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Sample records for purified envelope glycoprotein

  1. Envelope glycoprotein of arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2012-10-17

    Arenaviruses include lethal human pathogens which pose serious public health threats. So far, no FDA approved vaccines are available against arenavirus infections, and therapeutic options are limited, making the identification of novel drug targets for the development of efficacious therapeutics an urgent need. Arenaviruses are comprised of two RNA genome segments and four proteins, the polymerase L, the envelope glycoprotein GP, the matrix protein Z, and the nucleoprotein NP. A crucial step in the arenavirus life-cycle is the biosynthesis and maturation of the GP precursor (GPC) by cellular signal peptidases and the cellular enzyme Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) yielding a tripartite mature GP complex formed by GP1/GP2 and a stable signal peptide (SSP). GPC cleavage by SKI-1/S1P is crucial for fusion competence and incorporation of mature GP into nascent budding virion particles. In a first part of our review, we cover basic aspects and newer developments in the biosynthesis of arenavirus GP and its molecular interaction with SKI-1/S1P. A second part will then highlight the potential of SKI-1/S1P-mediated processing of arenavirus GPC as a novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  2. Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation, Not Shedding of Surface Envelope Glycoprotein (gp120/SU), Is the Primary Determinant of SU Content of Purified Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chertova, Elena; Bess, Jr., Julian W.; Crise, Bruce J.; Sowder II, Raymond C.; Schaden, Terra M.; Hilburn, Joanne M.; Hoxie, James A.; Benveniste, Raoul E.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Henderson, Louis E.; Arthur, Larry O.

    2002-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles typically contain small amounts of the surface envelope protein (SU), and this is widely believed to be due to shedding of SU from mature virions. We purified proteins from HIV-1 and SIV isolates using procedures which allow quantitative measurements of viral protein content and determination of the ratios of gag- and env-encoded proteins in virions. All of the HIV-1 and most of the SIV isolates examined contained low levels of envelope proteins, with Gag:Env ratios of approximately 60:1. Based on an estimate of 1,200 to 2,500 Gag molecules per virion, this corresponds to an average of between 21 and 42 SU molecules, or between 7 and 14 trimers, per particle. In contrast, some SIV isolates contained levels of SU at least 10-fold greater than SU from HIV-1 isolates. Quantification of relative amounts of SU and transmembrane envelope protein (TM) provides a means to assess the impact of SU shedding on virion SU content, since such shedding would be expected to result in a molar excess of TM over SU on virions that had shed SU. With one exception, viruses with sufficient SU and TM to allow quantification were found to have approximately equivalent molar amounts of SU and TM. The quantity of SU associated with virions and the SU:TM ratios were not significantly changed during multiple freeze-thaw cycles or purification through sucrose gradients. Exposure of purified HIV-1 and SIV to temperatures of 55°C or greater for 1 h resulted in loss of most of the SU from the virus but retention of TM. Incubation of purified virus with soluble CD4 at 37°C resulted in no appreciable loss of SU from either SIV or HIV-1. These results indicate that the association of SU and TM on the purified virions studied is quite stable. These findings suggest that incorporation of SU-TM complexes into the viral membrane may be the primary factor determining the quantity of SU associated with SIV and

  3. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans.

  4. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) has a novel structure.

    PubMed Central

    Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Elango, N; Norrby, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    Amino acid sequence of human respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) was deduced from the DNA sequence of a recombinant plasmid and confirmed by limited amino acid microsequencing of purified 90K G protein. The calculated molecular mass of the protein encoded by the only long open reading frame of 298 amino acids was 32,588 daltons and was somewhat smaller than the 36K polypeptide translated in vitro from mRNA selected by this plasmid. Inspection of the sequence revealed a single hydrophobic domain of 23 amino acids capable of membrane insertion at 41 residues from the N-terminus. There was no N-terminal signal sequence and the hydrophilic N-terminal 20 residues probably represent the cytoplasmic tail of the protein. The N-terminally oriented membrane insertion was somewhat analogous to paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and influenza neuraminidase (NA). The protein was moderately hydrophilic and rich in hydroxy-amino acids. It was both N- and O-glycosylated with the latter contributing significantly to the net molecular mass 90K. Images PMID:4069997

  6. Synthesis of cell envelope glycoproteins of Cryptococcus laurentii

    PubMed Central

    Schutzbach, John; Ankel, Helmut; Brockhausen, Inka

    2007-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Cryptococcus are encapsulated basidiomycetes that are ubiquitously found in the environment. These organisms infect both lower and higher animals. Human infections that are common in immune-compromised individuals have proven difficult to cure or even control with currently available antimycotics that are quite often toxic to the host. The virulence of Cryptococcus has been linked primarily to its polysaccharide capsule, but also to cell-bound glycoproteins. In this review we show that C. laurentii is an excellent model for studies of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis in the pathogenic relative C. neoformans. In particular we will discuss the structure and biosynthesis of O-linked carbohydrates on cell envelope glycoproteins of C. laurentii. These O-linked structures are synthesized by at least four mannosyltransferases, two galactosyltransferases and at least one xylosyltransferase that have been characterized. These glycosyltransferases have no known homologues in human tissues. Therefore enzymes involved in the synthesis of cryptococcal glycoproteins, as well as related enzymes involved in capsule synthesis, are potential targets for the development of specific inhibitors for treatment of cryptococcal disease. PMID:17316583

  7. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  8. A recombinant envelope protein from Dengue virus purified by IMAC is bioequivalent with its immune-affinity chromatography purified counterpart.

    PubMed

    Hermida, L; Rodríguez, R; Lazo, L; López, C; Márquez, G; Páez, R; Suárez, C; Espinosa, R; García, J; Guzmán, G; Guillén, G

    2002-03-28

    Semi-purified DEN-4 envelope protein, obtained in Pichia pastoris, was capable of generating neutralising and protecting antibodies after immunisation in mice. Here we compared two purification processes of this recombinant protein using two chromatographic steps: immune-affinity chromatography and immobilised metal ion adsorption chromatography (IMAC). The protein purified by both methods produced functional antibodies reflected by titres of haemagglutination inhibition and neutralisation. IMAC could be used as an alternative for high scale purification.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  10. Rotavirus protein rearrangements in purified membrane-enveloped intermediate particles.

    PubMed Central

    Poruchynsky, M S; Atkinson, P H

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus, a double-shelled nonenveloped member of the REoviridae family, becomes transiently membrane enveloped during its maturation process, as single-shelled particles bud from cytoplasmic viroplasm structures into the adjacent endoplasmic reticulum. The present study describes the isolation of these membrane-enveloped viral intermediates from rotavirus SA11-infected Ma104 cells. The enveloped intermediates comprised the proteins VP1, VP2, VP4, VP6, VP7, and NS28 and small amounts of NS35 and NS34. VP7 in the intermediate particles was recognized by either a polyclonal antibody to VP7, which previous studies had shown recognizes the membrane-associated form of VP7, or a monoclonal antibody which recognizes VP7 on mature virus. NS28, VP7, and VP4 could be complexed to a higher-molecular-weight form when the membrane-permeable cross-linker dithiobis(succinimidylproprionate) was used. However, when an impermeable cross-linker was used, the structural proteins, including VP7, were not accessible to cross-linking. Velocity sedimentation of cross-linked immunoisolated enveloped virus particles showed that VP7 and VP4 were located in the same fractions only when the membrane-permeable cross-linker was used, implying their heterooligomeric association during outer capsid formation. When intermediate enveloped virus particles were treated with protease, VP6 and VP7 were protected, but not in the presence of detergent. Taken together, these results support the idea that in the membrane-enveloped intermediate, VP7 is repositioned from its location in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen back across the viral membrane envelope to the inferior of the virus particle during the maturation process. Images PMID:1651404

  11. Morphology and Molecular Composition of Purified Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Nathalie; Brügger, Britta; Bonnafous, Pierre; Drobecq, Hervé; Gerl, Mathias J.; Krey, Thomas; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Till; Lambert, Olivier; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The family Flaviviridae includes viruses that have different virion structures and morphogenesis mechanisms. Most cellular and molecular studies have been so far performed with viruses of the Hepacivirus and Flavivirus genera. Here, we studied bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a member of the Pestivirus genus. We set up a method to purify BVDV virions and analyzed their morphology by electron microscopy and their protein and lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Cryo-electron microscopy showed near spherical viral particles displaying an electron-dense capsid surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer with no visible spikes. Most particles had a diameter of 50 nm and about 2% were larger with a diameter of up to 65 nm, suggesting some size flexibility during BVDV morphogenesis. Morphological and biochemical data suggested a low envelope glycoprotein content of BVDV particles, E1 and E2 being apparently less abundant than Erns. Lipid content of BVDV particles displayed a ~2.3 to 3.5-fold enrichment in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and hexosyl-ceramide, concomitant with a 1.5 to 5-fold reduction of all glycerophospholipid classes, as compared to lipid content of MDBK cells. Although BVDV buds in the endoplasmic reticulum, its lipid content differs from a typical endoplasmic reticulum membrane composition. This suggests that BVDV morphogenesis includes a mechanism of lipid sorting. Functional analyses confirmed the importance of cholesterol and sphingomyelin for BVDV entry. Surprisingly, despite a high cholesterol and sphingolipid content of BVDV envelope, E2 was not found in detergent-resistant membranes. Our results indicate that there are differences between the structure and molecular composition of viral particles of Flaviviruses, Pestiviruses and Hepaciviruses within the Flaviviridae family. PMID:26939061

  12. Immunological and structural homology between human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoprotein and a region of human interleukin-2 implicated in binding the. beta. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Puszkin, S. ); Altman, A. )

    1988-02-01

    The N-terminal segment of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) appears to mediate binding of the {beta} hIL-2 receptor. An affinity-purified antibody prepared against this peptide segment (p81) is shown here to cross-react with a homologous region of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) envelope glycoprotein, raising the interesting possibility that the envelope glycoprotein of HTLV-I can interact with the {beta} hIL-2 receptor.

  13. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs.

  14. Phenylalanines at positions 88 and 159 of Ebolavirus envelope glycoprotein differentially impact envelope function

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Wu; King, Harlan; Delisle, Josie; Shi Dashuang; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-05

    The envelope glycoprotein (GP) of Ebolavirus (EBOV) mediates viral entry into host cells. Through mutagenesis, we and other groups reported that two phenylalanines at positions 88 and 159 of GP are critical for viral entry. However, it remains elusive which steps of viral entry are impaired by F88 or F159 mutations and how. In this study, we further characterized these two phenylalanines through mutagenesis and examined the impact on GP expression, function, and structure. Our data suggest that F159 plays an indirect role in viral entry by maintaining EBOV GP's overall structure. In contrast, we did not detect any evidence for conformational differences in GP with F88 mutations. The data suggest that F88 influences viral entry during a step after cathepsin processing, presumably impacting viral fusion.

  15. Identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein variant resistant to cold inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These results indicate that the CD4-bound intermediate of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins is cold labile; avoiding the CD4-bound state increases temperature stability.

  16. Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: profound influences on immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) leads to progressive destruction of the CD4+ T-cell subset, resulting in immune deficiency and AIDS. The specific binding of the viral external envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, gp120, to the CD4 molecules initiates viral entry. In the past few years, several studies have indicated that the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with cells and molecules of the immune system leads to pleiotropic biological effects on immune functions, which include effects on differentiation of CD34+ lymphoid progenitor cells and thymocytes, aberrant activation and cytokine secretion patterns of mature T cells, induction of apoptosis, B-cell hyperactivity, inhibition of T-cell dependent B-cell differentiation, modulation of macrophage functions, interactions with components of complement, and effects on neuronal cells. The amino acid sequence homologies of the envelope glycoproteins with several cellular proteins have suggested that molecular mimicry may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. This review summarizes work done by several investigators demonstrating the profound biological effects of envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 on immune system cells. Extensive studies have also been done on interactions of the viral envelope proteins with components of the immune system which may be important for eliciting a "protective immune response." Understanding the influences of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins on the immune system may provide valuable insights into HIV-1 disease pathogenesis and carries implications for the trials of HIV-1 envelope protein vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:8801439

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 challenge of chimpanzees immunized with recombinant envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P W; Groopman, J E; Gregory, T; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A; Ferriani, R; Riddle, L; Shimasaki, C; Lucas, C; Lasky, L A

    1988-01-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein, gp120, of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was purified from a Chinese hamster ovary cell line transfected with a truncated form of the HIV-1 env gene. The recombinant glycoprotein (rgp120) was formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and was used to immunize chimpanzees. The recombinant preparation was effective in eliciting cellular and humoral immunity as well as immunologic memory. Anti-rgp 120 antibodies reacted with authentic viral gp120 in immunological blot assays and were able to neutralize HIV-1 infectivity in vitro. Sera from the rgp120-immunized animals were able to neutralize HIV-1 pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus prepared from the IIIB isolate, from which the gene encoding rgp120 was derived, as well as two heterologous isolates, ARV-2 and RF. The immune response elicited against the rgp120 was not effective in preventing viral infection after intravenous challenge with HIV-1. The implications of these results on HIV-1 vaccine development are discussed. Images PMID:2455898

  18. Assembly of arenavirus envelope glycoprotein GPC in detergent-soluble membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Dancho, Brooke; Grant, Kenneth W; Grimes, Mark L; Lyles, Douglas S; Nunberg, Jack H

    2009-10-01

    The family Arenaviridae includes a number of highly pathogenic viruses that are responsible for acute hemorrhagic fevers in humans. Genetic diversity among arenavirus species in their respective rodent hosts supports the continued emergence of new pathogens. In the absence of available vaccines or therapeutic agents, the hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses remain a serious public health and biodefense concern. Arenaviruses are enveloped virions that assemble and bud from the plasma membrane. In this study, we have characterized the microdomain organization of the virus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) on the cell surface by using immunogold electron microscopy. We find that Junín virus (JUNV) GPC clusters into discrete microdomains of 120 to 160 nm in diameter and that this property of GPC is independent of its myristoylation and of coexpression with the virus matrix protein Z. In cells infected with the Candid#1 strain of JUNV, and in purified Candid#1 virions, these GPC microdomains are soluble in cold Triton X-100 detergent and are thus distinct from conventional lipid rafts, which are utilized by numerous other viruses for assembly. Virion morphogenesis ultimately requires colocalization of viral components, yet our dual-label immunogold staining studies failed to reveal a spatial association of Z with GPC microdomains. This observation may reflect either rapid Z-dependent budding of virus-like particles upon coassociation or a requirement for additional viral components in the assembly process. Together, these results provide new insight into the molecular basis for arenavirus morphogenesis.

  19. Glycosylation Benchmark Profile for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Production Based on Eleven Env Trimers.

    PubMed

    Go, Eden P; Ding, Haitao; Zhang, Shijian; Ringe, Rajesh P; Nicely, Nathan; Hua, David; Steinbock, Robert T; Golabek, Michael; Alin, James; Alam, S Munir; Cupo, Albert; Haynes, Barton F; Kappes, John C; Moore, John P; Sodroski, Joseph G; Desaire, Heather

    2017-05-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) glycosylation is important because individual glycans are components of multiple broadly neutralizing antibody epitopes, while shielding other sites that might otherwise be immunogenic. The glycosylation on Env is influenced by a variety of factors, including the genotype of the protein, the cell line used for its expression, and the details of the construct design. Here, we used a mass spectrometry (MS)-based approach to map the complete glycosylation profile at every site in multiple HIV-1 Env trimers, accomplishing two goals. (i) We determined which glycosylation sites contain conserved glycan profiles across many trimeric Envs. (ii) We identified the variables that impact Env's glycosylation profile at sites with divergent glycosylation. Over half of the gp120 glycosylation sites on 11 different trimeric Envs have a conserved glycan profile, indicating that a native consensus glycosylation profile does indeed exist among trimers. We showed that some soluble gp120s and gp140s exhibit highly divergent glycosylation profiles compared to trimeric Env. We also assessed the impact of several variables on Env glycosylation: truncating the full-length Env; producing Env, instead of the more virologically relevant T lymphocytes, in CHO cells; and purifying Env with different chromatographic platforms, including nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA), 2G12, and PGT151 affinity. This report provides the first consensus glycosylation profile of Env trimers, which should serve as a useful benchmark for HIV-1 vaccine developers. This report also defines the sites where glycosylation may be impacted when Env trimers are truncated or produced in CHO cells.IMPORTANCE A protective HIV-1 vaccine will likely include a recombinant version of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Env is highly glycosylated, and yet vaccine developers have lacked guidance on how to assess whether their immunogens have optimal glycosylation. The following important

  20. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  1. Immunogenicity of a purified fragment of 17D yellow fever envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Brandriss, M W; Schlesinger, J J; Walsh, E E

    1990-06-01

    Information on the immunogenic properties of purified flavivirus proteins may be useful in the development of recombinant or synthetic peptide vaccines. Using a monoclonal antibody, an attempt was made to purify the envelope (E) protein of 17D yellow fever virus (17D YF) by affinity chromatography. The purified material could not be identified as intact E protein but it did bear antigenic determinants of E as determined by selective reactivity with anti-E monoclonal antibodies. Rabbits immunized with this material produced antibodies that neutralized 17D YF and dengue-2 viruses in comparable titers, indicating that cross-reactive antigenic determinants were preserved. Immunization of mice resulted in protection against intracerebral challenge with 17D YF.

  2. Cross-reactivity between herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B and a 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Edson, C M; Hosler, B A; Respess, R A; Waters, D J; Thorley-Lawson, D A

    1985-01-01

    Cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies recognizing both herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B and a major 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus (VZV) envelope glycoprotein were isolated and found to neutralize VZV infection in vitro. None of the other VZV glycoproteins was recognized by any polyclonal anti-HSV serum tested. These results demonstrate that HSV glycoprotein B and the 63,000-dalton VZV glycoprotein share antigenic epitopes and raise the possibility that these two proteins have a similar function in infection. Images PMID:2993665

  3. Biological properties of purified recombinant HCV particles with an epitope-tagged envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hitoshi; Akazawa, Daisuke; Kato, Takanobu; Date, Tomoko; Shirakura, Masayuki; Nakamura, Noriko; Mochizuki, Hidenori; Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2010-05-14

    To establish a simple system for purification of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles, we designed a chimeric J6/JFH-1 virus with a FLAG (FL)-epitope-tagged sequence at the N-terminal region of the E2 hypervariable region-1 (HVR1) gene (J6/JFH-1/1FL). We found that introduction of an adaptive mutation at the potential N-glycosylation site (E2N151K) leads to efficient production of the chimeric virus. This finding suggests the involvement of glycosylation at Asn within the envelope protein(s) in HCV morphogenesis. To further analyze the biological properties of the purified recombinant HCV particles, we developed a strategy for large-scale production and purification of recombinant J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K. Infectious particles were purified from the culture medium of J6/JFH-1/1FL/E2N151K-infected Huh-7 cells using anti-FLAG affinity chromatography in combination with ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy of the purified particles using negative staining showed spherical particle structures with a diameter of 40-60 nm and spike-like projections. Purified HCV particle-immunization induced both an anti-E2 and an anti-FLAG antibody response in immunized mice. This strategy may contribute to future detailed analysis of HCV particle structure and to HCV vaccine development.

  4. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment.

  5. Molecular Docking Studies to Explore Potential Binding Pockets and Inhibitors for Chikungunya Virus Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong T V; Yu, Haibo; Keller, Paul A

    2017-03-11

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) envelope glycoproteins are considered important potential targets for anti-CHIKV drug discovery due to their crucial roles in virus attachment and virus entry. In this study, using two available crystal structures of the immature and mature forms of envelope glycoproteins, virtual screenings based on blind dockings and focused dockings were carried out to identify potential binding pockets and hit compounds for the virus. The chemical library database of compounds, NCI Diversity Set II, was used in these docking studies. In addition to reproducing previously reported examples, new binding pockets were identified, e.g., Pocket 2 in the 3N40, and Pocket 2 and Pocket 3 in the 3N42. Convergences in conformational sampling in docking using AutoDock Vina were evaluated. An analysis of docking results was carried out to understand interactions of the envelope glycoproteins complexes. Some key residues for interactions, for example Gly91 and His230, are identified as possessing important roles in the fusion process.

  6. New method for purifying histidine-rich glycoprotein from human plasma redefines its functional properties.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kruti K; Poon, Ivan K H; Talbo, Gert H; Perugini, Matthew A; Taylor, Nicole L; Ralph, Troy J; Hoogenraad, Nicholas J; Hulett, Mark D

    2013-06-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is a relatively abundant plasma protein that has been implicated in multiple biological processes including immunity, tumor progression, and vascular biology. However, current protocols for purifying HRG from plasma result in the copurification of contaminating proteins and raise questions over the validity of biological activities ascribed to HRG. In this study, we describe a two-step protocol for the large-scale purification of HRG from human plasma using a combination of metal affinity and ion exchange chromatography. The protocol employs a rapid and simple strategy to isolate highly purified HRG that minimizes proteolytic cleavage of the protein. The purification of HRG was assessed at each stage by measuring the amount of HRG immunoreactive protein using a specific monoclonal antibody against total protein, and demonstrated ~1,000-fold purification with an overall yield of ~32%. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that plasma-derived HRG was free of contaminating proteins and gel electrophoresis showed it to have minimal proteolytic degradation. Characterization of protein by physical method showed that the protein exists as a single, monodisperse species. In contrast to the previous studies of HRG purified by different methods, HRG purified using the new procedure demonstrated a reduced profile of functions. Although the HRG retained binding to heparin and phosphatidic acid, it did not interact with necrotic cells or other cellular lipids. These data demonstrate that HRG does not exhibit the broad interactive properties that have been reported previously, suggesting that copurification of HRG-binding partners or other impurities are responsible for some of the reported functional properties. The findings in this study demonstrate that the new purification procedure can provide a ready source of pure HRG to assess ligand specificity and biological function of this important plasma protein.

  7. Antioxidant activity of glycoprotein purified from Undaria pinnatifida measured by an in vitro digestion model.

    PubMed

    Rafiquzzaman, S M; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, Yu-Ri; Nam, Taek-Jeong; Kong, In-Soo

    2013-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of glycoprotein purified from Undaria pinnatifida Harvey (UPGP). On SDS-PAGE, UPGP migrated as a single band with a molecular weight of approximately 10 kDa and confirmed by staining with Schiff's reagent as glycoprotein. It consists of a carbohydrate component (42.53%) and protein component (57.47%). Amino acid profile, FT-IR spectrum and enzymatic glycosylation analysis suggested that protein is linked with carbohydrate by O-glycosylation. UPGP showed dose-dependent antioxidant activities as detected by different assays before and after in vitro digestion. The IC50 values of undigested UPGP were 0.25 ± 0.03, 0.08 ± 0.005, 0.69 ± 0.12, and 0.25 ± 0.08 mg/mL for DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and NO, respectively. Following in vitro digestion, the antioxidant activities of UPGP were decreased during the gastric phase compared to those of undigested UPGP, with an increase occurring during the duodenal phase in all assays. However, the reducing power was unchanged after in vitro digestion. Furthermore, UPGP showed protective activity against oxidative DNA damage both undigested, after saliva and duodenal phase of digestion. These results indicate that the antioxidant and DNA protection activities of UPGP may be pH-dependent and assay specific.

  8. Conservation of hydrophobicity within viral envelope glycoproteins reveals a putative hepatitis C virus fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; O'Leary, J M; Pollock, S; Zitzmann, N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters and infects cells remains unknown. Identifying the HCV fusion peptide(s) and understanding the early stages of infection may provide new opportunities for improved antiviral therapy. The HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 is thought to be a class II fusion protein. Class II fusion proteins are exemplified by the E protein of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and the E1 protein of the Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Analysis of the hydrophobicity profiles of four HCV E2 envelope glycoproteins revealed a region with a conserved three-pronged pattern of hydrophobicity, termed the tridentate (TD) region. The primary sequence of the TD region is highly conserved in all 490 HCV strains currently reported. The known fusion peptide loops of TBEV and SFV share the characteristic TD region hydrophobicity profile and significant sequence conservation in the TD region was identified in the E and E1 glycoproteins of members of the Flaviviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. The HCV TD region peptides have membranotropic activity; in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the HCV TD region peptides insert into in a biomimetic bilayer in a similar manner to the TBEV fusion peptide and the peptides induce effective mixing of lipid membranes in a liposome fusion assay. Together these results indicate that the highly conserved TD region of the HCV E2 protein is a fusion peptide candidate and may be an important factor in the class II fusion mechanism.

  9. Palmitoylation of the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein and its effect on fusion activity and envelope incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Paladino, Monica G.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2012-06-20

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) possesses a short cytoplasmic domain of 53 amino acids containing four highly conserved cysteines at Env positions 804, 811, 815 and 848. Since palmitoylation of transmembrane proteins occurs at or near the membrane anchor, we investigated whether cysteines 804, 811 and 815 are acylated and analyzed the relevance of these residues for Env functions. Replacement of cysteines 804, 811 and 815 individually or in combination by serine residues resulted in Env glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed and processed. However, mutations C804S and C811S reduced Env fusogenicity by 93% and 84%, respectively, compared with wild-type Env. By contrast, mutant C815S exhibited a fusogenic capacity representing 50% of the wild-type value. Remarkably, the double mutation C804S/C811S abrogated both Env fusion activity and Env incorporation into virions. Finally, by means of Click chemistry assays we demonstrated that the four FIV Env cytoplasmic cysteines are palmitoylated.

  10. DC-SIGN Increases the Affinity of HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Interaction with CD4

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Karolin; Wang, Yufei; Scala, Carlo; Jeffs, Simon; Longstaff, Colin; Stieh, Daniel; Haggarty, Beth; Vanham, Guido; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Jones, Ian M.; Hoxie, James; Shattock, Robin; Kelly, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin receptors, expressed on Langerhans cells and subepithelial dendritic cells (DCs) of cervico-vaginal tissues, play an important role in HIV-1 capture and subsequent dissemination to lymph nodes. DC-SIGN has been implicated in both productive infection of DCs and the DC-mediated trans infection of CD4+ T cells that occurs in the absence of replication. However, the molecular events that underlie this efficient transmission have not been fully defined. In this study, we have examined the effect of the extracellular domains of DC-SIGN and Langerin on the stability of the interaction of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with CD4 and also on replication in permissive cells. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that DC-SIGN increases the binding affinity of trimeric gp140 envelope glycoproteins to CD4. In contrast, Langerin had no effect on the stability of the gp140:CD4 complex. In vitro infection experiments to compare DC-SIGN enhancement of CD4-dependent and CD4-independent strains demonstrated significantly lower enhancement of the CD4-independent strain. In addition DC-SIGN increased the relative rate of infection of the CD4-dependent strain but had no effect on the CD4-independent strain. DC-SIGN binding to the HIV envelope protein effectively increases exposure of the CD4 binding site, which in turn contributes to enhancement of infection. PMID:22163292

  11. Functional Relevance of the N-Terminal Domain of Pseudorabies Virus Envelope Glycoprotein H and Its Interaction with Glycoprotein L.

    PubMed

    Vallbracht, Melina; Rehwaldt, Sascha; Klupp, Barbara G; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Fuchs, Walter

    2017-05-01

    Several envelope glycoproteins are involved in herpesvirus entry into cells, direct cell-to-cell spread, and induction of cell fusion. The membrane fusion protein glycoprotein B (gB) and the presumably gB-activating heterodimer gH/gL are essential for these processes and conserved throughout the Herpesviridae However, after extended cell culture passage of gL-negative mutants of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PrV), phenotypic revertants could be isolated which had acquired spontaneous mutations affecting the gL-interacting N-terminal part of the gH ectodomain (gDH and gH(B4.1)) (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J Virol 73:3014-3022, 1999; C. Schröter, M. Vallbracht, J. Altenschmidt, S. Kargoll, W. Fuchs, B. G. Klupp, and T. C. Mettenleiter, J Virol 90:2264-2272, 2016). To investigate the functional relevance of this part of gH in more detail, we introduced an in-frame deletion of 66 codons at the 5' end of the plasmid-cloned gH gene (gH(32/98)). The N-terminal signal peptide was retained, and the deletion did not affect expression or processing of gH but abrogated its function in in vitro fusion assays. Insertion of the engineered gH gene into the PrV genome resulted in a defective mutant (pPrV-gH(32/98)K), which was incapable of entry and spread. Interestingly, in vitro activity of mutated gH(32/98) was restored when it was coexpressed with hyperfusogenic gB(B4.1), obtained from a passaged gL deletion mutant of PrV. Moreover, the entry and spread defects of pPrV-gH(32/98)K were compensated by the mutations in gB(B4.1) in cis, as well as in trans, independent of gL. Thus, PrV gL and the gL-interacting domain of gH are not strictly required for function.IMPORTANCE Membrane fusion is crucial for infectious entry and spread of enveloped viruses. While many enveloped viruses require only one or two proteins for receptor binding and membrane fusion, herpesvirus infection depends on several envelope glycoproteins. Besides subfamily-specific receptor binding

  12. Reduction of cerebral glucose utilization by the HIV envelope glycoprotein Gp-120

    SciTech Connect

    Kimes, A.S.; London, E.D.; Szabo, G.; Raymon, L.; Tabakoff, B. )

    1991-05-01

    Gp-120 is a glycoprotein constituent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope. The effects of gp-120 on cerebral glucose utilization in rats were studied by the quantitative 2-deoxy-D-(1-14C) glucose method. Intracerebroventricular injection of gp-120 significantly reduced glucose utilization in the lateral habenula and the suprachiasmatic nucleus and decreased the global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. The findings suggest that gp-120 and closely related peptides can alter neuronal function, thereby contributing to the sequelae of HIV infection.

  13. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  14. Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Vaccine Elicits Antibodies Targeting Multiple Epitopes on the Envelope Glycoproteins Associated with Broad Cross-Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Bhat, Rakesh; Hockman, Darren; Logan, Michael; Chen, Chao; Levin, Aviad; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals are on the horizon, a global prophylactic vaccine for HCV remains elusive. The diversity of the virus is a major concern for vaccine development; there are 7 major genotypes of HCV found globally. Therefore, a successful vaccine will need to protect against HCV infection by all genotypes. Despite the diversity, many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with broadly cross-neutralizing activity have been described, suggesting the presence of conserved epitopes that can be targeted to prevent infection. Similarly, a vaccine comprising recombinant envelope glycoproteins (rE1E2) derived from the genotype 1a HCV-1 strain has been shown to be capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs, chimpanzees, and healthy human volunteers. In order to investigate the basis for this cross-neutralization, epitope mapping of anti-E1E2 antibodies present within antisera from goats and humans immunized with HCV-1 rE1E2 was conducted through peptide mapping and competition studies with a panel of cross-neutralizing MAbs targeting various epitopes within E1E2. The immunized-goat antiserum was shown to compete with the binding of all MAbs tested (AP33, HC33.4, HC84.26, 1:7, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, IGH526, and A4). Antisera showed the best competition against HC84.26 and AR3B and the weakest competition against AR4A. Furthermore, antisera from five immunized human vaccinees were shown to compete with five preselected MAbs (AP33, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, and IGH526). These data show that immunization with HCV-1 rE1E2 elicits antibodies targeting multiple cross-neutralizing epitopes. Our results further support the use of such a vaccine antigen to induce cross-genotype neutralization. IMPORTANCE An effective prophylactic vaccine for HCV is needed for optimal control of the disease burden. The high diversity of HCV has posed a challenge for developing vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies for protection against infection

  15. Determination of molecular structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins using cryo-electron tomography and automated sub-tomogram averaging.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; White, Tommi A; Bliss, Donald; Moran, Amy; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Borgnia, Mario J; de la Cruz, M Jason V; Schauder, David; Hartnell, Lisa M; Nandwani, Rachna; Dawood, Moez; Kim, Brianna; Kim, Jun Hong; Sununu, John; Yang, Lisa; Bhatia, Siddhant; Subramaniam, Carolyn; Hurt, Darrell E; Gaudreault, Laurent; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, more than 60 million people have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (www.usaid.gov). The virus infects and destroys CD4+ T-cells thereby crippling the immune system, and causing an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (2). Infection begins when the HIV Envelope glycoprotein "spike" makes contact with the CD4 receptor on the surface of the CD4+ T-cell. This interaction induces a conformational change in the spike, which promotes interaction with a second cell surface co-receptor (5,9). The significance of these protein interactions in the HIV infection pathway makes them of profound importance in fundamental HIV research, and in the pursuit of an HIV vaccine. The need to better understand the molecular-scale interactions of HIV cell contact and neutralization motivated the development of a technique to determine the structures of the HIV spike interacting with cell surface receptor proteins and molecules that block infection. Using cryo-electron tomography and 3D image processing, we recently demonstrated the ability to determine such structures on the surface of native virus, at ˜20 Å resolution (9,14). This approach is not limited to resolving HIV Envelope structures, and can be extended to other viral membrane proteins and proteins reconstituted on a liposome. In this protocol, we describe how to obtain structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins starting from purified HIV virions and proceeding stepwise through preparing vitrified samples, collecting, cryo-electron microscopy data, reconstituting and processing 3D data volumes, averaging and classifying 3D protein subvolumes, and interpreting results to produce a protein model. The computational aspects of our approach were adapted into modules that can be accessed and executed remotely using the Biowulf GNU/Linux parallel processing cluster at the NIH (http://biowulf.nih.gov). This remote access, combined with low-cost computer hardware and

  16. Determination of Molecular Structures of HIV Envelope Glycoproteins using Cryo-Electron Tomography and Automated Sub-tomogram Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Joel R.; White, Tommi A.; Bliss, Donald; Moran, Amy; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Borgnia, Mario J.; de la Cruz, M. Jason V.; Schauder, David; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Nandwani, Rachna; Dawood, Moez; Kim, Brianna; Kim, Jun Hong; Sununu, John; Yang, Lisa; Bhatia, Siddhant; Subramaniam, Carolyn; Hurt, Darrell E.; Gaudreault, Laurent; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, more than 60 million people have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (www.usaid.gov). The virus infects and destroys CD4+ T-cells thereby crippling the immune system, and causing an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) 2. Infection begins when the HIV Envelope glycoprotein "spike" makes contact with the CD4 receptor on the surface of the CD4+ T-cell. This interaction induces a conformational change in the spike, which promotes interaction with a second cell surface co-receptor 5,9. The significance of these protein interactions in the HIV infection pathway makes them of profound importance in fundamental HIV research, and in the pursuit of an HIV vaccine. The need to better understand the molecular-scale interactions of HIV cell contact and neutralization motivated the development of a technique to determine the structures of the HIV spike interacting with cell surface receptor proteins and molecules that block infection. Using cryo-electron tomography and 3D image processing, we recently demonstrated the ability to determine such structures on the surface of native virus, at ˜20 Å resolution 9,14. This approach is not limited to resolving HIV Envelope structures, and can be extended to other viral membrane proteins and proteins reconstituted on a liposome. In this protocol, we describe how to obtain structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins starting from purified HIV virions and proceeding stepwise through preparing vitrified samples, collecting, cryo-electron microscopy data, reconstituting and processing 3D data volumes, averaging and classifying 3D protein subvolumes, and interpreting results to produce a protein model. The computational aspects of our approach were adapted into modules that can be accessed and executed remotely using the Biowulf GNU/Linux parallel processing cluster at the NIH (http://biowulf.nih.gov). This remote access, combined with low-cost computer hardware and high

  17. Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Giang, Erick; Dorner, Marcus; Prentoe, Jannick C; Dreux, Marlène; Evans, Matthew J; Bukh, Jens; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander; Burton, Dennis R; Law, Mansun

    2012-04-17

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼2% of the world's population. It is estimated that there are more than 500,000 new infections annually in Egypt, the country with the highest HCV prevalence. An effective vaccine would help control this expanding global health burden. HCV is highly variable, and an effective vaccine should target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Conserved B-cell epitopes overlapping the CD81 receptor-binding site (CD81bs) on the E2 viral envelope glycoprotein have been reported previously and provide promising vaccine targets. In this study, we isolated 73 human mAbs recognizing five distinct antigenic regions on the virus envelope glycoprotein complex E1E2 from an HCV-immune phage-display antibody library by using an exhaustive-panning strategy. Many of these mAbs were broadly neutralizing. In particular, the mAb AR4A, recognizing a discontinuous epitope outside the CD81bs on the E1E2 complex, has an exceptionally broad neutralizing activity toward diverse HCV genotypes and protects against heterologous HCV challenge in a small animal model. The mAb panel will be useful for the design and development of vaccine candidates to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies to HCV.

  18. Determining the Structure of an Unliganded and Fully Glycosylated SIV gp120 Envelope Glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Vogan, Erik M.; Gong, Haiyun; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2010-07-13

    HIV/SIV envelope glycoproteins mediate the first steps in viral infection. They are trimers of a membrane-anchored polypeptide chain, cleaved into two fragments known as gp120 and gp41. The structure of HIV gp120 bound with receptor (CD4) has been known for some time. We have now determined the structure of a fully glycosylated SIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in an unliganded conformation by X-ray crystallography at 4.0 {angstrom} resolution. We describe here our experimental and computational approaches, which may be relevant to other resolution-limited crystallographic problems. Key issues were attention to details of beam geometry mandated by small, weakly diffracting crystals, and choice of strategies for phase improvement, starting with two isomorphous derivatives and including multicrystal averaging. We validated the structure by analyzing composite omit maps, averaged among three distinct crystal lattices, and by calculating model-based, SeMet anomalous difference maps. There are at least four ordered sugars on many of the thirteen oligosaccharides.

  19. Stoichiometry of Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in the Entry of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinzhen; Kurteva, Svetla; Ren, Xinping; Lee, Sandra; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Envs) function as a trimer, mediating virus entry by promoting the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. HIV-1 Env trimers induce membrane fusion through a pH-independent pathway driven by the interaction between an Env trimer and its cellular receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. We studied viruses with mixed heterotrimers of wild-type and dominant-negative Envs to determine the number (T) of Env trimers required for HIV-1 entry. To our surprise, we found that a single Env trimer is capable of supporting HIV-1 entry; i.e., T = 1. A similar approach was applied to investigate the entry stoichiometry of envelope glycoproteins from amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV), avian sarcoma/leukosis virus type A (ASLV-A), and influenza A virus. When pseudotyped on HIV-1 virions, the A-MLV and ASLV-A Envs also exhibit a T = 1 entry stoichiometry. In contrast, eight to nine influenza A virus hemagglutinin trimers function cooperatively to achieve membrane fusion and virus entry, using a pH-dependent pathway. The different entry requirements for cooperativity among Env trimers for retroviruses and influenza A virus may influence viral strategies for replication and evasion of the immune system. PMID:16160141

  20. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Antagonize Tetherin through a Distinctive Mechanism That Requires Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rebekah B.; Marcano, Adriana C.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Rogstad, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env− particles do not. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV

  1. Utilization of C-C chemokine receptor 5 by the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239.

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, L; Choe, H; Martin, K A; Farzan, M; Ponath, P D; Wu, L; Newman, W; Gerard, N; Gerard, C; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    We examined chemokine receptors for the ability to facilitate the infection of CD4-expressing cells by viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of a pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVmac239. Expression of either human or simian C-C chemokine receptor CCR5 allowed the SIVmac239 envelope glycoproteins to mediate virus entry and cell-to-cell fusion. Thus, distantly related immunodeficiency viruses such as SIV and the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates can utilize CCR5 as an entry cofactor. PMID:9032394

  2. Ubiquitination of the Prototype Foamy Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Leader Peptide Regulates Subviral Particle Release

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Nicole; Stange, Annett; Lüftenegger, Daniel; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) particle egress is unique among retroviruses because of its essential requirement for Gag and Env coexpression for budding and particle release. The FV glycoprotein undergoes a highly unusual biosynthesis resulting in the generation of three particle-associated, mature subunits, leader peptide (LP), surface (SU), and transmembrane (TM), derived from a precursor protein by posttranslational proteolysis mediated by furin or furinlike proteases. Previously at least three LP products of different molecular weights were detected in purified FV particles. Here we demonstrate that the higher-molecular-weight forms gp28LP and gp38LP are ubiquitinated variants of the major gp18LP cleavage product, which has a type II membrane topology. Furthermore, we show that all five lysine residues located within the N-terminal 60-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain of gp18LP can potentially be ubiquitinated, however, there seems to be a preference for using the first three. Inactivation of ubiquitination sites individually resulted in no obvious phenotype. However, simultaneous inactivation of the first three or all five ubiquitination sites in gp18LP led to a massive increase in subviral particles released by these mutant glycoproteins that were readily detectable by electron microscopy analysis upon expression of the ubiquitination-deficient glycoprotein by itself or in a proviral context. Surprisingly, only the quintuple ubiquitination mutant showed a two- to threefold increase in single-cycle infectivity assays, whereas all other mutants displayed infectivities similar to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data suggest that the balance between viral and subviral particle release of FVs is regulated by ubiquitination of the glycoprotein LP. PMID:16306578

  3. Characterization of virulence-associated determinants in the envelope glycoprotein of Pichinde virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Wang, Jialong; Lan, Shuiyun; Danzy, Shamika; McLay Schelde, Lisa; Seladi-Schulman, Jill; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2012-11-10

    We use a small animal model, based on guinea pigs infected with a non-pathogenic Pichinde virus (PICV), to understand the virulence mechanisms of arenavirus infections in the hosts. PICV P2 strain causes a mild febrile reaction in guinea pigs, while P18 causes severe disease with clinical and pathological features reminiscent of Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans. The envelope glycoproteins (GPC) of P2 and P18 viruses differ at positions 119, 140, and 164, all localized to the receptor-binding G1 subunit. We found that lentiviral pseudotyped virions (VLPs) bearing P18 GPC show more efficient cell entry than those with P2 GPC, and that the E140 residue plays a critical role in this process. Infection of guinea pigs with the recombinant viruses containing the E140K change demonstrated that E140 of GPC is a necessary virulence determinant of P18 infections, possibly by enhancing the ability of virus to enter target cells.

  4. Opposite polarity of virus budding and of viral envelope glycoprotein distribution in epithelial cells derived from different tissues

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We compared the surface envelope glycoprotein distribution and the budding polarity of four RNA viruses in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in CaCo-2 cells derived from a human colon carcinoma. Whereas both FRT and CaCo-2 cells sort similarly influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, respectively, to apical and basolateral membrane domains, they differ in their handling of two togaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By conventional EM Sindbis virus and SFV were shown to bud apically in FRT cells and basolaterally in CaCo-2 cells. Consistent with this finding, the distribution of the p62/E2 envelope glycoprotein of SFV, assayed by immunoelectronmicroscopy and by domain-selective surface biotinylation was predominantly apical on FRT cells and basolateral on CaCo-2 cells. We conclude that a given virus and its envelope glycoprotein can be delivered to opposite membrane domains in epithelial cells derived from different tissues. The tissue specificity in the polarity of virus budding and viral envelope glycoprotein distribution indicate that the sorting machinery varies considerably between different epithelial cell types. PMID:1572895

  5. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  6. Monoclonal antibody mapping of the envelope glycoprotein of the dengue 2 virus, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, J T; Bolin, R A; Kelly, R G

    1998-07-05

    Although dengue (DEN) virus is the etiologic agent of dengue fever, the most prevalent vector-borne viral disease in the world, precise information on the antigenic structure of the dengue virion is limited. We have prepared a set of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the envelope (E) glycoprotein of DEN 2 virus and used these antibodies in a comprehensive biological and biochemical analysis to identify 16 epitopes. Following domain nomenclature developed for the related flavivirus, tick-borne encephalitis, three functional domains were identified. Five epitopes associated with domain A were arranged in three spatially independent regions. These A-domain epitopes were destroyed by reduction, and antibodies reactive with these epitopes were able to block virus hemagglutination, neutralize virus infectivity, and block virus-mediated cell membrane fusion. Domain-A epitopes were present on the full-length E glycoprotein, a 45-kDa tryptic peptide representing its first 400 amino acids (aa) and a 22-kDa tryptic peptide representing at least aa 1-120. Four epitopes mapped into domain B, as determined by their partial resistance to reduction and the localization of these epitopes on a 9-kDa tryptic or chymotryptic peptide fragment (aa 300-400). One domain-B-reactive MAb was also capable of binding to a DEN 2 synthetic peptide corresponding to aa 333-351 of the E glycoprotein, confirming the location of this domain. Domain-B epitopes elicited MAbs that were potent neutralizers of virus infectivity and blocked hemagglutination, but they did not block virus-mediated cell-membrane fusion. Domains A and B were spatially associated. As with tick-borne encephalitis virus, determination of domain C was more problematic; however, at least four epitopes had biochemical characteristics consistent with C-domain epitopes.

  7. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-02

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4(+) T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses.

  8. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses. PMID:27275775

  9. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to hepatitis C virus recombinant envelope glycoprotein 2 protein exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Rudnicki, Martina; Ferrer, Renila; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos da; Costa, Paulo Inácio da

    2014-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes approximately 10 different structural and non-structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2). HCV proteins, especially the envelope proteins, bind to cell receptors and can damage tissues. Endothelial inflammation is the most important determinant of fibrosis progression and, consequently, cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to two recombinant forms of the HCV E2 protein produced in different expression systems (Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris). We observed the induction of cell death and the production of nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by the two recombinant E2 proteins. The E2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs was confirmed using the molecular marker PARP. The apoptosis rescue observed when the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was used suggests that reactive oxygen species are involved in E2-induced apoptosis. We propose that these proteins are involved in the chronic inflammation caused by HCV.

  10. Characterization of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complexes expressed by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, R; Thudium, K; Berger, K; Kuo, C; Gervase, B; Hall, J; Selby, M; Kuo, G; Houghton, M; Choo, Q L

    1993-01-01

    We constructed recombinant vaccinia virus vectors for expression of the structural region of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Infection of mammalian cells with a vector (vv/HCV1-906) encoding C-E1-E2-NS2 generated major protein species of 22 kDa (C), 33 to 35 kDa (E1), and 70 to 72 kDa (E2), as observed previously with other mammalian expression systems. The bulk of the E1 and E2 expressed by vv/HCV1-906 was found integrated into endoplasmic reticulum membranes as core-glycosylated species, suggesting that these E1 and E2 species represent intracellular forms of the HCV envelope proteins. HCV E1 and E2 formed E1-E2 complexes which were precipitated by either anti-E1 or anti-E2 serum and which sedimented at approximately 15 S on glycerol density gradients. No evidence of intermolecular disulfide bonding between E1 and E2 was detected. E1 and E2 were copurified to approximately 90% purity by mild detergent extraction followed by chromatography on Galanthus nivalus lectin-agarose and DEAE-Fractogel. Immunization of chimpanzees with purified E1-E2 generated high titers of anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies. Further studies, to be reported separately, demonstrated that purified E1-E2 complexes were recognized at high frequency by HCV+ human sera (D. Y. Chien, Q.-L. Choo, R. Ralston, R. Spaete, M. Tong, M. Houghton, and G. Kuo, Lancet, in press) and generated protective immunity in chimpanzees (Q.-L. Choo, G. Kuo, R. Ralston, A. Weiner, D. Chien, G. Van Nest, J. Han, K. Berger, K. Thudium, J. Kansopon, J. McFarland, A. Tabrizi, K. Ching, B. Mass, L. B. Cummins, E. Muchmore, and M. Houghton, submitted for publication), suggesting that these purified HCV envelope proteins display native HCV epitopes. Images PMID:8411378

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Glycosylation Profiles of Membrane-Anchored HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers and Soluble gp140

    PubMed Central

    Go, Eden P.; Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Zhang, Shijian; Mao, Youdong; Chen, Haiyan; Ding, Haitao; Wakefield, John K.; Hua, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kappes, John C.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer, which consists of the gp120 and gp41 subunits, is the focus of multiple strategies for vaccine development. Extensive Env glycosylation provides HIV-1 with protection from the immune system, yet the glycans are also essential components of binding epitopes for numerous broadly neutralizing antibodies. Recent studies have shown that when Env is isolated from virions, its glycosylation profile differs significantly from that of soluble forms of Env (gp120 or gp140) predominantly used in vaccine discovery research. Here we show that exogenous membrane-anchored Envs, which can be produced in large quantities in mammalian cells, also display a virion-like glycan profile, where the glycoprotein is extensively decorated with high-mannose glycans. Additionally, because we characterized the glycosylation with a high-fidelity profiling method, glycopeptide analysis, an unprecedented level of molecular detail regarding membrane Env glycosylation and its heterogeneity is presented. Each glycosylation site was characterized individually, with about 500 glycoforms characterized per Env protein. While many of the sites contain exclusively high-mannose glycans, others retain complex glycans, resulting in a glycan profile that cannot currently be mimicked on soluble gp120 or gp140 preparations. These site-level studies are important for understanding antibody-glycan interactions on native Env trimers. Additionally, we report a newly observed O-linked glycosylation site, T606, and we show that the full O-linked glycosylation profile of membrane-associated Env is similar to that of soluble gp140. These findings provide new insight into Env glycosylation and clarify key molecular-level differences between membrane-anchored Env and soluble gp140. IMPORTANCE A vaccine that protects against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection should elicit antibodies that bind to the surface

  12. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gD function in a redundant fashion to promote secondary envelopment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David C; Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C

    2011-05-01

    Egress of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other herpesviruses from cells involves extensive modification of cellular membranes and sequential envelopment and deenvelopment steps. HSV glycoproteins are important in these processes, and frequently two or more glycoproteins can largely suffice in any step. Capsids in the nucleus undergo primary envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), and then enveloped virus particles undergo deenvelopment by fusing with the outer nuclear membrane (ONM). Capsids delivered into the cytoplasm then undergo secondary envelopment, involving trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes. The deenvelopment step involves HSV glycoproteins gB and gH/gL acting in a redundant fashion. This fusion has features common to the fusion that occurs between the virion envelope and cellular membranes when HSV enters cells, a process requiring gB, gD, and gH/gL. Whether HSV gD also participates (in a redundant fashion with gB or gH/gL) in deenvelopment has not been characterized. Secondary envelopment in the cytoplasm is known to involve HSV gD and gE/gI, also acting in a redundant fashion. Whether gB might also contribute to secondary envelopment, collaborating with gD and gE/gI, is also not clear. To address these questions, we constructed an HSV double mutant lacking gB and gD. The HSV gB(-)/gD(-) mutant exhibited no substantial defects in nuclear egress. In contrast, secondary envelopment was markedly reduced, and there were numerous unenveloped capsids that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as well as increased numbers of partially enveloped capsids and morphologically aberrant enveloped particles with thicker, oblong tegument layers. These defects were different from those observed with HSV gD(-)/gE(-)/gI(-) mutants, which accumulated capsids in large, aggregated masses in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest that HSV gB functions in secondary envelopment, apparently acting downstream of gE/gI.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Forms Trimers at the Surface of the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Alsaleh, Khaled; Tews, Birke Andrea; Loquet, Antoine; Ciczora, Yann; Riva, Laura; Montigny, Cédric; Montpellier, Claire; Duverlie, Gilles; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; le Maire, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells, the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 assemble as a heterodimer. To investigate potential changes in the oligomerization of virion-associated envelope proteins, we performed SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions but without thermal denaturation. This revealed the presence of SDS-resistant trimers of E1 in the context of cell-cultured HCV (HCVcc) as well as in the context of HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). The formation of E1 trimers was found to depend on the coexpression of E2. To further understand the origin of E1 trimer formation, we coexpressed in bacteria the transmembrane (TM) domains of E1 (TME1) and E2 (TME2) fused to reporter proteins and analyzed the fusion proteins by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As expected for strongly interacting TM domains, TME1–TME2 heterodimers resistant to SDS were observed. These analyses also revealed homodimers and homotrimers of TME1, indicating that such complexes are stable species. The N-terminal segment of TME1 exhibits a highly conserved GxxxG sequence, a motif that is well documented to be involved in intramembrane protein-protein interactions. Single or double mutations of the glycine residues (Gly354 and Gly358) in this motif markedly decreased or abrogated the formation of TME1 homotrimers in bacteria, as well as homotrimers of E1 in both HCVpp and HCVcc systems. A concomitant loss of infectivity was observed, indicating that the trimeric form of E1 is essential for virus infectivity. Taken together, these results indicate that E1E2 heterodimers form trimers on HCV particles, and they support the hypothesis that E1 could be a fusion protein. IMPORTANCE HCV glycoproteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry into liver cells as well as in virion morphogenesis. In infected cells, these two proteins form a complex in which E2 interacts with cellular receptors, whereas the function of E1 remains poorly understood. However, recent structural data suggest that E1

  14. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus type K envelope glycoprotein in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, R R; Limbach, C; Löwer, R; Kurth, R

    1997-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) family codes for the human teratocarcinoma-derived retrovirus (HTDV) particles. The existence of the envelope protein (ENV) of HERV-K encoded by the subgenomic env mRNA has not yet been demonstrated. To study the genetic requirements for successful expression of ENV, we have constructed a series of recombinant HERV-K env expression vectors for infection and transfection experiments in insect cells and mammalian cells, respectively. Six baculovirus constructs bearing full-length or truncated HERV-K env with or without homologous or heterologous signal peptides were used for infections of insect cells. All recombinant baculoviruses yielded ENV proteins with the expected molecular masses. The full-length 80- to 90-kDa HERV-K ENV protein including the cORF leader sequence was glycosylated in insect cells. In addition, the 14-kDa cORF protein was expressed due to splicing of the full-length env mRNA. The ENV precursor protein is not cleaved to the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins; it does not appear on the surface of infected insect cells and is not secreted into the medium. For ENV expression in COS cells, plasmid vectors harboring the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/intron A element and the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) signal peptide or the homologous HERV-K signal peptide upstream of the env gene were employed. Glycosylated and uncleaved ENV was expressed as in GH teratocarcinoma cells but at higher levels. The heterologous t-PA signal sequence was instrumental for expression of HERV-K ENV on the cell surface. Hence, we have shown for the first time that the HERV-K env gene has the potential to be expressed as a full-length envelope protein with appropriate glycosylation. In addition, our data provide explanations for the lack of infectivity of HERV-K/HTDV particles. PMID:9060628

  15. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of HIV-1 consensus subtype B envelope glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Denise L.; Decker, Julie M.; Li Yingying; Weng Zhiping; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Zammit, Kenneth P.; Salazar, Maria G.; Chen, Yalu; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Gao Feng; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M. ||; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette T.M. |; Hahn, Beatrice H. |. E-mail: bhahn@uab.edu

    2007-03-30

    'Centralized' (ancestral and consensus) HIV-1 envelope immunogens induce broadly cross-reactive T cell responses in laboratory animals; however, their potential to elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies has not been fully explored. Here, we report the construction of a panel of consensus subtype B (ConB) envelopes and compare their biologic, antigenic, and immunogenic properties to those of two wild-type Env controls from individuals with early and acute HIV-1 infection. Glycoprotein expressed from full-length (gp160), uncleaved (gp160-UNC), truncated (gp145), and N-linked glycosylation site deleted (gp160-201N/S) versions of the ConB env gene were packaged into virions and, except for the fusion defective gp160-UNC, mediated infection via the CCR5 co-receptor. Pseudovirions containing ConB Envs were sensitive to neutralization by patient plasma and monoclonal antibodies, indicating the preservation of neutralizing epitopes found in contemporary subtype B viruses. When used as DNA vaccines in guinea pigs, ConB and wild-type env immunogens induced appreciable binding, but overall only low level neutralizing antibodies. However, all four ConB immunogens were significantly more potent than one wild-type vaccine at eliciting neutralizing antibodies against a panel of tier 1 and tier 2 viruses, and ConB gp145 and gp160 were significantly more potent than both wild-type vaccines at inducing neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 viruses. Thus, consensus subtype B env immunogens appear to be at least as good as, and in some instances better than, wild-type B env immunogens at inducing a neutralizing antibody response, and are amenable to further improvement by specific gene modifications.

  16. Envelope glycoprotein and CD4 independence of vpu-facilitated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid export.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X J; Göttlinger, H; Haseltine, W A; Cohen, E A

    1992-01-01

    The effect of vpu on the release of human immunodeficiency type 1 capsid proteins was examined in the presence or absence of virus-encoded envelope glycoproteins as well as in cells which constitutively express either the CD4 or CD8 protein. The results show that vpu-mediated facilitated export of capsid proteins from HeLa cells does not require expression of the envelope glycoprotein. The experiments also show that export of virus capsid proteins from HeLa cells facilitated by vpu is not affected by coexpression of either the CD4 or CD8 protein. The vpu protein acts in trans to facilitate export of virus capsid proteins from HeLa cells. Images PMID:1629967

  17. Mutations altering the gammaretrovirus endoproteolytic motif affect glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein and early events of the virus life cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2015-01-15

    Previously, we found that mutation of glutamine to proline in the endoproteolytic cleavage signal of the PERV-C envelope (RQKK to RPKK) resulted in non-infectious vectors. Here, we show that RPKK results in a non-infectious vector when placed in not only a PERV envelope, but also the envelope of a related gammaretrovirus, FeLV-B. The amino acid substitutions do not prevent envelope precursor cleavage, viral core and genome assembly, or receptor binding. Rather, the mutations result in the formation of hyperglycosylated glycoprotein and a reduction in the reverse transcribed minus strand synthesis and undetectable 2-LTR circular DNA in cells exposed to vectors with these mutated envelopes. Our findings suggest novel functions associated with the cleavage signal sequence that may affect trafficking through the glycosylation machinery of the cell. Further, the glycosylation status of the envelope appears to impact post-binding events of the viral life cycle, either membrane fusion, internalization, or reverse transcription. - Highlights: • Env cleavage signal impacts infectivity of gammaretroviruses. • Non-infectious mutants have hyper-glycosylated envelope that bind target cells. • Non-infectious mutants have defects in the formation of the double-stranded DNA. • Env cleavage motif has functions beyond cleavage of the env precursor.

  18. Global site-specific N-glycosylation analysis of HIV envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liwei; Diedrich, Jolene K.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Pauthner, Matthias; He, Lin; Park, Sung-Kyu Robin; Sok, Devin; Su, Ching Yao; Delahunty, Claire M.; Menis, Sergey; Andrabi, Raiees; Guenaga, Javier; Georgeson, Erik; Kubitz, Michael; Adachi, Yumiko; Burton, Dennis R.; Schief, William R.; Yates III, John R.; Paulson, James C.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and the focus for design of an antibody-based HIV vaccine. The Env trimer is covered by ∼90N-linked glycans, which shield the underlying protein from immune surveillance. bNAbs to HIV develop during infection, with many showing dependence on glycans for binding to Env. The ability to routinely assess the glycan type at each glycosylation site may facilitate design of improved vaccine candidates. Here we present a general mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy that uses specific endoglycosidases to introduce mass signatures that distinguish peptide glycosites that are unoccupied or occupied by high-mannose/hybrid or complex-type glycans. The method yields >95% sequence coverage for Env, provides semi-quantitative analysis of the glycosylation status at each glycosite. We find that most glycosites in recombinant Env trimers are fully occupied by glycans, varying in the proportion of high-mannose/hybrid and complex-type glycans. PMID:28348411

  19. Rabies virus envelope glycoprotein targets lentiviral vectors to the axonal retrograde pathway in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Islam, Tarin A; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Carpentier, David C J; Trabalza, Antonio; Parkinson, Michael; Schiavo, Giampietro; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2014-06-06

    Rabies pseudotyped lentiviral vectors have great potential in gene therapy, not least because of their ability to transduce neurons following their distal axonal application. However, very little is known about the molecular processes that underlie their retrograde transport and cell transduction. Using multiple labeling techniques and confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that pseudotyping with rabies virus envelope glycoprotein (RV-G) enabled the axonal retrograde transport of two distinct subtypes of lentiviral vector in motor neuron cultures. Analysis of this process revealed that these vectors trafficked through Rab5-positive endosomes and accumulated within a non-acidic Rab7 compartment. RV-G pseudotyped vectors were co-transported with both the tetanus neurotoxin-binding fragment and the membrane proteins thought to mediate rabies virus endocytosis (neural cell adhesion molecule, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and p75 neurotrophin receptor), thus demonstrating that pseudotyping with RV-G targets lentiviral vectors for transport along the same pathway exploited by several toxins and viruses. Using motor neurons cultured in compartmentalized chambers, we demonstrated that axonal retrograde transport of these vectors was rapid and efficient; however, it was not able to transduce the targeted neurons efficiently, suggesting that impairment in processes occurring after arrival of the viral vector in the soma is responsible for the low transduction efficiency seen in vivo, which suggests a novel area for improvement of gene therapy vectors.

  20. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α-helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  1. Antigenicity of peptides comprising the immunosuppressive domain of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To achieve persistent infection of the host, viruses often subvert or suppress host immunity through mechanisms that are not entirely understood. The envelope glycoprotein of several retroviruses is thought to possess potent immunosuppressive activity, mapped to a 17-amino acid residue conserved domain. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this immunosuppressive domain can inhibit lymphocyte activation, whereas mutation of key domain residues can increase the lymphocyte response to linked antigenic epitopes. Using three T cell receptors (TCRs) of defined specificity, we examine the effect of the immunosuppressive domain on the T cell response to their respective antigenic peptides. We find that fusion of a T cell epitope to the immunosuppressive domain can greatly modulate its potency. However, the effects heavily depend on the particular combination of TCR and peptide-major histocompatibility complex class II (pMHC II), and are mimicked by sequence-scrambled peptides of similar length, suggesting they operate at the level of TCR-pMHC interaction. These results offer an alternative explanation for the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes comprising the putative immunosuppressive domain, which is more consistent with an effect on peptide antigenicity than true immunosuppressive activity. PMID:28111636

  2. Role of the cytosolic tails of Rift Valley fever virus envelope glycoproteins in viral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnec, Xavier; Ermonval, Myriam; Kreher, Felix; Flamand, Marie; Bouloy, Michèle

    2014-01-05

    The correct folding, heterodimerization and trafficking of Gn/Gc envelope glycoproteins of Rift Valley fever virus, RVFV (Bunyaviridae and Phlebovirus genus) are essential for Golgi assembly and budding of viral particles. The Gn and Gc carboxy-terminus contain a Golgi targeting and an ER-retrieval signal, respectively. We generated RVFV-like particles with mutations in the cytosolic tails of Gn or Gc and identified regions important for release of infectious particles. The role of specific amino-acids in these regions was further investigated by creating recombinant mutant viruses by reverse-genetics. Residues outside the suspected Golgi targeting motif, i.e. the di-lysine K29-K30 motif and the N43, R44 and I46 residues of the Gn cytosolic domain, appeared important for Golgi localization and RNP packaging. Concerning the Gc tail, replacement of K2 or K3 in the di-lysine motif, had a drastic impact on Gn trafficking and induced an important organelle redistribution and cell remodeling, greatly affecting particle formation and release.

  3. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  4. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  5. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Ryuta; Kar, Kalipada; Anthony, Karen; Gould, L. Hannah; Ledizet, Michel; Fikrig, Erol; Marasco, Wayne A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Modis, Yorgo

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:16943291

  6. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  7. Biochemical evidence of a role for matrix trimerization in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Mariia; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of HIV Gag has important functions in directing the trafficking of Gag to sites of assembly and mediating the incorporation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) into assembling particles. HIV-1 MA has been shown to form trimers in vitro; however, neither the presence nor the role of MA trimers has been documented in HIV-1 virions. We developed a cross-linking strategy to reveal MA trimers in virions of replication-competent HIV-1. By mutagenesis of trimer interface residues, we demonstrated a correlation between loss of MA trimerization and loss of Env incorporation. Additionally, we found that truncating the long cytoplasmic tail of Env restores incorporation of Env into MA trimer-defective particles, thus rescuing infectivity. We therefore propose a model whereby MA trimerization is required to form a lattice capable of accommodating the long cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env; in the absence of MA trimerization, Env is sterically excluded from the assembling particle. These findings establish MA trimerization as an obligatory step in the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. As such, the MA trimer interface may represent a novel drug target for the development of antiretrovirals. PMID:26711999

  8. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J.; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α -helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  9. HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein determinants for cytokine burst in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Brassard, Nathalie; Peres, Adam; Stegen, Camille; Madrenas, Joaquín; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The first step of HIV infection involves the interaction of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein to its receptor CD4, mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells. Besides its role on HIV-1 entry, the gp120 has been shown to be involved in the production of IL-1, IL-6, CCL20 and other innate response cytokines by bystander, uninfected CD4+ T cells and monocytes. However, the gp120 determinants involved in these functions are not completely understood. Whether signalling leading to cytokine production is due to CD4 or other receptors is still unclear. Enhanced chemokine receptor binding and subsequent clustering receptors may lead to cytokine production. By using a comprehensive panel of gp120 mutants, here we show that CD4 binding is mandatory for cytokine outburst in monocytes. Our data suggest that targeting monocytes in HIV-infected patients might decrease systemic inflammation and the potential tissue injury associated with the production of inflammatory cytokines. Understanding how gp120 mediates a cytokine burst in monocytes might help develop new approaches to improve the chronic inflammation that persists in these patients despite effective suppression of viremia by antiretroviral therapy. PMID:28346521

  10. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  11. Interaction of the Most Membranotropic Region of the HCV E2 Envelope Glycoprotein with Membranes. Biophysical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Guillén, Jaime; Moreno, Miguel R.; Gómez-Sánchez, Ana I.; Pabst, George; Laggner, Peter; Villalaín, José

    2008-01-01

    The previously identified membrane-active regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins led us to identify different segments that might be implicated in viral membrane fusion, membrane interaction, and/or protein-protein binding. HCV E2 glycoprotein contains one of the most membranotropic segments, segment 603–634, which has been implicated in CD81 binding, E1/E2 and E2/E2 dimerization, and membrane interaction. Through a series of complementary experiments, we have carried out a study of the binding and interaction with the lipid bilayer of a peptide corresponding to segment 603–634, peptide E2FP, as well as the structural changes induced by membrane binding that take place in both the peptide and the phospholipid molecules. Here, we demonstrate that peptide E2FP binds to and interacts with phospholipid model membranes, modulates the polymorphic phase behavior of membrane phospholipids, is localized in a shallow position in the membrane, and is probably oligomerized in the presence of membranes. These data support the role of E2FP in HCV-mediated membrane fusion, and sustain the notion that this segment of the E2 envelope glycoprotein, together with other segments of E2 and E1 glycoproteins, provides the driving force for the merging of the viral and target cell membranes. PMID:18339752

  12. Reduced cell surface expression of processed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the presence of Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, O; Rivière, Y; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1993-01-01

    nef genes from two laboratory grown human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and from two proviruses that had not been propagated in vitro were introduced into CD4+ lymphoblastoid CEM cells. The stable expression of all four Nef proteins was associated with an almost complete abrogation of CD4 cell surface localization. The consequences of the presence of Nef on gp160 cleavage, gp120 surface localization, and envelope-induced cytopathic effect were examined in CEM cells in which the HIV-1 env gene was expressed from a vaccinia virus vector. The presence of Nef did not modify the processing of gp160 into its subunits but resulted in a significant decrease of cell surface levels of gp120, associated with a dramatic reduction of the fusion-mediated cell death. Surface levels of mutant envelope glycoproteins unable to bind CD4 were not altered in Nef-expressing cells, suggesting that the phenomenon was CD4 dependent. The intracellular accumulation of fully processed envelope glycoproteins could significantly delay the cytopathic effect associated with envelope surface expression in HIV-infected cells and may be relevant to the selective advantage associated with Nef during the in vivo infectious process. Images PMID:8497051

  13. A weakly pathogenic Rauscher spleen focus-forming virus mutant that lacks the carboxyl-terminal membrane anchor of its envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Machida, C A; Bestwick, R K; Kabat, D

    1985-01-01

    A mutant Rauscher spleen focus-forming virus (mutant 4-3) that causes mild splenic erythroblastosis in mice has a 44-base-pair deletion in the 3' region of its envelope glycoprotein (env) gene. The encoded glycoprotein terminates prematurely, lacks a hydrophobic membrane anchor, and has a shortened intracellular lifespan. An active site for causing erythroblast proliferation may occur in the undamaged amino-terminal domain of the env glycoprotein. Images PMID:3973973

  14. Genetic Signatures in the Envelope Glycoproteins of HIV-1 that Associate with Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Gnanakaran, S.; Daniels, Marcus G.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Lapedes, Alan S.; Sethi, Anurag; Li, Ming; Tang, Haili; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Haynes, Barton F.; Cohen, Myron S.; Shaw, George M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Kumar, Amit; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C.; Korber, Bette

    2010-01-01

    A steady increase in knowledge of the molecular and antigenic structure of the gp120 and gp41 HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) is yielding important new insights for vaccine design, but it has been difficult to translate this information to an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies. To help bridge this gap, we used phylogenetically corrected statistical methods to identify amino acid signature patterns in Envs derived from people who have made potently neutralizing antibodies, with the hypothesis that these Envs may share common features that would be useful for incorporation in a vaccine immunogen. Before attempting this, essentially as a control, we explored the utility of our computational methods for defining signatures of complex neutralization phenotypes by analyzing Env sequences from 251 clonal viruses that were differentially sensitive to neutralization by the well-characterized gp120-specific monoclonal antibody, b12. We identified ten b12-neutralization signatures, including seven either in the b12-binding surface of gp120 or in the V2 region of gp120 that have been previously shown to impact b12 sensitivity. A simple algorithm based on the b12 signature pattern was predictive of b12 sensitivity/resistance in an additional blinded panel of 57 viruses. Upon obtaining these reassuring outcomes, we went on to apply these same computational methods to define signature patterns in Env from HIV-1 infected individuals who had potent, broadly neutralizing responses. We analyzed a checkerboard-style neutralization dataset with sera from 69 HIV-1-infected individuals tested against a panel of 25 different Envs. Distinct clusters of sera with high and low neutralization potencies were identified. Six signature positions in Env sequences obtained from the 69 samples were found to be strongly associated with either the high or low potency responses. Five sites were in the CD4-induced coreceptor binding site of gp120, suggesting an important role for

  15. Genomic and antigenic variations of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus major envelope GP5 glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pirzadeh, B; Gagnon, C A; Dea, S

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the importance of genomic and antigenic variations which may have affected the major envelope glycoprotein GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates responsible for outbreaks in Quebec and Ontario, in comparison with the modified-live U.S. vaccine strain (MLV) and the European prototype strain from Lelystad (LV). Nucleotide sequence analyses of the open reading frame (ORF)5 genes showed that all of the isolates studied were heterogenous, amino acid (aa) identities varied from 88 to 99% with the MLV strain, and between 51 and 54% with the LV strain. The aa substitutions were randomly scattered across the protein, although one region between residues 26 and 39 was found to correspond to a hypervariable region which involved 0 to 3 potential N-glycosylation sites. The ORF5 encoded products of 5 of these isolates, including the MLV and LV strains, were expressed in E. coli as recombinant proteins fused to the glutathione S-transferase (GST) protein and used to raise hyperimmune anti-ORF5 sera in rabbits. The reactivity patterns of strain-specific hyperimmune anti-ORF5 sera and a panel of 4 monoclonal antibodies directed against the ORF5 gene product of the Quebec IAF-Klop strain of PRRSV, indicated that GP5 of field isolates also underwent antigenic variations. The data suggest that neutralizing epitopes, independent of conformation and glycosylation, are also associated with antigenic variability of the GP5 of PRRSV. PMID:9684045

  16. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Efficiently Capture HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins via CD4 for Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Hedestam, Gunilla B Karlsson; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4+ T helper cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. Here, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalise and present recombinant Env to CD4+ T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalised Env via C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) while blood DC subsets, including CD1c+ myeloid DCs (MDCs), CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD141+ DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of CLRs and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for antigen uptake compared to MDCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalise Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1+ endosomes that progressed to Lamp1+ and MHC class II+ lysosomes where internalised Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalise an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4+ T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described here, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to antigen presentation and this may therefore be a mechanism utilised by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  17. A Mechanistic Understanding of Allosteric Immune Escape Pathways in the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Anurag; Tian, Jianhui; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Korber, Bette; Gnanakaran, S.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope (Env) spike, which consists of a compact, heterodimeric trimer of the glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, is the target of neutralizing antibodies. However, the high mutation rate of HIV-1 and plasticity of Env facilitates viral evasion from neutralizing antibodies through various mechanisms. Mutations that are distant from the antibody binding site can lead to escape, probably by changing the conformation or dynamics of Env; however, these changes are difficult to identify and define mechanistically. Here we describe a network analysis-based approach to identify potential allosteric immune evasion mechanisms using three known HIV-1 Env gp120 protein structures from two different clades, B and C. First, correlation and principal component analyses of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations identified a high degree of long-distance coupled motions that exist between functionally distant regions within the intrinsic dynamics of the gp120 core, supporting the presence of long-distance communication in the protein. Then, by integrating MD simulations with network theory, we identified the optimal and suboptimal communication pathways and modules within the gp120 core. The results unveil both strain-dependent and -independent characteristics of the communication pathways in gp120. We show that within the context of three structurally homologous gp120 cores, the optimal pathway for communication is sequence sensitive, i.e. a suboptimal pathway in one strain becomes the optimal pathway in another strain. Yet the identification of conserved elements within these communication pathways, termed inter-modular hotspots, could present a new opportunity for immunogen design, as this could be an additional mechanism that HIV-1 uses to shield vulnerable antibody targets in Env that induce neutralizing antibody breadth. PMID:23696718

  18. Contribution of Disulfide Bridging to Epitope Expression of the Dengue Type 2 Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, John T.; Volpe, Katharine E.; Squires, Jennifer; Hunt, Ann R.; Davis, Brent S.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2004-01-01

    The individual contributions of each of the six conserved disulfide (SS) bonds in the dengue 2 virus envelope (E) glycoprotein (strain 16681) to epitope expression was determined by measuring the reactivities of a panel of well-defined monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with LLC-MK2 cells that had been transiently transformed with plasmid vectors expressing E proteins that were mutant in their SS bonds. Three domain I (DI) epitopes (C1, C3, and C4) were affected by elimination of any SS bond and were essentially the only epitopes affected by elimination of the amino-proximal SS1 formed between Cys 3 and Cys 30. The remaining DI epitope (C2) was sensitive to only SS3-bond (Cys 74-Cys 105) and SS6-bond (Cys 302-Cys 333) elimination. Of the four DII epitopes examined, reactivities of three anti-epitope MAbs (A1, A2, and A5) were reduced by elimination of SS2 (Cys 61-Cys 121), SS3, SS4 (Cys 94-Cys 116), SS5 (Cys 185-Cys 285), or SS6. The other DII epitope examined (A3) was sensitive only to SS2- and SS3-bond elimination. The three DIII epitopes tested (B2, B3, and B4) were most sensitive to elimination of SS6. The flavivirus group epitope (A1) was less sensitive to elimination of SS3 and SS6. This result may indicate that the region proximal to the E-protein fusion motif (amino acids 98 to 110) may have important linear components. If this observation can be confirmed, peptide mimics from this region of E protein might be able to interfere with flavivirus replication. PMID:14963174

  19. Antigenic characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor incorporated into nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Kristen C.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Ding, Haitao; Espy, Nicole; Zhang, Shijian; Kappes, John C.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into host cells is mediated by the viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs), which are derived by the proteolytic cleavage of a trimeric gp160 Env precursor. The mature Env trimer is a major target for entry inhibitors and vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. Env interstrain variability, conformational flexibility and heavy glycosylation contribute to evasion of the host immune response, and create challenges for structural characterization and vaccine development. Here we investigate variables associated with reconstitution of the HIV-1 Env precursor into nanodiscs, nanoscale lipid bilayer discs enclosed by membrane scaffolding proteins. We identified detergents, as well as lipids similar in composition to the viral lipidome, that allowed efficient formation of Env-nanodiscs (Env-NDs). Env-NDs were created with the full-length Env precursor and with an Env precursor with the majority of the cytoplasmic tail intact. The self-association of Env-NDs was decreased by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The Env-NDs exhibited an antigenic profile expected for the HIV-1 Env precursor. Env-NDs were recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of note, neutralizing antibody epitopes in the gp41 membrane-proximal external region and in the gp120:gp41 interface were well exposed on Env-NDs compared with Env expressed on cell surfaces. Most Env epitopes recognized by non-neutralizing antibodies were masked on the Env-NDs. This antigenic profile was stable for several days, exhibiting a considerably longer half-life than that of Env solubilized in detergents. Negative selection with weak neutralizing antibodies could be used to improve the antigenic profile of the Env-NDs. Finally, we show that lipid adjuvants can be incorporated into Env-NDs. These results indicate that Env-NDs represent a potentially useful platform for investigating the structural, functional and antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env trimer in a membrane context

  20. EXPRESSION SYSTEM-DEPENDENT MODULATION OF HIV-1 ENVELOPE GLYCOPROTEIN ANTIGENICITY AND IMMUNOGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; Sheppard, Neil C.; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.E.; Robson, Cynthia L.; Chen, Hongying; Xu, Xiaodong; Krashias, George; Bonomelli, Camille; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Kwong, Peter D.; Jeffs, Simon A.; Jones, Ian M.; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant expression systems differ in the type of glycosylation they impart on expressed antigens such as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, potentially affecting their biological properties. We performed head-to-head antigenic, immunogenic and molecular profiling of two distantly-related Env surface (gp120) antigens produced in different systems: a) mammalian (293F) cells in the presence of kifunensine which impart only high mannose glycans; b) insect (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) cells, which confer mainly paucimannosidic glycans; c) Sf9 cells recombinant for mammalian glycosylation enzymes (Sf9 Mimic™), which impart high mannose, hybrid and complex glycans without sialic acid; d) 293F cells, which impart high mannose, hybrid and complex glycans with sialic acid. Molecular models revealed a significant difference in gp120 glycan coverage between the Sf9- and wild-type mammalian cell-derived material that is predicted to impact upon ligand binding sites proximal to glycans. Modelling of solvent-exposed surface electrostatic potentials showed that sialic acid imparts a significant negative surface charge that may influence gp120 antigenicity and immunogenicity. Gp120 expressed in systems that do not incorporate sialic acid displayed increased ligand binding to the CD4-binding and CD4–induced sites compared to those expressed in the system that does, and imparted other more subtle differences in antigenicity in a gp120 subtype-specific manner. Non-sialic acid-containing gp120 was significantly more immunogenic than the sialyated version when administered in two different adjuvants, and induced higher titres of antibodies competing for CD4 binding site ligand-gp120 interaction. These findings suggest that non-sialic acid imparting systems yield gp120 immunogens with modified antigenic and immunogenic properties, considerations which should be considered when selecting expression systems for glycosylated antigens to be used

  1. Antibodies against Manα1,2-Manα1,2-Man oligosaccharide structures recognize envelope glycoproteins from HIV-1 and SIV strains

    PubMed Central

    Luallen, Robert J; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Fu, Hu; Smith, David F; Doms, Robert W; Geng, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Design of an envelope glycoprotein (Env)-based vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is complicated by the large number of N-linked glycans that coat the protein and serve as a barrier to antibody-mediated neutralization. Compared to normal mammalian glycoproteins, high-mannose-type glycans are disproportionately represented on the gp120 subunit of Env. These N-glycans serve as a target for a number of anti-HIV molecules that bind terminal α1,2-linked mannose residues, including lectins and the monoclonal antibody 2G12. We created a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycosylation mutant, Δmnn1Δmnn4, to expose numerous terminal Manα1,2-Man residues on endogenous hypermannosylated glycoproteins in the yeast cell wall. Immunization of rabbits with whole cells from this mutant induced antibodies that bound to a broad range of Env proteins, including clade A, B, and C of HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The gp120 binding activity of these immune sera was due to mannose-specific immunoglobulin, as removal of high-mannose glycans and α1,2-linked mannoses from gp120 abrogated serum binding. Glycan array analysis with purified IgG demonstrated binding mainly to glycans with Manα1,2-Manα1,2-Man trisaccharides. Altogether, these data demonstrate the immunogenicity of exposed polyvalent Manα1,2-Manα1,2-Man structures on the yeast cell wall mannan and their ability to induce antibodies that bind to the HIV Env protein. The yeast strain and sera from this study will be useful tools for determining the type of mannose-specific response that is needed to develop neutralizing antibodies to the glycan shield of HIV. PMID:19920089

  2. Comparative evaluation of trimeric envelope glycoproteins derived from subtype C and B HIV-1 R5 isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Indresh K. Kan, Elaine; Sun Yide; Sharma, Victoria A.; Cisto, Jimna; Burke, Brian; Lian Ying; Hilt, Susan; Biron, Zohar; Hartog, Karin; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Cheng, R. Holland; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2008-03-15

    We previously reported that an envelope (Env) glycoprotein immunogen (o-gp140{delta}V2SF162) containing a partial deletion in the second variable loop (V2) derived from the R5-tropic HIV-1 isolate SF162 partially protected vaccinated rhesus macaques against pathogenic SHIV{sub SF162P4} virus. Extending our studies to subtype C isolate TV1, we have purified o-gp140{delta}V2TV1 (subtype C {delta}V2 trimer) to homogeneity, performed glycosylation analysis, and determined its ability to bind CD4, as well as a panel of well-characterized neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In general, critical epitopes are preserved on the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer; however, we did not observe significant binding for the b12 mAb. The molecular mass of subtype C {delta}V2 trimer was found to be 450 kDa, and the hydrodynamic radius was found to be 10.87 nm. Our data suggest that subtype C {delta}V2 trimer binds to CD4 with an affinity comparable to o-gp140{delta}V2SF162 (subtype B {delta}V2 trimer). Using isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis, we demonstrated that all three CD4 binding sites (CD4-BS) in both subtype C and B trimers are exposed and accessible. However, compared to subtype B trimer, the three CD4-BS in subtype C trimer have different affinities for CD4, suggesting a cooperativity of CD4 binding in subtype C trimer but not in subtype B trimer. Negative staining electron microscopy of the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer has demonstrated that it is in fact a trimer. These results highlight the importance of studying subtype C Env, and also of developing appropriate subtype C-specific reagents that may be used for better immunological characterization of subtype C Env for developing an AIDS vaccine.

  3. Influences on the Design and Purification of Soluble, Recombinant Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh P.; Yasmeen, Anila; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Go, Eden P.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ketas, Thomas A.; Cottrell, Christopher A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Cupo, Albert; Crispin, Max; Lee, Kelly K.; Desaire, Heather; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    . IMPORTANCE Soluble, recombinant multimeric proteins based on the HIV-1 env gene are current candidate immunogens for vaccine trials in humans. These proteins are generally designed to mimic the native trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env) that is the target of virus-neutralizing antibodies on the surfaces of virions. The underlying hypothesis is that an Env-mimetic protein may be able to induce antibodies that can neutralize the virus broadly and potently enough for a vaccine to be protective. Multiple different designs for Env-mimetic trimers have been put forth. Here, we used the CZA97.012 and 92UG037.8 env genes to compare some of these designs and determine which ones best mimic virus-associated Env trimers. We conclude that the most widely used versions of CZA97.012 and 92UG037.8 oligomeric Env proteins do not resemble the trimeric Env glycoprotein on HIV-1 viruses, which has implications for the design and interpretation of ongoing or proposed clinical trials of these proteins. PMID:26311893

  4. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ectodomain of the envelope glycoprotein E2 from Bovine viral diarrhoea virus

    PubMed Central

    Iourin, Oleg; Harlos, Karl; El Omari, Kamel; Lu, Weixian; Kadlec, Jan; Iqbal, Munir; Meier, Christoph; Palmer, Andrew; Jones, Ian; Thomas, Carole; Brownlie, Joe; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Stuart, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen which is closely related to Hepatitis C virus. Of the structural proteins, the envelope glycoprotein E2 of BVDV is the major antigen which induces neutralizing antibodies; thus, BVDV E2 is considered as an ideal target for use in subunit vaccines. Here, the expression, purification of wild-type and mutant forms of the ectodomain of BVDV E2 and subsequent crystallization and data collection of two crystal forms grown at low and neutral pH are reported. Native and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data sets have been collected and structure determination is in progress. PMID:23295482

  5. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate.

  6. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Antigenic Site 314-324 in Complex with Antibody IGH526.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; Kadam, Rameshwar U; Giang, Erick; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Nieusma, Travis; Culhane, Jeffrey C; Stanfield, Robyn L; Dawson, Philip E; Wilson, Ian A; Law, Mansun

    2015-08-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-strand RNA virus within the Flaviviridae family. The viral "spike" of HCV is formed by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2, which together mediate viral entry by engaging host receptors and undergoing conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion. While E2 can be readily produced in the absence of E1, E1 cannot be expressed without E2 and few reagents, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), are available for study of this essential HCV glycoprotein. A human mAb to E1, IGH526, was previously reported to cross-neutralize different HCV isolates, and therefore, we sought to further characterize the IGH526 neutralizing epitope to obtain information for vaccine design. We found that mAb IGH526 bound to a discontinuous epitope, but with a major component corresponding to E1 residues 314-324. The crystal structure of IGH526 Fab with this E1 glycopeptide at 1.75Å resolution revealed that the antibody binds to one face of an α-helical peptide. Single mutations on the helix substantially lowered IGH526 binding but did not affect neutralization, indicating either that multiple mutations are required or that additional regions are recognized by the antibody in the context of the membrane-associated envelope oligomer. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the free peptide is flexible in solution, suggesting that it requires stabilization for use as a candidate vaccine immunogen.

  7. Genetic analysis of heptad-repeat regions in the G2 fusion subunit of the Junin arenavirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    York, Joanne . E-mail: joanne.york@umontana.edu; Agnihothram, Sudhakar S. . E-mail: sudhakar.agnihothram@umontana.edu; Romanowski, Victor . E-mail: victor@biol.unlp.edu.ar; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2005-12-20

    The G2 fusion subunit of the Junin virus envelope glycoprotein GP-C contains two hydrophobic heptad-repeat regions that are postulated to form a six-helix bundle structure required for the membrane fusion activity of Class I viral fusion proteins. We have investigated the role of these heptad-repeat regions and, specifically, the importance of the putative interhelical a and d position sidechains by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the mutant glycoproteins were expressed and transported to the cell surface. Proteolytic maturation at the subtilisin kexin isozyme-1/site-1-protease (SKI-1/S1P) cleavage site was observed in all but two of the mutants. Among the adequately cleaved mutant glycoproteins, four positions in the N-terminal region (I333, L336, L347 and L350) and two positions in the C-terminal region (R392 and W395) were shown to be important determinants of cell-cell fusion. Taken together, our results indicate that {alpha}-helical coiled-coil structures are likely critical in promoting arenavirus membrane fusion. These findings support the inclusion of the arenavirus GP-C among the Class I viral fusion proteins and suggest pharmacologic and immunologic strategies for targeting arenavirus infection and hemorrhagic fever.

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  9. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  10. A rat model of human immunodeficiency virus 1 encephalopathy using envelope glycoprotein gp120 expression delivered by SV40 vectors.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Agrawal, Lokesh; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2009-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) encephalopathy is thought to result in part from the toxicity of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 for neurons. Experimental systems for studying the effects of gp120 and other HIV proteins on the brain have been limited to the acute effects of recombinant proteins in vitro or in vivo in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. We describe an experimental rodent model of ongoing gp120-induced neurotoxicity in which HIV-1 envelope is expressed in the brain using an SV40-derived gene delivery vector, SV(gp120). When it is inoculated stereotaxically into the rat caudate putamen, SV(gp120) caused a partly hemorrhagic lesion in which neuron and other cell apoptosis continues for at least 12 weeks. Human immunodeficiency virus gp120 is expressed throughout this time, and some apoptotic cells are gp120 positive. Malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal assays indicated that there was lipid peroxidation in these lesions. Prior administration of recombinant SV40 vectors carrying antioxidant enzymes, copper/ zinc superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase, was protective against SV(gp120)-induced oxidative injury and apoptosis. Thus, in vivo inoculation of SV(gp120) into the rat caudate putamen causes ongoing oxidative stress and apoptosis in neurons and may therefore represent a useful animal model for studying the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV-1 envelope-related brain damage.

  11. Egg envelope glycoprotein gp37 as a Xenopus homolog of mammalian ZP1, based on cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Kubo, H; Kawano, T; Tsubuki, S; Kotani, M; Kawasaki, H; Kawashima, S

    2000-08-01

    The egg envelope is a kind of extracellular matrix, which surrounds growing oocytes, ovulated eggs and early embryos. Among the glycoprotein components of the Xenopus laevis egg envelope, gp43/gp41 and gp69/64 have already been shown to be frog homologs of the mammalian zona pellucida components ZP3 and ZP2, respectively. To determine the structure of another major component of egg envelope, gp37, the peptides isolated from the lysyl endopeptidase digests of gp37 were sequenced for amino acids to design degenerate primers for polymerase chain reaction. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with a poly(A)+ RNA from the ovary of a postovulated female Xenopus, a specifically amplified band was obtained and sequenced. The upstream and downstream sequences of the sequenced region were completed by 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends, respectively. The gp37 cDNA comprises 1674 bp and contains one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with 543 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gp37 cDNA has a close similarity to that of mammalian ZP1. Northern blot and in situ hybridization studies indicated that the transcript (1.8 kb) is exclusively expressed in the oocytes, particularly in the previtellogenic young oocytes, just like the expression pattern of gp43 mRNA, suggesting a coordinate transcription of the gp43 and gp37 genes in Xenopus.

  12. Myristoylation of the Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Stable Signal Peptide Is Critical for Membrane Fusion but Dispensable for Virion Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    York, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are responsible for severe and often fatal hemorrhagic disease. In the absence of effective antiviral therapies and vaccines, these viruses pose serious threats to public health and biodefense. Arenaviruses enter the host cell by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, a process mediated by the virus envelope glycoprotein GPC. Unlike other class I viral fusion proteins, GPC retains its stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential third subunit in the mature complex. SSP spans the membrane twice and is myristoylated at its cytoplasmic N terminus. Mutations that abolish SSP myristoylation have been shown to reduce pH-induced cell-cell fusion activity of ectopically expressed GPC to ∼20% of wild-type levels. In order to examine the role of SSP myristoylation in the context of the intact virus, we used reverse genetics to generate Junín viruses (Candid #1 isolate) in which the critical glycine-2 residue in SSP was either replaced by alanine (G2A) or deleted (ΔG2). These mutant viruses produced smaller foci of infection in Vero cells and showed an ∼5-fold reduction in specific infectivity, commensurate with the defect in cell-cell fusion. However, virus assembly and GPC incorporation into budded virions were unaffected. Our findings suggest that the myristate moiety is cryptically disposed in the prefusion GPC complex and may function late in the fusion process to promote merging of the viral and cellular membranes. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Arenavirus entry into the host cell is promoted by the virus envelope glycoprotein GPC. Unlike other viral envelope glycoproteins, GPC contains a myristoylated stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential third subunit. Myristoylation has been shown to be important for the membrane fusion activity of recombinantly expressed GPC. Here, we use reverse genetics to study the role of SSP myristoylation in the context of the intact

  13. CD4-Induced Antibodies Promote Association of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein with CD4-Binding Site Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fellinger, Christoph H.; Prasad, Neha R.; Zhou, Amber S.; Kondur, Hema R.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120/gp41 heterodimers that mediates viral entry. Env binds cellular CD4, an association which stabilizes a conformation favorable to its subsequent association with a coreceptor, typically CCR5 or CXCR4. The CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites serve as epitopes for two classes of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies: CD4-binding site (CD4bs) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Here we observed that, at a fixed total concentration, mixtures of the CD4i antibodies (E51 or 412d) and the CD4bs antibody VRC01 neutralized the HIV-1 isolates 89.6, ADA, SG3, and SA32 more efficiently than either antibody alone. We found that E51, and to a lesser extent 412d and 17b, promoted association of four CD4bs antibodies to the Env trimer but not to monomeric gp120. We further demonstrated that the binding of the sulfotyrosine-binding pocket by CCR5mim2-Ig was sufficient for promoting CD4bs antibody binding to Env. Interestingly, the relationship is not reciprocal: CD4bs antibodies were not as efficient as CD4-Ig at promoting E51 or 412d binding to Env trimer. Consistent with these observations, CD4-Ig, but none of the CD4bs antibodies tested, substantially increased HIV-1 infection of a CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cell line. We conclude that the ability of CD4i antibodies to promote VRC01 association with Env trimers accounts for the increase potency of VRC01 and CD4i antibody mixtures. Our data further suggest that potent CD4bs antibodies avoid inducing Env conformations that bind CD4i antibodies or CCR5. IMPORTANCE Potent HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies can prevent viral transmission and suppress an ongoing infection. Here we show that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which recognize the conserved coreceptor-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), can increase the association of Env with potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies). We further show that

  14. Residues in the gp41 Ectodomain Regulate HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Conformational Transitions Induced by gp120-Directed Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Beatriz; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Debbeche, Olfa; Prévost, Jérémie; Ding, Shilei; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Herschhorn, Alon; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy; Melillo, Bruno; Gu, Christopher; Zeng, Xin; Mao, Youdong; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-03-01

    Interactions between the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer maintain the metastable unliganded form of the viral spike. Binding of gp120 to the receptor, CD4, changes the Env conformation to promote gp120 interaction with the second receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4. CD4 binding also induces the transformation of Env into the prehairpin intermediate, in which the gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) coiled coil is assembled at the trimer axis. In nature, HIV-1 Envs must balance the requirements to maintain the noncovalent association of gp120 with gp41 and to evade the host antibody response with the need to respond to CD4 binding. Here we show that the gp41 HR1 region contributes to gp120 association with the unliganded Env trimer. Changes in particular amino acid residues in the gp41 HR1 region decreased the efficiency with which Env moved from the unliganded state. Thus, these gp41 changes decreased the sensitivity of HIV-1 to cold inactivation and ligands that require Env conformational changes to bind efficiently. Conversely, these gp41 changes increased HIV-1 sensitivity to small-molecule entry inhibitors that block Env conformational changes induced by CD4. Changes in particular gp41 HR1 amino acid residues can apparently affect the relative stability of the unliganded state and CD4-induced conformations. Thus, the gp41 HR1 region contributes to the association with gp120 and regulates Env transitions from the unliganded state to downstream conformations.IMPORTANCE The development of an efficient vaccine able to prevent HIV infection is a worldwide priority. Knowledge of the envelope glycoprotein structure and the conformational changes that occur after receptor engagement will help researchers to develop an immunogen able to elicit antibodies that block HIV-1 transmission. Here we identify residues in the HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein that stabilize the unliganded state by modulating the

  15. Antibody recognition of the glycoprotein g of viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) purified in large amounts from insect larvae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are currently no purification methods capable of producing the large amounts of fish rhabdoviral glycoprotein G (gpG) required for diagnosis and immunisation purposes or for studying structure and molecular mechanisms of action of this molecule (ie. pH-dependent membrane fusion). As a result of the unavailability of large amounts of the gpG from viral haemorrhagic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV), one of the most dangerous viruses affecting cultured salmonid species, research interests in this field are severely hampered. Previous purification methods to obtain recombinant gpG from VHSV in E. coli, yeast and baculovirus grown in insect cells have not produced soluble conformations or acceptable yields. The development of large-scale purification methods for gpGs will also further research into other fish rhabdoviruses, such as infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), spring carp viremia virus (SVCV), hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV). Findings Here we designed a method to produce milligram amounts of soluble VHSV gpG. Only the transmembrane and carboxy terminal-deleted (amino acid 21 to 465) gpG was efficiently expressed in insect larvae. Recognition of G21-465 by ß-mercaptoethanol-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs) and pH-dependent recognition by sera from VHSV-hyperimmunized or VHSV-infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was demonstrated. Conclusions Given that the purified G21-465 conserved some of its most important properties, this method might be suitable for the large-scale production of fish rhabdoviral gpGs for use in diagnosis, fusion and antigenicity studies. PMID:21693048

  16. Basic Residues in Hypervariable Region 1 of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 Contribute to Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Nathalie; Ciczora, Yann; Bartosch, Birke; Vu-Dac, Ngoc; Cosset, François-Loïc; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Penin, François; Dubuisson, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The N terminus of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains a hypervariable region (HVR1) which has been proposed to play a role in viral entry. Despite strong amino acid variability, HVR1 is globally basic, with basic residues located at specific sequence positions. Here we show by analyzing a large number of HVR1 sequences that the frequency of basic residues at each position is genotype dependent. We also used retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) harboring genotype 1a envelope glycoproteins to study the role of HVR1 basic residues in entry. Interestingly, HCVpp infectivity globally increased with the number of basic residues in HVR1. However, a shift in position of some charged residues also modulated HCVpp infectivity. In the absence of basic residues, infectivity was reduced to the same level as that of a mutant deleted of HVR1. We also analyzed the effect of these mutations on interactions with some potential HCV receptors. Recognition of CD81 was not affected by changes in the number of charged residues, and we did not find a role for heparan sulfates in HCVpp entry. The involvement of the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) was indirectly analyzed by measuring the enhancement of infectivity of the mutants in the presence of the natural ligand of SR-BI, high-density lipoproteins (HDL). However, no correlation between the number of basic residues within HVR1 and HDL enhancement effect was observed. Despite the lack of evidence of the involvement of known potential receptors, our results demonstrate that the presence of basic residues in HVR1 facilitates virus entry. PMID:16306604

  17. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived from the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-27

    AD________ AD-A230 976 ARMY PROJECT NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE ENVELOPE...INO. INO r CCESSION NO I1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the...necessary and identify by block number) Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) ot dengue (DEN) virus infection in human mononuclear cells in vitro has been

  18. Structure-function analysis of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Aparajita; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Fadra, Numrah; Goldman, Radoslav; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Mazumder, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in humans. The envelope proteins of HCV are potential candidates for vaccine development. The absence of three-dimensional (3D) structures for the functional domain of HCV envelope proteins [E1.E2] monomer complex has hindered overall understanding of the virus infection, and also structure-based drug design initiatives. In this study, we report a 3D model containing both E1 and E2 proteins of HCV using the recently published structure of the core domain of HCV E2 and the functional part of E1, and investigate immunogenic implications of the model. HCV [E1.E2] molecule is modeled by using aa205-319 of E1 to aa421-716 of E2. Published experimental data were used to further refine the [E1.E2] model. Based on the model, we predict 77 exposed residues and several antigenic sites within the [E1.E2] that could serve as vaccine epitopes. This study identifies eight peptides which have antigenic propensity and have two or more sequentially exposed amino acids and 12 singular sites are under negative selection pressure that can serve as vaccine or therapeutic targets. Our special interest is 285FLVGQLFTFSPRRHW299 which has five negatively selected sites (L286, V287, G288, T292, and G303) with three of them sequential and four amino acids exposed (F285, L286, T292, and R296). This peptide in the E1 protein maps to dengue envelope vaccine target identified previously by our group. Our model provides for the first time an overall view of both the HCV envelope proteins thereby allowing researchers explore structure-based drug design approaches.

  19. A second envelope glycoprotein mediates neutralization of a pestivirus, hog cholera virus.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, E; Ahl, R; Stark, R; Weiland, F; Thiel, H J

    1992-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against hog cholera virus (HCV) reacted with the HCV structural glycoprotein gp44/48 and neutralized the virus. The presence of HCV gp44/48 on the viral surface was directly demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopy. Eight anti-HCV gp44/48 MAbs were tested by immunoperoxidase assay against a panel of pestivirus strains. Each MAb showed a distinct pattern of reactivity with HCV strains. It is suggested that the MAbs are well suited for epidemiological investigations of HCV outbreaks. Images PMID:1583727

  20. A Molecular Sensor To Characterize Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Cleavage by Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Oppliger, Joel; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique J.; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenaviruses are emerging viruses including several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has greatly accelerated the discovery of novel arenavirus species. However, for many of these viruses, only genetic information is available, and their zoonotic disease potential remains unknown. During the arenavirus life cycle, processing of the viral envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) is crucial for productive infection. The ability of newly emerging arenaviruses to hijack human SKI-1/S1P appears, therefore, to be a requirement for efficient zoonotic transmission and human disease potential. Here we implement a newly developed cell-based molecular sensor for SKI-1/S1P to characterize the processing of arenavirus GPC-derived target sequences by human SKI-1/S1P in a quantitative manner. We show that only nine amino acids flanking the putative cleavage site are necessary and sufficient to accurately recapitulate the efficiency and subcellular location of arenavirus GPC processing. In a proof of concept, our sensor correctly predicts efficient processing of the GPC of the newly emergent pathogenic Lujo virus by human SKI-1/S1P and defines the exact cleavage site. Lastly, we employed our sensor to show efficient GPC processing of a panel of pathogenic and nonpathogenic New World arenaviruses, suggesting that GPC cleavage represents no barrier for zoonotic transmission of these pathogens. Our SKI-1/S1P sensor thus represents a rapid and robust test system for assessment of the processing of putative cleavage sites derived from the GPCs of newly discovered arenavirus by the SKI-1/S1P of humans or any other species, based solely on sequence information. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are important emerging human pathogens that can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality in humans. A crucial step in productive arenavirus

  1. Transmembrane Domains of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoproteins: Residues Involved in E1E2 Heterodimerization and Involvement of These Domains in Virus Entry▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciczora, Yann; Callens, Nathalie; Penin, François; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Dubuisson, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 have been shown to play multiple roles during the biogenesis of the E1E2 heterodimer. By using alanine scanning insertion mutagenesis within the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins, we have previously shown that the central regions of these domains as well as the N-terminal part of the TM domain of E1 are involved in heterodimerization. Here, we used a tryptophan replacement scan of these regions to identify individual residues that participate in those interactions. Our mutagenesis study identified at least four residues involved in heterodimerization: Gly 354, Gly 358, Lys 370, and Asp 728. Interestingly, Gly 354 and Gly 358 belong to a GXXXG oligomerization motif. Our tryptophan mutants were also used to generate retrovirus-based, HCV-pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) in order to analyze the effects of these mutations on virus entry. Surprisingly, two mutants consistently displayed higher infectivity compared to that of the wild type. In contrast, HCVpp infectivity was strongly affected for many mutants, despite normal E1E2 heterodimerization and normal levels of incorporation of HCV glycoproteins into HCVpp. The characterization of some of these HCVpp mutants in the recently developed in vitro fusion assay using fluorescent-labeled liposomes indicated that mutations reducing HCVpp infectivity without altering E1E2 heterodimerization affected the fusion properties of HCV envelope glycoproteins. In conclusion, this mutational analysis identified residues involved in E1E2 heterodimerization and revealed that the TM domains of HCV envelope glycoproteins play a major role in the fusion properties of these proteins. PMID:17166909

  2. The Signal Peptide of the Junín Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Is Myristoylated and Forms an Essential Subunit of the Mature G1-G2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    York, Joanne; Romanowski, Victor; Lu, Min; Nunberg, Jack H.

    2004-01-01

    Arenaviruses comprise a diverse family of rodent-borne viruses that are responsible for recurring and emerging outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fevers worldwide. The Junín virus, a member of the New World arenaviruses, is endemic to the pampas grasslands of Argentina and is the etiologic agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. In this study, we have analyzed the assembly and function of the Junín virus envelope glycoproteins. The mature envelope glycoprotein complex is proteolytically processed from the GP-C precursor polypeptide and consists of three noncovalently associated subunits, G1, G2, and a stable 58-amino-acid signal peptide. This tripartite organization is found both on virions of the attenuated Candid 1 strain and in cells expressing the pathogenic MC2 strain GP-C gene. Replacement of the Junín virus GP-C signal peptide with that of human CD4 has little effect on glycoprotein assembly while abolishing the ability of the G1-G2 complex to mediate pH-dependent cell-cell fusion. In addition, we demonstrate that the Junín virus GP-C signal peptide subunit is myristoylated at its N-terminal glycine. Alanine substitution for the modified glycine residue in the GP-C signal peptide does not affect formation of the tripartite envelope glycoprotein complex but markedly reduces its membrane fusion activity. In contrast to the classical view that signal peptides act primarily in targeting nascent polypeptides to the endoplasmic reticulum, we suggest that the signal peptide of the arenavirus GP-C may serve additional functions in envelope glycoprotein structure and trafficking. PMID:15367645

  3. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jimin Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  4. Comparative evaluation of purified Taenia solium glycoproteins and crude metacestode extracts by immunoblotting for the serodiagnosis of human T. solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Canul, R; Allan, J C; Fletes, C; Sutisna, I P; Kapti, I N; Craig, P S

    1997-01-01

    A lentil-lectin purified glycoprotein (LL-Gp) and a crude saline extract of Taenia solium metacestodes were compared for the immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis by immunoblotting. The LL-Gp preparation was 95% sensitive for antibodies against a range of seven antigens with molecular masses of 50 to 13 kDa, whereas the sensitivity of the crude saline extract for the detection of antibodies against two major polypeptide molecules (26 and 8 kDa) was 91%. Specificity was 100% with both sets of diagnostic antigens. Affinity-purified antibodies against the 26-kDa molecule from the crude saline extract recognized the 24-kDa diagnostic region in the LL-Gp-purified extract and vice versa, suggesting that the antigens had common epitopes recognized by cysticercotic sera. In addition, in a preliminary community study of 115 randomly selected people from Bali (Indonesia), seroprevalence by immunoblot assay varied from 7.8% (with the crude saline antigen extract) to 9.6% (with the LL-Gp-purified extract). The results of this study demonstrate that both antigenic preparations are applicable for the immunodiagnosis of T. solium cysticercosis. The crude T. solium metacestode antigen extract was as specific as the purified LL-Gp T. solium metacestode extract and simpler to produce but slightly less sensitive. PMID:9302208

  5. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C phenotype evolves through distinct alterations near the N terminus of the envelope surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Brojatsch, J; Kristal, B S; Viglianti, G A; Khiroya, R; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1992-01-01

    Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) belonging to the C subgroup induce aplastic anemia in domestic cats and have the ability, unique among FeLV strains, to proliferate in guinea pig fibroblasts in tissue culture. Previous studies have shown that the pathogenic and host range specificity of a prototype molecular clone of FeLV-C [FeLV-Sarma-C (FSC)] colocalize to a region encoding the 3' 73 amino acids of the pol gene product and the N-terminal 241 amino acids of the envelope surface glycoprotein named SU. Here, we amplified, via PCR, cloned, and sequenced the SU coding sequence from three additional anemia-inducing subgroup C FeLV isolates. Chimeric viruses were constructed by replacement of fragments of FeLV-C envelope genes into the FeLV-A prototype virus 61E. Using a modified vesicular stomatitis virus-FeLV pseudotype assay, we demonstrated that the subgroup C receptor specificity for each virus was determined by changes within the N-terminal 87-92 amino acids of SU, in which most changes occurred within the 15- to 20-amino-acid first variable region (V1). Determinants for growth in guinea pig cells colocalized to this region. Despite the consistent localization of biological determinants, the only consistent features that distinguished the deduced FeLV-A and FeLV-C proteins was one lysine-to-arginine change and a structural prediction of an alpha-helix in FeLV-A proteins versus random coil in FeLV-C proteins within V1. However, arginine in equilibrium with lysine substitutions were not sufficient to convert the subgroup A virus to the subgroup C phenotype or vice versa. Thus, certain distinct structural changes within the N-terminal region of FeLV SU can result in convergent viral phenotypes. Images PMID:1326757

  6. Identification of Continuous Human B-Cell Epitopes in the Envelope Glycoprotein of Dengue Virus Type 3 (DENV-3)

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa N. M. Rangel; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Montenegro, Silvia M. L.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is a growing global public health concern in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Dengue vaccine development has been hampered by concerns that cross-reactive immunological memory elicited by a candidate vaccine could increase the risk of development of more severe clinical forms. One possible strategy to reduce risks associated with a dengue vaccine is the development of a vaccine composed of selected critical epitopes of each of the serotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings Synthetic peptides were used to identify B-cell epitopes in the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3). Eleven linear, immunodominant epitopes distributed in five regions at amino acid (aa) positions: 51–65, 71–90, 131–170, 196–210 and 246–260 were identified by employing an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using a pool of human sera from dengue type 3 infected individuals. Peptides 11 (aa51–65), 27 and 28 (aa131–150) also reacted with dengue 1 (DENV-1) and dengue 2 (DENV-2) patient sera as analyzed through the ROC curves generated for each peptide by ELISA and might have serotype specific diagnostic potential. Mice immunized against each one of the five immunogenic regions showed epitopes 51–65, 131–170, 196–210 and 246–260 elicited the highest antibody response and epitopes131–170, 196–210 and 246–260, elicited IFN-γ production and T CD4+ cell response, as evaluated by ELISA and ELISPOT assays respectively. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified several useful immunodominant IgG-specific epitopes on the envelope of DENV-3. They are important tools for understanding the mechanisms involved in antibody dependent enhancement and immunity. If proven protective and safe, in conjunction with others well-documented epitopes, they might be included into a candidate epitope-based vaccine. PMID:19826631

  7. Sperm proteasome degrades egg envelope glycoprotein ZP1 during fertilization of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Sasanami, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Kenichi; Tokumoto, Toshinobu; Yoshizaki, Norio; Dohra, Hideo; Nishio, Shunsuke; Mizushima, Shusei; Hiyama, Gen; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2012-10-01

    At the time of fertilization, the extracellular matrix surrounding avian oocytes, termed the perivitelline membrane (pvm), is hydrolyzed by a sperm-borne protease, although the actual protease that is responsible for the digestion of the pvm remains to be identified. Here, we show evidence that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is functional in the fertilization of Japanese quail. The activities for the induction of the acrosome reaction and binding to ZP3 as revealed by ligand blotting of purified serum ZP1 are similar to those of pvm ZP1. Western blot analysis of purified ZP1 and ZP3 by the use of the anti-ubiquitin antibody showed that only pvm ZP1 was reactive to the antibody. In vitro penetration assay of the sperm on the pvm indicated that fragments of ZP1 and intact ZP3 were released from the pvm. Western blot analysis using the anti-20S proteasome antibody and ultrastructural analysis showed that immunoreactive proteasome was localized in the acrosomal region of the sperm. Inclusion of specific proteasome inhibitor MG132 in the incubation mixture, or depletion of extracellular ATP by the addition of apyrase, efficiently suppressed the sperm perforation of the pvm. These results demonstrate for the first time that the sperm proteasome is important for fertilization in birds and that the extracellular ubiquitination of ZP1 might occur during its transport via blood circulation.

  8. Structure of a phleboviral envelope glycoprotein reveals a consolidated model of membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsson, Steinar; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Elliott, Richard M.; Crispin, Max; Brennan, Benjamin; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    An emergent viral pathogen termed severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is responsible for thousands of clinical cases and associated fatalities in China, Japan, and South Korea. Akin to other phleboviruses, SFTSV relies on a viral glycoprotein, Gc, to catalyze the merger of endosomal host and viral membranes during cell entry. Here, we describe the postfusion structure of SFTSV Gc, revealing that the molecular transformations the phleboviral Gc undergoes upon host cell entry are conserved with otherwise unrelated alpha- and flaviviruses. By comparison of SFTSV Gc with that of the prefusion structure of the related Rift Valley fever virus, we show that these changes involve refolding of the protein into a trimeric state. Reverse genetics and rescue of site-directed histidine mutants enabled localization of histidines likely to be important for triggering this pH-dependent process. These data provide structural and functional evidence that the mechanism of phlebovirus–host cell fusion is conserved among genetically and patho-physiologically distinct viral pathogens. PMID:27325770

  9. Replication and neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J; Sullivan, N; Desjardin, E; Parolin, C; Robinson, J; Wyatt, R; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutant lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein replicated in Jurkat lymphocytes with only modest delays compared with the wild-type virus. Revertants that replicated with wild-type efficiency rapidly emerged and contained only a few amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins compared with the parent virus. Both the parent and revertant viruses exhibited increased sensitivity to neutralization by antibodies directed against the V3 loop or a CD4-induced epitope on gp120 but not by soluble CD4 or an antibody against the CD4 binding site. This result demonstrates the role of the gp120 V1 and V2 loops in protecting HIV-1 from some subsets of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9371651

  10. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  11. ASPP2 involvement in p53-mediated HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 neurotoxicity in mice cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiying; Zang, Yunjin; Qiao, Luxin; Liu, Kai; Ouyang, Yabo; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders are still unclear. Apoptosis-stimulating protein 2 of p53 (ASPP2) is a damage-inducible p53-binding protein that stimulates p53-mediated apoptosis and transactivates proapoptotic and cell cycle regulatory genes. It has been reported that ASPP2 has a specific regulatory function in the death of retinal ganglion cells and the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, we used p53 and ASPP2 knockout mice and primary cerebrocortical neuron culture to analyze the role of the interaction between ASPP2 with p53 in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that 10 ng/mL gp120 protein might stimulate p53 overexpression and translocation to the nucleus, and 30 ng/mL gp120 protein could stimulate both p53 and ASPP2 translocation to the nucleus, but only with p53 overexpression. The primary cultured neurons of p53−/−ASPP2+/− mice had a higher survival rate than p53−/− mice under gp120 protein stress. The interaction of ASPP2 with p53 induced by a high dose of gp120 stimulated Bax transcription and contributed to caspase-3 cleavage, and ASPP2-siRNA attenuated gp120 induced neuron death through inhibition of Bax expression. These results suggest that ASPP2 plays an important role in p53-mediated neuronal apoptosis under gp120 stress. PMID:27625111

  12. Arenavirus envelope glycoproteins mimic autoprocessing sites of the cellular proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme-1/site-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Pasquato, Antonella; Burri, Dominique J; Traba, Esther Gomez-Ibarlucea; Hanna-El-Daher, Layane; Seidah, Nabil G; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-08-15

    A crucial step in the arenavirus life cycle is the proteolytic processing of the viral envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular proprotein convertase (PC) subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P). Here we conducted a systematic and quantitative analysis of SKI-1/S1P processing of peptides derived from the recognition sites of GPCs of different Old World and New World arenaviruses. We found that SKI-1/S1P showed a strong preference for arenaviral sequences resembling its autoprocessing sites, which are recurrent motifs in arenaviral GPCs. The African arenaviruses Lassa, Mobala, and Mopeia resemble the SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing C-site, whereas sequences derived from Clade B New World viruses Junin and Tacaribe have similarities to the autoprocessing B-site. In contrast, analogous peptides derived from cellular SKI-1/S1P substrates were remarkably poor substrates. The data suggest that arenavirus GPCs evolved to mimic SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing sites, likely ensuring efficient cleavage and perhaps avoiding competition with SKI-1/S1P's cellular substrates.

  13. Dissection of the role of the stable signal peptide of the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Messina, Emily L; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H

    2012-06-01

    The arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) retains a stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential subunit in the mature complex. The 58-amino-acid residue SSP comprises two membrane-spanning hydrophobic regions separated by a short ectodomain loop that interacts with the G2 fusion subunit to promote pH-dependent membrane fusion. Small-molecule compounds that target this unique SSP-G2 interaction prevent arenavirus entry and infection. The interaction between SSP and G2 is sensitive to the phylogenetic distance between New World (Junín) and Old World (Lassa) arenaviruses. For example, heterotypic GPC complexes are unable to support virion entry. In this report, we demonstrate that the hybrid GPC complexes are properly assembled, proteolytically cleaved, and transported to the cell surface but are specifically defective in their membrane fusion activity. Chimeric SSP constructs reveal that this incompatibility is localized to the first transmembrane segment of SSP (TM1). Genetic changes in TM1 also affect sensitivity to small-molecule fusion inhibitors, generating resistance in some cases and inhibitor dependence in others. Our studies suggest that interactions of SSP TM1 with the transmembrane domain of G2 may be important for GPC-mediated membrane fusion and its inhibition.

  14. Modulation of the effector function of human monocytes for Mycobacterium avium by human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, H; Johnson, J L; Toossi, Z; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS is associated with high tissue burdens (10(9)-10(10) mycobacteria/g tissue) of organism. The basis for the extraordinary susceptibility of AIDS to M. avium infection is unclear. HIV or its constituents may alter mononuclear phagocyte functions resulting in enhanced intracellular M. avium growth. The effects of an envelope glycoprotein (gp120), a transmembrane protein (p121), and core proteins of HIV-1 on M. avium infection of human monocytes were examined. Preculturing monocytes with gp120 inhibited M. avium phagocytosis and consistently enhanced intracellular growth of six M. avium strains. Pretreatment with p121, gag5, or p24 did not inhibit phagocytosis nor enhance intracellular growth of M. avium. Incubation of gp120 with soluble CD4 before addition to monocyte cultures or pretreatment of monocytes with OKT4A abrogated gp120 effects on M. avium phagocytosis and intracellular growth. gp120 also augmented cytokine production by infected monocytes. These results suggest that gp120, but not p121 or core proteins, modulate monocyte phagocytosis and enhance intracellular growth of M. avium at least in part through monocyte CD4 receptors. Direct effects of HIV-1 products may, therefore, contribute to the diathesis of AIDS to develop disseminated M. avium infection and to the extensive replication of the organisms within tissue macrophages. Images PMID:8113420

  15. Lack of complex N-glycans on HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins preserves protein conformation and entry function.

    PubMed

    Eggink, Dirk; Melchers, Mark; Wuhrer, Manfred; van Montfort, Thijs; Dey, Antu K; Naaijkens, Benno A; David, Kathryn B; Le Douce, Valentin; Deelder, André M; Kang, Kenneth; Olson, William C; Berkhout, Ben; Hokke, Cornelis H; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-06-05

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) is the focus of vaccine development aimed at eliciting humoral immunity. Env's extensive and heterogeneous N-linked glycosylation affects folding, binding to lectin receptors, antigenicity and immunogenicity. We characterized recombinant Env proteins and virus particles produced in mammalian cells that lack N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnTI), an enzyme necessary for the conversion of oligomannose N-glycans to complex N-glycans. Carbohydrate analyses revealed that trimeric Env produced in GnTI(-/-) cells contained exclusively oligomannose N-glycans, with incompletely trimmed oligomannose glycans predominating. The folding and conformation of Env proteins was little affected by the manipulation of the glycosylation. Viruses produced in GnTI(-/-) cells were infectious, indicating that the conversion to complex glycans is not necessary for Env entry function, although virus binding to the C-type lectin DC-SIGN was enhanced. Manipulating Env's N-glycosylation may be useful for structural and functional studies and for vaccine design.

  16. Release of gp120 Restraints Leads to an Entry-Competent Intermediate State of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaochu; Gu, Christopher; Ventura, John D.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Melillo, Bruno; Terry, Daniel S.; Smith, Amos B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Munro, James B.; Mothes, Walther; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers [(gp120/gp41)3] typically exist in a metastable closed conformation (state 1). Binding the CD4 receptor triggers Env to undergo extensive conformational changes to mediate virus entry. We identified specific gp120 residues that restrain Env in state 1. Alteration of these restraining residues destabilized state 1, allowing Env to populate a functional conformation (state 2) intermediate between state 1 and the full CD4-bound state (state 3). Increased state 2 occupancy was associated with lower energy barriers between the states. State 2 was an obligate intermediate for all transitions between state 1 and state 3. State 2-enriched Envs required lower CD4 concentrations to trigger virus entry and more efficiently infected cells expressing low levels of CD4. These Envs were resistant to several broadly neutralizing antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors. Thus, state 2 is an Env conformation on the virus entry pathway; sampling state 2 increases the adaptability of HIV-1 to different host cell receptor levels and immune environments. Our results provide new insights into the conformational regulation of HIV-1 entry. PMID:27795397

  17. Recognition of helper T cell epitopes in envelope (E) glycoprotein of Japanese encephalitis, west Nile and Dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Kutubuddin, M; Kolaskar, A S; Galande, S; Gore, M M; Ghosh, S N; Banerjee, K

    1991-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell antigenic sites were predicted from the primary amino acid sequence (approximately 500 in length) of the envelope (E) glycoprotein (gp) of Japanese encephalitis (JE), West Nile (WN) and Dengue (DEN) I-IV flaviviruses. Prediction of Th epitopes was done by analyzing the occurrence of amphipathic segments, Rothbard-Taylor tetra/pentamer motifs and presence of alpha helix-preferring amino acids. The simultaneous occurrence of all these parameters in segments of E gp were used as criteria for prediction as Th epitopes. Only one cross reactive epitope was predicted in the C-terminal region of the E gp predicted segments of all flaviviruses analyzed. This region is one of the longest amphipathic stretch (approximately from 420 to 455) and also has a fairly large amphipathic score. Based on the predicted findings three selected peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to induce in vitro T cell proliferative response in different inbred strains of mice (Balb/c, C57BL6, C3H/HeJ). Synthetic peptide I and II prepared from C-terminal region gave a cross reactive response to JE, WN and Den-II in Balb/c and C3H/HeJ mice. Synthetic peptide III prepared from N-terminal region gave a proliferative response to DEN-II in Balb/c strain only, indicating differential antigen presentation.

  18. Generation and evaluation of avian leukosis virus subgroup J envelope glycoprotein recombinant pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Cui, Lina; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhikun; Cui, Zhizhong; Chang, Weishan

    2014-06-01

    Retroviral and lentiviral vector pseudotypes (based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1, HIV-1) have been used for stable and safe gene transfer because of their broad host ranges and high mechanical strength. In the present study, a recombinant avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) polypeptide pseudotyped with lentivirus membrane glycoproteins gp85 and gp37, HIV/env-ALV, was generated, characterized in vitro and evaluated for its ability to infect natural host cells. We optimized the newly developed micro-neutralization (MN) assay using recombinant pseudovirion HIV/env-ALV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein and well-characterized sera from chickens with confirmed ALV-J disease or virus-free controls. HIV/env-ALV could infect CEF and DF-1 but not pk15, 293FT, MDCK or VERO E6 cells, therefore demonstrating a cellular tropism similar to the wild-type ALV-J. The MN assay indicated that the IC50 values of positive sera offered a considerable advantage in both speed and accuracy. These results suggest that this pseudotyped lentivirus is a good model for studying the functions of ALV-J env and that the MN assay is a reliable serological method for assessing antibody levels in investigating the actual status of the current ALV-J epidemic. These recombinant pseudovirions may prove to be useful for studying ALV-J biology in lower biosafety level laboratory environments, and also for the detection and quantification of neutralizing antibodies to ALV-J in a manner akin to ELISA assays, but that would also be applicable to other viruses.

  19. Stability, orientation and position preference of the stem region (residues 689-703) in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Jusoh, Siti Azma

    2013-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) play an important role in the virus assembly and initial entry into host cells. Conserved charged residues of the E2 transmembrane (TM) domain were shown to be responsible for the heterodimerization with envelope glycoprotein E1. Despite intensive research on both envelope glycoproteins, the structural information is still not fully understood. Recent findings have revealed that the stem (ST) region of E2 also functions in the initial stage of the viral life cycle. We have previously shown the effect of the conserved charged residues on the TM helix monomer of E2. Here, we extended the model of the TM domain by adding the adjacent ST segment. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations were performed for the E2 amphiphilic segment of the ST region connected to the putative TM domain (residues 683-746). Structural conformation and behavior are studied and compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-derived segment of E2 ( 2KQZ.pdb). We observed that the central helix of the ST region (residues 689 - 703) remained stable as a helix in-plane to the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, the TM domain appeared to provide minimal contribution to the structural stability of the amphipathic region. This study also provides insight into the orientation and positional preferences of the ST segment with respect to the membrane lipid-water interface. PMID:24555044

  20. Antibodies against the Envelope Glycoprotein Promote Infectivity of Immature Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Voorham, Júlia M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Ayala Nuñez, Nilda Vanesa; Colpitts, Tonya M.; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Fikrig, Erol; Diamond, Michael S.; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV) antibodies directed against the envelope (E) and precursor membrane (prM) proteins are believed to contribute to the development of severe dengue disease by facilitating antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. We and others recently demonstrated that anti-prM antibodies render essentially non-infectious immature DENV infectious in Fcγ-receptor-expressing cells. Immature DENV particles are abundantly present in standard (st) virus preparations due to inefficient processing of prM to M during virus maturation. Structural analysis has revealed that the E protein is exposed in immature particles and this prompted us to investigate whether antibodies to E render immature particles infectious. To this end, we analyzed the enhancing properties of 27 anti-E antibodies directed against distinct structural domains. Of these, 23 bound to immature particles, and 15 enhanced infectivity of immature DENV in a furin-dependent manner. The significance of these findings was subsequently tested in vivo using the well-established West Nile virus (WNV) mouse model. Remarkably, mice injected with immature WNV opsonized with anti-E mAbs or immune serum produced a lethal infection in a dose-dependent manner, whereas in the absence of antibody immature WNV virions caused no morbidity or mortality. Furthermore, enhancement infection studies with standard (st) DENV preparations opsonized with anti-E mAbs in the presence or absence of furin inhibitor revealed that prM-containing particles present within st virus preparations contribute to antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. Taken together, our results support the notion that antibodies against the structural proteins prM and E both can promote pathogenesis by enhancing infectivity of prM-containing immature and partially mature flavivirus particles. PMID:22431958

  1. Participation of the 39-kDa glycoprotein (gp39) of the vitelline envelope of Bufo arenarum eggs in sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Daniel; Llanos, Ricardo J; Miceli, Dora C

    2012-05-01

    The acquisition of egg fertilizability in Bufo arenarum takes place during the oviductal transit and during this process the extracellular coelomic envelope (CE) of the eggs is converted into the vitelline envelope (VE). It has been stated that one of the necessary events leading to a fertilizable state is the proteolytic cleavage of CE glycoproteins in the oviductal pars recta by oviductin, a serine protease. Consequently, there is a marked increase in the relative quantity of glycoproteins with 39 (gp39) and 42 kDa (gp42) in the VE. In the present study, sperm-VE binding assays using heat-solubilized biotin-conjugated VE glycoproteins revealed that both gp39 and gp42 have sperm binding capacity. According to this result, our study was focused on gp39, a glycoprotein that we have previously reported as a homologue of mammalian ZPC. For this purpose, rabbit polyclonal antibodies against gp39 were generated at our laboratory. The specificity of the antibodies was confirmed with western blot of VE glycoproteins separated on SDS-PAGE. Immunohistochemical and immunoelectron studies showed gp39 distributed throughout the width of the VE. In addition, immunofluorescence assays probed that gp39 bound to the sperm head. Finally, as an approach to elucidate the possible involvement of gp39 in fertilization, inhibition assays showed that pretreatment of eggs with antibodies against gp39 generated a significant decrease in the fertilization rate. Therefore, our findings suggest that gp39, which is modified by oviductal action, participates as a VE glycoprotein ligand for sperm in Bufo arenarum fertilization.

  2. HIV-1 tropism for the central nervous system: Brain-derived envelope glycoproteins with lower CD4 dependence and reduced sensitivity to a fusion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Garcia, Julio . E-mail: julio.martin-garcia@drexelmed.edu; Cao, Wei; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2006-03-01

    We previously described envelope glycoproteins of an HIV-1 isolate adapted in vitro for growth in microglia that acquired a highly fusogenic phenotype and lower CD4 dependence, as well as resistance to inhibition by anti-CD4 antibodies. Here, we investigated whether similar phenotypic changes are present in vivo. Envelope clones from the brain and spleen of an HIV-1-infected individual with neurological disease were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated clustering of sequences according to the tissue of origin, as expected. Functional clones were then used in cell-to-cell fusion assays to test for CD4 and co-receptor utilization and for sensitivity to various antibodies and inhibitors. Both brain- and spleen-derived envelope clones mediated fusion in cells expressing both CD4 and CCR5 and brain envelopes also used CCR3 as co-receptor. We found that the brain envelopes had a lower CD4 dependence, since they efficiently mediated fusion in the presence of low levels of CD4 on the target cell membrane, and they were significantly more resistant to blocking by anti-CD4 antibodies than the spleen-derived envelopes. In contrast, we observed no difference in sensitivity to the CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. However, brain-derived envelopes were significantly more resistant than those from spleen to the fusion inhibitor T-1249 and concurrently showed slightly greater fusogenicity. Our results suggest an increased affinity for CD4 of brain-derived envelopes that may have originated from in vivo adaptation to replication in microglial cells. Interestingly, we note the presence of envelopes more resistant to a fusion inhibitor in the brain of an untreated, HIV-1-infected individual.

  3. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gH function in fusion between the virion envelope and the outer nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Wisner, Todd W; Webb, Michael; Roller, Richard; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn; Johnson, David C

    2007-06-12

    Herpesviruses must traverse the nuclear envelope to gain access to the cytoplasm and, ultimately, to exit cells. It is believed that herpesvirus nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane (NM). To reach the cytoplasm these enveloped particles must fuse with the outer NM and the unenveloped capsids then acquire a second envelope in the trans-Golgi network. Little is known about the process by which herpesviruses virions fuse with the outer NM. Here we show that a herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant lacking both the two putative fusion glycoproteins gB and gH failed to cross the nuclear envelope. Enveloped virions accumulated in the perinuclear space or in membrane vesicles that bulged into the nucleoplasm (herniations). By contrast, mutants lacking just gB or gH showed only minor or no defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that either HSV gB or gH can promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. It is noteworthy that fusion associated with HSV entry requires the cooperative action of both gB and gH, suggesting that the two types of fusion (egress versus entry) are dissimilar processes.

  4. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; ...

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain;more » and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.« less

  5. Stabilizing Exposure of Conserved Epitopes by Structure Guided Insertion of Disulfide Bond in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Pampi; Labranche, Celia; Go, Eden P.; Clark, Daniel F.; Sun, Yide; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Desaire, Heather; Montefiori, David; Carfi, Andrea; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to cellular receptors and subsequent conformational changes that culminates in fusion of viral and target cell membranes. Recent structural information has revealed that these conformational transitions are regulated by three conserved but potentially flexible layers stacked between the receptor-binding domain (gp120) and the fusion arm (gp41) of Env. We hypothesized that artificial insertion of a covalent bond will ‘snap’ Env into a conformation that is less mobile and stably expose conserved sites. Therefore, we analyzed the interface between these gp120 layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) and identified residues that may form disulfide bonds when substituted with cysteines. We subsequently probed the structures of the resultant mutant gp120 proteins by assaying their binding to a variety of ligands using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assay. We found that a single disulfide bond strategically inserted between the highly conserved layers 1 and 2 (C65-C115) is able to ‘lock’ gp120 in a CD4 receptor bound conformation (in the absence of CD4), as indicated by the lower dissociation constant (Kd) for the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope binding 17b antibody. When disulfide-stabilized monomeric (gp120) and trimeric (gp140) Envs were used to immunize rabbits, they were found to elicit a higher proportion of antibodies directed against both CD4i and CD4 binding site epitopes than the wild-type proteins. These results demonstrate that structure-guided stabilization of inter-layer interactions within HIV-1 Env can be used to expose conserved epitopes and potentially overcome the sequence diversity of these molecules. PMID:24146829

  6. Molecular characterization of the processing of arenavirus envelope glycoprotein precursors by subtilisin kexin isozyme-1/site-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; Pasqual, Giulia; Rochat, Cylia; Seidah, Nabil G; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-05-01

    A crucial step in the life cycle of arenaviruses is the biosynthesis of the mature fusion-active viral envelope glycoprotein (GP) that is essential for virus-host cell attachment and entry. The maturation of the arenavirus GP precursor (GPC) critically depends on proteolytic processing by the cellular proprotein convertase (PC) subtilisin kexin isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/site-1 protease (S1P). Here we undertook a molecular characterization of the SKI-1/S1P processing of the GPCs of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the pathogenic Lassa virus (LASV). Previous studies showed that the GPC of LASV undergoes processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/cis-Golgi compartment, whereas the LCMV GPC is cleaved in a late Golgi compartment. Herein we confirm these findings and provide evidence that the SKI-1/S1P recognition site RRLL, present in the SKI-1/S1P prodomain and LASV GPC, but not in the LCMV GPC, is crucial for the processing of the LASV GPC in the ER/cis-Golgi compartment. Our structure-function analysis revealed that the cleavage of arenavirus GPCs, but not cellular substrates, critically depends on the autoprocessing of SKI-1/S1P, suggesting differences in the processing of cellular and viral substrates. Deletion mutagenesis showed that the transmembrane and intracellular domains of SKI-1/S1P are dispensable for arenavirus GPC processing. The expression of a soluble form of the protease in SKI-I/S1P-deficient cells resulted in the efficient processing of arenavirus GPCs and rescued productive virus infection. However, exogenous soluble SKI-1/S1P was unable to process LCMV and LASV GPCs displayed at the surface of SKI-I/S1P-deficient cells, indicating that GPC processing occurs in an intracellular compartment. In sum, our study reveals important differences in the SKI-1/S1P processing of viral and cellular substrates.

  7. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Lewis, George K.

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain; and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.

  8. Stabilized HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers lacking the V1V2 domain, obtained by virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Bontjer, Ilja; Melchers, Mark; Eggink, Dirk; David, Kathryn; Moore, John P; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W

    2010-11-19

    The envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the focus of HIV-1 vaccine development strategies based on the induction of humoral immunity, but the mechanisms the virus has evolved to limit the induction and binding of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) constitute substantial obstacles. Conserved neutralization epitopes are shielded by variable regions and carbohydrates, so one strategy to increase their exposure and, it is hoped, their immunogenicity is to delete the overlying variable loops. However, deleting the variable regions from Env trimers can be problematic, because hydrophobic patches that are normally solvent-inaccessible now become exposed, causing protein misfolding or aggregation, for example. Here, we describe the construction and characterization of recombinant gp140 trimers lacking variable domains 1 and 2 (ΔV1V2). The design of the trimers was guided by HIV-1 evolution studies that identified compensatory changes in V1V2-deleted but functional Env proteins (Bontjer, I., Land, A., Eggink, D., Verkade, E., Tuin, K., Baldwin, C., Pollakis, G., Paxton, W. A., Braakman, I., Berkhout, B., and Sanders, R. W. (2009) J. Virol. 83, 368-383). We now show that specific compensatory changes improved the function of ΔV1V2 Env proteins and hence HIV-1 replication. The changes acted by reducing the exposure of a hydrophobic surface either by replacing a hydrophobic residue with a hydrophilic one or by covering the surface with a glycan. The compensatory changes allowed the efficient expression of well folded, soluble gp140 trimers derived from various HIV-1 isolates. The evolved ΔV1V2 Env viruses were extremely sensitive to NAbs, indicating that neutralization epitopes are well exposed, which was confirmed by studies of NAb binding to the soluble ΔV1V2 gp140 trimers. These evolved ΔV1V2 trimers could be useful reagents for immunogenicity and structural studies.

  9. Stabilized HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers Lacking the V1V2 Domain, Obtained by Virus Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Bontjer, Ilja; Melchers, Mark; Eggink, Dirk; David, Kathryn; Moore, John P.; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins (Env) are the focus of HIV-1 vaccine development strategies based on the induction of humoral immunity, but the mechanisms the virus has evolved to limit the induction and binding of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) constitute substantial obstacles. Conserved neutralization epitopes are shielded by variable regions and carbohydrates, so one strategy to increase their exposure and, it is hoped, their immunogenicity is to delete the overlying variable loops. However, deleting the variable regions from Env trimers can be problematic, because hydrophobic patches that are normally solvent-inaccessible now become exposed, causing protein misfolding or aggregation, for example. Here, we describe the construction and characterization of recombinant gp140 trimers lacking variable domains 1 and 2 (ΔV1V2). The design of the trimers was guided by HIV-1 evolution studies that identified compensatory changes in V1V2-deleted but functional Env proteins (Bontjer, I., Land, A., Eggink, D., Verkade, E., Tuin, K., Baldwin, C., Pollakis, G., Paxton, W. A., Braakman, I., Berkhout, B., and Sanders, R. W. (2009) J. Virol. 83, 368–383). We now show that specific compensatory changes improved the function of ΔV1V2 Env proteins and hence HIV-1 replication. The changes acted by reducing the exposure of a hydrophobic surface either by replacing a hydrophobic residue with a hydrophilic one or by covering the surface with a glycan. The compensatory changes allowed the efficient expression of well folded, soluble gp140 trimers derived from various HIV-1 isolates. The evolved ΔV1V2 Env viruses were extremely sensitive to NAbs, indicating that neutralization epitopes are well exposed, which was confirmed by studies of NAb binding to the soluble ΔV1V2 gp140 trimers. These evolved ΔV1V2 trimers could be useful reagents for immunogenicity and structural studies. PMID:20826824

  10. Functional stability of unliganded envelope glycoprotein spikes among isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nitish; Leaman, Daniel P; Rowcliffe, Eric; Kinkead, Heather; Nohria, Raman; Akagi, Junya; Bauer, Katherine; Du, Sean X; Whalen, Robert G; Burton, Dennis R; Zwick, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike is challenging to study at the molecular level, due in part to its genetic variability, structural heterogeneity and lability. However, the extent of lability in Env function, particularly for primary isolates across clades, has not been explored. Here, we probe stability of function for variant Envs of a range of isolates from chronic and acute infection, and from clades A, B and C, all on a constant virus backbone. Stability is elucidated in terms of the sensitivity of isolate infectivity to destabilizing conditions. A heat-gradient assay was used to determine T(90) values, the temperature at which HIV-1 infectivity is decreased by 90% in 1 h, which ranged between ∼40 to 49°C (n = 34). For select Envs (n = 10), the half-lives of infectivity decay at 37°C were also determined and these correlated significantly with the T(90) (p = 0.029), though two 'outliers' were identified. Specificity in functional Env stability was also evident. For example, Env variant HIV-1(ADA) was found to be labile to heat, 37°C decay, and guanidinium hydrochloride but not to urea or extremes of pH, when compared to its thermostable counterpart, HIV-1(JR-CSF). Blue native PAGE analyses revealed that Env-dependent viral inactivation preceded complete dissociation of Env trimers. The viral membrane and membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 were also shown to be important for maintaining trimer stability at physiological temperature. Overall, our results indicate that primary HIV-1 Envs can have diverse sensitivities to functional inactivation in vitro, including at physiological temperature, and suggest that parameters of functional Env stability may be helpful in the study and optimization of native Env mimetics and vaccines.

  11. Recombinant subviral particles from tick-borne encephalitis virus are fusogenic and provide a model system for studying flavivirus envelope glycoprotein functions.

    PubMed Central

    Schalich, J; Allison, S L; Stiasny, K; Mandl, C W; Kunz, C; Heinz, F X

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant subviral particles (RSPs) obtained by coexpression of the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of tick-borne encephalitis virus in COS cells (S. L. Allison, K. Stadler, C. W. Mandl, C. Kunz, and F. X. Heinz, J. Virol. 69:5816-5820, 1995) were extensively characterized and shown to be ordered structures containing envelope glycoproteins with structural and functional properties very similar to those in the virion envelope. The particles were spherical, with a diameter of about 30 nm and a buoyant density of 1.14 g/cm3 in sucrose gradients. They contained mature E proteins with endoglycosidase H-resistant glycans as well as fully cleaved mature M proteins. Cleavage of prM, which requires an acidic pH in exocytic compartments, could be inhibited by treatment of transfected cells with ammonium chloride, implying a common maturation pathway for RSPs and virions. RSPs incorporated [14C]choline but not [3H]uridine, demonstrating that they contain lipid but probably lack nucleic acid. The envelope proteins of RSPs exhibited a native antigenic and oligomeric structure compared with virions, and incubation at an acidic pH (pH <6.5) induced identical conformational changes and structural rearrangements, including an irreversible quantitative conversion of dimers to trimers. The RSPs were also shown to be functionally active, inducing membrane fusion in a low-pH-dependent manner and demonstrating the same specific hemagglutination activity as whole virions. Tick-borne encephalitis virus RSPs thus represent an excellent model system for investigating the structural basis of viral envelope glycoprotein functions. PMID:8676481

  12. Analysis of P-glycoprotein expression in purified parasite plasma membrane and food vacuole from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Laurence M; Lindt, Meinrad; Collins, Malcolm; Smith, Peter J

    2006-11-01

    A P-glycoprotein homologue (Pgh1) is believed to play a role in modulating levels of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. To study the role of Pgh1 in the mechanism of chloroquine (CQ) resistance, antisera were raised against this protein. There was no direct association between the level of Pgh1 expression and chloroquine sensitivity. We also failed to detect phosphorylation of Pgh1 in the food vacuole (FV), suggesting that other mechanisms regulate the chloroquine-resistant (CQR) phenotype. Therefore, high levels of expression of Pgh1 or phosphorylation of this protein in the FV could not account for CQ sensitivity. In addition, the lack of inhibition of CQ accumulation by anti-Pgh1 antibodies suggests that Pgh1 is not involved as a CQ transporter in the plasma membrane of P. falciparum. Furthermore, resistance reversers do not appear to act at the plasma membrane level.

  13. Antigenic Properties of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Gp120 on Virions Bound to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Ray, Krishanu; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, undergoes multiple molecular interactions and structural rearrangements during the course of host cell attachment and viral entry, which are being increasingly defined at the atomic level using isolated proteins. In comparison, antigenic markers of these dynamic changes are essentially unknown for single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Such markers should indicate how neutralizing and/or non-neutralizing antibodies might interdict infection by either blocking infection or sensitizing host cells for elimination by Fc-mediated effector function. Here we address this deficit by imaging fluorescently labeled CCR5-tropic HIV-1 pseudoviruses using confocal and superresolution microscopy to track the exposure of neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes as they appear on single HIV-1 particles bound to target cells. Epitope exposure was followed under conditions permissive or non-permissive for viral entry to delimit changes associated with virion binding from those associated with post-attachment events. We find that a previously unexpected array of gp120 epitopes is exposed rapidly upon target cell binding. This array comprises both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, the latter being hidden on free virions yet capable of serving as potent targets for Fc-mediated effector function. Under non-permissive conditions for viral entry, both neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitope exposures were relatively static over time for the majority of bound virions. Under entry-permissive conditions, epitope exposure patterns changed over time on subsets of virions that exhibited concurrent variations in virion contents. These studies reveal that bound virions are distinguished by a broad array of both neutralizing and non-neutralizing gp120 epitopes that potentially sensitize a freshly engaged target cell for destruction by Fc-mediated effector function and/or for direct neutralization at a post-binding step. The elucidation of

  14. Optimized and enhanced DNA plasmid vector based in vivo construction of a neutralizing anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein Fab.

    PubMed

    Muthumani, Kar; Flingai, Seleeke; Wise, Megan; Tingey, Colleen; Ugen, Kenneth E; Weiner, David B

    2013-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody preparations have demonstrated considerable clinical utility in the treatment of specific malignancies, as well as inflammatory and infectious diseases. Antibodies are conventionally delivered by passive administration, typically requiring costly large-scale laboratory development and production. Additional limitations include the necessity for repeat administrations, and the length of in vivo potency. Therefore, the development of methods to generate therapeutic antibodies and antibody like molecules in vivo, distinct from an active antigen-based immunization strategy, would have considerable clinical utility. In fact, adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated delivery of immunoglobulin genes with subsequent generation of functional antibodies has recently been developed. As well, anon-viral vector mediated nucleic acid based delivery technology could permit the generation of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies in vivo, obviating potential safety issues associated with viral vector based gene delivery. This delivery strategy has limitations as well, mainly due to very low in vivo production and expression of protein from the delivered gene. In the study reported here we have constructed an "enhanced and optimized" DNA plasmid technology to generate immunoglobulin heavy and light chains (i.e., Fab fragments) from an established neutralizing anti-HIV envelope glycoprotein monoclonal antibody (VRC01). This "enhanced" DNA (E-DNA) plasmid technology includes codon/RNA optimization, leader sequence utilization, as well as targeted potentiation of delivery and expression of the Fab immunoglobulin genes through use of "adaptive" in vivo electroporation. The results demonstrate that delivery by this method of a single administration of the optimized Fab expressing constructs resulted in generation of Fab molecules in mouse sera possessing high antigen specific binding and HIV neutralization activity for at least 7 d after injection, against diverse

  15. Learning the Relationship between the Primary Structure of HIV Envelope Glycoproteins and Neutralization Activity of Particular Antibodies by Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Buiu, Cătălin; Putz, Mihai V.; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    The dependency between the primary structure of HIV envelope glycoproteins (ENV) and the neutralization data for given antibodies is very complicated and depends on a large number of factors, such as the binding affinity of a given antibody for a given ENV protein, and the intrinsic infection kinetics of the viral strain. This paper presents a first approach to learning these dependencies using an artificial feedforward neural network which is trained to learn from experimental data. The results presented here demonstrate that the trained neural network is able to generalize on new viral strains and to predict reliable values of neutralizing activities of given antibodies against HIV-1. PMID:27727189

  16. Soluble Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers from a CD4-Independent HIV-1 Elicit Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Marta K.; Teran, Victor A.; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Wang, Baomin; Kim, Su Hyon; LaBranche, Celia C.; Richard, Jonathan; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    CD4-independent HIV-1 variants can infect coreceptor-expressing cells lacking CD4. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins on these HIV-1 variants expose a coreceptor binding site that overlaps some CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes. Reports have demonstrated that CD4i antibodies mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Here we investigated the immunogenicity of soluble Env trimers (sgp140) from a CD4-independent HIV-1 in guinea pigs and found that the sgp140 elicited ADCC-mediating antibodies. Therefore, these sgp140 might be useful in vaccine regimens aimed at eliciting ADCC responses. PMID:26246571

  17. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity.

  18. Interactions of the Cytoplasmic Domains of Human and Simian Retroviral Transmembrane Proteins with Components of the Clathrin Adaptor Complexes Modulate Intracellular and Cell Surface Expression of Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Erdtmann, Lars; Delamarre, Lelia; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Sonigo, Pierre; Dokhelar, Marie Christine; Benarous, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domains of the transmembrane (TM) envelope proteins (TM-CDs) of most retroviruses have a Tyr-based motif, YXXØ, in their membrane-proximal regions. This signal is involved in the trafficking and endocytosis of membrane receptors via clathrin-associated AP-1 and AP-2 adaptor complexes. We have used CD8-TM-CD chimeras to investigate the role of the Tyr-based motif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM-CDs in the cell surface expression of the envelope glycoprotein. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies showed that this motif is a major determinant of the cell surface expression of the CD8-HTLV chimera. The YXXØ motif also plays a key role in subcellular distribution of the envelope of lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, these viruses, which encode TM proteins with a long cytoplasmic domain, have additional determinants distal to the YXXØ motif that participate in regulating cell surface expression. We have also used the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro binding assays to demonstrate that all three retroviral YXXØ motifs interact with the μ1 and μ2 subunits of AP complexes and that the C-terminal regions of HIV-1 and SIV TM proteins interact with the β2 adaptin subunit. The TM-CDs of HTLV-1, HIV-1, and SIV also interact with the whole AP complexes. These results clearly demonstrate that the cell surface expression of retroviral envelope glycoproteins is governed by interactions with adaptor complexes. The YXXØ-based signal is the major determinant of this interaction for the HTLV-1 TM, which contains a short cytoplasmic domain, whereas the lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV have additional determinants distal to this signal that are also involved. PMID:9882340

  19. Cross-protection against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mediated by a CD4+ T-cell clone specific for an envelope glycoprotein epitope of Lassa virus.

    PubMed Central

    La Posta, V J; Auperin, D D; Kamin-Lewis, R; Cole, G A

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the Lassa virus (LV) envelope glycoprotein precursor, V-LSGPC, was used to study the basis of LV-induced cross-protective immunity against the closely related arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). C3H/HeJ mice primed with V-LSGPC developed neither circulating antibodies nor CD8+ cytotoxic T cells specific for LCMV, yet they resisted a normally lethal LCMV challenge. Spleen cells from such mice gave a proliferative response to LCMV in vitro that was inhibitable by anti-CD4 antibody. Synthetic peptides corresponding to predicted T-cell sites common to the envelope glycoprotein precursor (GP-C) of LV and that of LCMV were used to map the specificity of the proliferative response to an epitope located between amino acids 403 and 417 of LV GP-C. Several CD4+ T-cell clones specific for the 403-417 peptide were isolated and found to produce gamma interferon in response to both the peptide and LCMV. One of these clones, C9, was selected for further study. C9 lysed I-AK-bearing target cells, and when adoptively transferred to C3H/HeJ mice, it was capable of mediating both a peptide-specific delayed hypersensitivity reaction and resistance to lethal LCMV challenge. These collective findings demonstrate, for the first time, that CD4+ T cells can play a major role in arenavirus-specific cross-protective immunity. PMID:7684468

  20. Binding of soluble CD4 proteins to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and infected cells induces release of envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, T K; Kirsh, R; Ellens, H; Sweet, R W; Lambert, D M; Petteway, S R; Leary, J; Bugelski, P J

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects cells after binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell surface recognition marker CD4. gp120 is noncovalently associated with the HIV transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41, and this complex is believed responsible for the initial stages of HIV infection and cytopathic events in infected cells. Soluble constructs of CD4 that contain the gp120 binding site inhibit HIV infection in vitro. This is believed to occur by competitive inhibition of viral binding to cellular CD4. Here we suggest an alternative mechanism of viral inhibition by soluble CD4 proteins. We demonstrate biochemically and morphologically that following binding, the soluble CD4 proteins sT4, V1V2,DT, and V1[106] (amino acids 1-369, 1-183, and -2 to 106 of mature CD4) induced the release of gp120 from HIV-1 and HIV-1-infected cells. gp120 release was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. The reaction was biphasic at 37 degrees C and did not take place at 4 degrees C, indicating that binding of soluble CD4 was not sufficient to release gp120. The appearance of free gp120 in the medium after incubation with sT4 correlated with a decrease in envelope glycoprotein spikes on virions and exposure of a previously cryptic epitope near the amino terminus of gp41 on virions and infected cells. The concentration of soluble CD4 proteins needed to induce the release of gp120 from virally infected cells also correlated with those required to inhibit HIV-mediated syncytium formation. These results suggest that soluble CD4 constructs may inactivate HIV by inducing the release of gp120. We propose that HIV envelope-mediated fusion is initiated following rearrangement and/or dissociation of gp120 from the gp120-gp41 complex upon binding to cellular CD4, thus exposing the fusion domain of gp41. Images PMID:2006155

  1. Effect of partial and complete variable loop deletions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein on the breadth of gp160-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Gzyl, Jaroslaw; Bolesta, Elizabeth; Wierzbicki, Andrew; Kmieciak, Dariusz; Naito, Toshio; Honda, Mitsuo; Komuro, Katsutoshi; Kaneko, Yutaro; Kozbor, Danuta

    2004-01-20

    Induction of cross-reactive cellular and humoral responses to the HIV-1 envelope (env) glycoprotein was examined after DNA immunization of BALB/c mice with gp140(89.6)-derived constructs exhibiting partial or complete deletions of the V1, V2, and V3 domains. It was demonstrated that specific modification of the V3 loop (mV3) in combination with the V2-modified (mV2) or V1/V2-deleted (DeltaV1/V2) region elicited increased levels of cross-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses. Mice immunized with the mV2/mV3 or DeltaV1/V2/mV3 gp140(89.6) plasmid DNA were greater than 50-fold more resistant to challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing heterologous env gene products than animals immunized with the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Sera from mV2/mV3- and DeltaV1/V2/mV3-immunized mice exhibited the highest cross-neutralizing activity and displayed intermediate antibody avidity values which were further enhanced by challenge with rVV expressing the homologous gp160 glycoprotein. In contrast, complete deletion of the variable regions had little or no effect on the cross-reactive antibody responses. The results of these experiments indicate that the breadth of antibody responses to the HIV-1 env glycoprotein may not be increased by removal of the variable domains. Instead, partial deletions within these regions may redirect specific responses toward conserved epitopes and facilitate approaches for boosting cross-reactive cellular and antibody responses to the env glycoprotein.

  2. Isolation and characterization of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein specific B cell from immortalized human naïve B cell library.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehua; Lu, Shiqiang; Yang, Zheng; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Meiyun

    2017-01-10

    With the recent development of single B cell cloning techniques, an increasing number of HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have been isolated since 2009. However, knowledge regarding HIV-1-specific B cells in vivo is limited. In this study, an HIV-1-specific B cell line has been established using healthy PBMC donors by the highly efficient EBV transformation method to generate immortalized human naïve B cell libraries. The enrichment of HIV-1 envelope-specific B cells was observed after four rounds of cell panning with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. An HIV-1 envelope-specific stable B cell line (LCL-P4) was generated. Although this cell line acquired a lymphoblastic phenotype, no expression was observed for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), an enzyme responsible for initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in B cells. This study describes a method that enables fast isolation of HIV-1-specific B cells, and this approach may extend to isolating other B cell-specific antigens for further experiments.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL37 Protein Tyrosine Residues Conserved among All Alphaherpesviruses Are Required for Interactions with Glycoprotein K, Cytoplasmic Virion Envelopment, and Infectious Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Chouljenko, Dmitry V.; Jambunathan, Nithya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Naderi, Misagh; Brylinski, Michal; Caskey, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL37 protein functions in virion envelopment at trans-Golgi membranes, as well as in retrograde and anterograde transport of virion capsids. Recently, we reported that UL37 interacts with glycoprotein K (gK) and its interacting partner protein UL20 (N. Jambunathan, D. Chouljenko, P. Desai, A. S. Charles, R. Subramanian, V. N. Chouljenko, and K. G. Kousoulas, J Virol 88:5927–5935, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00278-14), facilitating cytoplasmic virion envelopment. Alignment of UL37 homologs encoded by alphaherpesviruses revealed the presence of highly conserved residues in the central portion of the UL37 protein. A cadre of nine UL37 site-specific mutations were produced and tested for their ability to inhibit virion envelopment and infectious virus production. Complementation analysis revealed that replacement of tyrosines 474 and 480 with alanine failed to complement the UL37-null virus, while all other mutated UL37 genes complemented the virus efficiently. The recombinant virus DC474-480 constructed with tyrosines 474, 476, 477, and 480 mutated to alanine residues produced a gK-null-like phenotype characterized by the production of very small plaques and accumulation of capsids in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Recombinant viruses having either tyrosine 476 or 477 replaced with alanine produced a wild-type phenotype. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that replacement of all four tyrosines with alanines substantially reduced the ability of gK to interact with UL37. Alignment of HSV UL37 with the human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus UL37 homologs revealed that Y480 was conserved only for alphaherpesviruses. Collectively, these results suggest that the UL37 conserved tyrosine 480 residue plays a crucial role in interactions with gK to facilitate cytoplasmic virion envelopment and infectious virus production. IMPORTANCE The HSV-1 UL37 protein is conserved among all herpesviruses, functions in both

  4. Carboxy-terminally truncated Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein expressed in Pichia pastoris induced neutralizing antibodies and resistance to Dengue 4 virus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Muné, M; Rodríguez, R; Ramírez, R; Soto, Y; Sierra, B; Rodríguez Roche, R; Marquez, G; Garcia, J; Guillén, G; Guzmán, M G

    2003-11-01

    We have expressed a recombinant Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein (E4rec), truncated at its C-terminus by 53 amino acids, in Pichia pastoris. The presence of E4rec was confirmed by Western-blot using anti-DEN 4 hyper immune mouse ascitic fluid. E4rec migrated during SDS-PAGE as a 64 kDa protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases showed that the E protein was modified by the addition of short mannose chains and the absence of hyperglycosylation. When administered to BALB-C mice, E4rec elicited a DEN 4 neutralizing antibody response haemagglutination inhibition antibodies and specific memory T cell response. Mice immunized were also significantly protected against lethal DEN 4 virus challenge (86.6%, p < 0.001).

  5. Evolution of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Genes and Neutralizing Antibody Response in an Individual with Broadly Cross Neutralizing Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-31

    not indicate positive selection for L 1 a and L2, consistent with possible low levels of replication of these strains. The eventual displacement of...and replication ...... ..... ... .... .... .... ........ ..... .. ........... .......... ..... ...... .. 24 Antigenic determinants of the envelope...progression of disease [21-23]. The more restricted replication in humans may also account for the more restricted spread of HIV -2, compared to HIV -1

  6. Truncation of the membrane-spanning domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein defines elements required for fusion, incorporation, and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ling; Shang, Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein from human (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency viruses plays a key role in anchoring the Env complex into the viral membrane but also contributes to its biological function in fusion and virus entry. In HIV type 1 (HIV-1), it has been predicted to span 27 amino acids, from lysine residue 681 to arginine 707, and encompasses an internal arginine at residue 694. By examining a series of C-terminal-truncation mutants of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein that substituted termination codons for amino acids 682 to 708, we show that this entire region is required for efficient viral infection of target cells. Truncation to the arginine at residue 694 resulted in an Env complex that was secreted from the cells. In contrast, a region from residues 681 to 698, which contains highly conserved hydrophobic residues and glycine motifs and extends 4 amino acids beyond 694R, can effectively anchor the protein in the membrane, allow efficient transport to the plasma membrane, and mediate wild-type levels of cell-cell fusion. However, these fusogenic truncated Env mutants are inefficiently incorporated into budding virions. Based on the analysis of these mutants, a "snorkeling" model, in which the flanking charged amino acid residues at 681 and 694 are buried in the lipid while their side chains interact with polar head groups, is proposed for the HIV-1 MSD.

  7. Specifically binding of L-ficolin to N-glycans of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 leads to complement activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Ali, Mohammed A M; Shi, Yinghua; Zhao, Yinglan; Luo, Fenglin; Yu, Jin; Xiang, Tian; Tang, Jie; Li, Dongqing; Hu, Quan; Ho, Wenzhe; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2009-08-01

    L-ficolin, one of lectin families, is a recently identified complement factor that initiates lectin pathway of complement. Little is known about its role in viral hepatitis. In the present study, we found that L-ficolin in serum from 103 patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV), were significantly higher than that in 150 healthy controls. We further found that L-ficolin expressions were significantly increased in vitro study by HCV JFH-1 infected human hepatocyte cell line Huh7.5.1. Investigation of the mechanisms of the L-ficolin action on HCV demonstrated that L-ficolin protein could recognize and bind to envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 of HCV, activating the lectin complement pathway-mediated cytolytic activity in HCV-infected hepatocyte. This interaction between L-ficolin and HCV E1 and E2 glycoproteins was attributed to the N-glycans of E1 and E2. These findings provide new insights into the biological functions of L-ficolin in clinically important hepatic viral diseases.

  8. Evaluating the Immunogenicity of a Disulfide-Stabilized, Cleaved, Trimeric Form of the Envelope Glycoprotein Complex of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Beddows, Simon; Schülke, Norbert; Kirschner, Marc; Barnes, Kelly; Franti, Michael; Michael, Elizabeth; Ketas, Thomas; Sanders, Rogier W.; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex comprises three gp120 exterior glycoproteins each noncovalently linked to a gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein. Monomeric gp120 proteins can elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing atypically sensitive test viruses in vitro, but these antibodies are ineffective against representative primary isolates and the gp120 vaccines failed to provide protection against HIV-1 transmission in vivo. Alternative approaches to raising neutralizing antibodies are therefore being pursued. Here we report on the antibody responses generated in rabbits against a soluble, cleaved, trimeric form of HIV-1JR-FL Env. In this construct, the gp120 and gp41 moieties are covalently linked by an intermolecular disulfide bond (SOS gp140), and an I559P substitution has been added to stabilize gp41-gp41 interactions (SOSIP gp140). We investigated the value of DNA priming and compared the use of membrane-bound and soluble priming antigens and of repeat boosting with soluble and particulate protein antigen. Compared to monomeric gp120, SOSIP gp140 trimers elicited approximately threefold lower titers of anti-gp120 antibodies. Priming with DNA encoding a membrane-bound form of the SOS gp140 protein, followed by several immunizations with soluble SOSIP gp140 trimers, resulted in antibodies capable of neutralizing sensitive strains at high titers. A subset of these sera also neutralized, at lower titers, HIV-1JR-FL and some other primary isolates in pseudovirus and/or whole-virus assays. Neutralization of these viruses was immunoglobulin mediated and was predominantly caused by antibodies to gp120 epitopes, but not the V3 region. PMID:15994775

  9. N-terminal substitutions in HIV-1 gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric envelope glycoproteins on the virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Antu K.; David, Kathryn B.; Ray, Neelanjana; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per J.; Doms, Robert W.; Moore, John P.

    2008-03-01

    The native, functional HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex is a trimer of two non-covalently associated subunits: the gp120 surface glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein. However, various non-functional forms of Env are present on virus particles and HIV-1-infected cells, some of which probably arise as the native complex decays. The aberrant forms include gp120-gp41 monomers and oligomers, as well as gp41 subunits from which gp120 has dissociated. The presence of non-functional Env creates binding sites for antibodies that do not recognize native Env complexes and that are, therefore, non-neutralizing. Non-native Env forms (monomers, dimers, tetramers and aggregates) can also arise when soluble gp140 proteins, lacking the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of gp41, are expressed for vaccine studies. We recently identified five amino acids in the gp41 N-terminal region (I535, Q543, S553, K567 and R588) that promote gp140 trimerization. We have now studied their influence on the function and antigenic properties of JR-FL Env expressed on the surfaces of pseudoviruses and Env-transfected cells. The 5 substitutions in gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric gp160s, without affecting trimer levels. Pseudovirions bearing the mutant Env are fully infectious with similar kinetics of Env-mediated fusion. Various non-neutralizing antibodies bind less strongly to the Env mutant, but neutralizing antibody binding is unaffected. Hence the gp41 substitutions do not adversely affect Env structure, supporting their use for making new Env-based vaccines. The mutant Env might also help in studies intended to correlate antibody binding to virus neutralization. Of note is that the 5 residues are much more frequent, individually or collectively, in viruses from subtypes other than B.

  10. Several N-Glycans on the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein gp120 Preferentially Locate Near Disulphide Bridges and Are Required for Efficient Infectivity and Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Mathys, Leen; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 contains nine disulphide bridges and is highly glycosylated, carrying on average 24 N-linked glycans. Using a probability calculation, we here demonstrate that there is a co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-linked glycans in HIV-1 gp120, with a predominance of N-linked glycans in close proximity to disulphide bridges, at the C-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Also, N-glycans are frequently found immediately adjacent to disulphide bridges in gp120 at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. In contrast, N-glycans at positions close to, but not immediately neighboring disulphide bridges seem to be disfavored at the N-terminal side of the involved cysteines. Such a pronounced co-localization of disulphide bridges and N-glycans was also found for the N-glycans on glycoprotein E1 of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) but not for other heavily glycosylated proteins such as E2 from HCV and the surface GP from Ebola virus. The potential functional role of the presence of N-glycans near disulphide bridges in HIV-1 gp120 was studied using site-directed mutagenesis, either by deleting conserved N-glycans or by inserting new N-glycosylation sites near disulphide bridges. The generated HIV-1NL4.3 mutants were subjected to an array of assays, determining the envelope glycoprotein levels in mutant viral particles, their infectivity and the capture and transmission efficiencies of mutant virus particles by DC-SIGN. Three N-glycans located nearby disulphide bridges were found to be crucial for the preservation of several of these functions of gp120. In addition, introduction of new N-glycans upstream of several disulphide bridges, at locations where there was a significant absence of N-glycans in a broad variety of virus strains, was found to result in a complete loss of viral infectivity. It was shown that the N-glycan environment around well-defined disulphide bridges of gp120 is highly critical to allow efficient viral infection

  11. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein, TSPO, Inhibits HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Biosynthesis via the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Protein Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Dang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein is folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is necessary for viral entry and replication. Currently, it is still unclear how this process is regulated. The glycoprotein folding in the ER is controlled by the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, which specifically targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Previously, we reported that HIV-1 replication is restricted in the human CD4+ T cell line CEM.NKR (NKR). To understand this mechanism, we first analyzed cellular protein expression in NKR cells and discovered that levels of the mitochondrial translocator protein TSPO were upregulated by ∼64-fold. Notably, when NKR cells were treated with TSPO antagonist PK-11195, Ro5-4864, or diazepam, HIV restriction was completely disrupted, and TSPO knockdown by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) achieved a similar effect. We next analyzed viral protein expression, and, interestingly, we discovered that Env expression was specifically inhibited. Both TSPO knockdown and treatment with TSPO antagonist could restore Env expression in NKR cells. We further discovered that Env proteins were rapidly degraded and that kifunensine, an ERAD pathway inhibitor, could restore Env expression and viral replication, indicating that Env proteins were misfolded and degraded through the ERAD pathway in NKR cells. We also knocked out the TSPO gene in 293T cells using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat [CRISPR]/CRISPR-associated-9) technology and found that TSPO could similarly inhibit Env expression in these cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TSPO inhibits Env protein expression through the ERAD pathway and suggest that mitochondria play an important role in regulating the Env folding process. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein is absolutely required for viral infection, and an understanding of its expression pathway in infected cells will identify new targets for antiretroviral

  12. Identification of Conserved Residues in Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 That Modulate Virus Dependence on CD81 and SRB1 Entry Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Muriel; Sarrazin, Stéphane; Montserret, Roland; Descamps, Véronique; Baumert, Thomas F.; Duverlie, Gilles; Séron, Karin; Penin, François

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In spite of the high variability of its sequence, hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains several conserved regions. In this study, we explored the structural and functional features of the highly conserved E2 segment from amino acid (aa) 502 to 520, which had been proposed as a fusion peptide and shown to strongly overlap a potential conserved neutralizing epitope. For this purpose, we used reverse genetics to introduce point mutations within this region, and we characterized the phenotypes of these mutants in the light of the recently published structure of E2. The functional analyses showed that their phenotypes are in agreement with the positions of the corresponding residues in the E2 crystal structure. In contrast, our data ruled out the involvement of this region in membrane fusion, and they indicate that alternative conformations would be necessary to expose the potential neutralizing epitope present in this segment. Of particular interest, we identified three specific mutations (Y507L, V514A, and V515A) located within this neutralizing epitope which only mildly reduced infectivity and showed no assembly defect. These mutations modulated HCV dependence on the viral receptor SRB1, and/or they also modulated virion sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies. Importantly, their characterization also showed that amino acids Y507, V514, and V515 contribute to E2 interaction with HCV receptor CD81. In conclusion, our data show that the highly conserved E2 segment from aa 502 to 520 plays a key role in cell entry by influencing the association of the viral particle with coreceptors and neutralizing antibodies. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 exhibit sequence variability. However, some segments of the envelope proteins are highly conserved, suggesting that these sequences play a key role at some steps of the HCV life cycle. In this work, we characterized the function and structure of a highly conserved E2 region

  13. Indirect ELISAs based on recombinant and affinity-purified glycoprotein E of Aujeszky's disease virus to differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals.

    PubMed

    Morenkov, O S; Fodor, N; Fodor, I

    1999-01-01

    Two indirect ELISAs for the detection of antibodies against glycoprotein E (gE) of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) in sera have been developed. The rec-gE-ELISA is based on the E. coli-expressed recombinant protein containing the N-terminal sequences of gE (aa 1-125) fused with the glutathione S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum. The affi-gE-ELISA is based on native gE, which was purified from virions by affinity chromatography. The tests were optimised and compared with each other, as well as with the recently developed blocking gE-ELISA (Morenkov et al., 1997b), with respect to specificity and sensitivity. The rec-gE-ELISA was less sensitive in detecting ADV-infected animals than the affi-gE-ELISA (sensitivity 80% and 97%, respectively), which is probably due to the lack of conformation-dependent immunodominant epitopes on the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli. The specificity of the rec-gE-ELISA and affi-gE-ELISA was rather moderate (90% and 94%, respectively) because it was necessary to set such cut-off values in the tests that provided a maximum level of sensitivity, which obviously increased the incidence of false positive reactions. Though the indirect ELISAs detect antibodies against many epitopes of gE, the blocking gE-ELISA, which detects antibodies against only one immunodominant epitope of gE, showed a better test performance (specificity 99% and sensitivity 98%). This is most probably due to rather high dilutions of the sera used in the indirect gE-ELISAs (1:30) as compared to the serum dilution in the blocking gE-ELISA (1:2). We conclude that the indirect gE-ELISAs are sufficiently specific and sensitive to distinguish ADV-infected swine from those vaccinated with gE-negative vaccine and can be useful, in particularly affi-gE-ELISA, as additional tests for the detection of antibodies to gE.

  14. Preparation of VSV-G viral envelope glycoprotein from Pichia pastoris enhances transfection of DNA into animal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Dong, Ying; Wang, Jingquan; Li, Long; Zhong, Zhenmin; Li, Yun-Pan; Chen, Shao-Jun; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Wei, Chi-Ju

    2017-03-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) has been widely used for pseudotyping retroviral, lentiviral and artificial viral vectors. The objective of this study was to establish a potential approach for large scale production of VSV-G. To this end, VSV-G was cloned with a N-terminal His-tag into Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC3.5K. Three clones (Mut(s)) containing the VSV-G expression cassette were identified by PCR. All clones proliferated normally in expansion medium, while the proliferation was reduced significantly under induction conditions. VSV-G protein was detected in cell lysates by Western Blot, and the highest expression level was observed at 96 h post induction. VSV-G could also be obtained from the condition medium of yeast protoplasts. Further, VSV-G could be incorporated into Ad293 cells and was able to induce cell fusion, leading to the transfer of cytoplasmic protein. Finally, VSV-G mediated DNA transfection was assayed by flow cytometry and luciferase measurement. Incubation of VSV-G lysate with pGL3-control DNA complex increased luciferase activity in Ad293 and HeLa cells by about 3-fold. Likewise, incubation of VSV-G lysate with pCMV-DsRed DNA complex improved transfection efficiency into Ad293 by 10% and HeLa cells by about 1-fold. In conclusions, these results demonstrated that VSV-G could be produced from Pichia pastoris with bio-functionalities, demonstrating large scale production of the viral glycoprotein is feasible.

  15. Binding of the Epstein-Barr virus major envelope glycoprotein gp350 results in the upregulation of the TNF-alpha gene expression in monocytic cells via NF-kappaB involving PKC, PI3-K and tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, M; Ahmad, A; Morgan, A; Menezes, J

    2000-05-19

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpesvirus that interacts with various immunocompetent cells that carry the EBV receptor (CD21/CR2). EBV binds to CR2 through its major envelope glycoprotein 350 (gp350). Previously we had demonstrated that EBV and other human herpesviruses are capable of modulating cytokine synthesis through the deregulated expression of cytokine genes interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Here we show that, in contrast to infectious EBV, purified recombinant gp350 upregulates TNF-alpha gene expression in human monocyte/macrophages (M/M) as well as in a monocytoid cell line, U937. Our results also demonstrate that this increased expression is due to both enhanced transcription and stability of TNF-alpha mRNA in gp350-treated cells. The specificity of this effect is evidenced by the fact that pre-incubation of cells with anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody OKB7, which blocks binding of gp350 to CR2, inhibits the above mentioned effects of gp350. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of TNF-alpha by gp350 is mediated by NF-kappaB through signal transduction pathways involving PKC, PI3-K and tyrosine kinases. To our knowledge this is the first report describing the modulation of TNF-alpha gene expression by the EBV-gp350 molecule following its interaction with the viral receptor CR2 on cells of the monocytic lineage.

  16. Identification of amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from alpaca that may be involved in host adaptation.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Dubovi, Edward J; Ridpath, Julia F

    2015-09-30

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are most commonly associated with infections of cattle. However, BVDV are often isolated from closely related ruminants with a number of BVDV-1b viruses being isolated from alpacas that were both acutely and persistently infected. The complete nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame of eleven alpaca-adapted BVDV isolates and the region encoding the envelope glycoproteins of an additional three isolates were determined. With the exception of one, all alpaca isolates were >99.2% similar at the nucleotide level. The Hercules isolate was more divergent, with 95.7% sequence identity to the other viruses. Sequence similarity of the 14 viruses indicated they were isolates of a single BVDV strain that had adapted to and were circulating through alpaca herds. Hercules was a more distantly related strain that has been isolated only once in Canada and represented a separate adaptation event that possessed the same adaptive changes. Comparison of amino acid sequences of alpaca and bovine-derived BVDV strains revealed three regions with amino acid sequences unique to all alpaca isolates. The first contained two small in-frame deletions near the N-terminus of the E2 glycoprotein. The second was found near the C-terminus of the E2 protein where four altered amino acids were located within a 30 amino acid domain that participates in E2 homodimerization. The third region contained three variable amino acids in the C-terminus of the E(rns) within the amphipathic helix membrane anchor. These changes were found in the polar side of the amphipathic helix and resulted in an increased charge within the polar face. Titration of bovine and alpaca viruses in both bovine and alpaca cells indicated that with increased charge in the amphipathic helix, the ability to infect alpaca cells also increased.

  17. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  18. Characterization of CD4 glycoprotein determinant-HIV envelope protein interactions: perspectives for analog and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Farrar, W L; Harel-Bellan, A; Ferris, D K

    1988-01-01

    The CD4 surface determinant, previously associated as a phenotypic marker for helper/inducer subsets of T lymphocytes, has now been critically identified as the binding/entry protein for human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV). The human CD4 molecule is readily detectable on monocytes, T lymphocytes, and brain tissues. Soluble HIV (HTLV IIIB) envelope protein (gp120) binds native or recombinant CD4 with equal affinity estimated to be 4 to 8 nM kDa. All human tissue sources of CD4 bind radiolabeled gp120 to the same relative degree; however, the murine homologous protein, L3T4, does not bind the HIV envelope protein. Lack of sufficient recognition by the recombinant L3T4 molecule suggests divergence in the gp120-binding epitope. The binding of gp120 to CD4 is dependent upon intact sulfhydryl bonds within cysteine residues and glycosylation. Deglycosylated native gp120 is unable to bind CD4 under physiological conditions. Recombinant deglycosylated fragments cannot bind to the CD4 receptor, although they serve as immunogen for neutralizing antibody development. A number of synthetic peptides to putative critical domains of gp120 have been studied for their antagonism of native gp120 binding. Peptide T analogs or synthetic cogeners of Neuroleukin proposed to bind the CD4 determinant involved in gp120 binding had no competitive displacement of native gp120 binding as assessed by two independent methods that measure gp120 interaction with CD4. Recombinant C-terminal fragments, also containing other putative domains, did not displace native gp120 from CD4. Glycosylation appears to be critical in the maintenance of the structure of the binding domain of gp120. Native gp120 binding to CD4 is sufficient for the activation of cellular metabolism that alters target cell gene expression and differentiation, suggesting that the virus binding contributes to the activation of the host cell.

  19. Single Amino Acid Substitution N659D in HIV-2 Envelope Glycoprotein (Env) Impairs Viral Release and Hampers BST-2 Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Dufrasne, François E; Lombard, Catherine; Goubau, Patrick; Ruelle, Jean

    2016-10-14

    BST-2 or tetherin is a host cell restriction factor that prevents the budding of enveloped viruses at the cell surface, thus impairing the viral spread. Several countermeasures to evade this antiviral factor have been positively selected in retroviruses: the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) relies on the envelope glycoprotein (Env) to overcome BST-2 restriction. The Env gp36 ectodomain seems involved in this anti-tetherin activity, however residues and regions interacting with BST-2 are not clearly defined. Among 32 HIV-2 ROD Env mutants tested, we demonstrated that the asparagine residue at position 659 located in the gp36 ectodomain is mandatory to exert the anti-tetherin function. Viral release assays in cell lines expressing BST-2 showed a loss of viral release ability for the HIV-2 N659D mutant virus compared to the HIV-2 wild type virus. In bst-2 inactivated H9 cells, those differences were lost. Subtilisin treatment of infected cells demonstrated that the N659D mutant was more tethered at the cell surface. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments confirmed a direct molecular link between Env and BST-2 and highlighted an inability of the mutant to bind BST-2. We also tested a virus presenting a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminal part of Env, a cytoplasmic tail partial deletion that is spontaneously selected in vitro. Interestingly, viral release assays and FRET experiments indicated that a full Env cytoplasmic tail was essential in BST-2 antagonism. In HIV-2 infected cells, an efficient Env-mediated antagonism of BST-2 is operated through an intermolecular link involving the asparagine 659 residue as well as the C-terminal part of the cytoplasmic tail.

  20. Characterization of Lassa virus glycoprotein oligomerization and influence of cholesterol on virus replication.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Lennartz, Frank; Ströher, Ute; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature glycoprotein spikes are inserted in the Lassa virus envelope and consist of the distal subunit GP-1, the transmembrane-spanning subunit GP-2, and the signal peptide, which originate from the precursor glycoprotein pre-GP-C by proteolytic processing. In this study, we analyzed the oligomeric structure of the viral surface glycoprotein. Chemical cross-linking studies of mature glycoprotein spikes from purified virus revealed the formation of trimers. Interestingly, sucrose density gradient analysis of cellularly expressed glycoprotein showed that in contrast to trimeric mature glycoprotein complexes, the noncleaved glycoprotein forms monomers and oligomers spanning a wide size range, indicating that maturation cleavage of GP by the cellular subtilase SKI-1/S1P is critical for formation of the correct oligomeric state. To shed light on a potential relation between cholesterol and GP trimer stability, we performed cholesterol depletion experiments. Although depletion of cholesterol had no effect on trimerization of the glycoprotein spike complex, our studies revealed that the cholesterol content of the viral envelope is important for the infectivity of Lassa virus. Analyses of the distribution of viral proteins in cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant membrane areas showed that Lassa virus buds from membrane areas other than those responsible for impaired infectivity due to cholesterol depletion of lipid rafts. Thus, derivation of the viral envelope from cholesterol-rich membrane areas is not a prerequisite for the impact of cholesterol on virus infectivity.

  1. Seven new ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) field isolates from Dubois Idaho sheep comprise part of OPPV clade II based on surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) sequences.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Lynn M; Hötzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P; On Top, Kathy Pretty; Lewis, Gregory S; Knowles, Donald P

    2004-06-15

    Seven new ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) field isolates were derived from colostrum and milk of 10 naturally OPPV-infected sheep from the US Sheep Experiment Station in Dubois, Idaho, USA. Sixteen sequences of the surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) from these seven Dubois OPPV field isolates and SU sequence from OPPV WLC1 were obtained, aligned with published SRLV SU sequences, and analyzed using phylogenetic analysis using parsimony (PAUP). Percent nucleotide identity in SU was greater than 95.8% among clones from individual Dubois OPPVs and ranged from 85.5 to 93.8% between different Dubois OPPV clones. SU sequences from Dubois OPPVs and WLC1 OPPV had significantly higher percent nucleotide identity to SU sequences from the North American OPPVs (85/34 and S93) than caprine-arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEVs) or MVVs. PAUP analysis also showed that SU sequences from the Dubois OPPVs and OPPV WLC1 grouped with other North American OPPVs (85/34 and S93) with a bootstrap value of 100 and formed one OPPV clade II group. In addition, Dubois and WLC1 SU amino acid sequences had significantly higher identity to SU sequences from North American OPPVs than CAEV or MVV. These data indicate that the seven new Dubois OPPV field isolates along with WLC1 OPPV are part of the OPPV clade II and are distinct from CAEVs and MVVs.

  2. The C domain in the surface envelope glycoprotein of subgroup C feline leukemia virus is a second receptor-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rey, Michelle A; Prasad, Rati; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2008-01-20

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the surface (SU) subunit of gammaretrovirus envelope glycoprotein is critical for determining the host receptor specificity of the virus. This domain is separated from the carboxy terminal C domain (Cdom) of SU by a proline-rich region. In this study, we show that the Cdom region in the SU from subgroup C feline leukemia virus (FeLV-C) forms a second receptor-binding domain that is distinct from its RBD, and which can independently bind to its host receptor FLVCR1, in the absence of RBD. Furthermore, our results suggest that residues located in the C2 disulfide-bonded loop in FeLV-C Cdom are critical for SU binding to FLVCR1 and for virus infection. We propose that binding of FeLV-C SU to FLVCR1 involves interaction of two receptor-binding domains (RBD and Cdom) with FLVCR1, and that this mechanism of interaction is conserved for other gammaretroviruses. Our results could have important implications for designing gammaretrovirus vectors that can efficiently infect specific target cells.

  3. Enhanced CD4+ cellular apoptosis by CCR5-restricted HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein variants from patients with progressive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Jessica; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Gray, Lachlan; Roche, Michael; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Ellett, Anne; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Cowley, Daniel; Fonseca Pereira, Candida da; Saksena, Nitin; Wang, Bin; Purcell, Damian F.J.; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fenyoe, Eva-Maria; Churchill, Melissa; Gorry, Paul R.

    2010-01-20

    CCR5-using (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains cause CD4+ T-cell loss in most infected individuals, but mechanisms underlying cytopathicity of R5 viruses are poorly understood. We investigated mechanisms contributing to R5 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cellular apoptosis by constructing a panel of retroviral vectors engineered to co-express GFP and R5 Envs derived from two HIV-1-infected subjects spanning asymptomatic (Early, E-R5 Envs) to late stages of infection (Late, L-R5 Envs). The L-R5 Envs induced significantly more cellular apoptosis than E-R5 Envs, but only in Env-expressing (GFP-positive) cells, and only in cells where CD4 and CCR5 levels were limiting. Studies with fusion-defective Env mutants showed induction of apoptosis required membrane-fusing events. Our results provide evidence for an intracellular mechanism of R5 Env-induced apoptosis of CD4+ cells that requires membrane fusion. Furthermore, they contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms involved in CD4+ T-cell loss in subjects experiencing progressive R5 HIV-1 infection.

  4. Expression of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 in Yeast Pichia pastoris and its Application to an ELISA for Detection of BVDV Neutralizing Antibodies in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sthita Pragnya; Mishra, Niranjan; Nema, Ram Kumar; Pandey, Pooja Dubey; Kalaiyarasu, Semmannan; Rajukumar, Katherukamem; Prakash, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to express envelope glycoprotein E2 of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in yeast Pichia pastoris and its utility as a diagnostic antigen in ELISA. The BVDV E2 gene was cloned into the pPICZαA vector followed by integration into the Pichia pastoris strain X-33 genome for methanol-induced expression. SDS-PAGE and Western blot results showed that the recombinant BVDV E2 protein (72 kDa) was expressed and secreted into the medium at a concentration of 40 mg/L of culture under optimized conditions. An indirect ELISA was then developed by using the yeast-expressed E2 protein. Preliminary testing of 300 field cattle serum samples showed that the E2 ELISA showed a sensitivity of 91.07% and a specificity of 92.02% compared to the reference virus neutralization test. The concordance between the E2 ELISA and VNT was 91.67%. This study demonstrates feasibility of BVDV E2 protein expression in yeast Pichia pastoris for the first time and its efficacy as an antigen in ELISA for detecting BVDV neutralizing antibodies in cattle.

  5. Design and evaluation of antiretroviral peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat region (C-HR) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Soonthornsata, Bongkot; Tian, Yu-Shi; Utachee, Piraporn; Sapsutthipas, Sompong; Isarangkura-na-ayuthaya, Panasda; Auwanit, Wattana; Takagi, Tatsuya; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Kawashita, Norihito; Kameoka, Masanori

    2010-09-15

    Two {alpha}-helical heptad repeats, N-HR and C-HR, located in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp41, play an important role in membrane fusion by forming a 6-helix bundle. C34, a peptide mimicking C-HR, inhibits the formation of the 6-helix bundle; thus, it has potential as a novel antiretroviral compound. In order to improve the inhibitory effect of C34 on HIV-1 replication, we designed new C34-derived peptides based on computational analysis of the stable conformation of the 6-helix bundle. Newly designed peptides showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the replication of recombinant viruses containing CRF01{sub A}E, subtype B or subtype C Env than C34 or a fusion inhibitor, T-20. In addition, these peptides inhibited the replication of a T-20-resistant virus. We propose that these peptides could be applied to develop novel antiretroviral compounds to inhibit the replication of various subtypes of HIV-1 as well as of T-20-resistant variants.

  6. A Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer with an Embedded Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Domain Induces Enhanced Antibody and T Cell Responses*

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric EnvGM-CSF enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines. PMID:21515681

  7. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones.

  8. Computational Prediction and Analysis of Envelop Glycoprotein Epitopes of DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani Isolates: A First Step towards Dengue Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever of tropics is a mosquito transmitted devastating disease caused by dengue virus (DENV). There is no effective vaccine available, so far, against any of its four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4). There is a need for the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines against DENV to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, especially in Pakistan. In this research, linear and conformational B-cell epitopes of envelope glycoprotein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 (the most prevalent serotypes in Pakistan) were predicted. We used Kolaskar and Tongaonkar method for linear epitope prediction, Emini’s method for surface accessibility prediction and Karplus and Schulz’s algorithm for flexibility determination. To propose three dimensional epitopes, the E proteins for both serotypes were homology modeled by using Phyre2 V 2.0 server, and ElliPro was used for the prediction of surface epitopes on their globular structure. Total 21 and 19 linear epitopes were predicted for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Whereas, 5 and 4 discontinuous epitopes were proposed for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Moreover, the values of surface accessibility, flexibility and solvent-accessibility can be helpful in analyzing vaccines against DENV-2 and DENV-3. In conclusion, the proposed continuous and discontinuous antigenic peptides can be valuable candidates for diagnostic and therapeutics of DENV. PMID:25775090

  9. Conservation of the Conformation and Positive Charges of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Hypervariable Region 1 Points to a Role in Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Penin, François; Combet, Christophe; Germanidis, Georgios; Frainais, Pierre-Olivier; Deléage, Gilbert; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. The HCV polyprotein contains a hypervariable region (HVR1) located at the N terminus of the second envelope glycoprotein E2. The strong variability of this 27-amino-acid region is due to its apparent tolerance of amino acid substitutions together with strong selection pressures exerted by anti-HCV immune responses. No specific function has so far been attributed to HVR1. However, its presence at the surface of the viral particle suggests that it might be involved in viral entry. This would imply that HVR1 is not randomly variable. We sequenced 460 HVR1 clones isolated at various times from six HCV-infected patients receiving alpha interferon therapy (which exerts strong pressure towards quasispecies genetic evolution) and analyzed their amino acid sequences together with those of 1,382 nonredundant HVR1 sequences collected from the EMBL database. We found that (i) despite strong amino acid sequence variability related to strong pressures towards change, the chemicophysical properties and conformation of HVR1 were highly conserved, and (ii) HVR1 is a globally basic stretch, with the basic residues located at specific sequence positions. This conservation of positively charged residues indicates that HVR1 is involved in interactions with negatively charged molecules such as lipids, proteins, or glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). As with many other viruses, possible interaction with GAGs probably plays a role in host cell recognition and attachment. PMID:11356980

  10. Identification and characterization of a macrophage-tropic SIV envelope glycoprotein variant in blood from early infection in SIVmac251-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Yen, Po-Jen; Mefford, Megan E; Hoxie, James A; Williams, Kenneth C; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Gabuzda, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Macrophages play an important role in HIV/SIV pathogenesis by serving as a reservoir for viral persistence in brain and other tissues. Infected macrophages have been detected in brain early after infection, but macrophage-tropic viruses are rarely isolated until late-stage infection. Little is known about early variants that establish persistent infection in brain. Here, we characterize a unique macrophage-tropic SIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) variant from two weeks post-infection in blood of an SIVmac251-infected macaque that is closely related to sequences in brain from animals with neurological disease. SIVmac251 clones expressing this Env are highly fusogenic, and replicate efficiently in T cells and macrophages. N173 and N481 were identified as novel determinants of macrophage tropism and neutralization sensitivity. These results imply that macrophage-tropic SIV capable of establishing viral reservoirs in brain can be present in blood during early infection. Furthermore, these SIVmac251 clones will be useful for studies on pathogenesis, eradication, and vaccines.

  11. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  12. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D; Rey, Félix A

    2016-10-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single "fusion loop". We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal "tail" that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens.

  13. Intravaginal immunization using the recombinant HIV-1 clade-C trimeric envelope glycoprotein CN54gp140 formulated within lyophilized solid dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Louise; Curran, Rhonda M.; Tregoning, John S.; McKay, Paul F.; Cole, Tom; Morrow, Ryan J.; Kett, Vicky L.; Andrews, Gavin P.; Woolfson, A. David; Malcolm, R. Karl; Shattock, Robin J.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine-mediated prevention of primary HIV-1 infection at the heterosexual mucosal portal of entry may be facilitated by highly optimised formulations or drug delivery devices for intravaginal (i.vag) immunization. Previously we described hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC)-based rheologically structured gel vehicles (RSVs) for vaginal immunization of an HIV-1 vaccine candidate, a soluble recombinant trimeric HIV-1 clade-C envelope glycoprotein designated CN54gp140. Here we investigated the efficacy of lyophilized solid dosage formulations (LSDFs) for prolonging antigen stability and as i.vag delivery modalities. LSDFs were designed and developed that upon i.vag administration they would reconstitute with the imbibing of vaginal fluid to mucoadhesive, site-retentive semi-solids. Mice were immunized with lyophilized equivalents of (i) RSVs, (ii) modified versions of the RSVs more suited to lyophilization (sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC)-based gels) and (iii) Carbopol® gel, all containing CN54gp140. NaCMC-based LSDFs provided significantly enhanced antigen stability compared to aqueous-based RSVs. Rheological analysis indicated the NaCMC-based LSDFs would offer enhanced vaginal retention in woman compared to more conventional vaginal gel formulations. All LSDFs were well tolerated in the mouse model. Following i.vag administration, all LSDFs boosted systemic CN54gp140-specific antibody responses in sub-cutaneously primed mice. Induction of CN54gp140-specific antibody responses in the female genital tract was evident. Of all the LSDFs the fastest releasing which was lyophilized Carbopol® gel elicited immune responses comparable to buffer instillation of antigen suggesting that rather than slower sustained release, initial high burst release from the LSDFs may suffice. The boosting of specific immune responses upon i.vag administration indicates that LSDFs are viable mucosal vaccine delivery modalities promoting antigen stability and facilitating intimate exposure of

  14. Antibodies Elicited by Multiple Envelope Glycoprotein Immunogens in Primates Neutralize Primary Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV-1) Sensitized by CD4-Mimetic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M.; Easterhoff, David; Bradley, Todd; Luo, Kan; Williams, Wilton B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Phad, Ganesh E.; Vázquez Bernat, Néstor; Melillo, Bruno; Santra, Sampa; Smith, Amos B.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; Haynes, Barton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate virus entry through a series of complex conformational changes triggered by binding to the receptors CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize conserved Env epitopes are thought to be an important component of a protective immune response. However, to date, HIV-1 Env immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been identified, creating hurdles for vaccine development. Small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds engage the CD4-binding pocket on the gp120 exterior Env and induce Env conformations that are highly sensitive to neutralization by antibodies, including antibodies directed against the conserved Env region that interacts with CCR5/CXCR4. Here, we show that CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize primary HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies that can be elicited in monkeys and humans within 6 months by several Env vaccine candidates, including gp120 monomers. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the gp120 V2 and V3 variable regions were isolated from the immunized monkeys and humans; these monoclonal antibodies neutralized a primary HIV-1 only when the virus was sensitized by a CD4-mimetic compound. Thus, in addition to their direct antiviral effect, CD4-mimetic compounds dramatically enhance the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of antibodies that can be elicited with currently available immunogens. Used as components of microbicides, the CD4-mimetic compounds might increase the protective efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. IMPORTANCE Preventing HIV-1 transmission is a high priority for global health. Eliciting antibodies that can neutralize transmitted strains of HIV-1 is difficult, creating problems for the development of an effective vaccine. We found that small-molecule CD4-mimetic compounds sensitize HIV-1 to antibodies that can be elicited in vaccinated humans and monkeys. These results suggest an approach to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission in

  15. Comparative analysis of the fusion efficiency elicited by the envelope glycoprotein V1-V5 regions derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmitted perinatally.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyan; Abrahamyan, Levon G; Liu, Chang; Waltke, Mackenzie; Geng, Yunqi; Chen, Qimin; Wood, Charles; Kong, Xiaohong

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the properties of viruses preferentially establishing infection during perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is critical for the development of effective measures to prevent transmission. A previous study demonstrated that the newly transmitted viruses (in infants) of chronically infected mother-infant pairs (MIPs) were fitter in terms of growth, which was imparted by their envelope (Env) glycoprotein V1-V5 regions, than those in the corresponding chronically infected mothers. In order to investigate whether the higher fitness of transmitted viruses was conferred by their higher entry efficiency directed by the V1-V5 regions during perinatal transmission, the fusogenicity of Env containing V1-V5 regions derived from transmitted and non-tranmsmitted viruses of five chronically infected MIPs and two acutely infected MIPs was analysed using two different cell-cell fusion assays. The results showed that, in one chronically infected MIP, a higher fusion efficiency was induced by the infant Env V1-V5 compared with that of the corresponding mother. Moreover, the V4-V5 regions played an important role in discriminating the transmitted and non-transmitted viruses in this pair. However, neither a consistent pattern nor significant differences in fusogenicity mediated by the V1-V5 regions between maternal and infant variants was observed in the other MIPs. This study suggests that there is no consistent and significant correlation between viral fitness selection and entry efficiency directed by the V1-V5 regions during perinatal transmission. Other factors such as the route and timing of transmission may also be involved.

  16. Differential recognition of Old World and New World arenavirus envelope glycoproteins by subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P).

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Seidah, Nabil G; Zanotti, Giuseppe; Cendron, Laura; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses that includes several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans that represent serious public health problems. A crucial step of the arenavirus life cycle is maturation of the envelope glycoprotein precursor (GPC) by the cellular subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P). Comparison of the currently known sequences of arenavirus GPCs revealed the presence of a highly conserved aromatic residue at position P7 relative to the SKI-1/S1P cleavage side in Old World and clade C New World arenaviruses but not in New World viruses of clades A and B or cellular substrates of SKI-1/S1P. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis, we found that residue Y285 of SKI-1/S1P, distal from the catalytic triad, is implicated in the molecular recognition of the aromatic "signature residue" at P7 in the GPC of Old World Lassa virus. Using a quantitative biochemical approach, we show that Y285 of SKI-1/S1P is crucial for the efficient processing of peptides derived from Old World and clade C New World arenavirus GPCs but not of those from clade A and B New World arenavirus GPCs. The data suggest that during coevolution with their mammalian hosts, GPCs of Old World and clade C New World viruses expanded the molecular contacts with SKI-1/S1P beyond the classical four-amino-acid recognition sequences and currently occupy an extended binding pocket.

  17. Vaccinia and other viruses with available vaccines show marked homology with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein: the prospect of using existing vaccines to stem the AIDS pandemic.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J Chris

    2012-04-01

    Cross-reactive immunity occurs when infection with or vaccination against one virus protects against another related family member. A search for homologues of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein revealed that it is composed of thousands of intercalating and overlapping viral matches of pentapeptide or longer gapped consensi, belonging to over 70% of the currently sequenced virome, infecting all kingdoms from bacteria to man. It was also highly homologous to proteins from the Visna/Maedi and other ovine viruses, while other proteins (nef/tat/gag/pol) were homologous to proteins from the equine infectious anaemia virus and HTLV-2/HTLV-3 viruses. This phenomenon suggests that horizontal gene transfer from coinfecting RNA and DNA viruses to retroviruses is extensive, providing a route for the subsequent insertion of non-retroviral genes into human and other genomes via retroviral integration. This homology includes all viruses for which vaccines already exist. Cross-reactive immunity may be operative in AIDS, as Vaccinia vaccination decreases viral replication in HIV-1 infected patients' cells, for the CCR5 tropic form. Measles, Dengue virus, or GB virus C infections also decrease the HIV-1 viral load. A resumption of Vaccinia/smallpox vaccination might be expected to have a significant effect on the AIDS pandemic, and a careful study of the potential uses of other existing viral and bacterial vaccines merits close attention. This phenomenon may also be relevant to other recalcitrant viruses, bacteria, and parasites for which no vaccine exists and the armory of existing vaccines may have a role to play in diseases other than those for which they were designed.

  18. Dominant-negative effect of hetero-oligomerization on the function of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Carolina; Klasse, Per Johan; Kibler, Christopher W.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu; Beddows, Simon

    2006-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein forms trimers that mediate interactions with the CD4 receptor and a co-receptor on the target cell surface, thereby triggering viral fusion with the cell membrane. Cleavage of Env into its surface, gp120, and transmembrane, gp41, moieties is necessary for activation of its fusogenicity. Here, we produced pseudoviruses with phenotypically mixed wild-type (Wt) and mutant, cleavage-incompetent Env in order to quantify the effects of incorporating uncleaved Env on virion infectivity, antigenicity and neutralization sensitivity. We modeled the relative infectivity of three such phenotypically mixed viral strains, JR-FL, HXBc2 and a derivative of the latter, 3.2P, as a function of the relative amount of Wt Env. The data were fit very closely (R {sup 2} > 0.99) by models which assumed that only Wt homotrimers were functional, with different approximate thresholds of critical numbers of functional trimers per virion for the three strains. We also produced 3.2P pseudoviruses containing both a cleavage-competent Env that is defective for binding the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (NAb) 2G12, and a cleavage-incompetent Env that binds 2G12. The 2G12 NAb was not able to reduce the infectivity of these pseudoviruses detectably. Their neutralization by the CD4-binding site-directed agents CD4-IgG2 and NAb b12 was also unaffected by 2G12 binding to uncleaved Env. These results further strengthen the conclusion that only homotrimers consisting of cleaved Env are functional. They also imply that the function of a trimer is unaffected sterically by the binding of an antibody to an adjacent trimer.

  19. Investigating the effects of point mutations on the affinity between the cyanobacterial lectin microvirin and high mannose-type glycans present on the HIV envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Conceição de Souza, Rafael; de Medeiros Muniz, Gabriela; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; de Melo Lima, Adonis; da Silva, Alessandra Pereira; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio

    2016-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to exert an enormous impact on global human health. This led experts to emphasize the importance of new measures for preventing HIV infections, including the development of vaccines and novel drugs. In this context, a promising approach involves the use of lectins that can bind the surface envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV with high affinity, preventing viral entry. The cyanobacterial lectin microvirin (MVN) has been proposed as a candidate for development as a topical microbicide because of its ability to bind to high mannose-type glycans, potently inhibiting HIV-1 entry. Thus, the aim of this computational study was to investigate the effects of four point mutations (D53Q, D53E, D53K, and D53W) on the structure and affinity of MVN with di-mannose (MAN). Molecular dynamics simulations followed by binding free energy calculations using MM-GBSA were employed. The calculated binding free energy of ligand-receptor complexation of MVN with MAN was -26.02 kcal mol(-1). We identified in the wild-type protein that residues I45, T59, and Q81 have a major contribution to the binding free energy of di-mannose. Among the investigated mutants, the most promising one was the D53W mutation, with a theoretical binding free energy value of -29.16 kcal mol(-1). We suggest that this increased stability is due to the introduction of extra rigidity on the hinge region connecting two key structural elements of the MVN binding site.

  20. Immunogens Modeling a Fusion-Intermediate Conformation of gp41 Elicit Antibodies to the Membrane Proximal External Region of the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Vassell, Russell; He, Yong; Vennakalanti, Prasad; Dey, Antu K; Zhuang, Min; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yide; Biron-Sorek, Zohar; Srivastava, Indresh K; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Barnett, Susan W; Weiss, Carol D

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) contains determinants for broadly neutralizing antibodies and has remained an important focus of vaccine design. However, creating an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies to this region has proven difficult in part due to the relative inaccessibility of the MPER in the native conformation of Env. Here, we describe the antigenicity and immunogenicity of a panel of oligomeric gp41 immunogens designed to model a fusion-intermediate conformation of Env in order to enhance MPER exposure in a relevant conformation. The immunogens contain segments of the gp41 N- and C-heptad repeats to mimic a trapped intermediate, followed by the MPER, with variations that include different N-heptad lengths, insertion of extra epitopes, and varying C-termini. These well-characterized immunogens were evaluated in two different immunization protocols involving gp41 and gp140 proteins, gp41 and gp160 DNA primes, and different immunization schedules and adjuvants. We found that the immunogens designed to reduce extension of helical structure into the MPER elicited the highest MPER antibody binding titers, but these antibodies lacked neutralizing activity. The gp41 protein immunogens also elicited higher MPER titers than the gp140 protein immunogen. In prime-boost studies, the best MPER responses were seen in the groups that received DNA priming with gp41 vectors followed by gp41 protein boosts. Finally, although titers to the entire protein immunogen were similar in the two immunization protocols, MPER-specific titers differed, suggesting that the immunization route, schedule, dose, or adjuvant may differentially influence MPER immunogenicity. These findings inform the design of future MPER immunogens and immunization protocols.

  1. The V4 and V5 Variable Loops of HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Are Tolerant to Insertion of Green Fluorescent Protein and Are Useful Targets for Labeling.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Matsuda, Zene

    2015-06-12

    The mature human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) comprises the non-covalently associated gp120 and gp41 subunits generated from the gp160 precursor. Recent structural analyses have provided quaternary structural models for gp120/gp41 trimers, including the variable loops (V1-V5) of gp120. In these models, the V3 loop is located under V1/V2 at the apical center of the Env trimer, and the V4 and V5 loops project outward from the trimeric protomers. In addition, the V4 and V5 loops are predicted to have less movement upon receptor binding during membrane fusion events. We performed insertional mutagenesis using a GFP variant, GFPOPT, placed into the variable loops of HXB2 gp120. This allowed us to evaluate the current structural models and to simultaneously generate a GFP-tagged HIV-1 Env, which was useful for image analyses. All GFP-inserted mutants showed similar levels of whole-cell expression, although certain mutants, particularly V3 mutants, showed lower levels of cell surface expression. Functional evaluation of their fusogenicities in cell-cell and virus-like particle-cell fusion assays revealed that V3 was the most sensitive to the insertion and that the V1/V2 loops were less sensitive than V3. The V4 and V5 loops were the most tolerant to insertion, and certain tag proteins other than GFPOPT could also be inserted without functional consequences. Our results support the current structural models and provide a GFPOPT-tagged Env construct for imaging studies.

  2. Effects of L- and D-REKR amino acid-containing peptides on HIV and SIV envelope glycoprotein precursor maturation and HIV and SIV replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bahbouhi, Bouchaib; Chazal, Nathalie; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Chiva, Cristina; Kogan, Marcelo; Albericio, Fernando; Giralt, Ernest; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of synthetic l- and d-peptides encompassing the HIV-1(BRU) gp160 REKR cleavage site to interfere with HIV and simian immuno-deficiency virus (SIV) replication and maturation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) precursors. To facilitate their penetration into cells, a decanoyl (dec) group was added at the N-terminus. The sequences synthesized included dec5d or dec5l (decREKRV), dec9d or dec9l (decRVVQREKRV) and dec14d or dec14l (TKAKRRVVQREKRV). The peptide dec14d was also prepared with a chloromethane (cmk) group as C-terminus. Because l-peptides exhibit significant cytotoxicity starting at 35 microM, further characterization was conducted mostly with d-peptides, which exhibited no cytotoxicity at concentrations higher than 70 microM. The data show that only dec14d and dec14dcmk could inhibit HIV-1(BRU), HIV-2(ROD) and SIV(mac251) replication and their syncytium-inducing capacities. Whereas peptides dec5d and dec9d were inactive, dec14dcmk was at least twice as active as peptide dec14d. At the molecular level, our data show a direct correlation between anti-viral activity and the ability of the peptides to interfere with maturation of the Env precursors. Furthermore, we show that when tested in vitro the dec14d peptide inhibited PC7 with an inhibition constant K(i)=4.6 microM, whereas the peptide dec14l preferentially inhibited furin with a K(i)=28 microM. The fact that PC7 and furin are the major prohormone convertases reported to be expressed in T4 lymphocytes, the principal cell targets of HIV, suggests that they are involved in the maturation of HIV and SIV Env precursors. PMID:12071862

  3. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  4. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  5. Modulation of the effector function of human macrophages for Histoplasma capsulatum by HIV-1. Role of the envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S; Newman, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have demonstrated that monocyte-derived macrophages (Mphi) from HIV+ individuals are deficient in their capacity to phagocytose Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) yeasts, and are more permissive for the intracellular growth of Hc. To determine whether these defects in Mphi function were caused by HIV infection of the Mphi and/or by pathological events associated with HIV infection, cultured normal human Mphi were infected with the HIV-1BaL strain. Virus production, quantified by reverse transcriptase activity and p24 antigen, was evident on day 8 after infection and peaked on day 16. On days 12, 16, and 20 after infection, HIV-1-infected Mphi were deficient in their capacity to recognize and bind Hc yeasts compared with control Mphi, and also were more permissive for the intracellular growth of Hc. Culture of normal Mphi with the envelope glycoprotein gp120 inhibited phagocytosis of Hc yeasts by Mphi in a concentration-dependent manner, but did not cause more rapid intracellular growth of Hc. Normal Mphi cultured in the serum of HIV+ individuals with impaired Mphi function subsequently were deficient in their capacity to phagocytose Hc yeasts, and were more permissive for the intracellular growth of yeasts compared with Mphi cultured in normal serum. Conversely, culture of normal Mphi in the serum of HIV+ patients with normal Mphi function did not affect the interaction of Hc yeasts with Mphi. Moreover, when Mphi from HIV+ individuals that were initially defective in host defense against Hc were cultured in normal HIV- serum, normal Mphi function was demonstrated. Adsorption of gp120 from the serum of two HIV+ patients removed the capacity of the serum to cause a Mphi defect in phagocytosis of Hc, but had no effect on the capacity of the serum to cause accelerated intracellular growth. These data demonstrate that observed defects in Mphi interaction with Hc yeasts may be caused by gp120 and other, as yet unknown serum component(s) probably released into serum by HIV

  6. Effects of the I559P gp41 change on the conformation and function of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) membrane envelope glycoprotein trimer.

    PubMed

    Alsahafi, Nirmin; Debbeche, Olfa; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The mature human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer is produced by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor and consists of three gp120 exterior and three gp41 transmembrane subunits. The metastable Env complex is induced to undergo conformational changes required for virus entry by the binding of gp120 to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. An isoleucine-to-proline change (I559P) in the gp41 ectodomain has been used to stabilize soluble forms of HIV-1 Env trimers for structural characterization and for use as immunogens. In the native membrane-anchored HIV-1BG505 Env, the I559P change modestly decreased proteolytic maturation, increased the non-covalent association of gp120 with the Env trimer, and resulted in an Env conformation distinctly different from that of the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env. Compared with the wild-type Env, the I559P Env was recognized inefficiently by polyclonal sera from HIV-1-infected individuals, by several gp41-directed antibodies, by some antibodies against the CD4-binding site of gp120, and by antibodies that preferentially recognize the CD4-bound Env. Some of the gp120-associated antigenic differences between the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env and the I559P mutant were compensated by the SOS disulfide bond between gp120 and gp41, which has been used to stabilize cleaved soluble Env trimers. Nonetheless, regardless of the presence of the SOS changes, Envs with proline 559 were recognized less efficiently than Envs with isoleucine 559 by the VRC01 neutralizing antibody, which binds the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the PGT151 neutralizing antibody, which binds a hybrid gp120-gp41 epitope. The I559P change completely eliminated the ability of the HIV-1BG505 Env to mediate cell-cell fusion and virus entry, and abolished the capacity of the SOS Env to support virus infection in the presence of a reducing agent. These results suggest that differences exist between the quaternary structures of functional Env spikes and I559P

  7. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoetzel, Isidro . E-mail: ihotzel@gene.com; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain {beta}-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding.

  8. Use of synthetic peptides to represent surface-exposed epitopes defined by neutralizing dengue complex- and flavivirus group-reactive monoclonal antibodies on the native dengue type-2 virus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-07-01

    The reactions of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that defined dengue virus (DENV) complex, flavivirus subgroup or group neutralizing epitopes were tested against synthetic peptide sequences from domains I, II and III of the envelope (E) glycoproteins of different DENV-2 genotypes/strains. The DENV complex-reactive mAb identified the surface-exposed 304-GKFKV/IVKEIA-313 peptides and the DENV complex-conserved 393-KKGSSIGQ/KM-401 peptides in domain III, which were located adjacently in the native glycoprotein. Both flavivirus group-reactive mAbs reacted most strongly with fusion sequence peptides from domain II when they contained a cysteine (C) by glycine (G) substitution (underlined) (101-WGNGGGLFG-109) to represent the native rotated C side chain. The 393-401 sequence represents a newly identified epitope, present as a highly flexible coil located between the 385 and 393 cell-binding sequence and the 401 and 413 sequence involved in the E glycoprotein homo-trimer formation. The 101-109 sequence containing 105-C by G substitution and the 393-401 sequence are good candidates for diagnostic assays and cross-protection experiments.

  9. Human parainfluenza type 3 virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA and limited amino acid sequence of the purified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Coligan, J E; Jambou, R C; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of mRNA for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of human parainfluenza type 3 virus obtained from the corresponding cDNA clone had a single long open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 64,254 daltons consisting of 572 amino acids. The deduced protein sequence was confirmed by limited N-terminal amino acid microsequencing of CNBr cleavage fragments of native HN that was purified by immunoprecipitation. The HN protein is moderately hydrophobic and has four potential sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) of N-glycosylation in the C-terminal half of the molecule. It is devoid of both the N-terminal signal sequence and the C-terminal membrane anchorage domain characteristic of the hemagglutinin of influenza virus and the fusion (F0) protein of the paramyxoviruses. Instead, it has a single prominent hydrophobic region capable of membrane insertion beginning at 32 residues from the N terminus. This N-terminal membrane insertion is similar to that of influenza virus neuraminidase and the recently reported structures of HN proteins of Sendai virus and simian virus 5. Images PMID:3003381

  10. Purified herpes simplex type 1 glycoprotein D (gD) genetically fused with the type 16 human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein enhances antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses and confers protective antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Porchia, Bruna F M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Cariri, Francisco A M O; Santana, Vinícius C; Amorim, Jaime H; Balan, Andrea; Braga, Catarina J M; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2011-12-05

    Type 1 herpes virus (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) enhances antigen-specific immune responses, particularly CD8(+) T cell responses, in mice immunized with DNA vaccines encoding hybrid proteins genetically fused with the target antigen at a site near the C-terminal end. These effects are attributed to the interaction of gD with the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and the concomitant blockade of a coinhibitory mechanism mediated by the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA). However, questions concerning the requirement for endogenous synthesis of the antigen or the adjuvant/antigen fusion itself have not been addressed so far. In the present study, we investigated these points using purified recombinant gDs, genetically fused or not with type 16 papilloma virus (HPV-16) E7 oncoprotein. Soluble recombinant gDs, but not denatured forms, retained the ability to bind surface-exposed cellular receptors of HVEM-expressing U937 cells. In addition, in vivo administration of the recombinant proteins, particularly gD genetically fused with E7 (gDE7), promoted the activation of dendritic cells (DC) and antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. More relevantly, mice immunized with the gDE7 protein developed complete preventive and partial therapeutic antitumor protection, as measured in mice following the implantation of TC-1 cells expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the T cell adjuvant effects of the HSV-1 gD protein did not require endogenous synthesis and could be demonstrated in mice immunized with purified recombinant proteins.

  11. Purifying Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  12. Processing, fusogenicity, virion incorporation and CXCR4-binding activity of a feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein lacking the two conserved N-glycosylation sites at the C-terminus of the V3 domain.

    PubMed

    González, Silvia A; Affranchino, José L

    2016-07-01

    The process of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) entry into its target cells is initiated by the association of the surface (SU) subunit of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) with the cellular receptors CD134 and CXCR4. This event is followed by the fusion of the viral and cellular membranes, which is mediated by the transmembrane (TM) subunit of Env. We and others have previously demonstrated that the V3 domain of the SU subunit of Env is essential for CXCR4 binding. Of note, there are two contiguous and highly conserved potential N-glycosylation sites ((418)NST(420) and (422)NLT(424)) located at the C-terminal side of the V3 domain. We therefore decided to study the relevance for Env functions of these N-glycosylation motifs and found that disruption of both of them by introducing the N418Q/N422Q double amino acid substitution drastically impairs Env processing into the SU and TM subunits. Moreover, the simultaneous mutation of these N-glycosylation sites prevents Env incorporation into virions and Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Notably, a recombinant soluble version of the SU glycoprotein carrying the double amino acid replacement N418Q/N422Q at the V3 C-terminal side binds to CXCR4 with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type SU.

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein K is not essential for infectious virus production in actively replicating cells but is required for efficient envelopment and translocation of infectious virions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space.

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandra, S; Baghian, A; Kousoulas, K G

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the glycoprotein K (gK)-null herpes simplex virus type 1 [HSV-1] (KOS) delta gK and compared it to the gK-null virus HSV-1 F-gKbeta (L. Hutchinson et al., J. Virol. 69:5401-5413, 1995). delta gK and F-gKbeta mutant viruses produced small plaques on Vero cell monolayers at 48 h postinfection. F-gKbeta caused extensive fusion of 143TK cells that was sensitive to melittin, a specific inhibitor of gK-induced cell fusion, while delta gK virus did not fuse 143TK cells. A recombinant plasmid containing the truncated gK gene specified by F-gKbeta failed to rescue the ICP27-null virus KOS (d27-1), while a plasmid with the delta gK deletion rescued the d27-1 virus efficiently. delta gK virus yield was approximately 100,000-fold lower in stationary cells than in actively replicating Vero cells. The plaquing efficiencies of delta gK and F-gKbeta virus stocks on VK302 cells were similar, while the plaquing efficiency of F-gKbeta virus stocks on Vero cells was reduced nearly 10,000-fold in comparison to that of delta gK virus. Mutant delta gK and F-gKbeta infectious virions accumulated within Vero and HEp-2 cells but failed to translocate to extracellular spaces. delta gK capsids accumulated in the nuclei of Vero but not HEp-2 cells. Enveloped delta gK virions were visualized in the cytoplasms of both Vero and HEp-2 cells, and viral capsids were found in the cytoplasm of HEp-2 cells within vesicles. Glycoproteins B, C, D, and H were expressed on the surface of delta gK-infected Vero cells in amounts similar to those for KOS-infected Vero cells. These results indicate that gK is involved in nucleocapsid envelopment, and more importantly in the translocation of infectious virions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular spaces, and that actively replicating cells can partially compensate for the envelopment but not for the cellular egress deficiency of the delta gK virus. Comparison of delta gK and F-gKbeta viruses suggests that the inefficient viral replication

  14. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  15. Water Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Floatron water purifier combines two space technologies - ionization for water purification and solar electric power generation. The water purification process involves introducing ionized minerals that kill microorganisms like algae and bacteria. The 12 inch unit floats in a pool while its solar panel collects sunlight that is converted to electricity. The resulting current energizes a specially alloyed mineral electrode below the waterline, causing release of metallic ions into the water. The electrode is the only part that needs replacing, and water purified by the system falls within EPA drinking water standards.

  16. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Slack, Olga A.L.; Carpio, Victor H.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)–any amino acid (X)–serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: “Gc-large” and “Gc-small”, and N1077 was responsible for “Gc-large” band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN. PMID:27223297

  17. N-Glycans on the Rift Valley Fever Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Gn and Gc Redundantly Support Viral Infection via DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Huante, Matthew B; Slack, Olga A L; Carpio, Victor H; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-05-23

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-transmitted, zoonotic disease that infects humans and ruminants. Dendritic cell specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM-3) grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) acts as a receptor for members of the phlebovirus genus. The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) glycoproteins (Gn/Gc) encode five putative N-glycan sequons (asparagine (N)-any amino acid (X)-serine (S)/threonine (T)) at positions: N438 (Gn), and N794, N829, N1035, and N1077 (Gc). The N-glycosylation profile and significance in viral infection via DC-SIGN have not been elucidated. Gc N-glycosylation was first evaluated by using Gc asparagine (N) to glutamine (Q) mutants. Subsequently, we generated a series of recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain mutants, which encode N-to-Q mutations, and the infectivity of each mutant in Jurkat cells stably expressing DC-SIGN was evaluated. Results showed that Gc N794, N1035, and N1077 were N-glycosylated but N829 was not. Gc N1077 was heterogeneously N-glycosylated. RVFV Gc made two distinct N-glycoforms: "Gc-large" and "Gc-small", and N1077 was responsible for "Gc-large" band. RVFV showed increased infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN compared to cells lacking DC-SIGN. Infection via DC-SIGN was increased in the presence of either Gn N438 or Gc N1077. Our study showed that N-glycans on the Gc and Gn surface glycoproteins redundantly support RVFV infection via DC-SIGN.

  18. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and cDNA cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per a litter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide-binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48-1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  19. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J. . E-mail: n.j.dimmock@warwick.ac.uk

    2005-07-05

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, {beta}-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell.

  20. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per liter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48 - 1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  1. Selective killing of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytically infected cells with a recombinant immunotoxin targeting the viral gpK8.1A envelope glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Deboeeta; Chandran, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) is etiologically associated with three neoplastic syndromes: Kaposi sarcoma and the uncommon HIV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman disease. The incidence of the latter B-cell pathology has been increasing in spite of antiretroviral therapy; its association with lytic virus replication has prompted interest in therapeutic strategies aimed at this phase of the virus life cycle. We designed and expressed a recombinant immunotoxin (2014-PE38) targeting the gpK8.1A viral glycoprotein expressed on the surface of the virion and infected cells. We show that this immunotoxin selectively kills KSHV-infected cells in dose-dependent fashion, resulting in major reductions of infectious virus release. The immunotoxin and ganciclovir, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication, showed marked reciprocal potentiation of antiviral activities. These results suggest that the immunotoxin, alone or in combination, may represent a new approach to treat diseases associated with KSHV lytic replication. PMID:22377676

  2. Priming of CD4+ T cells specific for conserved regions of human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp120 in humans immunized with a recombinant envelope protein.

    PubMed Central

    Abrignani, S; Montagna, D; Jeannet, M; Wintsch, J; Haigwood, N L; Shuster, J R; Steimer, K S; Cruchaud, A; Staehelin, T

    1990-01-01

    A nonglycosylated denatured form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 1 glycoprotein gp120 (Env 2-3), which does not bind to CD4, was used with muramyl tripeptide as adjuvant to immunize HIV-seronegative healthy volunteers. In all the volunteers, three 50-micrograms injections of Env 2-3 induced priming of CD4+ T cells specific for conserved regions of the native glycosylated gp120. Moreover, we found that several major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) alleles can function as restriction molecules for presentation of conserved epitopes of gp120 to T cells, implying that a T-cell response to these epitopes can be obtained in a large fraction of the population. The possibility to prime CD4+ T cells specific for conserved epitopes of a HIV protein is particularly important in view of the lack of such cells in HIV-infected individuals and of a possible role that CD4+ T cells may play in the development of protective immunity against AIDS. PMID:1696717

  3. Water Purifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Technology developed to purify the water aboard manned spacecraft has led to a number of spinoff applications. One of them is the Ambassador line of bacteriostatic water treatment systems, which employ high grade, high absorption media to inhibit bacteria growth and remove the medicinal taste and odor of chlorine. Company President, Ray Ward, originally became interested in the technology because of the "rusty" taste of his water supply.

  4. A rev1-vpu polymorphism unique to HIV-1 subtype A and C strains impairs envelope glycoprotein expression from rev-vpu-env cassettes and reduces virion infectivity in pseudotyping assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Grayson, Truman; McPherson, David T.; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Williamson, Carolyn; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-02-20

    Functional studies of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) commonly include the generation of pseudoviruses, which are produced by co-transfection of rev-vpu-env cassettes with an env-deficient provirus. Here, we describe six Env constructs from transmitted/founder HIV-1 that were defective in the pseudotyping assay, although two produced infectious virions when expressed from their cognate proviruses. All of these constructs exhibited an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and vpu were in the same reading frame without an intervening stop codon. Disruption of the rev1-vpu fusion gene by frameshift mutation, stop codon, or abrogation of the rev initiation codon restored pseudovirion infectivity. Introduction of the fusion gene into wildtype Env cassettes severely compromised their function. The defect was not due to altered env and rev transcription or a dominant negative effect of the expressed fusion protein, but seemed to be caused by inefficient translation at the env initiation codon. Although the rev1-vpu polymorphism affects Env expression only in vitro, it can cause problems in studies requiring Env complementation, such as analyses of co-receptor usage and neutralization properties, since 3% of subtype A, 20% of subtype C and 5% of CRF01{sub A}/E viruses encode the fusion gene. A solution is to eliminate the rev initiation codon when amplifying rev-vpu-env cassettes since this increases Env expression irrespective of the presence of the polymorphism.

  5. Specific interaction of CXCR4 with CD4 and CD8{alpha}: Functional analysis of the CD4/CXCR4 interaction in the context of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Basmaciogullari, Stephane . E-mail: basmaciogullari@cochin.inserm.fr; Pacheco, Beatriz; Bour, Stephan; Sodroski, Joseph

    2006-09-15

    We investigated possible interactions between HIV-1 receptor (CD4) and the main coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5. We found that CD4 and CXCR4 coexpressed in 293T cells form a complex that can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies directed against the extracellular domain of either protein. Mutagenesis revealed that the CD4/CXCR4 interaction maps to two previously uncharacterized basic motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of CD4. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion was found to be independent of the ability of CD4 and CXCR4 to interact, whether fusion was studied in a virus-cell or a cell-cell model. However, this interaction might explain the adaptation of HIV-1 to CXCR4 as an alternative to CCR5. We found that CXCR4 also interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of CD8{alpha} in a way that is similar to the CD4/CXCR4 interaction. The CD4/CXCR4 and CD8{alpha}/CXCR4 interactions may thus be involved in cellular signaling pathways shared by the CD4 and CD8{alpha} molecules.

  6. Characterization of retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope glycoproteins of four serotypes of dengue viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.-P.; Hsieh, S.-C.; King, C.-C.; Wang, W.-K.

    2007-11-25

    In this study, we successfully established retrovirus-based reporter viruses pseudotyped with the precursor membrane and envelope (PrM/E) proteins of each of the four serotypes of dengue viruses, which caused the most important arboviral diseases in this century. Co-sedimentation of the dengue E protein and HIV-1 core proteins by sucrose gradient analysis of the pseudotype reporter virus of dengue virus type 2, D2(HIVluc), and detection of HIV-1 core proteins by immunoprecipitation with anti-E monoclonal antibody suggested that dengue viral proteins were incorporated into the pseudotype viral particles. The infectivity in target cells, as assessed by the luciferase activity, can be inhibited by the lysosomotropic agents, suggesting a pH-dependent mechanism of entry. Amino acid substitutions of the leucine at position 107, a critical residue at the fusion loop of E protein, with lysine resulted in severe impairment in infectivity, suggesting that entry of the pseudotype reporter virus is mediated through the fusogenic properties of E protein. With more and more dengue viral sequences available from different outbreaks worldwide, this sensitive and convenient tool has the potential to facilitate molecular characterization of the PrM/E proteins of dengue field isolates.

  7. ERManI (Endoplasmic Reticulum Class I α-Mannosidase) Is Required for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Degradation via Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Protein Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Frabutt, Dylan A; Moremen, Kelley W; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2015-09-04

    Previously, we reported that the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) induces HIV-1 envelope (Env) degradation via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, but the mechanism was not clear. Here we investigated how the four ER-associated glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) α-mannosidases, ERManI, and ER-degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like (EDEM) proteins 1, 2, and 3, are involved in the Env degradation process. Ectopic expression of these four α-mannosidases uncovers that only ERManI inhibits HIV-1 Env expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, genetic knock-out of the ERManI gene MAN1B1 using CRISPR/Cas9 technology disrupts the TSPO-mediated Env degradation. Biochemical studies show that HIV-1 Env interacts with ERManI, and between the ERManI cytoplasmic, transmembrane, lumenal stem, and lumenal catalytic domains, the catalytic domain plays a critical role in the Env-ERManI interaction. In addition, functional studies show that inactivation of the catalytic sites by site-directed mutagenesis disrupts the ERManI activity. These studies identify ERManI as a critical GH47 α-mannosidase in the ER-associated protein degradation pathway that initiates the Env degradation and suggests that its catalytic domain and enzymatic activity play an important role in this process.

  8. Impact of HIV-1 Backbone on Neutralization Sensitivity: Neutralization Profiles of Heterologous Envelope Glycoproteins Expressed in Native Subtype C and CRF01_AE Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Buell, Eric; Wesberry, Maggie; Towle, Teresa; Pillis, Devin M.; Molnar, Sebastian; McLinden, Robert; Edmonds, Tara; Hirsch, Ivan; O’Connell, Robert; McCutchan, Francine E.; Montefiori, David C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Kim, Jerome H.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-01-01

    Standardized assays to assess vaccine and antiviral drug efficacy are critical for the development of protective HIV-1 vaccines and drugs. These immune assays will be advanced by the development of standardized viral stocks, such as HIV-1 infectious molecular clones (IMC), that i) express a reporter gene, ii) are representative of globally diverse subtypes and iii) are engineered to easily exchange envelope (env) genes for expression of sequences of interest. Thus far, a subtype B IMC backbone expressing Renilla luciferase (LucR), and into which the ectodomain of heterologous env coding sequences can be expressed has been successfully developed but as execution of HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trials shifts increasingly to non-subtype B epidemics (Southern African and Southeast Asia), non-subtype B HIV-1 reagents are needed to support vaccine development. Here we describe two IMCs derived from subtypes C and CRF01_AE HIV-1 primary isolates expressing LucR (IMC.LucR) that were engineered to express heterologous gp160 Envs. 18 constructs expressing various subtypes C and CRF01_AE Envs, mostly acute, in subtype-matched and –unmatched HIV backbones were tested for functionality and neutralization sensitivity. Our results suggest a possible effect of non-env HIV-1 genes on the interaction of Env and neutralizing antibodies and highlight the need to generate a library of IMCs representative of the HIV-1 subtype spectrum to be used as standardized neutralization assay reagents for assessing HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. PMID:24312165

  9. Anti-envelope antibody responses in individuals at high risk of hepatitis C virus who resist infection.

    PubMed

    Swann, R E; Mandalou, P; Robinson, M W; Ow, M M; Foung, S K H; McLauchlan, J; Patel, A H; Cramp, M E

    2016-11-01

    Injection drug users uninfected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) despite likely repeated exposure through high-risk behaviour are well documented. Factors preventing infection in these individuals are incompletely understood. Here, we looked for anti-HCV-envelope antibody responses in a cohort of repeatedly exposed but uninfected subjects. Forty-two hepatitis C diagnostic antibody- and RNA-negative injection drug users at high risk of exposure were studied and findings compared to healthy controls and cases with chronic HCV infection. Purified IgGs from sera were tested by ELISA for binding to genotype 1a and 3a envelope glycoproteins E1E2 with further testing for IgG and IgM reactivity against soluble E2. Virus-neutralizing activity was assessed using an HCV pseudoparticle system. Uninfected subjects demonstrated significantly greater IgG and IgM reactivities to envelope glycoproteins than healthy controls with IgG from 6 individuals additionally showing significant neutralization. This study is the first to describe humoral immunological responses targeting the HCV envelope, important for viral neutralization, in exposed uninfected individuals. A subset of these cases also had evidence of viral neutralization via anti-envelope antibodies. In addition to confirming viral exposure, the presence of specific anti-envelope antibodies may be a factor that helps these individuals resist HCV infection.

  10. HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Resistance to Monoclonal Antibody 2G12 Is Subject-Specific and Context-Dependent in Macaques and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Delphine C.; Sanders, Rogier W.; van Gils, Marit J.; Park, Byung; Gomes, Michelle M.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Barnett, Susan; Haigwood, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Envelope (Env) protein is the sole target of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that arise during infection to neutralize autologous variants. Under this immune pressure, HIV escape variants are continuously selected and over the course of infection Env becomes more neutralization resistant. Many common alterations are known to affect sensitivity to NAbs, including residues encoding potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS). Knowledge of Env motifs associated with neutralization resistance is valuable for the design of an effective Env-based vaccine so we characterized Envs isolated longitudinally from a SHIVSF162P4 infected macaque for sensitivity to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) B12, 2G12, 4E10 and 2F5. The early Env, isolated from plasma at day 56 after infection, was the most sensitive and the late Env, from day 670, was the most resistant to MAbs. We identified four PNGS in these Envs that accumulated over time at positions 130, 139, 160 and 397. We determined that removal of these PNGS significantly increased neutralization sensitivity to 2G12, and conversely, we identified mutations by in silico analyses that contributed resistance to 2G12 neutralization. In order to expand our understanding of these PNGS, we analyzed Envs from clade B HIV-infected human subjects and identified additional glycan and amino acid changes that could affect neutralization by 2G12 in a context-dependent manner. Taken together, these in vitro and in silico analyses of clade B Envs revealed that 2G12 resistance is achieved by previously unrecognized PNGS substitutions in a context-dependent manner and by subject-specific pathways. PMID:24040404

  11. Preparation of Recombinant Viral Glycoproteins for Novel and Therapeutic Antibody Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Peng; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Broder, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are a critical component in the protection or recovery from viral infections. In the absence of available vaccines or antiviral drugs for many important human viral pathogens, the identification and characterization of new human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) able to neutralize viruses offers the possibility for effective pre- and/or post-exposure therapeutic modalities. Such hmAbs may also help in our understanding of the virus entry process, the mechanisms of virus neutralization and in the eventual development of specific entry inhibitors, vaccines and research tools. The majority of the more recently developed antiviral hmAbs have come from the use of antibody phage-display technologies using both naïve and immune libraries. Many of these agents are also enveloped viruses possessing important neutralizing determinants within their membrane-anchored envelope glycoproteins and the use of recombinant, soluble versions of these viral glycoproteins is often critical in the isolation and development of antiviral hmAbs. This chapter will detail several methods that have been successfully employed to produce, purify and characterize soluble and secreted versions of several viral envelope glycoproteins which have been successfully used as antigens to capture and isolate human phage-displayed monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19252850

  12. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4⁺ T-cells.

    PubMed

    McLinden, James H; Stapleton, Jack T; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-04-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glycoprotein (E2) of two GBV-Ccpz isolates obtained from the sera of captive chimpanzees. The deduced GBV-Ccpz E2 protein differed from human GBV-C by 31 % at the amino acid level. Similar to human GBV-C E2, expression of GBV-Ccpz E2 in a tet-off human CD4(+) Jurkat T-cell line significantly inhibited the replication of diverse HIV-1 isolates. This anti-HIV-replication effect of GBV-Ccpz E2 protein was reversed by maintaining cells in doxycycline to reduce E2 expression. Previously, we found a 17 aa region within human GBV-C E2 that was sufficient to inhibit HIV-1. Although GBV-Ccpz E2 differed by 3 aa differences in this region, the chimpanzee GBV-C 17mer E2 peptide inhibited HIV-1 replication. Similarly, the GBV-A peptide that aligns with this GBV-C E2 region inhibited HIV-1 replication despite sharing only 5 aa with the human GBV-C E2 sequence. Thus, despite amino acid differences, the peptide region on both the GBV-Ccpz and the GBV-A E2 protein inhibit HIV-1 replication similar to human GBV-C. Consequently, GBV-Ccpz or GBV-A infection of non-human primates may provide an animal model to study GB virus-HIV interactions.

  13. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  14. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  15. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  16. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  17. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  18. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  19. Glycoprotein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Circular dichroism of erythrocyte membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Decker, R V; Carraway, K L

    1975-03-28

    The circular dichroism spectra were obtained for purified equine, human and bovine membrane glycoproteins, which have 40, 55 and 70% carbohydrate, respectively. The spectra in aqueous buffer show similar shapes, maxima and minima but somewhat different peak amplitudes. Analysis of the spectra indicated that the glycoproteins can be pictured as existing primarily in an unordered form in dilute aqueous buffer with small amounts of alpha-helix (13-23%) present. In 2-chloroethanol, a helix-promoting solvent, the amount of alpha-helix is increased to 60-70%. The glycoproteins underwent denaturation in guanidine hydrochloride, although evidence of some residual structure did remain. The spectra of the glycoproteins change relatively little on going from aqueous buffer to dodecylsulfate solutions. Removal of 60% of the sialic acid does not induce significant conformational alterations. The anomalous behavior of the glycoproteins during molecular weight determinations does not appear to be related primarily to conformational restrictions on the polypeptide chain.

  4. Glycosylation of VSV glycoprotein is similar in cystic fibrosis, heterozygous carrier, and normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hunt, L A; Summers, D F

    1977-01-01

    The single envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus was used as a specific probe of glycosyltransferase activities in fibroblasts from two cystic fibrosis patients, an obligate heterozygous carrier and a normal individual. Gel filtration of pronase-digested glycopeptides from both purified virions and infected cell-associated VSV glycoprotein which had been labeled with[3H] glucosamine did not reveal any significant differences in the glycosylation patterns between the different cell cultures. All 4 cell lines were apparently able to synthesize the mannose- and glucosamine- containing core structure and branch chains terminating in sialic acid which are characteristic of asparagine-linked carbohydrate side chains in cellular glycoproteins. Analysis of tryptic glycopeptides by anion-exchange chromotography indicated that the same 2 major sites on the virus polypeptide were recognized and glycosylated in all 4 VSV-infected cell cultures. These studies suggest that the basic biochemical defect(s) in cystic fibrosis is not an absence or deficiency in enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrate side chains.

  5. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  6. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  7. Novel tubular and crystalline structures in purified preparations of Newcastle disease virus. Brief report.

    PubMed

    Gowans, E J; McNulty, M S

    1979-01-01

    Hitherto undescribed tubular and crystalline structures were detected by negative contrast electron microscopy in purified preparations of Newcastle disease virus. It is suggested that these are viral in origin and are composed of aggregates of viral glycoprotein.

  8. SAFEGUARDS ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Cao; Richard Metcalf

    2010-07-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z-testing. A brief analysis of the impact of the safeguards optimization on the rest of plant efficiency, criticality concerns, and overall requirements is presented.

  9. METHOD FOR PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

    1960-04-26

    A process is given for purifying a uranium-base nuclear material. The nuclear material is dissolved in zinc or a zinc-magnesium alloy and the concentration of magnesium is increased until uranium precipitates.

  10. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with a modified RD114 envelope glycoprotein show increased stability in sera and augmented transduction of primary lymphocytes and CD34+ cells derived from human and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Boson, Bertrand; Salmon, Patrick; Gay, Wilfried; Nègre, Didier; Le Grand, Roger; Trono, Didier; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-08-01

    Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system, and their host range. We have investigated the capacity of a panel of GPs of both retroviral (amphotropic murine leukemia virus [MLV-A]; gibbon ape leukemia virus [GALV]; RD114, feline endogenous virus) and nonretroviral (fowl plague virus [FPV]; Ebola virus [EboV]; vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]; lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]) origins to pseudotype lentiviral vectors derived from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251). SIV vectors were efficiently pseudotyped with the FPV hemagglutinin, VSV-G, LCMV, and MLV-A GPs. In contrast, the GALV and RD114 GPs conferred much lower infectivity to the vectors. Capitalizing on the conservation of some structural features in the transmembrane domains and cytoplasmic tails of the incorporation-competent MLV-A GP and in RD114 and GALV GPs, we generated chimeric GPs encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of GALV or RD114 GPs fused to the cytoplasmic tail (designated TR) of MLV-A GP. Importantly, SIV-derived vectors pseudotyped with these GALV/TR and RD114/TR GP chimeras had significantly higher titers than vectors coated with the parental GPs. Additionally, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors were efficiently concentrated and were resistant to inactivation induced by the complement of both human and macaque sera, indicating that modified RD114 GP-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors may be of particular interest for in vivo gene transfer applications. Furthermore, as compared to vectors pseudotyped with other retroviral GPs or with VSV-G, RD114/TR-pseudotyped vectors showed augmented transduction of human and macaque primary blood lymphocytes and CD34+ cells.

  11. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J.; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125–130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  12. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  13. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  14. Method of purifying isosaccharinate

    DOEpatents

    Rai, Dhanpat; Moore, Robert C.; Tucker, Mark D.

    2010-09-07

    A method of purifying isosaccharinate by mixing sodium carbonate, potassium carbonate, sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide with calcium isosaccharinate, removing the precipitated calcium carbonate and adjusting the pH to between approximately 4.5 to 5.0 thereby removing excess carbonate and hydroxide to provide an acidic solution containing isosaccharinate.

  15. Purifying Water by Imbibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.

    1986-01-01

    Concept for purifying water uses absorbent material to remove organic substances. Entire bulk of material employed, not just surface. Proposed purification process uses inexpensive equipment and low energy. Material is methyl acrylate polymer. Material cheap and regenerated by rinsing with methanol or by allowing absorbed compounds to evaporate from it.

  16. Elevated temperature envelope forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Bruce M. (Inventor); Gane, David H. (Inventor); Starowski, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Elevated temperature envelope forming includes enclosing a part blank and form tool within an envelope sealed against the atmosphere, heat treating the combination while forming pressure holds the envelope and part against the form tool, and allowing part cool down to occur in an inert atmosphere with forming pressure removed. The forming pressure is provided by evacuating the envelope and may be aided by differential force applied between the envelope and the form tool.

  17. PROCESS OF PURIFYING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Orlemann, E.F.; Jensen, L.H.

    1958-12-23

    A method of obtaining substantially pure uranium from a uranium composition contaminated with light element impurities such as sodium, magnesium, beryllium, and the like is described. An acidic aqueous solution containing tetravalent uranium is treated with a soluble molybdate to form insoluble uranous molybdate which is removed. This material after washing is dissolved in concentrated nitric acid to obtaln a uranyl nitrate solution from which highly purified uranium is obtained by extraction with ether.

  18. Molecular characterization of glycoprotein genes and phylogenetic analysis of two swine paramyxoviruses isolated from United States.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dan; Janke, Bruce H; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2009-08-01

    Two swine paramyxoviruses (SPMV)-(81-19252 (Texas-81) and 92-7783 (ISU-92)-were isolated from encephalitic pigs in the United States in 1981 and 1992. Antigenic, morphologic, and biological characteristics of these two viruses were essentially similar to members of the family Paramyxoviridae. Antigenic analysis by indirect fluorescent antibody, immunoblot, and one-way cross-neutralization tests placed these viruses along with bovine parainfluenza 3 (BPIV3) viruses. Purified virions were 50-300 nm in size and morphologically indistinguishable from other paramyxoviruses. These two viruses hemagglutinated red blood cells and had neuraminidase activity. The gene junctions of fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HN) glycoprotein genes of these viruses contained highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and trinucleotide intergenic regions similar to other Paramyxoviridae. The F gene of ISU-92 was longer than Texas-81 due to insertion of a 24-nucleotide "U"-rich 3' untranslated region. Structure-based sequence alignment of glycoproteins of these two SPMVs indicated that they are essentially similar in structure and function to parainfluenzaviruses. The Texas-81 strain was closely related to BPIV3 Shipping Fever (SF) strain at nucleotide and amino acid level, while the ISU-92 strain was more closely related to BPIV3 910N strain. The envelope glycoproteins of ISU-92 had only approximately 92 and approximately 96% identity at nucleotide and amino acid levels with BPIV3-SF strain, respectively. The high sequence identities to BPIV3 indicated cross-species infection in pigs. Phylogenetic analyses based on both F protein and HN protein suggested the classification of these viruses into the subfamily Paramyxovirinae, genus Respirovirus, and genotype A of BPIV3.

  19. Foreign Glycoproteins Can Be Actively Recruited to Virus Assembly Sites during Pseudotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Vogt, Volker M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites. PMID:19224995

  20. Natural Air Purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA environmental research has led to a plant-based air filtering system. Dr. B.C. Wolverton, a former NASA engineer who developed a biological filtering system for space life support, served as a consultant to Terra Firma Environmental. The company is marketing the BioFilter, a natural air purifier that combines activated carbon and other filter media with living plants and microorganisms. The filter material traps and holds indoor pollutants; plant roots and microorganisms then convert the pollutants into food for the plant. Most non-flowering house plants will work. After pollutants have been removed, the cleansed air is returned to the room through slits in the planter. Terra Firma is currently developing a filter that will also disinfect the air.

  1. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  2. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  3. Spatial orientation of glycoproteins in membranes of rat liver rough microsomes. II. Transmembrane disposition and characterization of glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Rat liver microsomal glycoproteins were purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A Sepharose columns from membrane and content fractions, separated from rough microsomes (RM) treated with low concentrations of deoxycholate (DOC). All periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive glycoproteins of RM showed affinity for concanavalin A Sepharose; even after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) acrylamide gel electrophoresis, most of the microsomal glycoproteins bound [125I]concanavalin A added to the gels, as detected by autoradiography. Two distinct sets of glycoproteins are present in the membrane and content fractions derived from RM. SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that RM membranes contain 15--20 glycoproteins (15--22% of the total microsomal protein) which range in apparent mol wt from 23,000 to 240,000 daltons. A smaller set of glycoproteins (five to seven polypeptides), with apparent mol wt between 60,000 and 200,000 daltons, was present in the microsomal content fraction. The disposition of the membrane glycoproteins with respect to the membrane plane was determined by selective iodination with the lactoperoxidase (LPO) technique. Intact RM were labeled on their outer face with 131I and, after opening of the vesicles with 0.05% DOC, in both faces with 125I. An analysis of iodination ratios for individual proteins separated electrophoretically showed that in most membrane glycoproteins, tyrosine residues are predominantly exposed on the luminal face of the vesicles, which is the same face on which the carbohydrate moieties are exposed. Several membrane glycoproteins are also exposed on the cytoplasmic surface and therefore have a transmembrane disposition. In this study, ribophorins I and II, two integral membrane proteins (mol wt 65,000 and 63,000) characteristic of RM, were found to be transmembrane glycoproteins. It is suggested that the transmembrane disposition of the ribophorins may be related to their possible role in ribosome binding and in the

  4. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 specifically inhibit the CD3/T cell-antigen receptor phosphoinositide transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cefai, D; Debre, P; Kaczorek, M; Idziorek, T; Autran, B; Bismuth, G

    1990-01-01

    The interference of the recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins gp160 and gp120 with the CD3/T cell antigen receptor (TcR)-mediated activation process has been investigated in the CD4+ diphtheria toxoid-specific human P28D T cell clone. Both glycoproteins clearly inhibit the T cell proliferation induced in an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free system by various cross-linked monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD3 molecule or the TcR alpha chain (up to 80% inhibition). Biochemical studies further demonstrate that exposure of the T cell clone to both glycoproteins (gps) specifically inhibits the CD3/TcR phospholipase C (PLC) transduction pathway, without affecting the CD3/TcR cell surface expression. Thus, inositol phosphate production, phosphatidic acid turnover, intracellular free calcium, and intracellular pH increase induced by CD3/TcR-specific MAbs are specifically impaired in gps-treated P28D T cells. Addition of purified soluble CD4 prevents binding of gps to T cells and overcomes all observed inhibitions. Maximal inhibitions are obtained for long-term exposure of the T cell clone to gps (16 h). No early effect of gps is observed. By contrast, gp160 and gp120 fail to suppress the CD2-triggered functional and biochemical P28D T cell responses. These results demonstrate that, in addition to their postulated role in the alteration of the interaction between CD4 on T lymphocytes and MHC class II molecules on APC, soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins may directly and specifically impair the CD3/TcR-mediated activation of PLC in uninfected T cells via the CD4 molecule. PMID:1979339

  6. Antibody Binding in Proximity to the Receptor/Glycoprotein Complex Leads to a Basal Level of Virus Neutralization▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinzhen; Lipchina, Inna; Lifton, Michelle; Wang, Liping; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Hypothetically, antibodies may neutralize enveloped viruses by diverse mechanisms, such as disruption of receptor binding, interference with conformational changes required for virus entry, steric hindrance, or virus aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that retroviral infection mediated by the avian sarcoma-leukosis virus (ASLV-A) envelope glycoproteins can be neutralized by an antibody directed against a functionally unimportant component of a chimeric receptor protein. Thus, the binding of an antibody in proximity to the retroviral envelope glycoprotein-receptor complex, without binding to the entry machinery itself, results in neutralization. This finding provides additional support for the hypothesis that steric hindrance is sufficient for antibody-mediated neutralization of retroviruses. PMID:17537847

  7. Characterization of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Filipa B.; Colaco, Susanna; May, Janet S.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) glycoprotein B (gB) was identified in purified virions by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy. It was synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor in infected cells and cleaved into 65-kDa and 55-kDa disulfide-linked subunits close to the time of virion release. The N-linked glycans on the cleaved, virion gB remained partially endoglycosidase H sensitive. The processing of MHV-68 gB therefore appears similar to that of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gB and human cytomegalovirus gB. PMID:15542690

  8. Immunogenicity of Escherichia coli expressed envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Nagesh K; Priya, Raj; Shrivastava, Ambuj

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging infection, is an arthropod-borne viral disease prevalent in different parts of the world, particularly Africa and South East Asia. Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein is involved in binding to host receptors and it contains specific epitopes that elicit virus neutralizing antibodies. A highly immunogenic, recombinant Chikungunya virus envelope 2 protein was produced by bioreactor in Escherichia coli for development of a suitable diagnostic and vaccine candidate. This protein was refolded and further purified to achieve biologically active protein. The biological function of refolded and purified recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus was confirmed by its ability to generate envelope 2 specific antibodies with high titers in animal models. These findings suggest that recombinant envelope 2 protein of Chikungunya virus in combination with compatible adjuvant is highly immunogenic. Thus, recombinant envelope 2 protein can be a potential diagnostic reagent and vaccine candidate against Chikungunya virus infection. PMID:24637708

  9. Substitution of specific cysteine residues in E1 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus strain Brescia affects formation of E1-E2 heterodimers and alters virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with E^rns and E2, is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E1 and E2 are anchored to the virus envelope at their carboxyl termini and E^rns loosely associates with the viral envelope. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers and heterodimers with E1,...

  10. Structural and Immunogenicity Studies of a Cleaved, Stabilized Envelope Trimer Derived from Subtype A HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Andjelic, Sofija; Binley, James M.; Crooks, Emma T.; Franti, Michael; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Donovan, Gerald P.; Dey, Antu K.; Zhu, Ping; Roux, Kenneth H.; Durso, Robert J.; Parsons, Thomas F.; Maddon, Paul J.; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.

    2015-01-01

    SOSIP gp140 trimers represent a soluble, stabilized, proteolytically cleaved form of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. SOSIP gp140 derived from a subtype A HIV-1 isolate, KNH1144, forms exceptionally stable trimers that resemble virion-associated Env in antigenicity and topology. Here, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers bound three soluble CD4 molecules in a symmetrical orientation similar to that seen for native Env. We compared the immunogenicities of KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers and gp120 monomers in rabbits and found that the trimers were superior at eliciting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to homologous virus as well as neutralization-sensitive subtype B and C viruses. The NAb specificities for SOSIP antisera mapped in part to the CD4 binding site on gp120. We also observed adjuvant-dependent induction of antibodies to the residual levels of host cell proteins (HCPs) contained in the purified Env preparations. When present, HCP antibodies enhanced pseudovirus infection. Our findings are relevant for the further development of Env-based vaccines for HIV-1. PMID:19567243

  11. Structural and immunogenicity studies of a cleaved, stabilized envelope trimer derived from subtype A HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun Kenneth; Andjelic, Sofija; Binley, James M; Crooks, Emma T; Franti, Michael; Iyer, Sai Prasad N; Donovan, Gerald P; Dey, Antu K; Zhu, Ping; Roux, Kenneth H; Durso, Robert J; Parsons, Thomas F; Maddon, Paul J; Moore, John P; Olson, William C

    2009-08-13

    SOSIP gp140 trimers represent a soluble, stabilized, proteolytically cleaved form of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoproteins. SOSIP gp140 derived from a subtype A HIV-1 isolate, KNH1144, forms exceptionally stable trimers that resemble virion-associated Env in antigenicity and topology. Here, we used electron microscopy to demonstrate that KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers bound three soluble CD4 molecules in a symmetrical orientation similar to that seen for native Env. We compared the immunogenicities of KNH1144 SOSIP gp140 trimers and gp120 monomers in rabbits and found that the trimers were superior at eliciting neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to homologous virus as well as neutralization-sensitive subtype B and C viruses. The NAb specificities for SOSIP antisera mapped in part to the CD4 binding site on gp120. We also observed adjuvant-dependent induction of antibodies to the residual levels of host cell proteins (HCPs) contained in the purified Env preparations. When present, HCP antibodies enhanced pseudovirus infection. Our findings are relevant for the further development of Env-based vaccines for HIV-1.

  12. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in calf kidney. Glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities towards serum glycoproteins and calf Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, W; Lasthuis, A M; van den Eijnden, D H

    1979-04-18

    CMP-AcNeu:glycoprotein sialyltransltransltransltransltransferase of calf kidney cortex was characterized using serum glycoproteins and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, obtained from calf urine, as acceptors. Native calf Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein showed the best acceptor properties, followed by desialylated calf fetuin and desialylated human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein exhibiting V values of, respectively, 114, 63 and 41 nmol/h per g wet wt. of kidney cortex and Km values of 0.12, 0.16 and 0.26 mM glycoprotein acceptor. Desialylated ovine submaxillary mucine appeared to be a very poor acceptor. Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein sialyltransferase could be distinguished from serum glycoprotein sialyltransferase by competition studies. In addition the two glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities showed different distributions over the three regions of the calf kidney: the ratios of the Tamm-Horsfall to serum glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities decreased from 3.3 in the cortex to 0.8 and 0.4 in the medulla and the papilla, respectively. It was concluded that in calf kidney at least two different sialyltransferases exist. The high cortical Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein sialyltransferases activity corresponds markedly to the origin of the urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, namely the distal part of the kidney tubule. Inactivation of glycoprotein sialyltransferase activity by preincubation at various temperatures and during storage at 0 degree C, could be reduced by the addition of CMP-AcNeu. The possible relevance towards the in vivo sialylation of this finding is discussed.

  13. The chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP1 is a constituent of the insoluble glycoprotein framework of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Frank, Ronald; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells are surrounded by the insoluble cell wall component, a sac-like framework of cross-linked glycoproteins containing 22% hydroxyproline. The chaotrope-soluble cell wall glycoprotein GP1 is the only polypeptide with an even higher proportion of hydroxyproline (35%) occurring in vegetative C. reinhardtii cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of peptides released from the purified insoluble cell wall fraction by trypsin treatment and epitope analyses of polyclonal antibodies raised against different deglycosylation products of this particular wall fraction using 181 chemically synthesized GP1-derived pentadecapeptides revealed evidence that GP1 is indeed a constituent of the insoluble wall component.

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus Capsids Are Transported in Neuronal Axons without an Envelope Containing the Viral Glycoproteins▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Aleksandra; Wisner, Todd W.; Johnson, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Electron micrographic studies of neuronal axons have produced contradictory conclusions on how alphaherpesviruses are transported from neuron cell bodies to axon termini. Some reports have described unenveloped capsids transported on axonal microtubules with separate transport of viral glycoproteins within membrane vesicles. Others have observed enveloped virions in proximal and distal axons. We characterized transport of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human and rat neurons by staining permeabilized neurons with capsid- and glycoprotein-specific antibodies. Deconvolution microscopy was used to view 200-nm sections of axons. HSV glycoproteins were very rarely associated with capsids (3 to 5%) and vice versa. Instances of glycoprotein/capsid overlap frequently involved nonconcentric puncta and regions of axons with dense viral protein concentrations. Similarly, HSV capsids expressing a VP26-green fluorescent protein fusion protein (VP26/GFP) did not stain with antiglycoprotein antibodies. Live-cell imaging experiments with VP26/GFP-labeled capsids demonstrated that capsids moved in a saltatory fashion, and very few stalled for more than 1 to 2 min. To determine if capsids could be transported down axons without glycoproteins, neurons were treated with brefeldin A (BFA). However, BFA blocked both capsid and glycoprotein transport. Glycoproteins were transported into and down axons normally when neurons were infected with an HSV mutant that produces immature capsids that are retained in the nucleus. We concluded that HSV capsids are transported in axons without an envelope containing viral glycoproteins, with glycoproteins transported separately and assembling with capsids at axon termini. PMID:16971450

  15. Arms Race between Enveloped Viruses and the Host ERAD Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Frabutt, Dylan A.; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Enveloped viruses represent a significant category of pathogens that cause serious diseases in animals. These viruses express envelope glycoproteins that are singularly important during the infection of host cells by mediating fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes. Despite low homology at protein levels, three classes of viral fusion proteins have, as of yet, been identified based on structural similarities. Their incorporation into viral particles is dependent upon their proper sub-cellular localization after being expressed and folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, viral protein expression can cause stress in the ER, and host cells respond to alleviate the ER stress in the form of the unfolded protein response (UPR); the effects of which have been observed to potentiate or inhibit viral infection. One important arm of UPR is to elevate the capacity of the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, which is comprised of host quality control machinery that ensures proper protein folding. In this review, we provide relevant details regarding viral envelope glycoproteins, UPR, ERAD, and their interactions in host cells. PMID:27657106

  16. [Proteomic Analyses of Purified Particles of the Rabies Virus].

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhongzhong; Gong, Wenjie; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Ye; Li, Nan; Tu, Changchun

    2015-05-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) is an enveloped RNA virus. It mainly damages the central nervous system and causes anencephaly in mammals and humans. There is now compelling evidence that enveloped virions released from infected cells can carry many host proteins, some of which may play an important part in viral replication. Several host proteins have been reported to be incorporated into RABV particles. However, a systematic study to reveal the proteomics of RABV particles has not been conducted. In the present study, after virus culture and purification by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, a proteomics approach was used to analyze the protein composition of purified RABV particles to understand the molecular mechanisms of virus-cell interactions. Fifty host proteins, along with five virus-encoded structural proteins, were identified in purified RABV particles. These proteins could be classified into ten categories according to function: intracellular trafficking (14%), molecular chaperone (12%), cytoskeletal (24%), signal transduction (8%), transcription regulation (12%), calcium ion-binding (6%), enzyme binding (6%), metabolic process (2%), ubiquitin (2%) and other (14%). Of these, four proteins (beta-actin, p-tubulin, Cofilin, Hsc70) were validated by western blotting to be present in purified RABV particles. This novel study of the composition of host proteins in RABV particles may aid investigation of the mechanism of RABV replication.

  17. Immunogenic Display of Purified Chemically Cross-Linked HIV-1 Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Leaman, Daniel P.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes are prime vaccine candidates, at least in principle, but suffer from instability, molecular heterogeneity and a low copy number on virions. We anticipated that chemical cross-linking of HIV-1 would allow purification and molecular characterization of trimeric Env spikes, as well as high copy number immunization. Broadly neutralizing antibodies bound tightly to all major quaternary epitopes on cross-linked spikes. Covalent cross-linking of the trimer also stabilized broadly neutralizing epitopes, although surprisingly some individual epitopes were still somewhat sensitive to heat or reducing agent. Immunodepletion using non-neutralizing antibodies to gp120 and gp41 was an effective method for removing non-native-like Env. Cross-linked spikes, purified via an engineered C-terminal tag, were shown by negative stain EM to have well-ordered, trilobed structure. An immunization was performed comparing a boost with Env spikes on virions to spikes cross-linked and captured onto nanoparticles, each following a gp160 DNA prime. Although differences in neutralization did not reach statistical significance, cross-linked Env spikes elicited a more diverse and sporadically neutralizing antibody response against Tier 1b and 2 isolates when displayed on nanoparticles, despite attenuated binding titers to gp120 and V3 crown peptides. Our study demonstrates display of cross-linked trimeric Env spikes on nanoparticles, while showing a level of control over antigenicity, purity and density of virion-associated Env, which may have relevance for Env based vaccine strategies for HIV-1. IMPORTANCE The envelope spike (Env) is the target of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies, which a successful vaccine will need to elicit. However, native Env on virions is innately labile, as well as heterogeneously and sparsely displayed. We therefore stabilized Env spikes using a chemical cross-linker and removed non-native Env by immunodepletion with non

  18. Secretory expression of bovine herpesvirus type 1/5 glycoprotein E in Pichia pastoris for the differential diagnosis of vaccinated or infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Siedler, Bianca S; Roloff, Bárbara C; de Sá, Gizele L; Neis, Alessandra; Conceição, Fabrício R; Hartwig, Daiane D; Borsuk, Sibele; Dellagostin, Odir A; Campos, Fabrício S; Roehe, Paulo M; Hartleben, Claudia P; McBride, Alan J A

    2017-02-01

    Bovine herpesvirus (BoHV) glycoprotein E (gE) is a non-essential envelope glycoprotein and the deletion of gE has been used to develop BoHV-1 and BoHV-5 differential vaccine strains. The DIVA (Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals) strategy, using marker vaccines based on gE-negative BoHV strains, allows the identification of vaccinated or infected animals in immunoassays designed to detect anti-gE antibodies. In this study a codon optimized synthetic sequence of gE containing highly conserved regions from BoHV-1 and BoHV-5 was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Following expression, the recombinant gE (rgE) was secreted and purified from the culture medium. The rgE was identified by Western blotting (WB) using sera from cattle naturally infected with BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5, or sera from bovines experimentally infected with wild-type BoHV-5. Sera collected from cattle vaccinated with a BoHV-5 gI/gE/US9¯ marker vaccine failed to recognise rgE. Expression of rgE, based on a sequence containing highly conserved regions from BoHV-1 and BoHV-5, in P. pastoris enabled the production of large quantities of rgE suitable for use in immunoassays for the differentiation vaccinated or infected cattle.

  19. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fun-In; Deng, Ming-Chung; Huang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Chia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field. PMID:26131960

  20. Methods for purifying carbon materials

    DOEpatents

    Dailly, Anne; Ahn, Channing; Yazami, Rachid; Fultz, Brent T.

    2009-05-26

    Methods of purifying samples are provided that are capable of removing carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous impurities from a sample containing a carbon material having a selected structure. Purification methods are provided for removing residual metal catalyst particles enclosed in multilayer carbonaceous impurities in samples generate by catalytic synthesis methods. Purification methods are provided wherein carbonaceous impurities in a sample are at least partially exfoliated, thereby facilitating subsequent removal of carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous impurities from the sample. Methods of purifying carbon nanotube-containing samples are provided wherein an intercalant is added to the sample and subsequently reacted with an exfoliation initiator to achieve exfoliation of carbonaceous impurities.

  1. Glycosylation does not determine segregation of viral envelope proteins in the plasma membrane of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Enveloped viruses are excellent tools for the study of the biogenesis of epithelial polarity, because they bud asymmetrically from confluent monolayers of epithelial cells and because polarized budding is preceded by the accumulation of envelope proteins exclusively in the plasma membrane regions from which the viruses bud. In this work, three different experimental approaches showed that the carbohydrate moieties do not determine the final surface localization of either influenza (WSN strain) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope proteins in infected Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, as determined by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, using ferritin as a marker. Infected concanavalin A- and ricin 1-resistant mutants of MDCK cells, with alterations in glycosylation, exhibited surface distributions of viral glycoproteins identical to those of the parental cell line, i.e., influenza envelope proteins were exclusively found in the apical surface, whereas VSV G protein was localized only in the basolateral region. MDCK cells treated with tunicamycin, which abolishes the glycosylation of viral glycoproteins, exhibited the same distribution of envelope proteins as control cells, after infection with VSF or influenza. A temperature-sensitive mutant of influenza WSN, ts3, which, when grown at the nonpermissive temperature of 39.5 degrees C, retains the sialic acid residues in the envelope glycoproteins, showed, at both 32 degrees C (permissive temperature) and 39.5 degrees C, budding polarity and viral glycoprotein distribution identical to those of the parental WSN strain, when grown in MDCK cells. These results demonstrate that carbohydrate moieties are not components of the addressing signals that determine the polarized distribution of viral envelope proteins, and possibly of the intrinsic cellular plasma membrane proteins, in the surface of epithelial cells. PMID:6265461

  2. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  3. Cloning and characterization of functional subtype A HIV-1 envelope variants transmitted through breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Rainwater, Stephanie M J; Wu, Xueling; Nduati, Ruth; Nedellec, Rebecca; Mosier, Donald; John-Stewart, Grace; Mbori-Ngacha, Dorothy; Overbaugh, Julie

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies of HIV-1 variants transmitted from mother-to-infant have focused primarily on computational analyses of partial envelope gene sequences, rather than analyses of functional envelope variants. There are very few examples of well-characterized functional envelope clones from mother-infant pairs, especially from envelope variants representing the most prevalent subtypes worldwide. To address this, we amplified the envelope variants present in 4 mother-infant transmission pairs, all of whom were infected with subtype A and three of whom presumably transmitted HIV-1 during the breastfeeding period. Functional envelope clones were constructed, either encoding full-length envelope sequences from the mother and baby or by making chimeric envelope clones in a common backbone sequence. The infant envelope sequences were genetically homogeneous compared to the maternal viruses, and pseudoviruses bearing these envelopes all used CCR5 as a coreceptor. The infant viruses were generally resistant to neutralization by maternal antibodies present near the time of transmission. There were no notable differences in sensitivity of the mother and infant envelope variants to neutralization by heterologous plasma or monoclonal antibodies 2G12 and b12, or to inhibition by sCD4, PSC-RANTES or TAK779. This collection of viral envelopes, which can be used for making pseudotyped viruses, may be useful for examining the efficacy of interventions to block mother-infant transmission, including sera from vaccine candidates, purified antibodies under consideration for passive immunization and viral entry inhibitors.

  4. Conformational Changes of the Flavivirus E Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Ogata, Steven; Clements, David; Strauss, James H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, has a surface composed of 180 copies each of the envelope (E) glycoprotein and the membrane (M) protein. The crystal structure of an N-terminal fragment of E has been determined and compared with a previously described structure. The primary difference between these structures is a 10° rotation about a hinge relating the fusion domain DII to domains DI and DIII. These two rigid body components were used for independent fitting of E into the cryo-electron microscopy maps of both immature and mature dengue viruses. The fitted E structures in these two particles showed a difference of 27° between the two components. Comparison of the E structure in its postfusion state with that in the immature and mature virions shows a rotation approximately around the same hinge. Flexibility of E is apparently a functional requirement for assembly and infection of flaviviruses. PMID:15341726

  5. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.

  6. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  7. Binding of DC-SIGN to glycoproteins expressed in glycoengineered Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Cukan, Michael C; Hopkins, Daniel; Burnina, Irina; Button, Michelle; Giaccone, Erin; Houston-Cummings, Nga Rewa; Jiang, Youwei; Li, Fang; Mallem, Muralidhar; Mitchell, Teresa; Moore, Renée; Nylen, Adam; Prinz, Bianka; Rios, Sandra; Sharkey, Nathan; Zha, Dongxing; Hamilton, Stephen; Li, Huijuan; Stadheim, Terrance A

    2012-12-14

    Previous studies have shown that glycoproteins expressed in wild-type Pichia pastoris bind to Dendritic cell-SIGN (DC-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3 Grabbing Nonintegrin), a mannose-binding receptor found on dendritic cells in peripheral tissues which is involved in antigen presentation and the initiation of an immune response. However, the binding of DC-SIGN to glycoproteins purified from P. pastoris strains engineered to express humanized N- and O-linked glycans has not been tested to date. In this study, the binding of glycoproteins with specific high-mannose or human N- and O-linked glycan structures to DC-SIGN was tested. Proteins with humanized N-glycans including Man5 structures and O-glycans (up to as many as 24) with single mannose chain length showed DC-SIGN binding that was comparable to that measured for a CHO-produced IgG1 which lacks O-linked mannose. Glycoproteins with wild-type N-glycans and mannotriose and higher O-glycans bound to DC-SIGN in a manner that was strongly inhibited by either the use of enzymatic N-deglycosylation or sodium meta-periodate oxidation. Mannan purified from humanized P. pastoris also showed lower ability to inhibit DC-SIGN binding to glycoproteins with wild type fungal glycosylation than mannan purified from wild type strains. This study shows that humanized P. pastoris can produce glycoproteins that do not bind to DC-SIGN.

  8. The metastable state of nucleocapsids of enveloped viruses as probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, L P; Terezan, A F; Pinheiro, A S; Foguel, D; Rebello, M A; Silva, J L

    2001-03-09

    Enveloped viruses fuse their membranes with cellular membranes to transfer their genomes into cells at the beginning of infection. What is not clear, however, is the role of the envelope (lipid bilayer and glycoproteins) in the stability of the viral particle. To address this question, we compared the stability between enveloped and nucleocapsid particles of the alphavirus Mayaro using hydrostatic pressure and urea. The effects were monitored by intrinsic fluorescence, light scattering, and binding of fluorescent dyes, including bis(8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) and ethidium bromide. Pressure caused a drastic dissociation of the nucleocapsids as determined by tryptophan fluorescence, light scattering, and gel filtration chromatography. Pressure-induced dissociation of the nucleocapsids was poorly reversible. In contrast, when the envelope was present, pressure effects were much less marked and were highly reversible. Binding of ethidium bromide occurred when nucleocapsids were dissociated under pressure, indicating exposure of the nucleic acid, whereas enveloped particles underwent no changes. Overall, our results demonstrate that removal of the envelope with the glycoproteins leads the particle to a metastable state and, during infection, may serve as the trigger for disassembly and delivery of the genome. The envelope acts as a "Trojan horse," gaining entry into the host cell to allow release of a metastable nucleocapsid prone to disassembly.

  9. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  10. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  11. Purification and characterization of a soluble glycoprotein from garlic (Allium sativum) and its in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zou, Tingting; Xiang, Minghui; Jin, Chenzhong; Zhang, Xuejiao; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Qiuqing; Hu, Yihong

    2016-10-02

    A soluble glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity from ripe garlic (Allium sativum) bulbs using ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, and diethylaminoethyl-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography. A native mass of 55.7 kDa estimated on gel permeation chromatography and a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa observed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis supported that the glycoprotein is a homotetramer. β-Elimination reaction result suggested that the glycoprotein is an N-linked type. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy proved that it contains sugar. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis showed that its sugar component was galactose. The glycoprotein has 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil free radical scavenging activity and the peroxidation inhibition ability to polyunsaturated fatty acid. These results indicated that the glycoprotein has potential for food additives, functional foods, and even biotechnological and medical applications.

  12. Furin cleavage of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein enhances cell-cell fusion but does not affect virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Follis, Kathryn E.; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2006-07-05

    The fusogenic potential of Class I viral envelope glycoproteins is activated by proteloytic cleavage of the precursor glycoprotein to generate the mature receptor-binding and transmembrane fusion subunits. Although the coronavirus (CoV) S glycoproteins share membership in this class of envelope glycoproteins, cleavage to generate the respective S1 and S2 subunits appears absent in a subset of CoV species, including that responsible for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To determine whether proteolytic cleavage of the S glycoprotein might be important for the newly emerged SARS-CoV, we introduced a furin recognition site at single basic residues within the putative S1-S2 junctional region. We show that furin cleavage at the modified R667 position generates discrete S1 and S2 subunits and potentiates membrane fusion activity. This effect on the cell-cell fusion activity by the S glycoprotein is not, however, reflected in the infectivity of pseudotyped lentiviruses bearing the cleaved glycoprotein. The lack of effect of furin cleavage on virion infectivity mirrors that observed in the normally cleaved S glycoprotein of the murine coronavirus and highlights an additional level of complexity in coronavirus entry.

  13. Isolation and preliminary characterization of herpes simplex virus 1 primary enveloped virions from the perinuclear space.

    PubMed

    Padula, Maryn E; Sydnor, Mariam L; Wilson, Duncan W

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids exit the nucleus by budding into the inner nuclear membrane, where they exist briefly as primary enveloped virions. These virus particles subsequently fuse their envelopes with the outer nuclear membrane, permitting nucleocapsids to then enter the cytoplasm and complete assembly. We have developed a method to isolate primary enveloped virions from HSV-1-infected cells and subjected the primary enveloped virion preparation to MALDI-MS/MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) analyses. We identified most capsid proteins, a tegument protein (VP22), a glycoprotein (gD), and a cellular protein (annexin A2) in the primary enveloped virion preparation. We determined that annexin A2 does not play an essential role in infection under our experimental conditions. Elucidating the structure and biochemical properties of this unique virus assembly intermediate will provide new insights into HSV-1 biology.

  14. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  15. Process for purifying geothermal steam

    DOEpatents

    Li, C.T.

    Steam containing hydrogen sulfide is purified and sulfur recovered by passing the steam through a reactor packed with activated carbon in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of oxygen which oxidizes the hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur which is adsorbed on the bed. The carbon can be recycled after the sulfur has been recovered by vacuum distillation, inert gas entrainment or solvent extraction. The process is suitable for the purification of steam from geothermal sources which may also contain other noncondensable gases.

  16. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  17. Characterization of mucin glycoprotein-specific translation products from swine and human trachea, pancreas and colon.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Wallace, P; Mendicino, J

    1991-07-24

    RNA was isolated from cultured swine trachea epithelial cells and mucus-secreting tumor cell lines from human pancreas, lung and colon by extraction with guanidine isothiocyanate. Poly(A)+mRNA rich fractions were purified by repeated chromatography on oligo (dT)-cellulose columns and they were translated in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte system. Translation products labelled with 35S-methionine were isolated by immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies to the polypeptide chains of mucin glycoproteins and they were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. A single principal polypeptide band of 67 kDa was found in all cases when the immunoprecipitates were washed with buffer containing bovine serum albumin and unlabeled deglycosylated mucin glycoprotein. The intensity of the 67 kDa band decreased when unlabeled deglycosylated mucin glycoprotein was added to the translation mixture before immunoprecipitation. Affinity purified monospecific antibodies elicited against chemically deglycosylated polypeptide chains of purified mucin glycoproteins from human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland were all equally effective in immunoprecipitating the 67 kDa translation product. Monospecific antibodies directed against the glycosylated and unglycosylated regions of the polypeptide chain yielded single bands with a molecular size of 67 kDa in each case. Peptide profiles obtained by digestion of the 67 kDa translation product with S. aureus V-8 protease were identical to those obtained with deglycosylated human and swine trachea mucin glycoproteins. These studies clearly demonstrate that the translation product of swine trachea and human lung, colon and pancreatic mucin glycoprotein gene is a single polypeptide chain of 67 kDa. The relative size and properties of the translation products synthesized with poly (A)+RNA isolated from mucus-secreting cells derived from three different tissues are similar to those of mucin glycoproteins purified directly from mucus secretions of

  18. Subunit structure of deglycosylated human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Kim, D; Brewer, J M; Mendicino, J

    1991-03-27

    The oligosaccharide chains in human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins were completely removed in order to examine the subunit structure and properties of the polypeptide chains of these glycoproteins. The carbohydrate, which constitutes more than 70% of these glycoproteins, was removed by two treatments with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid for 3 h at 3 degrees and periodate oxidation by a modified Smith degradation. All of the sialic acid, fucose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine present in these glycoproteins was removed by these procedures. The deglycosylated polypeptide chains were purified and characterized. The size of the monomeric forms of all three polypeptide chains were very similar. Data obtained by gel filtration, release of amino acids during hydrolysis with carboxypeptidase B and gel electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% dodecyl sulfate showed that a major fraction from each of the three mucin glycoproteins had a molecular size of about 67 kDa. All of the deglycosylated chains had a tendency to aggregate. Digestion with carboxypeptidases showed that human and swine trachea mucin glycoproteins had identical carboxyl terminal sequences, -Val-Ala-Phe-Tyr-Leu-Lys-Arg-COOH. Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein had a similar carboxyl terminal sequence, -Val-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Arg-Arg-COOH. The yield of amino acids after long periods of hydrolysis with carboxypeptidases showed that at least 85% of the polypeptide chains in each of the deglycosylated preparations have these sequences. These results suggested that the polypeptide chains in these deglycosylated mucin glycoprotein preparations were relatively homogeneous. The deglycosylated polypeptide chains as well as the intact mucin glycoproteins had blocked amino terminii. The purified polypeptide chains were digested with trypsin-TCPK, and S. aureus V8 protease and the resulting peptides were isolated by gel electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% dodecyl sulfate

  19. Insulin receptor: Interaction with nonreceptor glycoprotein from liver cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Joseph M.; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    1978-01-01

    In crude receptor preparations (either particulate or soluble) of rat liver membranes, the insulin receptor exhibits complicated binding kinetics (two binding plateaus, half-saturated at approximately 60 pM and 700 pM insulin) and an apparent chromatographic heterogeneity, suggested by the presence of two detectable, soluble insulin-binding components with apparent Stokes radii of 72 Å and 38 Å. In contrast, the insulin receptor isolated by affinity chromatography exhibits a simple binding isotherm (half-maximal saturation of binding at 700 pM insulin) without evidence for negative cooperativity and behaves as a single component (apparent Stokes radius of 38 Å) upon chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The apparent discrepancies between the properties of the unpurified insulin receptor and the affinity-purified receptor can be attributed to the presence in crude preparations of a nonreceptor constituent(s) having properties consistent with those of a membrane glycoprotein. A glycoprotein fraction from such crude soluble membrane preparations, freed from insulin receptor and subsequently partially purified using concanavalin-A-agarose, when combined with affinity-purified insulin receptor, causes both a reappearance of the complicated binding kinetics and an increase in the receptor's apparent Stokes radius from 38 Å to 72 Å. Similar results are observed for a glycoprotein fraction obtained from rat adipocyte membranes but are not observed for an identical fraction isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that the insulin receptor in rat liver membranes can interact with another nonreceptor membrane glycoprotein that may represent either a nonrecognition moiety of the receptor oligomer or an effector molecule to the biological action of insulin. PMID:277909

  20. Glycoprotein Degradation in the Blind Loop Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prizont, Roberto

    1981-01-01

    Contents obtained from jejunum of normal controls, self-emptying and self-filling blind loop rats were analyzed for the presence of glycoprotein-degrading glycosidases. The blind loop syndrome was documented by the increased fat excretion and slower growth rate of self-filling blind loop rats 6 wk after surgery. With p-nitrophenylglycosides as substrate, the specific activity of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, a potential blood group A destroying glycosidase, was 0.90±0.40 mU/mg of protein. This level was 23-fold higher than the specific activity of normal controls. In partially purified self-filling blind loop contents, the activity of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was 9- to 70-fold higher than activities of self-emptying and normal controls. Antibiotic treatment with chloromycetin and polymyxin decreased 24-fold the glycosidase levels in self-filling blind loops. In experiments with natural substrate, the blood group A titer of a20,000g supernate from normal jejunal homogenates decreased 128-fold after 24-h incubation with blind loop contents. Normal contents failed to diminish the blood group reactivity of the natural substrate. Furthermore, blind loop contents markedly decreased the blood group A titer of isolated brush borders. Incubation between blind loop bacteria and mucosal homogenates or isolated brush borders labeled with d-[U-14C]glucosamine revealed increased production of labeled ether extractable organic acids. Likewise, intraperitoneal injection of d-[U-14C]glucosamine into self-filling blind loop rats resulted in incorporation of the label into luminal short chain fatty acids. These results suggest that glycosidases may provide a mechanism by which blind loop bacteria obtain sugars from intestinal glycoproteins. The released sugars are used and converted by bacteria into energy and organic acids. This use of the host's glycoproteins would allow blind loop bacteria to grow and survive within the lumen independent of exogenous sources. PMID:6257760

  1. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  2. Facing extremes: archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jerry

    2003-12-01

    Archaea are best known in their capacities as extremophiles, i.e. micro-organisms able to thrive in some of the most drastic environments on Earth. The protein-based surface layer that envelopes many archaeal strains must thus correctly assemble and maintain its structural integrity in the face of the physical challenges associated with, for instance, life in high salinity, at elevated temperatures or in acidic surroundings. Study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins has thus offered insight into the strategies employed by these proteins to survive direct contact with extreme environments, yet has also served to elucidate other aspects of archaeal protein biosynthesis, including glycosylation, lipid modification and protein export. In this mini-review, recent advances in the study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins are discussed.

  3. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-12-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 mug/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 mug/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  4. Process for purifying zirconium sponge

    SciTech Connect

    Abodishish, H.A.M.; Kimball, L.S.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a Kroll reduction process wherein a zirconium sponge contaminated with unreacted magnesium and by-product magnesium chloride is produced as a regulus, a process for purifying the zirconium sponge. It comprises: distilling magnesium and magnesium chloride from: a regulus containing a zirconium sponge and magnesium and magnesium chloride at a temperature above about 800{degrees} C and at an absolute pressure less than about 10 mmHg in a distillation vessel to purify the zirconium sponge; condensing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride distilled from the zirconium sponge in a condenser; and then backfilling the vessel containing the zirconium sponge and the condenser containing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride with a gas; recirculating the gas between the vessel and the condenser to cool the zirconium sponge from above about 800{degrees} C to below about 300{degrees} C; and cooling the recirculating gas in the condenser containing the condensed magnesium and the condensed magnesium chloride as the gas cools the zirconium sponge to below about 300{degrees} C.

  5. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope-initiated G2-phase programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnitchenko, V; Wahl, L M; Tian, H; Sunila, I; Tani, Y; Hartmann, D P; Cossman, J; Raffeld, M; Orenstein, J; Samelson, L E

    1995-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation, no clearly defined mechanism explaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced cell killing has emerged. HIV-1 infection is initiated through a high-affinity interaction between the HIV-1 external envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and the CD4 receptor on T cells. Cell killing is a later event intimately linked by in vitro genetic analyses with the fusogenic properties of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 and transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. In this report, we describe aberrancies in cell cycle regulatory proteins initiated by cell-cell contact between T cells expressing HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and other T cells expressing CD4 receptors. Cells rapidly accumulate cyclin B protein and tyrosine-hyperphosphorylated p34cdc2 (cdk1) kinase, indicative of cell cycle arrest at G2 phase. Moreover, these cells continue to synthesize cyclin B protein, enlarge and display an abnormal ballooned morphology, and disappear from the cultures in a pattern previously described for cytotoxicity induced by DNA synthesis (S phase) inhibitors. Similar changes are observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with pathogenic primary isolates of HIV-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8524869

  7. Refrigerated cryogenic envelope

    DOEpatents

    Loudon, John D.

    1976-11-16

    An elongated cryogenic envelope including an outer tube and an inner tube coaxially spaced within said inner tube so that the space therebetween forms a vacuum chamber for holding a vacuum. The inner and outer tubes are provided with means for expanding or contracting during thermal changes. A shield is located in the vacuum chamber intermediate the inner and outer tubes; and, a refrigeration tube for directing refrigeration to the shield is coiled about at least a portion of the inner tube within the vacuum chamber to permit the refrigeration tube to expand or contract along its length during thermal changes within said vacuum chamber.

  8. Methods for Purifying Enzymes for Mycoremediation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullings, Kenneth W. (Inventor); DeSimone, Julia C. (Inventor); Paavola, Chad D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for purifying laccase from an ectomycorrhizal fruiting body is disclosed. The process includes steps of homogenization, sonication, centrifugation, filtration, affinity chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. Purified laccase can also be separated into isomers.

  9. Palmitoylation Strengthens Cholesterol-dependent Multimerization and Fusion Activity of Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B (gB)*

    PubMed Central

    Patrone, Marco; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Teixeira, Ana P.; Alves, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses are a large order of animal enveloped viruses displaying a virion fusion mechanism of unusual complexity. Their multipartite machinery has a conserved core made of the gH/gL ancillary complexes and the homo-trimeric fusion protein glycoprotein B (gB). Despite its essential role in starting the viral infection, gB interaction with membrane lipids is still poorly understood. Here, evidence is provided demonstrating that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gB depends on the S-palmitoylation of its endodomain for an efficient interaction with cholesterol-rich membrane patches. We found that, unique among herpesviral gB proteins, the HCMV fusion factor has a Cys residue in the C-terminal region that is palmitoylated and mediates methyl-β-cyclodextrin-sensitive self-association of purified gB. A cholesterol-dependent virus-like particle trap assay, based on co-expression of the HIV Gag protein, confirmed that this post-translational modification is functional in the context of cellular membranes. Mutation of the palmitoylated Cys residue to Ala or inhibition of protein palmitoylation decreased HCMV gB export via Gag particles. Moreover, purified gBC777A showed an increased kinetic sensitivity in a cholesterol depletion test, demonstrating that palmitoyl-gB limits outward cholesterol diffusion. Finally, gB palmitoylation was required for full fusogenic activity in human epithelial cells. Altogether, these results uncover the palmitoylation of HCMV gB and its role in gB multimerization and activity. PMID:26694613

  10. Transduction of human primitive repopulating hematopoietic cells with lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Sang; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Hargrove, Phillip; Kepes, Steven; Gray, John; Persons, Derek A; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2010-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors are useful for transducing primitive hematopoietic cells. We examined four envelope proteins for their ability to mediate lentiviral transduction of mobilized human CD34(+) peripheral blood cells. Lentiviral particles encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G), the amphotropic (AMPHO) murine leukemia virus envelope protein, the endogenous feline leukemia viral envelope protein or the feline leukemia virus type C envelope protein. Because the relative amount of genome RNA per ml was similar for each pseudotype, we transduced CD34(+) cells with a fixed volume of each vector preparation. Following an overnight transduction, CD34(+) cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice which were sacrificed 12 weeks later. The average percentages of engrafted human CD45(+) cells in total bone marrow were comparable to that of the control, mock-transduced group (37-45%). Lenti-particles pseudotyped with the VSV-G envelope protein transduced engrafting cells two- to tenfold better than particles pseudotyped with any of the gamma-retroviral envelope proteins. There was no correlation between receptor mRNA levels for the gamma-retroviral vectors and transduction efficiency of primitive hematopoietic cells. These results support the use of the VSV-G envelope protein for the development of lentiviral producer cell lines for manufacture of clinical-grade vector.

  11. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment.

  12. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  13. Opioid binding properties of the purified kappa receptor from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.S.; Zhou, D.; Cavinato, A.G.; Maulik, D.

    1989-01-01

    A glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 63,000 has been purified, in an active form, from human placental villus tissue membranes. The binding properties of this glycoprotein to opioid alkaloids and peptides indicates that it is the kappa opiate receptor of human placenta. The receptor binds the tritiated ligands etorphine, bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine and naloxone specifically and reversibly with Kd values of 3.3, 4.4, 5.1 and 7.0nM, respectively. The binding of /sup 3/H-Bremazocine to the purified receptor is inhibited by the following compounds with the corresponding Ki values EKC, 1.3 x 10/sup -8/M; Dynorphin 1-8, 3.03 x 10/sup -7/; U50,488H, 4.48 x 10/sup -9/; U69-593,2.28 x 10/sup -8/, morphine, 4.05 x 10/sup -6/ DADLE, 6.47 x 10/sup -6/ and naloxone, 2.64 x 10/sup -8/. The purified receptor binds 8 nmole of /sup 3/H-Etorphine and 1.7 nmole /sup 3/H-BZC per mg protein. The theoretical binding capacity of a protein of this molecular weight is 15.8. Although the iodinated purified receptor appears by autoradiography as one band on SDS-PAGE, yet homogeneity of the preparation is not claimed.

  14. Expression and antigenicity of recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins having different affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, A-Reum; Kim, Kisoon; Lee, Wan-Ji; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, You-Jin

    2016-12-29

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly. Glycoprotein (G) is major antigen on the viral surface, and plays a key role for virus entry. Therefore, purification of the glycoprotein of HRSV is critical for the development of HRSV vaccine and serological diagnosis. In this study, we report the design and characterization of glycoprotein engineered rationally to enhance the protein solubility and to facilitate efficient purification. We permuted HRSV glycoproteins with two tags: (i) an immunoglobulin (Ig) M signal peptide and a protein A B domain tag to render HRSV glycoprotein secret into the culture media and (ii) a foldon and 6 × histidine tag with or without transmembrane domain. Three recombinant baculoviruses were constructed: (i) transmembrane-truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) inserted with the N-terminal IgM signal peptide and protein A B domain (MG-GΔTM), (ii) truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (GΔTM-FH), and (iii) full-length HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 1-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (G-FH). Highly soluble recombinant MG-GΔTM protein was clearly purified using one-step affinity chromatography with IgG-sepharose resin, whereas the recombinant G-FH protein and truncated GΔTM-FH were purified partially using nickel-resin. Although, the antigenicity of GΔTM-FH was stronger than highly mannose-rich MG-GΔTM protein, MG-GΔTM induced neutralizing antibodies efficiently in the mice to protect from infectious HRSV.

  15. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  16. Turbocharged engine with exhaust purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, T.; Matsuda, I.; Okimoto, H.

    1986-09-23

    The patent described a control system for an automobile engine having intake and exhaust systems for respectively conducting intake gases to and exhaust gases from the engine, which comprises, in combination: a turbocharger including a turbine disposed in the exhaust system and adapted to be driven by the flow of the exhaust gases therethrough and a blower disposed in the intake system and drivingly connected with the turbine for supercharging the intake gases; and exhaust purifying device disposed in the exhaust system downstream of the turbine with respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust gases; a regulating means for varying the effective cross-section of a portion of the exhaust system leading to the turbine; a control means for controlling the regulating means in dependence on an operating condition of the engine, the control means causing the regulating means to decrease the effective cross-section during a low speed operating condition, but to increase the effective cross-section during a high speed operating condition of the engine.

  17. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  18. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  19. Fast Moreau envelope computation I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, Yves

    2006-11-01

    The present article summarizes the state of the art algorithms to compute the discrete Moreau envelope, and presents a new linear-time algorithm, named NEP for NonExpansive Proximal mapping. Numerical comparisons between the NEP and two existing algorithms: The Linear-time Legendre Transform (LLT) and the Parabolic Envelope (PE) algorithms are performed. Worst-case time complexity, convergence results, and examples are included. The fast Moreau envelope algorithms first factor the Moreau envelope as several one-dimensional transforms and then reduce the brute force quadratic worst-case time complexity to linear time by using either the equivalence with Fast Legendre Transform algorithms, the computation of a lower envelope of parabolas, or, in the convex case, the non expansiveness of the proximal mapping.

  20. Microstructure of Purified Rubber Particles.

    PubMed

    Wood; Cornish

    2000-05-01

    Purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis (Brazilian rubber tree), Parthenium argentatum (guayule), Ficus elastica (Indian rubber tree), and Euphorbia lactiflua were examined and compared using conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission SEM, cryo-SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rubber particles of all four species were spherical; they varied in size and had a uniform homogeneous material, the rubber core, surrounded by a contiguous monolayer (half-unit) membrane. Frozen-hydrated and/or untreated particles from H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum deformed and fused readily, whereas those from F. elastica and E. lactiflua retained their spherical shapes. These results indicate that the surface components of the H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles are more fluid than those of F. elastica or E. lactiflua. When fixed in aldehyde, F. elastica particles retained their spherical exterior shapes but had hollow centers, whereas H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles completely collapsed. In aldehyde-osmium tetroxide-fixed material, the rubber core of F. elastica was poorly preserved in some particles in which only a small amount of the rubber core remained adhering to the monolayer membrane, leaving a hollow center. Euphorbia lactiflua particles were well preserved in terms of retaining the rubber core; however, the membrane was not as easily discernible as it was in the other three species. Both H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum were well preserved following fixation; their cores remained filled with rubber, and their monolayer membranes were defined. The addition of potassium permanganate to the fixation-staining regime resulted in higher-contrast micrographs and more well defined monolayer membranes.

  1. Biogenesis of plasma membrane glycoproteins. Purification and properties of two rat liver plasma membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Elovson, J

    1980-06-25

    As a preliminary to a study of the biogenesis of individual plasma membrane glycoproteins, the marker enzyme nucleotide pyrophosphatase (NPPase) and a major rat liver plasma membrane sialoprotein, subsequently found to be identical with the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were purified 10,000- and 2,000-fold, respectively, from rat liver. Both were amphipathic proteins which formed defined micellar complexes with detergents and aggregated in their absence. Gel filtration, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed the Triton X-100 complex of NPPase to contain a single 150,000-dalton peptide, while that of DPP IV was composed of two 120,000-dalton subunits; each complex also contained about 150,000-dalton Triton X-100. Trypsin cleaved the detergent complexes with release of major hydrophilic fragments which no longer bound detergent micelles; the accompanying change in peptide size was small for NPPase and undetectable for DPP IV, which also retained the dimer structure of its native form. DPP IV was the only major glycoprotein in rat liver plasma membrane which bound strongly to wheat germ agglutinin. Monospecific rabbit antibodies against NPPase and DPP IV precipitated the antigens without affecting their enzymatic activities.

  2. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-10-25

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  3. Antigenic Properties of the HIV Envelope on Virions in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, Meron; Lewis, George K.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The structural flexibility found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoproteins creates a complex relationship between antigenicity and sensitivity to antiviral antibodies. The study of this issue in the context of viral particles is particularly problematic as conventional virus capture approaches can perturb antigenicity profiles. Here, we employed a unique analytical system based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which measures antibody-virion binding with all reactants continuously in solution. Panels of nine anti-envelope monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and five virus types were used to connect antibody binding profiles with neutralizing activities. Anti-gp120 MAbs against the 2G12 or b12 epitope, which marks functional envelope structures, neutralized viruses expressing CCR5-tropic envelopes and exhibited efficient virion binding in solution. MAbs against CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes considered hidden on functional envelope structures poorly bound these viruses and were not neutralizing. Anti-gp41 MAb 2F5 was neutralizing despite limited virion binding. Similar antigenicity patterns occurred on CXCR4-tropic viruses, except that anti-CD4i MAbs 17b and 19e were neutralizing despite little or no virion binding. Notably, anti-gp120 MAb PG9 and anti-gp41 MAb F240 bound to both CCR5-tropic and CXCR4-tropic viruses without exerting neutralizing activity. Differences in the virus production system altered the binding efficiencies of some antibodies but did not enhance antigenicity of aberrant gp120 structures. Of all viruses tested, only JRFL pseudoviruses showed a direct relationship between MAb binding efficiency and neutralizing potency. Collectively, these data indicate that the antigenic profiles of free HIV particles generally favor the exposure of functional over aberrant gp120 structures. However, the efficiency of virion-antibody interactions in solution inconsistently predicts neutralizing activity in vitro. PMID:24284318

  4. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  5. Masonry building envelope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullan, Phillip C.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past five years, infrared thermography has proven an effective tool to assist in required inspections on new masonry construction. However, with more thermographers providing this inspection service, establishing a standard for conducting these inspections is imperative. To attempt to standardize these inspections, it is important to understand the nature of the inspection as well as the context in which the inspection is typically conducted. The inspection focuses on evaluating masonry construction for compliance with the design specifications with regard to structural components and thermal performance of the building envelope. The thermal performance of the building includes both the thermal resistance of the material as well as infiltration/exfiltration characteristics. Given that the inspections occur in the 'field' rather than the controlled environment of a laboratory, there are numerous variables to be considered when undertaking this type of inspection. Both weather and site conditions at the time of the inspection can vary greatly. In this paper we will look at the variables encountered during recent inspections. Additionally, the author will present the standard which was employed in collecting this field data. This method is being incorporated into a new standard to be included in the revised version of 'Guidelines for Specifying and Performing Infrared Inspections' developed by the Infraspection Institute.

  6. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Faakye, Omari; Griffiths, Dianne

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  7. Dengue Type-2 Virus Envelope Protein Made Using Recombinant Baculovirus Protects Mice Against Virus Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue 2 virus was cloned into baculovirus (IAutographa californical nuclear polyhedrosis virus, AcNPV). The...polyclonal, anti- dengue type 2 antibody and a dengue type 2-specific, neutralizing monoclonal antibody. Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant...antigen produced only non-neutralizing antibody against dengue 2 virus but were partially protected against morbidity and mortality after

  8. Hantavirus Gn and Gc glycoproteins self-assemble into virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2014-02-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera.

  9. Hantavirus Gn and Gc Glycoproteins Self-Assemble into Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bulling, Manuela; Klingström, Jonas; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    How hantaviruses assemble and exit infected cells remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of Andes (ANDV) and Puumala (PUUV) hantavirus Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins lead to their self-assembly into virus-like particles (VLPs) which were released to cell supernatants. The viral nucleoprotein was not required for particle formation. Further, a Gc endodomain deletion mutant did not abrogate VLP formation. The VLPs were pleomorphic, exposed protrusions and reacted with patient sera. PMID:24335294

  10. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  11. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  12. Phosphatidylserine receptors: enhancers of enveloped virus entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Maury, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    A variety of both RNA and DNA viruses envelop their capsids in a lipid bilayer. One of the more recently appreciated benefits this envelope is incorporation of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Surface exposure of PtdSer disguises viruses as apoptotic bodies; tricking cells into engulfing virions. This mechanism is termed apoptotic mimicry. Several PtdSer receptors have been identified to enhance virus entry and we have termed this group of proteins PtdSer-mediated virus entry enhancing receptors or PVEERs. These receptors enhance entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses. Internalization of virions by PVEERs provides a broad mechanism of entry with little investment by the virus itself and may allow some viruses to attach to cells, thereby making viral glycoprotein/cellular receptor interactions more probable. Alternatively, other viruses may rely entirely on PVEERs for internalization into endosomes. This review provides an overview of PtdSer receptors that serve as PVEERs and the biology behind virion/PVEER interaction. PMID:25277499

  13. Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support

    DOEpatents

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

    2012-07-24

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

  14. Immunological characterization of deglycosylated human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Brewer, J M; Mendicino, J

    1991-04-01

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits against purified swine and human trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins and their deglycosylated polypeptide chains. Three monospecific antibody fractions that recognize the carbohydrate, the deglycosylated or unglycosylated regions of the polypeptide chains in these glycoproteins, were isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography. The human and swine trachea mucin glycoproteins showed extensive immunological homology in both their carbohydrate and polypeptide chains. The carbohydrate chains and unglycosylated region of the polypeptide chain in Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein showed little or no cross-reaction with comparable regions in respiratory mucin glycoproteins. However, the polypeptide chains in the deglycosylated regions of all three mucin glycoproteins showed extensive homology. Five bands with molecular masses ranging from 40 to 46 kDa that differed by a constant molecular mass of approximately 1.5 kDa were detected in hydrolysates of all of the polypeptide chains after treatment with S. aureus V8 protease. Monospecific antibodies to the deglycosylated region of these chains reacted with the peptides, whereas those directed against the unglycosylated region did not. The results suggest that these chains contain tandem repeating sequences of amino acids.

  15. Glycan analysis of therapeutic glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are glycoproteins produced by living cell systems. The glycan moieties attached to the proteins can directly affect protein stability, bioactivity, and immunogenicity. Therefore, glycan variants of a glycoprotein product must be adequately analyzed and controlled to ensure product quality. However, the inherent complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. This review provides an update of recent advances in glycan analysis, including the potential utility of lectin-based microarray for high throughput glycan profiling. Emphasis is placed on comparison of the major types of analytics for use in determining unique glycan features such as glycosylation site, glycan structure, and content. PMID:26599345

  16. Role of sialidase in glycoprotein utilization by Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sumita; Honma, Kiyonobu; Douglas, C W Ian; Sharma, Ashu; Stafford, Graham P

    2011-11-01

    The major bacterial pathogens associated with periodontitis include Tannerella forsythia. We previously discovered that sialic acid stimulates biofilm growth of T. forsythia, and that sialidase activity is key to utilization of sialoconjugate sugars and is involved in host-pathogen interactions in vitro. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of the NanH sialidase on initial biofilm adhesion and growth in experiments where the only source of sialic acid was sialoglycoproteins or human oral secretions. After showing that T. forsythia can utilize sialoglycoproteins for biofilm growth, we showed that growth and initial adhesion with sialylated mucin and fetuin were inhibited two- to threefold by the sialidase inhibitor oseltamivir. A similar reduction (three- to fourfold) was observed with a nanH mutant compared with the wild-type. Importantly, these data were replicated using clinically relevant serum and saliva samples as substrates. In addition, the ability of the nanH mutant to form biofilms on glycoprotein-coated surfaces could be restored by the addition of purified NanH, which we show is able to cleave sialic acid from the model glycoprotein fetuin and, much less efficiently, 9-O-acetylated bovine submaxillary mucin. These data show for the first time that glycoprotein-associated sialic acid is likely to be a key in vivo nutrient source for T. forsythia when growing in a biofilm, and suggest that sialidase inhibitors might be useful adjuncts in periodontal therapy.

  17. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  18. THE FORMATION OF THE PRIMARY ENVELOPE DURING OOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION IN TELEOSTS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Everett

    1967-01-01

    The differentiation of the primary envelope of oocytes of the seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) and the pipefish (Syngnathus fuscus) has been investigated by techniques of light- and electron microscopy. The developing oocytes have been divided into four stages according to size. Oogonia are designated as stage I; stages II and III are oocytes; stage IV represents mature eggs. The primary envelope which is produced by the oocyte is initially a tripartite structure; for convenience of description, the portions are referred to as zones 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Zone 1 first appears as a homogeneous substance at approximately the middle of the long axis of each microvillus. Zone 2 is immediately beneath zone 1 and consists of an extremely electron-opaque granular component. Zone 3 is subjacent to zone 2; it is the largest and most complex of the three. Zone 3 consists of an amorphous material organized in a reticular-like network. Staining procedures indicate that the envelope is composed of a glycoprotein. Just before the oocyte matures there is a structural alteration in zones 2 and 3. Zone 2 becomes a compact, dense layer and zone 3 becomes multilaminate. Subsequent to these changes, zone 1 degenerates. The classification of egg envelopes is discussed, and comparisons are made between the primary envelope of the teleosts investigated and the primary envelopes of other species. PMID:4863048

  19. Targeting of loaded Sendai virus envelopes by covalently attached insulin molecules to virus receptor-depleted cells: fusion-mediated microinjection of ricin A and simian virus 40 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gitman, A G; Graessmann, A; Loyter, A

    1985-01-01

    Insulin molecules were covalently attached to detergent-solubilized Sendai virus envelope glycoproteins (HN and F polypeptides) by the use of the crosslinking reagent succinimidyl 4-(p-maleimidophenyl)butyrate (SMPB). Reconstitution of modified viral glycoproteins (carrying covalently attached insulin) together with unmodified viral glycoproteins resulted in the formation of "fusogenic" viral envelopes bearing insulin molecules. Reconstitution of such fusogenic viral envelopes in the presence of ricin A or simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA resulted in the formation of viral envelopes bearing insulin molecules and loaded with ricin A or SV40 DNA. Such viral envelopes were able to bind to hepatoma tissue culture cells (HTCC) from which Sendai virus receptors were removed by treatment with neuraminidase. Incubation of viral envelopes loaded with ricin A with virus receptor-depleted HTCC resulted in fusion-mediated injection of the toxin, as inferred from inhibition of protein synthesis and decrease in cell viability of the microinjected cells. Fusion-mediated injection of SV40 DNA was inferred from the appearance of SV40 tumor antigen in microinjected cells. Binding and fusion of the loaded viral envelopes to neuraminidase-treated HTCC was mediated solely by the virus-associated insulin molecules. Addition of free insulin molecules inhibited binding of the viral envelopes and, consequently, the microinjection of ricin A and SV40 DNA. PMID:2997783

  20. Structure of the cell envelope of Halobacterium halobium

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The structure of the isolated cell envelope of Halobacterium halobium is studied by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and biochemical analysis. The envelope consists of the cell membrane and two layers of protein outside. The outer layer of protein shows a regular arrangement of the protein or glycoprotein particles and is therefore identified as the cell wall. Just outside the cell membrane is a 20 A-thick layer of protein. It is a third structure in the envelope, the function of which may be distinct from that of the cell membrane and the cell wall. This inner layer of protein is separated from the outer protein layer by a 65 A-wide space which has an electron density very close to that of the suspending medium, and which can be etched after freeze-fracture. The space is tentatively identified as the periplasmic space. At NaCl concentrations below 2.0 M, both protein layers of the envelope disintegrate. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation of the soluble components from the two protein layers reveal two major bands of protein with apparent mol wt of approximately 16,000 and 21,000. At the same time, the cell membrane stays essentially intact as long as the Mg++ concentration is kept at treater than or equal to 20 mM. The cell membrane breaks into small fragments when treated with 0.1 M NaCl and EDTA, or with distilled water, and some soluble proteins, including flavins and cytochromes, are released. The cell membrane apparently has an asymmetric core of the lipid bilayer. PMID:977644

  1. Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorus compounds

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1977-01-01

    Bidentate organophosphorus compounds useful for extracting actinide elements from acidic nuclear waste solutions are purified of undesirable acidic impurities by contacting the compounds with ethylene glycol which preferentially extracts the impurities found in technical grade bidentate compounds.

  2. Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Glycoproteins B, H, and L Are Sufficient for, and Viral Glycoprotein Ov8 Can Enhance, Cell-Cell Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    AlHajri, Salim M; Cunha, Cristina W; Nicola, Anthony V; Aguilar, Hector C; Li, Hong; Taus, Naomi S

    2017-03-15

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Macavirus that is carried asymptomatically by sheep. Infection of poorly adapted animals with OvHV-2 results in sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever, a fatal disease characterized by lymphoproliferation and vasculitis. There is no treatment or vaccine for the disease and no cell culture system to propagate the virus. The lack of cell culture has hindered studies of OvHV-2 biology, including its entry mechanism. As an alternative method to study OvHV-2 glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion as a part of the entry mechanism, we developed a virus-free cell-to-cell membrane fusion assay to identify the minimum required OvHV-2 glycoproteins to induce membrane fusion. OvHV-2 glycoproteins B, H, and L (gB, gH, and gL) were able to induce membrane fusion together but not when expressed individually. Additionally, open reading frame Ov8, unique to OvHV-2, was found to encode a transmembrane glycoprotein that can significantly enhance membrane fusion. Thus, OvHV-2 gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to induce membrane fusion, while glycoprotein Ov8 plays an enhancing role by an unknown mechanism.IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses enter cells via attachment of the virion to the cellular surface and fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes. Virus-cell membrane fusion is an important step for a successful viral infection. Elucidating the roles of viral glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion is critical toward understanding viral entry. Entry of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), the causative agent of sheep associated-malignant catarrhal fever, which is one of the leading causes of death in bison and other ungulates, has not been well studied due to the lack of a cell culture system to propagate the virus. The identification of OvHV-2 glycoproteins that mediate membrane fusion may help identify viral and/or cellular factors involved in OvHV-2 cell tropism and will advance investigation of cellular

  3. Role of pseudorabies virus glycoprotein II in protection from lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Ihara, T; Nunoya, T; Kuwahara, H; Ishihama, A; Ueda, S

    1993-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), named 1.21, with complement-dependent neutralizing activity was produced against glycoprotein II (gII) of pseudorabies virus (PRV). By immunoaffinity chromatography using a mAB 1.21 column, gII was purified from Nonidet P40-lysates of PRV infected BHK21/13 cells. When mice and pigs were immunized with purified gII, complement-dependent virus-neutralizing antibodies were produced. The immunized animals survived potentially lethal challenge with PRV. These results indicate that an immunological response against gII plays an important role in the protection from PRV infection.

  4. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Uichi; Anzai, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements. PMID:27916961

  5. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D; Center, Rob J; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178-346 Asn-Val, 232-236 Thr-Ser, 240-340 Lys-Lys, 279-315 Asp-Lys, 291-792 Ala-Ile, 322-347 Asp-Thr, 535-620 Leu-Asp, 742-837 Arg-Phe, and 750-836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644-781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133-287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307-337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553-624 (Ser-Asn), 724-747 (Arg-Arg), or 46-293 (Arg-Glu).

  6. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178–346 Asn-Val, 232–236 Thr-Ser, 240–340 Lys-Lys, 279–315 Asp-Lys, 291–792 Ala-Ile, 322–347 Asp-Thr, 535–620 Leu-Asp, 742–837 Arg-Phe, and 750–836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644–781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133–287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307–337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553–624 (Ser-Asn), 724–747 (Arg-Arg), or 46–293 (Arg-Glu). PMID:28187204

  7. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of nonmetallic or fabric structures for space application is considered. The following structures are suggested: (1) unpressurized space hangars; (2) extendable tunnels for soft docking; and (3) manned habitat for space stations, storage facilities, and work structures. The uses of the tunnel as a passageway: for personnel and equipment, eliminating extravehicular activity, for access to a control cabin on a space crane and between free flyers and the space station are outlined. The personnal occupied woven envelope robot (POWER) device is shown. The woven envelope (tunnel) acts as part of the boom of a crane. Potential applications of POWER are outlined. Several possible deflection mechanisms and design criteria are determined.

  8. Carbon chemistry of circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieging, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical composition of envelopes surrounding cool evolved stars, as determined from microwave spectroscopic observations, is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on recent observations with the new large mm-wavelength telescopes and interferometer arrays, and on new theoretical work, especially concerning ion-molecule chemistry of carbon-bearing in these envelopes. Thermal (as opposed to maser) emission lines are discussed. Much progress has been made in the past few years in the theoretical understanding of these objects. It is already clear, however, that observations with the new generation of mm-telescopes will require substantial improvements in the theoretical models to achieve a thorough understanding of the data now becoming available.

  9. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Kaariainen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 μg/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 μg/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  10. Characterization of the rabbit homolog of human MUC1 glycoprotein isolated from bladder by affinity chromatography on immobilized jacalin.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, T; Xin, P; Buckley, M S; Erickson, D R; Bhavanandan, V P

    2000-07-01

    The urinary bladder is lined by transitional epithelium, the glycocalyx on the luminal surface has interesting properties and is implicated in protective functions. Glycoconjugates are major components of the glycocalyx, but their biochemical nature is not well understood. Previous studies on rabbit bladder indicated the presence of significant levels of sialoglycoproteins compared to glycosaminoglycans in the epithelium. In this study, rabbit explant cultures were radiolabeled by precursor sugars or amino acids and a major lectin-reactive glycoprotein of rabbit bladder mucosa was isolated by affinity chromatography on jacalin-agarose. The radiolabeled glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity by a second cycle on the lectin column, followed by gel filtration and density gradient centrifugation. The average molecular mass of the glycoprotein was estimated to be 245 kDa and 210 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Its buoyant density was 1.40 g/ml, suggesting a carbohydrate content of approximately 50%. The percent distribution of glucosamine-derived tritium label in sialic acid, galactosamine, and glucosamine was 30, 52, and 18, respectively. The glycoprotein consisted entirely of small sialylated and neutral oligosaccharides O-glycosidically linked to serine and threonine residues. The same glycoprotein could be immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the carboxy terminal 17 amino acid peptide of human MUC1 mucin glycoprotein. This suggests that this mucin glycoprotein is the rabbit homolog of MUC1 glycoprotein, which has been previously established to be a component of human bladder urothelium and has been purified from human urine and biochemically characterized.

  11. Alteration of a second putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus alters virus replication and virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, the major envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is involved in several critical virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility, and virulence in natural hosts. Functional structural analysis of E2 based on Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity dis...

  12. Alteration of the N-linked Glycosylation Condition of E1 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Alters Virulence in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with Erns and E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Previously we showed that glycosylation status of virulent CSFV strain Brescia E2 or Erns affects virus virulence. Here, the three putative glycosylation sites of E1 were serially removed by ...

  13. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, along with E^rns and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with E1, media...

  14. Fusogenic activity of reconstituted newcastle disease virus envelopes: a role for the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein in the fusion process.

    PubMed

    Cobaleda, C; Muñoz-Barroso, I; Sagrera, A; Villar, E

    2002-04-01

    Enveloped viruses, such as newcastle disease virus (NDV), make their entry into the host cell by membrane fusion. In the case of NDV, the fusion step requires both transmembrane hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (F) viral envelope glycoproteins. The HN protein should show fusion promotion activity. To date, the nature of HN-F interactions is a controversial issue. In this work, we aim to clarify the role of the HN glycoprotein in the membrane fusion step. Four types of reconstituted detergent-free NDV envelopes were used, on differing in their envelope protein contents. Fusion of the different virosomes and erythrocyte ghosts was monitored using the octadecyl rhodamine B chloride assay. Only the reconstituted envelopes having the F protein, even in the absence of HN protein, displayed residual fusion activity. Treatment of such virosomes with denaturing agents affecting the F protein abolished fusion, indicating that the fusion detected was viral protein-dependent. Interestingly, the rate of fusion in the reconstituted systems was similar to that of intact viruses in the presence of the inhibitor of HN sialidase activity 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The results show that the residual fusion activity detected in the reconstituted systems was exclusively due to F protein activity, with no contribution from the fusion promotion activity of HN protein.

  15. The role of eukaryotic subtilisin-like endoproteases for the activation of human immunodeficiency virus glycoproteins in natural host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenberger, S; Moulard, M; Sordel, M; Klenk, H D; Garten, W

    1997-01-01

    Proteolytic activation of the precursor envelope glycoproteins gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and gp140 of HIV-2, a prerequisite for viral infection, results in the formation of gp120/gp41 and gp125/gp36, respectively. Cleavage is mediated by cellular proteases. Furin, a member of the eukaryotic subtilisin family, has been shown to be an activating protease for HIV. Here, we compared the presence of furin and other mammalian subtilisins in lymphatic cells and tissues. Northern blot analyses revealed that furin and the recently discovered protease LPC/PC7 were the only subtilisin-like enzymes transcribed in such cells. Furin was identified as an enzymatically active endoprotease present in different lymphocytic, as well as monocytic, cell lines. When expressed from vaccinia virus vectors, the proprotein convertases were correctly processed, transported, and secreted into the media and enzymatically active. Coexpression of different subtilisins with the HIV envelope precursors revealed that furin and LPC/PC7 are able to cleave HIV-1 gp160. Moreover, both enzymes proteolytically processed the envelope precursor of HIV-2. gp140 was also cleaved to some extent by PC1, which is not, however, present in lymphatic cells. Furin- and LPC/PC7-catalyzed cleavage of HIV-1 gp160 resulted in biologically active envelope protein. In conclusion, among the known members of the subtilisin family, only furin and LPC/PC7 fulfill the requirements of a protease responsible for in vivo activation of HIV envelope glycoproteins. PMID:8995623

  16. A lectin-binding glycoprotein of Mr 135,000 associated with basal keratinocytes in pig epidermis.

    PubMed

    King, I A; Tabiowo, A; Pope, F M

    1986-07-15

    Pig epidermis separated by 1 M-CaCl2 treatment was homogenized and separated into three fractions by filtration through nylon mesh and high-speed centrifugation. Lectin-binding glycoproteins were isolated from urea/deoxycholate/mercaptoethanol extracts of the residue fraction that resisted filtration, from deoxycholate extracts of the particulate material in the filtrate and from the soluble fraction. Concanavalin A, Ricinus communis (castor bean) agglutinin 1, peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin and Ulex europaeus (gorse) agglutinin-binding glycoproteins in the three epidermal fractions were analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A major neuraminidase-sensitive glycoprotein component of the particulate fraction of Mr 135,000 was strongly bound by concanavalin A and Ricinus communis agglutinin 1, but only weakly by peanut and Ulex europaeus agglutinins. This glycoprotein was not detected in the residue or soluble fractions of the epidermis, indicating that it had only a limited distribution within the tissue. The 135,000-Mr glycoprotein was one of two major glycoprotein antigens in the particulate fraction. Rabbits immunized with total particulate glycoproteins produced antibodies directed mainly against 135,000- and 110,000-Mr components. Monospecific antibodies were obtained from guinea pigs immunized with the 135,000-Mr glycoprotein band excised from polyacrylamide gels. Indirect immunofluorescence with the use of affinity-purified antibodies showed that the 135,000-Mr glycoprotein was present at the surface of cells in the basal layer of the epidermis as well as at that of other stratified epithelia. It was not present on differentiating cells in the suprabasal layers of the epithelium, suggesting an important role in the attachment or proliferative functions of basal cells in stratified epithelia. Metabolic labelling studies with skin explants cultured in the presence of D-[3H]glucosamine showed that this basal-cell glycoprotein was synthesized

  17. Differential Inhibitory Effects of Cyanovirin-N, Griffithsin, and Scytovirin on Entry Mediated by Envelopes of Gammaretroviruses and Deltaretroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Stig M. R.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Rein, Alan; Bertolette, Daniel C.; Saucedo, Carrie J.; O'Keefe, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    The antiviral lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N), and scytovirin (SVN), which inhibit several enveloped viruses, including lentiviruses, were examined for their ability to inhibit entry mediated by Env proteins of delta- and gammaretroviruses. The glycoproteins from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) were resistant to the antiviral effects of all three lectins. For gammaretroviruses, CV-N inhibited entry mediated by some but not all of the envelopes examined, whereas GRFT and SVN displayed only little or no effect. PMID:24284326

  18. Identification of the origin and localization of chorion (egg envelope) proteins in an ancient fish, the white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Conte, Fred S; McInnis, Elizabeth; Fong, Tak Hou; Cherr, Gary N

    2014-06-01

    In many modern teleost fish, chorion (egg envelope) glycoproteins are synthesized in the liver of females, and the expression of those genes is controlled by endogenous estrogen released from the ovary during maturation. However, among the classical teleosts, such as salmonid, carp, and zebrafish, the chorion glycoproteins are synthesized in the oocyte, as in higher vertebrates. Sturgeon, which are members of the subclass Chondrostei, represent an ancient lineage of ray-finned fishes that differ from other teleosts in that their sperm possess acrosomes, their eggs have numerous micropyles, and early embryo development is similar to that of amphibians. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of chorion formation and the phylogenetic relationship between sturgeon and other teleosts, we used specific antibodies directed against the primary components of sturgeon chorion glycoproteins, using immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry approaches. The origin of each chorion glycoprotein was determined through analyses of both liver and ovary, and their localization during ovarian development was investigated. Our data indicate that the origin of the major chorion glycoproteins of sturgeon, ChG1, ChG2, and ChG4, derive not only from the oocyte itself but also from follicle cells in the ovary, as well as from hepatocytes. In the follicle cell layer, granulosa cells were found to be the primary source of ChGs during oogenesis in white sturgeon. The unique origins of chorion glycoproteins in sturgeon suggest that sturgeons are an intermediate form in the evolution of the teleost lineage.

  19. Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorous compounds

    DOEpatents

    McIsaac, Lyle D.; Krupa, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Norman C.

    1981-01-01

    Bidentate organophosphorous compounds are purified of undesirable impurities by contacting a solution of the compounds with a mercuric nitrate solution to form an insoluble mercuric bidentate compound which precipitates while the impurities remain in solution. The precipitate is washed and then contacted with a mixture of an aqueous solution of a strong mercuric ion complexing agent and an organic solvent to complex the mercuric ion away from the bidentate compound which then dissolves in the solvent. The purified bidentate compounds are useful for extracting the actinide elements from aqueous acidic nuclear waste solutions.

  20. A benzoboroxole-based affinity ligand for glycoprotein purification at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Laura; El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Developing ligands capable of carbohydrate recognition has become increasingly important as the essential roles of glycoproteins and glycolipids in a diverse array of cellular signaling, pathophysiology, and immune response mechanisms are elucidated. Effective ligands for the glycan portion of glycoproteins and glycolipids are needed for pre-enrichment proteomics strategies, as well as for the purification of individual glycoproteins from complex biological milieu encountered both in biochemistry research and bio-pharmaceutical development. In this work, we developed a carbohydrate specific affinity ligand for glycoprotein purification using a one-pot, multi-component synthesis reaction (Ugi synthesis) and an amine-functionalized benzoboroxole moiety immobilized on agarose beads. Benzoboroxoles are unique boronic acid derivatives that have recently been found to bind specifically to the cis-diol groups of carbohydrates at physiological pH, with superior affinity to any other Wulff-type boronic acid. The solid-phase affinity ligand developed herein specifically binds the carbohydrate moiety of the glycoprotein glucose oxidase, as well as a fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, as shown through deglycosylation binding studies. Additionally, the ligand is able to purify glucose oxidase from crude Escherichia coli lysate, at physiological pH, equitably to commercially available boronic acid-functionalized agarose beads that required alkaline pH conditions. Thus, this affinity ligand is a marked improvement on current, commercially available boronic acid-based glycoprotein enrichment matrices and has the potential to exhibit high individual glycoprotein specificity because of the additional functional groups available for variation on the Ugi scaffold.

  1. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  2. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  3. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  4. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  5. Dermatitis from purified sea algae toxin (debromoaplysiatoxin).

    PubMed

    Solomon, A E; Stoughton, R B

    1978-09-01

    Cutaneous inflammation was induced by debromoaplysiatoxin, a purified toxin extracted from Lyngbya majuscula Gomont. This alga causes a seaweed dermatitis that occurs in persons who have swum off the coast of Oahu in Hawaii. By topical application, the toxin was found to produce an irritant pustular folliculitis in humans and to cause a severe cutaneous inflammatory reaction in the rabbit and in hairless mice.

  6. Improvement of Linde Kryotechnik's internal purifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Lutz; Meier, Albert; Wilhelm, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    With the recent shortage in supply of helium, recovery solutions have experienced a new focus with a tendency to recover streams with higher impurity content. This development calls for purifier systems operating efficiently and with low impact on liquefaction capacity for helium streams with impurity levels in the percentage range. Linde Kryotechnik has answered this demand by improving the performance of its purifier technology. Since 1983, its standardized helium liquefiers of the L- and former TCF-series type contain an internal purifier which already allows efficient impurity removal with minimized space demand. Along with a line dryer to absorb humidity, it is designed to remove air impurities up to 5 mol%. However, with increasing impurity level, liquefaction capacity reduced significantly being furthermore restricted to an upper level of approx. 180 l/h and continuous purification became limited in time. With the current redesign of this purifier, the impact on liquefaction capacity is now minimized without any limitation within the capacity range of the L-series plants. Continuous purification is hence ensured beyond previous maximum impurity content. This paper provides the key design changes and the achievable performance, which has been verified in the recent L-series plants delivered to customers.

  7. Method of purifying neutral organophosphorus extractants

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1988-01-01

    A method for removing acidic contaminants from neutral mono and bifunctional organophosphorous extractants by contacting the extractant with a macroporous cation exchange resin in the H.sup.+ state followed by contact with a macroporous anion exchange resin in the OH.sup.- state, whereupon the resins take up the acidic contaminants from the extractant, purifying the extractant and improving its extraction capability.

  8. Home Air Purifiers Eradicate Harmful Pathogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center funded the University of Madison-Wisconsin to develop ethylene scrubbers to keep produce fresh in space. Akida Holdings of Jacksonville, Florida, licensed the technology and developed Airocide, an air purifier that can kill airborne pathogens. Previously designed for industrial spaces, there is now a specially designed unit for home use.

  9. Two systems developed for purifying inert atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Kyle, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Two systems, one for helium and one for argon, are used for purifying inert atmospheres. The helium system uses an activated charcoal bed at liquid nitrogen temperature to remove oxygen and nitrogen. The argon system uses heated titanium sponge to remove nitrogen and copper wool beds to remove oxygen. Both use molecular sieves to remove water vapor.

  10. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  11. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  12. Envelope-receptor interactions in Nipah virus pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benhur

    2007-04-01

    Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses are members of the newly defined Henipavirus genus of the Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus (NiV) is an emergent paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in up to 70% of infected patients, and there is increasing evidence of human-to-human transmission. NiV is designated a priority pathogen in the NIAID Biodefense Research Agenda, and could be a devastating agent of agrobioterrorism if used against the pig farming industry. Endothelial syncytium is a pathognomonic feature of NiV infections, and is mediated by the fusion (F) and attachment (G) envelope glycoproteins. This review summarizes what is known about the pathophysiology of NiV infections, and documents the identification of the NiV receptor. EphrinB2, the NiV and HeV receptor, is expressed on endothelial cells and neurons, consistent with the known cellular tropism for NiV. We discuss how the identification of the henipahvirus receptor sheds light on the pathobiology of NiV infection, and how it will spur the rational development of effective therapeutics. In addition, ephrinB3, a related protein, can serve as an alternative receptor, and we suggest that differential usage of ephrinB2 versus B3 may explain the variant pathogenic profiles observed between NiV and HeV. Thus, identifying the NiV receptors opens the door for a more comprehensive analysis of the envelope-receptor interactions in NiV pathobiology. Finally, we also describe how galectin-1 (an innate immune defense lectin) can interact with specific N-glycans on the Nipah envelope fusion protein, underscoring the potential role that innate immune defense mechanisms may play against emerging pathogens.

  13. Envelope lipid-packing as a critical factor for the biological activity and stability of alphavirus particles isolated from mammalian and mosquito cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ivanildo P; Carvalho, Carlos A M; Ferreira, Davis F; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Rocha, Gustavo M; Silva, Jerson L; Gomes, Andre M O

    2011-01-21

    Alphaviruses are enveloped arboviruses. The viral envelope is derived from the host cell and is positioned between two icosahedral protein shells (T = 4). Because the viral envelope contains glycoproteins involved in cell recognition and entry, the integrity of the envelope is critical for the success of the early events of infection. Differing levels of cholesterol in different hosts leads to the production of alphaviruses with distinct levels of this sterol loaded in the envelope. Using Mayaro virus, a New World alphavirus, we investigated the role of cholesterol on the envelope of alphavirus particles assembled in either mammalian or mosquito cells. Our results show that although quite different in their cholesterol content, Mayaro virus particles obtained from both cells share a similar high level of lateral organization in their envelopes. This organization, as well as viral stability and infectivity, is severely compromised when cholesterol is depleted from the envelope of virus particles isolated from mammalian cells, but virus particles isolated from mosquito cells are relatively unaffected by cholesterol depletion. We suggest that it is not cholesterol itself, but rather the organization of the viral envelope, that is critical for the biological activity of alphaviruses.

  14. In Vivo Analysis of Infectivity, Fusogenicity, and Incorporation of a Mutagenic Viral Glycoprotein Library Reveals Determinants for Virus Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Salamango, Daniel J.; Alam, Khalid K.; Burke, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enveloped viruses utilize transmembrane surface glycoproteins to gain entry into target cells. Glycoproteins from diverse viral families can be incorporated into nonnative viral particles in a process termed pseudotyping; however, the molecular mechanisms governing acquisition of these glycoproteins are poorly understood. For murine leukemia virus envelope (MLV Env) glycoprotein, incorporation into foreign viral particles has been shown to be an active process, but it does not appear to be caused by direct interactions among viral proteins. In this study, we coupled in vivo selection systems with Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS) to test hundreds of thousands of MLV Env mutants for the ability to be enriched in viral particles and to perform other glycoprotein functions. NGS analyses on a subset of these mutants predicted that the residues important for incorporation are in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER), particularly W127 and W137, and the residues in the membrane-spanning domain (MSD) and also immediately flanking it (T140 to L163). These predictions were validated by directly measuring the impact of mutations in these regions on fusogenicity, infectivity, and incorporation. We suggest that these two regions dictate pseudotyping through interactions with specific lipid environments formed during viral assembly. IMPORTANCE Researchers from numerous fields routinely exploit the ability to manipulate viral tropism by swapping viral surface proteins. However, this process, termed pseudotyping, is poorly understood at the molecular level. For murine leukemia virus envelope (MLV Env) glycoprotein, incorporation into foreign viral particles is an active process, but it does not appear to occur through direct viral protein-protein interactions. In this study, we tested hundreds of thousands of MLV Env mutants for the ability to be enriched in viral particles as well as perform other glycoprotein functions. Our analyses on a subset of these

  15. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes 1

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jaen; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663076

  16. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY08

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bean; Richard Metcalf; Aaron Bevill

    2008-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope Project met its milestones by creating a rudimentary safeguards envelope, proving the value of the approach on a small scale, and determining the most appropriate path forward. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant’s large cache of reprocessing process monitoring data, dubbed UBER Data, was recovered and used in the analysis. A probabilistic Z test was used on a Markov Monte Carlo simulation of expected diversion data when compared with normal operating data. The data regarding a fully transient event in a tank was used to create a simple requirement, representative of a safeguards envelope, whose impact was a decrease in operating efficiency by 1.3% but an increase in material balance period of 26%. This approach is operator, state, and international safeguards friendly and should be applied to future reprocessing plants. Future requirements include tank-to-tank correlations in reprocessing facilities, detailed operations impact studies, simulation inclusion, automated optimization, advanced statistics analysis, and multi-attribute utility analysis.

  17. Heat recovery in building envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-08-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to contribute to the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Some studies have indicated that application of such a simple formula may produce an unreasonably high contribution because of heat recovery within the building envelope. The major objective of this study was to provide an improved prediction of the energy load due to infiltration by introducing a correction factor that multiplies the expression for the conventional load. This paper discusses simplified analytical modeling and CFD simulations that examine infiltration heat recovery (IHR) in an attempt to quantify the magnitude of this effect for typical building envelopes. For comparison, we will also briefly examine the results of some full-scale field measurements of IHR based on infiltration rates and energy use in real buildings. The results of this work showed that for houses with insulated walls the heat recovery is negligible due to the small fraction of the envelope that participates in heat exchange with the infiltrating air. However; there is the potential for IHR to have a significant effect for higher participation dynamic walls/ceilings or uninsulated walls. This result implies that the existing methods for evaluating infiltration related building loads provide adequate results for typical buildings.

  18. Paramyxovirus Glycoprotein Incorporation, Assembly and Budding: A Three Way Dance for Infectious Particle Production

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Schmitt, Anthony P.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are a family of negative sense RNA viruses whose members cause serious diseases in humans, such as measles virus, mumps virus and respiratory syncytial virus; and in animals, such as Newcastle disease virus and rinderpest virus. Paramyxovirus particles form by assembly of the viral matrix protein, the ribonucleoprotein complex and the surface glycoproteins at the plasma membrane of infected cells and subsequent viral budding. Two major glycoproteins expressed on the viral envelope, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote attachment of the virus to host cells and subsequent virus-cell membrane fusion. Incorporation of the surface glycoproteins into infectious progeny particles requires coordinated interplay between the three viral structural components, driven primarily by the matrix protein. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contributions of the matrix protein and glycoproteins in driving paramyxovirus assembly and budding while focusing on the viral protein interactions underlying this process and the intracellular trafficking pathways for targeting viral components to assembly sites. Differences in the mechanisms of particle production among the different family members will be highlighted throughout. PMID:25105277

  19. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system. PMID:26761026

  20. Lipid rafts both in cellular membrane and viral envelope are critical for PRRSV efficient infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significantly economical challenge to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, we investigated the importance of cellular and viral lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. First, we demonstrated that PRRSV glycoproteins, Gp3 and Gp4, were associated with lipid rafts during viral entry, and disruption of cellular lipid rafts inhibited PRRSV entry. We also showed the raft-location of CD163, which might contribute to the glycoproteins-raft association. Subsequently, raft disruption caused a significant reduction of viral RNA production. Moreover, Nsp9 was shown to be distributed in rafts, suggesting that rafts probably serve as a platform for PRRSV replication. Finally, we confirmed that disassembly of rafts on the virus envelope may affect the integrity of PRRSV particles and cause the leakage of viral proteins, which impaired PRRSV infectivity. These findings might provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of PRRSV infection.

  1. The structure of common-envelope remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip D.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the structure and evolution of the remnants of common-envelope evolution in binary star systems. In a common-envelope phase, two stars become engulfed in a gaseous envelope and, under the influence of drag forces, spiral to smaller separations. They may merge to form a single star or the envelope may be ejected to leave the stars in a shorter period orbit. This process explains the short orbital periods of many observed binary systems, such as cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binary systems. Despite the importance of these systems, and of common-envelope evolution to their formation, it remains poorly understood. Specifically, we are unable to confidently predict the outcome of a common-envelope phase from the properties at its onset. After presenting a review of work on stellar evolution, binary systems, common-envelope evolution and the computer programs used, we describe the results of three computational projects on common-envelope evolution. Our work specifically relates to the methods and prescriptions which are used for predicting the outcome. We use the Cambridge stellar-evolution code STARS to produce detailed models of the structure and evolution of remnants of common-envelope evolution. We compare different assumptions about the uncertain end-of-common envelope structure and envelope mass of remnants which successfully eject their common envelopes. In the first project, we use detailed remnant models to investigate whether planetary nebulae are predicted after common-envelope phases initiated by low-mass red giants. We focus on the requirement that a remnant evolves rapidly enough to photoionize the nebula and compare the predictions for different ideas about the structure at the end of a common-envelope phase. We find that planetary nebulae are possible for some prescriptions for the end-of-common envelope structure. In our second contribution, we compute a large set of single-star models and fit new formulae to the core radii of

  2. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-29

    AD-A261 707 AD____ ARMY PROJECT ORDER NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE...DATES COVERED 29 Nov 91 Final Report (9/1/89 - 11/30/91) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ana ysis or Dengue Vnrus nancing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Epitopes Using...biological events leading to the development of severe disease manifestations of dengue infections ( dengue hemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome

  3. Host Cell Virus Entry Mediated by Australian Bat Lyssavirus Envelope G glycoprotein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-24

    facial palsy; additionally, her level of consciousness began to fluctuate. By day eleven she was unresponsive and ventilator dependent; an...infectious entry of human enterovirus 71. J Biol Chem 286:309-21 160 135. Iversen TG, Frerker N, Sandvig K. 2012. Uptake of ricinB- quantum dot...Cell 13:96-109 160. Liu H, Liu Y, Liu S, Pang DW, Xiao G. 2011. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis in living host cells visualized through quantum dot

  4. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  5. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  6. Neutralizing activities of caprine antibodies towards conserved regions of the HCV envelope glycoprotein E2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Anti HCV vaccine is not currently available and the present antiviral therapies fail to cure approximately half of the treated HCV patients. This study was designed to assess the immunogenic properties of genetically conserved peptides derived from the C-terminal region of HVR-1 and test their neutralizing activities in a step towards developing therapeutic and/or prophylactic immunogens against HCV infection. Antibodies were generated by vaccination of goats with synthetic peptides derived from HCV E2. Viral neutralizing capacity of the generated anti E2 antibodies was tested using in vitro assays. Goats immunized with E2 synthetic peptides termed p412 [a.a 412-419], p430 [a.a 430-447] and p517 [a.a 517-531] generated high titers of antibody responses 2 to 4.5 fold higher than comparable titers of antibodies to the same epitopes in chronic HCV patients. In post infection experiments of native HCV into cultured Huh7.5 cells anti p412 and anti p 517 were proven to be neutralizing to HCV genotype 4a from patients' sera (87.5% and 75% respectively). On the contrary anti p430 exhibited weak viral neutralization capacity on the same samples (31.25%). Furthermore Ab mixes containing anti p430 exhibited reduced viral neutralization properties. From these experiments one could predict that neutralization by Abs towards different E2-epitopes varies considerably and success in the enrichment of neutralization epitope-specific antibodies may be accompanied by favorable results in combating HCV infection. Also, E2 conserved peptides p517 and p412 represent potential components of a candidate peptide vaccine against HCV infection. PMID:21819575

  7. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses.

  8. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  9. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C; Ryckman, Brent J; Britt, William J; Kamil, Jeremy P

    2015-04-07

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes.

  10. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein L is necessary for virus infectivity but dispensable for virion localization of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, B G; Fuchs, W; Weiland, E; Mettenleiter, T C

    1997-01-01

    Herpesviruses contain a number of envelope glycoproteins which play important roles in the interaction between virions and target cells. Although several glycoproteins are not present in all herpesviruses, others, including glycoproteins H and L (gH and gL), are conserved throughout the Herpesviridae. To elucidate common properties and differences in herpesvirus glycoprotein function, corresponding virus mutants must be constructed and analyzed in different herpesvirus backgrounds. Analysis of gH- mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV) showed that in both viruses gH is essential for penetration and cell-to-cell spread and that its presence is required for virion localization of gL. Since gH homologs are found complexed with gL, it was of interest to assess the phenotype of gL- mutant viruses. By using this approach, HSV-1 gL has been shown to be required for entry and for virion localization of gH (C. Roop, L. Hutchinson, and D. Johnson, J. Virol. 67:2285-2297, 1993). To examine whether a similar phenotype is associated with lack of gL in another alphaherpesvirus, PrV, we constructed two independent gL- PrV mutants by insertion and deletion-insertion mutagenesis. The salient findings are as follows: (i) PrV gL is required for penetration of virions and cell-to-cell spread; (ii) unlike HSV-1, PrV gH is incorporated into the virion in the absence of gL; (iii) virion localization of gH in the absence of gL is not sufficient for infectivity; (iv) in the absence of gL, N-glycans on PrV gH are processed to a greater extent than in the presence of gL, indicating masking of N-glycans by association with gL; and (v) an anti-gL polyclonal antiserum is able to neutralize virion infectivity but did not inhibit cell-to-cell spread. Thus, whereas PrV gL is essential for virus replication, as is HSV-1 gL, gL- PrV mutants exhibit properties strikingly different from those of HSV-1. In conclusion, our data show an important functional role for

  11. Steroidogenesis in amlodipine treated purified Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, Rabia; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Hameed, Waqas; Aslam, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Drugs have been shown to adversely affect male fertility and recently anti-hypertensive drugs were added to the list. The anti-fertility effects of amlodipine, a calcium channel blocker, are well-illustrated in in vivo experiments but lack an in vitro proof. The present study was designed to experimentally elucidate the effects of amlodipine on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in vitro. Leydig cells of Sprague–Dawley rats were isolated and purified by Percoll. Cells were incubated for 3 h with/without amlodipine in the presence/absence of LH, dbcAMP, Pregnenolone and 25-Hydroxycholesterol. Cytosolic calcium was measured in purified Leydig cells by fluorometric technique. The results showed significantly reduced (P < 0.05) steroidogenesis and intracellular calcium in amlodipine exposed rats. The site of amlodipine induced steroidogenic inhibition seems to be prior to the formation of Pregnenolone at the level of StAR protein. -- Highlights: ► Inhibition of steroidogenesis in isolated and purified Leydig cells by amlodipine. ► Site of inhibition was before Pregnenolone formation, at the level of StAR protein. ► Inhibition of LH stimulated rise in cytosolic calcium by amlodipine.

  12. Utilization of purified cellulose in fiber studies.

    PubMed

    Penner, M H; Liaw, E T

    1990-01-01

    Purified cellulose-type fiber products are widely used in experimental nutrition. Their use in a broad spectrum of studies may potentially lead to the acceptance of the misconception that the various commercially available cellulose products are equivalent. In this paper we have attempted to show that this is not the case. The comparative structural data of Table 2 and the compositional data of Olsen et al provide examples which indicate that purified cellulose preparations should not necessarily be considered equivalent. Unfortunately, our current lack of understanding of how fibers are metabolized and how they may affect specific physiological parameters makes it difficult to determine which, if any, of the measurable structural and chemical properties will be of relevance for a given in vivo study. At present, it appears that researchers utilizing/evaluating the consequences of consuming a purified cellulose-type fiber would be prudent to provide at least a limited amount of data on the properties of the cellulose preparation used in their studies. The characterization of the cellulose product may be done by a variety of methods depending on the expertise of the laboratory. The methods and results discussed in this paper provide an example of the type of information which may be obtained from an in vitro characterization of cellulose products.

  13. Canine Distemper Virus Envelope Protein Interactions Modulated by Hydrophobic Residues in the Fusion Protein Globular Head

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Mislay; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Alves, Lisa; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion for morbillivirus cell entry relies on critical interactions between the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) envelope glycoproteins. Through extensive mutagenesis of an F cavity recently proposed to contribute to F's interaction with the H protein, we identified two neighboring hydrophobic residues responsible for severe F-to-H binding and fusion-triggering deficiencies when they were mutated in combination. Since both residues reside on one side of the F cavity, the data suggest that H binds the F globular head domain sideways. PMID:25355896

  14. A strategy for O-glycoproteomics of enveloped viruses--the O-glycoproteome of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J; Dabelsteen, Sally; Nyström, Kristina; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Olofsson, Sigvard; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-04-01

    Glycosylation of viral envelope proteins is important for infectivity and interaction with host immunity, however, our current knowledge of the functions of glycosylation is largely limited to N-glycosylation because it is difficult to predict and identify site-specific O-glycosylation. Here, we present a novel proteome-wide discovery strategy for O-glycosylation sites on viral envelope proteins using herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) as a model. We identified 74 O-linked glycosylation sites on 8 out of the 12 HSV-1 envelope proteins. Two of the identified glycosites found in glycoprotein B were previously implicated in virus attachment to immune cells. We show that HSV-1 infection distorts the secretory pathway and that infected cells accumulate glycoproteins with truncated O-glycans, nonetheless retaining the ability to elongate most of the surface glycans. With the use of precise gene editing, we further demonstrate that elongated O-glycans are essential for HSV-1 in human HaCaT keratinocytes, where HSV-1 produced markedly lower viral titers in HaCaT with abrogated O-glycans compared to the isogenic counterpart with normal O-glycans. The roles of O-linked glycosylation for viral entry, formation, secretion, and immune recognition are poorly understood, and the O-glycoproteomics strategy presented here now opens for unbiased discovery on all enveloped viruses.

  15. [Interaction of the glycoprotein from the Bacillus pumilis cell wall with liposomes].

    PubMed

    Karamushka, V I; Gruzina, T G; Podol'skaia, V I; Ul'berg, Z R

    1987-01-01

    The methods of centrifugation and gel-filtration on Sephadexes G-50 and G-150 were used to study the interaction of Bacillus pumilis cell wall glycoprotein component having the molecular weight of 50 kDa (GP-50) with lyposomes from bacterial lipids. GP-50 is shown to sorb on such liposomes and disturb their barrier properties inducing yield of low-molecular label. GP-50 exerts no effect on properties of liposomes from egg lecithin. Electrostatic forces are supposed to play a decisive role in initial acts of GP-50 interactions with lipid phase of microbial envelopes.

  16. Isolating The Building Thermal Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrje, D. T.; Dutt, G. S.; Gadsby, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermal integrity of building envelopes by infrared scanning tech-niques is often hampered in mild weather because temperature differentials across the envelope are small. Combining the infrared scanning with positive or negative building pressures, induced by a "blower door" or the building ventilation system, considerably extends the periods during which meaningful diagnostics can be conducted. Although missing or poorly installed insulation may lead to a substantial energy penalty, it is the search for air leakage sites that often has the largest potential for energy savings. Infrared inspection of the attic floor with air forced from the occupied space through ceiling by-passes, and inspecting the interior of the building when outside air is being sucked through the envelope reveals unexpected leakage sites. Portability of the diagnostic equipment is essential in these surveys which may include access into some tight spaces. A catalog of bypass heat losses that have been detected in residential housing using the combined infrared pressure differential technique is included to point out the wide variety of leakage sites which may compromise the benefits of thermal insulation and allow excessive air infiltration. Detection and suppression of such leaks should be key items in any building energy audit program. Where a calibrated blower door is used to pressurize or evacuate the house, the leakage rate can be quantified and an excessively tight house recognized. Houses that are too tight may be improved with a minimal energy penalty by forced ventilation,preferably with a heat recuperator and/or by providing combustion air directly to the furnace.

  17. Aircraft maneuver envelope warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivens, Courtland C. (Inventor); Rosado, Joel M. (Inventor); Lee, Burnett (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A maneuver envelope warning system for an aircraft having operating limits, operating condition sensors and an indicator driver. The indicator driver has a plurality of visual indicators. The indicator driver determines a relationship between sensed operating conditions and the operating limits; such as, a ratio therebetween. The indicator driver illuminates a number of the indicators in proportion to the determined relationship. The position of the indicators illuminated represents to a pilot in an easily ascertainable manner whether the operational conditions are approaching operational limits of the aircraft, and the degree to which operational conditions lie within or exceed operational limits.

  18. Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoch, David R.; Lavallee, David; Weinstein, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: scheduling application; the motivation for the Flexible Envelope Request Notation (FERN); characteristics of FERN; types of information needed in requests; where information is stored in requests; FERN structures; generic requests; resource availability for pooled resources; expressive notation; temporal constraints; time formats; changes to FERN; sample FERN requests; the temporal relationship between two steps; maximum activity length to limit step delays; alternative requests; the temporal relationship between two activities; and idle resource usage between steps.

  19. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  20. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY10

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf

    2010-10-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters within which nuclear facilities may operate to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details the additions to the advanced operating techniques that will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Research this year focused on combining disparate pieces of data together to maximize operating time with minimal downtime due to safeguards. A Chi-Square and Croiser's cumulative sum were both included as part of the new analysis. Because of a major issue with the original data, the implementation of the two new tests did not add to the existing set of tests, though limited one-variable optimization made a small increase in detection probability. Additional analysis was performed to determine if prior analysis would have caused a major security or safety operating envelope issue. It was determined that a safety issue would have resulted from the prior research, but that the security may have been increased under certain conditions.

  1. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Pre-fusion Nipah Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Novel Hexamer-of-Trimers Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Feng, YanRu; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lee, Benhur; Zhou, Z. Hong; Broder, Christopher C.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus that infects host cells through the coordinated efforts of two envelope glycoproteins. The G glycoprotein attaches to cell receptors, triggering the fusion (F) glycoprotein to execute membrane fusion. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pre-fusion form of the NiV-F glycoprotein ectodomain. Interestingly this structure also revealed a hexamer-of-trimers encircling a central axis. Electron tomography of Nipah virus-like particles supported the hexameric pre-fusion model, and biochemical analyses supported the hexamer-of-trimers F assembly in solution. Importantly, structure-assisted site-directed mutagenesis of the interfaces between F trimers highlighted the functional relevance of the hexameric assembly. Shown here, in both cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion systems, our results suggested that this hexamer-of-trimers assembly was important during fusion pore formation. We propose that this assembly would stabilize the pre-fusion F conformation prior to cell attachment and facilitate the coordinated transition to a post-fusion conformation of all six F trimers upon triggering of a single trimer. Together, our data reveal a novel and functional pre-fusion architecture of a paramyxoviral fusion glycoprotein. PMID:26646856

  3. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Wissink, E H J; Kroese, M V; van Wijk, H A R; Rijsewijk, F A M; Meulenberg, J J M; Rottier, P J M

    2005-10-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA clones in which the genes encoding the membrane proteins were disrupted by site-directed mutagenesis. By transfection of RNAs transcribed from these cDNAs into BHK-21 cells and analysis of the culture medium using ultracentrifugation, radioimmunoprecipitation, and real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we observed that the production of viral particles is dependent on both major envelope proteins; no particles were released when either the GP5 or the M protein was absent. In contrast, particle production was not dependent on the minor envelope proteins. Remarkably, in the absence of any one of the latter proteins, the incorporation of all other minor envelope proteins was affected, indicating that these proteins interact with each other and are assembled into virions as a multimeric complex. Independent evidence for such complexes was obtained by coexpression of the minor envelope proteins in BHK-21 cells using a Semliki Forest virus expression system. By analyzing the maturation of their N-linked oligosaccharides, we found that the glycoproteins were each retained in the endoplasmic reticulum unless expressed together, in which case they were collectively transported through the Golgi complex to the plasma membrane and were even detected in the extracellular medium. As the PRRSV particles lacking the minor envelope proteins are not infectious, we hypothesize that the virion surface structures formed by these proteins function in viral entry by mediating receptor binding and/or virus-cell fusion.

  4. Identification of a tryptophan-like epitope borne by the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Semballa, S; Okomo-Assoumou, M C; Holzmuller, P; Büscher, P; Magez, S; Lemesre, J L; Daulouede, S; Courtois, P; Geffard, M; Vincendeau, P

    2007-02-01

    Antibodies (Ab) directed against a tryptophan-like epitope (WE) were previously detected in patients with human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). We investigated whether or not these Ab resulted from immunization against trypanosome antigen(s) expressing a WE. By Western blotting, we identified an antigen having an apparent molecular weight ranging from 60 to 65 kDa, recognized by purified rabbit anti-WE Ab. This antigen, present in trypomastigote forms, was absent in procyclic forms and Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. Using purified variable surface glycoproteins (VSG) from various trypanosomes, we showed that VSG was the parasite antigen recognized by these rabbit Ab. Anti-WE and anti-VSG Ab were purified from HAT sera by affinity chromatography. Immunoreactivity of purified antibodies eluted from affinity columns and of depleted fractions showed that WE was one of the epitopes borne by VSG. These data underline the existence of an invariant WE in the structure of VSG from several species of African trypanosomes.

  5. Studies on the protein composition of human serum very low density lipoproteins: demonstration of the beta 2-glycoprotein-I.

    PubMed

    Polz, E; Kostner, G M; Holasek, A

    1979-08-01

    Human serum VLDL isolated by polyanion precipitation and ultracentrifugation have been delipidated with ethanal/diethyl ether. By electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gels containing 8M urea, we found a protein which comigrated with apolipoprotein E. This protein was purified by column chromatography and turned out to be identical with beta 2-glycoprotein-I, the serum factor which is necessary for the precipitation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins with sodium decyl sulfate or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Upon analytical isoelectric focusing, beta 2-glycoprotein-I gave four major bands in the pH region 5.7--6.6. All four bands gave an immunochemical reaction of identity with a monospecific antiserum. From its unique amino acid composition we conclude that beta 2-glycoprotein-I is distinct from all apolipoproteins described previously in the literature.

  6. Air Purifiers Eliminate Pathogens, Preserve Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA-funded researchers produced an ethylene reduction device for a plant growth unit. KES Science & Technology Inc., a Kennesaw, Georgia-based company specializing in sustaining perishable foods, licensed the ethylene scrubbing technology. KES partnered with Akida Holdings, of Jacksonville, Florida, which now markets the NASA-developed technology as AiroCide. According to the company, it is the only air purifier that completely destroys airborne bacteria, mold, fungi, mycotoxins, viruses, volatile organic compounds (like ethylene), and odors. What?s more, the devices have no filters that need changing and produce no harmful byproducts, such as the ozone created by some filtration systems.

  7. Cytoplasmic tail length influences fatty acid selection for acylation of viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Veit, M; Reverey, H; Schmidt, M F

    1996-01-01

    We report remarkable differences in the fatty acid content of thioester-type acylated glycoproteins of enveloped viruses from mammalian cells. The E2 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus contains mainly palmitic acid like most other palmitoylated proteins analysed so far. However, the other glycoprotein (E1) of the same virus, as well as the HEF (haemagglutinin esterase fusion) glycoprotein of influenza C virus, are unique in this respect because they are acylated primarily with stearic acid. Comparative radiolabelling of uninfected cells with different fatty acids suggests that stearate may also be the prevailing fatty acid in some cellular acylproteins. To look for further differences between palmitoylated and stearoylated glycoproteins we characterized stearoylation in more detail. We identified the acylation site of HEF as a cysteine residue located at the boundary between the transmembrane region and the cytoplasmic tail. The attachment of stearate to HEF and E1 occurs post-translationally in a pre-Golgi compartment. Thus, stearoylated and palmitoylated proteins cannot be discriminated on the basis of the fatty acid linkage site or the intracellular compartment, where acylation occurs. However, stearoylated acylproteins contain a very short, positively charged cytoplasmic tail, whereas in palmitoylated proteins this molecular region is longer. Replacing the short cytoplasmic tail of stearoylated HEF with the long influenza A virus haemagglutinin (HA) tail in an HEF-HA chimera, and subsequent vaccinia T7 expression in CV-1 cells, yielded proteins with largely palmitic acid bound. The reverse chimera, HA-HEF with a short cytoplasmic tail was not fatty acylated at all during expression, indicating that conformational or topological constraints control fatty acid transfer. PMID:8761467

  8. A scalable method to concentrate lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with measles virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Marino, M P; Panigaj, M; Ou, W; Manirarora, J; Wei, C-H; Reiser, J

    2015-03-01

    Lentiviral (LV) vectors have emerged as powerful tools for basic research and clinical applications because of their ability to stably transduce both dividing and nondividing cells. A wide range of viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins have the ability to associate with the membrane of LV vectors, a process that is referred to as pseudotyping. Pseudotyped vectors have the capacity to transduce specific cell types for specific applications. For example, LV vectors pseudotyped with the measles virus (MV)-derived hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins have the ability to transduce quiescent lymphocytes. In addition, the MV H glycoprotein can be engineered allowing cell-specific targeting of LV vectors. One problem with MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors is low titer during vector production. This results in the need to manufacture large volumes of the vectors and to concentrate them to appropriate titers. The commonly used centrifugation-based concentration techniques for LV vectors are not practical for large-scale vector manufacturing. Thus, there is a need for improved methods to concentrate LV vectors. In this study, we adapted an anion-exchange membrane chromatography method that we previously used in the context of LV vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein to concentate MV glycoprotein-pseudotyped LV vectors. Up to 60% of the input vectors with an up to 5300-fold reduction in volume was achieved using this anion-exchange chromatography method in conjunction with a desalting/concentration step involving centrifugal filter units. This technique provides a rapid and scalable approach for concentrating MV-pseudotyped LV vectors that does not require an elaborate setup.

  9. Techniques and tactics used in determining the structure of the trimeric ebolavirus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Hessell, Ann J.; Burton, Dennis R.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2009-11-01

    Here, the techniques, tactics and strategies used to overcome a series of technical roadblocks in crystallization and phasing of the trimeric ebolavirus glycoprotein are described. The trimeric membrane-anchored ebolavirus envelope glycoprotein (GP) is responsible for viral attachment, fusion and entry. Knowledge of its structure is important both for understanding ebolavirus entry and for the development of medical interventions. Crystal structures of viral glycoproteins, especially those in their metastable prefusion oligomeric states, can be difficult to achieve given the challenges in production, purification, crystallization and diffraction that are inherent in the heavily glycosylated flexible nature of these types of proteins. The crystal structure of ebolavirus GP in its trimeric prefusion conformation in complex with a human antibody derived from a survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak has now been determined [Lee et al. (2008 ▶), Nature (London), 454, 177–182]. Here, the techniques, tactics and strategies used to overcome a series of technical roadblocks in crystallization and phasing are described. Glycoproteins were produced in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, which allowed rapid screening of constructs and expression of protein in milligram quantities. Complexes of GP with an antibody fragment (Fab) promoted crystallization and a series of deglycosylation strategies, including sugar mutants, enzymatic deglycosylation, insect-cell expression and glycan anabolic pathway inhibitors, were attempted to improve the weakly diffracting glycoprotein crystals. The signal-to-noise ratio of the search model for molecular replacement was improved by determining the structure of the uncomplexed Fab. Phase combination with Fab model phases and a selenium anomalous signal, followed by NCS-averaged density modification, resulted in a clear interpretable electron-density map. Model building was assisted by the use of B-value-sharpened electron-density maps and the

  10. Cell surface glycoproteins from Thermoplasma acidophilum are modified with an N-linked glycan containing 6-C-sulfofucose.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Deschatelets, Lise; Lamoureux, Marc; Patel, Girishchandra B; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Robotham, Anna; Goneau, Marie-France; Cummings-Lorbetskie, Cathy; Watson, David C; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Kelly, John F; Gilbert, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows optimally at pH 2 and 59°C. This extremophile is remarkable by the absence of a cell wall or an S-layer. Treating the cells with Triton X-100 at pH 3 allowed the extraction of all of the cell surface glycoproteins while keeping cells intact. The extracted glycoproteins were partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and we identified five glycoproteins by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of in-gel tryptic digests. These glycoproteins are positive for periodic acid-Schiff staining, have a high content of Asn including a large number in the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon and have apparent masses that are 34-48% larger than the masses deduced from their amino acid sequences. The pooled glycoproteins were digested with proteinase K and the purified glycopeptides were analyzed by NMR. Structural determination showed that the carbohydrate part was represented by two structures in nearly equal amounts, differing by the presence of one terminal mannose residue. The larger glycan chain consists of eight residues: six hexoses, one heptose and one sugar with an unusual residue mass of 226 Da which was identified as 6-deoxy-6-C-sulfo-D-galactose (6-C-sulfo-D-fucose). Mass spectrometry analyses of the peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion confirmed the principal structures to be those determined by NMR and identified 14 glycopeptides derived from the main glycoprotein, Ta0280, all containing the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Thermoplasma acidophilum appears to have a "general" protein N-glycosylation system that targets a number of cell surface proteins.

  11. Cryo-electron microscopy of hepatitis B virions reveals variability in envelope capsid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan; Antoni, Christoph; Böttcher, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen causing about 750 000 deaths per year. The virion consists of a nucleocapsid and an envelope formed by lipids, and three integral membrane proteins. Although we have detailed structural insights into the organization of the HBV core, the arrangement of the envelope in virions and its interaction with the nucleocapsid is elusive. Here we show the ultrastructure of hepatitis B virions purified from patient serum. We identified two morphological phenotypes, which appear as compact and gapped particles with nucleocapsids in distinguishable conformations. The overall structures of these nucleocapsids resemble recombinant cores with two α-helical spikes per asymmetric unit. At the charged tips the spikes are contacted by defined protrusions of the envelope proteins, probably via electrostatic interactions. The HBV envelope in the two morphotypes is to some extent variable, but the surface proteins follow a general packing scheme with up to three surface protein dimers per asymmetric unit. The variability in the structure of the envelope indicates that the nucleocapsid does not firmly constrain the arrangement of the surface proteins, but provides a general template for the packing. PMID:17762862

  12. A structural glycoprotein, containing hydroxyproline, isolated from the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardii.

    PubMed

    Catt, J W; Hills, G J; Roberts, K

    1976-01-01

    A soluble extract from purified cell walls of C. reinhardii has been separated by gel filtration into three fractions which together account for 94% of the cell wall. The major fraction (accounting for 70% of the extract) is a glycoprotein, with a molecular wt. in sodium perchlorate of 298,000, which can be split into 4 electrophoretically distinct species. It contains 35% protein with high levels of hydroxyproline, arabinose and galactose, and is capable of self assembly into crystalline structures identical to those found within the cell wall. The second fraction (25% of the extract) is a similar glycoprotein, but contains 24% protein, a higher proportion of mannose, and is incapable of self assembly. The third fraction (3-6% of the extract) is shown to be an adsorbed impurity from the growth medium used.

  13. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    . Since the nature of future outbreaks cannot be predicted, there is an urgent need for therapeutics with broad protective efficacy against multiple filoviruses. Here we describe a set of monoclonal antibodies cross-reactive with multiple filovirus species. These antibodies target novel conserved epitopes within the envelope glycoprotein and exhibit protective efficacy in mice. We further present novel concepts for combination of cross-reactive antibodies against multiple epitopes that show enhanced efficacy compared to monotherapy and provide complete protection in mice. These findings set the stage for further evaluation of these antibodies in nonhuman primates and development of effective pan-filovirus immunotherapeutics for use in future outbreaks. PMID:26468532

  14. Calnexin, calreticulin and the folding of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Calnexin and calreticulin are molecular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum (ERJ. They are lectins that interact with newly synthesized glycoproteins that have undergone partial trimming of their core N-linked oligosaccharides. Together with the enzymes responsible for glucose removal and a glucosyltransferase that re-glucosylates already-trimmed glycoproteins, they provide a novel mechanism for promoting folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control in the ER.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet air purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in the air by...

  19. The Role of Phlebovirus Glycoproteins in Viral Entry, Assembly and Release

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Martin; Plegge, Teresa; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are enveloped viruses with a tripartite RNA genome that can pose a serious threat to animal and human health. Members of the Phlebovirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae are transmitted by mosquitos and ticks to humans and include highly pathogenic agents like Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) as well as viruses that do not cause disease in humans, like Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). Phleboviruses and other bunyaviruses use their envelope proteins, Gn and Gc, for entry into target cells and for assembly of progeny particles in infected cells. Thus, binding of Gn and Gc to cell surface factors promotes viral attachment and uptake into cells and exposure to endosomal low pH induces Gc-driven fusion of the viral and the vesicle membranes. Moreover, Gn and Gc facilitate virion incorporation of the viral genome via their intracellular domains and Gn and Gc interactions allow the formation of a highly ordered glycoprotein lattice on the virion surface. Studies conducted in the last decade provided important insights into the configuration of phlebovirus Gn and Gc proteins in the viral membrane, the cellular factors used by phleboviruses for entry and the mechanisms employed by phlebovirus Gc proteins for membrane fusion. Here, we will review our knowledge on the glycoprotein biogenesis and the role of Gn and Gc proteins in the phlebovirus replication cycle. PMID:27455305

  20. [Biological role of heterogeneous glycoprotein structures].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate molecules connected mostly with covalent junctions to protein chains are called glycoproteins. These carbohydrate molecules are attached to the protein core in different qualities and order. When the protein core is connected with acidic components such as uronic acid or SO4 radicals, they are called proteoglycans. The currently used name "glycosaminoglycan" in this case is not entirely correct. In the living world polymannane structures occur, too. Glycoproteins do not only exceptionally hold acidic groups but they have neuraminic acid derivatives. Tissue, cellular and matrix structures, and mostly all serum "proteins" are mainly glycoproteins. In the everyday clinical practice glycoproteins are mentioned as proteins. Nevertheless, the inadequate use of the concept may cause errors in the attitudes, too. This paper aims to correct this notion, because the term of "glycobiology" has already been expanded to be an independent scientific field. The practical clinical consequences of recent knowledge in this field are also summarized including novel findings on glycoprotein structures and functions. The importance of the quantity of carbohydrates, and their structural arrangements are also presented. In short, significance of glycoprotein-carbohydrate structures, as well as their physiological and pathological roles are reviewed in order to introduce the field of "glycobiology". Orosomucoid and immunoglobulins are discussed separately. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1185-1192.

  1. Apparatus and methods for purifying lead

    DOEpatents

    Tunison, Harmon M.

    2016-01-12

    Disclosed is an exemplary method of purifying lead which includes the steps of placing lead and a fluoride salt blend in a container; forming a first fluid of molten lead at a first temperature; forming a second fluid of the molten fluoride salt blend at a second temperature higher than the first temperature; mixing the first fluid and the second fluid together; separating the two fluids; solidifying the molten fluoride salt blend at a temperature above a melting point of the lead; and removing the molten lead from the container. In certain exemplary methods the molten lead is removed from the container by decanting. In still other exemplary methods the molten salt blend is a Lewis base fluoride eutectic salt blend, and in yet other exemplary methods the molten salt blend contains sodium fluoride, lithium fluoride, and potassium fluoride.

  2. Induction slag reduction process for purifying metals

    DOEpatents

    Traut, Davis E.; Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Dennis A.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous method is provided for purifying and recovering transition metals such as neodymium and zirconium that become reactive at temperatures above about 500.degree. C. that comprises the steps of contacting the metal ore with an appropriate fluorinating agent such as an alkaline earth metal fluosilicate to form a fluometallic compound, and reducing the fluometallic compound with a suitable alkaline earth or alkali metal compound under molten conditions, such as provided in an induction slag metal furnace. The method of the invention is advantageous in that it is simpler and less expensive than methods used previously to recover pure metals, and it may be employed with a wide range of transition metals that were reactive with enclosures used in the prior art methods and were hard to obtain in uncontaminated form.

  3. Method of separating and purifying gadolinium-153

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A [Richland, WA; Corneillie, Todd M [Davis, CA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the method of separating and purifying gadolinium from a mixture of gadolinium and europium having the steps of (a) dissolving the mixture in an acid; (b) reducing europium+3 to europium+2; and (c) precipitating the europium+2 with a sulfate ion in a superstoichiometric amount; wherein the improvement is achieved by using one or more of the following: (i) the acid is an anoic acid; (ii) the reducing is with zinc metal in the absence of a second metal or with an amount of the second metal that is ineffective in the reducing; (iii) adding a group IIA element after step (c) for precipitating the excess sulfate prior to repeating step (c); (iv) the sulfate is a sulfate salt with a monovalent cation; (v) adding cold europium+3 prior to repeating step (c).

  4. Some enzymatic activities associated with purified parapoxvirions.

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, H S; Holowczak, J A

    1983-01-01

    Purified virions of milker's nodule virus, a parapoxvirus, were shown to contain an RNA polymerase, a nucleotide phosphohydrolase, and a protein kinase associated with or encapsulated within the DNA-containing core of the virus. In vitro, the activated viral RNA polymerase transcribed only 7 to 8% of the genome, in the form of 8S to 14S polyadenylated RNA molecules which were complementary to sequences present in milker's nodule virus DNA but not vaccinia virus DNA or DNA prepared from the host cells in which the virus was propagated. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis showed that in vitro, the activated viral protein kinase phosphorylated viral polypeptides of 95, 60, 33.5, 15, and 13.8 kilodaltons. Images PMID:6188861

  5. Ozone emissions from a "personal air purifier".

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Bloudoff, D P; Jenkins, P L; Stroud, K R

    1999-01-01

    Ozone emissions were measured above a "personal air purifier" (PAP) designed to be worn on a lapel, shirt pocket, or neck strap. The device is being marketed as a negative ion generator that purifies the air. However, it also produces ozone within the person's immediate breathing zone. In order to assess worst-case potential human exposure to ozone at the mouth and nose, we measured ozone concentrations in separate tests at 1, 3, 5, and 6 in. above each of two PAPs in a closed office. One PAP was new, and one had been used slightly for 3 months. Temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, room ozone concentration, and outdoor ozone concentration also were measured concurrently during the tests. Average ozone levels measured directly above the individual PAPs ranged from 65-71 ppb at 6 in. above the device to 268-389 ppb at 1 in. above the device. Ozone emission rates from the PAPs were estimated to be 1.7-1.9 microg/minute. When house dust was sprinkled on the top grid of the PAPs, one showed an initial peak of 522 ppb ozone at 1 in., and then returned to the 200-400 ppb range. Room ozone levels increased by only 0-5 ppb during the tests. Even when two PAPs were left operating over a weekend, room ozone levels did not noticeably increase beyond background room ozone levels. These results indicate that this "PAP," even without significant background ozone, can potentially elevate the user's exposures to ozone levels greater than the health-based air quality standards for outdoor air in California (0.09 ppm, 1-hour average) and the United States (0.08 ppm, 8-hour average).

  6. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  7. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  8. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  9. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water...

  10. Sturgeon hatching enzyme and the mechanism of egg envelope digestion: Insight into changes in the mechanism of egg envelope digestion during the evolution of ray-finned fish.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuki; Kawaguchi, Mari; Sano, Kaori; Yasumasu, Shigeki

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the evolution of the hatching enzyme gene using bester sturgeon (hybrid of Acipencer ruthenus and Huso huso), a basal member of ray-finned fishes. We purified the bester hatching enzyme from hatching liquid, yielding a single band on SDS-PAGE, then isolated its cDNA from embryos by PCR. The sturgeon hatching enzyme consists of an astacin family protease domain and a CUB domain. The CUB domains are present in frog and bird hatching enzymes, but not in teleostei, suggesting that the domain structure of sturgeon hatching enzyme is the tetrapod type. The purified hatching enzyme swelled the egg envelope, and selectively cleaved one of five egg envelope proteins, ZPAX. Xenopus hatching enzyme preferentially digests ZPAX, thus, the egg envelope digestion process is conserved between amphibians and basal ray-finned fish. Teleostei hatching enzymes cleave the repeat sequences at the N-terminal region of ZPB and ZPC, suggesting that the targets of the teleostei hatching enzymes differ from those of amphibians and sturgeons. Such repeat sequences were not found in the N-terminal region of ZPB and ZPC of amphibians and sturgeons. Our results suggest that the change in substrates of the hatching enzymes was accompanied by the mutation of the amino acid sequence of N-terminal regions of ZPB and ZPC. We conclude that the changes in the mechanism of egg envelope digestion, including the change in the domain structure of the hatching enzymes and the switch in substrate, occurred during the evolution of teleostei, likely triggered by the teleost-specific third whole genome duplication. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 720-732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  12. Recombinant pestivirus E2 glycoproteins prevent viral attachment to permissive and non permissive cells with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asfor, A S; Wakeley, P R; Drew, T W; Paton, D J

    2014-08-30

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen, which like other pestiviruses has similar molecular biological features to hepaciviruses, including human Hepatitis C virus. The pestivirus E2 glycoproteins are the major target for virus-neutralising antibodies, as well as playing a role in receptor binding and host range restriction. In this study, recombinant E2 glycoproteins (rE2) derived from three different pestivirus species were examined for their inhibitory effects on pestivirus infectivity in cell culture. Histidine-tagged rE2 glycoproteins of BVDV type 2 strain 178003, BVDV type 1 strain Oregon C24V and CSFV strain Alfort 187 were produced in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells and purified under native conditions. The ability of rE2 glycoprotein to inhibit the infection of permissive cells by both homologous and heterologous virus was compared, revealing that the inhibitory effects of rE2 glycoproteins correlated with the predicted similarity of the E2 structures in the recombinant protein and the test virus. This result suggests that the sequence and structure of E2 are likely to be involved in the host specificity of pestiviruses at their point of uptake into cells.

  13. Use of influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF for generation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanika, Andrea; Larisch, Birthe; Steinmann, Eike; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Zimmer, Gert

    2005-05-01

    Influenza C virus contains two envelope glycoproteins: CM2, a putative ion channel protein; and HEF, a unique multifunctional protein that performs receptor-binding, receptor-destroying and fusion activities. Here, it is demonstrated that expression of HEF is sufficient to pseudotype replication-incompetent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) that lacks the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene. The pseudotyped virus showed characteristic features of influenza C virus with respect to proteolytic activation, receptor usage and cell tropism. Chimeric glycoproteins composed of HEF ectodomain and VSV-G C-terminal domains were efficiently incorporated into VSV particles and showed receptor-binding and receptor-destroying activities but, unlike authentic HEF, did not mediate efficient infection, probably because of impaired fusion activity. HEF-pseudotyped VSV efficiently infected polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells via the apical plasma membrane, whereas entry of VSV-G-complemented virus was restricted to the basolateral membrane. These findings suggest that pseudotyping of viral vectors with HEF might be useful for efficient apical gene transfer into polarized epithelial cells and for targeting cells that express 9-O-acetylated sialic acids.

  14. Crystal Structure of Glycoprotein C from a Hantavirus in the Post-fusion Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Willensky, Shmuel; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Tischler, Nicole D.; Dessau, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging human pathogens and are the causative agents of serious diseases in humans with high mortality rates. Like other members in the Bunyaviridae family their M segment encodes two glycoproteins, GN and GC, which are responsible for the early events of infection. Hantaviruses deliver their tripartite genome into the cytoplasm by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes in response to the reduced pH of the endosome. Unlike phleboviruses (e.g. Rift valley fever virus), that have an icosahedral glycoprotein envelope, hantaviruses display a pleomorphic virion morphology as GN and GC assemble into spikes with apparent four-fold symmetry organized in a grid-like pattern on the viral membrane. Here we present the crystal structure of glycoprotein C (GC) from Puumala virus (PUUV), a representative member of the Hantavirus genus. The crystal structure shows GC as the membrane fusion effector of PUUV and it presents a class II membrane fusion protein fold. Furthermore, GC was crystallized in its post-fusion trimeric conformation that until now had been observed only in Flavi- and Togaviridae family members. The PUUV GC structure together with our functional data provides intriguing evolutionary and mechanistic insights into class II membrane fusion proteins and reveals new targets for membrane fusion inhibitors against these important pathogens. PMID:27783673

  15. Crystal Structure of Glycoprotein C from a Hantavirus in the Post-fusion Conformation.

    PubMed

    Willensky, Shmuel; Bar-Rogovsky, Hagit; Bignon, Eduardo A; Tischler, Nicole D; Modis, Yorgo; Dessau, Moshe

    2016-10-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging human pathogens and are the causative agents of serious diseases in humans with high mortality rates. Like other members in the Bunyaviridae family their M segment encodes two glycoproteins, GN and GC, which are responsible for the early events of infection. Hantaviruses deliver their tripartite genome into the cytoplasm by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes in response to the reduced pH of the endosome. Unlike phleboviruses (e.g. Rift valley fever virus), that have an icosahedral glycoprotein envelope, hantaviruses display a pleomorphic virion morphology as GN and GC assemble into spikes with apparent four-fold symmetry organized in a grid-like pattern on the viral membrane. Here we present the crystal structure of glycoprotein C (GC) from Puumala virus (PUUV), a representative member of the Hantavirus genus. The crystal structure shows GC as the membrane fusion effector of PUUV and it presents a class II membrane fusion protein fold. Furthermore, GC was crystallized in its post-fusion trimeric conformation that until now had been observed only in Flavi- and Togaviridae family members. The PUUV GC structure together with our functional data provides intriguing evolutionary and mechanistic insights into class II membrane fusion proteins and reveals new targets for membrane fusion inhibitors against these important pathogens.

  16. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  17. Enhanced antagonism of BST-2 by a neurovirulent SIV envelope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kenta; Chen, Chia-Yen; Whitted, Sonya; Chertova, Elena; Roser, David J.; Wu, Fan; Plishka, Ronald J.; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Buckler-White, Alicia; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Strebel, Klaus; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not sufficient to completely suppress disease progression in the CNS, as indicated by the rising incidence of HIV-1–associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) among infected individuals on ART. It is not clear why some HIV-1–infected patients develop HAND, despite effective repression of viral replication in the circulation. SIV-infected nonhuman primate models are widely used to dissect the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis in the CNS. Here, we identified 4 amino acid substitutions in the cytoplasmic tail of viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 of the neurovirulent virus SIVsm804E that enhance replication in macrophages and associate with enhanced antagonism of the host restriction factor BM stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2). Rhesus macaques were inoculated with a variant of the parental virus SIVsmE543-3 that had been engineered to contain the 4 amino acid substitutions present in gp41 of SIVsm804E. Compared with WT virus–infected controls, animals infected with mutant virus exhibited higher viral load in cerebrospinal fluid. Together, these results are consistent with a potential role for BST-2 in the CNS microenvironment and suggest that BST-2 antagonists may serve as a possible target for countermeasures against HAND. PMID:27159392

  18. Structural constraints determine the glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope trimers

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Seabright, Gemma E.; Cupo, Albert; Ringe, Rajesh; Kim, Helen J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Doores, Katie J.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Moore, John P.; Crispin, Max

    2015-01-01

    A highly glycosylated, trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env) mediates HIV-1 cell entry. The high density and heterogeneity of the glycans shield Env from recognition by the immune system but, paradoxically, many potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes involving this glycan shield. To better understand Env glycosylation and its role in bNAb recognition, we characterized a soluble, cleaved recombinant trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664) that is a close structural and antigenic mimic of native Env. Large, unprocessed oligomannose-type structures (Man8-9GlcNAc2) are notably prevalent on the gp120 components of the trimer, irrespective of the mammalian cell expression system or the bNAb used for affinity-purification. In contrast, gp41 subunits carry more highly processed glycans. The glycans on uncleaved, non-native oligomeric gp140 proteins are also highly processed. A homogeneous, oligomannose-dominated glycan profile is therefore a hallmark of a native Env conformation and a potential Achilles’ heel that can be exploited for bNAb recognition and vaccine design. PMID:26051934

  19. The theoretical polarization of pure scattering axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Sobolev approach to the scattering of starlight through a pure scattering circumstellar envelope is developed. The theoretical polarization due to electron scattering in Be star envelopes is calculated for two geometries (an equatorially enhanced envelope and a spheroidal envelope). Only the disk-type envelope is found to yield a maximum polarization consistent with the observed range for Be stars. A lower limit, analytical approximation to the theoretical polarization from a pure scattering envelope is obtained.

  20. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-23

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER.

  1. Four glycoproteins are expressed in the cat zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Stetson, I; Avilés, M; Moros, C; García-Vázquez, F A; Gimeno, L; Torrecillas, A; Aliaga, C; Bernardo-Pisa, M V; Ballesta, J; Izquierdo-Rico, M J

    2015-04-15

    The mammalian oocyte is surrounded by a matrix called the zona pellucida (ZP). This envelope participates in processes such as acrosome reaction induction, sperm binding and may be involved in speciation. In cat (Felis catus), this matrix is composed of at least three glycoproteins called ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4. However, recent studies have pointed to the presence of a fourth protein in several mammals (rat, human, hamster or rabbit), meaning that a reevaluation of cat ZP is needed. For this reason, the objective of this research was to analyze the protein composition of cat ZP by means of proteomic analysis. Using ZP from ovaries and oocytes, several peptides corresponding to four proteins were detected, yielding a coverage of 33.17%, 71.50%, 50.23%, and 49.64% for ZP1, ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4, respectively. Moreover, the expression of four genes was confirmed by molecular analysis. Using total RNA isolated from cat ovaries, the complementary deoxyribonucleic acids encoding cat ZP were partially amplified by reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, ZP1 was totally amplified for the first time in this species. As far as we are aware, this is the first study that confirms the presence of four proteins in cat ZP.

  2. Safeguards Envelope Progress FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Metcalf; Robert Bean

    2009-09-01

    The Safeguards Envelope is a strategy to determine a set of specific operating parameters which nuclear facilities may operate within to maximize safeguards effectiveness without sacrificing safety or plant efficiency. This paper details advanced statistical techniques will be applied to real plant process monitoring (PM) data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a result of the U.S. having no operating nuclear chemical reprocessing plants, there has been a strong interest in obtaining process monitoring data from the ICPP. The ICPP was shut down in 1996 and a recent effort has been made to retrieve the PM data from storage in a data mining effort. In a simulation based on this data, multi-tank and multi-attribute correlations were tested against synthetic diversion scenarios. Kernel regression smoothing was used to fit a curve to the historical data, and multivariable, residual analysis and cumulative sum techniques set parameters for operating conditions. Diversion scenarios were created and tested, showing improved results when compared with a previous study utilizing only one-variable Z- testing7.

  3. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis; Teoh, William; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) provides an alternative to extravehicular activity (EVA) of space suited astronauts and/or use of long slender manipulator arms such as are used in the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. POWER provides the capability for a shirt sleeved astronaut to perform such work by entering a control pod through air locks at both ends of an inflated flexible bellows (access tunnel). The exoskeleton of the tunnel is a series of six degrees of freedom (Six-DOF) articulated links compressible to 1/6 of their fully extended length. The operator can maneuver the control pod to almost any location within about 50 m of the base attachment to the space station. POWER can be envisioned as a series of hollow Six-DOF manipulator segments or arms wherein each arm grasps the shoulder of the next arm. Inside the hollow arms ia a bellow-type access tunnel. The control pod is the fist of the series of linked hollow arms. The fingers of the fist are conventional manipulator arms under direct visual control of the nearby operator in the pod. The applications and progress to date of the POWER system is given.

  4. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers.

  5. Use of lambdagt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector lambdagt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the lambdagt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as ..beta..-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved.

  6. Purifying Selection and Molecular Adaptation in the Genome of Verminephrobacter, the Heritable Symbiotic Bacteria of Earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Bataillon, Thomas; Pinel, Nicolás; De Mita, Stéphane; Lund, Marie B.; Panitz, Frank; Bendixen, Christian; Stahl, David A.; Schramm, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    While genomic erosion is common among intracellular symbionts, patterns of genome evolution in heritable extracellular endosymbionts remain elusive. We study vertically transmitted extracellular endosymbionts (Verminephrobacter, Betaproteobacteria) that form a beneficial, species-specific, and evolutionarily old (60–130 Myr) association with earthworms. We assembled a draft genome of Verminephrobacter aporrectodeae and compared it with the genomes of Verminephrobacter eiseniae and two nonsymbiotic close relatives (Acidovorax). Similar to V. eiseniae, the V. aporrectodeae genome was not markedly reduced in size and showed no A–T bias. We characterized the strength of purifying selection (ω = dN/dS) and codon usage bias in 876 orthologous genes. Symbiont genomes exhibited strong purifying selection (ω = 0.09 ± 0.07), although transition to symbiosis entailed relaxation of purifying selection as evidenced by 50% higher ω values and less codon usage bias in symbiont compared with reference genomes. Relaxation was not evenly distributed among functional gene categories but was overrepresented in genes involved in signal transduction and cell envelope biogenesis. The same gene categories also harbored instances of positive selection in the Verminephrobacter clade. In total, positive selection was detected in 89 genes, including also genes involved in DNA metabolism, tRNA modification, and TonB-dependent iron uptake, potentially highlighting functions important in symbiosis. Our results suggest that the transition to symbiosis was accompanied by molecular adaptation, while purifying selection was only moderately relaxed, despite the evolutionary age and stability of the host association. We hypothesize that biparental transmission of symbionts and rare genetic mixing during transmission can prevent genome erosion in heritable symbionts. PMID:22333491

  7. Resource envelope concepts for mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, K. Y.; Weiler, J. D.; Tokaz, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Seven proposed methods for creating resource envelopes for Space Station Freedom mission planning are detailed. Four reference science activity models are used to illustrate the effect of adding operational flexibility to mission timelines. For each method, a brief explanation is given along with graphs to illustrate the application of the envelopes to the power and crew resources. The benefits and costs of each method are analyzed in terms of resource utilization. In addition to the effect on individual activities, resource envelopes are analyzed at the experiment level.

  8. Studies on the role of neutralizing antibodies against envelope genes in resolving HCV pseudo-particles infection.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Shazia; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Amjad; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of antibodies targeting the attachment and entry of the viral particles into host cells is important for studding antibody mediated neutralization. Antibodies against the envelope glycoproteins (EGP) have neutralizing capacity and can prevent HCV infections. System based on HCV pseudo typed-particles (HCVpp) stably expressing EGP can be used for screening of HCV anti envelope neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with acute and chronic HCV infections. The aim of the current study was to check HCVpp as a useful tool for the detection of anti-HCV envelope antibodies in the serum of HCV infected patients and to test the binding potential of these antiviral molecules to EGP of HCV 3a. Previously developed HCVpp harboring unmodified glycoproteins from local isolates in 293T cell line were used in this study. HCVpp were pre incubated with different concentrations of anti E1 antibody and different E2 antibodies to check antiviral activity. Further we used serum samples with low/medium (≤800,000 IU/mL), and high (>800,000 IU/mL) viral titer from chronic HCV male and female patients. Infection was done in Huh-7 cells for 1 h at 37 oC. Infectivity was checked through Luciferase assay. Considerable decrease in HCVpp infectivity with anti-envelope antibodies was observed in dose dependent manner. Maximum inhibition was seen when 5 µg/ml of monoclonal anti E1 antibody used. Further increase in concentration exhibited no decrease in infectivity which suggests that other factors are also involved in causing infection. Various well characterized E2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been screened for their capability to reduce infection in Huh-7 cells. Three of the four mAbs specific for the E2 had no effect on the infectivity of HCVpp. Confirmation sensitive antibody H53 showed maximum inhibition of infectivity. HCV ELISA positive samples from both male and female patients were used to neutralize the HCVpp. The neutralizing antibody response

  9. The significance of the Golgi complex in envelopment of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) as revealed by cryobased electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Peter; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Cantieni, Daniel; Loepfe, Eva; Walther, Paul; Müller, Martin; Engels, Monika

    2002-01-01

    Nucleocapsids of herpesviruses originate in the nucleus of host cells and bud through the inner nuclear membrane acquiring tegument and envelope. The release of the enveloped virus particle from the perinuclear space is unknown. Cryobased electron microscopic imaging revealed enveloped virus particles within cisterns associated with the perinuclear space, a pre-Golgi compartment connecting Golgi cisterns to the perinuclear space, and enveloped virus particles in Golgi cisterns where they are packaged into transport vacuoles by membrane fission. To our knowledge, our images show for the first time the connectivity from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. The data strongly indicate an intracisternal transport of enveloped virus particles from the budding site to the packaging site. Budding starts by condensation at the inner membrane. Condensation involving the viral envelope and peripheral tegument was persistent in virus particles within perinuclear space and associated cisterns. Virus particles within Golgi cisterns and transport vacuoles originating by Golgi membrane fission, however, lacked condensation. Instead, spikes were clearly evident. The phenomenon of condensation is considered likely to be responsible for preventing fusion of the viral envelope with cisternal membranes and/or for driving virions from the perinuclear space to Golgi cisterns. Glycoprotein K is discussed to likely play a role in the intracisternal transportation of virions. In addition to the pathway including intracisternal transport and packaging, there were clear indications for the well-known pathway involving wrapping of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids by Golgi membranes. The origin of the cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, however, remains obscure. Lack of evidence for release of nucleocapsids at the outer nuclear membrane suggests that the process is very rapid, or that nucleocapsids pass the nucleocytoplasmic barrier via an alternative route.

  10. Resistance to neutralization by broadly reactive antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 glycoprotein conferred by a gp41 amino acid change.

    PubMed Central

    Thali, M; Charles, M; Furman, C; Cavacini, L; Posner, M; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1994-01-01

    A neutralization-resistant variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that emerged during in vitro propagation of the virus in the presence of neutralizing serum from an infected individual has been described. A threonine-for-alanine substitution at position 582 in the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of the variant virus was responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype (M.S. Reitz, Jr., C. Wilson, C. Naugle, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, Cell 54:57-63, 1988). The mutant virus also exhibited reduced sensitivity to neutralization by 30% of HIV-1-positive sera that neutralized the parental virus, suggesting that a significant fraction of the neutralizing activity within these sera can be affected by the amino acid change in gp41 (C. Wilson, M. S. Reitz, Jr., K. Aldrich, P. J. Klasse, J. Blomberg, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, J. Virol. 64:3240-3248, 1990). It is shown here that the change of alanine 582 to threonine specifically confers resistance to neutralizing by antibodies directed against both groups of discontinuous, conserved epitopes related to the CD4 binding site on the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Only minor differences in binding of these antibodies to wild-type and mutant envelope glycoproteins were observed. Thus, the antigenic structure of gp120 can be subtly affected by an amino acid change in gp41, with important consequences for sensitivity to neutralization. Images PMID:7507184

  11. Characterization of phage receptors in Streptococcus thermophilus using purified cell walls obtained by a simple protocol.

    PubMed

    Quiberoni, A; Stiefel, J I; Reinheimer, J A

    2000-12-01

    A simple protocol was designed and applied to obtain Streptococcus thermophilus purified cell walls. To identify the structures involved in phage adsorption, the cell walls of two Strep. thermophilus strains were treated with sodium dodecyl sulphate and proteinase K. These treatments did not reduce the adsorption of phages CYM and 0BJ to the cell walls of Strep. thermophilus YSD10 and Strep. thermophilus BJ15, respectively. However, phage binding was reduced when the cell envelopes were treated with mutanolysin or trichloroacetic acid 5%, suggesting that the phage receptor component is part of the peptidoglycan or a polymer closely linked to it. The ability of several saccharides to inactivate both phages was also assayed. These phage inhibition experiments suggested that the phage CYM adsorbed to a component involving glucosamine and rhamnose, while glucosamine and ribose interfered with the adsorption of phage 0BJ.

  12. Radiative accelerations in stellar envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, M. J.

    1997-08-01

    In stars which are sufficiently quiescent, changes in the relative abundances of the chemical elements can result from gravitational settling and from levitation produced by radiation pressure forces, usually expressed as radiative accelerations g_rad. Those changes can affect the structure of such stars, due to modifications in opacities, and can lead to marked peculiarities in observed atmospheric abundances. It is necessary to consider diffusive movements both in the atmospheres and in much deeper layers of the stellar envelopes. For the envelopes the equation of radiative transfer can be solved in a diffusion approximation and, for an element k in ionization stage j, one obtains expressions for g_rad(j, k) proportional to the total radiative flux, to the Rosseland-mean opacity kappa_R (which may depend on the abundance of k), and to a dimensionless quantity gamma(j, k) which, due to saturation effects, can be sensitive to the abundance of k. The radiative accelerations are required for each ionization stage, because the diffusion coefficients depend on j. Using atomic data obtained in the course of the work of the Opacity Project (OP), we calculate kappa_R and gamma(j, k) for the chemical elements C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni. We start from standard Solar system abundances, and then vary the abundance of one element at a time (element k) by a factor chi. The following results are obtained and are available at the Centre de Donnees astronomiques de Strasbourg (CDS). (1) Files stages.zz (where zz specifies the nuclear charge of the selected element k) containing values of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) on a mesh of values of (T, N_e, chi), where T is temperature, and N_e is electron density. We include derivatives of kappa_R and gamma(j, k) with respect to chi, which are used for making interpolations. (2) A code add.f which reads a file stages.zz and writes a file acc.zz containing values of gamma(k) obtained on summing the gamma(j, k

  13. Tomato LeAGP-1 arabinogalactan-protein purified from transgenic tobacco corroborates the Hyp contiguity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhan Dong; Tan, Li; Showalter, Allan Marshall; Lamport, Derek Thomas Anthony; Kieliszewski, Marcia Jane

    2002-08-01

    Functional analysis of the hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) attempts to relate biological roles to the molecular properties that result largely from O-Hyp glycosylation putatively coded by the primary sequence. The Hyp contiguity hypothesis predicts contiguous Hyp residues as attachment sites for arabino-oligosaccharides (arabinosides) and clustered, non-contiguous Hyp residues as arabinogalactan polysaccharide sites. Although earlier tests of naturally occurring hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) and HRGPs designed by synthetic genes were consistent with a sequence-driven code, the predictive value of the hypothesis starting from the DNA sequences of known AGPs remained untested due to difficulties in purifying a single AGP for analysis. However, expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) of the major tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) AGP, LeAGP-1, as an enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion glycoprotein (EGFP)-LeAGP-1, increased its hydrophobicity sufficiently for chromatographic purification from other closely related endogenous AGPs. We also designed and purified two variants of LeAGP-1 for future functional analysis: one lacking the putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor signal sequence; the other lacking a 12-residue internal lysine-rich region. Fluorescence microscopy of plasmolysed cells confirmed the location of LeAGP-1 at the plasma membrane outer surface and in Hechtian threads. Hyp glycoside profiles of the fusion glycoproteins gave ratios of Hyp-polysaccharides to Hyp-arabinosides plus non-glycosylated Hyp consistent with those predicted from DNA sequences by the Hyp contiguity hypothesis. These results demonstrate a route to the purification of AGPs and the use of the Hyp contiguity hypothesis for predicting the Hyp O-glycosylation profile of an HRGP from its DNA sequence.

  14. Personnel occupied woven envelope robot power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Personnel Occupied Woven Envelope Robot (POWER) concept has evolved over the course of the study. The goal of the project was the development of methods and algorithms for solid modeling for the flexible robot arm.

  15. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of a Native, Oligomeric Form of Recombinant Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Chul; Seo, Mi-Young; Stadler, Konrad; Yoo, Byoung J.; Choo, Qui-Lim; Coates, Stephen R.; Uematsu, Yasushi; Harada, Takashi; Greer, Catherine E.; Polo, John M.; Pileri, Piero; Eickmann, Markus; Rappuoli, Rino; Abrignani, Sergio; Houghton, Michael; Han, Jang H.

    2004-01-01

    We have expressed and characterized the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike protein in cDNA-transfected mammalian cells. The full-length spike protein (S) was newly synthesized as an endoglycosidase H (endo H)-sensitive glycoprotein (gp170) that is further modified into an endo H-resistant glycoprotein (gp180) in the Golgi apparatus. No substantial proteolytic cleavage of S was observed, suggesting that S is not processed into head (S1) and stalk (S2) domains as observed for certain other coronaviruses. While the expressed full-length S glycoprotein was exclusively cell associated, a truncation of S by excluding the C-terminal transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains resulted in the expression of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized glycoprotein (gp160) as well as a Golgi-specific form (gp170) which was ultimately secreted into the cell culture medium. Chemical cross-linking, thermal denaturation, and size fractionation analyses suggested that the full-length S glycoprotein of SARS-CoV forms a higher order structure of ∼500 kDa, which is consistent with it being an S homotrimer. The latter was also observed in purified virions. The intracellular form of the C-terminally truncated S protein (but not the secreted form) also forms trimers, but with much less efficiency than full-length S. Deglycosylation of the full-length homotrimer with peptide N-glycosidase-F under native conditions abolished recognition of the protein by virus-neutralizing antisera raised against purified virions, suggesting the importance of the carbohydrate in the correct folding of the S protein. These data should aid in the design of recombinant vaccine antigens to prevent the spread of this emerging pathogen. PMID:15367599

  17. Blue eye disease porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) infects pig neurons and glial cells using sialo-glycoprotein as receptor.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Godoy-Martinez, Diana V; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Rodriguez-Peredo, Alejandra; Dueñas-Jimenez, Judith M; Dueñas-Jiménez, Sergio H; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A

    2007-03-01

    Pig neural cells express glycoproteins with sialylated N-linked oligosaccharide chains (SNOC) which are used by the porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) as receptors. Pig neuronal or glial cell cultures were employed to investigate (a) whether PoRv infects such cells using a molecule expressing SNOC, and (b) the role of viral envelope glycoproteins in establishing the infection. Enriched neuronal or glial cell cultures were exposed to PoRv and infection was detected immunocytochemically. Neuronal cultures prepared from neonatal pigs were treated enzymatically to eliminate sialic acid or N-linked oligosaccharide chains. Primary neural cultures were exposed to anti-HN or anti-F preincubated with PoRv to study the role of the viral glycoproteins. In enriched cultures, PoRv infected neurons and glial cells, and sialic acid expressed in N-linked oligosaccharide chains appeared to play a central role in infection. It was concluded that HN and F viral glycoproteins are required to infect neurons and glial cells.

  18. The role of the membrane-spanning domain sequence in glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G M; Sanders, D A

    1999-09-01

    The role of glycoprotein membrane-spanning domains in the process of membrane fusion is poorly understood. It has been demonstrated that replacing all or part of the membrane-spanning domain of a viral fusion protein with sequences that encode signals for glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage attachment abrogates membrane fusion activity. It has been suggested, however, that the actual amino acid sequence of the membrane-spanning domain is not critical for the activity of viral fusion proteins. We have examined the function of Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope proteins with substitutions in the membrane-spanning domain. Envelope proteins bearing substitutions for proline 617 are processed and incorporated into virus particles normally and bind to the viral receptor. However, they possess greatly reduced or undetectable capacities for the promotion of membrane fusion and infectious virus particle formation. Our results imply a direct role for the residues in the membrane-spanning domain of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein in membrane fusion and its regulation. They also support the thesis that membrane-spanning domains possess a sequence-dependent function in other protein-mediated membrane fusion events.

  19. Creating a Lunar EVA Work Envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Howard, Robert; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Smitherman, David

    2009-01-01

    A work envelope has been defined for weightless Extravehicular Activity (EVA) based on the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), but there is no equivalent for planetary operations. The weightless work envelope is essential for planning all EVA tasks because it determines the location of removable parts, making sure they are within reach and visibility of the suited crew member. In addition, using the envelope positions the structural hard points for foot restraints that allow placing both hands on the job and provides a load path for reacting forces. EVA operations are always constrained by time. Tasks are carefully planned to ensure the crew has enough breathing oxygen, cooling water, and battery power. Planning first involves computers using a virtual work envelope to model tasks, next suited crew members in a simulated environment refine the tasks. For weightless operations, this process is well developed, but planetary EVA is different and no work envelope has been defined. The primary difference between weightless and planetary work envelopes is gravity. It influences anthropometry, horizontal and vertical mobility, and reaction load paths and introduces effort into doing "overhead" work. Additionally, the use of spacesuits other than the EMU, and their impacts on range of motion, must be taken into account. This paper presents the analysis leading to a concept for a planetary EVA work envelope with emphasis on lunar operations. There is some urgency in creating this concept because NASA has begun building and testing development hardware for the lunar surface, including rovers, habitats and cargo off-loading equipment. Just as with microgravity operations, a lunar EVA work envelope is needed to guide designers in the formative stages of the program with the objective of avoiding difficult and costly rework.

  20. EsrC, an envelope stress-regulated repressor of the mexCD-oprJ multidrug efflux operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Purssell, Andrew; Fruci, Michael; Mikalauskas, Alaya; Gilmour, Christie; Poole, Keith

    2015-01-01

    mexCD-oprJ is an envelope stress-inducible multidrug efflux operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A gene encoding a homologue of the NfxB repressor of this operon, PA4596, occurs downstream of oprJ and was proposed as a second repressor of this efflux operon. Inactivation of this gene had no impact on mexCD-oprJ expression in cells not exposed to envelope stress although its loss under envelope stress conditions yielded a > 10-fold increase in mexCD-oprJ expression. Consistent with PA4596 functioning as a mexCD-oprJ repressor, the purified protein was able to bind to a DNA fragment carrying the mexCD-oprJ promoter region. Expression of PA4596 was induced under conditions of envelope stress dependent on the AlgU envelope stress sigma factor, consistent with PA4596 operating under envelope stress conditions where it possibly serves to moderate envelope stress-inducible mexCD-oprJ expression. nfxB mutants showed elevated PA4596 expression and purified NfxB bound to DNA encompassing the PA4596 upstream region, an indication that NfxB functions as a repressor of PA4596 expression. Elimination of PA4596 in P. aeruginosa lacking nfxB and hyperexpressing mexCD-oprJ had no additional impact on mexCD-oprJ expression, regardless of the presence of envelope stress, suggesting that PA4596 repressor activity may be dependent on NfxB. This envelope stress-regulated repressor of mexCD-oprJ has been renamed esrC.

  1. Growth in and breakdown of purified rabbit small intestinal mucin by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Rombough, C

    1993-01-01

    The mucus lining of the gastrointestinal tract serves as a protective barrier over the epithelial surface that must be crossed by invading bacteria seeking entry into the mucosa. The gel-forming component of mucus is mucin, a large polymeric glycoprotein. The present study examined the growth of Yersinia enterocolitica (with and without its virulence plasmid) in purified rabbit small intestinal mucin and the ability of bacteria to degrade mucin. Both virulent and nonvirulent organisms showed enhanced growth in mucin-supplemented media compared with unsupplemented media, but only at 37 degrees C and not at 25 degrees C. The effects of mucin were not specific because medium supplemented with bovine serum albumin also enhanced bacterial growth at 37 degrees C. Purified mucin was broken down into lower-molecular-weight components (assessed by monitoring its elution profile on a Sepharose CL-2B column) by plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica but not by plasmid-cured organisms. Culturing virulent Y. enterocolitica at 25 degrees C completely suppressed its capacity to degrade mucin, suggesting that this activity depends on plasmid expression. These results were confirmed in similar studies with purified rabbit colonic mucin. Mucin-degrading activity could be demonstrated in spent culture media from virulent Y. enterocolitica incubated at 37 degrees C but not in bacterial membrane preparations. Changes in the elution profiles of small intestinal and colonic mucins exposed to plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica at 37 degrees C were consistent with proteolytic depolymerization. The ability to grow well in mucin may help Y. enterocolitica to colonize the intestine, while the production of a mucin-degrading enzyme(s) by plasmid-bearing organisms may assist pathogenic strains to solubilize and penetrate the mucus gel layer. PMID:8406802

  2. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  3. Particle tracking microrheology of purified gastrointestinal mucins.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Pantelis; Pudney, Paul D A; Thornton, David J; Waigh, Thomas A

    2014-04-01

    The rheological characteristics of gastric and duodenal mucin solutions, the building blocks of the mucus layer that covers the epithelia of the two organs, were investigated using particle tracking microrheology. We used biochemically well characterized purified porcine mucins (MUC5AC and MUC2) as models for human mucins, to probe their viscoelasticity as a function of mucin concentration and pH. Furthermore, we used both reducing (dithiothreitol, DTT) and chaotropic agents (guanidinium chloride and urea) to probe the mesoscopic forces that mediate the integrity of the polymer network. At neutral pH both gastric and duodenal mucins formed self-assembled semi-dilute networks above a certain critical mucin concentration (c*) with the viscosity (η) scaling as η∼c(0.53±0.08) for MUC5AC and η∼c(0.53±0.06) for MUC2, where c is the mucin concentration. Above an even higher mucin concentration threshold (ce , the entanglement concentration) reptation occurs and there is a dramatic increase in the viscosity scaling, η∼c(3.92±0.38) for MUC5AC and η∼c(5.1±0.8) for MUC2. The dynamics of the self-assembled comb polymers is examined in terms of a scaling model for flexible polyelectrolyte combs. Both duodenum and gastric mucin are found to be pH switchable gels, gelation occurring at low pHs. There is a hundred-fold increase in the elastic shear modulus once the pH is decreased. The addition of DTT, guanidinium chloride and urea disassembles both the semi-dilute and gel structures causing a large increase in the compliance (decrease in their shear moduli). Addition of the polyphenol EGCG has a reverse effect on mucin viscoelasticity, that is, it triggers a sol-gel transition in semi-dilute mucin solutions at neutral pH.

  4. Genetic diversity of koala retroviral envelopes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Gorman, Kristen; Santiago, Jan Clement; Kluska, Kristen; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-03-17

    Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A) were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  5. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105-106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  6. Traceless labeling of glycoproteins and its application to the study of glycoprotein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Lin; Lee, Yen-Pin; Yang, Yen-Ling; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-21

    A new chemical method for the traceless labeling of glycoproteins with synthetic boronic acid (BA)-tosyl probes was successfully developed. The BA moiety acts as an affinity head to direct the formation of a cyclic boronate diester with the diol groups of glycans. Following this step, the electrophilic tosyl group is displaced by an SN2 reaction with a nucleophilic residue of the boronated glycoprotein, and finally, a reporter group is tagged onto the glycoprotein via an ether linkage. In the presence of polyols, a competition reaction recovers the native glycan of the tagged glycoprotein, conserving its biological significance. The BA-tosyl probes were used successfully for the specific labeling of glycosylated fetuins in a mixed protein pool and from crude Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysate. Further, a BA-tosyl-functionalized glass slide was used to fabricate glycoprotein microarrays with highly conserved glycans. By interacting with various lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins), such as Concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), the types of carbohydrates and specific linkages of glycoproteins (α or β) could be systematically monitored. It is believed that the newly developed method will greatly accelerate the understanding of glycoproteins.

  7. The joke envelope: a neglected precursor of the psychic envelope concept in Freud's writing.

    PubMed

    Spero, Moshe Halevi

    2009-01-01

    The concepts of the primeval skin ego, psychic envelope, and related pre-ego containing and wrapping functions elaborated respectively by Esther Bick, Didier Anzieu, and Francis Tustin occupy an important position in contemporary psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice. The psychic envelope begins as a virtual mental protostructure ("proto" because it is not yet based on fully symbolized representations) that holds the budding mind together pending further developments. With maturity, the enveloping functions adopt symbolized, metaphoric form (for example, the aesthetic use of cloth, the analytic framework), but can regress to more concrete and pathological forms. The aforementioned authors based their ideas on a cluster of specific allusions to the idea of a psychic covering, barrier, or envelope in Freud's work. Yet they neglected one reference, hidden in Freud's analysis of the structure ofjokes and humor: the 'joke envelope"--die witzige Einkleidung. The present essay explores Freud's use of the term Einkleidung, including his intriguing idea that a joke requires three people whereas a dream does not and the fact that Freud nowhere speaks of a "dream envelope. "I take the "joke envelope" beyond its original context and posit a relationship between laughter and the early, normative traumas of breathing, crying, and loss, and the dawn of rhythmic envelopes that enable mentalization. Jokes and joking symbolically repeat the early rupture and rapture of breathing and self-other differentiation and the internalization of maternal containing and envelopment.

  8. Purification of the trypanosome phospholipase C which cleaves the variant surface glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, D.; Hart, G.W.; Englund, P.T.

    1986-05-01

    The surface coat of Trypanosoma brucei is composed of many copies of the Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). This protein is tethered to the cell membrane by a glycolipid moiety which contains dimyristylphosphatidylinositol. Following cell lysis, an endogenous, membrane-bound phospholipase C cleaves the glycolipid and releases the VSG in soluble form. The authors have purified a lipase which they believe is responsible for VSG release. This enzyme, designated VSG lipase, is assayed by measuring release of butanol-soluble /sup 3/H from VSG labeled with (/sup 3/H)myristate. The purification involves detergent extraction of trypanosome membranes, ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydrophobic chromatography, and cation exchange chromatography. The enzyme is purified roughly 2500 fold and is nearly homogeneous. Based on SDS-PAGE, it has an apparent subunit molecular weight of 37,000 daltons. This polypeptide co-fractionates with the activity during several fractionation procedures. The enzyme has an apparent s/sub 20,w/ of 3.8 S. The purified VSG lipase is active in the presence of EDTA; its activity is inhibited by organomercurials and stimulated by dithiothreitol. The purified enzyme releases dimyristylglycerol from VSG.

  9. Structural characterization of the glycoprotein GP2 core domain from the CAS virus, a novel arenavirus-like species.

    PubMed

    Koellhoffer, Jayne F; Dai, Zhou; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Stenglein, Mark D; Liu, Yanyun; Toro, Rafael; S Harrison, Joseph; Chandran, Kartik; DeRisi, Joseph L; Almo, Steven C; Lai, Jonathan R

    2014-04-03

    Fusion of the viral and host cell membranes is a necessary first step for infection by enveloped viruses and is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein. The transmembrane subunits from the structurally defined "class I" glycoproteins adopt an α-helical "trimer-of-hairpins" conformation during the fusion pathway. Here, we present our studies on the envelope glycoprotein transmembrane subunit, GP2, of the CAS virus (CASV). CASV was recently identified from annulated tree boas (Corallus annulatus) with inclusion body disease and is implicated in the disease etiology. We have generated and characterized two protein constructs consisting of the predicted CASV GP2 core domain. The crystal structure of the CASV GP2 post-fusion conformation indicates a trimeric α-helical bundle that is highly similar to those of Ebola virus and Marburg virus GP2 despite CASV genome homology to arenaviruses. Denaturation studies demonstrate that the stability of CASV GP2 is pH dependent with higher stability at lower pH; we propose that this behavior is due to a network of interactions among acidic residues that would destabilize the α-helical bundle under conditions where the side chains are deprotonated. The pH-dependent stability of the post-fusion structure has been observed in Ebola virus and Marburg virus GP2, as well as other viruses that enter via the endosome. Infection experiments with CASV and the related Golden Gate virus support a mechanism of entry that requires endosomal acidification. Our results suggest that, despite being primarily arenavirus like, the transmembrane subunit of CASV is extremely similar to the filoviruses.

  10. Phytochrome regulates GTP-binding protein activity in the envelope of pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Memon, A. R.; Thompson, G. A. Jr; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Three GTP-binding proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 28 and 30 kDa have been detected in isolated nuclei of etiolated pea plumules. After LDS-PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose these proteins bind [32P]GTP in the presence of excess ATP, suggesting that they are monomeric G proteins. When nuclei are disrupted, three proteins co-purify with the nuclear envelope fraction and are highly enriched in this fraction. The level of [32P]GTP-binding for all three protein bands is significantly increased when harvested pea plumules are irradiated by red light, and this effect is reversed by far-red light. The results indicate that GTP-binding activity associated with the nuclear envelope of plant cells is photoreversibly regulated by the pigment phytochrome.

  11. Hydrogen purifier module and method for forming the same

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Peter David

    2012-02-07

    A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane, and a gas-tight seal, where the seal is uses a low temperature melting point metal, which upon heating above the melting point subsequently forms a seal alloy with adjacent metals, where the alloy has a melting point above the operational temperature of the purifier. The purifier further is constructed such that a degree of isolation exists between the metal that melts to form the seal and the active area of the purifier membrane, so that the active area of the purifier membrane is not corrupted. A method of forming a hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen permeable membrane with a seal of the same type is also disclosed.

  12. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  13. Solitary Alfven wave envelopes and the modulational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, C.F.

    1987-06-01

    The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the modulational instability of circularly polarized dispersive Alfven wave envelopes. It also may be used to determine the properties of finite amplitude localized stationary wave envelopes. Such envelope solitons exist only in conditions of modulational stability. This leaves open the question of whether, and if so, how, the modulational instability produces envelope solitons. 12 refs.

  14. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Trimeric Envelope Protein from an Indian Clade C HIV-1 Isolate*

    PubMed Central

    Sneha Priya, Rangasamy; Veena, Menon; Kalisz, Irene; Whitney, Stephen; Priyanka, Dhopeshwarkar; LaBranche, Celia C.; Sri Teja, Mullapudi; Montefiori, David C.; Pal, Ranajit; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates from India mainly belong to clade C and are quite distinct from clade C isolates from Africa in terms of their phylogenetic makeup, serotype, and sensitivity to known human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Because many of these properties are associated with the envelope proteins of HIV-1, it is of interest to study the envelope proteins of Indian clade C isolates as part of the ongoing efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV-1. To this end, we purified trimeric uncleaved gp145 of a CCR5 tropic Indian clade C HIV-1 (93IN101) from the conditioned medium of 293 cells. The purified protein was shown to be properly folded with stable structure by circular dichroism. Conformational integrity was further demonstrated by its high affinity binding to soluble CD4, CD4 binding site antibodies such as b12 and VRC01, quaternary epitope-specific antibody PG9, and CD4-induced epitope-specific antibody 17b. Sera from rabbits immunized with gp145 elicited high titer antibodies to various domains of gp120 and neutralized a broad spectrum of clade B and clade C HIV-1 isolates. Similar to other clade B and clade C envelope immunogens, most of the Tier 1 neutralizing activity could be absorbed with the V3-specific peptide. Subsequent boosting of these rabbits with a clade B HIV-1 Bal gp145 resulted in an expanded breadth of neutralization of HIV-1 isolates. The present study strongly supports the inclusion of envelopes from Indian isolates in a future mixture of HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:25691567

  15. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  16. A simple, inexpensive, robust and sensitive dot-blot assay for equal detection of the nonstructural-1 glycoprotein of all dengue virus serotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detection of dengue virus (DENV) soluble/excreted (s/e) form of the nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein in patient acute-phase sera is ideal for diagnosis. The commercially-available detection assays are, however, too expensive for routine use and have low specificity, particularly for the s/e NS1 glycoprotein of DENV-2 and DENV-4, which are important causes of lethal human disease worldwide. Methods Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and screened against s/e NS1 glycoprotein purified from each DENV serotype to obtain those that reacted equally with each serotype, but not with yellow fever virus (YFV) s/e NS1 glycoprotein or human serum proteins. One MAb, MAb 2C4.6, was further tested against these DENV glycoproteins in human sera using simple, peroxidase-labelled secondary antibody/substrate-developed dot-blot assays. Results Optimal quenching of endogenous human serum peroxidases was attained using 3% H2O2 in H20 for 5 min. MAb 2C4.6 showed an acceptable detection sensitivity of < 32 ng/ml for the s/e NS1 glycoprotein of each DENV serotype but did not cross-react with the YFV s/e NS1 glycoprotein or human serum proteins. By contrast, the LX1 epitope-specific MAb, 3D1.4, showed similar detection sensitivity against only the DENV-1 NS1 glycoprotein, consistent with results from commercial DENV s/e NS1 glycoprotein detection assays. DENV s/e NS1 glycoproteins were stable in human sera after drying on the nitrocellulose membranes and storage for one month at ambient temperature (28°C) before being processed. The total assay time was reduced to 3 h without any loss of detection sensitivity. This dot-blot format was ideal for the circulating immune complex disruption step, which is required for increased DENV s/e NS1 glycoprotein detection. Conclusions This is the first study to determine the detection sensitivity of MAbs against known concentrations of s/e NS1 glycoprotein from each DENV serotype. The preparation of patient serum samples for

  17. Structural proteins of ribonucleic acid tumor viruses. Purification of envelope, core, and internal components.

    PubMed

    Strand, M; August, J T

    1976-01-25

    Murine type C virus structural proteins, the envelope glycopeptides, 30,000 dalton major core protein, and 15,000 dalton internal protein have each been purified to near homogeneity and in high yield from the smae batch of virus by use of phosphocellulose column chromatography and gel filtration procedures. Evidence that these proteins are specified by the viral genome was obtained by competition radioimmunoassay analysis, comparing these polypeptides from Rauscher virus cultivated in a variety of mammalian cell lines; all of the reactive antigenic determinants of these proteins appeared to be virus-specific.

  18. Partial purification and characterization of a mannosyl transferase involved in O -linked mannosylation of glycoproteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Flores, Blanca L; Calvo-Méndez, Carlos; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; López-Romero, Everardo

    2004-04-01

    Incubation of a mixed membrane fraction of C. albicans with the nonionic detergents Nonidet P-40 or Lubrol solubilized a fraction that catalyzed the transfer of mannose either from endogenously generated or exogenously added dolichol-P-[14C]Man onto endogenous protein acceptors. The protein mannosyl transferase solubilized with Nonidet P-40 was partially purified by a single step of preparative nondenaturing electrophoresis and some of its properties were investigated. Although transfer activity occurred in the absence of exogenous mannose acceptors and thus depended on acceptor proteins isolated along with the enzyme, addition of the protein fraction obtained after chemical de-mannosylation of glycoproteins synthesized in vitro stimulated mannoprotein labeling in a concentration-dependent manner. Other de-mannosylated glycoproteins, such as yeast invertase or glycoproteins extracted from C. albicans, failed to increase the amount of labeled mannoproteins. Mannosyl transfer activity was not influenced by common metal ions such as Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Ca(2+), but it was stimulated up to 3-fold by EDTA. Common phosphoglycerides such as phosphatidylglycerol and, to a lower extent, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine enhanced transfer activity. Interestingly, coupled transfer activity between dolichol phosphate mannose synthase, i.e., the enzyme responsible for Dol-P-Man synthesis, and protein mannosyl transferase could be reconstituted in vitro from the partially purified transferases, indicating that this process can occur in the absence of cell membranes.

  19. Toxoids of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin-A: photoaffinity inactivation of purified toxin and purified toxin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, L T; Martinez, D; Marburg, S; Tolman, R L; Galloway, D R

    1984-01-01

    For the preparation of greatly detoxified but highly immunogenic toxoids, two enzymatically active, low-toxicity derivatives of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin-A were further inactivated by photoaffinity labeling. These derivatives were formed during toxin purification, when a relatively crude toxin preparation was concentrated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently dialyzed. These derivatives, designated peak-1 protein (PK-1) and peak-2 protein (PK-2) were antigenically indistinguishable from native toxin, but had isoelectric points (5.00 and 4.90, respectively) that were different from that of the native toxin (4.95). Although the enzymatic activities and molecular weights of PK-1 and PK-2 were similar to those of native toxin, their toxicities were greatly reduced (ca. 500-fold). Photoaffinity labeling of fully active toxin-A, purified by a process which limits the formation of these derivatives, decreased its enzymatic activity (ca. 30-fold) and toxicity (ca. 100-fold). Likewise, photoaffinity labeling of purified PK-1 and PK-2 decreased their enzymatic activities and toxicities (ca. 30-fold and 100-fold, respectively) and, thus, yielded toxoids that were ca. 50,000-fold less toxic than unpurified native toxin. These toxoids were irreversibly detoxified and highly immunogenic during 9 months of storage at 4 degrees C. Images PMID:6321348

  20. Morphologically complex protostellar envelopes : structure and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.

    I present an in-depth study of protostars and their surrounding envelopes of dense gas and dust, using a multitude of observational methods to reveal new details of the star formation process. I use mid-infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with photometry spanning the near-infrared to millimeter wavelengths, to construct a model of the L1527 protostellar system. I modeled both the spectral energy distribution and resolved scattered light images to determine physical properties of the protostellar system. The nature of the apparent central point source in the Spitzer images was uncertain until high-resolution L-band imaging from the Gemini observatory resolved the point source into a disk in scattered light, having a radius of 200 AU. Protostellar envelopes are also often found to cast shadows against the 8 micron Galactic background in Spitzer imaging, enabling direct probes of envelope structure. The shadow images show that the dense envelopes around twenty-two Class 0 protostars are generally morphologically complex from 0.1 pc scales down to ˜1000 AU; they are often filamentary, and frequently non-axisymmetric. The observed envelope structure indicates a likely origin in turbulent cloud structure rather than a quasi-static/equilibrium formation. The complex envelope structure also may indicate an increased likelihood of fragmentation during collapse, forming close binaries. To further characterize these envelopes, I have observed them in the dense molecular gas tracers nthp and nht, both of which closely follow the 8 micron extinction morphology. The magnitude of the velocity gradients and envelope complexity on ˜10000 AU scales indicates that the velocity structure may reflect large-scale infall in addition to the often assumed rotation. Comparisons with three-dimensional filamentary and symmetric rotating collapse models reinforce the interpretation of velocities reflecting large-scale infall, showing that the structure of the envelope

  1. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  2. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-07-07

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this work for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method - Signal Noise Slope Intersection (SNSI), incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called Geometric Method (GM). Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained post detection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid and subclavian arteries. Results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low - less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow; and also less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of Pulsatility Index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  3. Featured Image: Orbiting Stars Share an Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    This beautiful series of snapshots from a simulation (click for a better look!) shows what happens when two stars in a binary system become enclosed in the same stellar envelope. In this binary system, one of the stars has exhausted its hydrogen fuel and become a red giant, complete with an expanding stellar envelope composed of hydrogen and helium. Eventually, the envelope expands so much that the companion star falls into it, where it releases gravitational potential energy into the common envelope. A team led by Sebastian Ohlmann (Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies and University of Wrzburg) recently performed hydrodynamic simulations of this process. Ohlmann and collaborators discovered that the energy release eventually triggers large-scale flow instabilities, which leads to turbulence within the envelope. This process has important consequences for how these systems next evolve (for instance, determining whether or not a supernova occurs!). You can check out the authors video of their simulated stellar inspiral below, or see their paper for more images and results from their study.CitationSebastian T. Ohlmann et al 2016 ApJ 816 L9. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/816/1/L9

  4. COMPLEX STRUCTURE IN CLASS 0 PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Looney, Leslie W.; Chiang, Hsin-Fang

    2010-04-01

    We use archived Infrared Array Camera images from the Spitzer Space Telescope to show that many Class 0 protostars exhibit complex, irregular, and non-axisymmetric structure within their dusty envelopes. Our 8 {mu}m extinction maps probe some of the densest regions in these protostellar envelopes. Many of the systems are observed to have highly irregular and non-axisymmetric morphologies on scales {approx}>1000 AU, with a quarter of the sample exhibiting filamentary or flattened dense structures. Complex envelope structure is observed in regions spatially distinct from outflow cavities, and the densest structures often show no systematic alignment perpendicular to the cavities. These results indicate that mass ejection is not responsible for much of the irregular morphologies we detect; rather, we suggest that the observed envelope complexity is mostly the result of collapse from protostellar cores with initially non-equilibrium structures. The striking non-axisymmetry in many envelopes could provide favorable conditions for the formation of binary systems. We also note that protostars in the sample appear to be formed preferentially near the edges of clouds or bends in filaments, suggesting formation by gravitational focusing.

  5. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  6. Canine distemper virus matrix protein influences particle infectivity, particle composition, and envelope distribution in polarized epithelial cells and modulates virulence.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Erik; Anderson, Danielle E; Castan, Alexandre; von Messling, Veronika; Maisner, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    In paramyxoviruses, the matrix (M) protein mediates the interaction between the envelope and internal proteins during particle assembly and egress. In measles virus (MeV), M mutations, such as those found in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) strains, and differences in vaccine and wild-type M proteins can affect the strength of interaction with the envelope glycoproteins, assembly efficiency, and spread. However, the contribution of the M protein to the replication and pathogenesis of the closely related canine distemper virus (CDV) has not been characterized. To this end this, we generated a recombinant wild-type CDV carrying a vaccine strain M protein. The recombinant virus retained the parental growth phenotype in VerodogSLAMtag cells, but displayed an increased particle-to-infectivity ratio very similar to that of the vaccine strain, likely due to inefficient H protein incorporation. Even though infectious virus was released only from the apical surface, consistent with the release polarity of the wild-type CDV strain, envelope protein distribution in polarized epithelial cells reproduced the bipolar pattern seen in vaccine strain-infected cells. Most notably, the chimeric virus was completely attenuated in ferrets and caused only a mild and transient leukopenia, indicating that the differences in particle infectivity and envelope protein sorting mediated by the vaccine M protein contribute importantly to vaccine strain attenuation.

  7. 21 CFR 880.6500 - Medical ultraviolet air purifier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet air purifier. 880.6500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6500 Medical ultraviolet air purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet...

  8. Portable self-contained solar powered water purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a portable self-contained solar powered water purifier. It comprises housing means for buoyantly supporting the purifier; solar cell means supported by the housing means above water to be treated; purification means depending from the housing means so as to be positioned in water to be treated and including sacrificial anode means providing ionized metallic ions for purifying the water and cathode means providing abstraction of electrons to facilitate the release of oxygen into the water; means for electrically connecting the solar cell means to the electrolytic purification means to enable the electrolytic purification means to purify water when the purifier is placed therein; and diode means for preventing reverse current flow between the anode means and cathode means.

  9. Ultradonut topology of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mehdi; Lele, Tanmay P.; Agrawal, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a unique topological structure formed by lipid membranes in eukaryotic cells. Unlike other membrane structures, the nuclear envelope comprises two concentric membrane shells fused at numerous sites with toroid-shaped pores that impart a “geometric” genus on the order of thousands. Despite the intriguing architecture and vital biological functions of the nuclear membranes, how they achieve and maintain such a unique arrangement remains unknown. Here, we used the theory of elasticity and differential geometry to analyze the equilibrium shape and stability of this structure. Our results show that modest in- and out-of-plane stresses present in the membranes not only can define the pore geometry, but also provide a mechanism for destabilizing membranes beyond a critical size and set the stage for the formation of new pores. Our results suggest a mechanism wherein nanoscale buckling instabilities can define the global topology of a nuclear envelope-like structure. PMID:27647910

  10. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2016-02-25

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC--an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target--access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics.

  11. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  12. Envelope Solitons in Acoustically Dispersive Vitreous Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation-induced static strains, displacements, and stresses are manifested as rectified or dc waveforms linked to the energy density of an acoustic wave or vibrational mode via the mode nonlinearity parameter of the material. An analytical model is developed for acoustically dispersive media that predicts the evolution of the energy density of an initial waveform into a series of energy solitons that generates a corresponding series of radiation-induced static strains (envelope solitons). The evolutionary characteristics of the envelope solitons are confirmed experimentally in Suprasil W1 vitreous silica. The value (-11.9 plus or minus 1.43) for the nonlinearity parameter, determined from displacement measurements of the envelope solitons via a capacitive transducer, is in good agreement with the value (-11.6 plus or minus 1.16) obtained independently from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The agreement provides strong, quantitative evidence for the validity of the model.

  13. Glycoprotein patterns in normal and malignant cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M E; Souberbielle, B E; Cowan, M E; Allen, C A; Luesley, D M; Mould, J J; Blackledge, G R; Skinner, G R

    1991-07-04

    Glycoproteins from normal and malignant human cervix were studied using an organ culture system and compared by gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Five glycoproteins of 178 kDa, 95 kDa, 93 kDa, 82 kDa and 38 kDa and 1 glycolipid (46 kDa) were detected more frequently in squamous carcinomas. Certain glycoproteins were shown to be oncofoetal and some had affinity for Concanavalin A (Con A). The 82 kDa glycoprotein was present in 16/17 squamous carcinomas but in only 1/13 normal cervices. This band represented a glycoprotein containing glucosamine, mannose, small quantities of methionine and no fucose. These preliminary results suggest that these glycoproteins and in particular the 82-kDa glycoprotein are worthy of further investigation and characterisation.

  14. [NESPRINS--nuclear envelope proteins ensuring integrity].

    PubMed

    Pershina, E G; Morozova, K N; Kiseleva, E V

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the nesprins (nuclear envelope spectrin-repeat proteins), which are recently discovered family of nuclear envelope proteins. These proteins play an important role in maintaining the cellular architecture and establish the link between the nucleus and other sub-cellular compartments. Many tissue-specific diseases including lipodystrophies, hearing loss, cardiac and skeletal myopathies are associated with nesprins mutations. These proteins comprise of multiple tissue specific isoforms which contain spectrin repeats providing interaction of nesprins with other nuclear membrane proteins, cytoskeleton and intranuclear matrix. We summarize recent findings and suggestions about nesprins structural organization and function inside the cell. Human diseases caused by abnormal nesprins expression are also described.

  15. The photodissociation of CO in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, G. A.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The CO photodissociation rate for the unshielded ISM is calculated using recent laboratory results which confirm that photodissociation occurs by way of line absorption. A value of 2.0 x 10 to the -10th/s, an order of magnitude higher than the rate used in the past, is obtained. The new rate and a treatment of the radiative transfer and shielding are used to develop a theory for the CO abundance in the circumstellar envelopes of cool, evolved stars, and results are presented on the spatial variation of CO, C, and C(+). It is shown that these distributions play important roles in determining the observational properties of circumstellar envelopes.

  16. Consumer access to utility billing envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, M.K.

    1984-09-13

    Billing envelope inserts are a medium of advertising used by utilities for a variety of purposes, from encouraging conservation to expressing political opinions. Recently, consumer groups have begun to assert a right of access to the same medium. A constitutional right of reply has been advocated. Commissions have found regulatory authority to direct companies to provide access on the basis of several different theories. At least two states have passed legislation permitting consumer groups to use bill inserts to solicit members and contributions. When examined, these developments reveal a trend of granting organizations access to utility billing envelopes.

  17. Perception and coding of envelopes in weakly electric fishes.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Sarah A; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2013-07-01

    Natural sensory stimuli have a rich spatiotemporal structure and can often be characterized as a high frequency signal that is independently modulated at lower frequencies. This lower frequency modulation is known as the envelope. Envelopes are commonly found in a variety of sensory signals, such as contrast modulations of visual stimuli and amplitude modulations of auditory stimuli. While psychophysical studies have shown that envelopes can carry information that is essential for perception, how env