalic breeds. Discussion After controlling for environmental factors, we have provided evidence that at least two independent phenotypic traits with certain genetic variability affect the ability of dogs to rely on human visual cues. This finding should caution researchers against making simple generalizations about the effects of

  2. A review of official data obtained from dog control records generated by the dog control service of county cork, Ireland during 2007

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no peer reviewed data on dog control records from an official agency in Ireland. In order to address this, a total of 2,669 official dog control service records generated during 2007 by Cork County Council dog control service were reviewed. Results Over 70 percent of records related to unwanted dogs and dogs not under their owners control. Stray dogs were collected by the service regularly throughout the year but with notable increase in voluntary surrenders by owners from January through to April. The majority of dogs collected or surrendered were male (2:1 ratio), of medium size, described as having a friendly temperament and were not wearing a neck collar. The Crossbreed and Greyhound breeds were more frequently collected as strays, while Greyhounds and German Shepherds were more frequently voluntarily surrendered by their owner. Restricted breeds such as Pit Bull terriers, German Shepherds and Rottweilers were more frequently reported by members of the public for aggressive behaviour while the only restricted breed reported for biting or snapping was the German Shepherd. Conclusions Routine recording of dog control services in County Cork provide data on responsible dog ownership including the licensing of breeds, and surrender of owned dogs and the collection of stray dogs. Data capture and utilisation of dog control services by local authorities has potential to inform policy on responsible dog ownership and education programmes. PMID:22681751

  3. Milk quality, coagulation properties, and curd firmness modeling of purebred Holsteins and first- and second-generation crossbred cows from Swedish Red, Montbéliarde, and Brown Swiss bulls.

    PubMed

    Malchiodi, F; Cecchinato, A; Penasa, M; Cipolat-Gotet, C; Bittante, G

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate how the crossbreeding of Holstein (HO) cows with bulls from Nordic and Alpine European breeds affect milk quality traits, traditional milk coagulation properties (MCP), and curd firmness modeling obtained from individual milk samples. A total of 506 individual milk samples were collected from evening milking at 3 commercial farms located in Northern Italy. Over the past decade, the 3 farms have followed crossbreeding programs in part of their herds, whereas the remainder of the animals consisted of purebred HO. The basic scheme was a 3-breed rotation based on the use of Swedish Red (SR) semen on HO cows (SR × HO), the use of Montbéliarde (MO) semen on first-cross cows [MO × (SR × HO)], and the use of HO semen in the third cross. In all herds, a smaller proportion of purebred HO were mated to M and Brown Swiss (BS) bulls, and these first crosses were mated to SR and MO bulls, respectively. Milk samples were analyzed for milk composition and MCP, and parameters for curd firmness were modeled. Compared with purebred HO, crossbred cows produced less milk with lower lactose content, higher fat and protein content, and a tendency for higher casein content. Crossbred cows generally produced milk with a more favorable curd-firming rate (k₂₀) and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition, among traditional MCP, and better trends of curd firmness measures as shown by model parameters: estimated rennet coagulation time, asymptotical potential value of curd firmness, and curd-firming instant rate constant. Among crossbred cows, SR × HO presented longer rennet coagulation time compared with MO × HO and BS × HO cows, and MO × HO showed shorter k₂₀ compared with BS × HO cows. Among second-generation cows, those sired by SR bulls showed a lower incidence of noncoagulated samples, higher curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition and asymptotical potential value of curd firmness, and faster curd-firming instant

  4. Gross anatomical study of the nerve supply of genitourinary structures in female mongrel hound dogs.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Amaya, S M; Ruggieri, M R; Arias Serrato, S A; Massicotte, V S; Barbe, M F

    2015-04-01

    Anatomical variations in lumbosacral plexus or nerves to genitourinary structures in dogs are under described, despite their importance during surgery and potential contributions to neuromuscular syndromes. Gross dissection of 16 female mongrel hound dogs showed frequent variations in lumbosacral plexus classification, sympathetic ganglia, ventral rami input to nerves innervating genitourinary structures and pudendal nerve (PdN) branching. Lumbosacral plexus classification types were mixed, rather than pure, in 13 (82%) of dogs. The genitofemoral nerve (GFN) originated from ventral ramus of L4 in 67% of nerves, differing from the expected L3. Considerable variability was seen in ventral rami origins of pelvic (PN) and Pd nerves, with new findings of L7 contributions to PN, joining S1 and S2 input (23% of sides in 11 dogs) or S1-S3 input (5%), and to PdN, joining S1-S2, unilaterally, in one dog. L7 input was confirmed using retrograde dye tracing methods. The PN also received CG1 contributions, bilaterally, in one dog. The PdN branched unusually in two dogs. Lumbosacral sympathetic ganglia had variant intra-, inter- and multisegmental connectivity in 6 (38%). Thus, the anatomy of mongrel dogs had higher variability than previously described for purebred dogs. Knowledge of this variant innervation during surgery could aid in the preservation of nerves and reduce risk of urinary and sexual dysfunctions. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Ancient European dog genomes reveal continuity since the Early Neolithic

    PubMed Central

    Botigué, Laura R.; Song, Shiya; Scheu, Amelie; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Pendleton, Amanda L.; Oetjens, Matthew; Taravella, Angela M.; Seregély, Timo; Zeeb-Lanz, Andrea; Arbogast, Rose-Marie; Bobo, Dean; Daly, Kevin; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Veeramah, Krishna R.

    2017-01-01

    Europe has played a major role in dog evolution, harbouring the oldest uncontested Palaeolithic remains and having been the centre of modern dog breed creation. Here we sequence the genomes of an Early and End Neolithic dog from Germany, including a sample associated with an early European farming community. Both dogs demonstrate continuity with each other and predominantly share ancestry with modern European dogs, contradicting a previously suggested Late Neolithic population replacement. We find no genetic evidence to support the recent hypothesis proposing dual origins of dog domestication. By calibrating the mutation rate using our oldest dog, we narrow the timing of dog domestication to 20,000–40,000 years ago. Interestingly, we do not observe the extreme copy number expansion of the AMY2B gene characteristic of modern dogs that has previously been proposed as an adaptation to a starch-rich diet driven by the widespread adoption of agriculture in the Neolithic. PMID:28719574

  6. A simple genetic architecture underlies morphological variation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Adam R; Quignon, Pascale; Li, Lin; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Zhao, Keyan; Brisbin, Abra; Parker, Heidi G; vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Cargill, Michele; Auton, Adam; Reynolds, Andy; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Castelhano, Marta; Mosher, Dana S; Sutter, Nathan B; Johnson, Gary S; Novembre, John; Hubisz, Melissa J; Siepel, Adam; Wayne, Robert K; Bustamante, Carlos D; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2010-08-10

    Domestic dogs exhibit tremendous phenotypic diversity, including a greater variation in body size than any other terrestrial mammal. Here, we generate a high density map of canine genetic variation by genotyping 915 dogs from 80 domestic dog breeds, 83 wild canids, and 10 outbred African shelter dogs across 60,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Coupling this genomic resource with external measurements from breed standards and individuals as well as skeletal measurements from museum specimens, we identify 51 regions of the dog genome associated with phenotypic variation among breeds in 57 traits. The complex traits include average breed body size and external body dimensions and cranial, dental, and long bone shape and size with and without allometric scaling. In contrast to the results from association mapping of quantitative traits in humans and domesticated plants, we find that across dog breeds, a small number of quantitative trait loci (< or = 3) explain the majority of phenotypic variation for most of the traits we studied. In addition, many genomic regions show signatures of recent selection, with most of the highly differentiated regions being associated with breed-defining traits such as body size, coat characteristics, and ear floppiness. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of mapping multiple traits in the domestic dog using a database of genotyped individuals and highlight the important role human-directed selection has played in altering the genetic architecture of key traits in this important species.

  7. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    PubMed

    Wong, Valerie M; Kidney, Beverly A; Snead, Elisabeth C R; Myers, Sherry L; Jackson, Marion L

    2011-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive marker for inflammation in people and dogs. In people, an association between CRP concentration and atherosclerosis has been reported. Atherosclerosis is rare in dogs, but the Miniature Schnauzer breed may be at increased risk for developing this vascular disease. It is not known if CRP concentrations in Miniature Schnauzer dogs differ from those in other dog breeds. Our objectives were to validate an automated human CRP assay for measuring CRP in dogs and compare CRP concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs with those in non-Miniature Schnauzer breeds. Sera from 37 non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs with inflammatory disease were pooled and used to validate a human CRP immunoturbidimetric assay for measuring canine CRP. Blood was collected from 20 healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs and 41 healthy dogs of other breeds. Median serum CRP concentration of healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs was compared with that of healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. The human CRP assay measured CRP reliably with linearity between 0 and 20 mg/L. CRP concentration for healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 4.0 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-18.2 mg/L) was significantly higher than for the healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 0.1 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-10.7 mg/L); 17 of the 20 Miniature Schnauzer dogs had values that overlapped with those of the non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. Median CRP concentration of Miniature Schnauzer dogs was slightly higher than that of other breeds of dogs. A relationship between higher CRP concentration in Miniature Schnauzer dogs and idiopathic hyperlipidemia, pancreatitis, and possible increased risk for atherosclerosis remains to be determined. ©2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Is your dog empathic? Developing a Dog Emotional Reactivity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' seemingly empathic behaviour attracts general and scientific attention alike. Behaviour tests are usually not sufficiently realistic to evoke empathic-like behaviour; therefore we decided to ask owners about their experiences with their dogs in emotionally loaded situations. Owners from Hungary (N = 591) and from Germany (N = 2283) were asked to rate their level of agreement on a 1–5 Likert scale with statements about the reactivity of their dogs to their emotions and to other dogs’ behaviour. We created two scales with satisfactory internal reliability: reactivity to the owner’s emotion and reactivity to other dogs’ behaviour. Based on an owner-dog personality matching theory, we hypothesised that the owner’s empathy, as measured by the subscale on the cooperativeness character factor of the human personality, will correlate with their dog’s emotional reactivity in emotionally loaded situations. In addition we also examined how anthropomorphism, contagious yawning, attitude toward the dog are related to emotional reactivity in dogs as perceived by the owner. In addition we examined how owners rate dog pictures. We found that the scale scores were largely independent from demographic and environmental variables like breed, sex, age, age at acquiring, keeping practices, training experiences and owner's age. However, anthropomorphic and emotional attitude of the owners probably biased the responses. In the German sample more empathic owners reported to have more emotionally reactive dog, as expected by the personality matching theory. More empathic owners reported to have fewer problems with their dogs and they rated a puppy picture as more cute in both countries. 62% of owners from Hungary and 36% of owner from Germany agreed with the statement “My dog is more important for me than any human being”. In Germany, more empathic owners agreed less with this statement and indicated that their dogs have a tendency for contagious yawning. Owners whose

  9. Adaptive traits of indigenous cattle breeds: The Mediterranean Baladi as a case study.

    PubMed

    Shabtay, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    Generally taken, breeds of Bos taurus ancestry are considered more productive, in comparison with Bos indicus derived breeds that present enhanced hardiness and disease resistance, low nutritional requirements and higher capability of feed utilization. While breeds of B. taurus have been mostly selected for intensive production systems, indigenous cattle, developed mostly from indicine and African taurines, flourish in extensive habitats. Worldwide demographic and economic processes face animal production with new challenges - the increasing demand for animal food products. Intensification of animal husbandry is thus a desired goal in stricken parts of the world. An introduction of productive traits to indigenous breeds might serve to generate improved biological and economic efficiencies. For this to succeed, the genetic merit of traits like efficiency of feed utilization and product quality should be revealed, encouraging the conservation initiatives of indigenous cattle populations, many of which are already extinct and endangered. Moreover, to overcome potential genetic homogeneity, controlled breeding practices should be undertaken. The Baladi cattle are a native local breed found throughout the Mediterranean basin. Purebred Baladi animals are rapidly vanishing, as more European breeds are being introduced or used for backcrosses leading to improved production. The superiority of Baladi over large-framed cattle, in feedlot and on Mediterranean pasture, with respect to adaptability and efficiency, is highlighted in the current review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genealogical analyses in open populations: the case of three Arab-derived Spanish horse breeds.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, I; Gutiérrez, J P; Molina, A; Goyache, F; Valera, M

    2009-10-01

    This research assesses the genetic composition of three Arab-derived Spanish horse breeds as an example to highlight the major shortcomings related to genealogical analyses in open populations and to propose approaches useful to deal with this task. The studbooks of three Spanish Arab (SA)-derived horse breeds, Spanish Anglo-Arab (dAA), Hispano-Arab (dHA) and Spanish Sport Horse (dSSH) and those of their parental breeds SA, Spanish Purebred (SPB) and Thoroughbred (TB), totalling 211 754 individuals, were available. The genealogies of the dAA, dHA and dSSH were analysed not only using the corresponding studbook (breed exclusive dataset) but also including the genealogies of the founders from parental breeds (completed dataset). Coancestry analyses revealed that the present SA-derived populations share more genes with the Arab than with the other parental breeds. Effective population size was computed by accounting for migration rates to obtain an equivalent closed-population effective size ((eq)N(e)) of 39.2 for the dAA, 56.3 for dHA and 114.1 for dSSH. The essayed methodologies were useful for characterising populations involving migration. The consequences of the management of the analysed breeds are discussed. The results emphasize the need to include the complete genealogies of the individuals to attain reliable genealogical parameters.

  11. Distribution of blood types in a sample of 245 New Zealand non-purebred cats.

    PubMed

    Cattin, R P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the distribution of feline blood types in a sample of non-pedigree, domestic cats in New Zealand, whether a difference exists in this distribution between domestic short haired and domestic long haired cats, and between the North and South Islands of New Zealand; and to calculate the risk of a random blood transfusion causing a severe transfusion reaction, and the risk of a random mating producing kittens susceptible to neonatal isoerythrolysis. The results of 245 blood typing tests in non-pedigree cats performed at the New Zealand Veterinary Pathology (NZVP) and Gribbles Veterinary Pathology laboratories between the beginning of 2009 and the end of 2014 were retrospectively collated and analysed. Cats that were identified as domestic short or long haired were included. For the cats tested at Gribbles Veterinary Pathology 62 were from the North Island, and 27 from the South Island. The blood type distribution differed between samples from the two laboratories (p=0.029), but not between domestic short and long haired cats (p=0.50), or between the North and South Islands (p=0.76). Of the 89 cats tested at Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, 70 (79%) were type A, 18 (20%) type B, and 1 (1%) type AB; for NZVP 139/156 (89.1%) cats were type A, 16 (10.3%) type B, and 1 (0.6%) type AB. It was estimated that 18.3-31.9% of random blood transfusions would be at risk of a transfusion reaction, and neonatal isoerythrolysis would be a risk in 9.2-16.1% of random matings between non-pedigree cats. The results from this study suggest that there is a high risk of complications for a random blood transfusion between non-purebred cats in New Zealand. Neonatal isoerythrolysis should be considered an important differential diagnosis in illness or mortality in kittens during the first days of life.

  12. Relationships between fetal biometry, maternal factors and birth weight of purebred domestic cat kittens.

    PubMed

    Gatel, L; Rosset, E; Chalvet-Monfray, K; Buff, S; Rault, D N

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the relation between kittens' birth weights and biometrical factors from the kittens and the mother during pregnancy. Knowing fetal birth weight could help in detecting abnormalities before parturition. A Caesarean-section or a postnatal management plan could be scheduled. Consequently, the neonatal mortality rate should be decreased. We used ultrasonographic measurements of femur length (FL) or fetal biparietal diameter (BPD), pregnancies, and maternal factors to obtain a model of prediction. For this purpose, linear mixed-effects models were used because of random effects (several fetuses for one queen and a few paired measurements) and fixed effects (litter size, pregnancy rank, weight, wither height, and age of the queen). This study was performed in 24 purebred queens with normal pregnancies and normal body conditions. Queens were scanned in the second half of pregnancy, using a micro-convex probe. They gave birth to 140 healthy kittens whose mean birth weight was 104 g (ranged 65 to 165 g). No correlation between the birth weight and the age of the queen, as a maternal factor alone, was observed. But the birth weight was found to be inversely proportional to the pregnancy rank and the litter size. Moreover, birth weight increased when the weight and wither height of queen increased. BPD and FL increased linearly during pregnancy so a model was used to estimate mean birth weight. Using this model, we found a correlation between mean birth weights and an association of parameters: maternal factors (wither height and age), and litter size. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Suitability of cross-bred cows for organic farms based on cross-breeding effects on production and functional traits.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Y; Smolders, E A A; Hoorneman, J N; Nauta, W J; Veerkamp, R F

    2013-04-01

    Data from 113 Dutch organic farms were analysed to determine the effect of cross-breeding on production and functional traits. In total, data on 33 788 lactations between January 2003 and February 2009 from 15 015 cows were available. Holstein-Friesian pure-bred cows produced most kg of milk in 305 days, but with the lowest percentages of fat and protein of all pure-bred cows in the data set. Cross-breeding Holstein dairy cows with other breeds (Brown Swiss, Dutch Friesian, Groningen White Headed, Jersey, Meuse Rhine Yssel, Montbéliarde or Fleckvieh) decreased milk production, but improved fertility and udder health in most cross-bred animals. In most breeds, heterosis had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on milk (kg in 305 days), fat and protein-corrected milk production (kg in 305 days) and calving interval (CI) in the favourable direction (i.e. more milk, shorter CI), but unfavourably for somatic cell count (higher cell count). Recombination was unfavourable for the milk production traits, but favourable for the functional traits (fertility and udder health). Farm characteristics, like soil type or housing system, affected the regression coefficients on breed components significantly. The effect of the Holstein breed on milk yield was twice as large in cubicle housing as in other housing systems. Jerseys had a negative effect on fertility only on farms on sandy soils. Hence, breed effects differ across farming systems in the organic farming and farmers can use such information to dovetail their farming system with the type of cow they use.

  14. Inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger dogs.

    PubMed

    Hultin Jäderlund, K; Baranowska Körberg, I; Nødtvedt, A

    2011-01-01

    Although reporting the same clinical phenotype, inherited polyneuropathy in Leonberger dogs (ILPN) has been attributed to various modes of inheritance. The ILPN is one disease with a major risk factor on chromosome X. Dogs affected by ILPN (n = 104). Pedigree analyses were performed by means of a case-control approach. Data were retrieved either from medical records of cases diagnosed by the first author (n = 13), from breeders (n = 18) or from different registries publishing data on affected dogs (n = 73). A comparison was made between the X-chromosome ancestry of fathers of affected male dogs and the ancestry of the X-chromosomes of mothers of affected dogs of either sex. A systematic random sample, obtained from an international database of registered Leonberger dogs, served as a reference population regarding ancestry. Having one particular female, born 1943, in the X-chromosomal lineage is a major risk factor for developing ILPN. Sex distribution among affected dogs is in favor of a risk factor on the X-chromosome and contradicts a monogenic autosomal or mitochondrial inheritance. The ILPN is considered most likely to be one disease, and the inheritance of ILPN is best explained by an underlying X-linked mode of transmission for the phenotype. However, age at onset and severity of signs might be determined by contributing loci. This has consequences in molecular genetic studies and for breeding strategies aimed at eliminating this disease. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Pulmonary artery dissection in eight dogs with patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Brian A; Simpson, Elaine M; López-Alvarez, Jordi; Thomas, William P; Bright, Janice M; Eason, Bryan D; Rush, John E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna; Green, Henry W; Cunningham, Suzanne M; Visser, Lance C; Kent, Agnieszka M; Schober, Karsten E

    2015-06-01

    To describe a series of dogs with pulmonary artery dissection and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Eight dogs. Retrospective case series. Pulmonary artery dissection was diagnosed in 8 dogs, 3 were Weimaraners. Four dogs presented in left-sided congestive heart failure, 4 presented for murmur evaluation and without clinical signs, and 1 presented in right-sided congestive heart failure. In 7 dogs the dissection was first documented concurrent with a diagnosis of uncorrected PDA. In the other dog, with pulmonary valve stenosis and PDA, the dissection was observed on autopsy examination 17 months after balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty and ductal closure. Median age at presentation for the 7 dogs with antemortem diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was 3.5 years (range, 1.5-4 years). Three dogs had the PDA surgically ligated, 2 dogs did not undergo PDA closure, 1 dog failed transcatheter occlusion of the PDA with subsequent surgical ligation, 1 dog underwent successful transcatheter device occlusion of the PDA, and 1 dog had the PDA closed by transcatheter coil delivery 17 months prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection. The 2 dogs that did not have the PDA closed died 1 and 3 years after diagnosis due to heart failure. Pulmonary artery dissection is a potential complication of PDA in dogs, the Weimaraner breed may be at increased risk, presentation is often in mature dogs, and closure of the PDA can be performed and appears to improve outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Feasibility of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Marks, Stanley L; Douthitt, Katie L; Belafsky, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    To assess feasibility of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in awake dogs, determine whether specific variables associated with the oropharyngeal phase of swallowing can be recognized, and evaluate the safety and tolerability of FEES. 6 healthy client-owned large- and giant-breed adult dogs. A topical anesthetic was applied to the nasal passage of each dog, and a fiberoptic endoscope was passed transnasally until the tip of the scope was positioned in the oropharynx. All dogs voluntarily drank colored water followed by consumption of a commercial canned diet and then a kibble diet mixed with food color. During each swallow, laryngeal and pharyngeal anatomic structures were evaluated and depth of bolus flow prior to the pharyngeal phase of swallowing was assessed. Evidence of bolus retention in the vallecula or pyriform sinuses and laryngeal penetration of the bolus were recorded. FEES was completed without major adverse events and was tolerated well by all 6 dogs. Mild, self-limiting epistaxis was noted for 2 dogs. The nasopharynx, oropharynx, and hypopharynx were observed in all dogs; movement of food boluses through the esophagus was observed in 2 dogs, and food boluses in the stomach were visible in 1 dog. Pharyngeal and laryngeal function was considered physiologically normal in all dogs. FEES appeared to be a feasible diagnostic tool for use in large- and giant-breed dogs. Studies are warranted in dogs with oropharyngeal dysphagia to determine whether FEES can be tolerated and whether it can augment videofluoroscopy findings.

  17. [The problem of the danger of dogs; a study of incidents with dogs in a large city].

    PubMed

    Unshelm, J; Rehm, N; Heidenberger, E

    1993-10-01

    Incidents with dogs present a public problem. In order to specify this, all recorded cases of dog bites in the city of Munich from 1986-1991 (n = 284) were registered. The range of injury of men and animal, the influence of breed, age and sex of the dog on the incident, the behaviour of the owner in the situation and the location were inquired. 207 people have been lightly wounded. 136 dogs have been injured. The most incidents occurred with German Shepherds, mixed breeds of German Shepherds, Boxers, Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Great Danes and Bull terriers. Almost one third of the dogs have been involved in cases of recurrence. There has been a distinct influence of the owner on the behaviour of the dogs. The reaction of the owner has got significant influence of the kind, frequency and seriousness of the accident. The spectrum reaches from passive watching of the incidence to encouraging the dog to bite. Most owners did not absolve any kind of educational program with their dog. More than 50% of the dog owners were judged incompetent to lead their dog in an expert opinion and two third of the owners considered themselves unsuitable to lead a dog. Almost 90% of the dogs have not been on a leash. Most of the incidents took place in public places and only 9% happened in parks. A catalogue of possible measures to avoid such incidents will be presented.

  18. Cat and dog ownership and management patterns in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Slater, Margaret R; Di Nardo, Antonio; Pediconi, Ombretta; Villa, Paolo Dalla; Candeloro, Luca; Alessandrini, Barbara; Del Papa, Stefania

    2008-07-15

    Three hundred and ninety-seven randomly selected households were interviewed by telephone to determine the numbers and management of owned cats and dogs in the Teramo Province of Italy. The households were selected using stratified random sampling for each municipality; municipalities were combined into coastal, central hills and mountain regions for analysis. The interviews were completed during May and June of 2004 with a response rate of 74% (397/536). Forty-six percent of households (n=181) owned pets; 15% of all households (n=60) owned cats and 33% (n=130) owned dogs. Twenty-seven of these households (7%) owned both cats and dogs. Data were provided on 91 cats evenly divided between males and females. The median age was 3 years (range 0.2-10 years). Forty-one percent of cats (36/87) entered the household as strays. Nearly half lived entirely outside. Seventy percent (62/88) had visited a veterinarian at least once; 43% (39/91) were sterilized. About 1/3 had had a litter and all litters were considered accidental rather than planned. Age, indoor/outdoor status, veterinarian visit and region were all associated with sterilization. Age, confined to a yard, veterinary visit and region were associated with allowing the cat to roam freely. Data were provided on 182 dogs. Sixty-two percent (113/181) were male, with a median age of 4 years (range newborn to 17 years) and 40% (72/181) were purebred. Almost half were acquired as a gift. Sixty-two percent (112/180) were kept entirely outside despite the fact that 82% (147/180) were considered companions rather than working dogs. Almost all of the dogs had been to a veterinarian at least once; only 20% (n=29) were sterilized. Male dogs were significantly less likely to be sterilized than females. Almost half the dogs had had at least one litter. Seventy-six percent (137/180) of dogs knew some basic commands. Sex, source and training to sit/stay/come were significantly associated with whether the dog was sterilized. Dog

  19. Equine viral arteritis in breeding and sport horses in central Spain.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Lopez, Fatima; Newton, Richard; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Ana; Ireland, Joanne; Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Moreno, Miguel A; Fores, Paloma

    2017-12-01

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA) may have a high economic impact on breeding stud farms due to the occurrence of EVA-associated abortion outbreaks and the ability of the virus to persist in carrier stallions. While the consequences of EVA in premises with sport horses are usually less severe, the first confirmed outbreak of EVA in Spain occurred in a riding club in Barcelona, but no data on the seroprevalence of EVA in sport horses have been reported in Spain. Given the importance of both Spanish Purebred (SP) breeding horses and sport horses for Spain's equine industry, the aim of this study was to determine and compare the seroprevalence of EVA in these two horse populations in central Spain. Serum samples from 155 SP breeding horses residing in 16 stud farms and 105 sport horses of different breeds housed in 12 riding clubs, collected between September 2011 and November 2013, were tested using a commercial EVA antibody ELISA test with a 100% sensitivity, and confirmed by seroneutralisation (SN) test. EVA seroprevalence in SP breeding horses was higher 21.1% (95% CI 15.3-26.8%) than that in sport horses (6.7%, 95% CI 1.89-11.45%). However, the primary use (breeding vs. sport) was not significantly associated with seropositivity to Equine Arteritis Virus (EAV), suggesting that different management factors do not affect EVA circulation in these two horse populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Retrospective analysis of co-occurrence of congenital aortic stenosis and pulmonary artery stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kander, M; Pasławska, U; Staszczyk, M; Cepiel, A; Pasławski, R; Mazur, G; Noszczyk-Nowak, A

    2015-01-01

    The study has focused on the retrospective analysis of cases of coexisting congenital aortic stenosis (AS) and pulmonary artery stenosis (PS) in dogs. The research included 5463 dogs which were referred for cardiological examination (including clinical examination, ECG and echocardiography) between 2004 and 2014. Aortic stenosis and PS stenosis were detected in 31 dogs. This complex defect was the most commonly diagnosed in Boxers - 7 dogs, other breeds were represented by: 4 cross-breed dogs, 2 Bichon Maltais, 3 Miniature Pinschers, 2 Bernese Mountain Dogs, 2 French Bulldogs, and individuals of following breeds: Bichon Frise, Bull Terrier, Czech Wolfdog, German Shepherd, Hairless Chinese Crested Dog, Miniature Schnauzer, Pug, Rottweiler, Samoyed, West Highland White Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier. In all the dogs, the murmurs could be heard, graded from 2 to 5 (on a scale of 1-6). Besides, in 9 cases other congenital defects were diagnosed: patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve dysplasia, pulmonary or aortic valve regurgitation, tricuspid valve dysplasia, ventricular or atrial septal defect. The majority of the dogs suffered from pulmonary valvular stenosis (1 dog had supravalvular pulmonary artery stenosis) and subvalvular aortic stenosis (2 dogs had valvular aortic stenosis). Conclusions and clinical relevance - co-occurrence of AS and PS is the most common complex congenital heart defect. Boxer breed was predisposed to this complex defect. It was found that coexisting AS and PS is more common in male dogs and the degree of PS and AS was mostly similar.

  1. Causes for discharge of military working dogs from service: 268 cases (2000-2004).

    PubMed

    Evans, Rebecca I; Herbold, John R; Bradshaw, Benjamin S; Moore, George E

    2007-10-15

    To determine causes for discharge of military working dogs (MWDs) from service. Retrospective case series. 268 MWDs. Records of all MWDs approved for discharge from December 2000 through November 2004 were evaluated for cause of discharge. 23 dogs had been obtained through the Department of Defense breeding program but had failed to meet prepurchase or certification standards. The remaining 245 (120 German Shepherd Dogs, 100 Belgian Malinois, and 25 dogs of other breeds) had been purchased as adults or obtained through the breeding program and had passed prepurchase and certification standards. Eighty-five of the 245 (34.7%) adult dogs were 1 to < 5 years old at discharge, and 160 (65.3%) were >or= 5 years old at discharge. The proportion of adult dogs < 5 years old at discharge that were German Shepherd Dogs (69.4%) was significantly greater than the proportion of adult dogs >or= 5 years old at discharge that were German Shepherd Dogs (38.1%). Within the subgroup of dogs >or= 5 years old at discharge, median age at discharge for the German Shepherd Dogs (8.59 years) was significantly less than median age at discharge for the Belgian Malinois (10.61 years). For adult dogs < 5 years old at discharge, the most common cause for discharge was behavioral problems (82.3%). Results suggested that longevity of service for MWDs may be influenced by breed differences and that selection criteria should be evaluated to reduce behavior-related discharge from service.

  2. Noninvasive Assessment of Neuromuscular Disease in Dogs: Use of the 6-minute Walk Test to Assess Submaximal Exercise Tolerance in Dogs with Centronuclear Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Gonzalez, S; Talarico, L; Todhunter, R

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive methods of quantitating exercise tolerance in dogs with neuromuscular disease are needed both for clinical and research use. The 6-minute walk test (6MWT) has been validated as a reliable test of exercise tolerance in dogs with pulmonary and cardiac disease, but not in dogs with neuromuscular disease. Distance walked and number of steps taken during 6MWT will differ between Labrador retriever dogs with centronuclear myopathy (CNM) and control (ie, healthy) littermates. Eight purebred Labrador retrievers were drawn from a purpose-bred research colony (status: 3 clear, 2 carrier, and 3 homozygous mutants for the protein tyrosine phosphatase-like A (PTPLA) gene mutation associated with CNM). Pilot, prospective, Case-controlled study. Researchers were blinded to disease status. Each dog was leash-trained and acclimatized to the testing area (length, 12.8 m). At the start of testing, each animal was fitted with a pedometer, a timer was started, and dogs were allowed to walk at their own pace for 6 minutes. Distance walked and pedometer readings were recorded. Degree of paresis varied among affected dogs, and was reflected by significant differences in distance walked between CNM-affected dogs and those with clear and carrier genotypes (P = .048). Pedometer readings did not vary according to genotype (P = .86). The 6MWT appears to differentiate between the ambulatory capacity of normal and CNM-affected dogs. Additional studies are needed to confirm this relationship in a larger number of dogs, and to evaluate the ability of the 6MWT to differentiate between dogs with variable severity of neuromuscular disease-associated exercise intolerance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of oral amantadine in greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; Warner, M; KuKanich, B

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in greyhound dogs after oral administration. Five healthy greyhound dogs were used. A single oral dose of 100 mg amantadine hydrochloride (mean dose 2.8 mg/kg as amantadine hydrochloride) was administered to nonfasted subjects. Blood samples were collected at predetermined time points from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma concentrations of amantadine were measured by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Amantadine was well tolerated in all dogs with no adverse effects observed. The mean (range) amantadine CMAX was 275 ng/mL (225-351 ng/mL) at 2.6 h (1-4 h) with a terminal half-life of 4.96 h (4.11-6.59 h). The results of this study can be used to design dosages to assess multidose pharmacokinetics and dosages designed to achieve targeted concentrations in order to assess the clinical effects of amantadine in a variety of conditions including chronic pain. Further studies should also assess the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in other dog breeds or using population pharmacokinetics studies including multiple dog breeds to assess potential breed-specific differences in the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in dogs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in Australian dogs.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A J; Norris, J M; Heller, J; Brown, G; Malik, R; Bosward, K L

    2016-09-01

    The role of dogs in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans is uncertain, and extensive seroprevalence studies of dogs have not been previously conducted in Australia. This study determined C. burnetii exposure in four diverse canine subpopulations by adapting, verifying and comparing an indirect immunofluoresence assay (IFA) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) used to detect anti-C. burnetii antibodies in humans. Canine serum samples (n = 1223) were tested with IFA from four subpopulations [breeding establishments; household pets; free-roaming dogs in Aboriginal communities; shelter dogs]. The proportions of seropositive dogs were as follows: breeding (7/309, 2.3%), household pets (10/328, 3%), Aboriginal communities (21/321, 6.5%) and shelters (5/265, 1.9%). Dogs from Aboriginal communities were 2.8 times (CI 1.5-5.1; P < 0.001) more likely to be seropositive than dogs from other populations. The ELISA was used on 86 of 1223 sera tested with IFA, and a Cohen's Kappa coefficient of 0.60 (CI 0.43-0.78) indicated good agreement between the two assays. This study has established that Australian dogs within all four subpopulations have been exposed to C. burnetii and that a higher seroprevalence was observed amongst free-roaming dogs associated with Aboriginal communities. As C. burnetii recrudesces during pregnancy and birth products contain the highest concentration of organism, individuals assisting at the time of parturition, those handling pups shortly after birth as well as those residing in the vicinity of whelping dogs are potentially at risk of developing Q fever. However, the identification of active antigen shed in excreta from seropositive dogs is required in order to accurately define and quantify the public health risk. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. PMID:24975239

  6. Age, sex and reproductive status affect boldness in dogs.

    PubMed

    Starling, Melissa J; Branson, Nicholas; Thomson, Peter C; McGreevy, Paul D

    2013-09-01

    Boldness in dogs is believed to be one end of the shy-bold axis, representing a super-trait. Several personality traits fall under the influence of this super-trait. Previous studies have found that boldness is affected by breed and breed groups, influences performance in sporting dogs, and is affected in some cases by the sex of the dogs. This study investigated the effects of dog age, sex and reproductive status on boldness in dogs by way of a dog personality survey circulated amongst Australian dog owners. Age had a significant effect on boldness (F=4.476; DF=16,758; P<0.001), with boldness decreasing with age in years. Males were bolder than females (F=19.219; DF=1,758; P<0.001) and entire dogs were bolder than neutered dogs (F=4.330; DF=1,758; P<0.038). The study indicates how behaviour may change in adult dogs as they age and adds to the literature on how sex and reproductive status may affect personality in dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ground Dog Day: Lessons Don’t Have to be Relearned in the Use of Dogs in Combat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    could operate without a soldier present, and did not consume as much food . Unlike mechanized transportation, the dogs could likewise operate over rough...German Shepherd dogs ), and Rottweilers trained for active service as pack-carriers, first-aid scouts, and messengers, while others of the same breeds...methods used were the cause of the problem: though 18 the dogs were conditioned by having them to search for food under Russian tanks, the Russian

  8. Incidence of and mortality from kidney disease in over 600,000 insured Swedish dogs.

    PubMed

    Pelander, L; Ljungvall, I; Egenvall, A; Syme, H; Elliott, J; Häggström, J

    2015-06-20

    Kidney disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs. Knowledge about the epidemiology of kidney disease in the dog population is valuable and large-scale epidemiological studies are needed. The aim of the present study was to use insurance data to estimate kidney-related morbidity and mortality in the Swedish dog population. Insurance company data from insured dogs during the years 1995-2006 were studied retrospectively. Incidence and mortality were calculated for the whole group of dogs as well as divided by sex and breed. The total number of veterinary care insured dogs was 665,245. The total incidence of kidney disease in this group of dogs was 15.8 (15.3-16.2) cases/10,000 dog-years at risk. The number of dogs in the life insurance was 548,346 and in this group the total kidney-related mortality was 9.7 (9.3-10.2) deaths/10,000 dog-years at risk. The three breeds with the highest incidence of kidney disease were the Bernese mountain dog, miniature schnauzer and boxer. The three breeds with the highest mortality caused by kidney disease were the Bernese mountain dog, Shetland sheepdog and flat-coated retriever. In conclusion, the epidemiological information provided in this study concerning kidney disease in dogs can provide valuable information for future research. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Epidemiology of Dog and Cat Abandonment in Spain (2008-2013).

    PubMed

    Fatjó, Jaume; Bowen, Jonathan; García, Elena; Calvo, Paula; Rueda, Silvia; Amblás, Silvia; Lalanza, Jaume F

    2015-06-12

    Millions of pets are abandoned worldwide every year, which is an important animal welfare and financial problem. This paper was divided into three studies. Our first two studies were designed as a national survey of animal shelters to profile the population of stray dogs and cats, as well as to gather information on both relinquishment and adoption. The aim of our third study was to test the impact of identification on the recovery of dogs entering animal shelters. Studies one and two indicate that more than 100,000 dogs and more than 30,000 cats enter animal shelters annually in Spain. We observed a seasonal effect in the number of admissions in cats. Two-thirds of dogs and cats entering shelters were found as strays, while the rest were relinquished directly to the shelter. Most pets admitted to animal shelters were adult, non-purebred, and without a microchip, with the majority of dogs being medium sized. Adult dogs spent significantly more time in shelters than puppies. While most animals were either adopted or recovered by their owner, a considerable percentage remained at the shelter or was euthanized. The identification of dogs with a microchip increased by 3-fold the likelihood of them being returned to the owner.

  10. An investigation of the association between socio-demographic factors, dog-exercise requirements, and the amount of walking dogs receive

    PubMed Central

    Degeling, Chris; Burton, Lindsay; McCormack, Gavin R.

    2012-01-01

    Risk factors associated with canine obesity include the amount of walking a dog receives. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between canine exercise requirements, socio-demographic factors, and dog-walking behaviors in winter in Calgary. Dog owners, from a cross-sectional study which included a random sample of adults, were asked their household income, domicile type, gender, age, education level, number and breed(s) of dog(s) owned, and frequency and time spent dog-walking in a usual week. Canine exercise requirements were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) positively associated with the minutes pet dogs were walked, as was the owner being a female. Moreover, dog walking frequency, but not minutes of dog walking, was significantly associated with residing in attached housing (i.e., apartments). Different types of dogs have different exercise requirements to maintain optimal health. Understanding the role of socio-demographic factors and dog-related characteristics such as exercise requirements on dog-walking behaviors is essential for helping veterinarians and owners develop effective strategies to prevent and manage canine obesity. Furthermore, encouraging regular dog-walking has the potential to improve the health of pet dogs, and that of their owners. PMID:23277705

  11. An investigation of the association between socio-demographic factors, dog-exercise requirements, and the amount of walking dogs receive.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Burton, Lindsay; McCormack, Gavin R

    2012-07-01

    Risk factors associated with canine obesity include the amount of walking a dog receives. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between canine exercise requirements, socio-demographic factors, and dog-walking behaviors in winter in Calgary. Dog owners, from a cross-sectional study which included a random sample of adults, were asked their household income, domicile type, gender, age, education level, number and breed(s) of dog(s) owned, and frequency and time spent dog-walking in a usual week. Canine exercise requirements were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) positively associated with the minutes pet dogs were walked, as was the owner being a female. Moreover, dog walking frequency, but not minutes of dog walking, was significantly associated with residing in attached housing (i.e., apartments). Different types of dogs have different exercise requirements to maintain optimal health. Understanding the role of socio-demographic factors and dog-related characteristics such as exercise requirements on dog-walking behaviors is essential for helping veterinarians and owners develop effective strategies to prevent and manage canine obesity. Furthermore, encouraging regular dog-walking has the potential to improve the health of pet dogs, and that of their owners.

  12. Dog Models of Naturally Occurring Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowell, Jennie L.; McCarthy, Donna O.; Alvarez, Carlos E.

    2011-01-01

    Studies using dogs provide an ideal solution to the gap in animal models of natural disease and translational medicine. This is evidenced by approximately 400 inherited disorders being characterized in domesticated dogs, most of which are relevant to humans. There are several hundred isolated populations of dogs (breeds) and each has vastly reduced genetic variation compared to humans; this simplifies disease mapping and pharmacogenomics. Dogs age five to eight-fold faster than humans, share environments with their owners, are usually kept until old age, and receive a high level of health care. Farseeing investigators recognized this potential and, over the last decade, developed the necessary tools and infrastructure to utilize this powerful model of human disease, including the sequencing of the dog genome in 2005. Here we review the nascent convergence of genetic and translational canine models of spontaneous disease, focusing on cancer. PMID:21439907

  13. Size and demography pattern of the domestic dog population in Bhutan: Implications for dog population management and disease control.

    PubMed

    Rinzin, Karma; Tenzin, Tenzin; Robertson, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the demography of domestic dogs is essential to plan the dog population management and rabies control program. In this study, we estimated the owned and stray dog population and the proportion of owned dogs that are free-roaming in Bhutan. For this, a cross-sectional household surveys were conducted in six districts (both urban and rural areas) and two border towns in southern Bhutan. The population estimation was done by extrapolation of the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person, whilst mark-resight survey was conducted to estimate the proportion of owned dogs that were free-roaming. A total of 1,301 (rural:585; urban:716) respondents (one per household) were interviewed of which 173 households (24.4%) in urban areas owned 237 dogs whilst 238 households (40.8%) in rural areas owned 353 dogs. The mean number of dogs per dog owning household was estimated to be 1.44 (urban:1.37 dogs; rural:1.48 dogs) and dogs per household was estimated to be 0.45 (urban:0.33; rural:0.60). The dog: human ratio was 1:16.30 (0.06 dogs per person) in urban areas and 1:8.43 (0.12 dogs per person) in rural areas. The total owned dog population based on the mean number of dogs per household and dogs per person were estimated to be 65,312 and 71,245 in the country, respectively. The male: female ratio of the owned dog was 1.31:1 in urban areas and 2.05:1 in rural areas. Majority of the dogs were local non-descript breeds in both urban (60.8%) and rural (78%) areas, and the most common source was acquisition from friends or family (44.7%). The stray dog population in Bhutan was estimated to be 48,379 (urban:22,772; rural:25,607). Of the total estimated owned dog population in the two border towns, the proportion that were found free-roaming was estimated to be 31%. The different dog population estimation methods were compared and discussed in this paper. This study generated baseline data on the demographic patterns of the owned and stray dogs in Bhutan which

  14. Association between previous splenectomy and gastric dilatation-volvulus in dogs: 453 cases (2004-2009).

    PubMed

    Sartor, Angela J; Bentley, Adrienne M; Brown, Dorothy C

    2013-05-15

    To evaluate the association between previous splenectomy and gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) in dogs. Multi-institutional retrospective case-control study. Animals-151 dogs treated surgically for GDV and 302 control dogs with no history of GDV. Computerized records of dogs evaluated via exploratory laparotomy or abdominal ultrasonography were searched, and dogs with GDV and dogs without GDV (control dogs) were identified. Two control dogs were matched with respect to age, body weight, sex, neuter status, and breed to each dog with GDV. Data were collected on the presence or absence of the spleen for both dogs with GDV and control dogs. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of previous splenectomy with GDV. 6 (4%) dogs in the GDV group and 3 (1%) dogs in the control group had a history of previous splenectomy. The odds of GDV in dogs with a history of previous splenectomy in this population of dogs were 5.3 times those of dogs without a history of previous splenectomy (95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 26.8). For the patients in the present study, there was an increased odds of GDV in dogs with a history of splenectomy. Prophylactic gastropexy may be considered in dogs undergoing a splenectomy, particularly if other risk factors for GDV are present.

  15. Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Rak Seung; Lee, Jong Su; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Do Kyo

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs. PMID:26435541

  16. Reproductive ability of a cloned male detector dog and behavioral traits of its offspring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Geon A; Kim, Rak Seung; Lee, Jong Su; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Hong, Do Kyo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-09-30

    In 2007, seven detector dogs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer using one nuclear donor dog, then trained and certified as excellent detector dogs, similar to their donor. In 2011, we crossed a cloned male and normal female by natural breeding and produced ten offspring. In this study, we investigated the puppies' temperaments, which we later compared with those of the cloned parent male. The results show that the cloned male had normal reproductive abilities and produced healthy offspring. All puppies completed narcotic detector dog training with a success rate for selection of 60%. Although the litter of cloned males was small in this study, a cloned male dog bred by natural mating produced puppies that later successfully completed the training course for drug detection. In conclusion, cloning an elite dog with superior genetic factors and breeding of the cloned dog was found to be a useful method to efficiently procure detector dogs.

  17. Epidemiology of Dog and Cat Abandonment in Spain (2008–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Fatjó, Jaume; Bowen, Jonathan; García, Elena; Calvo, Paula; Rueda, Silvia; Amblás, Silvia; Lalanza, Jaume F.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary In this paper we wanted to estimate the incidence of abandonment, as well as the general profile of dogs and cats entering animal shelters in our country. Also, we wanted to test the impact of identification on the recovery of dogs that had entered animal shelters. More than 100,000 dogs and more than 30,000 cats enter animal shelters annually in Spain. We observed a seasonal effect in the number of admissions in cats. A considerable percentage remained at the shelter or was euthanized. We found that identification of dogs with a microchip increased by 3-fold the likelihood of them being returned to the owner. Abstract Millions of pets are abandoned worldwide every year, which is an important animal welfare and financial problem. This paper was divided into three studies. Our first two studies were designed as a national survey of animal shelters to profile the population of stray dogs and cats, as well as to gather information on both relinquishment and adoption. The aim of our third study was to test the impact of identification on the recovery of dogs entering animal shelters. Studies one and two indicate that more than 100,000 dogs and more than 30,000 cats enter animal shelters annually in Spain. We observed a seasonal effect in the number of admissions in cats. Two-thirds of dogs and cats entering shelters were found as strays, while the rest were relinquished directly to the shelter. Most pets admitted to animal shelters were adult, non-purebred, and without a microchip, with the majority of dogs being medium sized. Adult dogs spent significantly more time in shelters than puppies. While most animals were either adopted or recovered by their owner, a considerable percentage remained at the shelter or was euthanized. The identification of dogs with a microchip increased by 3-fold the likelihood of them being returned to the owner. PMID:26479243

  18. Mandatory desexing of dogs: one step in the right direction to reduce the risk of dog bite? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    D'Onise, Katina; Hazel, Susan; Caraguel, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Preventing dog bites is an intractable problem given the complex dog bite injury environment. Desexing of dogs has the opportunity of creating a safer injury environment, given the potential links between desexing and behaviour change in dogs. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to examine the evidence for desexing of dogs to reduce dog bite risk within a population health paradigm. Medline and CAB Abstracts were searched for studies that reported data on the association of dog neuter status with the risk of dog bite. All definitions of dog bite were included and all empirical studies were included in the review, limited to those published in English. Quality appraisal and data extraction were based on the 2013 evidence-based practice and critical appraisal tool from the University of Auckland. Five out of six observational studies, from four study populations found evidence that intact dogs were associated with an increased risk of dog bite compared with desexed dogs. The effect sizes ranged across the studies and given the heterogeneity of the studies no single effect size on the association between desexing and dog bite risk could be estimated. There is consistent evidence that desexing dogs is associated with a reduced risk of dog bite, although the studies reflect association and may not be causal. Although recent publications have suggested desexing is associated with health and behavioural costs in some breeds, population level evidence supports desexed dogs having a longer lifespan, and being less likely to wander with the added benefit of reducing unwanted litters. Thus, mandatory desexing presents a possible opportunity for prevention of dog bites expanding dog bite prevention beyond an education-only approach. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Canine gastrointestinal physiology: Breeds variations that can influence drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Hayley; Sharkey, Michele; Pade, Devendra; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2015-11-01

    Although all dogs belong to Canis lupus familiaris, the physiological diversity resulting from selective breeding can lead to wide interbreed variability in drug pharmacokinetics (PK) or in oral drug product performance. It is important to understand this diversity in order to predict the impact of drug product formulation attributes on in vivo dissolution and absorption characteristics across the canine population when the dog represents the targeted patient population. Based upon published information, this review addresses breed differences in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology and discusses the in vivo implications of these differences. In addition to the importance of such information for understanding the variability that may exist in the performance of oral dosage forms in dogs for the purpose of developing canine therapeutics, an appreciation of breed differences in GI physiology can improve our prediction of oral drug formulation performance when we extrapolate bioavailability results from the dog to the humans, and vice versa. In this literature review, we examine reports of breed associated diversity in GI anatomy and morphology, gastric emptying time (GET), oro-cecal transit time (OCTT), small intestinal transit time (SITT), large intestinal transit time (LITT), intestinal permeability, sodium/potassium fecal concentrations, intestinal flora, and fecal moisture content. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluation of growth, deposition of back fat, and loin muscle for purebred Berkshire pigs housed in bedded hoop buildings.

    PubMed

    Walugembe, M; Swantek, P M; Honeyman, M S; Mabry, J W; Stalder, K J; Rothschild, M F

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accretion of BW, back fat, and loin muscle from purebred Berkshire pigs raised in bedded hoop barns in Iowa. The growth of a total of 144 purebred Berkshire pigs (18 barrows and 18 gilts per trial) was evaluated from 4 trials (2 winter and 2 summer trials). Pigs were fed ad libitum utilizing a 5-phase standard corn-soybean meal feeding program that met or exceeded NRC nutrient requirements. Pigs were housed in bedded hoop barns (unheated) to approximate common niche market requirements. At 21-d intervals, pigs were serially weighed, and ultrasonic back fat depth and loin muscle area (LMA) measurements were taken. Live BW measurements began at the trial initiation at approximately 18 to 32 kg, but ultrasonic scans for 10th-rib back fat depth and LMA began at between 36 and 45 kg until market weight of about 122 ± 2.5 kg. The rate (µ) of live body growth (weight) and ultrasonic back fat depth were influenced ( < 0.01) by trial and sex, with no significant interactions between trial and sex. Both live BW and back fat deposition were significantly greater in trial 1 than all other trials (2, 3, and 4). The rate of accretion and maximum growth of LMA depth were not affected ( > 0.05) by trial and sex. Overall, barrows averaged 31 mm of back fat at 125 kg, whereas gilts had an average of about 23 mm at 121 kg of market weight. Results suggest that because of the sex differences in growth and back fat deposition between Berkshire barrows and gilts, it may be important to formulate their diets differently in commercial pork production systems.

  1. Effect of Body Weight on Echocardiographic Measurements in 19,866 Pure-Bred Cats with or without Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Häggström, J; Andersson, Å O; Falk, T; Nilsfors, L; OIsson, U; Kresken, J G; Höglund, K; Rishniw, M; Tidholm, A; Ljungvall, I

    2016-09-01

    Echocardiography is a cost-efficient method to screen cats for presence of heart disease. Current reference intervals for feline cardiac dimensions do not account for body weight (BW). To study the effect of BW on heart rate (HR), aortic (Ao), left atrial (LA) and ventricular (LV) linear dimensions in cats, and to calculate 95% prediction intervals for these variables in normal adult pure-bred cats. 19 866 pure-bred cats. Clinical data from heart screens conducted between 1999 and 2014 were included. Associations between BW, HR, and cardiac dimensions were assessed using univariate linear models and allometric scaling, including all cats, and only those considered normal, respectively. Prediction intervals were created using 95% confidence intervals obtained from regression curves. Associations between BW and echocardiographic dimensions were best described by allometric scaling, and all dimensions increased with increasing BW (all P<0.001). Strongest associations were found between BW and Ao, LV end diastolic, LA dimensions, and thickness of LV free wall. Weak linear associations were found between BW and HR and left atrial to aortic ratio (LA:Ao), for which HR decreased with increasing BW (P<0.001), and LA:Ao increased with increasing BW (P<0.001). Marginal differences were found for prediction formulas and prediction intervals when the dataset included all cats versus only those considered normal. BW had a clinically relevant effect on echocardiographic dimensions in cats, and BW based 95% prediction intervals may help in screening cats for heart disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Directional preference in dogs: Laterality and "pull of the north"

    PubMed Central

    Adámková, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Benediktová, Kateřina; Martini, Sabine; Nováková, Petra; Tůma, David; Kučerová, Michaela; Divišová, Michaela; Begall, Sabine; Hart, Vlastimil

    2017-01-01

    Laterality is a well described phenomenon in domestic dogs. It was shown that dogs, under calm Earth's magnetic field conditions, when marking their home ranges, tend to head about north- or southwards and display thus magnetic alignment. The question arises whether magnetic alignment might be affected or even compromised by laterality and vice versa. We tested the preference of dogs to choose between two dishes with snacks that were placed left and right, in different compass directions (north and east, east and south, south and west or west and north) in front of them. Some dogs were right-lateral, some left-lateral but most of them were ambilateral. There was a preference for the dish placed north compared to the one placed east of the dog ("pull of the north"). This effect was highly significant in small and medium-sized breeds but not in larger breeds, highly significant in females, in older dogs, in lateralized dogs but less significant or not significant in males, younger dogs, or ambilateral dogs. Laterality and “pull of the north” are phenomena which should be considered in diverse tasks and behavioral tests with which dogs or other animals might be confronted. The interaction and possible conflict between lateralization and "pull of the north" might be also considered as a reason for shifted magnetic alignment observed in different animal species in different contexts. PMID:28945773

  3. Directional preference in dogs: Laterality and "pull of the north".

    PubMed

    Adámková, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Benediktová, Kateřina; Martini, Sabine; Nováková, Petra; Tůma, David; Kučerová, Michaela; Divišová, Michaela; Begall, Sabine; Hart, Vlastimil; Burda, Hynek

    2017-01-01

    Laterality is a well described phenomenon in domestic dogs. It was shown that dogs, under calm Earth's magnetic field conditions, when marking their home ranges, tend to head about north- or southwards and display thus magnetic alignment. The question arises whether magnetic alignment might be affected or even compromised by laterality and vice versa. We tested the preference of dogs to choose between two dishes with snacks that were placed left and right, in different compass directions (north and east, east and south, south and west or west and north) in front of them. Some dogs were right-lateral, some left-lateral but most of them were ambilateral. There was a preference for the dish placed north compared to the one placed east of the dog ("pull of the north"). This effect was highly significant in small and medium-sized breeds but not in larger breeds, highly significant in females, in older dogs, in lateralized dogs but less significant or not significant in males, younger dogs, or ambilateral dogs. Laterality and "pull of the north" are phenomena which should be considered in diverse tasks and behavioral tests with which dogs or other animals might be confronted. The interaction and possible conflict between lateralization and "pull of the north" might be also considered as a reason for shifted magnetic alignment observed in different animal species in different contexts.

  4. Characteristics of 234 dog bite incidents in Ireland during 2004 and 2005.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, E N; Jones, B R; O'Sullivan, K; Hanlon, A J

    2008-07-12

    Information was obtained by telephone interview from 100 dog owners whose dog had bitten a person, and from 134 victims of bites by a dog not owned by the victim. Three-quarters of the victims were female and aged from 21 to 60 years. The majority of the dogs were owned, male, two to six years old, over 10 kg in bodyweight and belonged to the popular breeds: collies, cocker/springer spaniels, terrier breeds, Jack Russell terriers, German shepherd dogs, golden retrievers and crossbreeds. The numbers of bites by the different breeds indicated that those that inflicted the most bites were the popular breeds rather than the breeds with any greater propensity to bite. Most attacks were rapid single bites and in 50 per cent of the cases, neither the owner nor the victim was able to identify any signal of the dog's intention to bite. Overall, 21 per cent of the incidents were rated as 'serious' and 2 per cent as 'life threatening'. One fifth of the dogs were euthanased as a result of the incident. Half the incidents required professional medical assistance for the victim. Almost half the incidents took place while the victim was walking or passing close to the dog's territory, or while the victim was interacting with the dog at home.

  5. Naturally Occurring Adrenocortical Insufficiency--An Epidemiological Study Based on a Swedish-Insured Dog Population of 525,028 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Hanson, J M; Tengvall, K; Bonnett, B N; Hedhammar, Å

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring adrenocortical insufficiency (NOAI) in dogs is considered an uncommon disease with good prognosis with hormonal replacement treatment. However, there are no epidemiological studies with estimates for the general dog population. To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of NOAI in a large population of insured dogs. Data were derived from 525,028 client-owned dogs insured by a Swedish insurance company representing 2,364,652 dog-years at risk (DYAR) during the period between 1995-2006. Retrospective cohort study. Incidence rates, prevalences, and relative risks for dogs with NOAI (AI with no previous claim for hypercortisolism), were calculated for the whole dog population, and for subgroups divided by breed and sex. Mortality rates were calculated and compared in dogs with NOAI and the remaining dogs overall. In total 534 dogs were identified with NOAI. The overall incidence was 2.3 cases per 10,000 DYAR. The relative risk of disease was significantly higher in the Portuguese Water Dog, Standard Poodle, Bearded Collie, Cairn Terrier, and Cocker Spaniel compared with other breeds combined. Female dogs overall were at higher risk of developing AI than male dogs (RR 1.85; 95% CI, 1.55-2.22; P < .001). The relative risk of death was 1.9 times higher in dogs with NOAI than in dogs overall. The data supports the existence of breed-specific differences in incidence rates of NOAI in dogs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Observations of sacrocaudal fusion in Greyhounds and other dogs.

    PubMed

    Oheida, Aiman H; Philip, Christopher J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Davies, Helen M S

    2016-01-01

    To describe the incidence and forms of nonpathological sacrocaudal fusion in racing Greyhounds and compare them with those in a variety of other domestic dog breeds. This retrospective observational study used archived anatomical specimens from 81 racing Greyhounds and 10 Beagles, and archived clinical radiographs from 81 non-Greyhound dogs representing 37 other breeds. Dogs less than two years of age and dogs with evidence of soft tissue or osseous pathology involving the sacrocaudal region were excluded. The incidence of osseous sacrocaudal fusion (any type and complete fusion) was compared between Greyhounds and all of the other dogs combined, using the Fisher's exact test. Sacrocaudal fusion of some type was found in 33 (41%) of 81 Greyhounds but in only 14 (15%) of 91 non-Greyhound dogs (p <0.01). Complete fusion (osseous fusion of vertebral bodies and both transverse and articular processes) between the sacrum and the first caudal vertebra was the most common form in Greyhounds, found in 27 (33%) of 81 Greyhounds, but in only three (3.3%) of 91 non-Greyhound dogs (p <0.01). Sacrocaudal fusion appears to be more prevalent in Greyhounds than in other domestic dog breeds and may be attributable to selection pressure for speed on a region of the spine that is naturally prone to variation. Its significance for performance and soundness requires further study.

  7. Mycobacterioses in dogs and cats from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, Soledad; Martínez Vivot, Marcela; Falzoni, Elvira; Marfil, María J; Pérez Tort, Gabriela; Rovatti, Paula; Fernández, Mónica; Iachini, Ricardo; Satek, Fernanda; Duchene, Adriana; Zumárraga, Martín J

    2017-09-01

    Mycobacterioses can produce nonspecific clinical signs in dogs and cats that make diagnosis difficult. Furthermore, the full characterization of mycobacterial agents is not always possible or practical. We characterized mycobacteria detected through cytology in 12 dogs and 7 cats with generalized clinical signs from the province of Buenos Aires in Argentina. In dogs, molecular testing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) in 8 cases and M. fortuitum in 1 case. All dogs were Miniature Schnauzers, suggesting that this breed may be more susceptible to M. avium than other dog breeds. The cat isolates were 2 M. bovis, 1 M. fortuitum, and 1 MAH. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat patterns suggested possible links with cattle, swine, and humans studied previously in Argentina. The results show that pets may act as susceptible hosts with the potential risk of transmitting the infection to humans and other animals.

  8. Extramedullary plasmacytoma in the trachea of a dog.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, K; Cross, A R; Allen, S W; Mahaffey, E A; Watson, S K

    1998-05-15

    A 10-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was examined because of acute inspiratory dyspnea. Radiography and tracheoscopy revealed a discrete, solitary mass originating from the membranous portion of the trachea at the level of the thoracic inlet. Tracheal resection and anastomosis were performed, and on histologic examination of the resected tissue, extramedullary plasmacytoma was diagnosed. Although tracheal tumors are rare in dogs, they should be considered during evaluation of dogs with signs of airway obstruction. Prognosis is excellent for dogs with extramedullary plasmacytoma in which surgical excision is complete.

  9. Birth mass is the key to understanding the negative correlation between lifespan and body size in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Olbricht, Gayla; Baker, Xavior; Hou, Chen

    2016-12-08

    Larger dog breeds live shorter than the smaller ones, opposite of the mass-lifespan relationship observed across mammalian species. Here we use data from 90 dog breeds and a theoretical model based on the first principles of energy conservation and life history tradeoffs to explain the negative correlation between longevity and body size in dogs. We found that the birth/adult mass ratio of dogs scales negatively with adult size, which is different than the weak interspecific scaling in mammals. Using the model, we show that this ratio, as an index of energy required for growth, is the key to understanding why the lifespan of dogs scales negatively with body size. The model also predicts that the difference in mass-specific lifetime metabolic energy usage between dog breeds is proportional to the difference in birth/adult mass ratio. Empirical data on lifespan, body mass, and metabolic scaling law of dogs strongly supports this prediction.

  10. Dogs' Body Language Relevant to Learning Achievement.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Ohtani, Nobuyo; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2014-02-27

    The facial expressions and body postures of dogs can give helpful information about their moods and emotional states. People can more effectively obedience train their dogs if we can identify the mannerisms associated with learning in dogs. The aim of this study was to clarify the dog's body language during operant conditioning to predict achievement in the test that followed by measuring the duration of behaviors. Forty-six untrained dogs (17 males and 26 females) of various breeds were used. Each session consisted of 5 minutes of training with a treat reward followed by 3 minutes of rest and finally an operant conditioning test that consisted of 20 "hand motion" cues. The operant tests were conducted a total of nine times over three consecutive days, and the success numbers were counted. The duration of the dog's behavior, focusing on the dog's eyes, mouth, ears, tail and tail-wagging, was recorded during the operant conditioning sessions before the test. Particular behaviors, including wide-eyes, closed mouth, erect ears, and forward and high tail carriage, without wagging or with short and quick wagging, related to high achievement results. It is concluded that dogs' body language during operant conditioning was related to their success rate.

  11. Faecal microbiota in lean and obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Handl, Stefanie; German, Alexander J; Holden, Shelley L; Dowd, Scot E; Steiner, Jörg M; Heilmann, Romy M; Grant, Ryan W; Swanson, Kelly S; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2013-05-01

    Previous work has shown obesity to be associated with changes in intestinal microbiota. While obesity is common in dogs, limited information is available about the role of the intestinal microbiota. The aim of this study was to investigate whether alterations in the intestinal microbiota may be associated with canine obesity. Using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we evaluated the composition of the faecal microbiota in 22 lean and 21 obese pet dogs, as well as in five research dogs fed ad libitum and four research dogs serving as lean controls. Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial phyla. The phylum Actinobacteria and the genus Roseburia were significantly more abundant in the obese pet dogs. The order Clostridiales significantly increased under ad libitum feeding in the research dogs. Canine intestinal microbiota is highly diverse and shows considerable interindividual variation. In the pet dogs, influence on the intestinal microbiota besides body condition, like age, breed, diet or lifestyle, might have masked the effect of obesity. The study population of research dogs was small, and further work is required before the role of the intestinal microbiota in canine obesity is clarified. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Affective behavioural responses by dogs to tactile human-dog interactions].

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Franziska; Hössler, Johanna C; Struwe, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The communication of dogs is based on complex, subtle body postures and facial expressions. Some social interaction between dogs includes physical contact. Humans generally use both verbal and tactile signals to communicate with dogs. Hence, interaction between humans and dogs might lead to conflicts because the behavioural responses of dogs to human-dog interaction may be misinterpreted and wrongly assessed. The behavioural responses of dogs to tactile human-dog interactions and human gestures are the focus of this study. The participating dogs (n = 47) were privately owned pets.They were of varying breed and gender.The test consisted of nine randomised test sequences (e. g. petting the dog's head or chest). A test sequence was performed for a period of 30 seconds. The inter-trial interval was set at 60 seconds and the test-retest interval was set at 10 minutes. The frequency and duration of the dogs'behavioural responses were recorded using INTERACT. To examine the behavioural responses of the dogs, a two-way analysis of variance within the linear mixed models procedure of IBM SPSS Statistics 19 was conducted. A significant influence of the test-sequenc order on the dogs' behaviour could be analysed for appeasement gestures (F8,137 = 2.42; p = 0.018), redirected behaviour (F8,161 = 6.31; p = 0.012) and socio-positive behaviour (F8,148 = 6.28; p = 0.012). The behavioural responses of the dogs, which were considered as displacement activities (F8,109 = 2.5; p = 0.014) differed significantly among the test sequences. The response of the dogs, measured as gestures of appeasement, redirected behaviours, and displacement activities, was most obvious during petting around the head and near the paws.The results of this study conspicuously indicate that dogs respond to tactile human-dog interactions with gestures of appeasement and displacement activities. Redirected behaviours, socio-positive behaviours as well displacement activities are behavioural responses which dogs

  13. Assessment of the age for a preventive ultrasonographic examination of the prostate in the dog.

    PubMed

    Mantziaras, G; Alonge, S; Faustini, M; Luvoni, G C

    2017-09-15

    The prostate commonly develops benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in dogs over 5 years, while in aged dogs other pathological findings might be revealed by ultrasonographic exam. The aim of the present study was to estimate the most suitable age for a preventive ultrasonographic examination of the prostate in the dog. The prostate of 1003 intact male dogs of 64 different breeds, of different ages (1-18 years) and bodyweights (2-55 kg) was evaluated with ultrasound, irrespective of the reason for clinical examination. The age of each dog was expressed as the ratio between the actual age and the maximum longevity expected for the breed. Dogs were divided in two groups based on breeds' life expectancy as short life (SL) and long life (LL). The size of the prostate (normal, enlarged or small) and the presence of abnormal sonographic findings were recorded for each dog. The results of the present study indicate that the most suitable age for a preventive ultrasonographic exam of the prostate in the dog is approximately at 40% of its expected longevity, both in short and long life breeds, because at this age there is a strong possibility to be able to detect abnormal prostatic findings. In 47.5% of the dogs at least one abnormal finding of the prostate was revealed by ultrasonographic exam, while dogs with long life expectancy showed a significantly higher prevalence of abnormalities, than dogs with short life expectancy. The most frequent findings were the increase of prostatic size (33.5%) and the presence of at least one cyst (33.6%), with no difference between SL and LL dogs. In conclusion, a preventive examination of the prostate starting at 40% of expected longevity in dogs of short and long life breeds is strongly recommended for early detection of abnormalities, for scheduling specific follow up and for suggesting effective therapeutic protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Defaming Rover: Error-Based Latent Rhetoric in the Medical Literature on Dog Bites.

    PubMed

    Arluke, Arnold; Cleary, Donald; Patronek, Gary; Bradley, Janis

    2017-10-25

    This article examines the accuracy and rhetoric of reports by human health care professionals concerning dog bite injuries published in the peer-reviewed medical literature, with respect to nonclinical issues, such as dog behavior. A qualitative content analysis examined 156 publications between 1966 and 2015 identified by terms such as "dog bite" or "dangerous dogs." The analysis revealed misinformation about human-canine interactions, the significance of breed and breed characteristics, and the frequency of dog bite-related injuries. Misinformation included clear-cut factual errors, misinterpretations, omissions, emotionally loaded language, and exaggerations based on misunderstood or inaccurate statistics or reliance on the interpretation by third parties of other authors' meaning. These errors clustered within one or more rhetorical devices including generalization, catastrophization, demonization, and negative differentiation. By constructing the issue as a social problem, these distortions and errors, and the rhetorical devices supporting them, mischaracterize dogs and overstate the actual risk of dog bites.

  15. Breed- and age-related differences in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Ha-Young; Shin, Jong-Il; Seung, Byung-Joon; Ju, Jung-Hyung; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). It is an important and clinically relevant condition as it has a poor prognosis and is difficult to treat. Basal-like triple-negative cancer is highly prevalent in both African-Americans and adolescents. We therefore examined whether such a cancer likewise occurs in specific breeds and age groups in dogs, focusing on basal-like triple-negative cancer in particular. In this study, 181 samples from dogs with malignant mammary carcinoma from the 5 most common breeds and 2 age groups in Korea were analyzed. Histological classification and molecular subtyping, including assessment of immunohistochemical findings, were carried out. Twenty-five of 28 (89.3%) triple-negative carcinomas were identified as basal-like triple-negative carcinomas. Analysis of associations of classified factors revealed that the shih tzu breed (9/25, 36.0%) and advanced-age (19/25, 76.0%) groups were characterized by higher prevalence of basal-like triple-negative tumors with diverse histological types and of a higher grade. These results suggest that breed- and age-related differences can be identified in canine mammary carcinoma and, notably, in the shih tzu breed and at older ages. Further investigation of these distinguishing characteristics of the shih tzu breed is warranted. PMID:27127342

  16. The Companion Dog as a Model for the Longevity Dividend

    PubMed Central

    Creevy, Kate E.; Austad, Steven N.; Hoffman, Jessica M.; O’Neill, Dan G.; Promislow, Daniel E.L.

    2016-01-01

    The companion dog is the most phenotypically diverse species on the planet. This enormous variability between breeds extends not only to morphology and behavior but also to longevity and the disorders that affect dogs. There are remarkable overlaps and similarities between the human and canine species. Dogs closely share our human environment, including its many risk factors, and the veterinary infrastructure to manage health in dogs is second only to the medical infrastructure for humans. Distinct breed-based health profiles, along with their well-developed health record system and high overlap with the human environment, make the companion dog an exceptional model to improve understanding of the physiological, social, and economic impacts of the longevity dividend (LD). In this review, we describe what is already known about age-specific patterns of morbidity and mortality in companion dogs, and then explore whether this existing evidence supports the LD. We also discuss some potential limitations to using dogs as models of aging, including the fact that many dogs are euthanized before they have lived out their natural life span. Overall, we conclude that the companion dog offers high potential as a model system that will enable deeper research into the LD than is otherwise possible. PMID:26729759

  17. Wolves are better imitators of conspecifics than dogs.

    PubMed

    Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    Domestication is thought to have influenced the cognitive abilities of dogs underlying their communication with humans, but little is known about its effect on their interactions with conspecifics. Since domestication hypotheses offer limited predictions in regard to wolf-wolf compared to dog-dog interactions, we extend the cooperative breeding hypothesis suggesting that the dependency of wolves on close cooperation with conspecifics, including breeding but also territory defense and hunting, has created selection pressures on motivational and cognitive processes enhancing their propensity to pay close attention to conspecifics' actions. During domestication, dogs' dependency on conspecifics has been relaxed, leading to reduced motivational and cognitive abilities to interact with conspecifics. Here we show that 6-month-old wolves outperform same aged dogs in a two-action-imitation task following a conspecific demonstration. While the wolves readily opened the apparatus after a demonstration, the dogs failed to solve the problem. This difference could not be explained by differential motivation, better physical insight of wolves, differential developmental pathways of wolves and dogs or a higher dependency of dogs from humans. Our results are best explained by the hypothesis that higher cooperativeness may come together with a higher propensity to pay close attention to detailed actions of others and offer an alternative perspective to domestication by emphasizing the cooperativeness of wolves as a potential source of dog-human cooperation.

  18. Imaging findings in dogs with caudal intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Caitlin M; Reichle, Jean K; McKlveen, Tori; Smith, Mary O

    2011-01-01

    The radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for four dogs with herniation of the Cd1-Cd2 intervertebral disc are described. All dogs were 7 years of age at the time of presentation, with one neutered male and three neutered females. Breeds included one Beagle, one Bassett hound, and two large, mixed breed dogs. All dogs had tail pain on manipulation, two had pain during defecation, and two maintained an abnormal tail position. Three dogs had radiographs in which mineralization within the disc space was apparent. Two of these dogs also had mineralization within the vertebral canal. Three dogs underwent MRI, which was characterized by varying degrees of disc herniation and nerve root compression at Cd1-Cd2. Mobility may be a factor predisposing to disc herniation in the cranial aspect of the caudal spine. We documented that caudal disc herniation does occur occasionally in dogs and that radiography and MRI may be used to identify this disease. Caudal intervertebral disc herniation should be considered as a differential for dogs with caudal vertebral pain, pain with tail manipulation, pain during defecation, or abnormal tail carriage. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. The Companion Dog as a Model for the Longevity Dividend.

    PubMed

    Creevy, Kate E; Austad, Steven N; Hoffman, Jessica M; O'Neill, Dan G; Promislow, Daniel E L

    2016-01-04

    The companion dog is the most phenotypically diverse species on the planet. This enormous variability between breeds extends not only to morphology and behavior but also to longevity and the disorders that affect dogs. There are remarkable overlaps and similarities between the human and canine species. Dogs closely share our human environment, including its many risk factors, and the veterinary infrastructure to manage health in dogs is second only to the medical infrastructure for humans. Distinct breed-based health profiles, along with their well-developed health record system and high overlap with the human environment, make the companion dog an exceptional model to improve understanding of the physiological, social, and economic impacts of the longevity dividend (LD). In this review, we describe what is already known about age-specific patterns of morbidity and mortality in companion dogs, and then explore whether this existing evidence supports the LD. We also discuss some potential limitations to using dogs as models of aging, including the fact that many dogs are euthanized before they have lived out their natural life span. Overall, we conclude that the companion dog offers high potential as a model system that will enable deeper research into the LD than is otherwise possible. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of intestinal nematode parasitism among pet dogs in the United States (2003-2006).

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed S; Moore, George E; Glickman, Larry T

    2009-03-01

    To estimate prevalence of intestinal nematode parasitism among pet dogs in the United States and characterize risk factors for infection. Retrospective period prevalence survey. 1,213,061 dogs examined at 547 private veterinary hospitals in 44 states from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2006. Data were obtained from electronic medical records of all dogs that had at least 1 fecal flotation test. Risk factors for intestinal nematode parasitism were identified by means of multivariable logistic regression analysis. 2,785,248 fecal flotation tests were performed during the study period. When results for only the first test in each dog were considered, prevalences of Toxocara, Ancylostoma, and Trichuris parasitism were 5.04%, 4.50%, and 0.81%, respectively. Dogs < 0.5 years old had higher odds of Toxocara and Ancylostoma parasitism, compared with dogs > 5.0 years old; sexually intact male and female dogs had higher odds of parasitism, compared with spayed female dogs; toy dogs had lower odds of parasitism, compared with dogs in other breed groups; and dogs living in the mountain region had lower odds of parasitism, compared with dogs living in other regions. Results suggested that age, body weight, sex, breed, and geographic region were risk factors for intestinal nematode parasitism among pet dogs in the United States.

  1. Clinical and histological characterization of hair coat and glandular tissue of Chinese crested dogs.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique J; Gurtner, Corinne; Panakova, Lucia; Mausberg, Theresa-Bernadette; Müller, Eliane J; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso; Welle, Monika M

    2013-04-01

    Two varieties exist in the Chinese crested dog breed, namely hairless Chinese crested dogs presenting with hypotrichosis and dentition abnormalities, and the coated powderpuffs. Hairless Chinese crested dogs are obligate heterozygotes for a FOXI3 mutation, and this phenotype is classified as a form of canine ectodermal dysplasia. We provide a detailed histological description of hair follicles and their density for the three subphenotypes (true hairless, semi-coated and powderpuffs) of Chinese crested dogs. Apocrine and exocrine glands of the skin and other tissues were compared with findings reported from dogs with X-linked ectodermal dysplasia. Skin biopsies were collected from 22 Chinese crested dogs. Additionally, the glands of the skin and other tissues were examined from another two dogs available for postmortem examination. Skin biopsies and tissues were processed, stained and evaluated in a blinded fashion. Hair follicular anomalies decreased with increasing number of hairs in the different phenotypes. The FOXI3 mutants had only simple primary hair follicles, whereas the nonmutant powderpuffs had compound follicles identical to other dog breeds. All Chinese crested dogs had an anagen-dominated hair cycle. Furthermore, apocrine glands in the skin and respiratory mucous glands of the mutant Chinese crested dogs were present and normal. We have identified striking histopathological differences between the three subphenotypes of Chinese crested dogs. We clearly demonstrated distinct differences between the canine ectodermal dysplasia in Chinese crested dogs and dogs with X-linked ectodermal dysplasia. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. The concerted impact of domestication and transposon insertions on methylation patterns between dogs and gray wolves

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Ilana Janowitz; Clark, Michelle M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Deere-Machemer, Kerry A.; Wang, Jun; Duarte, Lionel; Gnanadesikan, Gitanjali E.; McCoy, Eskender L.; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Stahler, Daniel R.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Wayne, Robert K.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; vonHoldt, Bridgett M.

    2015-01-01

    The process of domestication can exert intense trait-targeted selection on genes and regulatory regions. Specifically, rapid shifts in the structure and sequence of genomic regulatory elements could provide an explanation for the extensive, and sometimes extreme, variation in phenotypic traits observed in domesticated species. Here, we explored methylation differences from >24,000 cytosines distributed across the genomes of the domesticated dog (Canis familiaris) and the gray wolf (C. lupus). PCA and model-based cluster analyses identified two primary groups, domestic versus wild canids. A scan for significantly differentially methylated sites (DMSs) revealed species-specific patterns at 68 sites after correcting for cell heterogeneity, with weak yet significant hyper-methylation typical of purebred dogs when compared to wolves (59% and 58%, p<0.05, respectively). Additionally, methylation patterns at eight genes significantly deviated from neutrality, with similar trends of hyper-methylation in purebred dogs. The majority (>66%) of differentially methylated regions contained or were associated with repetitive elements, indicative of a genotype-mediated trend. However, DMSs were also often linked to functionally relevant genes (e.g. neurotransmitters). Finally, we utilized known genealogical relationships among Yellowstone wolves to survey transmission stability of methylation marks, from which we found a substantial fraction that demonstrated high heritability (both H2 and h2>0.99). These analyses provide a unique epigenetic insight into the molecular consequences of recent selection and radiation of our most ancient domesticated companion, the dog. These findings suggest selection has acted on methylation patterns, providing a new genomic perspective on phenotypic diversification in domesticated species. PMID:27112634

  3. The concerted impact of domestication and transposon insertions on methylation patterns between dogs and grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Janowitz Koch, Ilana; Clark, Michelle M; Thompson, Michael J; Deere-Machemer, Kerry A; Wang, Jun; Duarte, Lionel; Gnanadesikan, Gitanjali E; McCoy, Eskender L; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Stahler, Daniel R; Pellegrini, Matteo; Ostrander, Elaine A; Wayne, Robert K; Sinsheimer, Janet S; vonHoldt, Bridgett M

    2016-04-01

    The process of domestication can exert intense trait-targeted selection on genes and regulatory regions. Specifically, rapid shifts in the structure and sequence of genomic regulatory elements could provide an explanation for the extensive, and sometimes extreme, variation in phenotypic traits observed in domesticated species. Here, we explored methylation differences from >24 000 cytosines distributed across the genomes of the domesticated dog (Canis familiaris) and the grey wolf (Canis lupus). PCA and model-based cluster analyses identified two primary groups, domestic vs. wild canids. A scan for significantly differentially methylated sites (DMSs) revealed species-specific patterns at 68 sites after correcting for cell heterogeneity, with weak yet significant hypermethylation typical of purebred dogs when compared to wolves (59% and 58%, P < 0.05, respectively). Additionally, methylation patterns at eight genes significantly deviated from neutrality, with similar trends of hypermethylation in purebred dogs. The majority (>66%) of differentially methylated regions contained or were associated with repetitive elements, indicative of a genotype-mediated trend. However, DMSs were also often linked to functionally relevant genes (e.g. neurotransmitters). Finally, we utilized known genealogical relationships among Yellowstone wolves to survey transmission stability of methylation marks, from which we found a substantial fraction that demonstrated high heritability (both H(2) and h(2 ) > 0.99). These analyses provide a unique epigenetic insight into the molecular consequences of recent selection and radiation of our most ancient domesticated companion, the dog. These findings suggest selection has acted on methylation patterns, providing a new genomic perspective on phenotypic diversification in domesticated species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Dog Ecology and Population Studies in Lagos State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Hambolu, Sunday E.; Dzikwi, Asabe A.; Kwaga, Jacob K.P.; Kazeem, Haruna M.; Umoh, Jarlath U.; Hambolu, Dupe A.

    2014-01-01

    Dog population dynamics have a major impact upon the effectiveness of rabies control strategies. As such, understanding domestic dog ecology has been recognized as central to the design of effective rabies control programmes. This study was conducted to determine the dog ecology in Lagos State using compound dog count and street dog count in the three senatorial districts (Lagos West, East and Central) of Lagos State from February, 2011 to January, 2012. A total of 546 questionnaires were distributed for the compound dog count and all were completed and returned. Various aspects of dog ecology were determined, including size, sex, breed of the dog population, management of dogs and rabies awareness among the respondents. Out of the 546 compounds surveyed, 518 (94.87%) owned at least one dog. A total of 1,427 dogs were counted from the street counts while a total of 1,447 dogs (2.8 dogs/compound) were counted from the compound count. The dogs comprised of 583 males and 864 females, out of which 64.10% are confined. The dog vaccination coverage in the dog population surveyed was 64.10% and administered majorly (91.30%) by veterinarians. Security (60%) and pets (26%) were the major reasons for keeping dogs. Majority (88.80%) of the respondents were aware of rabies and its mode of transmission, but still believed in the use of concoctions (40.40%), herbs (19.90%) and consumption of the organ of the offending dog (11.50%) for the treatment of rabies. The findings of this study showed a male: female ratio of dog to be 1:1.5 and a dog: human ratio of 1:5.6. There was also a responsible dog ownership as majority of the respondents do confine, vaccinate and provide food for their dogs. Vaccination coverage of the total dog population was however below the 70-80% target recommended by the World Health Organization to achieve herd immunity. PMID:24576383

  5. Tail docking in dogs: can attitude change be achieved?

    PubMed

    Bennett, P; Perini, E

    2003-05-01

    The debate about tail docking in domestic dogs continues to rage in many developed countries and attitudes expressed by different community groups remain diametrically opposed. Veterinary associations and welfare organisations typically want the practice banned, while many breeders and pure-bred dog associations just as vigorously oppose the introduction of anti-docking legislation. In recent years, much data have been accumulated concerning the welfare implications of tail docking. A recent evaluation of this literature suggests that the practice has little to recommend it and that, in the absence of reasonable case-by-case justification, it may constitute an unacceptable abuse of a sentient species. Given this situation, it is difficult to understand why many canine interest groups, presumably representing those people who care most about the welfare of companion dogs, should continue to hold such strong attitudes in favour of tail docking. In this review we attempt to explain why different community groups might espouse strong but opposing attitudes, despite having access to the same information. We argue that the theory of cognitive dissonance, popular among social psychologists, may provide a useful framework within which to understand, and attempt to alter, attitudes that persist even though they appear contrary to available empirical evidence.

  6. Study on the introgression of beef breeds in Canchim cattle using single nucleotide polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Buzanskas, Marcos Eli; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Seleguim Chud, Tatiane Cristina; Bernardes, Priscila Arrigucci; Santos, Daniel Jordan de Abreu; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Alencar, Maurício Mello de; Mudadu, Maurício de Alvarenga; Zanella, Ricardo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Gualberto Barbosa; Li, Changxi; Schenkel, Flavio Schramm; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of introgression of breeds in the Canchim (CA: 62.5% Charolais-37.5% Zebu) and MA genetic group (MA: 65.6% Charolais-34.4% Zebu) cattle using genomic information on Charolais (CH), Nelore (NE), and Indubrasil (IB) breeds. The number of animals used was 395 (CA and MA), 763 (NE), 338 (CH), and 37 (IB). The Bovine50SNP BeadChip from Illumina panel was used to estimate the levels of introgression of breeds considering the Maximum likelihood, Bayesian, and Single Regression method. After genotype quality control, 32,308 SNPs were considered in the analysis. Furthermore, three thresholds to prune out SNPs in linkage disequilibrium higher than 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01 were considered, resulting in 15,286, 7,652, and 1,582 SNPs, respectively. For k = 2, the proportion of taurine and indicine varied from the expected proportion based on pedigree for all methods studied. For k = 3, the Regression method was able to differentiate the animals in three main clusters assigned to each purebred breed, showing more reasonable according to its biological viewpoint. Analyzing the data considering k = 2 seems to be more appropriate for Canchim-MA animals due to its biological interpretation. The usage of 32,308 SNPs in the analyses resulted in similar findings between the estimated and expected breed proportions. Using the Regression approach, a contribution of Indubrasil was observed in Canchim-MA when k = 3 was considered. Genetic parameter estimation could account for this breed composition information as a source of variation in order to improve the accuracy of genetic models. Our findings may help assemble appropriate reference populations for genomic prediction for Canchim-MA in order to improve prediction accuracy. Using the information on the level of introgression in each individual could also be useful in breeding or crossing design to improve individual heterosis in crossbred cattle.

  7. Study on the introgression of beef breeds in Canchim cattle using single nucleotide polymorphism markers

    PubMed Central

    Buzanskas, Marcos Eli; Ventura, Ricardo Vieira; Seleguim Chud, Tatiane Cristina; Bernardes, Priscila Arrigucci; Santos, Daniel Jordan de Abreu; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; de Alencar, Maurício Mello; Mudadu, Maurício de Alvarenga; Zanella, Ricardo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Gualberto Barbosa; Li, Changxi; Schenkel, Flavio Schramm; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of introgression of breeds in the Canchim (CA: 62.5% Charolais—37.5% Zebu) and MA genetic group (MA: 65.6% Charolais—34.4% Zebu) cattle using genomic information on Charolais (CH), Nelore (NE), and Indubrasil (IB) breeds. The number of animals used was 395 (CA and MA), 763 (NE), 338 (CH), and 37 (IB). The Bovine50SNP BeadChip from Illumina panel was used to estimate the levels of introgression of breeds considering the Maximum likelihood, Bayesian, and Single Regression method. After genotype quality control, 32,308 SNPs were considered in the analysis. Furthermore, three thresholds to prune out SNPs in linkage disequilibrium higher than 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01 were considered, resulting in 15,286, 7,652, and 1,582 SNPs, respectively. For k = 2, the proportion of taurine and indicine varied from the expected proportion based on pedigree for all methods studied. For k = 3, the Regression method was able to differentiate the animals in three main clusters assigned to each purebred breed, showing more reasonable according to its biological viewpoint. Analyzing the data considering k = 2 seems to be more appropriate for Canchim-MA animals due to its biological interpretation. The usage of 32,308 SNPs in the analyses resulted in similar findings between the estimated and expected breed proportions. Using the Regression approach, a contribution of Indubrasil was observed in Canchim-MA when k = 3 was considered. Genetic parameter estimation could account for this breed composition information as a source of variation in order to improve the accuracy of genetic models. Our findings may help assemble appropriate reference populations for genomic prediction for Canchim-MA in order to improve prediction accuracy. Using the information on the level of introgression in each individual could also be useful in breeding or crossing design to improve individual heterosis in crossbred cattle. PMID:28182737

  8. Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in Insured Swedish Cats in Relation to Age, Breed and Sex.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, M; Fall, T; Ström Holst, B; Hansson-Hamlin, H; Bonnett, B; Egenvall, A

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrinopathy in cats. Most affected cats suffer from a type of diabetes similar to type 2 diabetes in humans. An increasing prevalence has been described in cats, as in humans, related to obesity and other lifestyle factors. To describe the incidence of DM in insured Swedish cats and the association of DM with demographic risk factors, such as age, breed and sex. A cohort of 504,688 individual cats accounting for 1,229,699 cat-years at risk (CYAR) insured by a Swedish insurance company from 2009 to 2013. We used reimbursed insurance claims for the diagnosis of DM. Overall incidence rates and incidence rates stratified on year, age, breed, and sex were estimated. The overall incidence rate of DM in the cohort was 11.6 cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.0-12.2) per 10,000 CYAR. Male cats had twice as high incidence rate (15.4; 95% CI, 14.4-16.4) as females (7.6; 95% CI, 6.9-8.3). Domestic cats were at higher risk compared to purebred cats. A significant association with breed was seen, with the Burmese, Russian Blue, Norwegian Forest cat, and Abyssinian breeds at a higher risk compared to other cats. No sex predisposition was found among Burmese cats. Several breeds with a lower risk of DM were identified. Our results verify that the Burmese breed is at increased risk of developing DM. We also identified several previously unreported breeds with increased or decreased risk of DM. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Genetic evaluation of Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog.

    PubMed

    Oberbauer, A M; Bell, J S; Belanger, J M; Famula, T R

    2006-05-02

    Addison's disease, also known as hypoadrenocorticism, has been reported in many individual dogs, although some breeds exhibit a greater incidence than the population as a whole. Addison's is presumed to be an autoimmune mediated hereditary defect but the mode of inheritance remains unclear. In particular, the heritability and mode of inheritance have not been defined for the Portuguese Water Dog although Addison's is known to be prevalent in the breed. The analyses present clear evidence that establishes Addison's disease as an inherited disorder in the Portuguese Water Dog with an estimate of heritability of 0.49 (+/- 0.16); there were no differences in risk for disease across sexes (p > 0.49). Further, the complex segregation analysis provides suggestive evidence that Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog is inherited under the control of a single, autosomal recessive locus. The high heritability and mode of inheritance of Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog should enable the detection of segregating markers in a genome-wide scan and the identification of a locus linked to Addison's. Though the confirmation of Addison's disease as an autosomal recessive disorder must wait until the gene is identified, breeders of these dogs may wish to keep the present findings in mind as they plan their breeding programs to select against producing affected dogs.

  10. Genetic evaluation of Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog

    PubMed Central

    Oberbauer, AM; Bell, JS; Belanger, JM; Famula, TR

    2006-01-01

    Background Addison's disease, also known as hypoadrenocorticism, has been reported in many individual dogs, although some breeds exhibit a greater incidence than the population as a whole. Addison's is presumed to be an autoimmune mediated hereditary defect but the mode of inheritance remains unclear. In particular, the heritability and mode of inheritance have not been defined for the Portuguese Water Dog although Addison's is known to be prevalent in the breed. Results The analyses present clear evidence that establishes Addison's disease as an inherited disorder in the Portuguese Water Dog with an estimate of heritability of 0.49 (± 0.16); there were no differences in risk for disease across sexes (p > 0.49). Further, the complex segregation analysis provides suggestive evidence that Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog is inherited under the control of a single, autosomal recessive locus. Conclusion The high heritability and mode of inheritance of Addison's disease in the Portuguese Water Dog should enable the detection of segregating markers in a genome-wide scan and the identification of a locus linked to Addison's. Though the confirmation of Addison's disease as an autosomal recessive disorder must wait until the gene is identified, breeders of these dogs may wish to keep the present findings in mind as they plan their breeding programs to select against producing affected dogs. PMID:16670022

  11. Zoonotic Trichomonas tenax and a new trichomonad species, Trichomonas brixi n. sp., from the oral cavities of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Kellerová, Pavlína; Tachezy, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Trichomonads are known to inhabit the oral cavities of various mammals, including dogs, cats and horses. However, little attention has been paid to species identification, prevalence and zoonotic potential of these parasites, although their hosts live in close proximity with humans. According to the original description, oral trichomonads in dogs and cats belong to the genus Tetratrichomonas. Interestingly, later investigations suggested that the oral cavities of dogs and cats could be infected with different species of the genus Trichomonas, including the human oral cavity parasite Trichomonas tenax. Thus, in this study we investigated the occurrence of oral trichomonads in 111 domestic dogs and 122 cats using cell cultivation methods, nested PCR analyses, and the sequencing of ITS1-5.8rRNA-ITS2 regions. We found that both dogs and cats harbour T. tenax, with prevalences of 8.1% and 4.1%, respectively. Considerably more dogs were infected with different species of the genus Trichomonas (30.6%), which we also identified in cats (6.6%). An analysis of the potential risk factors suggested that dogs of more than 3years old or with dental disease signs are more frequently infected with Trichomonas sp. than younger dogs or dogs without the disease signs, and that crossbreed dogs revealed increased rates of infection in comparison with purebred dogs. An analysis of the cat population suggested that Trichomonas sp. infection is lower in younger and crossbreed cats. Although the morphology of Trichomonas sp. is very similar to that of T. tenax, based on a phylogenetic analysis of ITS1-5.8rRNA-ITS2 regions and the ssrRNA genes, we consider Trichomonas sp. to represent a new trichomonad species, for which we propose the name Trichomonas brixi. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Breed and breed x environment interaction effects for growth traits and survival rate from birth to weaning in crossbred lambs.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Avalos, J; Montaldo, H H; Valencia-Posadas, M; Castillo-Juárez, H; Ulloa-Arvizu, R

    2012-12-01

    dam × environmental category interaction effect was significant for birth and weaning weights (P < 0.01). Weaning weight of lambs from hair sheep breeds (Barbados Blackbelly or Pelibuey) and crosses (F(1) Pelibuey × Dorper) as well as purebred Dorset, Hampshire, and Suffolk dams were more affected when changing from the high to the low environmental category compared with the other genetic groups. No breed of the sire or genetic group of the dam × environmental category interactions were (P > 0.05) observed for survival rate.

  13. Urethral prolapse in dogs: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Carr, Jennifer G; Tobias, Karen M; Smith, Laura

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the signalment, clinical signs, treatment, and outcome of dogs with urethral prolapse and identify risk factors associated with prolapse or treatment. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 48) with urethral prolapse. Medical records (May 1995-June 2010) from 2 referral centers were reviewed. Retrieved data included signalment, clinical signs, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, results of long-term follow-up. Records from Veterinary Medical Data Base (VMDB) were evaluated to determine odds ratios. Odds ratio for urethral prolapse in English bulldogs compared to all breeds was 366.99 (95% CI: 265.83, 506.65). Of 48 affected dogs, 46 had either resection and anastomosis (43 dogs) or urethropexy (3 dogs). The most common early postoperative complication was hemorrhage (39%); postoperative hemorrhage was less common when a simple continuous pattern was used for resection and anastomosis. Prolapse recurred in 57% of dogs available for long-term follow-up; recurrence was less common in dogs that were administered postoperative butorphanol or acepromazine. Gender was not associated with urethral prolapse or postoperative complications. Urethral prolapse occurs most commonly in English bulldogs. Postoperative hemorrhage and prolapse recurrence may be reduced with use of a simple continuous pattern for urethral anastomosis and by administration of postoperative sedation, respectively. Castration status did not appear to affect prolapse development or outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Glomerular Lesions in Proteinuric Miniature Schnauzer Dogs.

    PubMed

    Furrow, E; Lees, G E; Brown, C A; Cianciolo, R E

    2017-05-01

    Miniature Schnauzer dogs are predisposed to idiopathic hypertriglyerceridemia, which increases risk for diseases such as pancreatitis and gallbladder mucocele. Recently, elevated triglyceride concentrations have been associated with proteinuria in this breed, although it is difficult to determine which abnormality is primary. Retrospective review of renal tissue from 27 proteinuric Miniature Schnauzers revealed that 20 dogs had ultrastructural evidence of osmophilic globules consistent with lipid in glomerular tufts. Seven of these dogs had lipid thromboemboli in glomerular capillary loops that distorted their shape and compressed circulating erythrocytes. Triglyceride concentrations were reported in 6 of these 7 dogs, and all were hypertriglyceridemic. In addition, glomerular lipidosis (defined as accumulation of foam cells within peripheral capillary loops) was identified in a single dog. The remaining 12 dogs had smaller amounts of lipid that could only be identified ultrastructurally. Neither signalment data nor clinicopathologic parameters (serum albumin, serum creatinine, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and blood pressure) differed among the various types of lipid lesions. During the time course of this study, all dogs diagnosed with glomerular lipid thromboemboli were Miniature Schnauzers, underscoring the importance of recognizing these clear spaces within capillary loops as lipid.

  15. Glomerular Lesions in Proteinuric Miniature Schnauzer Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Furrow, E.; Lees, G. E.; Brown, C. A.; Cianciolo, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Miniature Schnauzer dogs are predisposed to idiopathic hypertriglyerceridemia, which increases risk for diseases such as pancreatitis and gallbladder mucocele. Recently, elevated triglyceride concentrations have been associated with proteinuria in this breed, although it is difficult to determine which abnormality is primary. Retrospective review of renal tissue from 27 proteinuric Miniature Schnauzers revealed that 20 dogs had ultrastructural evidence of osmophilic globules consistent with lipid in glomerular tufts. Seven of these dogs had lipid thromboemboli in glomerular capillary loops that distorted their shape and compressed circulating erythrocytes. Triglyceride concentrations were reported in 6 of these 7 dogs, and all were hypertriglyceridemic. In addition, glomerular lipidosis (defined as accumulation of foam cells within peripheral capillary loops) was identified in a single dog. The remaining 12 dogs had smaller amounts of lipid that could only be identified ultrastructurally. Neither signalment data nor clinicopathologic parameters (serum albumin, serum creatinine, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and blood pressure) differed among the various types of lipid lesions. During the time course of this study, all dogs diagnosed with glomerular lipid thromboemboli were Miniature Schnauzers, underscoring the importance of recognizing these clear spaces within capillary loops as lipid. PMID:28005494

  16. 'It was not just a walking experience': reflections on the role of care in dog-walking.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Rock, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    Research into physical activity and human health has recently begun to attend to dog-walking. This study extends the literature on dog-walking as a health behaviour by conceptualizing dog-walking as a caring practice. It centres on qualitative interviews with 11 Canadian dog-owners. All participants resided in urban neighbourhoods identified through previous quantitative research as conducive to dog-walking. Canine characteristics, including breed and age, were found to influence people's physical activity. The health of the dog and its position in the life-course influenced patterns of dog-walking. Frequency, duration and spatial patterns of dog-walking all depended on relationships and people's capacity to tap into resources. In foregrounding networks of care, inclusive of pets and public spaces, a relational conceptualization of dog-walking as a practice of caring helps to make sense of heterogeneity in patterns of physical activity among dog-owners.

  17. Breeding bird communities

    Treesearch

    Vanessa L. Artman; Randy Dettmers

    2003-01-01

    Prescribed burning is being applied on an experimental basis to restore and maintain mixed-oak communities in southern Ohio. This chapter describes baseline conditions for the breeding bird community prior to prescribed burning. We surveyed breeding bird populations at four study areas using the territory-mapping method. We observed 35 bird species during the surveys....

  18. TILLING for plant breeding.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Peter; Dong, Chongmei

    2014-01-01

    TILLING is widely used in plant functional genomics. Mutagenesis and SNP detection is combined to allow for the isolation of mutations in genes of interest. It can also be used as a plant breeding tool, whereby variation in known or candidate genes of interest to breeding programs is generated. Here we describe a simple low-cost TILLING procedure.

  19. Sexual Reproduction and Breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the second edition of Plant Propagation Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, we have combined the first edition chapters 36: Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms and 37: Breeding Horticultural Plants into the present single chapter Sexual Reproduction and Breeding. These topics are so closely relate...

  20. Mapping quantitative trait loci for canine hip dysplasia in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Yvonne; Distl, Ottmar

    2007-12-01

    Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a common hereditary developmental disease of the coxofemoral joints. CHD is characterized by subluxation of the femoral head and deformation of the acetabulum leading to a painful osteoarthrosis. Analyses of mode of inheritance have shown the involvement of a major gene in expression of CHD in German Shepherd dogs. Thus, a whole genome scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) was performed in German Shepherd dogs. For this purpose 11 paternal half-sib families, including a total of 459 purebred German Shepherd dogs with sires, dams, and offspring, were genotyped for 261 microsatellites. These markers were equidistantly distributed over all 38 autosomes and the X chromosome with an average marker distance of 11.7 cM. The mean observed heterozygosity of the marker set was 50%. The CHD status for the dogs was scored according to the official rules of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. At the genome-wide level of significance at p < 0.05, QTL for CHD were located on nine different canine chromosomes: 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 16, 19, 26, and 33. The minimal QTL regions containing the CHD genes spanned on average 5 Mb with a range between 1 and 8.2 Mb. Chromosome-wide level of significance at p < 0.05 was found for QTL on 19 chromosomes. Further analyses can now be performed to refine these map positions of QTL already identified in German Shepherd dogs.

  1. Allometry of Sexual Size Dimorphism in Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Frynta, Daniel; Baudyšová, Jana; Hradcová, Petra; Faltusová, Kateřina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    Background The tendency for male-larger sexual size dimorphism (SSD) to scale with body size – a pattern termed Rensch's rule – has been empirically supported in many animal lineages. Nevertheless, its theoretical elucidation is a subject of debate. Here, we exploited the extreme morphological variability of domestic dog (Canis familiaris) to gain insights into evolutionary causes of this rule. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied SSD and its allometry among 74 breeds ranging in height from less than 19 cm in Chihuahua to about 84 cm in Irish wolfhound. In total, the dataset included 6,221 individuals. We demonstrate that most dog breeds are male-larger, and SSD in large breeds is comparable to SSD of their wolf ancestor. Among breeds, SSD becomes smaller with decreasing body size. The smallest breeds are nearly monomorphic. Conclusions/Significance SSD among dog breeds follows the pattern consistent with Rensch's rule. The variability of body size and corresponding changes in SSD among breeds of a domestic animal shaped by artificial selection can help to better understand processes leading to emergence of Rensch's rule. PMID:23049956

  2. Do traditional sheep breeders perform conscious selection? An example from a participatory breeding program of Morada Nova sheep.

    PubMed

    Arandas, Janaina Kelli Gomes; Alves, Ângelo Giuseppe Chaves; Facó, Olivardo; Belchior, Ernandes Barboza; Shiotsuki, Luciana; de Arruda Leite, Paulo Márcio Barbosa; Ribeiro, Maria Norma

    2017-10-01

    The implementation of sustainable breeding programs requires genetic breeding strategies that are appropriate for the reality production systems. It is also essential that the choice of animal selection criteria be based on breeders' knowledge and objectives. This work is an ethno-zootechnical study of the Morada Nova sheep breed and its crossbreeds. The goals of this study were to register and analyze indigenous breeders' knowledge and practices regarding animal selection criteria and to generate technical information to support a participatory breeding program of the breed. This study was conducted in the Morada Nova municipality in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were evaluated using two groups of individuals, purebred Morada Nova sheep breeders (RMN, n = 13) and breeders of Morada Nova crossbreeds (MMN, n = 48). Interview questions were used to identify local selection criteria adopted by each group in the choice of animals for breeding. Data from the interviews were submitted to frequency distribution analysis and the Shapiro-Wilk test to verify their distribution. Later, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the two groups of farmers based on that information, in addition to multivariate statistical analysis and evaluation of Smith salience index. Breeders in the RMN group used selection criteria related to breed standards, such as pelage color. In contrast, breeders of the MMN group used criteria related to productivity, such as body conformation and milk production. Breeders should be engaged in the development of breeding programs, and it is important to consider their preferences and objectives when evaluating breeding animals.

  3. Lateral patellar luxation in dogs: a retrospective study of 65 dogs.

    PubMed

    Kalff, S; Butterworth, S J; Miller, A; Keeley, B; Baines, S; McKee, W M

    2014-01-01

    To report the signalment and clinical features of dogs with non-traumatic lateral patellar luxation and to report the complications and outcomes following surgery. A multicentre retrospective study was performed. Medical records were reviewed and the signalment, clinical features, and treatment of dogs presenting with lateral patellar luxation were recorded. In dogs treated surgically, the outcome and complications were investigated. Sixty-five dogs (95 stifles) were included; 39 were male and median age at presentation was 10 months. Breeds were classified as small (n = 6), medium (n = 23), large (n = 27), and giant (n = 9). Lateral patellar luxation was classified as grade I (n = 14), II (n = 41), III (n = 29), and IV (n = 11). Conformational abnormalities were noted in 34 stifles; genu valgum was the most common (n = 28). Higher-grade luxation was associated with a younger age at presentation (p = 0.032) and genu valgum (p = 0.01). Surgery was performed on 58 stifles, 22 of which sustained one or more complications; 16 complications were managed conservatively, four with implant removal and six with revision surgery. Surgeon-assessed outcome was good or excellent in 47 of the 51 dogs available for review. Non-traumatic lateral patellar luxation is a disease of predominantly medium and large breed dogs. It has several similar clinical features and can be surgically treated in a similar manner to medial patellar luxation with similar types of complications and outcomes expected.

  4. A serological survey of leptospiral antibodies in dogs in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Harland, A L; Cave, N J; Jones, B R; Benschop, J; Donald, J J; Midwinter, A C; Squires, R A; Collins-Emerson, J M

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of titres to four endemic leptospiral serovars in dog sera from the lower half of the North Island, and the South Island of New Zealand submitted to diagnostic laboratories, and to explore the association between the prevalence of seropositive samples to leptospirosis and breed group, age group and sex. Serum samples from 655 dogs residing in the central and lower North Island and from the South Island of New Zealand were sourced from the Massey University Veterinary Teaching Hospital and from submissions to New Zealand Veterinary Pathology in 2005. They were screened by the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) against Leptospira interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Pomona and L. borgpetersenii serovars Hardjo and Ballum. Titres greater or equal to 96 were considered positive. Variables investigated for their association with the prevalence of seropositive samples to leptospirosis included serovar, breed, North vs. South Island, age and sex. Positive MAT titres to Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni were found in 10.3 % of dogs (95% CI=8.1-12.9), and were more common than positive titres to other leptospiral serovars. Small breeds did not have a lower prevalence of Copenhageni titres than other breeds. Positive titres to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo were associated with breeds of dogs used as farm working dogs. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of positive leptospiral titres between dogs from the North or South Islands. Dogs greater than 12 years of age were less likely to have positive titres to Leptospira than younger dogs. No association was found between positive titres and sex. Breeds of dogs used as farm working were at greater risk of exposure to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo. Small breeds did not have a lower risk of seropositivity to Copenhageni than farm working breeds. Further study should be undertaken to confirm the prevalence of positive titres to leptospirosis in farm

  5. Insights into morphology and disease from the dog genome project.

    PubMed

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    Although most modern dog breeds are less than 200 years old, the symbiosis between man and dog is ancient. Since prehistoric times, repeated selection events have transformed the wolf into man's guardians, laborers, athletes, and companions. The rapid transformation from pack predator to loyal companion is a feat that is arguably unique among domesticated animals. How this transformation came to pass remained a biological mystery until recently: Within the past decade, the deployment of genomic approaches to study population structure, detect signatures of selection, and identify genetic variants that underlie canine phenotypes is ushering into focus novel biological mechanisms that make dogs remarkable. Ironically, the very practices responsible for breed formation also spurned morbidity; today, many diseases are correlated with breed identity. In this review, we discuss man's best friend in the context of a genetic model to understand paradigms of heritable phenotypes, both desirable and disadvantageous.

  6. Insights into Morphology and Disease from the Dog Genome Project

    PubMed Central

    Schoenebeck, Jeffrey J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Although most modern dog breeds are less than 200 years old, the symbiosis between man and dog is ancient. Since prehistoric times, repeated selection events have transformed the wolf into man’s guardians, laborers, athletes, and companions. The rapid transformation from pack predator to loyal companion is a feat that is arguably unique among domesticated animals. How this transformation came to pass remained a biological mystery until recently: Within the past decade, the deployment of genomic approaches to study population structure, detect signatures of selection, and identify genetic variants that underlie canine phenotypes is ushering into focus novel biological mechanisms that make dogs remarkable. Ironically, the very practices responsible for breed formation also spurned morbidity; today, many diseases are correlated with breed identity. In this review, we discuss man’s best friend in the context of a genetic model to understand paradigms of heritable phenotypes, both desirable and disadvantageous. PMID:25062362

  7. The relationships between morphological features and social signalling behaviours in juvenile dogs: the effect of early experience with dogs of different morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Kerswell, Keven J; Butler, Kym L; Bennett, Pauleen; Hemsworth, Paul H

    2010-09-01

    Research on dog communication has tended to focus on breed differences and the use of lupine signals by the domestic dog. However, the relationship between morphological change and communication has received little empirical study. The link between morphology and behavioural selection in a canid undergoing domestication, the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes), has been well documented. Therefore, it is reasonable to propose a similar link may be present in another canid species that has undergone domestication, namely the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). Inter-morphotype interactions (587 interactions) of 115 juvenile dogs aged 8-20 weeks from over 30 breeds and various hybrids, enrolled in veterinary "Puppy Socialisation Classes", were video taped. Each signal that could be sent, was recorded, and the sending and the intended receiving dog identified. The frequencies with which a dog sent each category of signal, and the frequency with which each category of signal was directed at the dog (elicited), were calculated. The relationship between these frequencies and the morphology of the dog was then studied using generalized linear models. Overall morphology of the dog was not related to either the sending or eliciting of any social signaling behaviours (social signals). However, snout length was related to both the signals sent by a dog, and especially the signals that were directed to a dog (elicited). Relationships to eye cover and coat length were also found. Possible explanations for the results are discussed, and avenues for further research are indicated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Using pooled data to estimate variance components and breeding values for traits affected by social interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Through social interactions, individuals affect one another’s phenotype. In such cases, an individual’s phenotype is affected by the direct (genetic) effect of the individual itself and the indirect (genetic) effects of the group mates. Using data on individual phenotypes, direct and indirect genetic (co)variances can be estimated. Together, they compose the total genetic variance that determines a population’s potential to respond to selection. However, it can be difficult or expensive to obtain individual phenotypes. Phenotypes on traits such as egg production and feed intake are, therefore, often collected on group level. In this study, we investigated whether direct, indirect and total genetic variances, and breeding values can be estimated from pooled data (pooled by group). In addition, we determined the optimal group composition, i.e. the optimal number of families represented in a group to minimise the standard error of the estimates. Methods This study was performed in three steps. First, all research questions were answered by theoretical derivations. Second, a simulation study was conducted to investigate the estimation of variance components and optimal group composition. Third, individual and pooled survival records on 12 944 purebred laying hens were analysed to investigate the estimation of breeding values and response to selection. Results Through theoretical derivations and simulations, we showed that the total genetic variance can be estimated from pooled data, but the underlying direct and indirect genetic (co)variances cannot. Moreover, we showed that the most accurate estimates are obtained when group members belong to the same family. Additional theoretical derivations and data analyses on survival records showed that the total genetic variance and breeding values can be estimated from pooled data. Moreover, the correlation between the estimated total breeding values obtained from individual and pooled data was surprisingly

  9. Brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, infestation ofsusceptible dog hosts is reduced by slow release of semiochemicalsfrom a less susceptible host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Domestic dog breeds are hosts for the tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, but infestation levels vary among breeds. Beagles are less susceptible to tick infestations than English cocker spaniels due to enhanced production of 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde that act as tick repellents. We report th...

  10. Can non-breeding be a cost of breeding dispersal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danchin, E.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Breeding habitat selection and dispersal are crucial processes that affect many components of fitness. Breeding dispersal entails costs, one of which has been neglected: dispersing animals may miss breeding opportunities because breeding dispersal requires finding a new nesting site and mate, two time- and energy-consuming activities. Dispersers are expected to be prone to non-breeding. We used the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) to test whether breeding dispersal influences breeding probability. Breeding probability was associated with dispersal, in that both were negatively influenced by private information (previous individual reproductive success) and public information (average reproductive success of conspecifics) about patch quality. Furthermore, the probability of skipping breeding was 1.7 times higher in birds that settled in a new patch relative to those that remained on the same patch. Finally, non-breeders that resumed breeding were 4.4 times more likely to disperse than birds that bred in successive years. Although private information may influence breeding probability directly, the link between breeding probability and public information may be indirect, through the influence of public information on breeding dispersal, non-breeding thus being a cost of dispersal. These results support the hypothesis that dispersal may result in not being able to breed. More generally, non-breeding (which can be interpreted as an extreme form of breeding failure) may reveal costs of various previous activities. Because monitoring the non-breeding portion of a population is difficult, non-breeders have been neglected in many studies of reproduction trade-offs.

  11. Wolves Are Better Imitators of Conspecifics than Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2014-01-01

    Domestication is thought to have influenced the cognitive abilities of dogs underlying their communication with humans, but little is known about its effect on their interactions with conspecifics. Since domestication hypotheses offer limited predictions in regard to wolf-wolf compared to dog-dog interactions, we extend the cooperative breeding hypothesis suggesting that the dependency of wolves on close cooperation with conspecifics, including breeding but also territory defense and hunting, has created selection pressures on motivational and cognitive processes enhancing their propensity to pay close attention to conspecifics’ actions. During domestication, dogs’ dependency on conspecifics has been relaxed, leading to reduced motivational and cognitive abilities to interact with conspecifics. Here we show that 6-month-old wolves outperform same aged dogs in a two-action-imitation task following a conspecific demonstration. While the wolves readily opened the apparatus after a demonstration, the dogs failed to solve the problem. This difference could not be explained by differential motivation, better physical insight of wolves, differential developmental pathways of wolves and dogs or a higher dependency of dogs from humans. Our results are best explained by the hypothesis that higher cooperativeness may come together with a higher propensity to pay close attention to detailed actions of others and offer an alternative perspective to domestication by emphasizing the cooperativeness of wolves as a potential source of dog-human cooperation. PMID:24489744

  12. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities.

    PubMed

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H; Hart, Lynette A

    2017-01-01

    Dogs' roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans' Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  13. A cloned toy poodle produced from somatic cells derived from an aged female dog.

    PubMed

    Jang, G; Hong, S G; Oh, H J; Kim, M K; Park, J E; Kim, H J; Kim, D Y; Lee, B C

    2008-03-15

    To date, dogs have been cloned with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), using donor cells derived from large-breed dogs 2 months to 3 years of age. The objective of the present study was to use SCNT to produce a small-breed dog from ear fibroblasts of an aged poodle, using large-breed oocyte donors and surrogate females, and to determine the origin of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the length of its telomeres. Oocytes were derived from large-breed donors, matured in vivo, collected by flushing oviducts, and reconstructed with somatic cells derived from an aged (14-year-old) female toy poodle. Oocytes and donor cells were fused by electric stimuli, activated chemically, and transferred into the oviducts of large-breed recipient females. Overall, 358 activated couplets were surgically transferred into the oviducts of 20 recipient dogs. Two recipients became pregnant; only one maintained pregnancy to term, and a live puppy (weighing 190 g) was delivered by Caesarean section. The cloned poodle was phenotypically and genetically identical to the nuclear donor dog; however, its mtDNA was from the oocyte donor, and its mean telomere length was not significantly different from that of the nuclear donor. In summary, we demonstrated that a small-breed dog could be cloned by transferring activated couplets produced by fusion of somatic cells from a small-breed, aged donor female with enucleated in-vivo-matured oocytes of large-breed females, and transferred into the oviduct of large-breed recipient female dogs.

  14. Serum insulin-like growth factor type 1 concentrations in healthy dogs and dogs with spontaneous primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Jaillardon, Laetitia; Martin, Lucile; Nguyen, Patrick; Siliart, Brigitte

    2011-11-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1) concentrations in dogs have been correlated with standard breed bodyweight (SBBW or breed size). Thyroid and somatotropic functions, which have common effects and regulatory mechanisms, were investigated in hypothyroid dogs. IGF-1 was measured in 495 adult healthy dogs (N) and in 220 primary hypothyroid dogs (HOT) with clinical and biological signs of primary hypothyroidism. IGF-1 was determined as a function of SBBW (kg): ≤15 (group A); 1540 (group D). In HOT dogs, median fT4 and c-TSH values were 9pmol/L and 1.5ng/mL, respectively. A significant correlation between bodyweight (BW) and IGF-1 was observed in both HOT and N dogs. The median IGF-1 value (ng/mL) was significantly higher (P<0.01) in HOT dogs compared to N in groups B, C and D (230 vs. 182; 316 vs. 230; 606 vs. 306 respectively). In conclusion, IGF-1 concentration should be interpreted in the context of SBBW in dogs and increases in spontaneous primary hypothyroidism. However, it remains unclear if this association is directly due to hypothyroidism or is the result of the weight gain accompanying hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dog Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2010-01-01

    Bringing service animals into schools raises serious questions about how to meet one student's special needs while ensuring the educational well-being of all. This article discusses how schools grapple with the practical and legal questions involved in allowing service dogs on campus. The author cites a case in 2009 called "Kalbfleisch v. Columbia…

  16. Association between cystine urolithiasis and neuter status of dogs within the UK.

    PubMed

    Florey, J; Ewen, V; Syme, H

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of the study were to examine the association between diagnosis of cystine urolithiasis and entire versus neutered status in male dogs and whether the strength of association varies among breeds. A previously reported canine urolithiasis database was used, documenting all urolith submissions to Hill's Pet Nutrition UK over a 10-year period. Uroliths were classified as cystine or non-cystine, and only male dogs with known neuter status were included in the analysis. Breeds of dog (and an additional crossbreed group), for which there was a minimum of 10 cystine urolith submissions, were analysed individually, with all other breeds combined together to form a reference group. Results were analysed using chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between breed and neuter status and formation of cystine calculi. In multiple breeds, dogs with cystine uroliths were significantly more likely to be entire than dogs forming other types of urolith. Being an entire male, regardless of breed, was associated with an increased risk of cystine urolithiasis (odds ratio=4·5; 95% confidence interval: 3·22 to 6·37; P<0·001). Increased odds of cystine formation in entire dogs supports further investigation of castration as a method to prevent cystine urolithiasis. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  17. Cystine-containing urinary calculi in dogs: 102 cases (1981-1989).

    PubMed

    Case, L C; Ling, G V; Franti, C E; Ruby, A L; Stevens, F; Johnson, D L

    1992-07-01

    One hundred and seven cystine-containing urinary calculi from 1 female and 101 male dogs were analyzed. Cystine-containing calculi accounted for 2% (107 of 5,375) of all canine urinary calculi submitted to the urinary stone analysis laboratory from July 1981 through December 1989. Male dogs that formed cystine calculi were compared with 3 other canine populations to determine whether certain breeds were apparently at increased or decreased risk for cystine calculus formation. In one or more of 3 population comparisons, significantly increased risk of cystine calculus formation was found in Mastiffs, Australian Cattle Dogs, English Bulldogs, Chihuahuas, Bullmastiffs, Newfoundlands, Dachshunds, Basenjis, Australian Shepherd Dogs, Scottish Deerhounds, Staffordshire Terriers, Miniature Pinschers, pitbull terriers, Welsh Corgis, Silky Terriers, and Bichon Frises. Significantly low risk of cystine calculus formation was found in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, Schnauzers, and mixed-breed dogs.

  18. Cloning of the short-tailed Gyeongju Donggyeong dog via SCNT: conserving phenotypic inheritance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Setyawan, Erif Maha Nugraha; Lee, Seok Hee; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer is a useful tool to maintain genetic information of animals. The Gyeongju Donggyeong dog is a breed registered as natural monument in Korea. The unique feature of the Donggyeong dog is its tail, as the Donggyeong dog can be classified as either short tailed or tailless. The aim of this study was to preserve the Donggyeong dog's unique feature by cloning. Fibroblasts were obtained from a short-tailed Donggyeong dog. In vivo matured oocytes were enucleated, microinjected with a donor cell and fused electrically. Reconstructed embryos were transferred to six recipient dogs. One surrogate became pregnant, and one short-tailed Donggyeong dog was delivered. This study demonstrated that the phenotype of the Donggyeong dog could be conserved by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  19. Characterization of dog repellent factor from cuticular secretion of female yellow dog tick, Haemaphysalis leachi.

    PubMed

    Burger, Ben V; Marx, Brenda; Le Roux, Maritha; Oelofsen, Burger W

    2006-01-01

    During its natural life cycle, the yellow dog tick, Haemaphysalis leachi, has three hosts, and it has to spend enough time on each of them to complete a blood meal. When irritated, the females of this tick species produce a cuticular secretion that contains a dog-repelling allomone. This improves the tick's chances of survival by deterring the dog from biting the tick off its body. Employing response-guided isolation techniques in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the defensive allomone of H. leachi was found to consist of the six homologous aliphatic aldehydes from hexanal to undecanal. A mixture of synthetic versions of these six aldehydes in quantities corresponding to those secreted by one tick elicited strong aversion reactions in the majority of dogs of various breeds.

  20. Amylase activity is associated with AMY2B copy numbers in dog: implications for dog domestication, diet and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Maja; Fall, Tove; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Axelsson, Erik

    2014-10-01

    High amylase activity in dogs is associated with a drastic increase in copy numbers of the gene coding for pancreatic amylase, AMY2B, that likely allowed dogs to thrive on a relatively starch-rich diet during early dog domestication. Although most dogs thus probably digest starch more efficiently than do wolves, AMY2B copy numbers vary widely within the dog population, and it is not clear how this variation affects the individual ability to handle starch nor how it affects dog health. In humans, copy numbers of the gene coding for salivary amylase, AMY1, correlate with both salivary amylase levels and enzyme activity, and high amylase activity is related to improved glycemic homeostasis and lower frequencies of metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigate the relationship between AMY2B copy numbers and serum amylase activity in dogs and show that amylase activity correlates with AMY2B copy numbers. We then describe how AMY2B copy numbers vary in individuals from 20 dog breeds and find strong breed-dependent patterns, indicating that the ability to digest starch varies both at the breed and individual level. Finally, to test whether AMY2B copy number is strongly associated with the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, we compare copy numbers in cases and controls as well as in breeds with varying diabetes susceptibility. Although we see no such association here, future studies using larger cohorts are needed before excluding a possible link between AMY2B and diabetes mellitus. © 2014 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  1. B-cell lymphoma in a dog with ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis) and systemic histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum).

    PubMed

    Brunker, Jill D; Hoover, John P

    2007-03-01

    A mixed breed dog treated for ehrlichiosis and systemic histoplasmosis developed a refractory thrombocytopenia. When an abdominal mass was detected, exploratory laparotomy and biopsies confirmed lymphoma, which on immunohistochemical stains was determined to be of B-cell origin. Conceivably, the B-cell lymphoma in this dog was associated with chronic inflammation from ehrlichiosis, histoplasmosis, or both.

  2. Assistance Dogs: Historic Patterns and Roles of Dogs Placed by ADI or IGDF Accredited Facilities and by Non-Accredited U.S. Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Sandra; Yamamoto, Mariko; Thigpen, Abigail Paige; Garcia, Anaissa; Willits, Neil H.; Hart, Lynette A.

    2017-01-01

    Dogs’ roles to support people with disabilities are increasing. Existing U.S. laws and regulations pertaining to the use of dogs for people with disabilities are only minimally enforced. Pushback legislation against some aspects of uses of assistance dogs currently is being passed or proposed in several states. Further, the U.S. Department of the Army and the Veterans’ Administration support only dogs trained by an Assistance Dogs International (ADI) or International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) accredited facility. Lacking a mandatory national process for screening the selection, training, and placement of assistance dogs with persons who have disabilities, the U.S. offers a creative but confusing opportunity for people to train their own dogs for any disability. While no U.S. surveillance system monitors assistance dogs, other countries generally have a legislated or regulatory process for approving assistance dogs or a cultural convention for obtaining dogs from accredited facilities. We conducted an online survey investigating current demographics of assistance dogs placed in 2013 and 2014 with persons who have disabilities, by facilities worldwide that are associated with ADI or IGDF and by some non-accredited U.S. facilities. Placement data from ADI and IGDF facilities revealed that in most countries aside from the U.S., guide dogs were by far the main type of assistance dog placed. In the U.S., there were about equal numbers of mobility and guide dogs placed, including many placed by large older facilities, along with smaller numbers of other types of assistance dogs. In non-accredited U.S. facilities, psychiatric dogs accounted for most placements. Dogs for families with an autistic child were increasing in all regions around the world. Of dog breeds placed, accredited facilities usually mentioned Labrador Retrievers and Golden Retrievers, and sometimes, German Shepherd Dogs. The facilities bred their dogs in-house, or acquired them from certain breeders

  3. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-13

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs.

  4. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament

    PubMed Central

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs. PMID:26758076

  5. Levels of maternal care in dogs affect adult offspring temperament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foyer, Pernilla; Wilsson, Erik; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Dog puppies are born in a state of large neural immaturity; therefore, the nervous system is sensitive to environmental influences early in life. In primates and rodents, early experiences, such as maternal care, have been shown to have profound and lasting effects on the later behaviour and physiology of offspring. We hypothesised that this would also be the case for dogs with important implications for the breeding of working dogs. In the present study, variation in the mother-offspring interactions of German Shepherd dogs within the Swedish breeding program for military working dogs was studied by video recording 22 mothers with their litters during the first three weeks postpartum. The aim was to classify mothers with respect to their level of maternal care and to investigate the effect of this care on pup behaviour in a standardised temperament test carried out at approximately 18 months of age. The results show that females differed consistently in their level of maternal care, which significantly affected the adult behaviour of the offspring, mainly with respect to behaviours classified as Physical and Social Engagement, as well as Aggression. Taking maternal quality into account in breeding programs may therefore improve the process of selecting working dogs.

  6. Morphological study of Socorro Island Merino sheep and its crosses with hair breeds.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Juan Augusto; Lepe, Marissa; Macedo, Rafael; Arredondo, Victalina; Cortez, Carlos Eliseo; García, Luis Jorge; Prado, Omar

    2017-01-01

    A study was conducted with the objective to characterize the morphology of Socorro Island Merino sheep. A total of 67 sheep, 62 females, 26 purebred and 36 crossbred with hair breeds, and five males were scored for 10 body measurements in addition to live weight, and four racial and seven functional indices were calculated. The influence of sex and crossbreeding on the body measurements and indices was analyzed by one-way analysis of variance, and morphological harmony was determined using Spearman correlation. With exception of rump length, body measurements and live weight were significantly greater in males than in females. Sexual dimorphism was 1.21, with males being 78 % heavier than females. Socorro Island Merino sheep were dolichocephalous, elipometric, with a convex curve rump, and with a high and low morphological harmony for females and males, respectively. They had undefined zootechnical aptitude tended toward dairy phenotype as lon