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Sample records for putative basic leucine

  1. The Arabidopsis ERECTA gene encodes a putative receptor protein kinase with extracellular leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, K U; Mitsukawa, N; Oosumi, T; Matsuura, Y; Yokoyama, R; Whittier, R F; Komeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta is one of the most popular ecotypes and is used widely for both molecular and genetic studies. It harbors the erecta (er) mutation, which confers a compact inflorescence, blunt fruits, and short petioles. We have identified five er mutant alleles from ecotypes Columbia and Wassilewskija. Phenotypic characterization of the mutant alleles suggests a role for the ER gene in regulating the shape of organs originating from the shoot apical meristem. We cloned the ER gene, and here, we report that it encodes a putative receptor protein kinases. The deduced ER protein contains a cytoplasmic protein kinase catalytic domain, a transmembrane region, and an extracellular domain consisting of leucine-rich repeats, which are thought to interact with other macromolecules. Our results suggest that cell-cell communication mediated by a receptor kinase has an important role in plant morphogenesis. PMID:8624444

  2. Simulations of potentials of mean force for separating a leucine zipper dimer and the basic region of a basic region leucine zipper dimer.

    PubMed

    Cukier, Robert I

    2014-09-04

    Basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors involved in DNA recognition are dimeric proteins. The monomers consist of two subdomains, a leucine zipper sequence responsible for dimerization and a highly basic DNA recognition sequence. Leucine zippers are strongly dimerized, and in a bZIP, the basic region can, in the absence of DNA, undergo extensive relative monomer-to-monomer fluctuations. In this work, LZ and bZIP potentials of mean force (PMFs), which provide free energies along reaction coordinates, are simulated with a distance replica exchange method. The method uses restraint potentials to provide sampling along a reaction coordinate and enhances configuration space exploration by exchanging information between neighboring restraint potential configurations. Restraint potentials that are constructed from sums over a number of atom distances are employed. Their use requires a modification of the Weighted Histogram Analysis Method (WHAM) procedure to combine and unbias the data from the different restraint-potential-biased window densities to provide a PMF. These methods are first used to obtain a PMF for separating a leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The PMF indicates a very strong binding free energy that only weakens when the monomers are separated by about 12 Å, which is about 6 Å beyond their bound, dimer equilibrium distance. PMFs are also obtained for separating the basic subdomain monomer parts of the GCN4 bZIP transcriptional factor, in the absence of DNA. In a monomer separation range spanning the open, crystal-based structure to closer configurations, the basic subdomain PMF is quite flat, implying essentially thermal sampling in this distance range. A PMF generated starting from a "collapsed" state, taken from a previous simulation ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6071 ), where collapsed refers to the feature that the basic subdomain monomers are also effectively dimerized, shows that this state is

  3. Putative evolutionary origin of plasmids carrying the genes involved in leucine biosynthesis in Buchnera aphidicola (endosymbiont of aphids).

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, R C; Moya, A; Latorre, A

    1997-01-01

    An 8.5-kb plasmid encoding genes (leuABCD) involved in leucine biosynthesis and a small plasmid of 1.74 kb of yet unknown function were found in the intracellular symbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, of two divergent aphid species, Thelaxes suberi and Tetraneura caerulescens, respectively. The leuABCD-carrying plasmid (pBTs1) was amplified from total aphid DNA by inverse long PCR, using outwardly oriented oligonucleotide primers specific to leuA. The resulting 8.2-kb PCR fragment as well as the 1.74-kb plasmid (pBTc1) were cloned and sequenced. pBTs1 differed from a previously described B. aphidicola plasmid (pRPE) of the aphid Rhopalosiphum padi by the presence of a small heat shock gene (ibp) and in the order of the leuABCD and repA genes. Comparison of both leucine plasmids to the small plasmid pBTc1 revealed extensive similarity with respect to putative replication functions as well as in the presence of a highly conserved open reading frame that was found to be homologous to Escherichia coli YqhA and Haemophilus influenzae HI0507 and which may encode an integral membrane protein. The three B. aphidicola plasmids most likely evolved from a common ancestral replicon, which in turn may be distantly related to IncFII plasmids. Phylogenetic affiliations of the B. aphidicola strains of the two aphid species were assessed by sequencing of their 16S rRNA genes. Evaluation of the distribution of the leuABCD-encoding plasmids within a phylogenetic framework suggests independent origins for pBTs1 and pRPE from an ancestral replicon resembling pBTc1. The implications for symbiotic essential amino acid biosynthesis and provisioning are discussed. PMID:9244264

  4. Evolutionary and Expression Analyses of the Apple Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiao; Guo, Rongrong; Guo, Chunlei; Hou, Hongmin; Wang, Xiping; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play essential roles in the regulatory networks controlling many developmental processes in plants. Members of the basic leucine (Leu) zipper (bZIP) TF family, which is unique to eukaryotes, are involved in regulating diverse processes, including flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling, and defense responses to pathogens. The bZIP proteins have a characteristic bZIP domain composed of a DNA-binding basic region and a Leu zipper dimerization region. In this study, we identified 112 apple (Malus domestica Borkh) bZIP TF-encoding genes, termed MdbZIP genes. Synteny analysis indicated that segmental and tandem duplication events, as well as whole genome duplication, have contributed to the expansion of the apple bZIP family. The family could be divided into 11 groups based on structural features of the encoded proteins, as well as on the phylogenetic relationship of the apple bZIP proteins to those of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtbZIP genes). Synteny analysis revealed that several paired MdbZIP genes and AtbZIP gene homologs were located in syntenic genomic regions. Furthermore, expression analyses of group A MdbZIP genes showed distinct expression levels in 10 different organs. Moreover, changes in these expression profiles in response to abiotic stress conditions and various hormone treatments identified MdbZIP genes that were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as to different phytohormones. PMID:27066030

  5. The Importance of Being Flexible: The Case of Basic Region Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Large volumes of protein sequence and structure data acquired by proteomic studies led to the development of computational bioinformatic techniques that made possible the functional annotation and structural characterization of proteins based on their primary structure. It has become evident from genome-wide analyses that many proteins in eukaryotic cells are either completely disordered or contain long unstructured regions that are crucial for their biological functions. The content of disorder increases with evolution indicating a possibly important role of disorder in the regulation of cellular systems. Transcription factors are no exception and several proteins of this class have recently been characterized as premolten/molten globules. Yet, mammalian cells rely on these proteins to control expression of their 30,000 or so genes. Basic region:leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA-binding proteins constitute a major class of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. This review discusses how conformational flexibility “built” into the amino acid sequence allows bZIP proteins to interact with a large number of diverse molecular partners and to accomplish their manifold cellular tasks in a strictly regulated and coordinated manner. PMID:19519454

  6. Abscisic-acid-dependent basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors in plant abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2017-01-01

    One of the major causes of significant crop loss throughout the world is the myriad of environmental stresses including drought, salinity, cold, heavy metal toxicity, and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays. Plants as sessile organisms have evolved various effective mechanism which enable them to withstand this plethora of stresses. Most of such regulatory mechanisms usually follow the abscisic-acid (ABA)-dependent pathway. In this review, we have primarily focussed on the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) activated by the ABA-mediated signalosome. Upon perception of ABA by specialized receptors, the signal is transduced via various groups of Ser/Thr kinases, which phosphorylate the bZIP TFs. Following such post-translational modification of TFs, they are activated so that they bind to specific cis-acting sequences called abscisic-acid-responsive elements (ABREs) or GC-rich coupling elements (CE), thereby influencing the expression of their target downstream genes. Several in silico techniques have been adopted so far to predict the structural features, recognize the regulatory modification sites, undergo phylogenetic analyses, and facilitate genome-wide survey of TF under multiple stresses. Current investigations on the epigenetic regulation that controls greater accessibility of the inducible regions of DNA of the target gene to the bZIP TFs exclusively under stress situations, along with the evolved stress memory responses via genomic imprinting mechanism, have been highlighted. The potentiality of overexpression of bZIP TFs, either in a homologous or in a heterologous background, in generating transgenic plants tolerant to various abiotic stressors have also been addressed by various groups. The present review will provide a coherent documentation on the functional characterization and regulation of bZIP TFs under multiple environmental stresses, with the major goal of generating multiple-stress-tolerant plant cultivars in near future.

  7. OHP1: a maize basic domain/leucine zipper protein that interacts with opaque2.

    PubMed

    Pysh, L D; Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J

    1993-02-01

    OPAQUE2 (O2) is a regulatory gene that predominantly affects the expression of the 22-kD class of zein storage protein genes at the level of transcription. The O2 gene encodes a polypeptide belonging to the basic domain/leucine zipper (bZIP) class of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Our prior analyses have demonstrated that the O2 protein binds 22-kD zein gene promoters as a homodimer in vitro and have also suggested that O2 may bind as a heterodimer in vivo. To identify cDNAs encoding other bZIP motifs that might interact with O2, a portion encoding the bZIP motif from an O2 cDNA was used to screen an endosperm cDNA library. Sequence analysis of one isolated recombinant phage indicated the presence of a bZIP motif similar to O2. The protein product of this partial cDNA, designated OHP1, can bind the O2 target site both as a homodimer and in a heterodimeric complex with O2. Whole genome DNA gel blot analysis of maize recombinant inbreds revealed two strongly hybridizing restriction fragments, neither of which mapped close to any locus known to affect zein expression. RNA gel blot analysis revealed an approximately 1.7-kb transcript that is expressed in all organs examined except the female flower and is also expressed in endosperms homozygous for o2 and other mutations that affect zein expression (opaque7, floury2, and Defective endosperm b-30). Based on these results and previously reported data, we propose models to accommodate OHP1 in the regulation of zein gene expression by O2.

  8. Basic Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Domain Transcription Factor MBZ1 Regulates Cell Wall Integrity, Spore Adherence, and Virulence in Metarhizium robertsii *

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels. PMID:25673695

  9. Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain transcription factor MBZ1 regulates cell wall integrity, spore adherence, and virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Shang, Yanfang; Chen, Peilin; Cen, Kai; Wang, Chengshu

    2015-03-27

    Transcription factors (TFs) containing the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain are widely distributed in eukaryotes and display an array of distinct functions. In this study, a bZIP-type TF gene (MBZ1) was deleted and functionally characterized in the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. The deletion mutant (ΔMBZ1) showed defects in cell wall integrity, adhesion to hydrophobic surfaces, and topical infection of insects. Relative to the WT, ΔMBZ1 was also impaired in growth and conidiogenesis. Examination of putative target gene expression indicated that the genes involved in chitin biosynthesis were differentially transcribed in ΔMBZ1 compared with the WT, which led to the accumulation of a higher level of chitin in mutant cell walls. MBZ1 exhibited negative regulation of subtilisin proteases, but positive control of an adhesin gene, which is consistent with the observation of effects on cell autolysis and a reduction in spore adherence to hydrophobic surfaces in ΔMBZ1. Promoter binding assays indicated that MBZ1 can bind to different target genes and suggested the possibility of heterodimer formation to increase the diversity of the MBZ1 regulatory network. The results of this study advance our understanding of the divergence of bZIP-type TFs at both intra- and interspecific levels.

  10. Analysis of basic leucine zipper genes and their expression during bud dormancy in peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Yue; Fu, Xi-Ling; Tan, Qiu-Ping; Liu, Li; Chen, Min; Zhu, Cui-Ying; Li, Ling; Chen, Xiu-De; Gao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Dormancy is a biological characteristic developed to resist the cold conditions in winter. The bZIP transcription factors are present exclusively in eukaryotes and have been identified and classified in many species. bZIP proteins are known to regulate numerous biological processes, however, the role of bZIP in bud dodormancy has not been studied extensively. In total, 50 PpbZIP transcription factor-encoding genes were identified and categorized them into 10 groups (A-I and S). Similar intron/exon structures, additional conserved motifs, and DNA-binding site specificity supported our classification scheme. Additionally, chromosomal distribution and collinearity analyses suggested that expansion of the PpbZIP transcription factor family was due to segment/chromosomal duplications. We also predicted the dimerization properties based on characteristic features of the leucine zipper and classified PpbZIP proteins into 23 subfamilies. Furthermore, qRT-PCR results indicated that PpbZIPs genes may be involved in regulating dormancy. The same gene of different species might participate in different regulating networks through interactions with specific partners. Our expression profiling results complemented the microarray data, suggesting that co-expression patterns of bZIP transcription factors during dormancy differed among deciduous fruit trees. Our findings further clarify the molecular characteristics of the PpbZIP transcription factor family, including potential gene functions during dormancy. This information may facilitate further research on the evolutionary history and biological functions of bZIP proteins in peach and other rosaceae plants.

  11. The wheat homolog of putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance gene TaRGA contributes to resistance against powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Wang, Defu; Wang, Xiaobing; Mei, Yu; Dong, Hansong

    2016-03-01

    Powdery mildew, one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide, is caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), a fungal species with a consistently high mutation rate that makes individual resistance (R) genes ineffective. Therefore, effective resistance-related gene cloning is vital for breeding and studying the resistance mechanisms of the disease. In this study, a putative nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R gene (TaRGA) was cloned using a homology-based cloning strategy and analyzed for its effect on powdery mildew disease and wheat defense responses. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that a Bgt isolate 15 and salicylic acid stimulation significantly induced TaRGA in the resistant variety. Furthermore, the silencing of TaRGA in powdery mildew-resistant plants increased susceptibility to Bgt15 and prompted conidia propagation at the infection site. However, the expression of TaRGA in leaf segments after single-cell transient expression assay highly increased the defense responses to Bgt15 by enhancing callose deposition and phenolic autofluorogen accumulation at the pathogen invading sites. Meanwhile, the expression of pathogenesis-related genes decreased in the TaRGA-silenced plants and increased in the TaRGA-transient-overexpressing leaf segments. These results implied that the TaRGA gene positively regulates the defense response to powdery mildew disease in wheat.

  12. The basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor Mitf is conserved in Drosophila and functions in eye development.

    PubMed Central

    Hallsson, Jón H; Haflidadóttir, Benedikta S; Stivers, Chad; Odenwald, Ward; Arnheiter, Heinz; Pignoni, Francesca; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur

    2004-01-01

    The MITF protein is a member of the MYC family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors and is most closely related to the TFE3, TFEC, and TFEB proteins. In the mouse, MITF is required for the development of several different cell types, including the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye. In Mitf mutant mice, the presumptive RPE cells hyperproliferate, abnormally express the retinal transcriptional regulator Pax6, and form an ectopic neural retina. Here we report the structure of the Mitf gene in Drosophila and demonstrate expression during embryonic development and in the eye-antennal imaginal disc. In vitro, transcriptional regulation by Drosophila Mitf, like its mouse counterpart, is modified by the Eyeless (Drosophila Pax6) transcription factor. In vivo, targeted expression of wild-type or dominant-negative Drosophila Mitf results in developmental abnormalities reminiscent of Mitf function in mouse eye development. Our results suggest that the Mitf gene is the original member of the Mitf-Tfe subfamily of bHLH-Zip proteins and that its developmental function is at least partially conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. These findings further support the common origin of the vertebrate and invertebrate eyes. PMID:15166150

  13. HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor downregulates cyclin D1 expression via interactions with NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Qian, Lili; Song, Xianmei; Wang, Xueyin; Yang, Chaokuan; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2017-03-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus. It can cause adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus-strand of the provirus, is expressed in all cases of ATL and involved in T cell proliferation. However, the exact mechanism underlying its growth-promoting activity is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 expression by inhibiting the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. Among the potential mechanisms of cyclin D1 inhibition mediated by HBZ, we found that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 promoter activity. Luciferase assay analysis revealed that HBZ repressed cyclin D1 promoter activity by suppressing NF-κB‑driven transcription mediated by the p65 subunit. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we found that HBZ could bind to p65, but not p50. Finally, we showed that HBZ selectively interacted with p65 via its AD+bZIP domains. By suppressing cyclin D1 expression, HBZ can alter cell cycle progression of HTLV-1-infected cells, which may be critical for oncogenesis.

  14. Constitutive expression of the Poplar FD-like basic leucine zipper transcription factor alters growth and bud development.

    PubMed

    Parmentier-Line, Cécile M; Coleman, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    In poplar, the CO/FT regulatory module mediates seasonal growth cessation. Although FT interacts with the basic leucine zipper transcription factor FD, surprisingly little is known about the possible role of FD in bud development and growth cessation in trees. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of the poplar FD homolog, PtFD1, during short-day (SD)-induced bud development, and the consequences of overexpressing PtFD1 on bud development and shoot growth. PtFD1 was primarily expressed in apical and axillary buds and exhibited a transient increase in expression during the initial stages of SD-induced bud development. This transient increase declined with continued SD treatment. When PtFD1 was overexpressed in poplar, SD-induced growth cessation and bud formation were abolished. PTFD1 overexpression also resulted in precocious flowering of juvenile plants in long-day (LD) photoperiods. Because the phenotypes associated with overexpression of PtFD1 are similar to those observe when poplar FT1 is overexpressed (Science, 312, 2006, 1040), the expression and diurnal patterns of expression of both poplar FT1 and FT2 were characterized in PtFD1 overexpression poplars and found to be altered. DNA microarray analysis revealed few differences in gene expression between PtFD1 overexpressing poplars in LD conditions while extensive levels of differential gene expression occur in SD-treated plants. These results enforce the connection between the regulation of flowering and the regulation of growth cessation and bud development in poplar.

  15. Molecular characterisation of the STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY of genes encoding putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Eyüboglu, Banu; Pfister, Karen; Haberer, Georg; Chevalier, David; Fuchs, Angelika; Mayer, Klaus FX; Schneitz, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Background Receptor-like kinases are a prominent class of surface receptors that regulate many aspects of the plant life cycle. Despite recent advances the function of most receptor-like kinases remains elusive. Therefore, it is paramount to investigate these receptors. The task is complicated by the fact that receptor-like kinases belong to a large monophyletic family with many sub-clades. In general, functional analysis of gene family members by reverse genetics is often obscured by several issues, such as redundancy, subtle or difficult to detect phenotypes in mutants, or by decision problems regarding suitable biological and biochemical assays. Therefore, in many cases additional strategies have to be employed to allow inference of hypotheses regarding gene function. Results We approached the function of genes encoding the nine-member STRUBBELIG-RECEPTOR FAMILY (SRF) class of putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. Sequence comparisons show overall conservation but also divergence in predicted functional domains among SRF proteins. Interestingly, SRF1 undergoes differential splicing. As a result, SRF1 is predicted to exist in a standard receptor configuration and in a membrane-anchored receptor-like version that lacks most of the intracellular domain. Furthermore, SRF1 is characterised by a high degree of polymorphism between the Ler and Col accessions. Two independent T-DNA-based srf4 mutants showed smaller leaves while 35S::SRF4 plants displayed enlarged leaves. This is in addition to the strubbelig phenotype which has been described before. Additional single and several key double mutant combinations did not reveal obvious mutant phenotypes. Ectopic expression of several SRF genes, using the 35S promoter, resulted in male sterility. To gain possible insights into SRF gene function we employed a computational analysis of publicly available microarray data. We performed global expression profiling, coexpression analysis, and an analysis of the

  16. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  17. MondoA, a Novel Basic Helix-Loop-Helix–Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Activator That Constitutes a Positive Branch of a Max-Like Network

    PubMed Central

    Billin, Andrew N.; Eilers, Alanna L.; Coulter, Kathryn L.; Logan, Jennifer S.; Ayer, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Max is a common dimerization partner for a family of transcription factors (Myc, Mad [or Mxi]), and Mnt [or Rox] proteins) that regulate cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. We recently characterized a novel Max-like protein, Mlx, which interacts with Mad1 and Mad4. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of a new family of basic helix-loop-helix–leucine zipper heterodimeric partners for Mlx termed the Mondo family. MondoA forms homodimers weakly and does not interact with Max or members of the Myc or Mad families. MondoA and Mlx associate in vivo, and surprisingly, they are localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cultured mammalian cells. Treatment of cells with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B results in the nuclear accumulation of MondoA and Mlx, demonstrating that they shuttle between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments rather than having exclusively cytoplasmic localization. MondoA preferentially forms heterodimers with Mlx, and this heterocomplex can bind to, and activate transcription from, CACGTG E-boxes when targeted to the nucleus via a heterologous nuclear localization signal. The amino termini of the Mondo proteins are highly conserved among family members and contain separable and autonomous cytoplasmic localization and transcription activation domains. Therefore, Mlx can mediate transcriptional repression in conjunction with the Mad family and can mediate transcriptional activation via the Mondo family. We propose that Mlx, like Max, functions as the center of a transcription factor network. PMID:11073985

  18. Pathological regulation of arachidonic acid release in cystic fibrosis: the putative basic defect.

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt-Duke, J; Brönnegård, M; Strandvik, B

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of arachidonic acid release from membrane phospholipids was investigated in lymphocytes from patients with cystic fibrosis as well as control patients. No effect of either dexamethasone or fetal calf serum was seen on arachidonic acid release from cystic fibrosis lymphocytes, in contrast to control lymphocytes. In the latter cells, arachidonic acid release was inhibited by dexamethasone, fetal calf serum, or both. There were no differences in glucocorticoid receptor in lymphocytes from the two groups with regard to Kd and number of binding sites per cell. Furthermore, dexamethasone inhibited the incorporation of thymidine into lymphocytes from either group, indicating a normal functional glucocorticoid receptor. The defective regulation of arachidonic acid, resulting in an increased turnover, can explain many of the findings in cystic fibrosis, and we hypothesize that it is the basic defect causing the disease. The defect occurs at a level after the glucocorticoid receptor, which is functionally normal, and involves either the glucocorticoid-dependent phospholipase-inhibitory protein lipomodulin (lipocortin) or phospholipase A2. PMID:3097647

  19. Pregnenolone sulfate activates basic region leucine zipper transcription factors in insulinoma cells: role of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 channels.

    PubMed

    Müller, Isabelle; Rössler, Oliver G; Thiel, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    The neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate activates a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells involving activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and enhanced expression of the transcription factor Egr-1. Here, we show that pregnenolone sulfate stimulation leads to a significant elevation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in insulinoma cells. Expression of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos is up-regulated in insulinoma cells and pancreatic β-cells in primary culture after pregnenolone sulfate stimulation. Up-regulation of a chromatin-embedded c-Jun promoter/luciferase reporter gene transcription in pregnenolone sulfate-stimulated insulinoma cells was impaired when the AP-1 binding sites were mutated, indicating that these motifs function as pregnenolone sulfate response elements. In addition, phosphorylation of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein is induced and transcription of a CRE-controlled reporter gene is stimulated after pregnenolone sulfate treatment, indicating that the CRE functions as a pregnenolone sulfate response element as well. Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that both L-type Ca(2+) channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) channels are essential for connecting pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced AP-1 activity and bZIP-mediated transcription in insulinoma cells. In contrast, pregnenolone sulfate stimulation did not enhance AP-1 activity or c-Jun and c-Fos expression in pituitary corticotrophs that express functional L-type Ca(2+) channels but only trace amounts of TRPM3. We conclude that expression of L-type Ca(2+) channels is not sufficient to activate bZIP-mediated gene transcription by pregnenolone sulfate. Rather, additional expression of TRPM3 or depolarization of the cells is required to connect pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced gene transcription.

  20. Arabidopsis basic leucine-zipper transcription factors TGA9 and TGA10 interact with floral glutaredoxins ROXY1 and ROXY2 and are redundantly required for anther development.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Jhadeswar; Bush, Michael J; DeLong, Catherine; Li, Shutian; Xu, Mingli; Khan, Madiha; Malcolmson, Caroline; Fobert, Pierre R; Zachgo, Sabine; Hepworth, Shelley R

    2010-11-01

    ROXY1 and ROXY2 are CC-type floral glutaredoxins with redundant functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) anther development. We show here that plants lacking the basic leucine-zipper transcription factors TGA9 and TGA10 have defects in male gametogenesis that are strikingly similar to those in roxy1 roxy2 mutants. In tga9 tga10 mutants, adaxial and abaxial anther lobe development is differentially affected, with early steps in anther development blocked in adaxial lobes and later steps affected in abaxial lobes. Distinct from roxy1 roxy2, microspore development in abaxial anther lobes proceeds to a later stage with the production of inviable pollen grains contained within nondehiscent anthers. Histological analysis shows multiple defects in the anther dehiscence program, including abnormal stability and lignification of the middle layer and defects in septum and stomium function. Compatible with these defects, TGA9 and TGA10 are expressed throughout early anther primordia but resolve to the middle and tapetum layers during meiosis of pollen mother cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that ROXY promotion of anther development is mediated in part by TGA9 and TGA10. First, TGA9 and TGA10 expression overlaps with ROXY1/2 during anther development. Second, TGA9/10 and ROXY1/2 operate downstream of SPOROCYTELESS/NOZZLE, where they positively regulate a common set of genes that contribute to tapetal development. Third, TGA9 and TGA10 directly interact with ROXY proteins in yeast and in plant cell nuclei. These findings suggest that activation of TGA9/10 transcription factors by ROXY-mediated modification of cysteine residues promotes anther development, thus broadening our understanding of how redox-regulated TGA factors function in plants.

  1. Seasonal abscisic acid signal and a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, DkbZIP5, regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in persimmon fruit.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Katayama-Ikegami, Ayako; Kobayashi, Shozo; Sato, Akihiko; Kono, Atsushi; Yonemori, Keizo

    2012-02-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are secondary metabolites that contribute to plant protection and crop quality. Persimmon (Diospyros kaki) has a unique characteristic of accumulating large amounts of PAs, particularly in its fruit. Normal astringent-type and mutant nonastringent-type fruits show different PA accumulation patterns depending on the seasonal expression patterns of DkMyb4, which is a Myb transcription factor (TF) regulating many PA pathway genes in persimmon. In this study, attempts were made to identify the factors involved in DkMyb4 expression and the resultant PA accumulation in persimmon fruit. Treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) and an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor resulted in differential changes in the expression patterns of DkMyb4 and PA biosynthesis in astringent-type and nonastringent-type fruits depending on the development stage. To obtain an ABA-signaling TF, we isolated a full-length basic leucine zipper (bZIP) TF, DkbZIP5, which is highly expressed in persimmon fruit. We also showed that ectopic DkbZIP5 overexpression in persimmon calluses induced the up-regulation of DkMyb4 and the resultant PA biosynthesis. In addition, a detailed molecular characterization using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and transient reporter assay indicated that DkbZIP5 recognized ABA-responsive elements in the promoter region of DkMyb4 and acted as a direct regulator of DkMyb4 in an ABA-dependent manner. These results suggest that ABA signals may be involved in PA biosynthesis in persimmon fruit via DkMyb4 activation by DkbZIP5.

  2. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  3. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  4. Leucine aminopeptidase - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Leucine aminopeptidase - urine URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ ...

  5. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  6. The Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 Is an Important Transcriptional Regulator of Abscisic Acid-Dependent Grape Berry Ripening Processes1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Philippe; Lecourieux, David; Kappel, Christian; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Cramer, Grant; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In grape (Vitis vinifera), abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates during fruit ripening and is thought to play a pivotal role in this process, but the molecular basis of this control is poorly understood. This work characterizes ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 (VvABF2), a grape basic leucine zipper transcription factor belonging to a phylogenetic subgroup previously shown to be involved in ABA and abiotic stress signaling in other plant species. VvABF2 transcripts mainly accumulated in the berry, from the onset of ripening to the harvesting stage, and were up-regulated by ABA. Microarray analysis of transgenic grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 showed that this transcription factor up-regulates and/or modifies existing networks related to ABA responses. In addition, grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 exhibited enhanced responses to ABA treatment compared with control cells. Among the VvABF2-mediated responses highlighted in this study, the synthesis of phenolic compounds and cell wall softening were the most strongly affected. VvABF2 overexpression strongly increased the accumulation of stilbenes that play a role in plant defense and human health (resveratrol and piceid). In addition, the firmness of fruits from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants overexpressing VvABF2 was strongly reduced. These data indicate that VvABF2 is an important transcriptional regulator of ABA-dependent grape berry ripening. PMID:24276949

  7. Leucine aminopeptidase urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is a proteolytic enzyme that breaks chemical bonds in proteins at specific sites next to leucine amino acids. Serum (blood) LAP is measured to diagnose liver (hepatic) dysfunction.

  8. Leucine metabolism in human newborns

    SciTech Connect

    Denne, S.C.; Kalhan, S.C. )

    1987-12-01

    The present study was designed to (1) determine whether a relationship exists between newborn birth weight and leucine metabolism and (2) compare leucine and energy metabolism in a period of rapid growth and development (i.e., newborn) with a constant nongrowth period (i.e., adult). Leucine kinetics and energy expenditure were measured in the postabsorptive state in 12 normal full-term newborns in early neonatal life and in 11 normal adults using a primed constant L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine infusion combined with respiratory calorimetry. A significant positive correlation between newborn birth weight and leucine flux was observed. These data suggest the following. (1) A relationship exists between newborn birth weight and protein metabolism, as reflected by the correlation between leucine flux when expressed as micromoles per kilogram per hour and birth weight. (2) The high rate of leucine flux measured in newborns probably reflects the rapid remodeling of protein that occurs in this period of development, even during fasting. (3) The similar values in newborns and adults of leucine kinetics and energy expenditure when normalized to metabolic body weight and the nearly equivalent allometric exponents relating body weight to leucine flux and energy expenditure support a close relationship between leucine and energy metabolism, at least at the extremes of human growth.

  9. Regulation of protein kinase Cmu by basic peptides and heparin. Putative role of an acidic domain in the activation of the kinase.

    PubMed

    Gschwendt, M; Johannes, F J; Kittstein, W; Marks, F

    1997-08-15

    Protein kinase Cmu is a novel member of the protein kinase C (PKC) family that differs from the other isoenzymes in structural and enzymatic properties. No substrate proteins of PKCmu have been identified as yet. Moreover, the regulation of PKCmu activity remains obscure, since a structural region corresponding to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKC isoenzymes has not been found for PKCmu. Here we show that aldolase is phosphorylated by PKCmu in vitro. Phosphorylation of aldolase and of two substrate peptides by PKCmu is inhibited by various proteins and peptides, including typical PKC substrates such as histone H1, myelin basic protein, and p53. This inhibitory activity seems to depend on clusters of basic amino acids in the protein/peptide structures. Moreover, in contrast to other PKC isoenzymes PKCmu is activated by heparin and dextran sulfate. Maximal activation by heparin is about twice and that by dextran sulfate four times as effective as maximal activation by phosphatidylserine plus 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, the conventional activators of c- and nPKC isoforms. We postulate that PKCmu contains an acidic domain, which is involved in the formation and stabilization of an active state and which, in the inactive enzyme, is blocked by an intramolecular interaction with a basic domain. This intramolecular block is thought to be released by heparin and possibly also by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate/phosphatidylserine, whereas basic peptides and proteins inhibit PKCmu activity by binding to the acidic domain of the active enzyme.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of the heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Seldeen, Kenneth L.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Deegan, Brian J.

    2008-10-31

    Jun and Fos are components of the AP1 family of transcription factors and bind to the promoters of a diverse multitude of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryonic development and cancer. Here, using the powerful technique of isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterize the thermodynamics of heterodimerization of leucine zippers of Jun and Fos. Our data suggest that the heterodimerization of leucine zippers is driven by enthalpic forces with unfavorable entropy change at physiological temperatures. Furthermore, the basic regions appear to modulate the heterodimerization of leucine zippers and may undergo at least partial folding upon heterodimerization. Large negative heat capacity changes accompanying the heterodimerization of leucine zippers are consistent with the view that leucine zippers do not retain {alpha}-helical conformations in isolation and that the formation of the native coiled-coil {alpha}-helical dimer is attained through a coupled folding-dimerization mechanism.

  11. Isolation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a NF-E2-like basic leucine zipper transcriptional activator that binds to the tandem NF-E2/AP1 repeat of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Moi, P; Chan, K; Asunis, I; Cao, A; Kan, Y W

    1994-01-01

    Hypersensitive site 2 located in the beta-globin locus control region confers high levels of expression to the genes of the beta-globin cluster. A tandem repeat of the consensus sequence for the transcription factors AP1 and NF-E2 (activating protein 1 and nuclear factor erythroid 2, respectively) is present within hypersensitive site 2 and is absolutely required for strong enhancer activity. This sequence binds, in vitro and in vivo, to ubiquitous proteins of the AP1 family and to the recently cloned erythroid-specific transcription factor NF-E2. Using the tandem repeat as a recognition site probe to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from K562 cells, we isolated several DNA binding proteins. Here, we report the characterization of one of the clones isolated. The gene, which we named Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2), is encoded within a 2.2-kb transcript and predicts a 66-kDa protein with a basic leucine zipper DNA binding domain highly homologous to that of NF-E2. Although Nrf2 is expressed ubiquitously, a role of this protein in mediating enhancer activity of hypersensitive site 2 in erythroid cells cannot be excluded. In this respect, Nrf2 contains a powerful acidic activation domain that may participate in the transcriptional stimulation of beta-globin genes. Images PMID:7937919

  12. Incorporation of radiolabeled leucine into protein to estimate bacterial production in plant litter, sediment, epiphytic biofilms, and water samples.

    PubMed

    Buesing, N; Gessner, M O

    2003-03-01

    The present study assessed the application of tritiated leucine incorporation into protein, as a measure of bacterial biomass production, within four benthic habitats of a littoral freshwater wetland dominated by emergent vegetation. Basic assumptions underlying the method, such as linearity of leucine incorporation, saturation level of incorporation rates, and specificity of incorporation for bacterial assemblages, were tested, and two procedures for extracting radiolabeled protein were compared. TCA precipitation followed by ultrasonication, and subsequent alkaline dissolution in 0.5 M NaOH, 25 mM EDTA, and 0.1% w/v SDS, gave best results in terms of both extraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio. Incorporation of leucine was linear for all habitats for up to 1 h. Saturation concentrations of leucine incorporation into protein were 150 nM for littoral surface waters, >960 nM for biofilms on plant surfaces, and 50 mM for aerobic sediment and submerged plant litter. An experiment with prokaryotic and eukaryotic inhibitors designed to examine specificity of leucine incorporation into bacterial protein showed no significant leucine incorporation into eukaryotes during short-term incubations. Calculations based on kinetic parameters of fungal leucine uptake suggest, nevertheless, that significant leucine incorporation cannot be ruled out in all situations. Thus, the leucine methodology can be used for estimating bacterial production in benthic aquatic habitats, provided that substrate saturation and isotope dilution are determined and that the active biomass of eukaryotes, such as fungi, does not greatly exceed bacterial biomass.

  13. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  14. A Heterospecific Leucine Zipper Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Y.; Liu, J; Zheng, Q; Li, Q; Kallenbach, N; Lu, M

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions dictate the assembly of the macromolecular complexes essential for functional networks and cellular behavior. Elucidating principles of molecular recognition governing important interfaces such as coiled coils is a challenging goal for structural and systems biology. We report here that two valine-containing mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper that fold individually as four-stranded coiled coils associate preferentially in mixtures to form an antiparallel, heterotetrameric structure. X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that the coinciding hydrophobic interfaces of the hetero- and homotetramers differ in detail, explaining their partnering and structural specificity. Equilibrium disulfide exchange and thermal denaturation experiments show that the 50-fold preference for heterospecificity results from a combination of preferential packing and hydrophobicity. The extent of preference is sensitive to the side chains comprising the interface. Thus, heterotypic versus homotypic interaction specificity in coiled coils reflects a delicate balance in complementarity of shape and chemistry of the participating side chains.

  15. A (14)C-leucine absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study in adult Sprague-Dawley rat reveals β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate as a metabolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony J; Beno, David W A; Zhang, Xiaolin; Shapiro, Robin; Mason, Mark; Mason-Bright, Tanita; Surber, Bruce; Edens, Neilé K

    2015-05-01

    Leucine is an essential branched-chain amino acid that acts as a substrate for protein synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Leucine not incorporated into muscle protein is ultimately oxidized through intermediates such as β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) which itself is reported to enhance muscle mass and function in rats and humans. HMB has been reported in the plasma following oral leucine administration in sheep and pigs but not in Sprague-Dawley rats, the standard preclinical model. Therefore, we conducted radiolabeled absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) studies in rats using a low (3 mg/kg) or high dose (1,000 mg/kg) of (14)C-leucine. Blood, tissue, and urine samples were analyzed for (14)C-leucine and its metabolites by HPLC-MS. Our results show for the first time that (14)C-HMB appears in plasma and urine of rats following an oral dose of (14)C-leucine. (14)C-leucine appears in plasma as (14)C-α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) with a slower time course than (14)C-HMB, a putative product of KIC. Further, two novel metabolites of leucine were detected in urine, N-acetyl leucine and glycyl leucine. Mass balance studies demonstrate that excretory routes accounted for no more than 0.9 % of the radiolabel and approximately 61 % of the dose was recovered in the carcass. Approximately 65 % of the dose was recovered in total, suggesting that approximately one-third of the leucine dose is oxidized to CO2. In conclusion, this study demonstrates endogenous production of HMB from leucine in adult rats, a standard preclinical model used to guide design of clinical trials in nutrition.

  16. Regulation of Leucine Catabolism in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Linda K.; Conrad, Robert S.; Sokatch, John R.

    1974-01-01

    The generation time of Pseudomonas putida with l-leucine was 20 h in synthetic media but only 3 h with d-leucine. Slow growth in the presence of l-leucine was partially overcome by addition of 0.1 mM amounts of either d-valine, l-valine, or 2-ketoisovalerate. The activities of five enzymes which take part in the oxidation of leucine by P. putida were measured under various conditions of growth. Four enzymes were induced by growth with dl-leucine as sole source of carbon: d-amino acid dehydrogenase, branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A lyase. The segment of the pathway required for oxidation of 3-methylcrotonate was induced by growth on isovalerate or 3-methylcrotonate without formation of the preceding enzymes. The synthesis of carboxylase and lyase appeared to have been repressed by the addition of l-glutamate or glucose to cells growing on dl-leucine as the sole carbon source. Mutants unable to grow at the expense of isovalerate had reduced levels of carboxylase and lyase, whereas the levels of three enzymes common to the catabolism of all three branched-chain amino acids and those of two isoleucine catabolic enzymes were normal. PMID:4150714

  17. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  18. Sequence and structural similarities between the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R M; Oxender, D L

    1990-01-01

    A role for the leucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.4) has been established for regulating the transport of leucine across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli by the leucine, isoleucine, valine (LIV-I) transport system. This transport system is mediated by interactions of periplasmic binding proteins with a complex of membrane-associated proteins, and transcription of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system genes is repressed by growth of E. coli on high levels of leucine. We now report results from sequence comparisons and structural modeling studies, which indicate that the leucine-specific binding protein, one of the periplasmic components of the LIV-I transport system, contains a 121-residue stretch, representing 36% of the mature protein, which displays both sequence and structural similarities to a region within the putative nucleotide-binding domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase. Early fusion events between ancestral genes for the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase could account for the similarity and suggest that processes of aminoacylation and transport for leucine in E. coli may be performed by evolutionarily interrelated proteins. PMID:2191293

  19. Leucine stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.K.; Grogan, C.K.

    1986-03-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated a stimulatory effect of leucine on skeletal muscle protein synthesis measured in vitro during catabolic conditions. Studies in other laboratories have consistently found this effect in diaphragm muscle, however, studies examining effects on nitrogen balance or with in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscle are equivocal. This experiment was designed to determine the potential of leucine to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in vivo. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200 g were fasted for 12 hrs, anesthetized, a jugular cannula inserted, and protein synthesis measured using a primed continuous infusion of /sup 14/C-tyrosine. A plateau in specific activity was reached after 30 to 60 min and maintained for 3 hrs. The leucine dose consisted of a 240 umole priming dose followed by a continuous infusion of 160 umoles/hr. Leucine infusion stimulated protein synthesis in the soleus muscle (28%) and in the red (28%) and white portions (12%) of the gastrocnemius muscle compared with controls infused with only tyrosine. The increased rates of protein synthesis were due to increased incorporation of tyrosine into protein and to decreased specific activity of the free tyrosine pool. These data indicate that infusion of leucine has the potential to stimulate in vivo protein synthesis in skeletal muscles.

  20. Directed evolution of leucine dehydrogenase for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Wu, Zhe; Jin, Jian-Ming; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2016-07-01

    L-tert-Leucine and its derivatives are used as synthetic building blocks for pharmaceutical active ingredients, chiral auxiliaries, and ligands. Leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) is frequently used to prepare L-tert-leucine from the α-keto acid precursor trimethylpyruvate (TMP). In this study, a high-throughput screening method for the L-tert-leucine synthesis reaction based on a spectrophotometric approach was developed. Directed evolution strategy was applied to engineer LeuDH from Lysinibacillus sphaericus for improved efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis. After two rounds of random mutagenesis, the specific activity of LeuDH on the substrate TMP was enhanced by more than two-fold, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme, while the activity towards its natural substrate, leucine, decreased. The catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) of the best mutant enzyme, H6, on substrates TMP and NADH were all enhanced by more than five-fold as compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. The efficiency of L-tert-leucine synthesis by mutant H6 was significantly improved. A productivity of 1170 g/l/day was achieved for the mutant enzyme H6, compared with 666 g/l/day for the wild-type enzyme.

  1. The behaviour of leucine aminopeptidase towards thionopeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, R E; Elmore, D T; Williams, C H; Guthrie, D J

    1987-01-01

    Thionoleucine S-anilide (Leut-anilide), Leut-Gly-OEt and Leut-Phe-OMe were synthesized and shown to be competitive inhibitors of leucine aminopeptidase from pig kidney. The kinetics of inhibition were determined in the presence of leucine 4-methylcoumarin-7-amide as substrate. Although the compounds showed only moderate inhibitory potency, it was found that all were resistant to hydrolysis by the enzyme, in contrast with the reported behaviour of some thionopeptide analogues of substrates for other Zn2+-peptidases such as carboxypeptidase A and angiotensin-converting enzyme. PMID:3663153

  2. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5406 - Leucine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leucine. 582.5406 Section 582.5406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements...

  7. Functional mapping and implications of substrate specificity of the yeast high-affinity leucine permease Bap2.

    PubMed

    Usami, Yuki; Uemura, Satsohi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Morita, Asami; Shishido, Fumi; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    Leucine is a major amino acid in nutrients and proteins and is also an important precursor of higher alcohols during brewing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leucine uptake is mediated by multiple amino acid permeases, including the high-affinity leucine permease Bap2. Although BAP2 transcription has been extensively analyzed, the mechanisms by which a substrate is recognized and moves through the permease remain unknown. Recently, we determined 15 amino acid residues required for Tat2-mediated tryptophan import. Here we introduced homologous mutations into Bap2 amino acid residues and showed that 7 residues played a role in leucine import. Residues I109/G110/T111 and E305 were located within the putative α-helix break in TMD1 and TMD6, respectively, according to the structurally homologous Escherichia coli arginine/agmatine antiporter AdiC. Upon leucine binding, these α-helix breaks were assumed to mediate a conformational transition in Bap2 from an outward-open to a substrate-binding occluded state. Residues Y336 (TMD7) and Y181 (TMD3) were located near I109 and E305, respectively. Bap2-mediated leucine import was inhibited by some amino acids according to the following order of severity: phenylalanine, leucine>isoleucine>methionine, tyrosine>valine>tryptophan; histidine and asparagine had no effect. Moreover, this order of severity clearly coincided with the logP values (octanol-water partition coefficients) of all amino acids except tryptophan. This result suggests that the substrate partition efficiency to the buried Bap2 binding pocket is the primary determinant of substrate specificity rather than structural amino acid side chain recognition.

  8. Age Attenuates Leucine Oxidation after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, E. L.; Campbell, W. W.; Krishnan, R. K.; Yarasheski, K. E.; Evans, W. J.; Kirwan, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Aging may alter protein metabolism during periods of metabolic and physiologic challenge. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age on whole-body amino acid turnover in response to eccentric exercise and hyperglycemia-induced hyperinsulinemia. 16 healthy men were divided into young (N = 8) and older (N = 8) groups. Protein metabolism was assessed using a [1-13C]-leucine isotopic tracer approach. Measures were obtained under fasted basal conditions and during 3-h hyperglycemic clamps that were performed without (control) and 48 h after eccentric exercise. Exercise reduced leucine oxidation in the younger men (P < 0.05), but not in older men. Insulin sensitivity was inversely correlated with leucine oxidation (P < 0.05), and was lower in older men (P < 0.05). Healthy aging is associated with an impaired capacity to adjust protein oxidation in response to eccentric exercise. The decreased efficiency of protein utilization in older men may contribute to impaired maintenance, growth, and repair of body tissues with advancing age. PMID:23325713

  9. Mitochondrial leucine tRNA level and PTCD1 are regulated in response to leucine starvation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Christof; Hahn, Dagmar; Schaller, André; Jackson, Christopher Benjamin; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Mirkovitch, Jelena; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2014-07-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1 (PTCD1) is a novel human protein that was recently shown to decrease the levels of mitochondrial leucine tRNAs. The physiological role of this regulation, however, remains unclear. Here we show that amino acid starvation by leucine deprivation significantly increased the mRNA steady-state levels of PTCD1 in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells. Amino acid starvation also increased the mitochondrially encoded leucine tRNA (tRNA(Leu(CUN))) and the mRNA for the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2). Despite increased PTCD1 mRNA steady-state levels, amino acid starvation decreased PTCD1 on the protein level. Decreasing PTCD1 protein concentration increases the stability of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs, tRNA(Leu(CUN)) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) as could be shown by RNAi experiments against PTCD1. Therefore, it is likely that decreased PTCD1 protein contributes to the increased tRNA(Leu(CUN)) levels in amino acid-starved cells. The stabilisation of the mitochondrial leucine tRNAs and the upregulation of the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase LARS2 might play a role in adaptation of mitochondria to amino acid starvation.

  10. Leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly inhibits the anchorage-independent growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hino, Satoshi; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Uchida, Daisuke; Begum, Nasima-Mila; Yoshida, Hideo; Sato, Mitsunobu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    Several investigators have demonstrated that TGF-beta stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) regulates cell growth and differentiation, and cell death. TSC-22 is a putative transcriptional regulator containing a leucine zipper-like structure and a nuclear export signal. We previously showed the cytoplasmic localization of TSC-22 and the nuclear translocation of TSC-22 concomitant with induction of apoptosis in salivary gland cancer cells. In the present study, we attempted to identify the active domain of TSC-22 protein that regulated the biological functions of TSC-22. We constructed three mammalian expression vectors, which could produce full length TSC-22 only in cytoplasm, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and the leucine zipper structure only in nucleus. Then, we transfected a salivary gland cancer cell line, HSG with these expression vectors, and investigated the growth profile of the transfectants. None of the TSC-22 constructs inhibited the monolayer growth and the anchorage-dependent colony formation of HSG cells. However, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 markedly inhibited the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells (p<0.001; one way ANOVA). Full length TSC-22 also suppressed the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells, although the effect of full length TSC-22 was much lower than those of the leucine zipper constructs. These observations suggest that the leucine zipper structure in TSC-22 protein is an active domain that negatively regulates the growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

  11. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  12. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes.

  13. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., plasma, and urine. Leucine aminopeptidase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  17. Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids and insulin independently stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to amino acids. We have shown that the postprandial rise in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle pro...

  18. The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations affecting specificity of gene activation alter a loop residue of a putative zinc finger.

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, B; Caddick, M X; Langdon, T; Martinez-Rossi, N M; Bennett, C F; Sibley, S; Davies, R W; Arst, H N

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans has been sequenced and its transcript mapped and orientated. A single ORF can encode a protein of 719 amino acids. A 52 amino acid region including a putative 'zinc finger' strongly resembles putative DNA binding regions of the major regulatory protein of erythroid cells. The derived protein sequence also contains a highly acidic region possibly involved in gene activation and 22 copies of the motif S(T)PXX, abundant in DNA binding proteins. Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements and transformation with deletion clones identified 342 N-terminal and 124 C-terminal residues as inessential and localized a C-terminal region required for nitrogen metabolite repressibility. A -1 frameshift eliminating the inessential 122 C-terminal amino acids is a surprising loss-of-function mutation. Extraordinary basicity of the replacement C terminus might explain its phenotype. Mutant sequencing also identified a polypeptide chain termination and several missense mutations, but most interesting are sequence changes associated with specificity mutations. A mutation elevating expression of some structural genes under areA control whilst reducing or not affecting expression of others is a leucine to valine change in the zinc finger loop. It reverts to a partly reciprocal phenotype by replacing the mutant valine by methionine. Images Fig.2 Fig.4 Fig.5 Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:1970293

  19. Leucine as a treatment for muscle wasting: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2014-12-01

    Amino acids are potent modulators of protein turnover and skeletal muscle cells are highly sensitive to changes in amino acid availability. During amino acid abundance increased activity of mTORC1 drives protein synthesis and growth. In skeletal muscle, it has been clearly demonstrated that of all the amino acids, leucine is the most potent stimulator of mTORC1 and protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo. As such, leucine has received considerable attention as a potential pharmaconutrient for the treatment of numerous muscle wasting conditions. However, despite a multitude of studies showing enhanced acute protein synthesis with leucine or leucine-rich supplements in healthy individuals, additional leucine intake does not necessarily enhance protein synthesis during muscle wasting conditions. In addition, long-term, placebo controlled, iso-caloric studies in humans consistently show no beneficial effect of leucine supplementation on skeletal muscle mass or function. This review, critically evaluates the therapeutic potential of leucine to attenuate the skeletal muscle wasting associated with ageing, cancer and immobilization/bed rest. It also highlights the impact of inflammation on amino acid sensing, mTORC1 activation and stimulation of protein synthesis and challenges the underlying hypothesis that the acute activation of mTORC1 and stimulation of protein synthesis by leucine increases in muscle mass over time. We conclude that leucine, as a standalone nutritional intervention, is not effective in the prevention of muscle wasting. Future work should focus on identifying and utilizing other nutrients or treatments that sensitize skeletal muscle to leucine, thereby enhancing its therapeutic potential for muscle wasting conditions.

  20. Thermodynamic characteristics of the heparin-leucine-CaCl2 system in a diluted physiological solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, L. S.; Belov, G. V.; Rulev, Yu. A.; Semenov, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    Chemical equilibria in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight heparin (Na4hep) and leucine (HLeu) are calculated through the mathematical modeling of chemical equilibria based on representative experimental pH titration data. In addition, chemical equilibria in the CaCl2-Na4hep-HLeu-H2O-NaCl system in the presence of 0.154M NaCl background electrolyte at a temperature of 37°C in the range of 2.30 ≤ pH ≤ 10.50 and initial concentrations of basic components n × 10-3 M ( n ≤ 4).

  1. Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 functions as a caspase-3 inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Weiyong; Kimura, Hiromichi; Shiota, Kunio . E-mail: ashiota@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 (PAL31) is expressed in proliferating cells and consists of 272 amino acids with a tandem structure of leucine-rich repeats in the N-terminus and a highly acidic region with a putative nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus. We previously reported that PAL31 is required for cell cycle progression. In the present study, we found that the antisense oligonucleotide of PAL31 induced apoptosis to the transfected Nb2 cells. Stable transfectants, in which PAL31 was regulated by an inducible promoter, were generated to gain further insight into the signaling role of PAL31 in the regulation of apoptosis. Expression of PAL31 resulted in the marked rescue of Rat1 cells from etoposide and UV radiation-induced apoptosis and the cytoprotection was correlated with the levels of PAL31 protein. Thus, cytoprotection from apoptosis is a physiological function of PAL31. PAL31 can suppress caspase-3 activity but not cytochrome c release in vitro, indicating that PAL31 is a direct caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, PAL31 is a multifunctional protein working as a cell cycle progression factor as well as a cell survival factor.

  2. Podocan-like protein: a novel small leucine-rich repeat matrix protein in bone.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Kaku, Masaru; Yoshida, Keiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    Recently, significant attention has been drawn to the biology of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) due to their multiple functionalities in various cell types and tissues. Here, we characterize a novel SLRP member, "Podocan-like (Podnl) protein" identified by a bioinformatics approach. The Podnl protein has a signal peptide, a unique cysteine-rich N-terminal cluster, 21 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs, and one putative N-glycosylation site. This protein is structurally similar to podocan in SLRPs. The gene was highly expressed in mineralized tissues and in osteoblastic cells and the high expression level was observed at and after matrix mineralization in vitro. Podnl was enriched in newly formed bones based on immunohistochemical analysis. When Podnl was transfected into osteoblastic cells, the protein with N-glycosylation was detected mainly in the cultured medium, indicating that Podnl is a secreted N-glycosylated protein. The endogenous Podnl protein was also present in bone matrix. These data provide a new insight into our understanding of the emerging SLRP functions in bone formation.

  3. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jarocki, Veronica M; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Deutscher, Ania T; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae.

  4. MHJ_0461 is a multifunctional leucine aminopeptidase on the surface of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Jarocki, Veronica M.; Santos, Jerran; Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Deutscher, Ania T.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aminopeptidases are part of the arsenal of virulence factors produced by bacterial pathogens that inactivate host immune peptides. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced pathogen of swine that lacks the genetic repertoire to synthesize amino acids and relies on the host for availability of amino acids for growth. M. hyopneumoniae recruits plasmin(ogen) onto its cell surface via the P97 and P102 adhesins and the glutamyl aminopeptidase MHJ_0125. Plasmin plays an important role in regulating the inflammatory response in the lungs of pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae. We show that recombinant MHJ_0461 (rMHJ_0461) functions as a leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) with broad substrate specificity for leucine, alanine, phenylalanine, methionine and arginine and that MHJ_0461 resides on the surface of M. hyopneumoniae. rMHJ_0461 also binds heparin, plasminogen and foreign DNA. Plasminogen bound to rMHJ_0461 was readily converted to plasmin in the presence of tPA. Computational modelling identified putative DNA and heparin-binding motifs on solvent-exposed sites around a large pore on the LAP hexamer. We conclude that MHJ_0461 is a LAP that moonlights as a multifunctional adhesin on the cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:25589579

  5. Molecular Recognition of Muramyl Dipeptide Occurs in the Leucine-rich Repeat Domain of Nod2.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Mackenzie L; D'Ambrosio, Elizabeth A; Bahnson, Brian J; Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler

    2017-04-14

    Genetic mutations in the innate immune receptor nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2 (Nod2) have demonstrated increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease that is hypothesized to be accompanied by changes in the gut microbiota. Nod2 responds to the presence of bacteria, specifically a fragment of the bacterial cell wall, muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The proposed site of this interaction is the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain. Surface plasmon resonance and molecular modeling were used to investigate the interaction of the LRR domain with MDP. A functional and pure LRR domain was obtained from Escherichia coli expression in high yield. The LRR domain binds to MDP with high affinity, with a KD of 212 ± 24 nM. Critical portions of the receptor were determined by mutagenesis of putative binding residues. Fragment analysis of MDP revealed that both the peptide and carbohydrate portion contribute to the binding interaction.

  6. Identification of a putative nuclear export signal motif in human NANOG homeobox domain

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Huh, Sun-Hyung; Sung, Boreum; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found the putative nuclear export signal motif within human NANOG homeodomain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leucine-rich residues are important for human NANOG homeodomain nuclear export. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM1-specific inhibitor LMB blocked the potent human NANOG NES-mediated nuclear export. -- Abstract: NANOG is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that plays an important role in pluripotent stem cells and tumorigenic cells. To understand how nuclear localization of human NANOG is regulated, the NANOG sequence was examined and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif ({sup 125}MQELSNILNL{sup 134}) was found in the homeodomain (HD). To functionally validate the putative NES motif, deletion and site-directed mutants were fused to an EGFP expression vector and transfected into COS-7 cells, and the localization of the proteins was examined. While hNANOG HD exclusively localized to the nucleus, a mutant with both NLSs deleted and only the putative NES motif contained (hNANOG HD-{Delta}NLSs) was predominantly cytoplasmic, as observed by nucleo/cytoplasmic fractionation and Western blot analysis as well as confocal microscopy. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of the putative NES motif in a partial hNANOG HD only containing either one of the two NLS motifs led to localization in the nucleus, suggesting that the NES motif may play a functional role in nuclear export. Furthermore, CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor LMB blocked the hNANOG potent NES-mediated export, suggesting that the leucine-rich motif may function in CRM1-mediated nuclear export of hNANOG. Collectively, a NES motif is present in the hNANOG HD and may be functionally involved in CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1460 - Leucine aminopeptidase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... system is a device intended to measure the activity of the enzyme leucine amino-peptidase in serum... diseases such as viral hepatitis and obstructive jaundice. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  8. Myc/Max and other helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins bend DNA toward the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, D E; Parent, L A; Sharp, P A

    1992-01-01

    A distinct family of DNA-binding proteins is characterized by the presence of adjacent "basic," helix-loop-helix, and leucine zipper domains. Members of this family include the Myc oncoproteins, their binding partner Max, and the mammalian transcription factors USF, TFE3, and TFEB. Consistent with their homologous domains, these proteins bind to DNA containing the same core hexanucleotide sequence CACGTG. Analysis of the conformation of DNA in protein-DNA complexes has been undertaken with a circular permutation assay. Large mobility anomalies were detected for all basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins tested, suggesting that each protein induced a similar degree of bending. Phasing analysis revealed that basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins orient the DNA bend toward the minor groove. The presence of in-phase spacing between adjacent binding sites for this family of proteins in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer suggests the possible formation of an unusual triple-bended structure and may have implications for the activities of Myc. Images PMID:1465398

  9. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  10. Fetoplacental deamination and decarboxylation of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, G.L.; Quick, A.N. Jr.; Hay, W.W. Jr.; Meschia, G.; Battaglia, F.C.; Fennessey, P.V. )

    1990-10-01

    Fetal and placental metabolism of leucine (Leu) and ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) were studied in seven fetal lambs at 132 +/- 1.3-days gestation. Fetal infusions of (1-13C)Leu, (1-14C)Leu, and antipyrine were carried out for 4 h. Uterine and umbilical blood flows were measured using the antipyrine steady-state diffusion technique. Leu and KIC concentrations, (14C)Leu-specific activities, 14CO2, (13C)Leu, and (13C)KIC enrichment (mole percent enrichment) were measured in the maternal artery, uterine vein, and umbilical artery and vein to calculate net fluxes of tracee and tracer molecules between fetus and placenta and between the uteroplacenta and the maternal circulation. There were net Leu and KIC fluxes into the fetus from the placenta with the KIC flux equal to approximately 19% of the combined Leu plus KIC flux. In addition, there was a net KIC flux into the uterine circulation. The fraction of infused tracer Leu escaping the placenta into the mother was small (approximately 6%). By contrast, there was a rapid exchange of tracer Leu carbon between placenta and fetus resulting in a significant flux of labeled KIC from placenta to fetus. Approximately 20% of the infused tracer carbon was converted to CO2 within the fetus. This rate of conversion was greater than 80% of the total fetoplacental conversion rate and significantly higher than the flux of KIC tracer carbon from placenta to fetus. Fetal KIC decarboxylation rate, calculated from the fetal KIC enrichment data, was 2.83 +/- 0.40 mumol.min-1.kg fetus-1 and approximately 60% of the combined net Leu and KIC flux into the fetus from the placenta.

  11. Photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Andreas; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K

    2017-02-24

    Protonated leucine enkephalin (YGGFL) was studied by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) from 225 to 300 nm utilizing an optical parametric oscillator tunable wavelength laser system (OPO). Fragments were identified by absolute mass measurement in a 9.4 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). Bond cleavage was preferred in the vicinity of the two aromatic residues, resulting in high ion abundances for a4, a1, b3, y2 and y1 fragments. a, b and y ions dominated the mass spectrum, and full sequence coverage was achieved for those types. Photodissociation was most effective at the short wavelength end of the studied range, which is assigned to the onset of the La π-π* transition of the tyrosine chromophore, but worked well also at the Lb π-π* chromophore absorption maxima in the 35 000-39 000 cm(-1) region. Several side-chain and internal fragments were observed. H atom loss is observed only above 41 000 cm(-1), consistent with the requirement of a curve crossing to a repulsive (1)πσ* state. It is suggested that the photochemically generated mobile H atom plays a role in further backbone cleavages, similar to the mechanism for electron capture dissociation. The b4 fragment is most intense at the Lb chromophore absorptions, undergoing additional fragmentation at higher photon energies. The high resolution of the FT-ICR MS revealed that out of all x and z-type fragments only x3 and x4 were formed, with low intensity. Other previously reported x- and z-fragments were re-assigned to internal fragments, based on exact mass measurement.

  12. Effect of exercise training on leucine oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, M.K.; Layman, D.K.

    1986-03-01

    Oxidation of the BCAA leucine is increased during a bout of exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on leu oxidation during aerobic exercise. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a commercial diet ad lib and divided into sedentary and two trained groups. Animals were trained to run on a treadmill with a 10/sup 0/ incline at 28 m/min for 5 wks for either 50 or 120 min/day. There were no differences in food intake or body weight. After a 12 hr fast, animals were run for 50 or 120 min and changes in leu catabolism determined by measurement of in vivo leu oxidation and activity of branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKAD). For measurement of leu oxidation, rats were injected IP with 4 ..mu..Ci 1-/sup 14/C-leu during the last 15 min of exercise, placed in glass metabolic chambers, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ collected in 1 N NaOH for 30 min periods. Leu oxidation was increased by 40% after 50 min of exercise and by 79% after 120 min of exercise. Five weeks of training reduced the rate of leu oxidation during an exercise bout. The activity of the BCKAD was not increased in the trained animals after either 50 or 120 min of exercise. These data indicate that the rate of leu oxidation during exercises is dependent on the duration of the exercise and that training will reduce the magnitude of this effect.

  13. L-Leucine and NO-mediated cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Zhenlong; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Reduced availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the vasculature is a major factor contributing to the impaired action of insulin on blood flow and, therefore, insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. Available evidence shows that vascular insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in developed nations. Interestingly, increased concentrations of L-leucine in the plasma occur in obese humans and other animals with vascular dysfunction. Among branched-chain amino acids, L-leucine is unique in inhibiting NO synthesis from L-arginine in endothelial cells and may modulate cardiovascular homeostasis in insulin resistance. Results of recent studies indicate that L-leucine is an activator of glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GFAT), which is the first and a rate-controlling enzyme in the synthesis of glucosamine (an inhibitor of endothelial NO synthesis). Through stimulating the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and thus protein synthesis, L-leucine may enhance GFAT protein expression, thereby inhibiting NO synthesis in endothelial cells. We propose that reducing circulating levels of L-leucine or endothelial GFAT activity may provide a potentially novel strategy for preventing and/or treating cardiovascular disease in obese and diabetic subjects. Such means may include dietary supplementation with either α-ketoglutarate to enhance the catabolism of L-leucine in the small intestine and other tissues or with N-ethyl-L-glutamine to inhibit GFAT activity in endothelial cells. Preventing leucine-induced activation of GFAT by nutritional supplements or pharmaceutical drugs may contribute to improved cardiovascular function by enhancing vascular NO synthesis.

  14. Leucine markedly regulates pancreatic exocrine secretion in goats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z P; Xu, M; Liu, K; Yao, J H; Yu, H X; Wang, F

    2014-02-01

    Four goats (30.1 ± 1.3 kg) with common bile duct re-entrant catheter and duodenal catheter were used to evaluate the effects of duodenal leucine infusion on pancreatic exocrine secretion and plasma parameters with two 4 × 4 Latin square design experiments. In the long-term infusion experiment, goats were fed twice daily [700 g/day, dry matter (DM) basis] at 8:00 and 18:00 hours and were duodenally infused with 0, 3, 6, 9 g/day leucine for 14 days. Pancreatic juice and jugular blood samples were collected over 1-h intervals for 6 h daily from d 11 to 14 days to encompass a 24-h day. In the short-term experiment, goats were infused leucine for 10 h continuously at the same infusion rate with Experiment 1 after feed deprivation for 24 h repeated every 10 days. Pancreatic juice and blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h of infusion. The results showed that the long-term leucine infusion did not affect pancreatic juice secretion, protein output, trypsin and lipase secretion and plasma insulin concentration, but linearly increased α-amylase secretion. No changes in pancreatic protein and lipase secretion were observed in the short-term infusion. Pancreatic juice and α-amylase secretion responded quadratically, with the greatest values observed in the 3 and 6 g/day leucine respectively. Trypsin secretion linearly decreased, while plasma insulin concentration increased linearly with increased leucine infusion. The results demonstrated that duodenal leucine infusion dose and time dependently regulated pancreatic enzyme secretion not associated with the change in plasma insulin concentration.

  15. Effect of hyperammonemia on leucine and protein metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Holecek, M; Sprongl, L; Tichý, M

    2000-10-01

    The cause of muscle wasting and decreased plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), valine, leucine, and isoleucine in liver cirrhosis is obscure. Here we have evaluated the effect of hyperammonemia. Rats were infused with either an ammonium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, a sodium acetate/bicarbonate mixture, or saline for 320 minutes. The parameters of leucine and protein metabolism were evaluated in the whole body and in several tissues using a primed constant intravenous infusion of L-[1-14C]leucine. Ammonium infusion caused an increase in ammonia and glutamine levels in plasma, a decrease in BCAA and alanine in plasma and skeletal muscle, a significant decrease in whole-body proteolysis and protein synthesis, and an increase in leucine oxidized fraction. A significant decrease in protein synthesis after ammonium infusion was observed in skeletal muscle while a nonsignificant effect was observed in liver, gut, heart, spleen, and kidneys. We conclude that the decrease in plasma BCAA after ammonia infusion is associated with decreased proteolysis and increased leucine oxidized fraction.

  16. The Development of Leucine Dehydrogenase and Formate Dehydrogenase Bifunctional Enzyme Cascade Improves the Biosynthsis of L-tert-Leucine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Sun, Dongfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2016-11-01

    Leucine dehydrogenase (LDH) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were assembled together based on a high-affinity interaction between two different cohesins in a miniscaffoldin and corresponding dockerins in LDH and FDH. The miniscaffoldin with two enzymes was further absorbed by regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) to form a bifunctional enzyme complex (miniscaffoldin with LDH and FDH adsorbed by RAC, RSLF) in vitro. The enzymatic characteristics of the bifunctional enzyme complex and free enzymes mixture were systematically compared. The synthesis of L-tert-leucine by the RSLF and free enzyme mixture were compared under different concentrations of enzymes, coenzyme, and substrates. The initial L-tert-leucine production rate by RSLF was enhanced by 2-fold compared with that of the free enzyme mixture. Ninety-one grams per liter of L-tert-leucine with an enantiomeric purity of 99 % e.e. was obtained by RSLF multienzyme catalysis. The results indicated that the bifuntional enzyme complex based on cohesin-dockerin interaction has great potential in the synthesis of L-tert-leucine.

  17. Spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies of new L-leucine and D-leucine complexes with chloranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, J.; Nowicka-Scheibe, J.; Maurin, Jan K.; Schilf, W.; Rozwadowski, Z.

    2017-04-01

    New molecular complexes of L-leucine and D-leucine with chloranilic acid have been synthesized. Crystal structures of these crystals have been solved; they crystallize in non-centrosymmetric monoclinic P21 space group. In the crystal, leucine molecules exist in protonated form (C6NO2H14+) and chloranilic acid molecules in deprotonated form (C6HCl2O4-). Electronic (UV-Vis) and vibrational absorption (VA) spectra for both materials were collected. Circular dichroism methods such as electronic circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) were used to determine the absolute configuration of new complexes. In both methods a characteristic (-,+) Cotton patterns are observed. In ECD spectra absorption bands are observed at 212 nm for acetonitrile solution and at 202 nm for aqueous solution. VCD spectra (in DMSO-d6 solution) show (-,+) Cotton pattern with strong peaks at 1323 cm-1 (CH rocking mode). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) investigations were performed to explore thermal properties of new materials. In DSC curve the decomposition and combustion processes are observed in 220-227 °C. The decomposition process was described by use of TG method and quadruple mass spectrometer (QMS). NMR spectra of pure L-leucine and chloranilic acid as well as L-leucine - chloranilic acid complex in solutions (D2O and DMSO) and in solid state confirm the geometry of molecules in complex both in solution and in solid state.

  18. Dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass ( Lateolabrax japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Cheng, Zhenyan; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-02-01

    A 56-day feeding trial was conducted to examine the dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass in seawater floating net cages (1.5 m × 1.5 m × 2.0 m). Six isonitrogenous (crude protein 40%) and isoenergetic (gross energy 20 kJ g-1) diets were formulated to contain different concentrations of leucine (0.9%, 1.49%, 2.07%, 2.70%, 3.30% and 3.88% of dry matter). Crystalline L-amino acids were supplemented to simulate the whole body amino acid pattern of Japanese seabass except for leucine. Three groups (30 fish individuals each, 8.0 g ± 0.20 g in initial weight) were fed to apparent satiation at 5:00 and 17:30 every day. During the experimental period, the water temperature ranged from 26 to 32δC and salinity from 26 to 30, and the dissolved oxygen was maintained at 7 mg L-1. The results showed that weight gain ( WG), nitrogen retention ( NR), feed efficiency ( FE) and protein efficiency ratio ( PER) were significantly increased when dietary leucine was increased from 0.90% to 2.70% of dry matter, and then declined. WG was the highest when fish were fed D4 containing 2.70% of leucine. No significant differences were observed in body composition among dietary treatments ( P > 0.05). Considering the change of WG, the optimum dietary leucine requirement of juvenile Japanese seabass was either 2.39% of dry matter or 5.68% of dietary protein.

  19. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C) leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C), L-(1-/sup 13/C) and L-(/sup 15/N) leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of /sup 13/CO/sup 2/ in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X/sup 0/) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis.

  20. The radiolysis and racemization of leucine on proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    D- and L-Leucine have been subjected to 39-55 percent radiolysis using 0.11 MeV protons, both with the proton beam passing through the sample or being absorbed by it and with quenching the sample immediately on completion of irradiation or after a 21-day interval. Racemization was small (1.1-1.7 percent) and comparable in all cases, suggesting that radioracemization and secondary degradative effects were not important factors in the recent unsuccessful attempts to induce optical activity in DL-Leucine by partial radiolysis using 0-11 MeV longitudinally polarized protons.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the homeodomain-leucine zipper IV transcription factor family in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rao; Liu, Wei; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-07-01

    The class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip IV) proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors known to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this study, 11 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) HD-Zip IV genes were identified in the version 2 cucumber genome and found to be distributed unevenly across the chromosomes. The CsHDZIV (Cucumis sativus homeodomain-leucine zipper IV) gene family is smaller than in other studied species (except for rice) because of the absence of gene duplication events. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HD-Zip IV genes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato, cotton, maize, and rice could be classified into five subgroups. All CsHDZIV genes appear to be derived from a basic module containing 11 exons in the coding region. Two conserved motifs of 21 and 19 nucleotides were found in the 3'-untranslated regions of six CsHDZIV genes, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation may play a role in regulation of CsHDZIV genes. In addition, 6 of 11 CsHDZIV genes were found to undergo alternative splicing events. Reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that all CsHDZIV genes (except one) were expressed and showed preferential expression in reproductive organs.

  2. Quantitative role of splanchnic region in leucine metabolism: L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and substrate balance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.E.; Walaszewski, J.A.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The role of the splanchnic region (Sp) in whole body leucine metabolism was assessed in six chronically catheterized fasting mongrel dogs and in eight dogs during constant enteral feeding of a complete amino acid solution (0.24 g.kg-1.h-1). We used primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(1-13C,15N)leucine and L-(1-14C)leucine and measurements of arteriovenous isotope and leucine balance across the gut, liver, and Sp. In the fasted condition, 3.5% of arterial leucine supply was oxidized in the Sp, accounting for 13% of total body leucine oxidation, with 10% by liver. With amino acid feeding (1) leucine carbon and nitrogen fluxes and oxidation were increased (P less than 0.01) at the whole body level; (2) the percent of whole body leucine oxidation occurring in the Sp and liver increased (P less than 0.01) to 41 and 27%, respectively; (3) fractional metabolic utilization of leucine delivered to the Sp was reduced (P less than 0.01) from 47 to 35%; (4) the deamination rate of leucine in the gut was increased (P less than 0.05), along with an increased reamination rate of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid in the Sp (P less than 0.05). These findings reveal that the Sp accounts for a small fraction of whole body leucine oxidation during the fasting condition, but it plays a quantitatively important role in total body leucine oxidation during amino acid feeding; the gut and liver play cooperative roles in controlling leucine supply to peripheral tissues.

  3. Enteral leucine and protein synthesis in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three members of the Branch Chain Amino Acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. As essential amino acids, these amino acids have important functions which include a primary role in protein structure and metabolism. It is intriguing that the requirement for BCAA in humans comprise about 40–...

  4. Genetic studies of leucine transport in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, M A; Lobatón, C D; Collarini, E J; Moreno, A; Giles, R E; Oxender, D L

    1984-05-15

    We have taken two approaches to the study of the genetics of leucine transport in mammalian cells. First, from a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that has a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase, we isolated temperature-resistant revertants with increased leucine transport activity. This transport elevation is reflected by increased Vmax values of leucine uptake and unchanged Km values of uptake. The temperature resistance in each revertant appears to result from the increased transport and not from any change in the leucyl-tRNA synthetase. We conclude that in each revertant there is a stable derepression of amino acid transport system L. In a second approach, we started with a Chinese hamster-human hybrid strain formed by the fusion of a temperature-sensitive leucyl-tRNA synthetase mutant hamster cell line and normal human leukocytes. From this temperature-sensitive hybrid strain we selected temperature-resistant hybrids, one class of which we found to have greatly elevated leucine transport activity. We have allowed human chromosomes to segregate from these high-transport hybrids, promoted by the presence of low concentrations of colcemid. The loss of the high-transport phenotype coincides with the loss of a single small human chromosome, which we are attempting to identify by using G-11 and G-banding staining techniques.

  5. The apo-structure of the leucine sensor Sestrin2 is still elusive

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Sestrin2 is a GATOR2 interacting protein that directly binds leucine and is required for the inhibition of mTORC1 under leucine deprivation, indicating that it is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway. We recently reported the structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine (PDB ID: 5DJ4), and demonstrated that mutations in the leucine-binding pocket alter the affinity of Sestrin2 for leucine and result in a corresponding change in the leucine sensitivity of mTORC1 in cells. A lower resolution structure of human Sestrin2 (PDB ID: 5CUF), which was crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine, showed Sestrin2 to be in a nearly identical conformation as the leucine-bound structure. Based on this observation, it has been argued that leucine binding does not affect the conformation of Sestrin2 and thus that Sestrin2 may not be a sensor for leucine. Here, we show that simple analysis of the reported “apo”-Sestrin2 structure reveals the clear presence of prominent, unmodeled electron density in the leucine-binding pocket that exactly accommodates the leucine observed in the higher resolution structure. Refining the reported “apo”-structure with leucine eliminates the large FO-FC difference density at this position and improves the working and free R-factors of the model. Consistent with this, our own structure of Sestrin2 crystallized in the absence of exogenous leucine also contains electron density that is best explained by leucine. Thus, the structure of apo-Sestrin2 remains elusive. PMID:27649739

  6. Relation between plasma and tissue parameters of leucine metabolism in fed and starved rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, J.A.; Paul, H.S.; Adibi, S.A.

    1986-06-01

    By use of a primed continuous infusion of (1-/sup 14/C)leucine, the authors investigated parameters of leucine metabolism in plasma, expired air, and tissues of fed and 48-h starved rats. The ratios of muscle to plasma specific activity of ..cap alpha..-ketoisocaproate (KIC) in fed and starved rats were not significantly different from 1. The ratio of muscle to plasma specific activity of leucine was also not significantly different from 1 in fed rats, but was significantly lower than 1 in starved rats. The rate of leucine oxidation was 28-34% higher when calculation was based on plasma KIC rather than leucine specific activity. However, starvation significantly increased the rate of leucine oxidation with either specific activity. The rates of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein, calculated as the difference between plasma leucine turnover and oxidation, were unaffected by starvation, but the incorporations into total protein measured directly were significantly decreased in liver and muscle. They conclude that a) leucine or KIC specific activity in muscle is better predicted by plasma KIC than leucine specific activity, and b) the difference between rates of plasma leucine turnover and oxidation does not appear to be a valid measurement of leucine incorporation into whole-body protein.

  7. Anesthesia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Anesthesia Basics Print A ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  8. Relationship between surface concentration of L-leucine and bulk powder properties in spray dried formulations.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Meiser, Felix; Tan, Geoffrey; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John; Rowles, Matthew R; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V

    2015-08-01

    The amino acid L-leucine has been demonstrated to act as a lubricant and improve the dispersibility of otherwise cohesive fine particles. It was hypothesized that optimum surface L-leucine concentration is necessary to achieve optimal surface and bulk powder properties. Polyvinylpyrrolidone was spray dried with different concentration of L-leucine and the change in surface composition of the formulations was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The formulations were also subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis in order to understand the relationship between surface concentration and solid-state properties of L-leucine. In addition, the morphology, surface energy and bulk cohesion of spray dried formulations were also assessed to understand the relation between surface L-leucine concentration and surface and bulk properties. The surface concentration of L-leucine increased with higher feed concentrations and plateaued at about 10% L-leucine. Higher surface L-leucine concentration also resulted in the formation of larger L-leucine crystals and not much change in crystal size was noted above 10% L-leucine. A change in surface morphology of particles from spherical to increasingly corrugated was also observed with increasing surface l-leucine concentration. Specific collapsed/folded over particles were only seen in formulations with 10% or higher l-leucine feed concentration suggesting a change in particle surface formation process. In addition, bulk cohesion also reduced and approached a minimum with 10% L-leucine concentration. Thus, the surface concentration of L-leucine governs particle formation and optimum surface L-leucine concentration results in optimum surface and bulk powder properties.

  9. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  10. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Robert A; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Wolfson, Rachel L; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag guanosine triphosphatases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. Here we present the 2.7 angstrom crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. These results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.

  11. Regulation of the plasma amino acid profile by leucine via the system L amino acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Hongmin; Nakamura, Koichi; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kondo, Yusuke; Xu, Minjun; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of amino acids reflect the intracellular amino acid pool in mammals. However, the regulatory mechanism requires clarification. In this study, we examined the effect of leucine administration on plasma amino acid profiles in mice with and without the treatment of 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) or rapamycin as an inhibitor of system L or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, respectively. The elevation of plasma leucine concentration after leucine administration was associated with a significant decrease in the plasma concentrations of isoleucine, valine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine; BCH treatment almost completely blocked the leucine-induced decrease in plasma amino acid concentrations. Rapamycin treatment had much less effects on the actions of leucine than BCH treatment. These results suggest that leucine regulates the plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, and that system L amino acid transporters are involved in the leucine action.

  12. Supplemental dietary leucine and the skeletal muscle anabolic response to essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; McClung, James P

    2011-09-01

    Skeletal muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is regulated by a number of dietary factors, to include essential amino acids (EAAs). Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, has been identified as a stimulator of MPS in many cell culture and animal studies. However, whether supplemental leucine exerts a unique stimulatory effect, as compared to other EAAs, on muscle anabolism in humans has not been clearly demonstrated. A recent study found no improvement in resting MPS in adults who consumed a 10 g EAA supplement providing added leucine (3.5 g leucine) when compared to a control 10 g EAA supplement (1.8 g leucine). These findings suggest that added leucine is unnecessary for the stimulation of MPS when sufficient EAAs are provided; however, the study of supplemental leucine during conditions such as endurance exercise, caloric deprivation, and ageing may be warranted.

  13. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Pacold, Michael E.; Wang, Tim; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucine leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. Lastly, these results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.

  14. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina; And Others

    1976-01-01

    These articles are presented as an aide in teaching basic subjects. This issue examines reading diagnosis, food preservation, prime numbers, electromagnets, acting out in language arts, self-directed spelling activities, and resources for environmental education. (Editor/RK)

  15. Basic Finance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  16. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  17. Inverse relationship of leucine flux and oxidation to free fatty acid availability in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, P; Nissen, S L; Miles, J M; Haymond, M W

    1986-01-01

    To determine the effect of fatty acid availability on leucine metabolism, 14-h fasted dogs were infused with either glycerol or triglyceride plus heparin, and 46-h fasted dogs were infused with either nicotinic acid or nicotinic acid plus triglyceride and heparin. Leucine metabolism was assessed using a simultaneous infusion of L-[4,5-3H]leucine and alpha-[1-14C]ketoisocaproate. Leucine, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), and totalleucine carbon (leucine plus KIC) flux and oxidation rates were calculated at steady state. In 14-h fasted animals, infusion of triglyceride and heparin increased plasma free fatty acids (FFA) by 0.7 mM (P less than 0.01) and decreased leucine (P less than 0.01), total leucine carbon flux (P less than 0.02), and oxidation (P less than 0.05). The estimated rate of leucine utilization not accounted for by oxidation and KIC flux decreased, but the changes were not significant. During glycerol infusion, leucine and KIC flux and oxidation did not change. In 46-h fasted dogs, nicotinic acid decreased FFA by 1.0 mM (P less than 0.01) and increased (P less than 0.05) the rate of leucine and total leucine carbon flux, but did not affect KIC flux. Leucine oxidation increased (P less than 0.01) by nearly threefold, whereas nonoxidized leucine utilization decreased. Infusion of triglyceride plus heparin together with nicotinic acid blunted some of the responses observed with nicotinic acid alone. In that changes in oxidation under steady state condition reflect changes in net leucine balance, these data suggest that FFA availability may positively affect the sparing of at least one essential amino acid and may influence whole body protein metabolism. PMID:3080479

  18. Dietary L-leucine supplementation enhances intestinal development in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuli; Wu, Zhenlong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Sun, Kaiji; Ji, Yun; Wang, Bin; Jiao, Ning; He, Beibei; Wang, Weiwei; Dai, Zhaolai; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-08-01

    L-Leucine is a signaling amino acid in animal metabolism. It is unknown whether supplementing L-leucine to breast-fed neonates may enhance their small-intestinal development. This hypothesis was tested with a piglet model. Seven-day-old sow-reared pigs with an average birth weight of 1.45 kg were assigned randomly to the control or leucine group (n = 30/group). Piglets in the leucine group were orally administrated with 1.4 g L-leucine/kg body weight, whereas piglets in the control group received isonitrogenous L-alanine, twice daily for 14 days. The supplemental L-leucine amounted to 200 % of L-leucine intake from sow's milk by 7-day-old pigs. At the end of the 2-week experiment, tissue samples were collected for determining intestinal morphology, expression of genes for intestinal leucine transporters (real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis), and plasma metabolites and hormones. L-leucine administration increased (P < 0.05) villus height in the duodenum, an elevated ratio of villus height to crypt depth in the duodenum and ileum, plasma concentrations of leucine, glutamine and asparagine, as well as body-weight gains. mRNA levels for L-leucine transporters (SLC6A14, SLC6A19 and SLC7A9) and the abundance of the ATB(0,+) protein were increased (P < 0.05) but those for SLC7A7 mRNA and the LAT2 protein were decreased (P < 0.05) in the jejunum of leucine-supplemented piglets, compared with the control. Plasma concentrations of ammonia, urea, triglycerides, and growth-related hormones did not differ between the control and leucine groups. Collectively, these results indicate that L-leucine supplementation improves intestinal development and whole-body growth in suckling piglets with a normal birth weight.

  19. Determination of Levo-Rotatory Leucine by a Fluorescent Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, D.; Zhu, H.

    2015-03-01

    With a certain concentration of Michaelis buffer solution (pH 6.1), and in the presence of CTMAB, the fluorescence intensity of fluorescein, which is quenched by Pd 2+ , can be enhanced after adding a certain content of L-leucine. Thereby, we establish a fluorescence spectrometry method to detect the content of L-leucine, the added amount of which is proportional to the fluorescence enhancement. When the excitation slit width is 3 nm and the emission slit width is 5 nm, we obtain the following results: correlation coefficient R = 0.9981, linear range 0.125-1.375 mg/l, and detection limit 0.00028 mg/l.

  20. Photolysis of rac-leucine with circularly polarized synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Meinert, Cornelia; Hoffmann, Søren V; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Nahon, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    Amino acids that pass the RNA machinery in living organisms occur in L-configuration. The question on the evolutionary origin of this biomolecular asymmetry remains unanswered to this day. Amino acids were detected in artificially produced interstellar ices, and L-enantiomer-enriched amino acids were identified in CM-type meteorites. This hints at a possible interstellar/circumstellar origin of the amino acids themselves as well as their stereochemical asymmetry. Based upon the current knowledge about the occurrence of circularly-polarized electromagnetic radiation in interstellar environments, we subjected rac-leucine to far-UV circularly-polarized synchrotron radiation. Asymmetric photolysis was followed by an analysis in an enantioselective GC/MS system. Here, we report on an advanced photolysis rate of more than 99% for leucine. The results indicate that high photolysis rates can occur under the chosen conditions, favoring enantioselective photolysis. In 2014, the obtained results will be reexamined by cometary mission Rosetta.

  1. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    PubMed

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  2. Articulation of three core metabolic processes in Arabidopsis: Fatty acid biosynthesis, leucine catabolism and starch metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Peng, Jianling; Ransom, Nick; Nikolau, Basil J; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2008-01-01

    Background Elucidating metabolic network structures and functions in multicellular organisms is an emerging goal of functional genomics. We describe the co-expression network of three core metabolic processes in the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana: fatty acid biosynthesis, starch metabolism and amino acid (leucine) catabolism. Results These co-expression networks form modules populated by genes coding for enzymes that represent the reactions generally considered to define each pathway. However, the modules also incorporate a wider set of genes that encode transporters, cofactor biosynthetic enzymes, precursor-producing enzymes, and regulatory molecules. We tested experimentally the hypothesis that one of the genes tightly co-expressed with starch metabolism module, a putative kinase AtPERK10, will have a role in this process. Indeed, knockout lines of AtPERK10 have an altered starch accumulation. In addition, the co-expression data define a novel hierarchical transcript-level structure associated with catabolism, in which genes performing smaller, more specific tasks appear to be recruited into higher-order modules with a broader catabolic function. Conclusion Each of these core metabolic pathways is structured as a module of co-expressed transcripts that co-accumulate over a wide range of environmental and genetic perturbations and developmental stages, and represent an expanded set of macromolecules associated with the common task of supporting the functionality of each metabolic pathway. As experimentally demonstrated, co-expression analysis can provide a rich approach towards understanding gene function. PMID:18616834

  3. Controlling Mechanical Properties of Bis-leucine Oxalyl Amide Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, William; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    is-leucine oxalyl amide is a low molecular weight gelator capable of gelling polar and organic solvents. A fundamental understanding of self-assembled systems can lead to new methods in drug delivery and the design of new soft material systems. An important feature of self-assembled systems are the intermolecular forces between solvent and gelator molecule; by changing the environment the gel is in, the mechanical properties also change. In this project two variables were considered: the degree of neutralization present for the gelator molecule from neutral to completely ionized, and the concentration of the gelator molecule, from 1 weight percent to 8 weight percent in 1-butanol. Mechanical properties were studied using displacement controlled indentation techniques and temperature sweep rheometry. It has been found that properties such as the storage modulus, gelation temperature and maximum stress allowed increase with bis-leucine oxalyl amide concentration. The results from this study establish a 3-d contour map between the gelator concentration, the gelator degree of ionization and mechanical properties such as storage modulus and maximum stress allowed. The intermolecular forces between the bis-leucine low molecular weight gelator and 1-butanol govern the mechanical properties of the gel system, and understanding these interactions will be key to rationally designed self-assembled systems.

  4. Characterization of a leucine aminopeptidase of Babesia gibsoni.

    PubMed

    Jia, H; Terkawi, M A; Aboge, G O; Goo, Y-K; Luo, Y; Li, Y; Yamagishi, J; Nishikawa, Y; Igarashi, I; Sugimoto, C; Fujisaki, K; Xuan, X

    2009-08-01

    Peptidases of parasitic protozoa are currently under intense investigation in order to identify novel virulence factors, drug targets, and vaccine candidates, except in Babesia. Leucine aminopeptidases in protozoa, such as Plasmodium and Leishmania, have been identified to be involved in free amino acid regulation. We report here the molecular and enzymatic characterization, as well as the localization of a leucine aminopeptidase, a member of the M17 cytosolic aminopeptidase family, from B. gibsoni (BgLAP). A functional recombinant BgLAP (rBgLAP) expressed in Escherichia coli efficiently hydrolysed synthetic substrates for aminopeptidase, a leucine substrate. Enzyme activity of the rBgLAP was found to be optimum at pH 8.0 and at 37 degrees C. The substrate profile was slightly different from its homologue in P. falciprum. The activity was also strongly dependent on metal divalent cations, and was inhibited by bestatin, which is a specific inhibitor for metalloprotease. These results indicated that BgLAP played an important role in free amino acid regulation.

  5. Identification and characterization of Paragonimus westermani leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Song, Su-Min; Park, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jin; Kim, Suk-Il; Hong, Yeon-Chul; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2008-09-01

    Paragonimus westermani is a tissue-invading trematode parasite that causes inflammatory lung disease as well as systemic infections including cerebral invasion in carnivorous mammals. While aminopeptidases play important roles in trematodes in the catabolism of host hemoglobin, an essential source of nutrient for the parasite, little is known about aminopeptidase in Paragonimus. Presently, we isolated a cDNA encoding a 58 kDa P. westermani leucine aminopeptidase (PwLAP). Deduced amino acid sequence of PwLAP exhibited significant sequence homology with LAP from Schistosoma spp. and Fasciola hepatica. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant PwLAP protein demonstrated preferential substrate specificity for Leu-NHMec and inhibition by EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, and bestatin, which are conserved characteristics of the M17 family of leucine aminopeptidase. PwLAP exhibited relatively higher enzyme activity in the presence of Mn2+ compared to Schistosoma mansoni LAP. Based on the biochemical properties and immunohistochemical analysis, PwLAP is concluded to represent a leucine aminopeptidase. The enzyme is most likely responsible for the catabolism of host hemoglobin, and, hence, represents a potential target of Paragonimus chemotherapy.

  6. Mechanosensory neurons, cutaneous mechanoreceptors, and putative mechanoproteins.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, M E; Cobo, T; Cobo, J L; Vega, J A

    2012-08-01

    The mammalian skin has developed sensory structures (mechanoreceptors) that are responsible for different modalities of mechanosensitivity like touch, vibration, and pressure sensation. These specialized sensory organs are anatomically and functionally connected to a special subset of sensory neurons called mechanosensory neurons, which electrophysiologically correspond with Aβ fibers. Although mechanosensory neurons and cutaneous mechanoreceptors are rather well known, the biology of the sense of touch still remains poorly understood. Basically, the process of mechanosensitivity requires the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal through the activation of ion channels that gate in response to mechanical stimuli. These ion channels belong primarily to the family of the degenerin/epithelium sodium channels, especially the subfamily acid-sensing ion channels, and to the family of transient receptor potential channels. This review compiles the current knowledge on the occurrence of putative mechanoproteins in mechanosensory neurons and mechanoreceptors, as well as the involvement of these proteins on the biology of touch. Furthermore, we include a section about what the knock-out mice for mechanoproteins are teaching us. Finally, the possibilities for mechanotransduction in mechanoreceptors, and the common involvement of the ion channels, extracellular membrane, and cytoskeleton, are revisited.

  7. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; O'Connor, Timothy K; Bryant, Jessica A; Charkoudian, Louise K; Docherty, Kathryn M; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics.

  8. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  9. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson),…

  10. Basic Backwardness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  11. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  12. Basic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    Instructional materials are provided for a course that covers basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Designed for use in a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners, the course describes applications of these concepts to real-life situations, with an emphasis on applications of…

  13. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  14. Body Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  15. Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Rachel L; Chantranupong, Lynne; Saxton, Robert A; Shen, Kuang; Scaria, Sonia M; Cantor, Jason R; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is a proteogenic amino acid that also regulates many aspects of mammalian physiology, in large part by activating the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase, a master growth controller. Amino acids signal to mTORC1 through the Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Several factors regulate the Rags, including GATOR1, aGTPase-activating protein; GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown function; and Sestrin2, a GATOR2-interacting protein that inhibits mTORC1 signaling. We find that leucine, but not arginine, disrupts the Sestrin2-GATOR2 interaction by binding to Sestrin2 with a dissociation constant of 20 micromolar, which is the leucine concentration that half-maximally activates mTORC1. The leucine-binding capacity of Sestrin2 is required for leucine to activate mTORC1 in cells. These results indicate that Sestrin2 is a leucine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway.

  16. Knockout of leucine aminopeptidase in Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Jia, Honglin; Zheng, Yonghui

    2015-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases of the M17 peptidase family represent ideal drug targets for therapies directed against the pathogens Plasmodium, Babesia and Trypanosoma. Previously, we characterised Toxoplasma gondii leucine aminopeptidase and demonstrated its role in regulating the levels of free amino acids. In this study, we evaluated the potential of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase as a drug target in T. gondii by a knockout method. Existing knockout methods for T. gondii have many drawbacks; therefore, we developed a new technique that takes advantage of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We first chose a Cas9 target site in the gene encoding T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase and then constructed a knockout vector containing Cas9 and the single guide RNA. After transfection, single tachyzoites were cloned in 96-well plates by limiting dilution. Two transfected strains derived from a single clone were cultured in Vero cells, and then subjected to expression analysis by western blotting. The phenotypic analysis revealed that knockout of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase resulted in inhibition of attachment/invasion and replication; both the growth and attachment/invasion capacity of knockout parasites were restored by complementation with a synonymously substituted allele of T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase. Mouse experiments demonstrated that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout somewhat reduced the pathogenicity of T. gondii. An enzymatic activity assay showed that T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout reduced the processing of a leucine aminopeptidase-specific substrate in T. gondii. The absence of leucine aminopeptidase activity could be slightly compensated for in T. gondii. Overall, T. gondii leucine aminopeptidase knockout influenced the growth of T. gondii, but did not completely block parasite development, virulence or enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that leucine aminopeptidase would be useful only as an adjunctive drug target in T. gondii.

  17. Kinetics and conformational stability studies of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, Ana V; Villaseñor, Francisco; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus is a broad specificity N-terminal aminopeptidase that is widely used in pharmaceutical processes where the removal of N-terminal residues in recombinant proteins is required. We previously reported the expression of a heterologous construction of the mature protein fused to a 6-histidine tag that presents a reasonable refolding rate for its use at industrial level. Here, we investigate this recombinant leucine aminopeptidase (rLAP) to explain the gain of activity observed when incubated at 37 °C after its production. Unfolding transitions of rLAP as a function of urea concentration were monitored by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence (FL) spectroscopy exhibiting single transitions by both techniques. Free energy change for unfolding measured by CD and FL spectroscopy are 2.8 ± 0.4 and 3.7 ± 0.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Thermal stability conformation of rLAP is 2.6 ± 0.1 and 6.1 kcal mol(-1) for CD and Nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (Nano-DSC), respectively. Enzyme activity was assessed with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide (L-pNA) as substrate. The catalytic efficiency was 3.87 ± 0.10 min(-1) μM(-1) at 37 °C and pH 8.0. Kinetic and conformation studies show differences between the enzyme native and rLAP; however rLAP is selective and specific to remove N-terminal groups from amino acids.

  18. Education: The Basics. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that education is important, we are confronted daily by discussion of it in the media and by politicians, but how much do we really know about education? "Education: The Basics" is a lively and engaging introduction to education as an academic subject, taking into account both theory and practice. Covering the schooling system, the…

  19. Histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  20. Histochemistry of leucine aminoaphthylamidase (LAN) in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1979-01-01

    The histochemistry of leucine aminonaphthylamidase (LAN) was studied in frozen tissue sections of rainbow trout both in yearling and adult fish. Age of fish had relatively little effect upon the results. The most intense LAN color production was in epithelial cells of midgut, pyloric ceca, hindgut, and in some segments of kidney tubules. Lower levels of LAN were evident in liver cells of Kupffer, and still lower or slight levels of LAN activity were found in blood cells, muscle, nerve, connective tissue, gonad, and pancreas. The results indicate that LAN might be useful in assessing histotoxicity to LAN-rich areas of the body.

  1. Novel leucine ureido derivatives as inhibitors of aminopeptidase N (APN).

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhua; Jin, Kang; Cao, Jiangying; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiaoguang; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-04-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) over expressed on tumor cells, plays a critical role in tumor invasion, metastasis, and tumor angiogenesis. Here we described the design, synthesis and preliminary activity studies of novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) inhibitors. The results showed that compound 8c had the most potent inhibitory activity against APN with the IC50 value to 0.06 ± 0.041 μM, which could be used for further anticancer agent research.

  2. "Leucine aminopeptidase" (neutral arylamidase) in sheep sera: improved resolution with gradient gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Manwell, C; Baker, C M

    1986-01-01

    Electrophoretic resolution of the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is greatly improved by the use of gradients of acrylamide polymer, together with enzyme localisation involving L-alanyl beta-naphthylamide and cobaltous ion. The improved resolution contradicts an earlier claim of the existence of only two patterns of individual variation in the heterogeneity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase", with one pattern completely dominant to the other. While the sheep enzyme is unusual among mammalian serum "leucine aminopeptidases" in its complex heterogeneity, it does conform to the typical mammalian pattern of codominant individual variation. The complexity of sheep serum "leucine aminopeptidase" is useful in the study of sheep evolution.

  3. Micro-trichome as a class I homeodomain-leucine zipper gene regulates multicellular trichome development in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Pan, Jun-Song; Guan, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Bie, Bei-Bei; Wang, Yun-Li; He, Huan-Le; Lian, Hong-Li; Cai, Run

    2015-11-01

    Plant trichomes serve as a highly suitable model for investigating cell differentiation at the single-cell level. The regulatory genes involved in unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana have been intensively studied, but genes regulating multicellular trichome development in plants remain unclear. Here, we characterized Cucumis sativus (cucumber) trichomes as representative multicellular and unbranched structures, and identified Micro-trichome (Mict), using map-based cloning in an F2 segregating population of 7,936 individuals generated from a spontaneous mict mutant. In mict plants, trichomes in both leaves and fruits, are small, poorly developed, and denser than in the wild type. Sequence analysis revealed that a 2,649-bp genomic deletion, spanning the first and second exons, occurred in a plant-specific class I homeodomain-leucine zipper gene. Tissue-specific expression analysis indicated that Mict is strongly expressed in the trichome cells. Transcriptome profiling identified potential targets of Mict including putative homologs of genes known in other systems to regulate trichome development, meristem determinacy, and hormone responsiveness. Phylogenic analysis charted the relationships among putative homologs in angiosperms. Our paper represents initial steps toward understanding the development of multicellular trichomes.

  4. Comparative analysis of pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-DL-leucine (Tanganil) and its two isomers (N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine) on vestibular compensation: Behavioral investigation in the cat.

    PubMed

    Tighilet, Brahim; Leonard, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Lacour, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Head roll tilt, postural imbalance and spontaneous nystagmus are the main static vestibular deficits observed after an acute unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). In the UVL cat model, these deficits are fully compensated over 6 weeks as the result of central vestibular compensation. N-Acetyl-dl-leucine is a drug prescribed in clinical practice for the symptomatic treatment of acute UVL patients. The present study investigated the effects of N-acetyl-dl-leucine on the behavioral recovery after unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) in the cat, and compared the effects of each of its two isomers N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine. Efficacy of these three drug treatments has been evaluated with respect to a placebo group (UVN+saline water) on the global sensorimotor activity (observation grids), the posture control (support surface measurement), the locomotor balance (maximum performance at the rotating beam test), and the spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (recorded in the light). Whatever the parameters tested, the behavioral recovery was strongly and significantly accelerated under pharmacological treatments with N-acetyl-dl-leucine and N-acetyl-L-leucine. In contrast, the N-acetyl-D-leucine isomer had no effect at all on the behavioral recovery, and animals of this group showed the same recovery profile as those receiving a placebo. It is concluded that the N-acetyl-L-leucine isomer is the active part of the racemate component since it induces a significant acceleration of the vestibular compensation process similar (and even better) to that observed under treatment with the racemate component only.

  5. SdAb heterodimer formation using leucine zippers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog-Lee, P. Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAb) are variable domains cloned from camel, llama, or shark heavy chain only antibodies, and are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments. SdAb derived from immunized llamas are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. We hypothesized that the ability to produce heterodimeric sdAb would enable reagents with the robust characteristics of component sdAb, but with dramatically improved overall affinity through increased avidity. Previously we had constructed multimeric sdAb by genetically linking sdAb that bind non-overlapping epitopes on the toxin, ricin. In this work we explored a more flexible approach; the construction of multivalent binding reagents using multimerization domains. We expressed anti-ricin sdAb that recognize different epitopes on the toxin as fusions with differently charged leucine zippers. When the initially produced homodimers are mixed the leucine zipper domains will pair to produce heterodimers. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to confirm heterodimer formation. Surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and fluid array assays were used to characterize the multimer constructs, and evaluate their utility in toxin detection.

  6. Effect of insulin and plasma amino acid concentrations on leucine metabolism in man. Role of substrate availability on estimates of whole body protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, P; Luzi, L; Simonson, D C; Haymond, M; DeFronzo, R A

    1987-01-01

    We examined the effect of insulin and plasma amino acid concentrations on leucine kinetics in 15 healthy volunteers (age 22 +/- 2 yr) using the euglycemic insulin clamp technique and an infusion of [1-14C]leucine. Four different experimental conditions were examined: (a) study one, high insulin with reduced plasma amino acid concentrations; (b) study two, high insulin with maintenance of basal plasma amino acid concentrations; (c) study three, high insulin with elevated plasma amino acid concentrations; and (d) study four, basal insulin with elevated plasma amino acid concentrations. Data were analyzed using both the plasma leucine and alpha-ketoisocaproate (the alpha-ketoacid of leucine) specific activities. In study one total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal (an index of whole body protein synthesis) all decreased (P less than 0.01) regardless of the isotope model utilized. In study two leucine flux did not change, while leucine oxidation increased (P less than 0.01) and nonoxidative leucine disposal was maintained at the basal rate; endogenous leucine flux (an index of whole body protein degradation) decreased (P less than 0.01). In study three total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal all increased significantly (P less than 0.01). In study four total leucine flux, leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal all increased (P less than 0.001), while endogenous leucine flux decreased (P less than 0.001). We conclude that: (a) hyperinsulinemia alone decreases plasma leucine concentration and inhibits endogenous leucine flux (protein breakdown), leucine oxidation, and nonoxidative leucine disposal (protein synthesis); (b) hyperaminoacidemia, whether in combination with hyperinsulinemia or with maintained basal insulin levels decreases endogenous leucine flux and stimulates both leucine oxidation and nonoxidative leucine disposal. PMID:3316280

  7. Long-term leucine induced stimulation of muscle protein synthesis is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 h increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in the neonate, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the corresponding fall in amino acids is prevented. This study aimed to determine whether a continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period...

  8. Differential effects of long-term leucine infusion on tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to promote protein synthesis by activating translation initiation via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Previously, we showed that leucine infusion acutely stimulates protein synthesis in fast-twitch glycolytic muscle of neonatal...

  9. Prolonged stimulation of protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine is unique among the amino acids in its ability to enhance protein synthesis by activating translation initiation (Kimball and Jefferson, 2005). Our laboratory has shown that raising leucine to postprandial levels, whilst keeping all other amino acids at the post absorptive, level acutely st...

  10. Triennial growth symposium: Leucine acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial increases in AA and insulin independently stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of piglets. Leucine is an important mediator of the response to AA. We have shown that the postprandial increase in leucine, but not isoleucine or valine, acutely stimulates muscle protein synth...

  11. Genetically encoded FRET-based nanosensor for in vivo measurement of leucine.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mohd; Abdin, M Z; Nischal, Lata; Kardam, Hemant; Ahmad, Altaf

    2013-12-15

    Besides fundamental role in protein synthesis, leucine has metabolic roles as energy substrates, precursors for synthesis of other amino acids and as a modulator of muscle protein synthesis via the insulin-signaling pathway. Leucine concentration in cell and tissue is temporally dynamic as the metabolism of leucine is regulated through multiple enzymes and transporters. Assessment of cell-type specific activities of transporters and enzymes by physical fractionation is extremely challenging. Therefore, a method of reporting leucine dynamics at the cellular level is highly desirable. Given this, we developed a series of genetically encoded nanosensors for real-time in vivo measurement of leucine at cellular level. A leucine binding periplasmic binding protein (LivK) of Escherichia coli K12 was flanked with CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) and YFP (yellow fluorescent protein) at N-terminus and C-terminus, respectively. The constructed nanosensors allowed in vitro determination of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes in a concentration-dependent manner. These sensors were found to be specific to leucine, and stable to pH-changes within a physiological range. Genetically encoded sensors can be targeted to a specific cell type, and allow dynamic measurement of leucine concentration in bacterial and yeast cells.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, a Chinese l-leucine producing strain.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yongli; Ma, Yuechao; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Xie, Xixian; Chen, Ning

    2016-02-20

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum CP, an industrial l-leucine producing strain in China. The whole genome consists of a circular chromosome and a plasmid. The comparative genomics analysis shows that there are many mutations in the key enzyme coding genes relevant to l-leucine biosynthesis compared to C. glutamicum ATCC 13032.

  13. Leucine Modulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and SIRT1-AMPK Signaling in C2C12 Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chunzi; Curry, Benjamin J.; Brown, Patricia L.; Zemel, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory demonstrate that dietary leucine protects against high fat diet-induced mitochondrial impairments and stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and energy partitioning from adipocytes to muscle cells through SIRT1-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, β-hydroxy-β-methyl butyrate (HMB), a metabolite of leucine, has been reported to activate AMPK synergistically with resveratrol in C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, we hypothesize that leucine-induced activation of SIRT1 and AMPK is the central event that links the upregulated mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Thus, C2C12 myotubes were treated with leucine (0.5 mM), alanine (0.5 mM), valine (0.5 mM), EX527 (SIRT1 inhibitor, 25 μM), and Compound C (AMPK inhibitor, 25 μM) alone or in combination to determine the roles of AMPK and SIRT1 in leucine-modulation of energy metabolism. Leucine significantly increased mitochondrial content, mitochondrial biogenesis-related genes expression, fatty acid oxidation, SIRT1 activity and gene expression, and AMPK phosphorylation in C2C12 myotubes compared to the controls, while EX527 and Compound C markedly attenuated these effects. Furthermore, leucine treatment for 24 hours resulted in time-dependent increases in cellular NAD+, SIRT1 activity, and p-AMPK level, with SIRT1 activation preceding that of AMPK, indicating that leucine activation of SIRT1, rather than AMPK, is the primary event. PMID:25400942

  14. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by leucine is dependent on plasma amino acid availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that a physiological increase in plasma leucine increased translation initiation factor activity during 60- and 120-min leucine infusion. Muscle protein synthesis was stimulated at 60 min but not at 120 min, perhaps due to the decrease (-50%) in plasma essential amino acids (AA). ...

  15. Kinetic Behavior of Leucine and Other Amino Acids Modulating Cognitive Performance via mTOR Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-02

    Acid BBB Transporter Type Structure Leucine L1 Essential Neutral Non-polar (hydrophobic) Branched chain Aspartic Acid Acidic X- Acidic Polar Glutamine...compared with other tissues. • Effects of leucine on other amino acids were analyzed. Those measured were aspartic acid , glutamic acid, serine, histidine

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel soybean gene encoding a leucine-zipper-like protein induced to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ayako; Kanegami, Akemi; Mihara, Michiko; Kojima, Toshio; Shiraiwa, Masakazu; Takahara, Hidenari

    2005-08-15

    To understand molecular responses to salt stress in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), we identified 106 salt-inducible soybean genes that expressed differentially at 72 h after 100 mM NaCl treatment using the cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. The genes were designated as G. max Transcript-Derived Fragments (GmTDFs). Among these genes, we characterized a soybean gene GmTDF-5 that encoded an unknown protein of 367 amino acids. The GmTDF-5 protein was a putative cytosolic protein with two leucine-zipper motifs at the N-terminal and was calculated as 40.7 kDa. Southern blot analysis indicated that GmTDF-5 presents as an intron-less single gene on soybean genome and possibly distributes narrowly throughout the higher plants. By 100 mM NaCl treatment, the gene expression of GmTDF-5 was induced in the stem and lower-expanded leaf, and the amount of mRNA increased 5.1- and 2.0-fold up to 72 h, respectively. Interestingly, GmTDF-5 expression in the upper-leaf appeared dramatically with 10.0-fold increase at 72 h after the salt stress, but not until 48 h. Hyperosmotic pressure (mannitol treatment) and dehydration also caused the increases similar to NaCl treatment in the levels of GmTDF-5 expression. These results suggest that GmTDF-5 might be a novel cytosolic leucine-zipper-like protein functioning in mature organs of soybean shoot against water-potential changes.

  17. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA.

  18. Effect of leucine uptake on hepatic and skeletal muscle gene expression in rats: a microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Wookwang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine by exploring genes with leucine-dependent variability using DNA microarray. [Methods] Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 20) were separated into a HPD (30% High Protein Diet, n = 10) group and a NPD (0% Non Protein Diet, n = 10) group and fed a protein diet for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2-week period, the rats were fasted for 12-16 hours, further separated into subgroups within the HPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) and NPD (Saline, n = 5, Leucine, n = 5) groups and administered with a leucine solution. The liver and muscles were harvested after 2 hours for RNA extraction. RNA purification from the isolated muscles and target gene identification using DNA chip were performed. The target gene was determined based on the results of the DNA chip experiment, and mRNA expression of the target gene was analyzed using Real-Time PCR. [Results] In the skeletal muscle, 27 genes were upregulated while 52 genes were down regulated after leucine administration in the NPD group. In the liver, 160 genes were up-regulated while 126 were down-regulated. The per2 gene was one of the genes with leucine-dependent induction in muscles and liver. [Conclusion] This study was performed to explore the physiological functions of leucine, however, a large number of genes showed variability. Therefore, it was difficult to definitively identify the genes linked with a particular physiological function. Various nutritional effects of leucine were observed. High variability in cytokines, receptors, and various membrane proteins were observed, which suggests that leucine functions as more than a nutrient. The interpretation may depend on investigators’ perspectives, therefore, discussion with relevant experts and the BCAA (Branched-Chain Amino Acids) society may be needed for effective utilization of this data. PMID:26244133

  19. Leucine improves protein nutritional status and regulates hepatic lipid metabolism in calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João Alfredo B; Nishimura, Luciana Sigueta; de Matos-Neto, Emídio Marques; Donato, Jose; Tirapegui, Julio

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have highlighted the potential of leucine supplementation for the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Caloric restriction is a common approach to improve the health in diabetic and obese subjects. However, very few studies assessed the effects of leucine supplementation in calorie-restricted animals. Rats were subjected to a 30% calorie-restricted diet for 6 weeks to study the effects of leucine supplementation on protein status markers and lipid metabolism. Caloric restriction reduced the body weight. However, increased leucine intake preserved body lean mass and protein mass and improved protein anabolism as indicated by the increased circulating levels of albumin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and the liver expression of albumin and IGF-1 messenger RNA. Leucine supplementation also increased the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and leptin but did not affect the tumour necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 concentrations. Ketone bodies were increased in rats consuming a leucine-rich diet, but we observed no changes in cholesterol or triglycerides concentrations. Caloric restriction reduced the liver expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and glucose-6-phosphatase, whereas leucine supplementation increased the liver expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1. A leucine-rich diet during caloric restriction preserved whole body protein mass and improved markers of protein anabolism. In addition, leucine modulated the hepatic lipid metabolism. These results indicate that increased leucine intake may be useful in preventing excessive protein waste in conditions of large weight loss.

  20. Glutamate formation via the leucine-to-glutamate pathway of rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schachter, David; Buteau, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The leucine-to-glutamate (Leu→Glu) pathway, which metabolizes the carbon atoms of l-leucine to form l-glutamate, was studied by incubation of rat tissue segments with l-[U-(14)C]leucine and estimation of the [(14)C]glutamate formed. Metabolism of the leucine carbon chain occurs in most rat tissues, but maximal activity of the Leu→Glu pathway for glutamate formation is limited to the thoracic aorta and pancreas. In rat aorta, the Leu→Glu pathway functions to relax the underlying smooth muscle; its functions in the pancreas are unknown. This report characterizes the Leu→Glu pathway of rat pancreas and develops methods to examine its functions. Pancreatic segments effect net formation of glutamate on incubation with l-leucine, l-glutamine, or a mix of 18 other plasma amino acids at their concentrations in normal rat plasma. Glutamate formed from leucine remains mainly in the tissue, whereas that from glutamine enters the medium. The pancreatic Leu→Glu pathway uses the leucine carbons for net glutamate formation; the α-amino group is not used; the stoichiometry is as follows: 1 mol of leucine yields 2 mol of glutamate (2 leucine carbons per glutamate) plus 2 mol of CO2. Comparison of the Leu→Glu pathway in preparations of whole pancreatic segments, isolated acini, and islets of Langerhans localizes it in the acini; relatively high activity is found in cultures of the AR42J cell line and very little in the INS-1 832/13 cell line. Pancreatic tissue glutamate concentration is homeostatically regulated in the range of ∼1-3 μmol/g wet wt. l-Valine and leucine ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters inhibit the Leu→Glu pathway without decreasing tissue total glutamate.

  1. Leucine supplementation via drinking water reduces atherosclerotic lesions in apoE null mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dai, Xiao-yan; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Ge-xin; Wang, Xian; Xu, Ming-jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent evidence suggests that the essential amino acid leucine may be involved in systemic cholesterol metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine supplementation on the development of atherosclerosis in apoE null mice. Methods: ApoE null mice were fed with chow supplemented with leucine (1.5% w/v) in drinking water for 8 week. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were examined using Oil Red O staining. Plasma lipoprotein-cholesterol levels were measured with fast protein liquid chromatography. Hepatic gene expression was detected using real-time PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Leucine supplementation resulted in 57.6% reduction of aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in apoE null mice, accompanied by 41.2% decrease of serum LDL-C levels and 40.2% increase of serum HDL-C levels. The body weight, food intake and blood glucose level were not affected by leucine supplementation. Furthermore, leucine supplementation increased the expression of Abcg5 and Abcg8 (that were involved in hepatic cholesterol efflux) by 1.28- and 0.86-fold, respectively, and significantly increased their protein levels. Leucine supplementation also increased the expression of Srebf1, Scd1 and Pgc1b (that were involved in hepatic triglyceride metabolism) by 3.73-, 1.35- and 1.71-fold, respectively. Consequently, leucine supplementation resulted in 51.77% reduction of liver cholesterol content and 2.2-fold increase of liver triglyceride content. Additionally, leucine supplementation did not affect the serum levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-12, but markedly decreased the serum level of MCP-1. Conclusion: Leucine supplementation effectively attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE null mice by improving the plasma lipid profile and reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26687933

  2. Inflation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  3. Structural basis for leucine-rich nuclear export signal recognition by CRM1

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xiuhua; Biswas, Anindita; Süel, Katherine E.; Jackson, Laurie K.; Martinez, Rita; Gu, Hongmei; Chook, Yuh Min

    2009-07-10

    CRM1 (also known as XPO1 and exportin 1) mediates nuclear export of hundreds of proteins through the recognition of the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (LR-NES). Here we present the 2.9 {angstrom} structure of CRM1 bound to snurportin 1 (SNUPN). Snurportin 1 binds CRM1 in a bipartite manner by means of an amino-terminal LR-NES and its nucleotide-binding domain. The LR-NES is a combined {alpha}-helical-extended structure that occupies a hydrophobic groove between two CRM1 outer helices. The LR-NES interface explains the consensus hydrophobic pattern, preference for intervening electronegative residues and inhibition by leptomycin B. The second nuclear export signal epitope is a basic surface on the snurportin 1 nucleotide-binding domain, which binds an acidic patch on CRM1 adjacent to the LR-NES site. Multipartite recognition of individually weak nuclear export signal epitopes may be common to CRM1 substrates, enhancing CRM1 binding beyond the generally low affinity LR-NES. Similar energetic construction is also used in multipartite nuclear localization signals to provide broad substrate specificity and rapid evolution in nuclear transport.

  4. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by prolonged parenteral infusion of leucine is dependent on amino acid availability in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine, stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonates. Previously, we showed that a 1-h infusion of leucine increased protein synthesis, but this response was not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced decrease in amino acids was prevented....

  5. Stimulation of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by long-term infusion of leucine is amino acid dependent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusing leucine for 1 hr increases skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs, but this is not sustained for 2 h unless the leucine-induced fall in amino acids is prevented. We aimed to determine whether continuous leucine infusion can stimulate protein synthesis for a prolonged period whe...

  6. Residues threonine 346 and leucine 352 are critical for the proper function of Bacillus kaustophilus leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chi, Meng-Chun; Huang, Hsien-Ben; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Liang, Wan-Chi; Lin, Long-Liu

    2006-07-01

    The importance of Thr-346 and Leu-352 residues in Bacillus kaustophilus leucine aminopeptidase (BkLAP) was explored by site-directed mutagenesis. The impact of substitutions at these positions was evaluated with His6-BkLAP fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. Substitution of Thr-346 with Tyr, Arg, and Leu, respectively, resulted in a dramatic reduction in LAP activity. A complete loss of activity was observed in L352E and L352R variants with the exception of L352 V, which retained approximately 60% of the wild-type activity. Zinc content analysis and protein modeling suggested that Thr-346 and Leu-352 of BkLAP play a role in maintaining the coordination environment for the zinc-binding residues.

  7. Functional diversification within the family of B-GATA transcription factors through the leucine-leucine-methionine domain.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Carina; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Ranftl, Quirin L; Mayer, Klaus F X; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-09-01

    The transcription of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GATA transcription factors GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and GNC-LIKE (GNL)/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 is controlled by several growth regulatory signals including light and the phytohormones auxin, cytokinin, and gibberellin. To date, GNC and GNL have been attributed functions in the control of germination, greening, flowering time, floral development, senescence, and floral organ abscission. GNC and GNL belong to the 11-member family of B-class GATA transcription factors that are characterized to date solely by their high sequence conservation within the GATA DNA-binding domain. The degree of functional conservation among the various B-class GATA family members is not understood. Here, we identify and examine B-class GATAs from Arabidopsis, tomato (Solanum lycopersicon), Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon), and barley (Hordeum vulgare). We find that B-class GATAs from these four species can be subdivided based on their short or long N termini and the presence of the 13-amino acid C-terminal leucine-leucine-methionine (LLM) domain with the conserved motif LLM. Through overexpression analyses and by complementation of a gnc gnl double mutant, we provide evidence that the length of the N terminus may not allow distinguishing between the different B-class GATAs at the functional level. In turn, we find that the presence and absence of the LLM domain in the overexpressors has differential effects on hypocotyl elongation, leaf shape, and petiole length, as well as on gene expression. Thus, our analyses identify the LLM domain as an evolutionarily conserved domain that determines B-class GATA factor identity and provides a further subclassification criterion for this transcription factor family.

  8. Positional Scanning Identifies the Molecular Determinants of a High Affinity Multi-Leucine Inhibitor for Furin and PACE4.

    PubMed

    Małuch, Izabela; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Ly, Kévin; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold A; Prahl, Adam; Day, Robert

    2017-03-24

    The proprotein convertase family of enzymes includes seven endoproteases with significant redundancy in their cleavage activity. We previously described the peptide Ac-LLLLRVK-Amba that displays potent inhibitory effects on both PACE4 and prostate cancer cell lines proliferation. Herein, the molecular determinants for PACE4 and furin inhibition were investigated by positional scanning using peptide libraries that substituted its leucine core with each natural amino acid. We determined that the incorporation of basic amino acids led to analogues with improved inhibitory potency toward both enzymes, whereas negatively charged residues significantly reduced it. All the remaining amino acids were in general well tolerated, with the exemption of the P6 position. However, not all of the potent PACE4 inhibitors displayed antiproliferative activity. The best analogues were obtained by the incorporation of the Ile residue at the P5 and P6 positions. These substitutions led to inhibitors with increased PACE4 selectivity and potent antiproliferative effects.

  9. Leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair of injured tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Gonçalves, Dawit A; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-09-29

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β receptor type I (TβR-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of TβR-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases.

  10. Leucine deprivation inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells via fatty acid synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chunxia; Yin, Hongkun; Yu, Junjie; Chen, Shanghai; Fang, Jing; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Substantial studies on fatty acid synthase (FASN) have focused on its role in regulating lipid metabolism and researchers have a great interest in treating cancer with dietary manipulation of amino acids. In the current study, we found that leucine deprivation caused the FASN-dependent anticancer effect. Here we showed that leucine deprivation inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In an in vivo tumor xenograft model, the leucine-free diet suppressed the growth of human breast cancer tumors and triggered widespread apoptosis of the cancer cells. Further study indicated that leucine deprivation decreased expression of lipogenic gene FASN in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of FASN or supplementation of palmitic acid (the product of FASN action) blocked the effects of leucine deprivation on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, leucine deprivation suppressed the FASN expression via regulating general control non-derepressible (GCN)2 and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C (SREBP1C). Taken together, our study represents proof of principle that anticancer effects can be obtained with strategies to deprive tumors of leucine via suppressing FASN expression, which provides important insights in prevention of breast cancer via metabolic intervention. PMID:27579768

  11. Increased IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in response to leucine deprivation is mediated by CK2 and PKC.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Niyati; Biggar, Kyle; Shehab, Majida Abu; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng; Jansson, Thomas; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2016-04-15

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), secreted by fetal liver, is a key regulator of IGF-I bioavailability and fetal growth. IGFBP-1 phosphorylation decreases IGF-I bioavailability and diminishes its growth-promoting effects. Growth-restricted fetuses have decreased levels of circulating essential amino acids. We recently showed that IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation (pSer101/119/169) in response to leucine deprivation is regulated via activation of the amino acid response (AAR) in HepG2 cells. Here we investigated nutrient-sensitive protein kinases CK2/PKC/PKA in mediating IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in leucine deprivation. We demonstrated that leucine deprivation stimulated CK2 activity (enzymatic assay) and induced IGFBP-1 phosphorylation (immunoblotting/MRM-MS). Inhibition (pharmacological/siRNA) of CK2/PKC, but not PKA, prevented IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation in leucine deprivation. PKC inhibition also prevented leucine deprivation-stimulated CK2 activity. Functionally, leucine deprivation decreased IGF-I-induced-IGF-1R autophosphorylation when CK2/PKC were not inhibited. Our data strongly support that PKC promotes leucine deprivation-induced IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation via CK2 activation, mechanistically linking decreased amino acid availability and reduced fetal growth.

  12. L-Leucine for gold nanoparticles synthesis and their cytotoxic effects evaluation.

    PubMed

    Berghian-Grosan, Camelia; Olenic, Liliana; Katona, Gabriel; Perde-Schrepler, Maria; Vulcu, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    This work reports the preparation of water-soluble leucine capped gold nanoparticles by two single-step synthesis methods. The first procedure involves a citrate reduction approach where the citrate is used as reducing agent and leucine as capping/stabilizing agent. Different sizes of gold nanoparticles, citrate reduced and stabilized by leucine, Leu-AuNPs-C, with the mean diameters in the range of 21-56 nm, were obtained by varying the macroscopic parameters such as: concentration of the gold precursor solution, Au (III):citrate molar ratio and leucine pH. In the second procedure, leucine acts both as reducing and stabilizing agent, allowing us to obtain spherical gold nanoparticles, Leu-AuNPs, with a majority of 80 % (with the mean diameter of 63 nm). This proves that leucine is an appropriate reductant for the formation of water-soluble and stable gold nanoparticles colloids. The characterization of the leucine coated gold nanoparticles was carried out by TEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR analysis. The cytotoxic effect of Leu-AuNPs-C and Leu-AuNPs was also evaluated.

  13. Purification and identification of a novel leucine aminopeptidase from Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis.

    PubMed

    Cahan, Rivka; Hetzroni, Efrat; Nisnevitch, Marina; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

    2007-11-01

    A novel leucine aminopeptidase was purified from a Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) culture. The purification stages included heating the concentrated supernatant to 65 degrees C for 90 min, anion-exchange chromatography by DEAE cellulose, and hydrophobic chromatography by phenyl Sepharose. The specific activity of leucine aminopeptidase after the hydrophobic chromatography increased by 215.5-fold and the yield was 16%. The molecular weight of the active enzyme was 59 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 59-kDa leucine aminopeptidase revealed that this protein has at least 41% homology with the cytosol leucine aminopeptidase produced by Bacillus cereus. Maximal leucine aminopeptidase activity occurred at 65 degrees C, pH 10 toward leucine as the amino acid terminus. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by bestatin, dithiothreitol, and 1,10-phenanthroline, indicating that the enzyme might be considered as a metallo-aminopeptidase that has disulfide bonds at the catalytic site or at a region that influences its configuration. Examination of the purified leucine aminopeptidase's effect on the activation of the protoxin Cyt1Aa from Bti revealed that when it acts synergistically with Bti endogenous proteases, it has only a minor role in the processing of Cyt1Aa into an active toxin.

  14. Lack of protective efficacy in buffaloes vaccinated with Fasciola gigantica leucine aminopeptidase and peroxiredoxin recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Raina, O K; Nagar, Gaurav; Varghese, Anju; Prajitha, G; Alex, Asha; Maharana, B R; Joshi, P

    2011-06-01

    Gene coding for leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), a metalloprotease, was identified in the tropical liver fluke, Fasciola gigantica; that on sequence analysis showed a close homology (98.6%) with leucine aminopeptidase of the temperate liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica. The recombinant leucine aminopeptidase protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. F. gigantica peroxiredoxin, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger and an immunomodulating protein, was also cloned and expressed in E. coli. A vaccination trial in buffaloes was conducted with these two recombinant proteins, with 150 and 300 μg of leucine aminopeptidase and a cocktail of 150 μg each of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase and peroxiredoxin in three groups, respectively. Both Th1- and Th2-associated humoral immune responses were elicited to immunization with these antigens. A challenge study with 400 metacercariae did not show a significant protection in terms of reduction in the worm burden (8.4%) or anti-fecundity/embryonation effect in the immunized groups, as to the non-immunized control animals. Our observations in this buffalo vaccination trial are contrary to the earlier promise shown by leucine aminopeptidase of F. hepatica as a leading candidate vaccine molecule. Identification of leucine aminopeptidase gene and evaluation of the protein for its protective efficacy in buffaloes is the first scientific report on this protein in F. gigantica.

  15. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  16. Design and characterization of short antimicrobial peptides using leucine zipper templates with selectivity towards microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Mishra, Nripendra N; Shukla, Praveen K; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2014-11-01

    Design of antimicrobial peptides with selective activity towards microorganisms is an important step towards the development of new antimicrobial agents. Leucine zipper sequence has been implicated in cytotoxic activity of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides; moreover, this motif has been utilized for the design of novel antimicrobial peptides with modulated cytotoxicity. To understand further the impact of substitution of amino acids at 'a' and/or 'd' position of a leucine zipper sequence of an antimicrobial peptides on its antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties four short peptides (14-residue) were designed on the basis of a leucine zipper sequence without or with replacement of leucine residues in its 'a' and 'd' positions with D-leucine or alanine or proline residue. The original short leucine zipper peptide (SLZP) and its D-leucine substituted analog, DLSA showed comparable activity against the tested Gram-positive and negative bacteria and the fungal strains. The alanine substituted analog (ASA) though showed appreciable activity against the tested bacteria, it showed to some extent lower activity against the tested fungi. However, the proline substituted analog (PSA) showed lower activity against the tested bacterial or fungal strains. Interestingly, DLSA, ASA and PSA showed significantly lower cytotoxicity than SLZP against both human red blood cells (hRBCs) and murine 3T3 cells. Cytotoxic and bactericidal properties of these peptides matched with peptide-induced damage/permeabilization of mammalian cells and bacteria or their mimetic lipid vesicles suggesting cell membrane could be the target of these peptides. As evidenced by tryptophan fluorescence and acrylamide quenching studies the peptides showed similarities either in interaction or in their localization within the bacterial membrane mimetic negatively charged lipid vesicles. Only SLZP showed localization inside the mammalian membrane mimetic zwitterionic lipid vesicles. The results show

  17. Enhanced Incorporation of 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Unit into Biosynthetic Polyhydroxyalkanoate Using Leucine as a Precursor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha PHB-4 expressing Pseudomonas sp. 61-3 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes PHA copolymer containing 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and a small amount (0.5 mol%) of 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV) from fructose as a carbon source. In this study, enhanced incorporation of 3H4MV into PHA was investigated using branched amino acid leucine as a precursor of 3H4MV. Leucine has the same carbon backbone as 3H4MV and is expected to be a natural and self-producible precursor. We found that the incorporation of 3H4MV was enhanced by the supplementation of excess amount (10 g/L) of leucine in the culture medium. This finding indicates that 3H4MV can be derived from leucine. To increase metabolic flux to leucine biosynthesis in the host strain by eliminating the feedback inhibition, the cells were subjected to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG) mutagenesis and leucine analog resistant mutants were generated. The mutants showed statistically higher 3H4MV fraction than the parent strain without supplementing leucine. Additionally, by supplying excess amount of leucine, the mutants synthesized 3HB-based PHA copolymer containing 3.1 mol% 3H4MV and 1.2 mol% 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) as minor constituents, which significantly affected the thermal properties of the copolymer. This study demonstrates that it is possible to enhance the monomer supply of 3H4MV into PHA by manipulating leucine metabolism. PMID:21906338

  18. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  19. A mutation within the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Arabidopsis disease resistance gene RPS5 partially suppresses multiple bacterial and downy mildew resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R F; Henk, A; Mowery, P; Holub, E; Innes, R W

    1998-01-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants is mediated by several distinct families of functionally variable but structurally related disease resistance (R) genes. The largest family is defined by the presence of a putative nucleotide binding domain and 12 to 21 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). The function of these LRRs has not been defined, but they are speculated to bind pathogen-derived ligands. We have isolated a mutation in the Arabidopsis RPS5 gene that indicates that the LRR region may interact with other plant proteins. The rps5-1 mutation causes a glutamate-to-lysine substitution in the third LRR and partially compromises the function of several R genes that confer bacterial and downy mildew resistance. The third LRR is relatively well conserved, and we speculate that it may interact with a signal transduction component shared by multiple R gene pathways. PMID:9724691

  20. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M.

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  1. Computer-aided design and activity prediction of leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; Sokalski, W. A.; Kafarski, P.

    2000-08-01

    The Ligand Design (LUDI) approach has been used in order to design leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors, predict their activity and analyze their interactions with the enzyme. The investigation was based on the crystal structure of bovine lens leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) complexed with its inhibitor - the phosphonic acid analogue of leucine (LeuP). More than 50 potential leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors have been obtained, including the most potent aminophosphonic LAP inhibitors with experimentally known activity, which have been the subject of more detailed studies. A reasonable agreement between theoretical and experimental activities has been obtained for most of the studied inhibitors. Our results confirm that LUDI is a powerful tool for the design of enzyme inhibitors as well as in the prediction of their activity. In addition, for inhibitor-active site interactions dominated by the electrostatic effects it is possible to improve binding energy estimates by using a more accurate description of inhibitor charge distribution.

  2. Leucine incorporation into the membranellar bands of regenerating and nonregenerating stentor.

    PubMed

    de Terra, N

    1966-07-29

    Autoradiographs of membranellar bands isolated from regenerating and nonregenerating stentors labeled with tritiated leucine indicate that the synthesis of proteins of the oral apparatus is continuous in Stentor and is not initiated at the time of regeneration.

  3. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Karin M.; Church, Matthew J.; Doggett, Joseph K.; Karl, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using 14C-bicarbonate and 3H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0–175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (Ek) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of 14C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar Ek values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using 3H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should be

  4. Differential Assimilation of Inorganic Carbon and Leucine by Prochlorococcus in the Oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Karin M; Church, Matthew J; Doggett, Joseph K; Karl, David M

    2015-01-01

    The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using (14)C-bicarbonate and (3)H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m) on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a 3-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ∼7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratios for the non-pigmented bacteria (NPB) were not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the NPB, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (E k) for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of (14)C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF), co-occurring at the DCM, had similar E k values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using (3)H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or light, and this should

  5. Leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1 (LETM1) forms a Ca2+/H+ antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Juan; Fu, Zhenglin; Ji, Yanli; Guan, Xiangchen; Guo, Shang; Ding, Zhanyu; Yang, Xue; Cong, Yao; Shen, Yuequan

    2016-01-01

    Leucine zipper-EF-hand-containing transmembrane protein1 (LETM1) is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane and is defective in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. LETM1 contains only one transmembrane helix, but it behaves as a putative transporter. Our data shows that LETM1 knockdown or overexpression robustly increases or decreases mitochondrial Ca2+ level in HeLa cells, respectively. Also the residue Glu221 of mouse LETM1 is identified to be necessary for Ca2+ flux. The mutation of Glu221 to glutamine abolishes the Ca2+-transport activity of LETM1 in cells. Furthermore, the purified LETM1 exhibits Ca2+/H+ anti-transport activity, and the activity is enhanced as the proton gradient is increased. More importantly, electron microscopy studies reveal a hexameric LETM1 with a central cavity, and also, observe two different conformational states under alkaline and acidic conditions, respectively. Our results indicate that LETM1 is a Ca2+/H+ antiporter and most likely responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ output. PMID:27669901

  6. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Modulates Retinoic Acid-Induced Neuronal Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Cathrin; Paus, Marie; Frey, Katharina; Schmid, Ramona; Kohl, Zacharias; Mennerich, Detlev; Winkler, Jürgen; Gillardon, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most prevalent cause of Parkinson's disease, however, little is known about the biological function of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is expressed in neural precursor cells suggesting a role in neurodevelopment. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, differential gene expression profiling revealed a faster silencing of pluripotency-associated genes, like Nanog, Oct4, and Lin28, during retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of LRRK2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells compared to wildtype cultures. By contrast, expression of neurotransmitter receptors and neurotransmitter release was increased in LRRK2+/− cultures indicating that LRRK2 promotes neuronal differentiation. Consistently, the number of neural progenitor cells was higher in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult LRRK2-deficient mice. Alterations in phosphorylation of the putative LRRK2 substrates, translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and moesin, do not appear to be involved in altered differentiation, rather there is indirect evidence that a regulatory signaling network comprising retinoic acid receptors, let-7 miRNA and downstream target genes/mRNAs may be affected in LRRK2-deficient stem cells in culture. Conclusion/Significance Parkinson's disease-linked LRRK2 mutations that associated with enhanced kinase activity may affect retinoic acid receptor signaling during neurodevelopment and/or neuronal maintenance as has been shown in other mouse models of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21695257

  7. The Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Blasticidin S Enters Mammalian Cells via Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Protein 8D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clarissa C.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Sabatini, David M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing 8 (LRRC8) proteins have been identified as putative receptors involved in lymphocyte development and adipocyte differentiation. They remain poorly characterized, and no specific function has been assigned to them. There is no consensus on how this family of proteins might function because homology searches suggest that members of the LRRC8 family act not as plasma membrane receptors, but rather as channels that mediate cell-cell signaling. Here we provide experimental evidence that supports a role for LRRC8s in the transport of small molecules. We show that LRRC8D is a mammalian protein required for the import of the antibiotic blasticidin S. We characterize localization and topology of LRRC8A and LRRC8D and demonstrate that LRRC8D interacts with LRRC8A, LRRC8B, and LRRC8C. Given the suggested involvement in solute transport, our results support a model in which LRRC8s form one or more complexes that may mediate cell-cell communication by transporting small solutes. PMID:24782309

  8. Toddlers' Duration of Attention toward Putative Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2011-01-01

    Although individual differences in reactions to novelty in the toddler years have been consistently linked to risk of developing anxious behavior, toddlers' attention toward a novel, putatively threatening stimulus while in the presence of other enjoyable activities has rarely been examined as a precursor to such risk. The current study examined…

  9. Relationships between leucine and the pancreatic exocrine function for improving starch digestibility in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Liu, Y; Liu, S M; Xu, M; Yu, Z P; Wang, X; Cao, Y C; Yao, J H

    2015-04-01

    Four Holstein heifers (215 ± 7 kg; means ± SD), fitted with one pancreatic pouch, duodenal re-entrant cannulas, and duodenal infusion catheters, were used in this experiment. In phase 1, the 24-h profile of pancreatic fluid was determined. Pancreatic fluid flow peaked 1h after feeding, but peaks of similar magnitude also occurred before the morning feed, necessitating 24-h collection of pancreatic fluid to estimate daily excretion. In phase 2, the effects of duodenal infusions of 0, 10, 20, or 30 g of leucine on pancreatic fluid flow were determined in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The leucine was infused for 12h in 2,500 mL of the infusate, and samples of pancreatic fluid and jugular blood were collected in 1-h intervals from the beginning of the infusion for 36 h. The results showed that the secretion rate of pancreatic fluid (mL/h) was significantly higher in 10-g leucine group than the other groups (mL/h). Protein concentration (mg/mL) in pancreatic fluid was elevated proportional to the amount of leucine infused. Leucine infusions increased both the concentration (U/mL) and secretion rate (U/h) of α-amylase. Infusion of 10 g of leucine also increased the secretion rates (U/h) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and lipase, but did not change their concentrations. No significant effects of leucine infusions on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were found. The results indicate that leucine could act as a nutrient signal to stimulate α-amylase production and pancreatic exocrine function in dairy heifers.

  10. Leucine induced dephosphorylation of Sestrin2 promotes mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Scot R; Gordon, Bradley S; Moyer, Jenna E; Dennis, Michael D; Jefferson, Leonard S

    2016-08-01

    The studies described herein were designed to explore the role of Sestrin2 in mediating the selective action of leucine to activate mTORC1. The results demonstrate that Sestrin2 is a phosphoprotein and that its phosphorylation state is responsive to the availability of leucine, but not other essential amino acids. Moreover, leucine availability-induced alterations in Sestrin2 phosphorylation correlated temporally and dose dependently with the activation state of mTORC1, there being a reciprocal relationship between the degree of phosphorylation of Sestrin2 and the extent of repression of mTORC1. With leucine deprivation, Sestrin2 became more highly phosphorylated and interacted more strongly with proteins of the GATOR2 complex. Notably, in cells lacking the protein kinase ULK1, the activation state of mTORC1 was elevated in leucine-deficient medium, such that the effect of re-addition of the amino acid was blunted. In contrast, overexpression of ULK1 led to hyperphosphorylation of Sestrin2 and enhanced its interaction with GATOR2. Neither rapamycin nor Torin2 had any effect on Sestrin2 phosphorylation, suggesting that leucine deprivation-induced repression of mTORC1 was not responsible for the action of ULK1 on Sestrin2. Mass spectrometry analysis of Sestrin2 revealed three phosphorylation sites that are conserved across mammalian species. Mutation of the three sites to phospho-mimetic amino acids in exogenously expressed Sestrin2 promoted its interaction with GATOR2 and dramatically repressed mTORC1 even in the presence of leucine. Overall, the results support a model in which leucine selectively promotes dephosphorylation of Sestrin2, causing it to dissociate from and thereby activate GATOR2, leading to activation of mTORC1.

  11. Isolation and characterization of awamori yeast mutants with L-leucine accumulation that overproduce isoamyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Hashida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nasuno, Ryo; Ohashi, Masataka; Iha, Tomoya; Nezuo, Maiko; Tsukahara, Masatoshi

    2015-02-01

    Awamori shochu is a traditional distilled alcoholic beverage made from steamed rice in Okinawa, Japan. Although it has a unique aroma that is distinguishable from that of other types of shochu, no studies have been reported on the breeding of awamori yeasts. In yeast, isoamyl alcohol (i-AmOH), known as the key flavor of bread, is mainly produced from α-ketoisocaproate in the pathway of L-leucine biosynthesis, which is regulated by end-product inhibition of α-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS). Here, we isolated mutants resistant to the L-leucine analog 5,5,5-trifluoro-DL-leucine (TFL) derived from diploid awamori yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular L-leucine, and among them, one mutant overproduced i-AmOH in awamori brewing. This mutant carried an allele of the LEU4 gene encoding the Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variant IPMS, which is less sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-leucine. Interestingly, we found that either of the constituent mutations (LEU4(S542F) and LEU4(A551V)) resulted in the TFL tolerance of yeast cells and desensitization to L-leucine feedback inhibition of IPMS, leading to intracellular L-leucine accumulation. Homology modeling also suggested that L-leucine binding was drastically inhibited in the Ser542Phe, Ala551Val, and Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variants due to steric hindrance in the cavity of IPMS. As we expected, awamori yeast cells expressing LEU4(S542F), LEU4(A551V), and LEU4(S542F/A551V) showed a prominent increase in extracellular i-AmOH production, compared with that of cells carrying the vector only. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of novel awamori yeasts to expand the diversity of awamori taste and flavor.

  12. Metabolic mechanism for L-leucine-induced metabolome to eliminate Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed

    Du, Chao-Chao; Yang, Manjun; Li, Min-Yi; Yang, Jun; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2017-03-07

    Crucial metabolites that modulate hosts' metabolome to eliminate bacterial pathogens have been documented, but the metabolic mechanisms are largely unknown. The present study explores the metabolic mechanism for L-leucine-induced metabolome to eliminate Streptococcus iniae in tilapia. GC-MS based metabolomics was used to investigate tilapia liver metabolic profile in the presence of exogenous L-leucine. Thirty-seven metabolites of differential abundance were determined, and eleven metabolic pathways were enriched. Pattern recognition analysis identified serine and proline as crucial metabolites, which are the two metabolites identified in survived tilapias during S. iniae infection, suggesting the two metabolites play crucial roles in L-leucine-induced elimination of the pathogen by the host. Exogenous L-serine reduces mortality of tilapias infected by S. iniae, providing a robust proof for supporting the conclusion. Furthermore, exogenous serine elevates expression of genes Il-1β and Il-8 in tilapia spleen, but not TNFα, CXCR4 and Mx, suggesting the metabolite promotes a phagocytosis role of macrophages, which is consistent with the finding that L-leucine promotes macrophages to kill both Gram-positive and negative bacterial pathogens. Therefore, the ability of phagocytosis enhanced by exogenous L-leucine is partly attributed to elevation of serine. These results demonstrate a metabolic mechanism by which exogenous L-leucine modulates tilapias' metabolome to enhance innate immunity and eliminate pathogens.

  13. Structural basis for leucine sensing by the Sestrin2-mTORC1 pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Saxton, Robert A.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Wolfson, Rachel L.; ...

    2015-11-19

    Eukaryotic cells coordinate growth with the availability of nutrients through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a master growth regulator. Leucine is of particular importance and activates mTORC1 via the Rag GTPases and their regulators GATOR1 and GATOR2. Sestrin2 interacts with GATOR2 and is a leucine sensor. We present the 2.7-Å crystal structure of Sestrin2 in complex with leucine. Leucine binds through a single pocket that coordinates its charged functional groups and confers specificity for the hydrophobic side chain. A loop encloses leucine and forms a lid-latch mechanism required for binding. A structure-guided mutation in Sestrin2 that decreases its affinity for leucinemore » leads to a concomitant increase in the leucine concentration required for mTORC1 activation in cells. Lastly, these results provide a structural mechanism of amino acid sensing by the mTORC1 pathway.« less

  14. Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) Domains Containing Intervening Motifs in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Norio; Miyashita, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    LRRs (leucine rich repeats) are present in over 14,000 proteins. Non-LRR, island regions (IRs) interrupting LRRs are widely distributed. The present article reviews 19 families of LRR proteins having non-LRR IRs (LRR@IR proteins) from various plant species. The LRR@IR proteins are LRR-containing receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs), LRR-containing receptor-like proteins (LRR-RLPs), TONSOKU/BRUSHY1, and MJK13.7; the LRR-RLKs are homologs of TMK1/Rhg4, BRI1, PSKR, PSYR1, Arabidopsis At1g74360, and RPK2, while the LRR-RLPs are those of Cf-9/Cf-4, Cf-2/Cf-5, Ve, HcrVf, RPP27, EIX1, clavata 2, fascinated ear2, RLP2, rice Os10g0479700, and putative soybean disease resistance protein. The LRRs are intersected by single, non-LRR IRs; only the RPK2 homologs have two IRs. In most of the LRR-RLKs and LRR-RLPs, the number of repeat units in the preceding LRR block (N1) is greater than the number of the following block (N2); N1 » N2 in which N1 is variable in the homologs of individual families, while N2 is highly conserved. The five families of the LRR-RLKs except for the RPK2 family show N1 = 8 − 18 and N2 = 3 − 5. The nine families of the LRR-RLPs show N1 = 12 − 33 and N2 = 4; while N1 = 6 and N2 = 4 for the rice Os10g0479700 family and the N1 = 4 − 28 and N2 = 4 for the soybean protein family. The rule of N1 » N2 might play a common, significant role in ligand interaction, dimerization, and/or signal transduction of the LRR-RLKs and the LRR-RLPs. The structure and evolution of the LRR domains with non-LRR IRs and their proteins are also discussed. PMID:24970139

  15. How to find a leucine in a haystack? Structure, ligand recognition and regulation of leucine-aspartic acid (LD) motifs.

    PubMed

    Alam, Tanvir; Alazmi, Meshari; Gao, Xin; Arold, Stefan T

    2014-06-15

    LD motifs (leucine-aspartic acid motifs) are short helical protein-protein interaction motifs that have emerged as key players in connecting cell adhesion with cell motility and survival. LD motifs are required for embryogenesis, wound healing and the evolution of multicellularity. LD motifs also play roles in disease, such as in cancer metastasis or viral infection. First described in the paxillin family of scaffolding proteins, LD motifs and similar acidic LXXLL interaction motifs have been discovered in several other proteins, whereas 16 proteins have been reported to contain LDBDs (LD motif-binding domains). Collectively, structural and functional analyses have revealed a surprising multivalency in LD motif interactions and a wide diversity in LDBD architectures. In the present review, we summarize the molecular basis for function, regulation and selectivity of LD motif interactions that has emerged from more than a decade of research. This overview highlights the intricate multi-level regulation and the inherently noisy and heterogeneous nature of signalling through short protein-protein interaction motifs.

  16. Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide (LRAP) Uptake by Cementoblast Requires Flotillin-1 Mediated Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luciane; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; de Luciane Martins, Em Nome; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Casati, Márcio Zaffalon; Nociti, Francisco Humberto

    2017-03-01

    Basic, pre-clinical, and clinical studies have documented the potential of amelogenin, and its variants, to affect cell response and tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms are unclear. Thus, the aim of the present study was to identify, in cementoblasts, novel binding partners for an alternatively spliced amelogenin form (Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide-LRAP), which is supposed to act as a signaling molecule in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. LRAP-binding protein complexes from immortalized murine cementoblasts (OCCM-30) were achieved by capture affinity assay (GST pull down) and proteins present in these complexes were identified by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. Flotillin-1, which functions as a platform for signal transduction, vesicle trafficking, endocytosis, and exocytosis, was identified and confirmed by co-precipitation and co-localization assays as a protein-binding partner for LRAP in OCCM-30 cells. In addition, we found that exogenously added GST-LRAP recombinant protein was internalized by OCCM-30 cells, predominantly localized in the perinuclear region and, that inhibition of flotillin1-dependent functions by small interference RNA (siRNA) methodology significantly affected LRAP uptake and its biological properties on OCCM-30 cells, including LRAP effect on the expression of genes encoding osteocalcin (Ocn), bone sialoprotein (Bsp), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RunX2). In conclusion, LRAP uptake by cementoblast involves flotillin-assisted endocytosis, which suggests an involvement of LRAP in lipid-raft-dependent signaling pathways which are mediated by flotillin-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 556-565, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  18. Distribution and Evolution of Yersinia Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yueming; Huang, He; Hui, Xinjie; Cheng, Xi; White, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, playing important roles in various protein-protein interaction processes. In Yersinia, the well-characterized type III secreted effector YopM also belongs to the LRR protein family and is encoded by virulence plasmids. However, little has been known about other LRR members encoded by Yersinia genomes or their evolution. In this study, the Yersinia LRR proteins were comprehensively screened, categorized, and compared. The LRR proteins encoded by chromosomes (LRR1 proteins) appeared to be more similar to each other and different from those encoded by plasmids (LRR2 proteins) with regard to repeat-unit length, amino acid composition profile, and gene expression regulation circuits. LRR1 proteins were also different from LRR2 proteins in that the LRR1 proteins contained an E3 ligase domain (NEL domain) in the C-terminal region or an NEL domain-encoding nucleotide relic in flanking genomic sequences. The LRR1 protein-encoding genes (LRR1 genes) varied dramatically and were categorized into 4 subgroups (a to d), with the LRR1a to -c genes evolving from the same ancestor and LRR1d genes evolving from another ancestor. The consensus and ancestor repeat-unit sequences were inferred for different LRR1 protein subgroups by use of a maximum parsimony modeling strategy. Structural modeling disclosed very similar repeat-unit structures between LRR1 and LRR2 proteins despite the different unit lengths and amino acid compositions. Structural constraints may serve as the driving force to explain the observed mutations in the LRR regions. This study suggests that there may be functional variation and lays the foundation for future experiments investigating the functions of the chromosomally encoded LRR proteins of Yersinia. PMID:27217422

  19. Biomimetic Enamel Regeneration Mediated by Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide.

    PubMed

    Kwak, S Y; Litman, A; Margolis, H C; Yamakoshi, Y; Simmer, J P

    2017-01-01

    We report here a novel biomimetic approach to the regeneration of human enamel. The approach combines the use of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to control the onset and rate of enamel regeneration and the use of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP), a nonphosphorylated 56-amino acid alternative splice product of amelogenin, to regulate the shape and orientation of growing enamel crystals. This study builds on our previous findings that show LRAP can effectively guide the formation of ordered arrays of needle-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in vitro and on the known role mineralization inhibitors, like PPi, play in the regulation of mineralized tissue formation. Acid-etched enamel surfaces of extracted human molars, cut perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the enamel rods, were exposed to a PPi-stabilized supersaturated calcium phosphate (CaP) solution containing 0 to 0.06 mg/mL LRAP for 20 h. In the absence of LRAP, PPi inhibition was reversed by the presence of etched enamel surfaces and led to the formation of large, randomly distributed plate-like HA crystals that were weakly attached, regardless of rod orientation. In the presence of 0.04 mg/mL LRAP, however, densely packed mineral layers, comprising bundles of small needle-like HA crystals, formed on etched surfaces that were cut perpendicular to the enamel rods. These crystals were strongly attached, and their arrangement reflected to a significant degree the underlying enamel prism pattern. In contrast, under the same conditions with LRAP, little to no crystal formation was found on enamel surfaces that were cut parallel to the direction of the enamel rods. These results suggest that LRAP preferentially interacts with ab surfaces of mature enamel crystals, inhibiting their directional growth, thus selectively promoting linear growth along the c-axis of enamel crystals. The present findings demonstrate a potential for the development of a new approach to regenerate enamel structure and properties.

  20. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gordon I; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Klein, Seth J; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N; Klein, Samuel; Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2015-05-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448), p-AKT(Ser473), and p-AKT(Thr308) in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTOR(Ser2448) by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKT(Ser473) and p-AKT(Thr308) were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL(-1) · min(-1); P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling.

  1. Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gordon I.; Yoshino, Jun; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L.; Klein, Seth J.; Magkos, Faidon; Reeds, Dominic N.; Klein, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Increased plasma branched-chain amino acid concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, and intravenous amino acid infusion blunts insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We tested the hypothesis that protein ingestion impairs insulin-mediated glucose disposal by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling, which can inhibit AKT. We measured glucose disposal and muscle p-mTORSer2448, p-AKTSer473, and p-AKTThr308 in 22 women during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with and without concomitant ingestion of whey protein (0.6 g/kg fat-free mass; n = 11) or leucine that matched the amount given with whey protein (n = 11). Both whey protein and leucine ingestion raised plasma leucine concentration by approximately twofold and muscle p-mTORSer2448 by ∼30% above the values observed in the control (no amino acid ingestion) studies; p-AKTSer473 and p-AKTThr308 were not affected by whey protein or leucine ingestion. Whey protein ingestion decreased insulin-mediated glucose disposal (median 38.8 [quartiles 30.8, 61.8] vs. 51.9 [41.0, 77.3] µmol glucose/µU insulin · mL−1 · min−1; P < 0.01), whereas ingestion of leucine did not (52.3 [43.3, 65.4] vs. 52.3 [43.9, 73.2]). These results indicate that 1) protein ingestion causes insulin resistance and could be an important regulator of postprandial glucose homeostasis and 2) the insulin-desensitizing effect of protein ingestion is not due to inhibition of AKT by leucine-mediated mTOR signaling. PMID:25475435

  2. Phosphorylation of 4EBP by oral leucine administration was suppressed in the skeletal muscle of PGC-1α knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Minami, Kimiko; Matsuda, Junichiro; Sawada, Naoki; Miura, Shinji; Kamei, Yasutomi

    2016-01-01

    Leucine is known to increase mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP. In this study, leucine was administered to skeletal muscle-PGC-1α knockout mice. We observed attenuated 4EBP phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle, but not in the liver, of the PGC-1α knockout mice. These data suggest that skeletal muscle-PGC-1α is important for leucine-mediated mTOR activation and protein biosynthesis.

  3. Separation by high-performance liquid chromatography of (3R)- and (3S)-beta-leucine as diastereomeric derivatives.

    PubMed

    Aberhart, D J; Cotting, J A; Lin, H J

    1985-11-15

    For studies on the coenzyme B12-dependent enzyme, leucine-2,3-aminomutase, (3R)- and (3S)-beta-leucines were synthesized. The 10-camphorsulfonamide p-nitrobenzyl esters could be resolved by normal-phase HPLC. A much better separation was obtained by reversed-phase HPLC of the diastereomeric derivatives obtained by treatment of -leucine with Marfey's reagent (N2-(5-fluoro-2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alaninamide).

  4. Stem Cell Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Info Center Research Topics Federal Policy Glossary Stem Cell Information General Information Clinical Trials Funding Information Current ... Basics » Stem Cell Basics I. Back to top Stem Cell Basics I. Introduction: What are stem cells, and ...

  5. Protective effects of leucine against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in Labeo rohita fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Sen, Shib Sankar; Jun, Jin Woo; Sukumaran, Venkatachalam; Park, Se Chang

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of leucine against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in Labeo rohita (rohu) in vivo and in vitro. Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the hepatopancreas, were exposed to different concentrations of LPS for 24 h to induce an inflammatory response, and the protective effects of leucine against LPS-induced inflammation were studied. Finally, we investigated the efficiency of dietary leucine supplementation in attenuating an immune challenge induced by LPS in vivo. Exposure of cells to 10-25 μg mL(-1) of LPS for 24 h resulted in a significant production of nitric oxide and release of lactate dehydrogenase to the medium, whereas cell viability and protein content were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS exposure (10 μg mL(-1)) increased mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 in vitro (p < 0.05). However, pretreatment with leucine prevented the LPS-induced upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 mRNAs by downregulating TLR4, MyD88, NF-κBp65, and MAPKp38 mRNA expression. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, which was increased by LPS treatment, was further enhanced (p < 0.05) by leucine pretreatment. The enhanced expression of IL-10 might inhibit the production of other pro-inflammatory cytokines. It was found that leucine pretreatment attenuated the excessive activation of LPS-induced TLR4-MyD88 signaling as manifested by lower level of TLR4, MyD88, MAPKp38, NF-κBp65 and increased level of IκB-α protein in leucine pre-treatment group. In vivo experiments demonstrated that leucine pre-supplementation could protect fish against LPS-induced inflammation through an attenuation of TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathway. Taken together, we propose that leucine pre-supplementation decreases LPS-induced immune damage in rohu by enhancing the expression of IL-10 and by regulating the TLR4-MyD88 signaling pathways.

  6. Reviewing the Effects of L-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João A B; Zampieri, Thais T; Donato, Jose

    2015-05-22

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss.

  7. Reviewing the Effects of l-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Zampieri, Thais T.; Donato, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss. PMID:26007339

  8. IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation in response to leucine deprivation is mediated by the AAR pathway.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Niyati; Jansson, Thomas; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2015-09-05

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) is the key regulator of fetal growth. IGF-I bioavailability is markedly diminished by IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) phosphorylation. Leucine deprivation strongly induces IGFBP-1 hyperphosphorylation, and plays an important role in fetal growth restriction (FGR). FGR is characterized by decreased amino acid availability, which activates the amino acid response (AAR) and inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We investigated the role of AAR and mTOR in mediating IGFBP-1 secretion and phosphorylation in HepG2 cells in leucine deprivation. mTOR inhibition (rapamycin or raptor + rictor siRNA), or activation (DEPTOR siRNA) demonstrated a role of mTOR in leucine deprivation-induced IGFBP-1 secretion but not phosphorylation. When the AAR was blocked (U0126, or ERK/GCN2 siRNA), both IGFBP-1 secretion and hyperphosphorylation (pSer101/pSer119/pSer169) due to leucine deprivation were prevented. CK2 inhibition by TBB also attenuated IGFBP-1 phosphorylation in leucine deprivation. These results suggest that the AAR and mTOR independently regulate IGFBP-1 secretion and phosphorylation in response to decreased amino acid availability.

  9. Arabinose-leucine deletion mutants of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D P; Englesberg, E

    1969-06-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established.

  10. Fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis from specifically labeled leucine by isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mathias, M M; Sullivan, A C; Hamilton, J G

    1981-10-01

    Hepatocytes isolated from female rats meal-fed a high-glucose diet were incubated in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate medium containing 16.5 mM glucose, 3H2O, and 14C-labeled amino acids (-)-Hydroxycitrate depressed the incorporation of 3H2O and [14C] alanine into fatty acids and cholesterol. Incorporation of [U-14C]leucine into lipids was not affected but incorporation of 3H2O into lipids was decreased significantly by (-)-hydroxycitrate. (-)-Hydroxycitrate depressed the incorporation of radioactivity from [2-14C]leucine into fatty acids and cholesterol by 61 and 38%, respectively, and stimulated the incorporation of radioactivity from [4,5-3H]leucine 35 and 28%. As [2-14C]leucine labels the acetyl-CoA pool and [4,5-3H]leucine labels the acetoacetate pool, it was concluded that mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA is not incorporated intact into cholesterol, and that acetoacetate can be activated effectively in the liver cytosol for support of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis.

  11. Arabinose-Leucine Deletion Mutants of Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Donald P.; Englesberg, Ellis

    1969-01-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established. PMID:4892369

  12. Functional profiling discovers the dieldrin organochlorinated pesticide affects leucine availability in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gaytán, Brandon D; Loguinov, Alex V; Lantz, Stephen R; Lerot, Jan-Michael; Denslow, Nancy D; Vulpe, Chris D

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to organochlorinated pesticides such as dieldrin has been linked to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, endocrine disruption, and cancer, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity behind these effects remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, using a functional genomics approach in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that dieldrin alters leucine availability. This model is supported by multiple lines of congruent evidence: (1) mutants defective in amino acid signaling or transport are sensitive to dieldrin, which is reversed by the addition of exogenous leucine; (2) dieldrin sensitivity of wild-type or mutant strains is dependent upon leucine concentration in the media; (3) overexpression of proteins that increase intracellular leucine confer resistance to dieldrin; (4) leucine uptake is inhibited in the presence of dieldrin; and (5) dieldrin induces the amino acid starvation response. Additionally, we demonstrate that appropriate negative regulation of the Ras/protein kinase A pathway, along with an intact pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is required for dieldrin tolerance. Many yeast genes described in this study have human orthologs that may modulate dieldrin toxicity in humans.

  13. Cj1199 Affect the Development of Erythromycin Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni through Regulation of Leucine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Li, Fei; Han, Jing; Foley, Steven L.; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Sun, Yawei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the biological function of Cj1199 which was overexpressed in the laboratory induced erythromycin resistant strains. The Cj1199 deletion mutant (ΦCj1199) was constructed via insertional inactivation from its parent strain Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168. The ΦCj1199 and NCTC11168 were then subjected to microarray and real-time PCR to find gene pathway of Cj1199. The antimicrobial susceptibility, antimicrobial resistance development, growth characteristics and leucine metabolism were examined to confirm the biological function of Cj1199. Our result showed that a total of 20 genes were down-regulated in ΦCj1199. These genes were mainly involved in leucine biosynthesis, amino acid transport and periplasmic/membrane structure. Compared to NCTC11168, ΦCj1199 was difficult to acquire higher-level erythromycin resistance during the in vitro step-wise selection. The competition growth and leucine-dependent growth assays demonstrated that ΦCj1199 imposed a growth disadvantage under pressure of erythromycin and in the leucine-free medium. In conclusion, Cj1199 gene may directly regulate the leucine biosynthesis and transport and indirectly affect the development of erythromycin resistance in C. jejuni. PMID:28144238

  14. METABOLIC RESPONSES TO DIETARY LEUCINE RESTRICTION INVOLVE REMODELING OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AND ENHANCED HEPATIC INSULIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P.; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within five to seven days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of FGF21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissue, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and leucine restriction cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Together these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine. PMID:26643647

  15. Substrate binding and formation of an occluded state in the leucine transporter.

    PubMed

    Celik, Leyla; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-03-01

    Translocation through the extracellular vestibule and binding of leucine in the leucine transporter (LeuT) have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations. More than 0.1 mus of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on different combinations of LeuT, bound substrate, and bound structural Na(+) ions to describe molecular events involved in substrate binding and in the formation of the occluded state and to investigate the dynamics of this state. Three structural features are found to be directly involved in the initial steps of leucine transport: a Na(+) ion directly coordinated to leucine (Na-1), two aromatic residues closing the binding site toward the extracellular vestibule (Tyr-108 and Phe-253), and a salt bridge in the extracellular vestibule (Arg-30 and Asp-404). These features account for observed differences between simulations of LeuT with and without bound substrate and for a possible pathway for leucine binding and thereby formation of the occluded LeuT binding site.

  16. Asymmetric photolysis of /RS/-leucine with circularly polarized ultraviolet light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Bonner, W. A.; Massey, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    (RS)-leucine in 0.1 M HCl solution has been subjected to photolysis with 212.8-nm right (R-) and left circularly polarized light (LCPL) obtained from a laser source. RCPL preferentially photolyzed the (R)-leucine component and LCPL the (S)-leucine component of the RS substrate. The enantiomeric excess produced were 1.98% for the 59% conversion with RCPL and 2.50% for the 75% conversion with LCPL. These 'equal and opposite' effects represent the second highest enantiomeric enrichments yet reported for an asymmetric photolysis and the first ever reported for a prebiotically important substrate - an amino acid. Implications regarding the origin of optical activity are briefly discussed.

  17. TGFβ1-induced leucine limitation uncovered by differential ribosome codon reading.

    PubMed

    Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Rooijers, Koos; Zijlstra, Jelle; Moumbeini, Behzad; Zaal, Esther A; Oude Vrielink, Joachim F; Lopes, Rui; Pineiro Ugalde, Alejandro; Berkers, Celia R; Agami, Reuven

    2017-03-08

    Cancer cells modulate their metabolic networks to support cell proliferation and a higher demand of building blocks. These changes may restrict the availability of certain amino acids for protein synthesis, which can be utilized for cancer therapy. However, little is known about the amino acid demand changes occurring during aggressive and invasive stages of cancer. Recently, we developed diricore, an approach based on ribosome profiling that can uncover amino acid limitations. Here, we applied diricore to a cellular model in which epithelial breast cells respond rapidly to TGFβ1, a cytokine essential for cancer progression and metastasis, and uncovered shortage of leucine. Further analyses indicated that TGFβ1 treatment of human breast epithelial cells reduces the expression of SLC3A2, a subunit of the leucine transporter, which diminishes leucine uptake and inhibits cell proliferation. Thus, we identified a specific amino acid limitation associated with the TGFβ1 response, a vulnerability that might be associated with aggressiveness in cancer.

  18. Morphological templating of metastable calcium carbonates by the amino acid leucine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Street, S. R.; Tang, C. C.

    2011-03-01

    The in vitro precipitation of the metastable CaCO3 phases aragonite and vaterite in the presence of leucine is investigated. Under normal conditions, the production of CaCO3 via the hydrolysis of urea method favours the formation of regular needle-like aragonite crystals, with very minor quantities of vaterite and calcite. However in the presence of leucine, aragonite forms highly branched structures and the vaterite yield is increased, forming flower-like clusters composed of nano-thin sheets. Both the degree of aragonite branching and the occurrence, regularity of shape and number of vaterite "petals" increases with leucine concentration. The two phases exhibit different variations in their crystallographic parameters with increasing concentration, while the molecular structure appears unaffected.

  19. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.G.; Baughman, S.; Scheidler, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    The simultaneous incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (1-/sup 14/C)leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration.

  20. Leucine aminopeptidase: an inducible component of the defense response in Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato).

    PubMed

    Pautot, V; Holzer, F M; Reisch, B; Walling, L L

    1993-11-01

    A leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) cDNA clone (DR57) that was induced in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. tomato) infection was isolated using a subtractive hybridization-enriched cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blot analysis showed that the tomato genome had two leucine aminopeptidase genes. The levels of DR57 mRNAs after P.s. tomato infection and mechanical wounding were determined in two inbred tomato lines that exhibit susceptibility and resistance to P.s. tomato. DR57 mRNAs were detected 12 hours after infection and 4 hours after wounding. Furthermore, DR57 mRNAs were systemically induced in response to wounding. DR57 mRNAs were induced in leaves after Spodoptera littoralis feeding but were not detected in detached leaf controls. Possible roles for the DR57 leucine aminopeptidase in the defense reactions are discussed.

  1. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  2. Biophysical and Mutational Analysis of the Putative bZIP Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus EBNA 3C

    PubMed Central

    West, Michelle J.; Webb, Helen M.; Sinclair, Alison J.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA 3C) is essential for B-cell immortalization and functions as a regulator of viral and cellular transcription. EBNA 3C contains glutamine-rich and proline-rich domains and a region in the N terminus consisting of a stretch of basic residues followed by a run of leucine residues spaced seven amino acids apart. This N-terminal domain is widely believed to represent a leucine zipper dimerization motif (bZIP). We have performed the first structural and functional analysis of this motif and demonstrated that this domain is not capable of forming stable homodimers. Peptides encompassing the EBNA 3C zipper domain are approximately 54 to 67% α-helical in solution but cannot form dimers at physiologically relevant concentrations. Moreover, the EBNA 3C leucine zipper cannot functionally substitute for another homodimerizing zipper domain in domain-swapping experiments. Our data indicate, however, that the EBNA 3C zipper domain behaves as an atypical bZIP domain and is capable of self-associating to form higher-order α-helical oligomers. Using directed mutagenesis, we also identified a new role for the bZIP domain in maintaining the interaction between EBNA 3C and RBP-Jκ in vivo. Disruption of the helical nature of the zipper domain by the introduction of proline residues reduces the ability of EBNA 3C to inhibit EBNA 2 activation and interact with RBP-Jκ in vivo by 50%, and perturbation of the charge on the basic region completely abolishes this function of EBNA 3C. PMID:15308737

  3. Down Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase and 3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase, and the Up-Regulation of Serine Dehydratase in Rat Liver from Intake of Excess Amount of Leucine Are Not Related to Leucine-Caused Amino Acid Imbalance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Takai, Marie; Namaki, Hiroya; Minami, Kimiko; Imamura, Wataru; Kato, Hisanori; Kamei, Yasutomi; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS), 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and serine dehydratase (SDS) in rat liver are expressed in response to protein and amino acid intake. In the present study, we examined the expression of these enzymes in relation to amino acid imbalance caused by leucine. Rats were subjected to leucine administration in the diet or orally between meals. Consumption of more than 2% leucine in a 6% casein diet suppressed food intake and caused growth retardation in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not seen in a 12% or 40% casein diet. ASNS and PHGDH expression in the liver was significantly induced by the 6% casein diet and was suppressed by leucine in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the SDS expression was induced. These effects were leucine specific and not seen with ingestion of isoleucine or valine. However, leucine orally administered between meals did not change the food intake or growth of rats fed a 6% casein die, though it similarly affected the expression of ASNS, PHGDH and SDS in the liver. These results suggest that the growth retardation caused by leucine imbalance was mainly because of the suppression of food intake, and demonstrated that there are no causal relationships between ASNS, PHGDH and SDS expression and amino acid imbalance caused by leucine.

  4. Adult Basic Education Basic Computer Literacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manini, Catalina M.; Cervantes, Juan

    This handbook, in both English and Spanish versions, is intended for use with adult basic education (ABE) students. It contains five sections of basic computer literacy activities and information about the ABE computer literacy course offered at Dona Ana Community College (DACC) in New Mexico. The handbook begins with forewords by the handbook's…

  5. Ten Putative Contributors to the Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Emily J.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Keith, Scott W.; Aronne, Louis J.; Barger, Jamie; Baskin, Monica; Benca, Ruth M.; Biggio, Joseph; Boggiano, Mary M.; Eisenmann, Joe C.; Elobeid, Mai; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Gluckman, Peter; Hanlon, Erin C.; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Redden, David T.; Ruden, Douglas M.; Wang, Chenxi; Waterland, Robert A.; Wright, Suzanne M.; Allison, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a global issue and shows no signs of abating, while the cause of this epidemic remains unclear. Marketing practices of energy-dense foods and institutionally-driven declines in physical activity are the alleged perpetrators for the epidemic, despite a lack of solid evidence to demonstrate their causal role. While both may contribute to obesity, we call attention to their unquestioned dominance in program funding and public efforts to reduce obesity, and propose several alternative putative contributors that would benefit from equal consideration and attention. Evidence for microorganisms, epigenetics, increasing maternal age, greater fecundity among people with higher adiposity, assortative mating, sleep debt, endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical iatrogenesis, reduction in variability of ambient temperatures, and intrauterine and intergenerational effects, as contributing factors to the obesity epidemic are reviewed herein. While the evidence is strong for some contributors such as pharmaceutical-induced weight gain, it is still emerging for other reviewed factors. Considering the role of such putative etiological factors of obesity may lead to comprehensive, cause specific, and effective strategies for prevention and treatment of this global epidemic. PMID:19960394

  6. Measurement of L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine kinetics in splanchnic and leg tissues in humans. Effect of amino acid infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, R.A.; Glickman, M.G.; Castellino, P.; Louard, R.J.; DeFronzo, R.A.

    1988-10-01

    Although whole-body leucine flux is widely measured to study body protein turnover in humans, the contribution of specific tissues to the total-body measurement remains unknown. By combining the organ-balance technique with the systemic infusion of L-(1-14C)leucine, we quantitated leucine production and disposal by splanchnic and leg tissues and by the whole body, simultaneously, in six normal men before and during amino acid infusion. At steady state, disposal of arterial leucine by splanchnic and leg tissues was calculated from the percent extraction (E) of L-(1-14C)leucine counts: uptake = E x (Leu)a x flow. Tissue release of cold leucine (from protein turnover) into vein was calculated as the difference between leucine uptake and the net tissue leucine balance. In the postabsorptive state, despite substantial (P less than .01) extraction of L-(1-14C)leucine by splanchnic (23 +/- 1%) and leg (18 +/- 2%) tissues, net leucine balance across both tissue beds was small, indicating active simultaneous disposal and production of leucine at nearly equivalent rates. Splanchnic tissues accounted for approximately 50% of the measured total-body leucine flux. During amino acid infusion, the net leucine balance across splanchnic and leg tissues became positive, reflecting not only an increase in leucine uptake but also a marked suppression (by approximately 50%, P less than .02) of cold leucine release. This reduction in splanchnic and leg leucine release was indicated by a sharp decline in whole-body endogenous leucine flux.

  7. Leucine Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Primary Preterm Rat Satellite Cells in Part through mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie-Min; Yu, Mu-Xue; Shen, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Chu-Yi; Zhuang, Si-Qi; Qiu, Xiao-Shan

    2015-05-08

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to leucine modulates many cellular and developmental processes. However, in the context of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, the role of leucine and mTORC1 is less known. This study investigates the role of leucine in the process of proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells, and the relationship with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. Dissociation of primary satellite cells occurred with type I collagenase and trypsin, and purification, via different speed adherence methods. Satellite cells with positive expression of Desmin were treated with leucine and rapamycin. We observed that leucine promoted proliferation and differentiation of primary satellite cells and increased the phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and differentiation, as well as decreased the phosphorylation level of mTOR. Furthermore, leucine increased the expression of MyoD and myogenin while the protein level of MyoD decreased due to rapamycin. However, myogenin expressed no affect by rapamycin. In conclusion, leucine may up-regulate the activation of mTORC1 to promote proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells. We have shown that leucine promoted the differentiation of myotubes in part through the mTORC1-MyoD signal pathway.

  8. Increasing leucine concentration stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling and cell growth in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Areta, José L; Hawley, John A; Ye, Ji-Ming; Chan, M H Stanley; Coffey, Vernon G

    2014-11-01

    Leucine is a key amino acid for initiating translation in muscle cells, but the dose-dependent effects of leucine on intracellular signaling are poorly characterized. This study examined the effect that increasing doses of leucine would have on changes in mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling, rates of protein synthesis, and cell size in C2C12 cells. We hypothesized that a leucine "threshold" exists, which represents the minimum stimulus required to initiate mTOR signaling in muscle cells. Acute exposure to 1.5, 3.2, 5.0, and 16.1 mM leucine increased phosphorylation of mTOR(Ser2448) (~1.4-fold; P < .04), 4E-BP1 (Thr37/46) (~1.9-fold; P < .001), and rpS6(Ser235/6) (~2.3-fold; P < .001). However, only p70S6k(Thr389) exhibited a dose-dependent response to leucine with all treatments higher than control (~4-fold; P < .001) and at least 5 mM higher than the 1.5-mM concentration (1.2-fold; P < .02). Rates of protein synthesis were not altered by any treatment. Seven days of exposure to 0.5, 1.5, 5.0, and 16.5 mM leucine resulted in an increase in cell size in at least 5 mM treatments (~1.6-fold, P < .001 vs control). Our findings indicate that even at low leucine concentrations, phosphorylation of proteins regulating translation initiation signaling is enhanced. The phosphorylation of p70S6k(Thr389) follows a leucine dose-response relationship, although this was not reflected by the acute protein synthetic response. Nevertheless, under the conditions of the present study, it appears that leucine concentrations of at least 5 mM are necessary to enhance cell growth.

  9. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  10. Prolonged leucine infusion differentially affects tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine (Leu) acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. To determine whether Leu can stimulate protein synthesis in muscles of different fiber types and visceral tissues of the neonate for a prolonged period and to determine the ...

  11. Metabolic responses to dietary leucine restriction involve remodeling of adipose tissue and enhanced hepatic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within 5 to 7 days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of fibroblast growth factor 21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissues, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and LR cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine.

  12. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed by supplementation with high levels of leucine, but not other tested amino acids. Conversely, overexpressed FLCN could sequester lysosomal leucine and stimulate mTORC1 in an amino acid limitation environment. These results identify a novel function of FLCN: it controls mTORC1 by modulating the leucine signal in lysosome. Furthermore, we provided evidence that FLCN exerted this role by inhibiting the accumulation of the amino acid transporter PAT1 on the lysosome surface, thereby maintaining the signal level within the organelle. PMID:27280402

  13. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    PubMed

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  14. Preferential Enrichment of DL-Leucine Using Cocrystal Formation With Oxalic Acid Under Nonequilibrium Crystallization Conditions.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Kochunnoonny; Takahashi, Hiroki; Morita, Yoko; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Iwama, Sekai; Tsue, Hirohito; Tamura, Rui

    2015-07-01

    By utilizing the preferential enrichment (PE) technique, we achieved an improved enantiomeric resolution of DL-leucine (Leu) using a 1:1 cocrystal (DL-) of DL-Leu and oxalic acid. The crystal structure analysis of DL- indicated the occurrence of a novel type of phase transition and subsequent preferential redissolution of one enantiomer from the resulting crystals into solution.

  15. Role of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone acquisition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have both anabolic and catabolic effects on bone. However, no GC anabolic effect mediator has been identified to date. In this report, we provide the first evidence that glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), a GC anti-inflammatory effect mediator, can enhance bone forma...

  16. Small-molecule probe using dual signals to monitor leucine aminopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hey Young; Shim, So Hee; Baek, Luck Ju; Hong, Jong-In

    2011-04-15

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are widely distributed in organisms from bacteria to humans, and play crucial roles in cell maintenance and cell growth. Thus, assays for LAP are necessary for measuring its activity and inhibitor potency. In this Letter, we report a small-molecule probe which exhibits colorimetric and fluorogenic changes according to LAP activity.

  17. Leucine supplementation has an anabolic effect on proteins in rabbit skin wound and muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L; Wolfe, Robert R

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on protein metabolism in skin wounds and muscle in anesthetized rabbits. l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was infused on d 7 after the ear was scalded, and the scalded ear and uninjured hindlimb were used as arteriovenous units to reflect protein kinetics in skin wounds and muscle. In comparison with a commercially available amino acid solution (10% Travasol), isonitrogenous [1638 micromol/(kg . h)] infusion of the amino acid solution with supplemental leucine to account for 35% of total nitrogen increased the net phenylalanine balance (P < 0.05) in the skin wound and muscle from -6.7 +/- 6.1 to 0.9 +/- 1.4 and from -4.4 +/- 2.4 to -1.0 +/- 0.4 micromol/(100 g . h), respectively. Infusion of leucine alone did not significantly improve the net phenylalanine balance in either skin wounds [-4.0 +/- 4.6 micromol/(100 g . h)] or muscle [-2.7 +/- 0.7 micromol/(100 g . h)]. We conclude that leucine supplementation had an anabolic effect on proteins in skin wounds and muscle, provided that adequate additional amino acids were also available.

  18. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. ...

  19. Leucine-protein supplemented recovery feeding enhances subsequent cycling performance in well-trained men.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jasmine S; Ali, Ajmol; Rowlands, David S

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a practical leucine-protein, high-carbohydrate postexercise feeding regimen could improve recovery, as measured by subsequent cycling performance and mechanistic markers, relative to control feeding. In a crossover, 10 male cyclists performed 2- to 2.5-h interval training bouts on 3 consecutive evenings, ingesting either leucine-protein, high-carbohydrate nutrition (0.1/0.4/1.2/0.2 g·kg(-1)·h(-1); leucine, protein, carbohydrate, fat, respectively) or isocaloric control (0.06/1.6/0.2 g·kg(-1)·h(-1); protein, carbohydrate, fat, respectively) nutrition for 1.5 h postexercise. Throughout the experimental period diet was controlled, energy and macronutrient intake balanced, and protein intake clamped at 1.6 g·kg(-1)·day(-1). The alternate supplement was provided the next morning, thereby isolating the postexercise nutrition effect. Following 39 h of recovery, cyclists performed a repeat-sprint performance test. Postexercise leucine-protein ingestion improved mean sprint power by 2.5% (99% confidence limit, ±2.6%; p = 0.013) and reduced perceived overall tiredness during the sprints by 13% (90% confidence limit, ±9.2%), but perceptions of leg tiredness and soreness were unaffected. Before exercise, creatine-kinase concentration was lowered by 19% (90% confidence limits, ±18%), but lactate dehydrogenase and pressure-pain threshold were unaltered. There was a small reduction in anger (25% ± 18%), but other moods were unchanged. Plasma leucine (3-fold) and essential amino acid (47%) concentrations were elevated postexercise. Net nitrogen balance trended mildly negative in both conditions (mean ± SD: leucine-protein, -20 ± 46 mg·kg(-1) per 24 h; control, -25 ± 36 mg·kg(-1) per 24 h). The ingestion of a leucine-protein supplement along with other high-carbohydrate food following intense training on consecutive days enhances subsequent high-intensity endurance performance and may attenuate

  20. Health Insurance Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics A ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  1. Health Insurance Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Health Insurance Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Health Insurance Basics Print ... thought advanced calculus was confusing. What Exactly Is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a plan that people buy ...

  2. PASCAL vs BASIC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundie, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison between PASCAL and BASIC as general purpose microprocessor languages rates PASCAL above BASIC in such points as program structure, data types, structuring methods, control structures, procedures and functions, and ease in learning. (CMV)

  3. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application.

  4. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  5. The distribution of methionine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin in the brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J.; Kosterlitz, H.W.; Smith, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    1 A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. 2 Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. 3 An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ε-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. 4 A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. 5 The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. 6 Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. 7 It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:597668

  6. THE DISTRIBUTION OF METHIONINE-ENKEPHALIN AND LEUCINE-ENKEPHALIN IN THE BRAIN AND PERIPHERAL TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Kosterlitz, HW; Smith, TW

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid extraction of opioid peptides from the brain and other tissues. The method is based on acid extraction of tissues followed by adsorption of the extract onto Amberlite XAD-2 resin. Elution with methanol separates the enkephalins and α-endorphin from β-endorphin. Over 90% of the opioid peptide activity isolated from brain and gut of several species by our method was due to methionine- and leucine-enkephalin. In contrast, the major opioid peptide activity recovered from the pituitary was due to peptides of much greater mol. wt. than the enkephalins. An opioid peptide with properties unlike those of the known endorphins or enkephalins was present in brain extracts. This peptide, termed ∈-endorphin, has an apparent mol. wt. of 700 to 1200; it constituted between 5 to 10% of the total opioid activity in our extracts. A differential assay of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin was made either by destroying methionine-enkephalin activity with cyanogen bromide or by separating the peptides by thin layer chromatography. The ratio of methionine-enkephalin to leucine-enkephalin varied greatly in different brain regions. The highest proportions of leucine-enkephalin were found in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Formaldehyde perfusion and fixation of the brain in vivo had no significant effect on the brain content of enkephalin, indicating that proteolytic breakdown is not a major problem in the extraction of these peptides. It is suggested that the enkephalins may have a neurotransmitter role in both brain and peripheral tissues and that methionine- and leucine-enkephalin may subserve separate neuronal functions. PMID:9142421

  7. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Boutry, Claire; El-Kadi, Samer W.; Suryawan, Agus; Wheatley, Scott M.; Orellana, Renán A.; Kimball, Scot R.; Nguyen, Hanh V.

    2013-01-01

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine infusion can be used to enhance protein synthesis during continuous feeding, neonatal piglets received the same amount of formula enterally by orogastric tube for 25.25 h continuously (CON) with or without LEU or intermittently by bolus every 4 h (BOL). For the CON+LEU group, leucine pulses were administered parenterally (800 μmol·kg−1·h−1) every 4 h. Insulin and glucose concentrations increased after the BOL meal and were unchanged in groups fed continuously. LEU infusion during CON feeding increased plasma leucine after the leucine pulse and decreased essential amino acids compared with CON feeding. Protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi (LD), gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles, but not liver or heart, were greater in CON+LEU and BOL than in the CON group. BOL feeding increased protein synthesis in the small intestine. Muscle S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and active eIF4E·eIF4G complex formation were higher in CON+LEU and BOL than in CON but AMPKα, eIF2α, and eEF2 phosphorylation were unchanged. LC3-II-to-total LC3 ratio was lower in CON+LEU and BOL than in CON, but there were no differences in atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 abundance and FoxO3 phosphorylation. In conclusion, administration of leucine pulses during continuous orogastric feeding in neonates increases muscle protein synthesis by stimulating translation initiation and may reduce protein degradation via the autophagy-lysosome, but not the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:23839523

  8. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  9. Chronic leucine exposure results in reduced but reversible glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujuan; Han, Wenxia; Jiang, Xiuyun; Li, Min; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Jia Jun

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sustained high leucine exposure decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, whether this effect is recoverable following the removal of leucine is unclear. Pancreatic/duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) and its downstream target, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), are reported to be positively associated with insulin secretion. However, it also remains unclear whether the effect of leucine on GSIS is accompanied by alterations in PDX-1 and GLUT2. In the present study, insulin secretion, insulin content, PDX-1 and GLUT2 protein expression in INS-1 (rat insulinoma cell line) cells were assessed following a 24-h incubation in 40 mmol/l leucine. Half of the cells were incubated in leucine-free media for a further 24 h to observe the abovementioned effects. In contrast to the control, 40 mmol/l leucine for 24 or 48 h diminished GSIS at high glucose concentrations by 11% (P=0.026) or 22% (P=0.003), insulin content by 14% (P=0.008) or 20% (P=0.002), as well as decreasing PDX-1 and GLUT2 expression. When leucine was removed from the media for a further 24-h incubation, in comparison with those cells that were maintained in leucine treatment for 24 and 48 h, the high GSIS increased by 13% (P=0.032) and 27% (P=0.002), insulin content was augmented by 10% (P=0.014) and 20% (P=0.003), and the protein expression of PDX-1 and GLUT2 also increased. The present study demonstrates that sustained high concentrations of leucine induce a reversible impairment of GSIS and alter insulin content, which is mediated by PDX-1 and GLUT2, in INS-1 cells.

  10. Leptin and leucine synergistically regulate protein metabolism in C2C12 myotubes and mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Zeng, Xiangfang; Huang, Zhimin; Wang, Junjun; Qiao, Shiyan

    2013-07-28

    Leucine and leptin play important roles in regulating protein synthesis and degradation in skeletal muscles in vitro and in vivo. However, the objective of the present study was to determine whether leptin and leucine function synergistically in regulating protein metabolism of skeletal muscles. In the in vitro experiment, C2C12 myotubes were cultured for 2 h in the presence of 5 mm-leucine and/or 50 ng/ml of leptin. In the in vivo experiment, C57BL/6 and ob/ob mice were randomly assigned to be fed a non-purified diet supplemented with 3 % L-leucine or 2·04 % L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 14 d. Ob/ob mice were injected intraperitoneally with sterile PBS or recombinant mouse leptin (0·1 μg/g body weight) for 14 d. In C57BL/6 mice, dietary leucine supplementation increased (P< 0·05) plasma leptin, leptin receptor expression and protein synthesis in skeletal muscles, but reduced (P< 0·05) plasma urea and protein degradation in skeletal muscles. Dietary leucine supplementation and leptin injection increased the relative weight of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles in ob/ob mice. Moreover, leucine and leptin treatments stimulated (P< 0·05) protein synthesis and inhibited (P< 0·05) protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes and skeletal muscles of ob/ob mice. There were interactions (P< 0·05) between the leucine and leptin treatments with regard to protein metabolism in C2C12 myotubes and soleus muscles of ob/ob mice but not in the gastrocnemius muscles of ob/ob mice. Collectively, these results suggest that leptin and leucine synergistically regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscles both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Ischemia induces partial loss of surface membrane polarity and accumulation of putative calcium ionophores.

    PubMed Central

    Molitoris, B A; Wilson, P D; Schrier, R W; Simon, F R

    1985-01-01

    To determine if ischemia induces alterations in renal proximal tubule surface membranes, brush border (BBM) and basolateral membranes (BLM) were isolated simultaneously from the same cortical homogenate after 50 min of renal pedicle clamping. Ischemia caused a selective decrease in the specific activity of BBM marker enzymes leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase, but did not effect enrichment (15 times). Neither specific activity nor enrichment (10 times) of BLM NaK-ATPase was altered by ischemia. Contamination of BBM by intracellular organelles was also unchanged, but there was an increase in the specific activity (41.1 vs. 60.0, P less than 0.01) and enrichment (2.3 vs. 4.3, P less than 0.01) of NaK-ATPase in the ischemic BBM fraction. Ischemia increased BLM lysophosphatidylcholine (1.3 vs. 2.5%, P less than 0.05) and phosphatidic acid (0.4 vs. 1.3%, P less than 0.05). Ischemia also decreased BBM sphingomyelin (38.5 vs. 29.6%, P less than 0.01) and phosphatidylserine (16.1 vs. 11.4%, P less than 0.01), and increased phosphatidylcholine (17.2 vs. 29.7%, P less than 0.01), phosphatidylinositol (1.8 vs. 4.6%, P less than 0.01), and lysophosphatidylcholine (1.0 vs. 1.8%, P less than 0.05). The large changes in BBM phospholipids did not result from new phospholipid synthesis, since the specific activity (32P dpm/nmol Pi) of prelabeled individual and total phospholipids was unaltered by ischemia. We next evaluated if these changes were due to inability of ischemic cells to maintain surface membrane polarity. Cytochemical evaluation showed that while NaK-ATPase could be detected only in control BLM, specific deposits of reaction product were present in the BBM of ischemic kidneys. Furthermore, using continuous sucrose gradients, the enzymatic profile of ischemic BBM NaK-ATPase shifted away from ischemic BLM NaK-ATPase and toward the BBM enzymatic marker leucine aminopeptidase. Taken together, these data suggest that NaK-ATPase activity determined enzymatically

  12. Putative bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Girginkardesler, Nogay; Celik, Pınar; Yereli, Kor; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be "flagellated protozoa" have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells.

  13. Biogenic Origin for Earth's Oldest Putative Microfossils

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, B.; Sharp, T; Flynn, G; Wirick, S; Hervig, R

    2009-01-01

    Carbonaceous microbe-like features preserved within a local chert unit of the 3.5 Ga old Apex Basalt in Western Australia may represent some of the oldest evidence of life on Earth. However, the biogenicity of these putative microfossils has been called into question, primarily because the sample collection locality is a black, carbon-rich, brecciated chert dike representing an Archean submarine hydrothermal spring, suggesting a formation via an abiotic organic synthesis mechanism. Here we describe the macromolecular hydrocarbon structure, carbon bonding, functional group chemistry, and biotic element abundance of carbonaceous matter associated with these filamentous features. These characteristics are similar to those of biogenic kerogen from the ca. 1.9 Ga old Gunflint Formation. Although an abiotic origin cannot be entirely ruled out, it is unlikely that known abiotic synthesis mechanisms could recreate both the structural and compositional complexity of this ancient carbonaceous matter. Thus, we find that a biogenic origin for this material is more likely, implying that the Apex microbe-like features represent authentic biogenic organic matter.

  14. Putative Bronchopulmonary Flagellated Protozoa in Immunosuppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kilimcioglu, Ali Ahmet; Havlucu, Yavuz; Çelik, Pınar; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Flagellated protozoa that cause bronchopulmonary symptoms in humans are commonly neglected. These protozoal forms which were presumed to be “flagellated protozoa” have been previously identified in immunosuppressed patients in a number of studies, but have not been certainly classified so far. Since no human cases of bronchopulmonary flagellated protozoa were reported from Turkey, we aimed to investigate these putative protozoa in immunosuppressed patients who are particularly at risk of infectious diseases. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples of 110 immunosuppressed adult patients who were admitted to the Department of Chest Diseases, Hafsa Sultan Hospital of Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey, were examined in terms of parasites by light microscopy. Flagellated protozoal forms were detected in nine (8.2%) of 110 cases. Metronidazole (500 mg b.i.d. for 30 days) was given to all positive cases and a second bronchoscopy was performed at the end of the treatment, which revealed no parasites. In conclusion, immunosuppressed patients with bronchopulmonary symptoms should attentively be examined with regard to flagellated protozoa which can easily be misidentified as epithelial cells. PMID:24804259

  15. PUTATIVE ADVERSE OUTCOME PATHWAY FOR INHIBITON ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) provides a framework for organizing knowledge to define links between a molecular initiating event (MIE) and an adverse outcome (AO) occurring at a higher level of biological organization, such as the individual or population. The AOP framework proceeds from a general (e.g., not chemical specific) molecular mode of action, designated as a MIE, through stepwise changes in biological status, defined as key events (KEs), to a final AO that can be used in risk assessment. Because aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals are widely used to treat breast cancer patients, we explored the unintended consequences that might occur in fish exposed to these chemicals through wastewater discharge into the aquatic environment. Unlike mammals, fish have two isoforms of aromatase, one that predominates in the ovary (cyp19a1a) and a second (cyp19a1b) that prevails in the brain. Aromatase activity in fish brain can be 100 to 1000 times that in mammals and is associated with reproduction. We have developed a putative AOP for inhibition of brain aromatase in fish leading to reproductive dysfunction based on review of relevant literature and reproductive experiments with the marine fish cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) exposed to aromatase-inhibiting pharmaceuticals in the laboratory. The first KE in this AOP is a decrease in brain aromatase activity due to exposure to an aromatase inhibitor. KEs then progress through subsequent steps including decreas

  16. L-leucine supplementation worsens the adiposity of already obese rats by promoting a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Thais T; Torres-Leal, Francisco L; Campaña, Amanda B; Lima, Fabio B; Donato, Jose

    2014-04-02

    Several studies showed that l-leucine supplementation reduces adiposity when provided before the onset of obesity. We studied rats that were exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks before they started to receive l-leucine supplementation. Fat mass was increased in l-leucine-supplemented rats consuming the HFD. Accordingly, l-leucine produced a hypothalamic pattern of gene expression that favors fat accumulation. In conclusion, l-leucine supplementation worsened the adiposity of rats previously exposed to HFD possibly by central mechanisms.

  17. N-acetyl-L-leucine accelerates vestibular compensation after unilateral labyrinthectomy by action in the cerebellum and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lisa; Beck, Roswitha; Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  18. N-Acetyl-L-Leucine Accelerates Vestibular Compensation after Unilateral Labyrinthectomy by Action in the Cerebellum and Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Guoming; Potschka, Heidrun; Jahn, Klaus; Bartenstein, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Dutia, Mayank; Dieterich, Marianne; Strupp, Michael; la Fougère, Christian; Zwergal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An acute unilateral vestibular lesion leads to a vestibular tone imbalance with nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance. These deficits gradually decrease over days to weeks due to central vestibular compensation (VC). This study investigated the effects of i.v. N-acetyl-DL-leucine, N-acetyl-L-leucine and N-acetyl-D-leucine on VC using behavioural testing and serial [18F]-Fluoro-desoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG)-μPET in a rat model of unilateral chemical labyrinthectomy (UL). Vestibular behavioural testing included measurements of nystagmus, head roll tilt and postural imbalance as well as sequential whole-brain [18F]-FDG-μPET was done before and on days 1,3,7 and 15 after UL. A significant reduction of postural imbalance scores was identified on day 7 in the N-acetyl-DL-leucine (p < 0.03) and the N-acetyl-L-leucine groups (p < 0.01), compared to the sham treatment group, but not in the N-acetyl-D-leucine group (comparison for applied dose of 24 mg i.v. per rat, equivalent to 60 mg/kg body weight, in each group). The course of postural compensation in the DL- and L-group was accelerated by about 6 days relative to controls. The effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on postural compensation depended on the dose: in contrast to 60 mg/kg, doses of 15 mg/kg and 3.75 mg/kg had no significant effect. N-acetyl-L-leucine did not change the compensation of nystagmus or head roll tilt at any dose. Measurements of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) by means of μPET revealed that only N-acetyl-L-leucine but not N-acetyl-D-leucine caused a significant increase of rCGM in the vestibulocerebellum and a decrease in the posterolateral thalamus and subthalamic region on days 3 and 7. A similar pattern was found when comparing the effect of N-acetyl-L-leucine on rCGM in an UL-group and a sham UL-group without vestibular damage. In conclusion, N-acetyl-L-leucine improves compensation of postural symptoms after UL in a dose-dependent and specific manner, most likely by

  19. Climate Change: Basic Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Climate Change Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Climate Change: Basic Information On This Page Climate change is ...

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Ronan K; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria; however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant had significantly attenuated virulence. Recently, a contradictory report was published suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition, we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP, identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine, and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP.

  1. Leucine-nitrogen metabolism in the brain of conscious rats: its role as a nitrogen carrier in glutamate synthesis in glial and neuronal metabolic compartments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ryosei; Cohen, David M; Henry, Joseph F; Burrin, Douglas G; Reeds, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The source of nitrogen (N) for the de novo synthesis of brain glutamate, glutamine and GABA remains controversial. Because leucine is readily transported into the brain and the brain contains high activities of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT), we hypothesized that leucine is the predominant N-precursor for brain glutamate synthesis. Conscious and unstressed rats administered with [U-13C] and/or [15N]leucine as additions to the diet were killed at 0-9 h of continuous feeding. Plasma and brain leucine equilibrated rapidly and the brain leucine-N turnover was more than 100%/min. The isotopic dilution of [U-13C]leucine (brain/plasma ratio 0.61 +/- 0.06) and [15N]leucine (0.23 +/- 0.06) differed markedly, suggesting that 15% of cerebral leucine-N turnover derived from proteolysis and 62% from leucine synthesis via reverse transamination. The rate of glutamate synthesis from leucine was 5 micro mol/g/h and at least 50% of glutamate-N originally derived from leucine. The enrichment of [5-15N]glutamine was higher than [15N]ammonia in the brain, indicating glial ammonia generation from leucine via glutamate. The enrichment of [15N]GABA, [15N]aspartate, [15N]glutamate greater than [2-15N]glutamine suggests direct incorporation of leucine-N into both glial and neuronal glutamate. These findings provide a new insight for the role of leucine as N-carrier from the plasma pool and within the cerebral compartments.

  2. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  3. The radiolysis of tryptophan and leucine with P-32 beta-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, N. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper extends earlier experiments on the radiolysis of DL-tryptophan using P-32 beta-radiation to longer reaction times, observing complete destruction of tryptophan by secondary, nonradiolytic processes. In addition DL-leucine is irradiated with P-32 beta-irradiation at -196 C, leading to radiolyses to the extents of about 20-30%, but observing no concomitant asymmetric bias. The complete absence of asymmetric bias in the present and earlier (Bonner et al., 1979) radiolyses of aqueous tryptophan at -25 C and the present radiolyses of water-free leucine at -196 C using P-32 beta-radiation and its accompanying bremsstrahlung leave it an open question whether or not the Vester-Ulbricht beta-decay/bremsstrahlung mechanism for the origin of optical activity is a viable one.

  4. Parkinson's Disease: Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Autophagy, Intimate Enemies

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A.; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology. PMID:22970411

  5. Parkinson's disease: leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 and autophagy, intimate enemies.

    PubMed

    Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Niso-Santano, Mireia; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes Rodríguez, José M

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second common neurodegenerative disorder, after Alzheimer's disease. It is a clinical syndrome characterized by loss of dopamine-generating cells in the substancia nigra, a region of the midbrain. The etiology of Parkinson's disease has long been through to involve both genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease idiopathic. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism whereby a cell recycles or degrades damage proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. This degradative process has been associated with cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes including Parkinson's disease. We discuss the role of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 in autophagy, and how the deregulations of this degradative mechanism in cells can be implicated in the Parkinson's disease etiology.

  6. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  7. Structural and functional evolution of isopropylmalate dehydrogenases in the leucine and glucosinolate pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yan; Galant, Ashley; Pang, Qiuying; Strul, Johanna M.; Balogun, Sherifat F.; Jez, Joseph M.; Chen, Sixue

    2012-10-24

    The methionine chain-elongation pathway is required for aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants and evolved from leucine biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases (AtIPMDHs) play key roles in methionine chain-elongation for the synthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates (e.g. AtIPMDH1) and leucine (e.g. AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3). Here we elucidate the molecular basis underlying the metabolic specialization of these enzymes. The 2.25 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of AtIPMDH2 was solved to provide the first detailed molecular architecture of a plant IPMDH. Modeling of 3-isopropylmalate binding in the AtIPMDH2 active site and sequence comparisons of prokaryotic and eukaryotic IPMDH suggest that substitution of one active site residue may lead to altered substrate specificity and metabolic function. Site-directed mutagenesis of Phe-137 to a leucine in AtIPMDH1 (AtIPMDH1-F137L) reduced activity toward 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate by 200-fold, but enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-isopropylmalate to levels observed with AtIPMDH2 and AtIPMDH3. Conversely, the AtIPMDH2-L134F and AtIPMDH3-L133F mutants enhanced catalytic efficiency with 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate {approx}100-fold and reduced activity for 3-isopropylmalate. Furthermore, the altered in vivo glucosinolate profile of an Arabidopsis ipmdh1 T-DNA knock-out mutant could be restored to wild-type levels by constructs expressing AtIPMDH1, AtIPMDH2-L134F, or AtIPMDH3-L133F, but not by AtIPMDH1-F137L. These results indicate that a single amino acid substitution results in functional divergence of IPMDH in planta to affect substrate specificity and contributes to the evolution of specialized glucosinolate biosynthesis from the ancestral leucine pathway.

  8. Photoinduced fragmentation of gas-phase protonated leucine- enkephalin peptide in the VUV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, M. Lj; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; Giuliani, A.; Milosavljević, A. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this article we report new results for action spectroscopy of protonated peptide Leucine enkephalin (YGGFL). By coupling a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation beamline, we investigate photofragmentation pattern of this peptide, through the analysis of tandem mass spectra recorded over a range of VUV photon energies, below and above the ionization energy. The obtained fragmentation patterns are discussed and compared to previous results.

  9. Fragment-Based Discovery of Type I Inhibitors of Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design was successfully applied to maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). A low affinity (160 μM) fragment hit was identified, which bound to the hinge region with an atypical binding mode, and this was optimized using structure-based design into a low-nanomolar and cell-penetrant inhibitor, with a good selectivity profile, suitable for use as a chemical probe for elucidation of MELK biology. PMID:25589925

  10. Impact of prolonged leucine supplementation on protein synthesis and lean growth in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Daniel A; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2015-09-15

    Most low-birth weight infants experience extrauterine growth failure due to reduced nutrient intake as a result of feeding intolerance. The objective of this study was to determine whether prolonged enteral leucine supplementation improves lean growth in neonatal pigs fed a restricted protein diet. Neonatal pigs (n = 14-16/diet, 5 days old, 1.8 ± 0.3 kg) were fed by gastric catheter a whey-based milk replacement diet with either a high protein (HP) or restricted protein (RP) content or RP supplemented with leucine to the same level as in the HP diet (RPL). Pigs were fed 40 ml·kg body wt(-1)·meal(-1) every 4 h for 21 days. Feeding the HP diet resulted in greater total body weight and lean body mass compared with RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Masses of the longissimus dorsi muscle, heart, and kidneys were greater in the HP- than RP-fed pigs (P < 0.05). Body weight, lean body mass, and masses of the longissimus dorsi, heart, and kidneys in pigs fed the RPL diet were intermediate to RP- and HP-fed pigs. Protein synthesis and mTOR signaling were increased in all muscles with feeding (P < 0.05); leucine supplementation increased mTOR signaling and protein synthesis rate in the longissimus dorsi (P < 0.05). There was no effect of diet on indices of protein degradation signaling in any tissue (P > 0.05). Thus, when protein intake is chronically restricted, the capacity for leucine supplementation to enhance muscle protein accretion in neonatal pigs that are meal-fed milk protein-based diets is limited.

  11. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar.

  12. Systemic D-Phenylalanine and D-Leucine for Effective Treatment of Pain in the Horse

    PubMed Central

    McKibbin, L. S.; Cheng, R. S. S.

    1982-01-01

    This study showed that subcutaneous injection of a solution of D-amino acids produced effective analgesia in horses. It is postulated that systemic D-phenylalanine and D-leucine may become one of the safe, effective and nonaddictive drugs for acute and chronic pain treatment. These D-amino acids cause analgesia by presumably preserving brain endorphins. They may bind reversibly to enkephalinases and prevent enzymatic degradation of enkephalins. PMID:17422107

  13. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J.; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  14. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  15. Novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N inhibitors. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunhua; Cao, Jiangying; Liang, Xuewu; Huang, Yongxue; Wu, Ping; Li, Yingxia; Xu, Wenfang; Zhang, Yingjie

    2016-01-27

    Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) over-expressed on tumor cells and tumor microenvironment, plays critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Here we described the design, synthesis and preliminary activity studies of novel leucine ureido derivatives as aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13) inhibitors. The results showed that compound 7a had the most potent inhibitory activity against APN with the IC50 value of 20 nM, which could be used for further anticancer agent research.

  16. Overexpression and characterization of an extracellular leucine aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Matsushita-Morita, Mayumi; Tada, Sawaki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Hattori, Ryota; Marui, Junichiro; Furukawa, Ikuyo; Yamagata, Youhei; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Michio; Kashiwagi, Yutaka; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi

    2011-02-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), an enzyme used in the food industry, is an exopeptidase that removes an amino acid residue, primarily leucine (Leu), from the N-terminus of peptides and protein substrates. In this study, we focused on the leucine aminopeptidase A (lapA) gene from Aspergillus oryzae RIB40. To purify and characterize the LapA, lapA was overexpressed in A. oryzae RIB40 using the amyB promoter. LAP activity in the culture supernatant of one transformant harboring the lapA expression plasmid was 33 times that of the host strain. LapA was purified from the culture supernatant of this lapA-overexpressing strain by column chromatography. The purified recombinant LapA had a molecular mass of 33 kDa, and its N-terminal amino acid was the tyrosine at position 80 of the deduced amino acid sequence. Optimal enzyme activity was observed at 60°C and pH 8.5, and the enzyme was stable at temperatures up to 60°C and in the pH range 7.5-11. In transcriptional analysis, lapA was induced under alkaline conditions and expressed at a relatively low level under normal conditions. LapA showed maximum hydrolyzing activity for the substrate leucine para-nitroanilide (Leu-pNA), followed by substrates Phe-pNA (39% activity compared with Leu-pNA), Met-pNA, Lys-pNA, and Arg-pNA. In addition, LapA preferentially hydrolyzed peptides longer than tripeptides.

  17. Leucine supplementation chronically improves muscle protein synthesis in older adults consuming the RDA for protein

    PubMed Central

    Casperson, Shanon L.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Hewlings, Susan J.; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background & aim Protein-energy supplementation is routinely employed to combat muscle loss. However, success is often compromised by increased satiety, poor palatability, high costs and low compliance. Methods For 2-weeks we supplemented meals of older individuals with leucine (4 g/meal; 3 meals/day; days 2–14). Metabolic studies were performed prior to (Day 1) and following (Day 15) supplementation. Leucine was not provided on metabolic study days. Venous blood and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained during a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine. Mixed muscle fractional synthesis rate (FSR), body composition and markers of nutrient signaling (mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 phosphorylation) were measured before and after a low protein/carbohydrate simulated meal. Results The meal modestly increased FSR on Day 1 (postabsorptive: 0.063 ± 0.004 vs. postprandial: 0.075 ± 0.006%/h; p = 0.03), however, two weeks of leucine supplementation increased postabsorptive FSR (p = 0.004) and the response to the meal (p = 0.01) (postabsorptive: 0.074 ± 0.007 vs. postprandial: 0.10 ± 0.007%/h). Changes in FSR were mirrored by increased phosphorylation of mTOR, 4E-BP1 and p70S6K1 (p ≤ 0.1). No change in fat free mass was observed (p > 0.05). Conclusions In older adults, leucine supplementation may improve muscle protein synthesis in response to lower protein meals. PMID:22357161

  18. A genome-wide survey of homeodomain-leucine zipper genes and analysis of cold-responsive HD-Zip I members' expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenzhu; Chen, Xiuling; Guan, Xin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Tingting; Mouekouba, Liana Dalcantara Ongouya; Li, Jingfu; Wang, Aoxue

    2014-01-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) proteins are a kind of transcriptional factors that play a vital role in plant growth and development. However, no detailed information of HD-Zip family in tomato has been reported till now. In this study, 51 HD-Zip genes (SlHZ01-51) in this family were identified and categorized into 4 classes by exon-intron and protein structure in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genome. The synthetical phylogenetic tree of tomato, Arabidopsis and rice HD-Zip genes were established for an insight into their evolutionary relationships and putative functions. The results showed that the contribution of segmental duplication was larger than that of tandem duplication for expansion and evolution of genes in this family of tomato. The expression profile results under abiotic stress suggested that all SlHZ I genes were responsive to cold stress. This study will provide a clue for the further investigation of functional identification and the role of tomato HD-Zip I subfamily in plant cold stress responses and developmental events.

  19. Comparative genetics of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat resistance gene homologues in the genomes of two dicotyledons: tomato and arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Q; Liu, Y S; Budai-Hadrian, O; Sela, M; Carmel-Goren, L; Zamir, D; Fluhr, R

    2000-01-01

    The presence of a single resistance (R) gene allele can determine plant disease resistance. The protein products of such genes may act as receptors that specifically interact with pathogen-derived factors. Most functionally defined R-genes are of the nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) supergene family and are present as large multigene families. The specificity of R-gene interactions together with the robustness of plant-pathogen interactions raises the question of their gene number and diversity in the genome. Genomic sequences from tomato showing significant homology to genes conferring race-specific resistance to pathogens were identified by systematically "scanning" the genome using a variety of primer pairs based on ubiquitous NBS motifs. Over 70 sequences were isolated and 10% are putative pseudogenes. Mapping of the amplified sequences on the tomato genetic map revealed their organization as mixed clusters of R-gene homologues that showed in many cases linkage to genetically characterized tomato resistance loci. Interspecific examination within Lycopersicon showed the existence of a null allele. Consideration of the tomato and potato comparative genetic maps unveiled conserved syntenic positions of R-gene homologues. Phylogenetic clustering of R-gene homologues within tomato and other Solanaceae family members was observed but not with R-gene homologues from Arabidopsis thaliana. Our data indicate remarkably rapid evolution of R-gene homologues during diversification of plant families. PMID:10790405

  20. Liver functional metabolomics discloses an action of L-leucine against Streptococcus iniae infection in tilapias.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Mei; Yang, Man-Jun; Wang, Sanying; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus iniae seriously affects the intensive farming of tilapias. Much work has been conducted on prevention and control of S. iniae infection, but little published information on the metabolic response is available in tilapias against the bacterial infection, and no metabolic modulation way may be adopted to control this disease. The present study used GC/MS based metabolomics to characterize the metabolic profiling of tilapias infected by a lethal dose (LD50) of S. iniae and determined two characteristic metabolomes separately responsible for the survival and dying fishes. A reversal changed metabolite, decreased and increased l-leucine in the dying and survival groups, respectively, was identified as a biomarker which featured the difference between the two metabolomes. More importantly, exogenous l-leucine could be used as a metabolic modulator to elevate survival ability of tilapias infected by S. iniae. These results indicate that tilapias mount metabolic strategies to deal with bacterial infection, which can be regulated by exogenous metabolites such as l-leucine. The present study establishes an alternative way, metabolic modulation, to cope with bacterial infections.

  1. The CUG codon is decoded in vivo as serine and not leucine in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M A; Tuite, M F

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the yeast Candida albicans encodes a unique seryl-tRNA(CAG) that should decode the leucine codon CUG as serine. However, in vitro translation of several different CUG-containing mRNAs in the presence of this unusual seryl-tRNA(CAG) result in an apparent increase in the molecular weight of the encoded polypeptides as judged by SDS-PAGE even though the molecular weight of serine is lower than that of leucine. A possible explanation for this altered electrophoretic mobility is that the CUG codon is decoded as modified serine in vitro. To elucidate the nature of CUG decoding in vivo, a reporter system based on the C. albicans gene (RBP1) encoding rapamycin-binding protein (RBP), coupled to the promoter of the C. albicans TEF3 gene, was utilized. Sequencing and mass-spectrometry analysis of the recombinant RBP expressed in C. albicans demonstrated that the CUG codon was decoded exclusively as serine while the related CUU codon was translated as leucine. A database search revealed that 32 out of the 65 C. albicans gene sequences available have CUG codons in their open reading frames. The CUG-containing genes do not belong to any particular gene family. Thus the amino acid specified by the CUG codon has been reassigned within the mRNAs of C. albicans. We argue here that this unique genetic code change in cellular mRNAs cannot be explained by the 'Codon Reassignment Theory'. Images PMID:7784200

  2. Leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein contracts upon binding of ligand.

    PubMed

    Olah, G A; Trakhanov, S; Trewhella, J; Quiocho, F A

    1993-08-05

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and computer modeling have been used to study the effects of ligand binding to the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein, an initial component of the high-affinity active transport system for branched-chain aliphatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. Measurements were made with no ligand present and with either L-leucine or L-valine present. Upon binding of either leucine or valine, there is a decrease in the radius of gyration, from 23.2 +/- 0.2 to 22.2 +/- 0.2 A, and in the maximum particle dimension, from 82 +/- 3 to 73 +/- 3 A. The x-ray structure of the unbound form has been determined and gives a radius of gyration and a maximum dimension consistent with the values found for the solution structure in this study (Sack, J. S., Saper, M. A., and Quiocho, F. A. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 206, 171-191). The reduction in the radius of gyration and maximum dimension upon ligand binding can be accounted for by a substrate-induced cleft closure in a combined "hinge-twist" motion. Modeling of the substrate-bound state was done by comparison of this protein with another periplasmic binding protein (L-arabinose-binding protein), which possesses a similar two-lobe structure and for which the x-ray structure is known in its ligand-bound form.

  3. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  4. Impact of leucine supplementation on exercise training induced anti-cardiac remodeling effect in heart failure mice.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Melara, Thaís Plasti; de Souza, Pamella Ramona Moraes; Guimarães, Fabiana de Salvi; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-05-15

    Leucine supplementation potentiates the effects of aerobic exercise training (AET) on skeletal muscle; however, its potential effects associated with AET on cardiac muscle have not been clarified yet. We tested whether leucine supplementation would potentiate the anti-cardiac remodeling effect of AET in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced heart failure in mice (α2A/α2CARKO). Mice were assigned to five groups: wild type mice treated with placebo and sedentary (WT, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and sedentary (KO, n = 9), α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and sedentary (KOL, n = 11), α2A/α2CARKO treated with placebo and AET (KOT, n = 12) or α2A/α2CARKO treated with leucine and AET (KOLT, n = 12). AET consisted of four weeks on a treadmill with 60 min sessions (six days/week, 60% of maximal speed) and administration by gavage of leucine (1.35 g/kg/day) or placebo (distilled water). The AET significantly improved exercise capacity, fractional shortening and re-established cardiomyocytes' diameter and collagen fraction in KOT. Additionally, AET significantly prevented the proteasome hyperactivity, increased misfolded proteins and HSP27 expression. Isolated leucine supplementation displayed no effect on cardiac function and structure (KOL), however, when associated with AET (KOLT), it increased exercise tolerance to a higher degree than isolated AET (KOT) despite no additional effects on AET induced anti-cardiac remodeling. Our results provide evidence for the modest impact of leucine supplementation on cardiac structure and function in exercised heart failure mice. Leucine supplementation potentiated AET effects on exercise tolerance, which might be related to its recognized impact on skeletal muscle.

  5. Lean body mass change over 6 years is associated with dietary leucine intake in an older Danish population.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Cameron Keith; Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Capra, Sandra; Bauer, Judy; Raymond, Kyle; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2016-05-01

    Higher protein intake, and particularly higher leucine intake, is associated with attenuated loss of lean body mass (LBM) over time in older individuals. Dietary leucine is thought to be a key mediator of anabolism. This study aimed to assess this relationship over 6 years among younger and older adult Danes. Dietary leucine intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years in men and women, aged 35-65 years, participating in the Danish cohort of the WHO-MONICA (Multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) study (n 368). Changes in LBM over the 6 years were measured by bioelectrical impedance using equations developed for this Danish population. The association between leucine and LBM changes was examined using multivariate linear regression and ANCOVA analyses adjusted for potential confounders. After adjustment for baseline LBM, sex, age, energy intake and physical activity, leucine intake was associated with LBM change in those older than 65 years (n 79), with no effect seen in those younger than 65 years. Older participants in the highest quartile of leucine intake (7·1 g/d) experienced LBM maintenance, whereas lower intakes were associated with LBM loss over 6 years (for trend: β=0·434, P=0·03). Sensitivity analysis indicated no effect modification of sex or the presence of CVD. Greater leucine intake in conjunction with adequate total protein intake was associated with long-term LBM retention in a healthy older Danish population. This study corroborates findings from laboratory investigations in relation to protein and leucine intakes and LBM change. A more diverse and larger sample is needed for confirmation of these results.

  6. Fluency with Basic Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Kling, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, learning basic facts has focused on rote memorization of isolated facts, typically through the use of flash cards, repeated drilling, and timed testing. However, as many experienced teachers have seen, "drill alone does not develop mastery of single-digit combinations." In contrast, a fluency approach to learning basic addition…

  7. Basic Electronics I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, L. Paul

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of twenty-nine units of instruction in five major content areas: Orientation, Basic Principles of Electricity/Electronics, Fundamentals of Direct Current, Fundamentals of Alternating Current, and Applying for a Job. Each instructional unit includes some or all of…

  8. Romanian Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    The "Romanian Basic Course," consisting of 89 lesson units in eight volumes, is designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing Romanian (based on a 1-5 scale in which Level 5 is native speaker proficiency). Volume 1, which introduces basic sentences in dialog form with…

  9. TOOLS AND BASIC MACHINES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. School of Education.

    THIS BASIC READER IS A PART OF AN EXPERIMENTAL CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROJECT DESCRIBED IN VT 004 454, TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE SPECIAL NEW TRAINING MATERIALS TO TEACH BASIC VOCATIONAL TALENT SKILLS TO DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS WHICH WERE TESTED ON APPROXIMATELY 2,500 EIGHTH AND NINTH GRADERS IN EIGHT SCHOOL SYSTEMS ACROSS THE NATION. THIS READER WAS…

  10. Basic Science Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummel, Clete

    These six learning modules were developed for Lake Michigan College's Basic Science Training Program, a workshop to develop good study skills while reviewing basic science. The first module, which was designed to provide students with the necessary skills to study efficiently, covers the following topics: time management; an overview of a study…

  11. Exponentiation: A New Basic?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brent

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, the basic operations of school mathematics have been identified as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Notably, these operations are "basic," not because they are foundational to mathematics knowledge, but because they were vital to a newly industrialized and market-driven economy several hundred years…

  12. BASIC Beats PASCAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ever, Jacob

    1981-01-01

    Features of two versions of the BASIC programing language are compared with the features of the PASCAL programing language. The application chosen for comparison was a word processor. The conclusion was that PASCAL had the best language features, but BASIC had better systems capabilities. (MP)

  13. Biosynthesis of 4-methyleneglutamic acid by peanut seedlings: Evidence for the involvement of a distinct source of leucine

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, H.C.; Dekker, E.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Germinating peanut seeds accumulate 4-methyleneglutamic acid its {gamma}-amide(MeGlx), as well as 4-methylglutamic acid(MGlu) for which leucine has been implicated as a precursor. When we incubated detached peanut cotyledons with {sup 14}C-leucine for 24-96 hr, most of the label was found in non-extractable components, while small but significant amounts were present in MeGlx, MGlu, and free leucine. The level of leucine in storage protein of ungerminated seeds is similar to the maximum level of MeGlx found in germinated seeds; further correlations were observed in various peanut tissues between rapid accumulation of MeGlx and the presence of high levels of glyoxysomal enzymes (catalase and isocitrate lyase). These results suggest that during germination, most of the leucine in the seed storage protein is converted to MeGlx, possibly by a glyoxysomal oxidase system in cotyledons, whereas most of the free leucine for protein synthesis is formed de novo.

  14. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-05-02

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1(®) mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown.

  15. Hypertrophy-Promoting Effects of Leucine Supplementation and Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Pre-Senescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhi; Cholewa, Jason; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Yue-Qin; Shang, Hua-Yu; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Su, Quan-Sheng; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have indicated a positive influence of leucine supplementation and aerobic training on the aging skeletal muscle signaling pathways that control muscle protein balance and muscle remodeling. However, the effect of a combined intervention requires further clarification. Thirteen month old CD-1® mice were subjected to moderate aerobic exercise (45 min swimming per day with 3% body weight workload) and fed a chow diet with 5% leucine or 3.4% alanine for 8 weeks. Serum and plasma were prepared for glucose, urea nitrogen, insulin and amino acid profile analysis. The white gastrocnemius muscles were used for determination of muscle size and signaling proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation. The results show that both 8 weeks of leucine supplementation and aerobic training elevated the activity of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its downstream target p70S6K and 4E-BP1, inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) in white gastrocnemius muscle. Moreover, leucine supplementation in combination with exercise demonstrated more significant effects, such as greater CSA, protein content and altered phosphorylation (suggestive of increased activity) of protein synthesis signaling proteins, in addition to lower expression of proteins involved in protein degradation compared to leucine or exercise alone. The current study shows moderate aerobic training combined with 5% leucine supplementation has the potential to increase muscle size in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during aging, potentially through increased protein synthesis and decreased protein breakdown. PMID:27144582

  16. Leucine supplementation is anti-atrophic during paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    de Sá Souza, Helton; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Dáttilo, Murilo; Lee, Kil Sun; Mônico-Neto, Marcos; de Campos Giampa, Sara Quaglia; Phillips, Stuart M; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify sleep deprivation-induced atrophy and the muscle-specific fiber types affected and to determine the effects of leucine supplementation on atrophy and pertinent portions of the pathways of muscle protein synthesis and degradation in rats. A total of 46 Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: control (CTL), leucine supplementation (LEU), sleep deprivation (SD), and leucine supplementation + sleep deprivation (LEU + SD). Leucine supplementation was by gavage (1.35 g/kg/daily), and the animals were subjected to SD for 96 h. Testosterone and corticosterone concentrations, along with proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation and proteasome activity levels, were measured in the gastrocnemius (GA) muscle. Myosin ATPase staining was used to evaluate the different muscle fibers. After sleep deprivation, GA muscle and body masses decreased in the SD group compared to the CTL, LEU, and LEU + SD groups. There was no difference between groups in type I fiber cross-sectional area (CSA). The CSAs for type IIa fibers were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups, while the IIb fiber CSA was lower in the SD group vs. the CSAs in all other groups. The phospho (p)-Akt levels were lower in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL and LEU groups. The p-mTORC1 levels were higher in the LEU, SD, and LEU + SD groups vs. the CTL group. The p-p70S6k levels were higher in the LEU and LEU + SD groups; the 4E-BP1 levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups compared to those in the CTL and LEU groups, and the p-4E-BP1 levels were higher in the LEU and SD groups compared to those in the CTL group and even higher in the LEU + SD group compared to those in the LEU and SD groups. Ubiquitinated proteins, LC3, and p62/SQSTM, and proteasome activity levels were higher in the SD and LEU + SD groups vs. the LEU and CTL groups. Sleep deprivation led to the atrophy of IIa and IIb muscle fibers; however, leucine

  17. Characterization of the regulon controlled by the leucine-responsive regulatory protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ernsting, B R; Atkinson, M R; Ninfa, A J; Matthews, R G

    1992-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) has been shown to regulate, either positively or negatively, the transcription of several Escherichia coli genes in response to leucine. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze the patterns of polypeptide expression in isogenic lrp+ and lrp mutant strains in the presence or absence of leucine. The absence of a functional Lrp protein alters the expression of at least 30 polypeptides. The expression of the majority of these polypeptides is not affected by the presence or absence of 10 mM exogenous leucine. Outer membrane porins OmpC and OmpF, glutamine synthetase (GlnA), the small subunit of glutamate synthase (GltD), lysyl-tRNA synthetase form II (LysU), a high-affinity periplasmic binding protein specific for branched-chain amino acids (LivJ), W protein, and the enzymes of the pathway converting threonine to glycine, namely, threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase (Kbl), were identified as members of the Lrp regulon by electrophoretic analysis. We have shown that Lrp is a positive regulator of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase and that exogenous leucine has little or no effect on the expression of these proteins. In strains carrying a glnL deletion and in strains carrying the glnL2302 allele, which directs the synthesis of a GlnL protein that is constitutively active, expression of glutamine synthetase is no longer regulated by Lrp, demonstrating that the effect of Lrp on glutamine synthetase levels is indirect and requires an intact glnL gene. lrp::Tn10 strains grow poorly when arginine or ornithine is present as the sole nitrogen source in the medium. On the bases of present studies and previous research, we propose that Lrp is involved in the adaptation of E. coli cells to major shifts in environment, such as those which occur when E. coli leaves the intestinal tract of its animal host. Several genes required for amino acid and peptide transport and

  18. BASIC: Updating a Familiar Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyman, David H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses reasons for learning to program in BASIC, various versions of BASIC, BASIC compilers, and adherence to proposed standards. Brief reviews of six BASIC software packages are included. (12 references) (MES)

  19. Oral Leucine Supplementation Is Sensed by the Brain but neither Reduces Food Intake nor Induces an Anorectic Pattern of Gene Expression in the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Thais T.; Pedroso, João A. B.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Tirapegui, Julio; Donato, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Leucine activates the intracellular mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake. Although central infusion of leucine reduces food intake, it is still uncertain whether oral leucine supplementation is able to affect the hypothalamic circuits that control energy balance. We observed increased phosphorylation of p70s6k in the mouse hypothalamus after an acute oral gavage of leucine. We then assessed whether acute oral gavage of leucine induces the activation of neurons in several hypothalamic nuclei and in the brainstem. Leucine did not induce the expression of Fos in hypothalamic nuclei, but it increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the area postrema. In addition, oral gavage of leucine acutely increased the 24 h food intake of mice. Nonetheless, chronic leucine supplementation in the drinking water did not change the food intake and the weight gain of ob/ob mice and of wild-type mice consuming a low- or a high-fat diet. We assessed the hypothalamic gene expression and observed that leucine supplementation increased the expression of enzymes (BCAT1, BCAT2 and BCKDK) that metabolize branched-chain amino acids. Despite these effects, leucine supplementation did not induce an anorectic pattern of gene expression in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, our data show that the brain is able to sense oral leucine intake. However, the food intake is not modified by chronic oral leucine supplementation. These results question the possible efficacy of leucine supplementation as an appetite suppressant to treat obesity. PMID:24349566

  20. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  1. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  2. Basics of Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... energy and nutrients. The basic required nutrients are water, carbohydrates, proteins, fats, dietary fibers, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats provide energy in the form of calories. Alcohol (beer, wine, ...

  3. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  4. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  5. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  6. Getting back to basics.

    PubMed

    Maricich, Stephen M; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2006-07-14

    Advances in understanding basic developmental and physiological processes often have direct relevance to human disease. They provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms and reveal new pathways that can be exploited in diagnosis and the development of therapeutics.

  7. Heterogeneous basic catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Hideshi

    1995-05-01

    Heterogeneous acid catalysis attracted much attention primarily because heterogeneous acidic catalysts act as catalysts in petroleum refinery and are known as a main catalyst in the cracking process which is the largest process among the industrial chemical processes. In contrast to these extensive studies of heterogeneous acidic catalysts, fewer efforts have been given to the study of heterogeneous basic catalysts. The types of heterogeneous basic catalysts are listed in Table 1. Except for non-oxide catalysts, the basic sites are believed to be surface O atoms. The studies of heterogeneous catalysis have been continuous and progressed steadily. They have never been reviewed in the chemical Reviews before. It is more useful and informative to describe the studies of heterogeneous basic catalysis performed for a long period. In the present article, therefore, the cited papers are not restricted to those published recently, but include those published for the last 25 years. The paper first describes the generation of basic sites before describing methods used in the characterization of basic surfaces. These are indicator methods, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, UV absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, TPD of H{sub 2}, XPS, IR of CO{sub 2}, IR of pyrrole, and oxygen exchange between CO{sub 2} and the surface. The paper then discusses studies on the catalysis by heterogeneous basic catalysts. Some of these reactions are dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, amination, alkylation, ring transformation, and reactions of organosilanes. Catalysts discussed are single component metal oxides, zeolites, non-oxide types, and superbasic catalysts. 141 refs.

  8. A C-terminal di-leucine motif controls plasma membrane expression of PMCA4b.

    PubMed

    Antalffy, Géza; Pászty, Katalin; Varga, Karolina; Hegedűs, Luca; Enyedi, Agnes; Padányi, Rita

    2013-12-01

    Recent evidences show that the localization of different plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCAs) is regulated in various complex, cell type-specific ways. Here we show that in low-density epithelial and endothelial cells PMCA4b localized mostly in intracellular compartments and its plasma membrane localization was enhanced upon increasing density of cells. In good correlation with the enhanced plasma membrane localization a significantly more efficient Ca(2+) clearance was observed in confluent versus non-confluent HeLa cell cultures expressing mCherry-PMCA4b. We analyzed the subcellular localization and function of various C-terminally truncated PMCA4b variants and found that a truncated mutant PMCA4b-ct24 was mostly intracellular while another mutant, PMCA4b-ct48, localized more to the plasma membrane, indicating that a protein sequence corresponding to amino acid residues 1158-1181 contained a signal responsible for the intracellular retention of PMCA4b in non-confluent cultures. Alteration of three leucines to alanines at positions 1167-1169 resulted in enhanced cell surface expression and an appropriate Ca(2+) transport activity of both wild type and truncated pumps, suggesting that the di-leucine-like motif (1167)LLL was crucial in targeting PMCA4b. Furthermore, upon loss of cell-cell contact by extracellular Ca(2+) removal, the wild-type pump was translocated to the early endosomal compartment. Targeting PMCA4b to early endosomes was diminished by the L(1167-69)A mutation, and the mutant pump accumulated in long tubular cytosolic structures. In summary, we report a di-leucine-like internalization signal at the C-tail of PMCA4b and suggest an internalization-mediated loss of function of the pump upon low degree of cell-cell contact.

  9. Leucine disposal rate for assessment of amino acid metabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Gerald B.; Deger, Serpil M.; Chen, Guanhua; Bian, Aihua; Sha, Feng; Booker, Cindy; Kesler, Jaclyn T.; David, Sthuthi; Ellis, Charles D.; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2016-01-01

    Background Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and closely associated with poor outcomes. Insulin resistance and associated alterations in amino acid metabolism are potential pathways leading to PEW. We hypothesized that the measurement of leucine disposal during a hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamp (HEAC) procedure would accurately measure the sensitivity to insulin for its actions on concomitant carbohydrate and protein metabolism in MHD patients. Methods We examined 35 MHD patients and 17 control subjects with normal kidney function by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEGC) followed by HEAC clamp procedure to obtain leucine disposal rate (LDR) along with isotope tracer methodology to assess whole body protein turnover. Results The glucose disposal rate (GDR) by HEGC was 5.1 ± 2.1 mg/kg/min for the MHD patients compared to 6.3 ± 3.9 mg/kg/min for the controls (p = 0.38). The LDR during HEAC was 0.09 ± 0.03 mg/kg/min for the MHD patients compared to 0.11 ± 0.05 mg/kg/min for the controls (p = 0.009). The LDR level was correlated with whole body protein synthesis (r = 0.25; p = 0.08), with whole body protein breakdown (r = −0.38 p = 0.01) and net protein balance (r = 0.85; p < 0.001) in the overall study population. Correlations remained significant in subgroup analysis. The GDR derived by HEGC and LDR correlated well in the controls (r = 0.79, p < 0.001), but less so in the MHD patients (r = 0.58, p < 0.001). Conclusions Leucine disposal rate reliably measures amino acid utilization in MHD patients and controls in response to high dose insulin. PMID:27413537

  10. Clusters of isoleucine, leucine, and valine side chains define cores of stability in high‐energy states of globular proteins: Sequence determinants of structure and stability

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Sagar V.; Chan, Yvonne H.; Nobrega, R. Paul; Özen, Ayşegül

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Measurements of protection against exchange of main chain amide hydrogens (NH) with solvent hydrogens in globular proteins have provided remarkable insights into the structures of rare high‐energy states that populate their folding free‐energy surfaces. Lacking, however, has been a unifying theory that rationalizes these high‐energy states in terms of the structures and sequences of their resident proteins. The Branched Aliphatic Side Chain (BASiC) hypothesis has been developed to explain the observed patterns of protection in a pair of TIM barrel proteins. This hypothesis supposes that the side chains of isoleucine, leucine, and valine (ILV) residues often form large hydrophobic clusters that very effectively impede the penetration of water to their underlying hydrogen bond networks and, thereby, enhance the protection against solvent exchange. The linkage between the secondary and tertiary structures enables these ILV clusters to serve as cores of stability in high‐energy partially folded states. Statistically significant correlations between the locations of large ILV clusters in native conformations and strong protection against exchange for a variety of motifs reported in the literature support the generality of the BASiC hypothesis. The results also illustrate the necessity to elaborate this simple hypothesis to account for the roles of adjacent hydrocarbon moieties in defining stability cores of partially folded states along folding reaction coordinates. PMID:26660714

  11. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  12. Role and mechanism of action of leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 in bone

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weirong R; Goodluck, Helen; Zeng, Canjun; Mohan, Subburaman

    2017-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1) plays a critical role in regulating cytoskeletal organization, osteoclast activity, and bone resorption with little effect on bone formation parameters. Deficiency of Lrrk1 in mice causes a severe osteopetrosis in the metaphysis of the long bones and vertebrae bones, which makes LRRK1 an attractive alternative drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis and other high-turnover bone diseases. This review summarizes recent advances on the functions of the Lrrk1-related family members, Lrrk1 deficiency-induced skeletal phenotypes, LRRK1 structure–function, potential biological substrates and interacting proteins, and the mechanisms of LRRK1 action in osteoclasts. PMID:28326224

  13. Additive insulinogenic action of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin extract and leucine after exercise in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral intake of a specific extract of Opuntia ficus-indica cladode and fruit skin (OpunDia™) (OFI) has been shown to increase serum insulin concentration while reducing blood glucose level for a given amount of glucose ingestion after an endurance exercise bout in healthy young volunteers. However, it is unknown whether OFI-induced insulin stimulation after exercise is of the same magnitude than the stimulation by other insulinogenic agents like leucine as well as whether OFI can interact with those agents. Therefore, the aims of the present study were: 1) to compare the degree of insulin stimulation by OFI with the effect of leucine administration; 2) to determine whether OFI and leucine have an additive action on insulin stimulation post-exercise. Methods Eleven subjects participated in a randomized double-blind cross-over study involving four experimental sessions. In each session the subjects successively underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after a 30-min cycling bout at ~70% VO2max. At t0 and t60 during the OGTT, subjects ingested 75 g glucose and capsules containing either 1) a placebo; 2) 1000 mg OFI; 3) 3 g leucine; 4) 1000 mg OFI + 3 g leucine. Blood samples were collected before and at 30-min intervals during the OGTT for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. Results Whereas no effect of leucine was measured, OFI reduced blood glucose at t90 by ~7% and the area under the glucose curve by ~15% and increased serum insulin concentration at t90 by ~35% compared to placebo (P<0.05). From t60 to the end of the OGTT, serum insulin concentration was higher in OFI+leucine than in placebo which resulted in a higher area under the insulin curve (+40%, P<0.05). Conclusion Carbohydrate-induced insulin stimulation post-exercise can be further increased by the combination of OFI with leucine. OFI and leucine could be interesting ingredients to include together in recovery drinks to resynthesize muscle glycogen faster post

  14. Identification of valine/leucine/isoleucine and threonine/alanine/glycine proton-spin systems of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase by selective deuteration and selective protonation.

    PubMed Central

    Bock-Möbius, I; Brune, M; Wittinghofer, A; Zimmermann, H; Leberman, R; Dauvergne, M T; Zimmermann, S; Brandmeier, B; Rösch, P

    1991-01-01

    Adenylate kinase from two types of Escherichia coli strains, a wild-type and a leucine-auxotrophic strain, was purified. On the one hand, growing the leucine-auxotrophic bacteria on a medium containing deuterated leucine yielded E. coli adenylate kinase with all leucine residues deuterated. On the other hand, by growing the wild-type bacteria on deuterated medium with phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine present as protonated specimens, 80% randomly deuterated enzyme with protonated phenylalanine, threonine and isoleucine residues could be prepared. Use of these proteins enabled identification of the spin systems of these amino acid residues in the n.m.r. spectra of the protein. PMID:1991031

  15. Crystal Structure of FadA Adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum Reveals a Novel Oligomerization Motif, the Leucine Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Yamada, Mitsunori; Ikegami, Akihiko; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2009-04-07

    Many bacterial appendages have filamentous structures, often composed of repeating monomers assembled in a head-to-tail manner. The mechanisms of such linkages vary. We report here a novel protein oligomerization motif identified in the FadA adhesin from the Gram-negative bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the secreted form of FadA (mFadA) reveals two antiparallel {alpha}-helices connected by an intervening 8-residue hairpin loop. Leucine-leucine contacts play a prominent dual intra- and intermolecular role in the structure and function of FadA. First, they comprise the main association between the two helical arms of the monomer; second, they mediate the head-to-tail association of monomers to form the elongated polymers. This leucine-mediated filamentous assembly of FadA molecules constitutes a novel structural motif termed the 'leucine chain.' The essential role of these residues in FadA is corroborated by mutagenesis of selected leucine residues, which leads to the abrogation of oligomerization, filament formation, and binding to host cells.

  16. Toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities in wetland water and sediment measured using leucine incorporation and potential denitrification.

    PubMed

    Milenkovski, Susann; Bååth, Erland; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Berglund, Olof

    2010-02-01

    We assessed potential toxicity of fungicides to natural bacterial communities from a constructed wetland, located in southern Sweden, and compared the sensitivity of two endpoints indicating bacterial activity, leucine incorporation, and potential denitrification, in detecting toxicity. The effects of eight fungicides (benomyl, carbendazim, carboxin, captan, cycloheximide, fenpropimorph, propiconazole, and thiram), two bactericides (bronopol and chlortetracycline) as controls, and one reference compound (3,5-dichlorophenol), were tested in a water-sediment microcosm set-up. Leucine incorporation was measured in both the water and sediment column, while potential denitrification was measured for the entire microcosm. The bactericides and the reference compound gave sigmoid concentration-response curves for both endpoints in all but one case. The fungicides thiram, captan, and benomyl, and to a lesser extent fenpropimorph and propiconazole had quantifiable toxic effects on leucine incorporation, with EC(50) values ranging from 3 to 70 mg l(-1), while carbendazim, carboxin, and cycloheximide had little effect at the investigated concentrations. Only thiram and captan inhibited potential denitrification; the other fungicides showed no quantifiable effect. A greater toxic effect on leucine incorporation was recorded for bacterial communities associated with the water column, compared to the sediment column, for all tested compounds. Leucine incorporation was the more sensitive method for toxicity assessment of bacterial communities, and also allowed for a rapid and simple way of comparing exposure in the sediment and water column, making it an attractive standard method for community based toxicological assays in aquatic environments.

  17. Nuclear localization of a putative Phytophthora sojae bZIP1 transcription factor is mediated by multiple targeting motifs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-18

    Oomycetes are fungal-like eukaryotic microbes in the kingdom Stramenopila. We recently found that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses nuclear localization signals (NLSs) for translocation of proteins into the nucleus that differ from conventional well-characterized NLSs from mammals and yeast. Here we have characterized in depth the nuclear localization signals of a P. sojae basic leucine zipper transcription factor, PsbZIP1. Nuclear localization of PsbZIP1 was determined by a central conserved region overlapping the DNA binding domain. Mutational analysis of this region identified four distinct elements that contributed multiplicatively to nuclear localization, but the conserved DNA binding residues were not required. Three of the elements showed autonomous NLS activity and the fourth served as a nuclear localization enhancer. Sequences within two of the nuclear localization elements defined a new form of bipartite NLS consisting of a triplet of basic residues followed by a tail of scattered basic amino acids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Basic research championed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebele, Elaine

    In April, the Office of National Science and Technology Policy released its biennial report to Congress. Science and Technology: Shaping the Twenty-First Century addresses the President's policy for maintaining U.S. leadership in science and technology, significant developments, and important national issues in science, and opportunities to use science and technology in federal programs and national goals. The administration strongly supports basic research as a sound investment and an inspiration to society. As corporate laboratories increasingly favor applied R&D projects, the federal government is becoming the dominant sponsor of long-term, basic research.

  19. Focus on Basics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus on Basics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Together, these four newsletters contain 36 articles devoted to adult literacy research and practice and the relationship between them. The following articles are included: "A Productive Partnership" (Richard J. Murnane, Bob Bickerton); "Welcome to 'Focus on Basics'" (Barbara Garner); "Applying Research on the Last Frontier" (Karen Backlund, Kathy…

  20. Adult Basic Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet, aimed at adult basic education students, pinpoints and summarizes a few common spelling rules to help make spelling easier, and includes a component on using the dictionary. In the text, each rule is presented with many examples. Exercises follow each spelling rule, allowing students the opportunity to apply the rule to specific…

  1. Turkish Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    These 14 volumes of the Defense Language Institute's basic course in Turkish consist of 112 lesson units designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Turkish. (Native-speaker fluency is Level 5.) An introduction to the sound system, vowel harmony, and syllable division…

  2. Swahili Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This basic audiolingual course in standard Swahili appears in six volumes, Lesson Units 1-56. Units consist of a "blueprint" prefatory page outlining the phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures and new vocabulary to be presented; perception drills; Swahili dialog with cartoon guides and English translation; pattern and recombination…

  3. Basic Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, John

    Intended as a guide to the use of different media for use in the classroom, this document demonstrates alternative approaches that may be taken to depicting and communicating images and concepts to others. Some basic tools and materials--including a ruler, matte knife, rubber cement, stapler, felt-tip pens, paint brushes, and lettering pens--are…

  4. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  5. Developing Basic Electronics Aptitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeshore Technical Coll., Cleveland, WI.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for basic training in electrical and electronic theory to enable participants to analyze circuits and use test equipment to verify electrical operations and to succeed in the beginning electrical and electronic courses in the Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) electronics programs. The course includes…

  6. Basic Experiments in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andresen, S. G.

    Presented is a set of laboratory experiments developed to provide students with demonstrations and hands-on experiences with a variety of basic communications methods. These experiments may be used with students who have training in engineering, as well as those with social sciences who have no engineering background. Detailed exercises dealing…

  7. Basic Soils. Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Dept. of Agricultural and Industrial Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use in teaching a course in basic soils that is intended for college freshmen. Addressed in the individual lessons of the unit are the following topics: the way in which soil is formed, the physical properties of soil, the chemical properties of soil, the biotic properties of soil, plant-soil-water…

  8. Focus on Basics, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus on Basics, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains the four 1998 quarterly issues of this newsletter that present best practices, current research on adult learning and literacy, and information on how research is used by adult basic education teachers, counselors, program administrators, and policy makers. The following are among the major articles included: "Power,…

  9. Sara Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, James E.; Maraby, Julien

    The basic plan of this course in Sara is modeled after "An Experimental Course in Hausa" (FSI 1965). The course uses short cycles consisting of mimicry followed by conversations built on the same vocabulary and syntactic pattern. The format has been condensed and altered. The course contains 95 cycles and would require approximately 50 hours to…

  10. Baby Bath Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel more comfortable at bath time. Start by learning baby bath basics. There's no need to give your newborn a bath every day. Three times a week might be enough until your baby becomes more mobile. Bathing your baby too much can dry out ...

  11. Projectable Basic Electronics Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    H'ng, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages derived from constructing and using a Projectable Basic Electronics Kit and provides: (1) list of components; (2) diagrams of 10 finished components (resistor; capacitor; diode; switch; bulb; transistor; meter; variable capacitor; coil; connecting terminal); and (3) diode and transistor activities. (JN)

  12. Computer Programming: BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Patience; And Others

    This guide was prepared to help teachers of the Lincoln Public School's introductory computer programming course in BASIC to make the necessary adjustments for changes made in the course since the purchase of microcomputers and such peripheral devices as television monitors and disk drives, and the addition of graphics. Intended to teach a…

  13. Basic Publication Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savedge, Charles E., Ed.

    Designed for students who produce newspapers and newsmagazines in junior high, middle, and elementary schools, this booklet is both a scorebook and a fundamentals text. The scorebook provides realistic criteria for judging publication excellence at these educational levels. All the basics for good publications are included in the text of the…

  14. Basic Writing: Progressive Proofreading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Lynette C.

    Writing problems in the basic college freshman writing course result from the students' misconception that once they get the required number of words down on paper their compositions are unalterable, and teachers' misconception that serving as an editor, correcting errors and rewriting sentences, is an effective teaching tool. Students'…

  15. Basic Engineer Equipment Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by basic engineer equipment mechanics. Addressed in the four individual units of the course are the following topics: mechanics and their tools (mechanics, hand tools, and power…

  16. Basic Structure Content Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Douglas N.; Helmes, Edward

    1979-01-01

    A basic structure approach is proposed for obtaining multidimensional scale values for attitude, achievement, or personality items from response data. The technique permits the unconfounding of scale values due to response bias and content and partitions item indices of popularity or difficulty among a number of relevant dimensions. (Author/BH)

  17. Internet Training: The Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Gail; Wichowski, Chester P.

    This paper outlines the basic information teachers need to know to use the World Wide Web for research and communication, using Netscape 3.04. Topics covered include the following: what is the World Wide Web?; what is a browser?; accessing the Web; moving around a web document; the Uniform Resource Locator (URL); Bookmarks; saving and printing a…

  18. Basic Electronics II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willison, Neal A.; Shelton, James K.

    Designed for use in basic electronics programs, this curriculum guide is comprised of 15 units of instruction. Unit titles are Review of the Nature of Matter and the P-N Junction, Rectifiers, Filters, Special Semiconductor Diodes, Bipolar-Junction Diodes, Bipolar Transistor Circuits, Transistor Amplifiers, Operational Amplifiers, Logic Devices,…

  19. FULA BASIC COURSE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SWIFT, LLOYD B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BEGINNING COURSE IS AN INTRODUCTION TO FULA (KNOWN VARIOUSLY AS FULANI, FUL, PEUL, OR PHEUL), A NIGER-CONGO LANGUAGE SPOKEN THROUGHOUT THE GRASSLAND AREAS OF WEST AFRICA FROM THE ATLANTIC TO CAMEROUN. THE TEXT IS ONE OF A SERIES OF SHORT BASIC COURSES IN SELECTED AFRICAN LANGUAGES BEING PREPARED BY THE FOREIGN SERVICE INSTITUTE. IT IS…

  20. Basic Pneumatics. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessehaye, Michael

    This instructor's guide is designed for use by industrial vocational teachers in teaching a course on basic pneumatics. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: an introduction to pneumatics (including the operation of a service station hoist); fundamentals and physical laws; air compressors (positive displacement compressors;…

  1. Lippincott Basic Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monterey Peninsula Unified School District, Monterey, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 459 students in grades 1-3 at 15 elementary schools. The program employs a diagnostic-prescriptive approach to instruction in a nongraded setting through the use of the Lippincott Basic Reading program. When a child enters the program, he is introduced to a decoding…

  2. Hindi Basic Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, J. Martin; And Others

    This reader is intended to accompany the Basic Course in Spoken Hindi. Following an outline of the Devanagari script, 20 lessons are presented. Each consists of a reading selection, several illustrative sentences in English and Hindi, and a series of questions. Most of the reading selections were adapted from the magazine "Bal-Bharati."…

  3. Basic Blueprint Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deieso, Angie; Meier, Jean

    This workbook, designed for workplace literacy courses, contains materials for a basic course in blueprint reading. The course provides a review of mathematics, information about using measuring tools to read blueprints, an explanation of the principles of blueprint drawing, and instructions on interpreting blueprint specifications. Introductory…

  4. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  5. Basics of Online Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadow, Charles T.; Cochrane, Pauline (Atherton)

    Intended to teach the principles of interactive bibliographic searching to those with little or no prior experience, this textbook explains the basic elements of online information retrieval and compares the major database search systems. Its chapters address (1) relevant definitions and vocabulary; (2) the conceptual facets of database searching,…

  6. Reading for Basic Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document offers materials for a year-long course on general basic reading skills that was part of a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey), and its partners. The document contains the following: (1) outlines (each of which contains objectives, a topical outline, and list of textbooks) for two…

  7. Assessing Basic Fact Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kling, Gina; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors share a variety of ways to formatively assess basic fact fluency. The define fluency, raise some issues related to timed testing, and then share a collection of classroom-tested ideas for authentic fact fluency assessment. This article encourages teachers to try a variety of alternative assessments from this sampling,…

  8. Basic Internet Software Toolkit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Once schools are connected to the Internet, the next step is getting network workstations configured for Internet access. This article describes a basic toolkit comprising software currently available on the Internet for free or modest cost. Lists URLs for Web browser, Telnet, FTP, file decompression, portable document format (PDF) reader,…

  9. Korean Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    These 11 volumes of the Korean Basic Course comprise 112 lesson units designed to train native English language speakers to Level 3 proficiency in comprehension and speaking and Level 2 proficiency in reading and writing Korean. (Level 5 on this scale is native-speaker level.) Intended for classroom use in the Defense Language Institute intensive…

  10. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  11. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  12. Basic Electricity. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Donald C.

    A primarily illustrated introduction to the basics of electricity is presented in this guide, the first of a set of four designed for the student interested in a vocation in electrical work. This guide is intended for the first-year student and provides mostly diagrams with accompanying defintions/information in three units, each covering one of…

  13. Leucine is a major regulator of muscle protein synthesis in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Columbus, Daniel A; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10% of infants born in the United States are of low birth weight. Growth failure during the neonatal period is a common occurrence in low birth weight infants due to their inability to tolerate full feeds, concerns about advancing amino acid supply, and high nutrient requirements for growth. An improved understanding of the nutritional regulation of growth during this critical period of development is vital for the development of strategies to improve lean growth. Past studies with animal models have demonstrated that muscle protein synthesis is increased substantially following a meal and that this increase is due to the postprandial rise in amino acids as well as insulin, which independently stimulate protein synthesis in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner. Further studies have elucidated that leucine, in particular, as well as its metabolites, α-ketoisocaproic acid and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate, have unique anabolic properties. Supplementation with leucine, provided either parenterally or enterally, has been shown to enhance muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs, making it an ideal candidate for stimulating growth of low birth weight infants. PMID:25408462

  14. Structure and Mechanism of Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: INSIGHTS ON LEUCINE AND ALIPHATIC GLUCOSINOLATE BIOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Nwumeh, Ronald; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-06-24

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) and 3-(2'-methylthio)ethylmalate dehydrogenase catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of different β-hydroxyacids in the leucine- and methionine-derived glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways, respectively, in plants. Evolution of the glucosinolate biosynthetic enzyme from IPMDH results from a single amino acid substitution that alters substrate specificity. Here, we present the x-ray crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana IPMDH2 (AtIPMDH2) in complex with either isopropylmalate and Mg(2+) or NAD(+) These structures reveal conformational changes that occur upon ligand binding and provide insight on the active site of the enzyme. The x-ray structures and kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants are consistent with a chemical mechanism in which Lys-232 activates a water molecule for catalysis. Structural analysis of the AtIPMDH2 K232M mutant and isothermal titration calorimetry supports a key role of Lys-232 in the reaction mechanism. This study suggests that IPMDH-like enzymes in both leucine and glucosinolate biosynthesis pathways use a common mechanism and that members of the β-hydroxyacid reductive decarboxylase family employ different active site features for similar reactions.

  15. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  16. Human leucine zipper protein promotes hepatic steatosis via induction of apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minsoo; Kim, Jeonghan; An, Hyoung-Tae; Ko, Jesang

    2017-02-28

    The molecular mechanism of stress-induced hepatic steatosis is not well known. Human leucine zipper protein (LZIP) regulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell migration, and stress response. The aim of this study was to determine the regulatory role of LZIP in stress-induced hepatic steatosis. We used a microarray analysis to identify LZIP-induced genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. LZIP increased the expression of apolipoprotein A-IV (APOA4) mRNA. In the presence of stress inducer, APOA4 promoter analysis was performed and LZIP-induced lipid accumulation was monitored in mouse primary cells and human tissues. Under Golgi stress conditions, LZIP underwent proteolytic cleavage and was phosphorylated by AKT to protect against proteasome degradation. The stabilized N-terminal LZIP was translocated to the nucleus, where it directly bound to the APOA4 promoter, leading to APOA4 induction. LZIP-induced APOA4 expression resulted in increased absorption of surrounding free fatty acids. LZIP also promoted hepatic steatosis in mouse liver. Both LZIP and APOA4 were highly expressed in human steatosis samples. Our findings indicate that LZIP is a novel modulator of APOA4 expression and hepatic lipid metabolism. LZIP might be a therapeutic target for developing treatment strategies for hepatic steatosis and related metabolic diseases.-Kang, M., Kim, J., An, H.-T., Ko, J. Human leucine zipper protein promotes hepatic steatosis via induction of apolipoprotein A-IV.

  17. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  18. Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase promotes axon growth in mammalian central nervous system neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meifan; Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Wong, Hetty N.; Tress, Oliver; Nguyen, Mallorie T.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Jin, Yishi; Zheng, Binhai

    2016-01-01

    Leucine Zipper-bearing Kinase (LZK/MAP3K13) is a member of the mixed lineage kinase family with high sequence identity to Dual Leucine Zipper Kinase (DLK/MAP3K12). While DLK is established as a key regulator of axonal responses to injury, the role of LZK in mammalian neurons is poorly understood. By gain- and loss-of-function analyses in neuronal cultures, we identify LZK as a novel positive regulator of axon growth. LZK signals specifically through MKK4 and JNKs among MAP2Ks and MAPKs respectively in neuronal cells, with JNK activity positively regulating LZK protein levels. Neuronal maturation or activity deprivation activates the LZK-MKK4-JNK pathway. LZK and DLK share commonalities in signaling, regulation, and effects on axon extension. Furthermore, LZK-dependent regulation of DLK protein expression and the lack of additive effects on axon growth upon co-manipulation suggest complex functional interaction and cross-regulation between these two kinases. Together, our data support the possibility for two structurally related MAP3Ks to work in concert to mediate axonal responses to external insult or injury in mammalian CNS neurons. PMID:27511108

  19. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla-Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis.

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of a M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-M; Ju, H-L; Sohn, W-M; Na, B-K

    2011-05-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are a group of metalloexopeptidases that catalyse the sequential removal of amino acids from the N-termini of polypeptides or proteins. They play an important role in regulating the balance between catabolism and anabolism in living cells. LAPs of apicomplexa parasitic protozoa have been intensively investigated due to their crucial roles in parasite biology as well as their potentials as drug targets. In this study, we identified an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum (CpLAP) and characterized the biochemical properties of the recombinant protein. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of CpLAP with those of other organisms revealed that typical amino acid residues essential for metal binding and active-site formation in M17 LAPs were well conserved in CpLAP. Recombinant CpLAP shared similar biochemical properties such as optimal pH, stability at neutral pHs, and metal-binding characteristics with other characterized LAPs. The enzyme showed a marked preference for Leu and its activity was effectively inhibited by bestatin. These results collectively suggest that CpLAP is a typical member of the M17 LAP family and may play an important role in free amino acid regulation in the parasite.

  1. Immunization with recombinant leucine aminopeptidase showed protection against Fasciola gigantica in mice.

    PubMed

    Changklungmoa, Narin; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Chaithirayanon, Kulathida; Chaichanasak, Pannigan; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin; Chantree, Pathanin; Sansri, Veerawat; Itagaki, Tadashi; Sobhon, Prasert

    2013-10-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is expressed in all stages of Fasciola gigantica and, hence, is considered as a potential vaccine candidate. In this study, we have tested a vaccine potential of LAP and the types of immune responses it elicited in vaccinated mice. Recombinant F. gigantica leucine aminopeptidase (rFgLAP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, BL21 (DE3). The imprinting control region mice subcutaneously immunized with 50 μg of rFgLAP combined with Freund's adjuvant (n = 10) exhibited a significant reduction in worm recoveries when compared with non-immunized and Freund's adjuvant controls at 60.8 and 64.3%, respectively, and both T helper (Th)1 and Th2 humoral immune responses were elicited in the hosts as reflected by the levels of IgG1 and IgG2a, with Th2 predominating. The levels of IgG1- and IgG2a-specific antibodies to rFgLAP were inversely and significantly correlated with the numbers of worm recoveries. The rFgLAP-vaccinated mice showed significantly reduced levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and liver damage. These indicated that rFgLAP has a potential as a vaccine candidate against F. gigantica, whose efficacy will be studied further in economic animals including cattle, sheep, and goat.

  2. Non-universal decoding of the leucine codon CUG in several Candida species.

    PubMed Central

    Ohama, T; Suzuki, T; Mori, M; Osawa, S; Ueda, T; Watanabe, K; Nakase, T

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that CUG, a universal leucine codon, is read as serine in an asporogenic yeast, Candida cylindracea. The distribution of this non-universal genetic code in various yeast species was studied using an in vitro translation assay system with a synthetic messenger RNA containing CUG codons in-frame. It was found that CUG is used as a serine codon in six out of the fourteen species examined, while it is used for leucine in the remaining eight. The tRNA species responsible for the translation of codon CUG as serine was detected in all the six species in which CUG is translated as serine. The grouping according to the CUG codon assignments in these yeast species shows a good correlation with physiological classification by the chain lengths of the isoprenoid moiety of ubiquinone and the cell-wall sugar contained in the yeasts. The six Candida species examined in which CUG is used as serine belong to one distinct group in Hemiascomycetes. PMID:8371978

  3. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    SciTech Connect

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C.; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  4. A putative hybrid swarm within Oonopsis foliosa (Asteraceae: Astereae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.F.; Brown, G.K.

    2004-01-01

    Oo??nopsis foliosa var. foliosa and var. monocephala are endemic to short-grass steppe of southeastern Colorado and until recently were considered geographically disjunct. The only known qualitative feature separating these 2 varieties is floral head type; var. foliosa has radiate heads, whereas var. monocephala heads are discoid. Sympatry between these varieties is restricted to a small area in which a range of parental types and intermediate head morphologies is observed. We used distribution mapping, morphometric analyses, chromosome cytology, and pollen stainability to characterize the sympatric zone. Morphometrics confirms that the only discrete difference between var. foliosa and var. monocephala is radiate versus discoid heads, respectively. The outer florets of putative hybrid individuals ranged from conspicuously elongated yet radially symmetric disc-floret corollas, to elongated radially asymmetric bilabiate- or deeply cleft corollas, to stunted ray florets with appendages remnant of corolla lobes. Chromosome cytology of pollen mother cells from both putative parental varieties and a series of intermediate morphological types collected at the sympatric zone reveal evidence of translocation heterozygosity. Pollen stainability shows no significant differences in viability between the parental varieties and putative hybrids. The restricted distribution of putative hybrids to a narrow zone of sympatry between the parental types and the presence of meiotic chromosome-pairing anomalies in these intermediate plants are consistent with a hybrid origin. The high stainability of putative-hybrid pollen adds to a growing body of evidence that hybrids are not universally unfit.

  5. Requirement for lysosomal localization of mTOR for its activation differs between leucine and other amino acids.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Carraro, Valérie; Gourbeyre, Ophélie; Parry, Laurent; B'Chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth and metabolism. It controls many cell functions by integrating nutrient availability and growth factor signals. Amino acids, and in particular leucine, are among the main positive regulators of mTORC1 signaling. The current model for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids involves the movement of mTOR to the lysosome mediated by the Rag-GTPases. Here, we have examined the control of mTORC1 signaling and mTOR localization by amino acids and leucine in serum-fed cells, because both serum growth factors (or, e.g., insulin) and amino acids are required for full activation of mTORC1 signaling. We demonstrate that mTORC1 activity does not closely correlate with the lysosomal localization of mTOR. In particular, leucine controls mTORC1 activity without any detectable modification of the lysosomal localization of mTOR, indicating that the signal(s) exerted by leucine is likely distinct from those exerted by other amino acids. In addition, knock-down of the Rag-GTPases attenuated the inhibitory effect of amino acid- or leucine-starvation on the phosphorylation of mTORC1 targets. Furthermore, data from cells where Rag expression has been knocked down revealed that leucine can promote mTORC1 signaling independently of the lysosomal localization of mTOR. Our data complement existing models for the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids and provide new insights into this important topic.

  6. Basic Emotions: A Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mason, William A.; Capitanio, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Emotionality is a basic feature of behavior. The argument over whether the expression of emotions is based primarily on culture (constructivism, nurture) or biology (natural forms, nature) will never be resolved because both alternatives are untenable. The evidence is overwhelming that at all ages and all levels of organization, the development of emotionality is epigenetic: The organism is an active participant in its own development. To ascribe these effects to “experience” was the best that could be done for many years. With the rapid acceleration of information on how changes in organization are actually brought about, it is a good time to review, update, and revitalize our views of experience in relation to the concept of basic emotion. PMID:27110280

  7. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  8. Identification of a di-leucine motif within the C terminus domain of the Menkes disease protein that mediates endocytosis from the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J; Jones, E E; Levy, E R; Martin, R L; Ponnambalam, S; Monaco, A P

    1999-06-01

    The protein encoded by the Menkes disease gene (MNK) is localised to the Golgi apparatus and cycles between the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane in cultured cells on addition and removal of copper to the growth medium. This suggests that MNK protein contains active signals that are involved in the retention of the protein to the trans-Golgi network and retrieval of the protein from the plasma membrane. Previous studies have identified a signal involved in Golgi retention within transmembrane domain 3 of MNK. To identify a motif sufficient for retrieval of MNK from the plasma membrane, we analysed the cytoplasmic domain, downstream of transmembrane domain 7 and 8. Chimeric constructs containing this cytoplasmic domain fused to the reporter molecule CD8 localised the retrieval signal(s) to 62 amino acids at the C terminus. Further studies were performed on putative internalisation motifs, using site-directed mutagenesis, protein expression, chemical treatment and immunofluorescence. We observed that a di-leucine motif (L1487L1488) was essential for rapid internalisation of chimeric CD8 proteins and the full-length Menkes cDNA from the plasma membrane. We suggest that this motif mediates the retrieval of MNK from the plasma membrane into the endocytic pathway, via the recycling endosomes, but is not sufficient on its own to return the protein to the Golgi apparatus. These studies provide a basis with which to identify other motifs important in the sorting and delivery of MNK from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus.

  9. Basic Research Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) more than twenty years ago led to the evolution of the Internet. Likewise, molecular...for detection/classification Acoustic imaging in shallow water Ray chaos models Acoustic holography 4 -6 4.2 Chemistry Chemistry research directly...strength, high-ductility structural materials. 4 -38 Table 4.8.1. Basic Research Funding for Terrestrial Sciences ($ Mllions ) Program Element Service

  10. Basics of Biosafety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Willy

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the basics of biosafety and the importance of assuring proper biosafety practices. The objectives of the presentation are to review regulations about biosafety, and the different biosafety levels; the biosafety facilities at Johnson Space Center; the usage and maintenance of the biosafety cabinet, the proper methods to handle biologically hazardous materials upon exposure, and the methods of cleanup in the event of a spill, and the training requirements that are mandated for personnel handling biologically hazardous materials.

  11. Identification and characterization of a putative baculoviral transcriptional factor IE-1 from Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus.

    PubMed

    Rashidan, Kianoush Khajeh; Nassoury, Nasha; Merzouki, Abderrazzak; Guertin, Claude

    2002-11-30

    A gene that encodes a protein homologue to baculoviral IE-1 was identified and sequenced in the genome of the Choristoneura fumiferana granulovirus (ChfuGV). The gene has an 1278 nucleotide (nt) open-reading frame (ORF) that encodes 426 amino acids with an estimated molecular weight of 50.33 kDa. At the nucleotide level, several cis-acting regulatory elements were detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV along with other studied granuloviruses (GVs). Two putative CCAAT elements were detected within the noncoding leader region of this gene; one was located on the opposite strand at -92 and the other at -420 nt from the putative start triplet. Two baculoviral late promoter motifs (TAAG) were also detected within the promoter region of the ie-1 gene of ChfuGV. A single polyadenylation signal, AATAAA, was located 18nt downstream of the putative translational stop codon of ie-1 from ChfuGV. At the protein level, the amino acid sequence data that was derived from the nucleotide sequence in ChfuGV IE-1 was compared to those of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV), Xestia c-nigrum granulovirus (XcGV) and Plutella xylostella granulovirus (PxGV). The C-terminal regions of the granuloviral IE-1 sequences appeared to be more conserved when compared to the N-terminal regions. A domain, similar to the basic helix-loop-helix like (bHLH-like) domain in NPVs, was detected at the C-terminal region of IE-1 from ChfuGV (residues 387 to 414). A phylogenetic tree for baculoviral IE-1 was constructed using a maximum parsimony analysis. A phylogenetic estimation demonstrates that ChfuGV IE-1 is most closely related to that of CpGV.

  12. Leucine supplementation of a low-protein meal increases skeletal muscle and visceral tissue protein synthesis in neonatal pigs by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs parenterally infused with amino acids. Leucine appears to be the most effective single amino acid to trigger these effects. To examine the response to enteral leucine supplementation...

  13. Leucine stimulates PPARβ/δ-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism with enhanced GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Schnuck, Jamie K; Sunderland, Kyle L; Gannon, Nicholas P; Kuennen, Matthew R; Vaughan, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Leucine stimulates anabolic and catabolic processes in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the effects of leucine on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activity. This work characterized the effects of 24-h leucine treatment on metabolic parameters and protein expression in cultured myotubes. Leucine significantly increased PPARβ/δ expression as well as markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to significantly increased mitochondrial content and oxidative metabolism in a PPARβ/δ-dependent manner. However, leucine-treated cells did not display significant alterations in uncoupling protein expression or oxygen consumed per relative mitochondrial content suggesting leucine-mediated increases in oxidative metabolism are a function of increased mitochondrial content and not altered mitochondrial efficiency. Leucine treatment also increased GLUT4 content and glucose uptake as well as PPARγ and FAS expression leading to increased total lipid content. Leucine appears to activate PPAR activity leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis and elevated substrate oxidation, while simultaneously promoting substrate/lipid storage and protein synthesis.

  14. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  15. Amino acid availability and age affect the leucine stimulation of protein synthesis and eIF4F formation in muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that a physiological increase in plasma leucine for 60 and 120 min increases translation initiation factor activation in muscle of neonatal pigs. Although muscle protein synthesis is increased by leucine at 60 min, it is not maintained at 120 min, perhaps because of the decr...

  16. Chronic leucine supplementation of a low protein diet increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We hypothesized that leucine supplementation of a low protein diet will enhance protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in the neonate for prolonged periods. Fasted 5-d-old pigs (n=6–8...

  17. Dose and Latency Effects of Leucine Supplementation in Modulating Glucose Homeostasis: Opposite Effects in Healthy and Glucocorticoid-Induced Insulin-Resistance States

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; de Siqueira-Filho, Mário Alves; Felitti, Vitor; Nicastro, Humberto; Bueno, Carlos; Lira, Fábio Santos; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Campos-Ferraz, Patrícia; Nunes, Maria Tereza; Seelaender, Marília; de Oliveira Carvalho, Carla Roberta; Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEXA) is a potent immunosupressant and anti-inflammatory agent whose main side effects are muscle atrophy and insulin resistance in skeletal muscles. In this context, leucine supplementation may represent a way to limit the DEXA side effects. In this study, we have investigated the effects of a low and a high dose of leucine supplementation (via a bolus) on glucose homeostasis, muscle mass and muscle strength in energy-restricted and DEXA-treated rats. Since the leucine response may also be linked to the administration of this amino acid, we performed a second set of experiments with leucine given in bolus (via gavage) versus leucine given via drinking water. Leucine supplementation was found to produce positive effects (e.g., reduced insulin levels) only when administrated in low dosage, both via the bolus or via drinking water. However, under DEXA treatment, leucine administration was found to significantly influence this response, since leucine supplementation via drinking water clearly induced a diabetic state, whereas the same effect was not observed when supplied via the gavage. PMID:23363994

  18. The Basic Anaesthesia Machine

    PubMed Central

    Gurudatt, CL

    2013-01-01

    After WTG Morton's first public demonstration in 1846 of use of ether as an anaesthetic agent, for many years anaesthesiologists did not require a machine to deliver anaesthesia to the patients. After the introduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide in the form of compressed gases in cylinders, there was a necessity for mounting these cylinders on a metal frame. This stimulated many people to attempt to construct the anaesthesia machine. HEG Boyle in the year 1917 modified the Gwathmey's machine and this became popular as Boyle anaesthesia machine. Though a lot of changes have been made for the original Boyle machine still the basic structure remains the same. All the subsequent changes which have been brought are mainly to improve the safety of the patients. Knowing the details of the basic machine will make the trainee to understand the additional improvements. It is also important for every practicing anaesthesiologist to have a thorough knowledge of the basic anaesthesia machine for safe conduct of anaesthesia. PMID:24249876

  19. The basic anaesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Gurudatt, Cl

    2013-09-01

    After WTG Morton's first public demonstration in 1846 of use of ether as an anaesthetic agent, for many years anaesthesiologists did not require a machine to deliver anaesthesia to the patients. After the introduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide in the form of compressed gases in cylinders, there was a necessity for mounting these cylinders on a metal frame. This stimulated many people to attempt to construct the anaesthesia machine. HEG Boyle in the year 1917 modified the Gwathmey's machine and this became popular as Boyle anaesthesia machine. Though a lot of changes have been made for the original Boyle machine still the basic structure remains the same. All the subsequent changes which have been brought are mainly to improve the safety of the patients. Knowing the details of the basic machine will make the trainee to understand the additional improvements. It is also important for every practicing anaesthesiologist to have a thorough knowledge of the basic anaesthesia machine for safe conduct of anaesthesia.

  20. Regulation of amino acid transport system L by amino acid availability in CHO-K1 cells. A special role for leucine.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lobatón, C D; Oxender, D L

    1985-10-10

    Starvation of CHO-K1 cells for leucine leads to a 3-4-fold increase in transport system L activity, without modification of transport through systems A and ASC. The concentration of leucine must be below 10 microM before the enhancement of transport can be clearly seen. To achieve low concentrations of leucine such as 10 microM, extensive dialysis of fetal calf serum was required. The enhancement of transport was completed after 12-24 h of starvation and was fully reversed within 1 h of re-feeding with leucine. Starvation for isoleucine, valine or phenylalanine also produced an increase in system L transport activity, but the effect was only one half of that seen following leucine starvation.

  1. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit B.; Wang, Qingde; Khillan, Jaspal S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  2. A putative in vitro organotypic model of molting with human skin explants.

    PubMed

    Peramo, A; Feinberg, S E; Marcelo, C L

    2012-03-01

    We report finding a simple method to partially reproduce the characteristic process of molting that takes place in invertebrates using human skin explants in vitro. In this method, human skin explants discarded from regular plastic surgery procedures were kept, submersed, in regular growth medium for 10 days at 4°C. After that period, the skin explants were cultured at the air-liquid interface for another 10 days. Histological analysis of the skin revealed the formation of one full epidermal structure and an additional intermediate epidermal structure containing a putative stratum corneum, superimposed one of top of the other, in which we consider an equivalent model of "molting" or "ecdysis". Basic analysis of cell proliferation and differentiation of the explants at different stages of the process are briefly presented. We believe this model can be used in the study of certain human skin diseases as well as in comparative animal physiology.

  3. Spectral Evidence of Aqueous Activity in Two Putative Martian Paleolakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Fonti, Sergio; Orofino, Vincenzo; Blanco, Armando

    2010-01-01

    CRISM observations of putative paleolakes in Cankuzo and Luqa craters exhibit spectral features consistent with the activity of water. The spatial distributions suggest different formation scenarios for each site. In Cankuzo the distribution suggests postimpact alteration whereas in Luqa there are hints of possible formation of a layer of phyllosilicate materials.

  4. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  5. Sulfur Isotope Composition of Putative Primary Troilite in Chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tachibana, Shogo; Huss, Gary R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur isotope compositions of putative primary troilites in chondrules from Bishunpur were measured by ion probe. These primary troilites have the same S isotope compositions as matrix troilites and thus appear to be isotopically unfractionated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Bartonella henselae AS A PUTATIVE CAUSE OF CONGENITAL CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    VELHO, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; BELLOMO-BRANDÃO, Maria Ângela; DRUMMOND, Marina Rovani; MAGALHÃES, Renata Ferreira; HESSEL, Gabriel; BARJAS-CASTRO, Maria de Lourdes; ESCANHOELA, Cecília Amélia Fazzio; NEGRO, Gilda Maria Barbaro DEL; OKAY, Thelma Suely

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Severe anemia and cholestatic hepatitis are associated with bartonella infections. A putative vertical Bartonella henselae infection was defined on the basis of ultrastructural and molecular analyses in a three-year-old child with anemia, jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly since birth. Physicians should consider bartonellosis in patients with anemia and hepatitis of unknown origin. PMID:27410916

  7. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  8. Chronic leucine supplementation improves lipid metabolism in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jun; Han, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Tong, Xing; Yin, Xue-Bin; Yuan, Lin-Xi; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Leucine supplementation has been reported to improve lipid metabolism. However, lipid metabolism in adipose tissues and liver has not been extensively studied for leucine supplementation in mice fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Design C57BL/6J mice were fed a chow diet, HFCD, HFCD supplemented with 1.5% leucine (HFCD+1.5% Leu group) or 3% leucine (HFCD+3% Leu group) for 24 weeks. The body weight, peritoneal adipose weight, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride in serum and liver, and serum adipokines were analyzed. In addition, expression levels of proteins associated with hepatic lipogenesis, adipocyte lipolysis, and white adipose tissue (WAT) browning were determined. Results Mice in the HFCD group developed obesity and deteriorated lipid metabolism. Compared with HFCD, leucine supplementation lowered weight gain and TC levels in circulation and the liver without changing energy intake. The decrease in body fat was supported by histological examination in the WAT and liver. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, were significantly decreased by supplemented leucine. At the protein level, leucine potently decreased the hepatic lipogenic enzymes (fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase) and corresponding upstream proteins. In epididymal WAT, the reduced expression levels of two major lipases by HFCD, namely phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, were reversed when leucine was supplemented. Uncoupling protein 1, β3 adrenergic receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1α, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were involved in the thermogenic program and WAT browning. Leucine additionally upregulated their protein expression in both WAT and interscapular brown adipose tissue. Conclusion This study demonstrated that chronic leucine supplementation reduced the body weight and improved the lipid profile of

  9. Structural and functional analysis of two small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, fibromodulin and chondroadherin.

    PubMed

    Paracuellos, Patricia; Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Hohenester, Erhard

    2017-02-17

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are important regulators of extracellular matrix assembly and cell signalling. We have determined crystal structures at ~2.2Å resolution of human fibromodulin and chondroadherin, two collagen-binding SLRPs. Their overall fold is similar to that of the prototypical SLRP, decorin, but unlike decorin neither fibromodulin nor chondroadherin forms a stable dimer. A previously identified binding site for integrin α2β1 maps to an α-helix in the C-terminal cap region of chondroadherin. Interrogation of the Collagen Toolkits revealed a unique binding site for chondroadherin in collagen II, and no binding to collagen III. A triple-helical peptide containing the sequence GAOGPSGFQGLOGPOGPO (O is hydroxyproline) forms a stable complex with chondroadherin in solution. In fibrillar collagen I and II, this sequence is aligned with the collagen cross-linking site KGHR, suggesting a role for chondroadherin in cross-linking.

  10. Studies on an L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal for frequency conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, P.; Vimalan, M.; Anandan, P.; Bakiyaraj, G.; Kirubavathi, K.; Praveen, S. G.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-03-01

    An L-leucine hydriodide semiorganic crystal has been synthesized and grown by a slow evaporation technique. The lattice parameters of the grown crystal have been confirmed using single-crystal x-ray diffractometry. Various functional groups present in the crystal were identified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral) assessment. The optical transmission percentage of the crystal was ascertained by UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) studies. The thermal stability of the crystal was determined by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis curves. The mechanical behavior of the crystal was studied using the Vicker’s microhardness analysis. The dielectric properties of the crystal have been investigated for varying temperatures. The second-harmonic generation efficiency was measured by the Kurtz and Perry powder technique and the efficiency is comparable to that of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.

  11. Control of Neural Circuit Formation by Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Joris; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The function of neural circuits depends on the precise connectivity between populations of neurons. Increasing evidence indicates that disruptions in excitatory or inhibitory synapse formation or function lead to excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalances and contribute to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing surface proteins have emerged as key organizers of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Distinct LRR proteins are expressed in different cell types and interact with key pre- and postsynaptic proteins. These protein interaction networks allow LRR proteins to coordinate pre- and postsynaptic elements during synapse formation and differentiation, pathway-specific synapse development, and synaptic plasticity. LRR proteins thus play a critical role in organizing synaptic connections into functional neural circuits, and their dysfunction may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25131359

  12. Structure of the OsSERK2 leucine-rich repeat extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Ryan; Pruitt, Rory N.; Kamita, Shizuo G.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Majumdar, Dipali; Hammock, Bruce D.; Adams, Paul D.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing integral membrane receptors that are involved in the regulation of development and immune responses in plants. It has recently been shown that rice SERK2 (OsSERK2) is essential for XA21-mediated resistance to the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. OsSERK2 is also required for the BRI1-mediated, FLS2-mediated and EFR-mediated responses to brassinosteroids, flagellin and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), respectively. Here, crystal structures of the LRR domains of OsSERK2 and a D128N OsSERK2 mutant, expressed as hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) fusions, are reported. These structures suggest that the aspartate mutation does not generate any significant conformational change in the protein, but instead leads to an altered interaction with partner receptors. PMID:25372696

  13. Structure of the OsSERK2 leucine-rich repeat extracellular domain.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Ryan; Pruitt, Rory N; Kamita, Shizuo G; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Majumdar, Dipali; Hammock, Bruce D; Adams, Paul D; Ronald, Pamela C

    2014-11-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing integral membrane receptors that are involved in the regulation of development and immune responses in plants. It has recently been shown that rice SERK2 (OsSERK2) is essential for XA21-mediated resistance to the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. OsSERK2 is also required for the BRI1-mediated, FLS2-mediated and EFR-mediated responses to brassinosteroids, flagellin and elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), respectively. Here, crystal structures of the LRR domains of OsSERK2 and a D128N OsSERK2 mutant, expressed as hagfish variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) fusions, are reported. These structures suggest that the aspartate mutation does not generate any significant conformational change in the protein, but instead leads to an altered interaction with partner receptors.

  14. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  15. Structure of free radicals in irradiated acetyl-L-leucine single crystals at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Almanov, G.A.; Bogdanchikov, G.A.; Usov, O.M.

    1988-09-01

    By using the EPR method, two types of radicals are observed, which are formed in acetyl-L-leucine single crystals irradiated at 77K. These are alkyl type radicals (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/CCH/sub 2/CH(NHCOCH/sub 3/)COOH and peptide group radicals. When the crystals are defrozen to room temperatures, the radicals of the second type disappear without formation of paramagnetic particles. Two possible structures of the peptide group radicals were studied by the INDO method. On defreezing to room temperature, the alkyl group radical is retained, while the peptide radical disappears without formation of paramagnetic particles. For the protonated form of the anion-radical, a better agreement is observed between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally obtained HFI constants. The quantum chemical analysis of the possible structures of the peptide group radicals indicates that the formation of the protonated form of the anion-radical is energetically favorable.

  16. Leucine-Rich Repeat Transmembrane Proteins Instruct Discrete Dendrite Targeting in an Olfactory Map

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Weizhe; Zhu, Haitao; Potter, Christopher J.; Barsh, Gabrielle; Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Zinn, Kai; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory systems utilize discrete neural pathways to process and integrate odorant information. In Drosophila, axons of first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and dendrites of second-order projection neurons (PNs) form class-specific synaptic connections at ∼50 glomeruli. The mechanisms underlying PN dendrite targeting to distinct glomeruli in a 3-dimensional discrete neural map are unclear. Here we show that the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane protein Capricious (Caps) is differentially expressed in different classes of PNs. Loss- and gain-of-function studies indicate that Caps instructs the segregation of Caps-positive and negative PN dendrites to discrete glomerular targets. Moreover, Caps does not mediate homophilic interactions and regulates PN dendrite targeting independent of pre-synaptic ORNs. The closely related protein Tartan plays a partially redundant function with Capricious. These LRR proteins are likely part of a combinatorial cell-surface code that instructs discrete olfactory map formation. PMID:19915565

  17. Leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins instruct discrete dendrite targeting in an olfactory map.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weizhe; Zhu, Haitao; Potter, Christopher J; Barsh, Gabrielle; Kurusu, Mitsuhiko; Zinn, Kai; Luo, Liqun

    2009-12-01

    Olfactory systems utilize discrete neural pathways to process and integrate odorant information. In Drosophila, axons of first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and dendrites of second-order projection neurons (PNs) form class-specific synaptic connections at approximately 50 glomeruli. The mechanisms underlying PN dendrite targeting to distinct glomeruli in a three-dimensional discrete neural map are unclear. We found that the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane protein Capricious (Caps) was differentially expressed in different classes of PNs. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies indicated that Caps instructs the segregation of Caps-positive and Caps-negative PN dendrites to discrete glomerular targets. Moreover, Caps-mediated PN dendrite targeting was independent of presynaptic ORNs and did not involve homophilic interactions. The closely related protein Tartan was partially redundant with Caps. These LRR proteins are probably part of a combinatorial cell-surface code that instructs discrete olfactory map formation.

  18. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) regulates multipotent neural progenitor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro; Paucar, Andres A; Bajpai, Ruchi; Dougherty, Joseph D; Zewail, Amani; Kelly, Theresa K; Kim, Kevin J; Ou, Jing; Groszer, Matthias; Imura, Tetsuya; Freije, William A; Nelson, Stanley F; Sofroniew, Michael V; Wu, Hong; Liu, Xin; Terskikh, Alexey V; Geschwind, Daniel H; Kornblum, Harley I

    2005-08-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) was previously identified in a screen for genes enriched in neural progenitors. Here, we demonstrate expression of MELK by progenitors in developing and adult brain and that MELK serves as a marker for self-renewing multipotent neural progenitors (MNPs) in cultures derived from the developing forebrain and in transgenic mice. Overexpression of MELK enhances (whereas knockdown diminishes) the ability to generate neurospheres from MNPs, indicating a function in self-renewal. MELK down-regulation disrupts the production of neurogenic MNP from glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive progenitors in vitro. MELK expression in MNP is cell cycle regulated and inhibition of MELK expression down-regulates the expression of B-myb, which is shown to also mediate MNP proliferation. These findings indicate that MELK is necessary for proliferation of embryonic and postnatal MNP and suggest that it regulates the transition from GFAP-expressing progenitors to rapid amplifying progenitors in the postnatal brain.

  19. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    PubMed

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  20. Enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions between phenols and N-tosylaldimines catalyzed by a leucine-derived bifunctional catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Xing; Qu, Jin

    2012-06-04

    Enantioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions between phenols and N-tosylaldimines were developed using a bifunctional catalyst readily prepared from L-leucine. The chiral benzylic amine products were obtained in high yields (up to 96% yield) and good to high enantiomeric excesses (up to 95% ee).

  1. Introduction of a leucine half-zipper engenders multiple high-quality crystals of a recalcitrant tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Min; Shapiro, Ryan; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-03-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase is recalcitrant to crystallization. A group of leucine substitutions has transformed the protein. Although Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase was among the first tRNA synthetases to be sequenced and extensively studied by functional analysis, it has proved to be recalcitrant to crystallization. This challenge remained even for crystallization of the catalytic fragment. By mutationally introducing three stacked leucines onto the solvent-exposed side of an α-helix, an engineered catalytic fragment of the synthetase was obtained that yielded multiple high-quality crystals and cocrystals with different ligands. The engineered α-helix did not form a leucine zipper that interlocked with the same α-helix from another molecule. Instead, using the created hydrophobic spine, it interacted with other surfaces of the protein as a leucine half-zipper (LHZ) to enhance the crystal lattice interactions. The LHZ made crystal lattice contacts in all crystals of different space groups. These results illustrate the power of introducing an LHZ into helices to facilitate crystallization. The authors propose that the method can be unified with surface-entropy reduction and can be broadly used for protein-surface optimization in crystallization.

  2. Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The effects of essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation during moderate steady state (ie, endurance) exercise on postexercise skeletal muscle metabolism are not well described, and the potential role of supplemental leucine on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and associated molecular re...

  3. Distinct Plasma Profile of Polar Neutral Amino Acids, Leucine, and Glutamate in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Obukhanych, Tetyana V.; Laval, Julie; Aronov, Pavel A.; Libove, Robin; Banerjee, Arpita Goswami; Parker, Karen J.; O'Hara, Ruth; Herzenberg, Leonard A.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Hardan, Antonio Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine plasma amino acid (AA) levels in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD, N = 27) and neuro-typically developing controls (N = 20). We observed reduced plasma levels of most polar neutral AA and leucine in children with ASD. This AA profile conferred significant post hoc power for discriminating…

  4. Leucine and alpha-Ketoisocaproic acid, but not norleucine, stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The branched-chain amino acid, leucine, acts as a nutrient signal to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of young pigs. However, the chemical structure responsible for this effect has not been identified. We have shown that the other branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine and valine, are ...

  5. Leucine supplementation stimulates protein synthesis and reduces degradation signal activation in muscle of newborn pigs during acute endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sepsis disrupts skeletal muscle proteostasis and mitigates the anabolic response to leucine (Leu) in muscle of mature animals. We have shown that Leu stimulates muscle protein synthesis (PS) in healthy neonatal piglets. To determine if supplemental Leu can stimulate PS and reduce protein degradation...

  6. Rapamycin blocks leucine-induced protein synthesis by suppressing mTORC1 activation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine (Leu). To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Leu stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight fasted 7-day-old piglets were...

  7. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  8. Estimation of activation energy from the survival yields: fragmentation study of leucine enkephalin and polyethers by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Ákos; Shemirani, Ghazaleh; Nagy, Lajos; Antal, Borbála; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2013-07-01

    A simple collision model for multiple collisions occurring in quadrupole type mass spectrometers was derived and tested with leucine enkaphalin a common mass spectrometric standard with well-characterized properties. Implementation of the collision model and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) algorithm into a spreadsheet software allowed a good fitting of the calculated data to the experimental survival yield (SY) versus collision energy curve. In addition, fitting also ensured to estimate the efficiencies of the kinetic to internal energy conversion for Leucine enkephalin in quadrupole-time-of-flight and triple quadrupole instruments. It was observed that the experimental SY versus collision energy curves for the leucine enkephalin can be described by the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (RRK) formalism by reducing the total degrees of freedom (DOF) to about one-fifth. Furthermore, this collision model with the RRK formalism was used to estimate the critical energy (E(o)) of lithiated polyethers, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), and polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) with degrees of freedom similar to that of leucine enkephalin. Applying polyethers with similar DOF provided the elimination of the effect of DOF on the unimolecular reaction rate constant. The estimated value of E(o) for PEG showed a relatively good agreement with the value calculated by high-level quantum chemical calculations reported in the literature. Interestingly, it was also found that the E(o) values for the studied polyethers were similar.

  9. Study design: the basics.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Ja; Hoffmann, Raymond G

    2007-01-01

    In biomedical research, meaningful conclusions can only be drawn based on data collected from a valid scientific design using appropriate statistical methods. Therefore, the selection of an appropriate study design is important in order to provide an unbiased and scientific evaluation of the research questions. In this chapter, the different kinds of experimental studies commonly used in biology and medicine are introduced. A brief survey of basic experimental study designs, randomization, blinding, possible biases, issues in data analysis, and interpretation of the study results are mainly provided.

  10. Basic Hitchhiker Payload Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    This document lists the requirements for the NMSU Hitchhiker experiment payload that were developed as part of the EE 498/499 Capstone Design class during the 1999-2000 academic year. This document is used to describe the system needs as described in the mission document. The requirements listed here are those primarily used to generate the basic electronic and data processing requirements developed in the class design document. The needs of the experiment components are more fully described in the draft NASA hitchhiker customer requirements document. Many of the details for the overall payload are given in full detail in the NASA hitchhiker documentation.

  11. The small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans in tissue repair and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Borén, Jan; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans consist of a protein core with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains, and have multiple roles in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Here we discuss the potential and known functions of a group of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) in atherosclerosis. We focus on five SLRPs, decorin, biglycan lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP, because these have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques or demonstrated to have a role in animal models of atherosclerosis. Decorin and biglycan are modified post translationally by substitution with chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAGs, whereas lumican, fibromodulin, and PRELP have keratan sulfate side chains, and the core proteins have leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs that are characteristic of the LRR superfamily. The chondroitin/dermatan sulfate GAG side chains have been implicated in lipid retention in atherosclerosis. The core proteins are discussed here in the context of: (i) interactions with collagens and their implications in tissue integrity, fibrosis, and wound repair; and (ii) interactions with growth factors, cytokines, pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and cell surface receptors that impact normal physiology and disease processes such as inflammation, innate immune responses, and wound healing (i.e processes that are all important in plaque development and progression). Thus, studies of these SLRPs in the context of wound healing are providing clues about their functions that may be important in early stages of atherosclerosis to plaque vulnerability and cardiovascular disease at later stages. Understanding of signal transduction pathways regulated by the core protein interactions is leading to novel roles and therapeutic potential for these proteins in wound repair and atherosclerosis. PMID:26477596

  12. Metabolic labeling of leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 with radioactive phosphate.

    PubMed

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Gao, Fangye; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2013-09-18

    Leucine rich repeat kinases 1 and 2 (LRRK1 and LRRK2) are paralogs which share a similar domain organization, including a serine-threonine kinase domain, a Ras of complex proteins domain (ROC), a C-terminal of ROC domain (COR), and leucine-rich and ankyrin-like repeats at the N-terminus. The precise cellular roles of LRRK1 and LRRK2 have yet to be elucidated, however LRRK1 has been implicated in tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, while LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this report, we present a protocol to label the LRRK1 and LRRK2 proteins in cells with (32)P orthophosphate, thereby providing a means to measure the overall phosphorylation levels of these 2 proteins in cells. In brief, affinity tagged LRRK proteins are expressed in HEK293T cells which are exposed to medium containing (32)P-orthophosphate. The (32)P-orthophosphate is assimilated by the cells after only a few hours of incubation and all molecules in the cell containing phosphates are thereby radioactively labeled. Via the affinity tag (3xflag) the LRRK proteins are isolated from other cellular components by immunoprecipitation. Immunoprecipitates are then separated via SDS-PAGE, blotted to PVDF membranes and analysis of the incorporated phosphates is performed by autoradiography ((32)P signal) and western detection (protein signal) of the proteins on the blots. The protocol can readily be adapted to monitor phosphorylation of any other protein that can be expressed in cells and isolated by immunoprecipitation.

  13. Expression of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Syaidah, Rahimi; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Ramadhani, Dini; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans are components of the extracellular matrix and comprise a specific core protein substituted with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan chains. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are a major family of proteoglycans and have key roles as potent effectors in cellular signaling pathways. Research during the last two decades has shown that SLRPs regulate biological functions in many tissues such as skin, tendon, kidney, liver, and heart. However, little is known of the expression of SLRPs, or the characteristics of the cells that produce them, in the anterior pituitary gland. Therefore, we have determined whether SLRPs are present in rat anterior pituitary gland. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of SLRP genes and have identified the cells that produce SLRPs by using in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probe. We have clearly detected the mRNA expression of SLRP genes, and cells expressing decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, proline/arginine-rich end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), and osteoglycin are located in the anterior pituitary gland. We have also investigated the possible double-staining of SLRP mRNA and pituitary hormones, S100 protein (a marker of folliculostellate cells), desmin (a marker of capillary pericytes), and isolectin B4 (a marker of endothelial cells). Decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, lumican, PRELP, and osteoglycin mRNA have been identified in S100-protein-positive and desmin-positive cells. Thus, we conclude that folliculostellate cells and pericytes produce SLRPs in rat anterior pituitary gland.

  14. Diurnal pattern of the interrelationships among leucine oxidation, urea production, and hydrolysis in humans.

    PubMed

    el-Khoury, A E; Ajami, A M; Fukagawa, N K; Chapman, T E; Young, V R

    1996-09-01

    We investigated in six healthy adult men, who received an adequate intake of protein (1 g.kg-1.day-1), the relationship among urea production, excretion, and hydrolysis. At the end of a 6-day diet-adjustment period, subjects were studied using a 24-h continuous intravenous [1-13C]leucine and [15N,15N]urea tracer protocol (A. E. El-Khoury, N. K. Fukagawa, M. Sánchez, R. H. Tsay, R. E. Gleason, T. E. Chapman, and V. R. Young. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 59: 1000-1011, 1994) to determine rates of irreversible protein nitrogen loss and urea kinetics. By combining leucine and urea kinetic data, we found a significant degree of urea hydrolysis over the 24-h period but no evidence to support the thesis that there is a net retention or "salvage" of the urea nitrogen liberated. Our measurements revealed little or no urea hydrolysis during the fed 12-h period of the 24-h tracer protocol but substantial hydrolysis during the 12-h fasting phase. Furthermore, a mass balance model and calculations (APPENDIX) indicated that nitrogen salvage, if any, is quantitatively indistinguishable from insensible nitrogen losses and aggregate estimation errors, accounting for no more than 5% of the nitrogen intake. We conclude that urea hydrolysis, via the intestinal microflora, although representing a component of the overall cycles of nitrogen flow within the body, does not contribute via a net retention of amino nitrogen to the maintenance of body nitrogen homeostasis in healthy adults consuming an adequate diet.

  15. Comparative biochemical and functional properties of two leucine aminopeptidases of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Mi; Ju, Hye-Lim; Ju, Jung-Won; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Kim, Tong-Soo; Bahk, Young-Yil; Hong, Sung-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk

    2012-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAP; EC 3.4.11.1) are a group of metalloexopeptidases, which catalyze the sequential removal of leucine amino acids from the N-termini of the polypeptides or proteins. In this study, we identified two novel genes that encode LAPs of Clonorchis sinensis (CsLAP1 and CsLAP2) and characterized their biochemical and functional properties. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 with those of other organisms revealed that typical metal-binding coordinating and active site residues for LAPs were well conserved in CsLAP1 and CsLAP2. Recombinant CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 showed similar biochemical properties such as pH optima at pH 8.0 and stability at neutral pHs. Both enzymes were specifically inhibited by bestatin and showed preferential substrate specificity for Leu-MCA. However, the enzymes differed in that they required different metal ions for maximum activity. Expressions of CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 were detected throughout the various developmental stages of C. sinensis, and their transcription levels increased gradually in accordance with the maturation of the parasite. Both enzymes were identified in soluble worm extract of C. sinensis, but not in excretory and secretory products. Immunolocalization studies showed that both enzymes were co-localized to the intestinal epithelial cells and gastrodermis of the parasite. These results collectively suggest that CsLAP1 and CsLAP2 are synthesized in the intestinal epithelial and gastrodermal cells of C. sinensis and may be involved in the final digestion of peptides that hydrolyzed within intestinal lumen followed by absorbed into gastrodermal cells of the parasite.

  16. Characterization of an N-glycosylated Bacillus subtilis leucine aminopeptidase expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hongxing; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Nandi; Zhou, Zhemin; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Aminopeptidase is an important flavorsome especially in protein hydrolysate debittering by removing hydrophobic amino acid residue at the N-terminal end. Besides, it is also applied to preparation of active peptides and analysis of protein sequence. In this study, leucine aminopeptidase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris, a widely used heterologous protein expression host. Then it was purified and characterized. After methanol induction for 96 h, the aminopeptidase activity in culture supernatant reached 28.4 U ml(À1) , which was 7.1 times that of wild strain B. subtilis Zj016. The optimal temperature and pH of the purified recombinant enzyme were 60 °C and 8.5, respectively. The purified aminopeptidase was stable within 30-60 °C and pH 8.0-9.0. It was intensively inhibited by Ni(2β) , Ca(2β) , DL-dithiothreitol (DTT) and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), but activated by Co(2β) . The Km toward leucine-p-nitroanilines (Leu-pNA) of the enzyme was 0.97 mM. The sequence analysis of aminopeptidase indicated three potential N-glycosylation sites and it was further verified via MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Consequently, the N-glycosylated aminopeptidase exhibited higher thermostability and catalytic efficiency. The purified enzyme exhibited two bands through sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) while a single band can be identified when the enzyme was deglycosylated. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the secondary structure of recombinant aminopeptidase was similar to the wild-type.

  17. RNA interference targeting leucine aminopeptidase blocks hatching of Schistosoma mansoni eggs.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Gabriel; Morales, Maria E; Alrefaei, Yousef N; Cancela, Martín; Castillo, Estela; Dalton, John P; Tort, José F; Brindley, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Schistosoma mansoni leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is thought to play a central role in hatching of the miracidium from the schistosome egg. We identified two discrete LAPs genes in the S. mansoni genome, and their orthologs in S. japonicum. The similarities in sequence and exon/intron structure of the two genes, LAP1 and LAP2, suggest that they arose by gene duplication and that this occurred before separation of the mansoni and japonicum lineages. The SmLAP1 and SmLAP2 genes have different expression patterns in diverse stages of the cycle; whereas both are equally expressed in the blood dwelling stages (schistosomules and adult), SmLAP2 expression was higher in free living larval (miracidia) and in parasitic intra-snail (sporocysts) stages. We investigated the role of each enzyme in hatching of schistosome eggs and the early stages of schistosome development by RNA interference (RNAi). Using RNAi, we observed marked and specific reduction of mRNAs, along with a loss of exopeptidase activity in soluble parasite extracts against the diagnostic substrate l-leucine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin hydroxide. Strikingly, knockdown of either SmLAP1 or SmLAP2, or both together, was accompanied by >or=80% inhibition of hatching of schistosome eggs showing that both enzymes are important to the escape of miracidia from the egg. The methods employed here refine the utility of RNAi for functional genomics studies in helminth parasites and confirm these can be used to identify potential drug targets, in this case schistosome aminopeptidases.

  18. Molecular dynamics of leucine and dopamine transporter proteins in a model cell membrane lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Indarte, Martín; Surratt, Christopher K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2010-03-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) operates via facilitated diffusion, harnessing an inward Na(+) gradient to drive dopamine from the extracellular synaptic cleft to the neuron interior. The DAT is relevant to central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and is the primary site of action for the abused psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Crystallization of a DAT homolog, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, provided the first reliable 3-D DAT template. Here, the LeuT crystal structure and the DAT molecular model have been combined with their respective substrates, leucine and dopamine, in lipid bilayer molecular dynamics simulations toward tracking substrate movement along the protein's substrate/ion permeation pathway. Specifically, movement of residue pairs that comprise the "external gate" was followed as a function of substrate presence. The transmembrane (TM) 1 arginine-TM 10 aspartate strut formed less readily in DAT compared with LeuT, with or without substrate present. For LeuT but not DAT, the addition of substrate enhanced the chances of forming the TM 1-10 bridge. Also, movement of the fourth extracellular loop EL-4 in the presence of substrate was more pronounced for DAT, the EL-4 unwinding to a degree. The overall similarity between the LeuT and DAT molecular dynamics simulations indicated that LeuT was a legitimate model to guide DAT structure-function predictions. There were, nevertheless, differences significant enough to allow for DAT-unique insights, which may include how cocaine, methylphenidate (Ritalin, NIDA Drug Supply, Rockville, MD), and other DAT blockers are not recognized as substrates even though they can access the primary substrate binding pocket. Proteins 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Establishing a Framework for the Ad/Abaxial Regulatory Network of Arabidopsis: Ascertaining Targets of Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER and KANADI Regulation[W

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Brenda J.; Liu, Tie; Newell, Nicole R.; Magnani, Enrico; Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall; Michaels, Scott; Barton, M. Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The broadly conserved Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER (HD-ZIPIII) and KANADI transcription factors have opposing and transformational effects on polarity and growth in all tissues and stages of the plant's life. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of how these factors work, we have identified transcripts that change in response to induced HD-ZIPIII or KANADI function. Additional criteria used to identify high-confidence targets among this set were presence of an adjacent HD-ZIPIII binding site, expression enriched within a subdomain of the shoot apical meristem, mutant phenotype showing defect in polar leaf and/or meristem development, physical interaction between target gene product and HD-ZIPIII protein, opposite regulation by HD-ZIPIII and KANADI, and evolutionary conservation of the regulator–target relationship. We find that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI regulate tissue-specific transcription factors involved in subsidiary developmental decisions, nearly all major hormone pathways, and new actors (such as INDETERMINATE DOMAIN4) in the ad/abaxial regulatory network. Multiple feedback loops regulating HD-ZIPIII and KANADI are identified, as are mechanisms through which HD-ZIPIII and KANADI oppose each other. This work lays the foundation needed to understand the components, structure, and workings of the ad/abaxial regulatory network directing basic plant growth and development. PMID:24076978

  20. LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation does not require the leucine-rich repeats and is reversed by p75(NTR) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bourikas, Dimitris; Mir, Anis; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2010-12-01

    LINGO-1 is a potent negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and hence may play a pivotal restrictive role during remyelination in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, little is known as to which stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation are inhibited by LINGO-1, which domains of the protein are involved and whether accessory proteins are required. Here, we show that LINGO-1 expression in the human oligodendroglial cell line MO3.13 inhibited process extension and this was reversed by an anti-LINGO-1 antibody or the antagonist LINGO-1-Fc. LINGO-1 expression was also found to inhibit myelin basic protein transcription in the rat oligodendroglial cell line CG4. Both of these inhibitory actions of LINGO-1 were abrogated by deletion of the entire ectodomain or cytoplasmic domains but, surprisingly, were unaffected by deletion of the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). As in neurons, LINGO-1 physically associated with endogenous p75(NTR) in MO3.13 cells and, correspondingly, its inhibition of process extension was reversed by antagonists of p75(NTR). Thus, LINGO-1 inhibits multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation independently of the LRRs via a process that requires p75(NTR) signalling.

  1. The Structure and Enzyme Characteristics of a Recombinant Leucine Aminopeptidase rLap1 from Aspergillus sojae and Its Application in Debittering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Qian; Zhong, Li-Fen; Meng, Zhi-Zhong; You, Zi-Juan; Li, Jia-Zhou; Luo, Xiao-Chun

    2015-09-01

    A leucine aminopeptidase Lap1 was cloned from Aspergillus sojae GIM3.30. The truncated Lap1 without a signal peptide was over-expressed in P. pastoris, and the enzymatic characteristics of recombinant Lap1 (rLap1) were tested. The rLap1 was about 36.7 kDa with an optimal pH 8.0 and optimal temperature 50 °C for substrate Leu-p-nitroanilide and it sustained 50 % activity after 1 h incubation at 50 °C. The activity of rLap1 was significantly inhibited by EDTA, whereas Co(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+) ions, but not Zn(2+) ions, restored its activity. rLap1 showed the highest activity against Arg-pNA and then Leu-, Lys-, Met-, and Phe-pNA. The 3D structure of rLap1 showed it had a conserved functional charge/dipole complex and a hydrogen bond network of Zn2-D179-S228-Q177-D229-S158 around its active center. An acidic Asp residue was found at the bottom of the substrate binding pocket, which explains its preference for basic N-terminal amino acid substrates such as Arg and Lys. rLap1 improved the degree of hydrolysis of casein and soy protein hydrolysates and also decreased their bitterness, indicating its potential utility in food production.

  2. Basic and clinical immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T.

    2003-01-01

    Progress in immunology continues to grow exponentially every year. New applications of this knowledge are being developed for a broad range of clinical conditions. Conversely, the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies is helping to elucidate the intricate mechanisms of the immune system. We have selected a few of the most significant contributions to the fields of basic and clinical immunology published between October 2001 and October 2002. Our choice of topics in basic immunology included the description of T-bet as a determinant factor for T(H)1 differentiation, the role of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase gene in B-cell development, the characterization of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, and the use of dynamic imaging to study MHC class II transport and T-cell and dendritic cell membrane interactions. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected for review include the description of immunodeficiency caused by caspase 8 deficiency; a case series report on X-linked agammaglobulinemia; the mechanism of action, efficacy, and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; mechanisms of autoimmunity diseases; and advances in HIV pathogenesis and vaccine development. We also reviewed two articles that explore the possible alterations of the immune system caused by spaceflights, a new field with increasing importance as human space expeditions become a reality in the 21st century.

  3. Basic space payload fastener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, J. M.; Gorevan, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    A new basic space fastener has been developed and tested by the GSFC. The purposes of this fastener are to permit assembly and servicing in space by astronauts and/or robots and to facilitate qualification of payloads on Earth prior to launch by saving time and money during the systems integration and component testing and qualification processes. The space fastener is a rework of the basic machine screw such that crossthreading is impossible; it is self-locking and will not work its way out during launch (vibration proof); it will not wear out despite repeated use; it occupies a small foot print which is comparable to its machine screw equivalent, and it provides force and exhibits strength comparable to its machine screw equivalent. Construction is ultra-simple and cost effective and the principle is applicable across the full range of screw sizes ranging from a #10 screw to 2.5 cm (1 in) or more. In this paper, the fastener principles of operation will be discussed along with test results and construction details. The new fastener also has considerable potential in the commercial sector. A few promising applications will be presented.

  4. Dietary Leucine Supplementation Improves the Mucin Production in the Jejunal Mucosa of the Weaned Pigs Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Liu, Minghui; Tang, Jun; Chen, Hao; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The present study was mainly conducted to determine whether dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the decrease of the mucin production in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs infected by porcine rotavirus (PRV). A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets supplemented with 1.00% L-leucine or 0.68% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control) for 17 d. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused PRV or the sterile essential medium. During the first 10 d of trial, dietary leucine supplementation could improve the feed efficiency (P = 0.09). The ADG and feed efficiency were impaired by PRV infusion (P<0.05). PRV infusion also increased mean cumulative score of diarrhea, serum rotavirus antibody concentration and crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and decreased villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.07), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 and 2 concentrations (P<0.05) and phosphorylated mTOR level (P<0.05) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. Dietary leucine supplementation could attenuate the effects of PRV infusion on feed efficiency (P = 0.09) and mean cumulative score of diarrhea (P = 0.09), and improve the effects of PRV infusion on villus height: crypt depth (P = 0.06), goblet cell numbers (P<0.05), mucin 1 (P = 0.08) and 2 (P = 0.07) concentrations and phosphorylated mTOR level (P = 0.08) of the jejunal mucosa in weaned pigs. These results suggest that dietary 1% leucine supplementation alleviated the decrease of mucin production and goblet cell numbers in the jejunal mucosa of weaned pigs challenged by PRV possibly via activation of the mTOR signaling.

  5. L-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2015-03-15

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS.

  6. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; Helmich, Rick C; Ferraye, Murielle; Thaler, Avner; Hendler, Talma; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Mirelman, Anat; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen S; Giladi, Nir; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, namely carriers of a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation associated with dominantly inherited parkinsonism. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine cerebral activity evoked during internal selection of motor representations, a core motor deficit in clinically overt Parkinson's disease. Thirty-nine healthy first-degree relatives of Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson's disease, who carry the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation, participated in this study. Twenty-one carriers of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S mutation and 18 non-carriers of this mutation were engaged in a motor imagery task (laterality judgements of left or right hands) known to be sensitive to motor control parameters. Behavioural performance of both groups was matched. Mutation carriers and non-carriers were equally sensitive to the extent and biomechanical constraints of the imagined movements in relation to the current posture of the participants' hands. Cerebral activity differed between groups, such that leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers had reduced imagery-related activity in the right caudate nucleus and increased activity in the right dorsal premotor cortex. More severe striatal impairment was associated with stronger effective connectivity between the right dorsal premotor cortex and the right extrastriate body area. These findings suggest that altered movement-related activity in the caudate nuclei of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-G2019S carriers might remain behaviourally latent by virtue of cortical compensatory mechanisms involving long-range connectivity between the dorsal premotor cortex and posterior sensory regions. These

  7. l-leucine partially rescues translational and developmental defects associated with zebrafish models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Sowa, Nenja; Cardenas, Maria E.; Gerton, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Cohesinopathies are human genetic disorders that include Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and Roberts syndrome (RBS) and are characterized by defects in limb and craniofacial development as well as mental retardation. The developmental phenotypes of CdLS and other cohesinopathies suggest that mutations in the structure and regulation of the cohesin complex during embryogenesis interfere with gene regulation. In a previous project, we showed that RBS was associated with highly fragmented nucleoli and defects in both ribosome biogenesis and protein translation. l-leucine stimulation of the mTOR pathway partially rescued translation in human RBS cells and development in zebrafish models of RBS. In this study, we investigate protein translation in zebrafish models of CdLS. Our results show that phosphorylation of RPS6 as well as 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) was reduced in nipbla/b, rad21 and smc3-morphant embryos, a pattern indicating reduced translation. Moreover, protein biosynthesis and rRNA production were decreased in the cohesin morphant embryo cells. l-leucine partly rescued protein synthesis and rRNA production in the cohesin morphants and partially restored phosphorylation of RPS6 and 4EBP1. Concomitantly, l-leucine treatment partially improved cohesinopathy embryo development including the formation of craniofacial cartilage. Interestingly, we observed that alpha-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC), which is a keto derivative of leucine, also partially rescued the development of rad21 and nipbla/b morphants by boosting mTOR-dependent translation. In summary, our results suggest that cohesinopathies are caused in part by defective protein synthesis, and stimulation of the mTOR pathway through l-leucine or its metabolite α-KIC can partially rescue development in zebrafish models for CdLS. PMID:25378554

  8. Crystal structure of a phospholipase A2 from Bothrops asper venom: Insights into a new putative "myotoxic cluster".

    PubMed

    Salvador, Guilherme H M; Dos Santos, Juliana I; Lomonte, Bruno; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2017-02-01

    Snake venoms from the Viperidae and Elapidae families often have several phospholipases A2 (PLA2s), which may display different functions despite having a similar structural scaffold. These proteins are considered an important target for the development of drugs against local myotoxic damage because they are not efficiently neutralized by conventional serum therapy. PLA2s from these venoms are generally divided into two classes: (i) catalytic PLA2s (or Asp49-PLA2s) and (ii) non-catalytic PLA2-like toxins (or Lys49-PLA2s). In many Viperidae venoms, a subset of the basic Asp49-PLA2s displays some functional and structural characteristics of PLA2-like proteins and group within the same phylogenetic clade, but their myotoxic mechanism is still largely unknown. In the present study, we have crystallized and solved the structure of myotoxin I (MT-I), a basic myotoxic Asp49-PLA2 isolated from Bothrops asper venom. The structure presents a dimeric conformation that is compatible with that of previous dimers found for basic myotoxic Asp49-PLA2s and Lys49-PLA2s and has been confirmed by other biophysical and bioinformatics techniques. This arrangement suggests a possible cooperative action between both monomers to exert myotoxicity via two different sites forming a putative membrane-docking site (MDoS) and a putative membrane disruption site (MDiS). This mechanism would resemble that proposed for Lys49-PLA2s, but the sites involved appear to be situated in a different region. Thus, as both sites are close to one another, they form a "myotoxic cluster", which is also found in two other basic myotoxic Asp49-PLA2s from Viperidae venoms. Such arrangement may represent a novel structural strategy for the mechanism of muscle damage exerted by the group of basic, Asp49-PLA2s found in viperid snake venoms.

  9. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  10. Basic properties and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querci, Francois R.

    1987-01-01

    Giant and supergiant M, S, and C stars are discussed in this survey of research. Basic properties as determined by spectra, chemical composition, photometry, or variability type are discussed. Space motions and space distributions of cool giants are described. Distribution of these stars in our galaxy and those nearby is discussed. Mira variables in particular are surveyed with emphasis on the following topics: (1) phase lag phenomenon; (2) Mira light curves; (3) variations in color indices; (4) determination of multiple periods; (5) correlations between quantities such as period length, light-curve shape, infrared (IR) excess, and visible and IR color diagram; (6) semiregular (SR) variables and different time scales in SR light variations; (7) irregular variable Lb and Lc stars; (8) different time-scale light variations; (9) hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars, in particular RCB stars; and (10) irreversible changes and rapid evolution in red variable stars.

  11. Putative melatonin receptors in a human biological clock

    SciTech Connect

    Reppert, S.M.; Weaver, D.R.; Rivkees, S.A.; Stopa, E.G.

    1988-10-07

    In vitro autoradiography with /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin was used to examine melatonin binding sites in human hypothalamus. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was localized to the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of a putative biological clock, and was not apparent in other hypothalamic regions. Specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding was consistently found in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of hypothalami from adults and fetuses. Densitometric analysis of competition experiments with varying concentrations of melatonin showed monophasic competition curves, with comparable half-maximal inhibition values for the suprachiasmatic nuclei of adults (150 picomolar) and fetuses (110 picomolar). Micromolar concentrations of the melatonin agonist 6-chloromelatonin completely inhibited specific /sup 125/I-labeled melatonin binding, whereas the same concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine caused only a partial reduction in specific binding. The results suggest that putative melatonin receptors are located in a human biological clock.

  12. Structure-activity relations of leucine derivatives reveal critical moieties for cellular uptake and activation of mTORC1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagamori, Shushi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Okuda, Suguru; Kojima, Naoto; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2016-04-01

    Among amino acids, leucine is a potential signaling molecule to regulate cell growth and metabolism by activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). To reveal the critical structures of leucine molecule to activate mTORC1, we examined the structure-activity relationships of leucine derivatives in HeLa S3 cells for cellular uptake and for the induction of phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K), a downstream effector of mTORC1. The activation of mTORC1 by leucine and its derivatives was the consequence of two successive events: the cellular uptake by L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) responsible for leucine uptake in HeLa S3 cells and the activation of mTORC1 following the transport. The structural requirement for the recognition by LAT1 was to have carbonyl oxygen, alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, amino group and hydrophobic side chain. In contrast, the requirement for mTORC1 activation was more rigorous. It additionally required fixed distance between carbonyl oxygen and alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, and amino group positioned at α-carbon. L-Configuration in chirality and appropriate length of side chain with a terminal isopropyl group were also important. This confirmed that LAT1 itself is not a leucine sensor. Some specialized leucine sensing mechanism with rigorous requirement for agonistic structures should exist inside the cells because leucine derivatives not transported by LAT1 did not activate mTORC1. Because LAT1-mTOR axis is involved in the regulation of cell growth and cancer progression, the results from this study may provide a new insight into therapeutics targeting both LAT1 and leucine sensor.

  13. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Naoya . E-mail: nakai@hss.osaka-u.ac.jp; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-05-19

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain {alpha}-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 ({alpha}2{beta}2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1{alpha} subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex.

  14. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine potentiates the differentiation of C2C12 murine myoblasts through the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjung; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yujin; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-03-01

    Aging causes phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle progenitor cells that lead to the progressive loss of myogenic differentiation and thus a decrease in muscle mass. The naturally occurring triterpene, ursolic acid, has been reported to be an effective agent for the prevention of muscle loss by suppressing degenerative muscular dystrophy. Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, and its metabolite, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyric acid, have been reported to enhance protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether the combination of ursolic acid and leucine promotes greater myogenic differentiation compared to either agent alone in C2C12 murine myoblasts. Morphological changes were observed and creatine kinase (CK) activity analysis was performed to determine the conditions through which the combination of ursolic acid and leucine would exert the most prominent effects on muscle cell differentiation. The effect of the combination of ursolic acid and leucine on the expression of myogenic differentiation marker genes was examined by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The combination of ursolic acid (0.5 µM) and leucine (10 µM) proved to be the most effective in promoting myogenic differentiation. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine significantly increased CK activity than treatment with either agent alone. The level of myosin heavy chain, a myogenic differentiation marker protein, was also enhanced by the combination of ursolic acid and leucine. The combination of ursolic acid and leucine significantly induced the expression of myogenic differentiation marker genes, such as myogenic differentiation 1 (MyoD) and myogenin, at both the mRNA and protein level. In addition, the number of myotubes and the fusion index were increased. These findings indicate that the combination of ursolic acid and leucine promotes muscle cell differentiation, thus suggesting that this combination of agents may prove to be beneficial

  15. Leucine supplementation at the onset of high-fat feeding does not prevent weight gain or improve glycemic regulation in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Baum, Jamie I; Washington, Tyrone A; Shouse, Stephanie A; Bottje, Walter; Dridi, Sami; Davis, Gina; Smith, Dameon

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern and it is essential to identify effective treatments and preventative strategies to stop continued increases in obesity rates. The potential functional roles of the branched chain amino acid leucine make this amino acid an attractive candidate for the treatment and/or prevention of obesity. The objective of this study was to determine if long-term leucine supplementation could prevent the development of obesity and reduce the risk factors for chronic disease in rats fed a high-fat (60 % fat) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30 per dietary treatment) were meal-fed (3 meals/day) either a control, low-fat diet (LF), control + leucine (LFL), high-fat (HF), or high-fat + leucine (HFL) for 42 days. On day 42, rats were sacrificed at 0, 30, or 90 min postprandial. Animals fed the HF and HFL diets had higher (P < 0.05) final body weights and weight gain compared to animals fed the LF and LFL diets. Leucine supplementation increased epididymal fat mass (P < 0.05) and decreased muscle mass (P < 0.05). There was no effect of leucine supplementation on postprandial glucose or insulin response. However, there was a significant effect (P < 0.05) of diet and time on free fatty acid concentrations. There was no effect of leucine on muscle markers of protein synthesis (4E-BP1, p70S6K) or energy metabolism (Akt, AMPK). Leucine supplementation decreased (P < 0.05) PGC1α expression and increased (P < 0.05) PPARγ expression in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, long-term leucine supplementation does not prevent weight gain, improve body composition, or improve glycemic control in rats fed a high-fat diet.

  16. Dietary l-leucine supplementation of lactating rats results in a tendency to increase lean/fat ratio associated to lower orexigenic neuropeptide expression in hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    López, N; Sánchez, J; Picó, C; Palou, A; Serra, F

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of dietary leucine supplementation in lactating dams, particularly on energy homeostasis through signaling mechanisms in the central nervous system. Dams were fed ad libitum with standard diet during pregnancy (control dams) or supplemented with 2% leucine (leucine-supplemented dams) from delivery onwards. Food intake, body weight and composition were periodically recorded. Hypothalamus was collected at the end of lactation, and the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), insulin receptor (InsR), ghrelin receptor (GSHR), melanocortin receptor (MCR4), leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) were analyzed. Dietary leucine supplementation to lactating rats increased plasma leucine by 56%, modulated body composition and contributed to a tendency of higher ratio of lean/fat mass content of dams during lactation, without affecting food intake, thermogenesis capacity or body or tissue/organs weights. No differences in body weight of offspring from control and leucine-supplemented dams were found. The expression of orexigenic peptides (NPY and AgRP) decreased in leucine-dams, whereas the expression of anorexigenic peptides (POMC and CART), the hypothalamic receptors of insulin, ghrelin, melanocortin and leptin and SOCS3 did not change by leucine supplementation. In conclusion, increased leucine intake during lactation may contribute to a healthier profile of body composition in dams, without compromising the growth and development of the progeny by a mechanism associated with lower expression of orexigenic neuropeptides in hypothalamus.

  17. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  18. Basic Blood Tests (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Basic Blood Chemistry Tests KidsHealth > For Parents > Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Print A A A en español Química sanguínea básica Doctors order basic blood chemistry tests to assess many conditions and learn how ...

  19. "New Voices": Enduring Basic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of basic writing, demonstrating how one university's basic writing program acts as a steward of writing. The assumption that basic writers only consume resources rather than contribute to academic excellence is rejected. What links the author responses to this issue is a publication of student writing entitled…

  20. Protein-leucine ingestion activates a regenerative inflammo-myogenic transcriptome in skeletal muscle following intense endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, David S; Nelson, Andre R; Raymond, Frederic; Metairon, Sylviane; Mansourian, Robert; Clarke, Jim; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-leucine supplement ingestion following strenuous endurance exercise accentuates skeletal-muscle protein synthesis and adaptive molecular responses, but the underlying transcriptome is uncharacterized. In a randomized single-blind triple-crossover design, 12 trained men completed 100 min of high-intensity cycling then ingested 70/15/180/30 g protein-leucine-carbohydrate-fat (15LEU), 23/5/180/30 g (5LEU), or 0/0/274/30 g (CON) beverages during the first 90 min of a 240 min recovery period. Vastus lateralis muscle samples (30 and 240 min postexercise) underwent transcriptome analysis by microarray followed by bioinformatic analysis. Gene expression was regulated by protein-leucine in a dose-dependent manner affecting the inflammatory response and muscle growth and development. At 30 min, 15LEU and 5LEU vs. CON activated transcriptome networks with gene-set functions involving cell-cycle arrest (Z-score 2.0-2.7, P < 0.01), leukocyte maturation (1.7, P = 0.007), cell viability (2.4, P = 0.005), promyogenic networks encompassing myocyte differentiation and myogenin (MYOD1, MYOG), and a proteinaceous extracellular matrix, adhesion, and development program correlated with plasma lysine, arginine, tyrosine, taurine, glutamic acid, and asparagine concentrations. High protein-leucine dose (15LEU-5LEU) activated an IL-1I-centered proinflammatory network and leukocyte migration, differentiation, and survival functions (2.0-2.6, <0.001). By 240 min, the protein-leucine transcriptome was anti-inflammatory and promyogenic (IL-6, NF- β, SMAD, STAT3 network inhibition), with overrepresented functions including decreased leukocyte migration and connective tissue development (-1.8-2.4, P < 0.01), increased apoptosis of myeloid and muscle cells (2.2-3.0, P < 0.002), and cell metabolism (2.0-2.4, P < 0.01). The analysis suggests protein-leucine ingestion modulates inflammatory-myogenic regenerative processes during skeletal muscle recovery from endurance exercise. Further

  1. Synergistic Effects of Polyphenols and Methylxanthines with Leucine on AMPK/Sirtuin-Mediated Metabolism in Muscle Cells and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bruckbauer, Antje; Zemel, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    The AMPK-Sirt1 pathway is an important regulator of energy metabolism and therefore a potential target for prevention and therapy of metabolic diseases. We recently demonstrated leucine and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) to synergize with low-dose resveratrol (200 nM) to activate sirtuin signaling and stimulate energy metabolism. Here we show that leucine exerts a direct effect on Sirt1 kinetics, reducing its Km for NAD+ by >50% and enabling low doses of resveratrol to further activate the enzyme (p = 0.012). To test which structure elements of resveratrol are necessary for synergy, we assessed potential synergy of structurally similar and dissimilar polyphenols as well as other compounds converging on the same pathways with leucine using fatty acid oxidation (FAO) as screening tool. Dose-response curves for FAO were constructed and the highest non-effective dose (typically 1–10 nM) was used with either leucine (0.5 mM) or HMB (5 µM) to treat adipocytes and myotubes for 24 h. Significant synergy was detected for stilbenes with FAO increase in adipocytes by 60–70% (p<0.05) and in myotubes >2000% (p<0.01). Sirt1 and AMPK activities were stimulated by ∼65% (p<0.001) and ∼50% (p<0.03), respectively. Similarly, hydroxycinnamic acids and derivatives (chlorogenic, cinnamic, and ferulic acids) combined with leucine/HMB increased FAO (300–1300%, p<0.01), AMPK activity (50–150%, p<0.01), and Sirt1 activity (∼70%, p<0.001). In contrast, more complex polyphenol structures, such as ellagic acid and epigallocatechin gallate required higher concentrations (>1 µM) and exhibited little or no synergy. Thus, the six-carbon ring structure bound to a carboxylic group seems to be a necessary element for leucine/HMB synergy with other stilbenes and hydroxycinnamic acids to stimulate AMPK/Sirt1 dependent FAO; these effects occur at concentrations that produce no independent effects and are readily achievable via oral administration. PMID:24551237

  2. Cold, Gas-Phase UV and IR Spectroscopy of Protonated Leucine Enkephalin and its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Nicole L.; Redwine, James; Dean, Jacob C.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The conformational preferences of peptide backbones and the resulting hydrogen bonding patterns provide critical biochemical information regarding the structure-function relationship of peptides and proteins. The spectroscopic study of cryogenically-cooled peptide ions in a mass spectrometer probes these H-bonding arrangements and provides information regarding the influence of a charge site. Leucine enkephalin, a biologically active endogenous opiod peptide, has been extensively studied as a model peptide in mass spectrometry. This talk will present a study of the UV and IR spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin [YGGFL+H]+ and two of its analogues: the sodiated [YGGFL+Na]+ and C-terminally methyl esterified [YGGFL-OMe+H]+ forms. All experiments were performed in a recently completed multi-stage mass spectrometer outfitted with a cryocooled ion trap. Ions are generated via nano-electrospray ionization and the analyte of interest is isolated in a linear ion trap. The analyte ions are trapped in a 22-pole ion trap held at 5 K by a closed cycle helium cryostat and interrogated via UV and IR lasers. Photofragments are trapped and isolated in a second LIT and mass analyzed. Double-resonance UV and IR methods were used to assign the conformation of [YGGFL+H]+, using the NH/OH stretch, Amide I, and Amide II regions of the infrared spectrum. The assigned structure contains a single backbone conformation at vibrational/rotational temperatures of 10 K held together with multiple H-bonds that self-solvate the NH3+ site. A "proton wire" between the N and C termini reinforces the H-bonding activity of the COO-H group to the F-L peptide bond, whose cleavage results in formation of the b4 ion, which is a prevalent, low-energy fragmentation pathway for [YGGFL+H]+. The reinforced H-bonding network in conjunction with the mobile proton theory may help explain the prevalence of the b4 pathway. In order to elucidate structural changes caused by modifying this H-bonding activity

  3. Molecular identification and characterization of leucine aminopeptidase 2, an excretory-secretory product of Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chuanhuan; Sun, Jiufeng; Li, Xuerong; Wang, Lexun; Hu, Xuchu; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Lv, Xiaoli; Liang, Chi; Li, Wenfang; Huang, Yan; Li, Ran; Wu, Zhongdao; Yu, Xinbing; Xu, Jin

    2012-10-01

    Aminopeptidases serve vital roles in metabolism of hormones, neurotransmission, turnover of proteins and immunological regulations. Leucine aminopeptidases catalyze the hydrolysis of amino-acid residues from the N-terminus of proteins and peptides. In the present study, leucine aminopeptidase 2 (LAP2) gene of Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) was isolated and identified from an adult cDNA library of C. sinensis. Recombinant CsLAP2 was expressed and purified in Escherichia coli BL21. The open reading frame of LAP2 contains 1,560 bp equivalent to 519 amino acids, a similarity analysis showed a relatively low homology with Homo sapiens (19.0 %), Trypanosoma cruzi (18.0 %), Mus musculus (19.3 %), and relatively high homology with Schistosoma mansoni (65.6 %). The optimum condition of rCsLAP2 enzyme activity was investigated using a fluorescent substrate of Leu-MCA at 37 °C and pH 7.5. The K (m) and V (max) values of rCsLAP2 were 18.2 μM and 10.7 μM/min, respectively. CsLAP2 gene expression can be detected at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria and egg of C. sinensis using real-time PCR, no difference was observed at the stages of the adult worm, metacercaria and egg. However, CsLAP2 showed a higher expression level at the stage of excysted metacercaria than the adult worm (3.90-fold), metacercaria (4.60-fold) and egg (4.59-fold). Histochemistry analysis showed that CsLAP2 was located at the tegument and excretory vesicle of metacercaria, and the tegument and intestine of adult worm. The immune response specific to rCsLAP2 was characterized by a mixed response patterns of Th1 and Th2, indicating a compounded humoral and cellular immune response. The combined results from the present study indicate that CsLAP2 was an important antigen exposed to host immune system, and probably implicated as potential role in interaction with host cells in clonorchiasis.

  4. Salt bridges destabilize a leucine zipper designed for maximized ion pairing between helices.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Paul; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Jelesarov, Ilian; Marti, Daniel N; Warwicker, James; Bosshard, Hans Rudolf

    2002-03-05

    Interhelical salt bridges are common in leucine zippers and are thought to stabilize the coiled coil conformation. Here we present a detailed thermodynamic investigation of the designed, disulfide-linked leucine zipper AB(SS) whose high-resolution NMR structure shows six interhelical ion pairs between heptad positions g of one helix and e' of the other helix but no ion pairing within single helices. The average pK(a) value of the Glu side chain carboxyl groups of AB(SS) is slightly higher than the pK(a) of a freely accessible Glu in an unfolded peptide [Marti, D. N., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 12804-12818]. This indicates that the salt bridges are destabilizing, a prediction we now have confirmed by determining the pH +/- stability profile of AB(SS). Circular dichroism-monitored unfolding by urea and by heating and differential scanning calorimetry show that the coiled coil conformation is approximately 5 kJ/mol more stable when salt bridges are broken by protonation of the carboxyl side chains. Using guanidinium chloride as the denaturant, the increase in the free energy of unfolding on protonation of the carboxyl side chains is larger, approximately 17 kJ/mol. The discrepancy between urea and guanidinium chloride unfolding can be ascribed to the ionic nature of guanidinium chloride, which screens charge-charge interactions. This work demonstrates the difficulty of predicting the energetic contribution of salt bridges from structural data alone even in a case where the ion pairs are seen in high-resolution NMR structures. The reason is that the contribution to stability results from a fine balance between energetically favorable Coulombic attractions and unfavorable desolvation of charges and conformational constraints of the residues involved in ion pairing. The apparent discrepancy between the results presented here and mutational studies indicating stabilization by salt bridges is discussed and resolved. An explanation is

  5. Basic concepts of epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Through epigenetic modifications, specific long-term phenotypic consequences can arise from environmental influence on slowly evolving genomic DNA. Heritable epigenetic information regulates nucleosomal arrangement around DNA and determines patterns of gene silencing or active transcription. One of the greatest challenges in the study of epigenetics as it relates to disease is the enormous diversity of proteins, histone modifications and DNA methylation patterns associated with each unique maladaptive phenotype. This is further complicated by a limitless combination of environmental cues that could alter the epigenome of specific cell types, tissues, organs and systems. In addition, complexities arise from the interpretation of studies describing analogous but not identical processes in flies, plants, worms, yeast, ciliated protozoans, tumor cells and mammals. This review integrates fundamental basic concepts of epigenetics with specific focus on how the epigenetic machinery interacts and operates in continuity to silence or activate gene expression. Topics covered include the connection between DNA methylation, methyl-CpG-binding proteins, transcriptional repression complexes, histone residues, histone modifications that mediate gene repression or relaxation, histone core variant stability, H1 histone linker flexibility, FACT complex, nucleosomal remodeling complexes, HP1 and nuclear lamins. PMID:22395460

  6. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  7. Basic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Pollard, J W

    1990-01-01

    This article will describe the basic techniques required for successful cell culture. It will also act to introduce some of the other chapters in this volume. It is not intended, as this volume is not, to describe the establishment of a tissue culture laboratory, nor to provide a historical or theoretical survey of cell culture. There are several books that adequately cover these areas, including the now somewhat dated but still valuable volume by Paul (1), the multi-authored Methods in Enzymology volume edited by Jakoby and Pastan (2), and the new edition of Freshney (3). Instead, this chapter's focus will be on the techniques for establishing primary rodent cell cultures from embryos and adult skin, maintaining and subculturing these fibro-blasts and their transformed derivatives, and the isolation of genetically pure strains. The cells described are all derived from Chinese hamsters since, to date, these cells, have proved to be the most useful for somatic cell genetics (4,5). The techniques, however, are generally applicable to most fibroblastic cell types.

  8. Basic science of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, Magali; de Girolamo, Laura; Filardo, Giuseppe; Oliveira, J Miguel; Orth, Patrick; Pape, Dietrich; Reboul, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent, disabling disorder of the joints that affects a large population worldwide and for which there is no definitive cure. This review provides critical insights into the basic knowledge on OA that may lead to innovative end efficient new therapeutic regimens. While degradation of the articular cartilage is the hallmark of OA, with altered interactions between chondrocytes and compounds of the extracellular matrix, the subchondral bone has been also described as a key component of the disease, involving specific pathomechanisms controlling its initiation and progression. The identification of such events (and thus of possible targets for therapy) has been made possible by the availability of a number of animal models that aim at reproducing the human pathology, in particular large models of high tibial osteotomy (HTO). From a therapeutic point of view, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising option for the treatment of OA and may be used concomitantly with functional substitutes integrating scaffolds and drugs/growth factors in tissue engineering setups. Altogether, these advances in the fundamental and experimental knowledge on OA may allow for the generation of improved, adapted therapeutic regimens to treat human OA.

  9. Back to basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    In an effort to educate the public about the long road from obscure experiment to life-changing discovery, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has been enlisting prominent researchers, science writers, and scientific organizations such as the AGU. More than two years in development, the NAS basic science initiative “Beyond Discovery: The Path From Research to Human Benefits” is an attempt to translate peer-review-quality science papers into general-interest science articles and booklets.As conceived by NAS vice-president Jack Halpern and a host of representatives from the scientific community, the Beyond Discovery initiative will “develop case studies that identify and trace the origins of important technological and medical advances.” These case studies will be written by scientists in a style publishable in a journal such as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. The articles are intended to be understandable to educators, college students, and the scientifically literate public. The case studies then will be further distilled by science writers into articles for a wider audience of policy makers and the general public.

  10. Basics of cytology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abbadi, Mousa A.

    2011-01-01

    This overview is intended to give a general outline about the basics of Cytopathology. This is a field that is gaining tremendous momentum all over the world due to its speed, accuracy and cost effectiveness. This review will include a brief description about the history of cytology from its inception followed by recent developments. Discussion about the different types of specimens, whether exfoliative or aspiration will be presented with explanation of its rule as a screening and diagnostic test. A brief description of the indications, utilization, sensitivity, specificity, cost effectiveness, speed and accuracy will be carried out. The role that cytopathology plays in early detection of cancer will be emphasized. The ability to provide all types of ancillary studies necessary to make specific diagnosis that will dictate treatment protocols will be demonstrated. A brief description of the general rules of cytomorphology differentiating benign from malignant will be presented. Emphasis on communication between clinicians and pathologist will be underscored. The limitations and potential problems in the form of false positive and false negative will be briefly discussed. Few representative examples will be shown. A brief description of the different techniques in performing fine needle aspirations will be presented. General recommendation for the safest methods and hints to enhance the sensitivity of different sample procurement will be given. It is hoped that this review will benefit all practicing clinicians that may face certain diagnostic challenges requiring the use of cytological material. PMID:23210005

  11. The role of an L-leucine residue on the conformations of glycyl-L-leucine oligomers and its N- or C-terminal dependence: infrared absorption and Raman scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Hiro-Fumi; Kanbe, Hide-Hiro; O'Connor, Charmian J

    2016-01-01

    The conformations of glycyl-L-leucine oligomers (GnL, residue number n = 3, 4, and 5) in the solid state were found to be similar to that of a polyglycine II (PGII). However, for L-leucyl-glycine oligomers (LGn; n = 3, 4, 5) in the solid state, LG3 and LG4 have already been confirmed to take a reverse-turn structure (LG3-type reverse-turn) while LG5 adopts a PGII-type helix. The present results provide evidence that the conformations of L-leucine-containing glycine oligomers depend strongly upon whether the L-leucine residue is placed in the N- or C-terminal position. For the aqueous G3L and G4L samples, we assumed that reverse-turn structures similar to the type II β-turn, rather than the LG3-type reverse-turn, are stabilized in concentrated solution, probably as the result of aggregation. Models to explain the mechanism of these phenomena are presented.

  12. Photodissociation of protonated leucine-enkephalin in the VUV range of 8-40 eV.

    PubMed

    Bari, S; Gonzalez-Magaña, O; Reitsma, G; Werner, J; Schippers, S; Hoekstra, R; Schlathölter, T

    2011-01-14

    Until now, photodissociation studies on free complex protonated peptides were limited to the UV wavelength range accessible by intense lasers. We have studied photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin cations for vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons energies ranging from 8 to 40 eV. We report time-of-flight mass spectra of the photofragments and various photofragment-yields as a function of photon energy. For sub-ionization energies our results are in line with existing studies on UV photodissociation of leucine-enkephalin. For photon energies exceeding 10 eV we could identify a new dissociation scheme in which photoabsorption leads to a fast loss of the tyrosine side chain. This loss process leads to the formation of a residual peptide that is remarkably cold internally.

  13. Photodissociation of protonated leucine-enkephalin in the VUV range of 8-40 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, S.; Gonzalez-Magana, O.; Reitsma, G.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathoelter, T.; Werner, J.; Schippers, S.

    2011-01-14

    Until now, photodissociation studies on free complex protonated peptides were limited to the UV wavelength range accessible by intense lasers. We have studied photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin cations for vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons energies ranging from 8 to 40 eV. We report time-of-flight mass spectra of the photofragments and various photofragment-yields as a function of photon energy. For sub-ionization energies our results are in line with existing studies on UV photodissociation of leucine-enkephalin. For photon energies exceeding 10 eV we could identify a new dissociation scheme in which photoabsorption leads to a fast loss of the tyrosine side chain. This loss process leads to the formation of a residual peptide that is remarkably cold internally.

  14. Non-empirical analysis of the nature of the inhibitor active-site interactions in leucine aminopeptidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grembecka, J.; K ȩdzierski, P.; Sokalski, W. A.

    1999-11-01

    Non-empirical analysis of the physical nature of the intermolecular interactions between several leucine aminopeptidase inhibitors and various constituents of the enzyme active site has been performed using a direct version of the hybrid variation-perturbation decomposition of SCF and MP2 interaction energies. The interaction energy terms obtained at different theory levels have been correlated with experimentally measured activities of the inhibitors, indicating that the more advanced the quantum-chemical method and, the larger the active-site model, the better is the correlation between calculated and measured binding energies. The electrostatic multipole term constitutes the dominant contribution in the total interaction energy, whereas Zn 2+488 and Lys +262 enzyme residues play the crucial role in the binding of these inhibitors by leucine aminopeptidase.

  15. Basic science of pain.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Joyce A

    2006-04-01

    The origin of the theory that the transmission of pain is through a single channel from the skin to the brain can be traced to the philosopher and scientist René Descartes. This simplified scheme of the reflex was the beginning of the development of the modern doctrine of reflexes. Unfortunately, Descartes' reflex theory directed both the study and treatment of pain for more than 330 years. It is still described in physiology and neuroscience textbooks as fact rather than theory. The gate control theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 rejuvenated the field of pain study and led to further investigation into the phenomena of spinal sensitization and central nervous system plasticity, which are the potential pathophysiologic correlates of chronic pain. The processing of pain takes place in an integrated matrix throughout the neuroaxis and occurs on at least three levels-at peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal sites. Basic strategies of pain control monopolize on this concept of integration by attenuation or blockade of pain through intervention at the periphery, by activation of inhibitory processes that gate pain at the spinal cord and brain, and by interference with the perception of pain. This article discusses each level of pain modulation and reviews the mechanisms of action of opioids and potential new analgesics. A brief description of animal models frames a discussion about recent advances regarding the role of glial cells and central nervous system neuroimmune activation and innate immunity in the etiology of chronic pain states. Future investigation into the discovery and development of novel, nonopioid drug therapy may provide needed options for the millions of patients who suffer from chronic pain syndromes, including syndromes in which the pain originates from peripheral nerve, nerve root, spinal cord, bone, muscle, and disc.

  16. The Basic Leucine Zipper Domain Transcription Factor Atf1 Directly Controls Cdc13 Expression and Regulates Mitotic Entry Independently of Wee1 and Cdc25 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sushobhana; Dey, Isha; Suresh, Megalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Progression into mitosis is a major point of regulation in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle, and its proper control is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. Investigation of the G2/M progression event in S. pombe has revealed the existence of a complex regulatory process that is responsible for making the decision to enter mitosis. Newer aspects of this regulation are still being revealed. In this paper, we report the discovery of a novel mode of regulation of G2/M progression in S. pombe. We show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-regulated transcription factor Atf1 is a regulator of Cdc13 (mitotic cyclin) transcription and is therefore a prominent player in the regulation of mitosis in S. pombe. We have used genetic approaches to study the effect of overexpression or deletion of Atf1 on the cell length and G2/M progression of S. pombe cells. Our results clearly show that Atf1 overexpression accelerates mitosis, leading to an accumulation of cells with shorter lengths. The previously known major regulators of entry into mitosis are the Cdc25 phosphatase and the Wee1 kinase, which modulate cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity. The significantly striking aspect of our discovery is that Atf1-mediated G2/M progression is independent of both Cdc25 and Wee1. We have shown that Atf1 binds to the Cdc13 promoter, leading to activation of Cdc13 expression. This leads to enhanced nuclear localization of CDK Cdc2, thereby promoting the G2/M transition. PMID:24728197

  17. The basic leucine zipper stress response regulator Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by coordination of [2Fe-2S] clusters.

    PubMed

    Rietzschel, Nicole; Pierik, Antonio J; Bill, Eckhard; Lill, Roland; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential, yet at elevated concentrations toxic trace element. To date, the mechanisms of iron sensing by eukaryotic iron-responsive transcription factors are poorly understood. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap5, a member of the Yap family of bZIP stress response regulators, administrates the adaptive response to high-iron conditions. Despite the central role of the iron-sensing process for cell viability, the molecule perceived by Yap5 and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by two Fe/S clusters bound to its activator domain (Yap5-AD). The more stable iron-regulatory Fe/S cluster at the N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (n-CRD) of Yap5 is detected in vivo and in vitro. The second cluster coordinated by the C-terminal CRD can only be shown after chemical reconstitution, since it is bound in a labile fashion. Both clusters are of the [2Fe-2S] type as characterized by UV/visible (UV/Vis), circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe/S cluster binding to Yap5-AD induces a conformational change that may activate transcription. The cluster-binding motif of the n-CRD domain is highly conserved in HapX-like transcription factors of pathogenic fungi and thus may represent a general sensor module common to many eukaryotic stress response regulators.

  18. The Basic Leucine Zipper Stress Response Regulator Yap5 Senses High-Iron Conditions by Coordination of [2Fe-2S] Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rietzschel, Nicole; Pierik, Antonio J.; Bill, Eckhard; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential, yet at elevated concentrations toxic trace element. To date, the mechanisms of iron sensing by eukaryotic iron-responsive transcription factors are poorly understood. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap5, a member of the Yap family of bZIP stress response regulators, administrates the adaptive response to high-iron conditions. Despite the central role of the iron-sensing process for cell viability, the molecule perceived by Yap5 and the underlying regulatory mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that Yap5 senses high-iron conditions by two Fe/S clusters bound to its activator domain (Yap5-AD). The more stable iron-regulatory Fe/S cluster at the N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (n-CRD) of Yap5 is detected in vivo and in vitro. The second cluster coordinated by the C-terminal CRD can only be shown after chemical reconstitution, since it is bound in a labile fashion. Both clusters are of the [2Fe-2S] type as characterized by UV/visible (UV/Vis), circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe/S cluster binding to Yap5-AD induces a conformational change that may activate transcription. The cluster-binding motif of the n-CRD domain is highly conserved in HapX-like transcription factors of pathogenic fungi and thus may represent a general sensor module common to many eukaryotic stress response regulators. PMID:25368382

  19. Bifunctional role of leucine 300 of firefly luciferase in structural rigidity.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Farzad; Ataei, Farangis; Mortazavi, Mojtaba; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-03-18

    Firefly luciferase is susceptible to thermal inactivation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Previous reports indicated that L(300)R mutation (LRR mutant) in E(354)R/Arg(356) double mutant (ERR mutant) from Lampyris turkestanicus luciferase has increased its thermal stability and rigidity through induction of some ionic bonds with Asp 270 and 271. Disruption of the deduced ionic bonds in an ultra-rigid mutant of firefly luciferase did not reverse the flexibility of the protein. In this study, we investigated the effects of this residue to find the truth behind an extraordinary increase in thermal stability and rigidity of luciferase after replacement of leucine 300 by arginine based on previous reports. For this purpose, L(300)R, L(300)K and L(300)E mutations were performed to compare the effects of these mutations on the native firefly luciferase. In spite of increase of intrinsic fluorescence of the mutants a slight increase in thermostability and retention of kinetic properties was observed. Based on our results, we can conclude that L(300)R mutation in LRR mutant accompanying with alteration in a flexible loop (352-359) increased thermostability and rigidity of luciferase.

  20. Plant Leucine Aminopeptidases Moonlight as Molecular Chaperones to Alleviate Stress-induced Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Melissa A.; Yee, Ashley; Park, Sang-Youl; Walling, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are present in animals, plants, and microbes. In plants, there are two classes of LAPs. The neutral LAPs (LAP-N and its orthologs) are constitutively expressed and detected in all plants, whereas the stress-induced acidic LAPs (LAP-A) are expressed only in a subset of the Solanaceae. LAPs have a role in insect defense and act as a regulator of the late branch of wound signaling in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Although the mechanism of LAP-A action is unknown, it has been presumed that LAP peptidase activity is essential for regulating wound signaling. Here we show that plant LAPs are bifunctional. Using three assays to monitor protein protection from heat-induced damage, it was shown that the tomato LAP-A and LAP-N and the Arabidopsis thaliana LAP1 and LAP2 are molecular chaperones. Assays using LAP-A catalytic site mutants demonstrated that LAP-A chaperone activity was independent of its peptidase activity. Furthermore, disruption of the LAP-A hexameric structure increased chaperone activity. Together, these data identify a new class of molecular chaperones and a new function for the plant LAPs as well as suggesting new mechanisms for LAP action in the defense of solanaceous plants against stress. PMID:22493451

  1. Endogenous Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Slows Synaptic Vesicle Recycling in Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Maas, James W. Jr.; Yang, Jing; Edwards, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    Dominant mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) produce the most common inherited form of Parkinson’s disease (PD) but the function of LRRK2 remains poorly understood. The presynaptic role of multiple genes linked to PD including α-synuclein (α-syn) has suggested that LRRK2 may also influence neurotransmitter release, a possibility supported by recent work. However, the use of disease-associated mutants that cause toxicity complicates the analysis. To determine whether LRRK2 normally influences the synaptic vesicle, we have now used a combination of imaging and electrophysiology to study LRRK2 knockout (KO) mice. Surprisingly, we find that in hippocampal (generally excitatory) neurons, the loss of LRRK2 does not affect synaptic vesicle exocytosis, endocytosis or the mobility of α-syn. Double KO (DKO) mice lacking LRRK1 as well as LRRK2 also show no defect in transmitter release by hippocampal neurons. However, in striatal neurons, which express LRRK2 at higher levels, the loss of LRRK2 leads to modest acceleration of synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Thus, endogenous LRRK2 normally slows synaptic vesicle recycling at striatal terminals. PMID:28280464

  2. NESmapper: accurate prediction of leucine-rich nuclear export signals using activity-based profiles.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shunichi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Terauchi, Ryohei; Tabata, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear export of proteins is regulated largely through the exportin/CRM1 pathway, which involves the specific recognition of leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) in the cargo proteins, and modulates nuclear-cytoplasmic protein shuttling by antagonizing the nuclear import activity mediated by importins and the nuclear import signal (NLS). Although the prediction of NESs can help to define proteins that undergo regulated nuclear export, current methods of predicting NESs, including computational tools and consensus-sequence-based searches, have limited accuracy, especially in terms of their specificity. We found that each residue within an NES largely contributes independently and additively to the entire nuclear export activity. We created activity-based profiles of all classes of NESs with a comprehensive mutational analysis in mammalian cells. The profiles highlight a number of specific activity-affecting residues not only at the conserved hydrophobic positions but also in the linker and flanking regions. We then developed a computational tool, NESmapper, to predict NESs by using profiles that had been further optimized by training and combining the amino acid properties of the NES-flanking regions. This tool successfully reduced the considerable number of false positives, and the overall prediction accuracy was higher than that of other methods, including NESsential and Wregex. This profile-based prediction strategy is a reliable way to identify functional protein motifs. NESmapper is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/nesmapper.

  3. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  4. Expression and regulation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in the developing anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, Laura E; Malkiewicz, Stefanie A; Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R; Porter, Tom E

    2009-02-01

    The expression profile of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in the anterior pituitary during the second half of embryonic development in the chick is consistent with in vivo regulation by circulating corticosteroids. However, nothing else has been reported about the presence of GILZ in the neuroendocrine system. We sought to characterize expression and regulation of GILZ in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland and determine the effect of GILZ overexpression on anterior pituitary hormone levels. Pituitary GILZ mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on the day of hatch, and decreased through the first week after hatch. GILZ expression was rapidly upregulated by corticosterone in embryonic pituitary cells. To determine whether GILZ regulates hormone gene expression in the developing anterior pituitary, we overexpressed GILZ in embryonic pituitary cells and measured mRNA for the major pituitary hormones. Exogenous GILZ increased prolactin mRNA above basal levels, but not as high as that in corticosterone-treated cells, indicating that GILZ may play a small role in lactotroph differentiation. The largest effect we observed was a twofold increase in FSH beta subunit in cells transfected with GILZ but not treated with corticosterone, suggesting that GILZ may positively regulate gonadotroph development in a manner not involving glucocorticoids. In conclusion, this is the first report to characterize avian GILZ and examine its regulation in the developing neuroendocrine system. We have shown that GILZ is upregulated by glucocorticoids in the embryonic pituitary gland and may regulate expression of several pituitary hormones.

  5. Contrasting Response of Two Dipolar Fluorescence Probes in a Leucine-Based Organogel and Its Implications.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Sivalingam; Seth, Sudipta; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2015-08-03

    The microenvironments of a leucine-based organogel are probed by monitoring the fluorescence behavior of coumarin 153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP). The steady-state data reveals distinctly different locations of the two molecules in the gel. Whereas AP resides close to the hydroxyl moieties of the gelator and engages in hydrogen-bonding interactions, C153 is found in bulk-toluene-like regions. In contrast to C153, AP exhibits excitation-wavelength-dependent emission, indicating that the environments of the hydrogen-bonded AP molecules are not all identical. A two-component fluorescence decay of AP in gel, unlike C153, supports this model. A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study of the rotational motion of the molecules also reveals the strong association of only AP with the gelator. That AP influences the critical gelation concentration implies its direct involvement in the gel-formation process. The results highlight the importance of guest-gelator interactions in gels containing guest molecules.

  6. Identification of the FTBL protein of Sumner and Dounce as a leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Dounce, A L; Allen, P Z

    1987-08-15

    The crystalline beef liver protein of Sumner and Dounce (A. L. Dounce, P. Z. Allen, and G. A. Mourtzikos (1978) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 188, 251-265) termed FTBL (football) protein because of the shape of its crystals, has been identified as a crystalline leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), on the basis of its high specific LAP activity and coincidence of its N terminal amino acid sequence (30 amino acids) with that of beef eye lens LAP. Amino acid analyses of the two proteins are also in reasonable agreement when based on the exact monomer molecular weight of beef eye lens protein obtained by the van Loon group ((1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 7077-7081). Our previously published monomer molecular weight of the FTBL protein was 25% too high, leading to the erroneous conclusion that the beef liver FTBL-LAP protein was a tetramer rather than a hexamer, as found by the van Loon group for beef lens LAP. The present report, taken together with our first paper on the FTBL protein establishes that the FTBL-LAP protein has been isolated from beef kidney and beef spleen as well as from beef liver. We now find that the properties of FTBL-LAP protein indicate that it is the same protein as beef eye lens LAP. The cellular and intracellular distributions of the FTBL-LAP protein have been considered in our first publication on the FTBL protein.

  7. The regulatory roles of small leucine-rich proteoglycans in extracellular assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shoujun; Birk, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are involved in a variety of biological and pathological processes. This review focuses on their regulatory roles in matrix assembly. SLRPs have protein cores and hypervariable glycosylation with multivalent binding abilities. During development, differential interactions of SLRPs with other molecules results in tissue-specific spatial and temporal distributions. The changing expression patterns play a critical role in the regulation of tissue-specific matrix assembly and, therefore, tissue function. SLRPs have significant structural roles within extracellular matrices. In addition, they have instructive roles, regulating collagen fibril growth, fibril organization, and extracellular matrix assembly. Moreover, they are involved in mediating cell-matrix interactions. Abnormal SLRP expression and/or structures result in dysfunctional extracellular matrices and pathophysiology. Altered expression of SLRPs has been found in many disease models, and structural deficiency also causes altered matrix assembly. SLRPs regulate the assembly of the extracellular matrix, which defines the microenvironment, modulating both the extracellular matrix and cellular functions leading to an impact on tissue function. PMID:23331954

  8. Modular mutagenesis of human placental ribonuclease inhibitor, a protein with leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F S; Vallee, B L

    1990-01-01

    Human placental ribonuclease inhibitor (PRI) is a potent protein inhibitor of pancreatic ribonucleases and the homologous blood vessel-inducing protein angiogenin. Although inhibition by PRI occurs with a 1:1 stoichiometry, its primary structure is composed predominantly of seven internal leucine-rich repeats. These internal repeats were systematically deleted either singly or in combination by "modular" mutagenesis. Deletion of repeat units 3 plus 4 or repeat unit 6 results in mutants that both bind to and inhibit ribonuclease A. Therefore, the angiogenin/ribonuclease binding site in PRI must reside primarily or entirely in repeats 1, 2, 5, or 7, the short N- or C-terminal segments, or a combination of these. Deletion of repeat units 3-5, 5-6, or 5 alone results in mutants that exhibit only binding activity. Hence, the binding site cannot reside exclusively in repeat 5. Other internal deletions or N- or C-terminal deletions of 6-86% of the protein all abolish activity. These results suggest that PRI has a modular structure, with one primary structural repeat constituting one module. The approach taken may be applicable to other proteins with repeat structures. Images PMID:2408043

  9. Fragmentation of Leucine Enkephalin as a Function of Laser Fluence in a MALDI TOF-TOF

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jennifer M.; Stein, Stephen E.; Blank, Paul S.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Vestal, Marvin L.; Yergey, Alfred L.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser fluence on ion formation in MALDI were studied using a tandem TOF mass spectrometer with a Nd-YAG laser and alpha-cyano hydrocinnamic acid matrix. Leucine enkephalin ionization and fragmentation were followed as a function of laser fluence ranging from the threshold of ion formation to the maximum available, i.e., approximately 280 – 930 mJ/mm2. The most notable finding was the appearance of immonium ions at fluence values close to threshold, increasing rapidly and then tapering in intensity with the appearance of typical backbone fragment ions. The data suggest the presence of two distinct environments for ion formation. One is associated with molecular desorption at low values of laser fluence that leads to extensive immonium ion formation. The second becomes dominant at higher fluences, is associated initially with backbone type fragments, but, at the highest values of fluence, progresses to immonium fragments. This second environment is suggestive of ion desorption from large pieces of material ablated from the surface. Arrhenius rate law considerations were used to estimate temperatures associated with the onset of these two processes. PMID:17204430

  10. The Natural Product N-Palmitoyl-l-leucine Selectively Inhibits Late Assembly of Human Spliceosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Effenberger, Kerstin A.; James, Robert C.; Urabe, Veronica K.; Dickey, Bailey J.; Linington, Roger G.; Jurica, Melissa S.

    2015-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic complex of five structural RNAs and dozens of proteins, which assemble together to remove introns from nascent eukaryotic gene transcripts in a process called splicing. Small molecules that target different components of the spliceosome represent valuable research tools to investigate this complicated macromolecular machine. However, the current collection of spliceosome inhibitors is very limited. To expand the toolkit we used a high-throughput in vitro splicing assay to screen a collection of pre-fractions of natural compounds derived from marine bacteria for splicing inhibition. Further fractionation of initial hits generated individual peaks of splicing inhibitors that interfere with different stages of spliceosome assembly. With additional characterization of individual peaks, we identified N-palmitoyl-l-leucine as a new splicing inhibitor that blocks a late stage of spliceosome assembly. Structure-activity relationship analysis of the compound revealed that length of carbon chain is important for activity in splicing, as well as for effects on the cytological profile of cells in culture. Together these results demonstrate that our combination of in vitro splicing analysis with complex natural product libraries is a powerful strategy for identifying new small molecule tools with which to probe different aspects of spliceosome assembly and function. PMID:26408199

  11. The Natural Product N-Palmitoyl-l-leucine Selectively Inhibits Late Assembly of Human Spliceosomes.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Kerstin A; James, Robert C; Urabe, Veronica K; Dickey, Bailey J; Linington, Roger G; Jurica, Melissa S

    2015-11-13

    The spliceosome is a dynamic complex of five structural RNAs and dozens of proteins, which assemble together to remove introns from nascent eukaryotic gene transcripts in a process called splicing. Small molecules that target different components of the spliceosome represent valuable research tools to investigate this complicated macromolecular machine. However, the current collection of spliceosome inhibitors is very limited. To expand the toolkit we used a high-throughput in vitro splicing assay to screen a collection of pre-fractions of natural compounds derived from marine bacteria for splicing inhibition. Further fractionation of initial hits generated individual peaks of splicing inhibitors that interfere with different stages of spliceosome assembly. With additional characterization of individual peaks, we identified N-palmitoyl-l-leucine as a new splicing inhibitor that blocks a late stage of spliceosome assembly. Structure-activity relationship analysis of the compound revealed that length of carbon chain is important for activity in splicing, as well as for effects on the cytological profile of cells in culture. Together these results demonstrate that our combination of in vitro splicing analysis with complex natural product libraries is a powerful strategy for identifying new small molecule tools with which to probe different aspects of spliceosome assembly and function.

  12. Key roles for the small leucine-rich proteoglycans in renal and pulmonary pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nastase, Madalina V.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Background Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are molecules that have signaling roles in a multitude of biological processes. In this respect, SLRPs play key roles in the evolution of a variety of diseases throughout the human body. Scope of Review We will critically review current developments in the roles of SLRPs in several types of disease of the kidney and lungs. Particular emphasis will be given to the roles of decorin and biglycan, the best characterized members of the SLRP gene family. Major Conclusions In both renal and pulmonary disorders, SLRPs are essential elements that regulate several pathophysiological processes including fibrosis, inflammation and tumor progression. Decorin has remarkable antifibrotic and antitumorigenic properties and is considered a valuable potential treatment of these diseases. Biglycan can modulate inflammatory processes in lung and renal inflammation and is a potential target in the treatment of inflammatory conditions. General significance SLRPs can serve as either treatment targets or as potential treatment in renal or lung disease. PMID:24508120

  13. RNA interference of cytosolic leucine aminopeptidase reduces fecundity in the hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Takeshi; Umemiya, Rika; Liao, Min; Gong, Haiyan; Harnnoi, Thasaneeya; Tanaka, Miho; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battsetseg, Badgar; Zhou, Jinlin; Xuan, Xuenan; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Taylor, Demar; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2007-03-01

    Ticks are effective vectors of pathogens because of their blood feeding and high fecundity. This high fecundity is related to the size of the blood meal. Therefore, knowledge of how blood proteins are degraded and converted to proteins, including yolk protein, is important for the development of ways to inhibit the utilization of blood proteins by ticks. RNA interference (RNAi) is becoming a powerful post-transcriptional gene silencing technique that provides insight into gene function. We constructed a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) based on a previously cloned Haemaphysalis longicornis leucine aminopeptidase (HlLAP) gene to reevaluate the biological role in tick blood digestion. Gene specific transcriptional, translational, and functional disruptions were achieved by the introduction of dsRNA into the ticks. Significantly delayed onset of egg-laying and reduced egg oviposition resulted from the RNAi for the HlLAP gene. These results suggest that HlLAP actually works as a blood digestive enzyme and affects tick fecundity via unknown mechanisms. The reduction of egg oviposition may be caused by a decrease in nutrients, especially free amino acids generated by HlLAP, from the blood meal. This is the first report of an impact on tick reproduction caused by gene silencing of a blood digestion-related molecule.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na{sup +} and leucine transport by LeuT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Rong Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na{sup +} and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na{sup +} binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na{sup +} binding and release. In Cl{sup −}-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl{sup −} ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na{sup +} and substrate transport as well as Cl{sup −}-independence of LeuT. - Highlights: • Ion binding site involving Glu290 is identified in the outward- and inward-open LeuT. • Sodium is released from inward-open LeuT once the side chain of Glu290 is protonated. • Protonation state of Glu290 regulates sodium binding and transport in LeuT.

  15. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  16. Vascular accumulation of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jung; Zhang, Xiaojie; Wang, Michael M

    2014-09-10

    Small penetrating brain artery thickening is a major feature of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Although affected fibrotic arteries of CADASIL have been shown to accumulate collagen, other components that compose pathological arterial walls remain incompletely characterized. We investigated the expression of decorin (DCN), the first collagen-binding small leucine-rich proteoglycan identified, in CADASIL. DCN was markedly upregulated in pathologically affected leptomeningeal and small penetrating arteries in CADASIL and was notably weaker in normal arteries from control brains. DCN protein was localized principally to the media and adventitia and only occasionally expressed in the intima. Immunoblotting of brain lysates showed a three-fold increase of DCN in CADASIL brains (compared with controls). Messenger RNA encoding DCN was five-fold increased in CADASIL. We conclude that DCN is the first identified proteoglycan to be identified in CADASIL arteries and may accumulate through transcriptional mechanisms. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether DCN localizes broadly to pathological small vessels in other cerebrovascular disorders.

  17. The role of leucine and its metabolites in protein and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Li, Yinghui; Tang, Yulong; Kong, Xiangfeng; Feng, Zemeng; Anthony, Tracy G; Watford, Malcolm; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Leucine (Leu) is a nutritionally essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) in animal nutrition. It is usually one of the most abundant amino acids in high-quality protein foods. Leu increases protein synthesis through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and placental cells. Leu promotes energy metabolism (glucose uptake, mitochondrial biogenesis, and fatty acid oxidation) to provide energy for protein synthesis, while inhibiting protein degradation. Approximately 80 % of Leu is normally used for protein synthesis, while the remainder is converted to α-ketoisocaproate (α-KIC) and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) in skeletal muscle. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that some of the functions of Leu are modulated by its metabolites. Both α-KIC and HMB have recently received considerable attention as nutritional supplements used to increase protein synthesis, inhibit protein degradation, and regulate energy homeostasis in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. Leu and its metabolites hold great promise to enhance the growth and health of animals (including humans, birds and fish).

  18. reduced ocelli encodes the leucine rich repeat protein Pray For Elves in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jason C; Fineberg, Sarah K; Eberl, Daniel F

    2007-01-01

    The ocelli are three simple photoreceptors on the vertex of the fruit fly head. We sought to identify the gene encoded by the classical ocellar mutant, reduced ocelli (rdo). Deficiency and inversion breakpoint mapping and P-element induced male recombination analyses were performed and Pray For Elves (PFE; CG15151; Fbgn0032661) emerged as a promising candidate for the rdo phenotype. The PFE locus maps to polytene region 36E on chromosome 2L between elfless (Fbgn0032660) and Arrestin 1 (Fbgn0000120). FlyBase annotation predicts that PFE encodes a serine/threonine kinase, yet protein prediction programs revealed no kinase domain. These analyses suggest that PFE simply encodes a leucine rich repeat molecule of unknown function, but presumably functions in nervous system protein-protein interaction. Two classical spontaneous alleles of rdo, rdo(1) and rdo(2), were characterized and the underlying mutations result from a small deletion spanning exon 1/intron 1 and a B104/roo insertion into the 3'UTR of PFE, respectively. Transposase-mediated excisions of several P-elements inserted into the PFE locus revert the rdo phenotype and a full-length PFE cDNA is sufficient to rescue rdo. A Gal4 enhancer trap reveals a broad adult neural expression pattern for PFE. Our identification and initial characterization of the rdo locus will contribute to the understanding of neurogenesis and neural development in the simple photoreceptors of the Drosophila visual system.

  19. mTOR independent regulation of macroautophagy by Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 via Beclin-1

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Roosen, Dorien A.; Dihanich, Sybille; Soutar, Marc P. M.; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Hardy, John; Tooze, Sharon A.; Cookson, Mark R.; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 is a complex enzyme with both kinase and GTPase activities, closely linked to the pathogenesis of several human disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Crohn’s disease, leprosy and cancer. LRRK2 has been implicated in numerous cellular processes; however its physiological function remains unclear. Recent reports suggest that LRRK2 can act to regulate the cellular catabolic process of macroautophagy, although the precise mechanism whereby this occurs has not been identified. To investigate the signalling events through which LRRK2 acts to influence macroautophagy, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and Beclin-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways were evaluated in astrocytic cell models in the presence and absence of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity resulted in the stimulation of macroautophagy in a non-canonical fashion, independent of mTOR and ULK1, but dependent upon the activation of Beclin 1-containing class III PI3-kinase. PMID:27731364

  20. Diatom Mimics: Directing the Formation of Biosilica Nanoparticles by Controlled Folding of Lysine-Leucine Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Zane, Ariel; Jaeger, Vance; Roehrich, Adrienne M.; Lutz, Helmut; Pfaendtner, Jim; Drobny, Gary P.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Silaffins, long chain polyamines, and other biomolecules found in diatoms are involved in the assembly of a large number of silica nanostructures under mild, ambient conditions. Nanofabrication researchers have sought to mimic the diatom's biosilica production capabilities by engineering proteins to resemble aspects of naturally occurring biomolecules. Such mimics can produce monodisperse biosilica nanospheres, but in vitro production of the variety of intricate biosilica nanostructures that compose the diatom frustule is not yet possible. In this study we demonstrate how LK peptides, composed solely of lysine (K) and leucine (L) amino acids arranged with varying hydrophobic periodicities, initiate the formation of different biosilica nanostructures in vitro. When L and K residues are arranged with a periodicity of 3.5 the α-helical form of the LK peptide produces monodisperse biosilica nanospheres. However, when the LK periodicity is changed to 3.0, corresponding to a 310 helix, the morphology of the nanoparticles changes to elongated rod-like structures. β-strand LK peptides with a periodicity of 2.0 induce wire-like silica morphologies. This study illustrates how the morphology of biosilica can be changed simply by varying the periodicity of polar and nonpolar amino acids. PMID:25285787

  1. Identification of a novel mono-leucine basolateral sorting motif within the cytoplasmic domain of amphiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Gephart, Jonathan D.; Singh, Bhuminder; Higginbotham, James N.; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Fölsch, Heike; Coffey, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial cells establish apical and basolateral (BL) membranes with distinct protein and lipid compositions. To achieve this spatial asymmetry, the cell utilizes a variety of mechanisms for differential sorting, delivery and retention of cell surface proteins. The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its ligand, amphiregulin (AREG), are transmembrane proteins delivered to the BL membrane in polarized epithelial cells. Herein, we show that the cytoplasmic domain of AREG contains dominant BL sorting information; replacement of the cytoplasmic domain of apically targeted NGFR with the cytoplasmic domain of AREG redirects the chimera to the BL surface. Using sequential truncations and site-directed mutagenesis of the AREG cytoplasmic domain, we identify a novel BL sorting motif consisting of a single leucine C-terminal to an acidic cluster (EEXXXL). In AP-1B-deficient cells, newly synthesized AREG is initially delivered to the BL surface like in AP-1B-expressing cells. However, in these AP-1B-deficient cells, recycling of AREG back to the BL surface is compromised, leading to its appearance at the apical surface. These results show that recycling, but not delivery, of AREG to the BL surface is AP-1B-dependent. PMID:21917092

  2. Leucine Rich α-2 Glycoprotein: A Novel Neutrophil Granule Protein and Modulator of Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Druhan, Lawrence J.; Lance, Amanda; Li, Shimena; Price, Andrea E.; Emerson, Jacob T.; Baxter, Sarah A.; Gerber, Jonathan M.; Avalos, Belinda R.

    2017-01-01

    Leucine-rich α2 glycoprotein (LRG1), a serum protein produced by hepatocytes, has been implicated in angiogenesis and tumor promotion. Our laboratory previously reported the expression of LRG1 in murine myeloid cell lines undergoing neutrophilic granulocyte differentiation. However, the presence of LRG1 in primary human neutrophils and a role for LRG1 in regulation of hematopoiesis have not been previously described. Here we show that LRG1 is packaged into the granule compartment of human neutrophils and secreted upon neutrophil activation to modulate the microenvironment. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and direct biochemical measurements, we demonstrate that LRG1 is present in the peroxidase-negative granules of human neutrophils. Exocytosis assays indicate that LRG1 is differentially glycosylated in neutrophils, and co-released with the secondary granule protein lactoferrin. Like LRG1 purified from human serum, LRG1 secreted from activated neutrophils also binds cytochrome c. We also show that LRG1 antagonizes the inhibitory effects of TGFβ1 on colony growth of human CD34+ cells and myeloid progenitors. Collectively, these data invoke an additional role for neutrophils in innate immunity that has not previously been reported, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby neutrophils may modulate the microenvironment via extracellular release of LRG1. PMID:28081565

  3. Leucine zipper, down regulated in cancer-1 gene expression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Michele; Barone, Nunziata; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A.; Recupero, Domenico; Galia, Antonio; Fraggetta, Filippo; Aiello, Anna Maria; Pepe, Pietro; Castiglione, Roberto; Vicari, Enzo; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous genetic alterations have been implicated in the development of prostate cancer (PCa). DNA and protein microarrays have enabled the identification of genes associated with apoptosis, which is important in PCa development. Despite the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood, inhibition of apoptosis is a critical pathophysiological factor that contributes to the onset and progression of PCa. Leucine zipper, down-regulated in cancer 1 (LDOC-1) is a known regulator of the nuclear factor (NF)-mediated pathway of apoptosis through the inhibition of NF-κB. The present study investigated the expression of the LDOC-1 gene in LNCaP, PC-3, PNT1A and PNT2 prostate cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition LDOC-1 protein expression in normal prostate tissues and PCa was studied by immunohistochemistry. LDOC-1 messenger RNA resulted overexpressed in LNCaP and PC-3 PCa cell lines compared with the two normal prostate cell lines PNT1A and PNT2. The results of immunohistochemistry demonstrated a positive cytoplasmic LDOC-1 staining in all PCa and normal prostate samples, whereas no nuclear staining was observed in any sample. Furthermore, a more intense signal was evidenced in PCa samples. LDOC-1 gene overexpression in PCa suggests an activity of LDOC-1 in PCa cell lines. PMID:27698860

  4. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs): characteristics and function in the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Liao, Jingwen; Klineberg, Eric; Leung, Victor Yl; Huang, Shishu

    2017-03-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is responsible for normal spinal motion and load distribution. However, degeneration may occur due to age- and non-age-related processes and is primarily characterized by a reduction in the number of chondrocyte-like cells and abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) structure in the nucleus pulposus. Although IVD progenitor cells have been identified, the local microenvironment components regulating the behaviour of these progenitor cell populations remain unknown. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are bioactive components of the ECM associated with fibrillogenesis, cellular growth and apoptosis and tissue remodelling. SLRPs support the survival of IVD progenitor cells under hypoxic conditions via the activation of specific hypoxia-inducible factors. Additionally, SLRPs deficiency (biglycan) in knockout mice is sufficient to accelerate the IVD degenerative process. These data suggest that SLRPs play an important role in the homeostasis of IVD. Given their specific properties and physiological functions, we propose a role of SLRPs in IVD degeneration and potential application in its regeneration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Endogenous Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Slows Synaptic Vesicle Recycling in Striatal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Maas, James W Jr; Yang, Jing; Edwards, Robert H

    2017-01-01

    Dominant mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) produce the most common inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD) but the function of LRRK2 remains poorly understood. The presynaptic role of multiple genes linked to PD including α-synuclein (α-syn) has suggested that LRRK2 may also influence neurotransmitter release, a possibility supported by recent work. However, the use of disease-associated mutants that cause toxicity complicates the analysis. To determine whether LRRK2 normally influences the synaptic vesicle, we have now used a combination of imaging and electrophysiology to study LRRK2 knockout (KO) mice. Surprisingly, we find that in hippocampal (generally excitatory) neurons, the loss of LRRK2 does not affect synaptic vesicle exocytosis, endocytosis or the mobility of α-syn. Double KO (DKO) mice lacking LRRK1 as well as LRRK2 also show no defect in transmitter release by hippocampal neurons. However, in striatal neurons, which express LRRK2 at higher levels, the loss of LRRK2 leads to modest acceleration of synaptic vesicle endocytosis. Thus, endogenous LRRK2 normally slows synaptic vesicle recycling at striatal terminals.

  6. Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans Exhibit Unique Spatiotemporal Expression Profiles During Cardiac Valve Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Loren E.; Kern, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans (SLRPs) play a role in collagen fiber formation and also function as signaling molecules. Given the importance of collagen synthesis to the cardiovascular extracellular matrix (ECM), we examined the spatiotemporal expression of SLRPs, not previously investigated in the murine heart. Results Cardiac expression using antibodies specific for biglycan (BGN), decorin (DCN), fibromodulin (FMOD) and lumican (LUM) revealed distinct patterns among the SLRPs in mesenchymal-derived tissues. DCN showed the most intense localization within the developing valve cusps, while LUM was evident primarily in the hinge region of postnatal cardiac valves. BGN, DCN and FMOD were immunolocalized to regions where cardiac valves anchor into adjacent tissues. Medial (BGN), and adventitial (BGN, DCN, FMOD and LUM) layers of the pulmonary and aortic arteries also showed intense staining of SLRPs but this spatiotemporal expression varied with developmental age. Conclusions The unique expression patterns of SLRPs suggest they have adapted to specialized roles in the cardiovascular ECM. SLRP expression patterns overlap with areas where TGFβ signaling is critical to the developing heart. Therefore we speculate that SLRPs may not only be required to facilitate collagen fiber formation but may also regulate TGFβ signaling in the murine heart. PMID:24272803

  7. AdpC is a Prevotella intermedia 17 leucine-rich repeat internalin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Divya; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Jones, Kevin; Yanamandra, Sai; Sengupta, Dipanwita; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Lewis, Janina P

    2010-06-01

    The oral bacterium Prevotella intermedia attaches to and invades gingival epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Several genes encoding proteins that mediate both the adhesion and invasion processes are carried on the genome of this bacterium. Here, we characterized one such protein, AdpC, belonging to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that this protein shares similarity with the Treponema pallidum LRR (LRR(TP)) family of proteins and contains six LRRs. Despite the absence of a signal peptide, this protein is localized on the bacterial outer membrane, indicating that it is transported through an atypical secretion mechanism. The recombinant form of this protein (rAdpC) was shown to bind fibrinogen. In addition, the heterologous host strain Escherichia coli BL21 expressing rAdpC (V2846) invaded fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells at a 40-fold-higher frequency than control E. coli BL21 cells expressing a sham P. intermedia 17 protein. Although similar results were obtained by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), only a 3-fold-increased invasion of V2846 into oral epithelial HN4 cells was observed. Thus, AdpC-mediated invasion is cell specific. This work demonstrated that AdpC is an important invasin protein of P. intermedia 17.

  8. Essential Role for an M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase in Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Ran; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Song, Su-Min; Joo, So-Young; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2015-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions such as starvation, low temperatures, and exposure to biocides. During encystation, a massive turnover of intracellular components occurs, and a large number of organelles and proteins are degraded by proteases. Previous studies with specific protease inhibitors have shown that cysteine and serine proteases are involved in encystation of Acanthamoeba, but little is known about the role of metalloproteases in this process. Here, we have biochemically characterized an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Acanthamoeba castellanii (AcLAP) and analyzed its functional involvement in encystation of the parasite. Recombinant AcLAP shared biochemical properties such as optimal pH, requirement of divalent metal ions for activity, substrate specificity for Leu, and inhibition profile by aminopeptidase inhibitors and metal chelators with other characterized M17 family LAPs. AcLAP was highly expressed at a late stage of encystation and mainly localized in the cytoplasm of A. castellanii. Knockdown of AcLAP using small interfering RNA induced a decrease of LAP activity during encystation, a reduction of mature cyst formation, and the formation of abnormal cyst walls. In summary, these results indicate that AcLAP is a typical M17 family enzyme that plays an essential role during encystation of Acanthamoeba.

  9. Alterations in the Helicoverpa armigera midgut digestive physiology after ingestion of pigeon pea inducible leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Jadhav, Bhakti R; Giri, Ashok P; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonate inducible plant leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is proposed to serve as direct defense in the insect midgut. However, exact functions of inducible plant LAPs in the insect midgut remain to be estimated. In the present investigation, we report the direct defensive role of pigeon pea inducible LAP in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and responses of midgut soluble aminopeptidases and serine proteinases upon LAP ingestion. Larval growth and survival was significantly reduced on the diets supplemented with pigeon pea LAP. Aminopeptidase activities in larvae remain unaltered in presence or absence of inducible LAP in the diet. On the contrary, serine proteinase activities were significantly decreased in the larvae reared on pigeon pea LAP containing diet as compared to larvae fed on diet without LAP. Our data suggest that pigeon pea inducible LAP is responsible for the degradation of midgut serine proteinases upon ingestion. Reduction in the aminopeptidase activity with LpNA in the H. armigera larvae was compensated with an induction of aminopeptidase activity with ApNA. Our findings could be helpful to further dissect the roles of plant inducible LAPs in the direct plant defense against herbivory.

  10. Activity of leucine aminopeptidase of Telchin licus licus: an important insect pest of sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Jorge W Arboleda; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi; Jiménez, Arnubio Valencia

    2014-06-01

    The enzymatic activity of leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) from the intestinal tract of sugarcane giant borer (Telchin licus licus) was assayed by using a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric assay that uses L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide as substrate. In this assay, L-leucyl-2-naphthylamide is hydrolyzed to produce 2-naphthylamine and Lleucine. The product 2-naphthylamine reacts with Fast Black K and can be monitored using a continuous spectrophotometric measurement at 590 nm. The data on the kinetic parameters indicates that the Km for the L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide at pH 7.0 was found to be lower than those found for other LAP substrates. The Km and Vmax for the LAP were determined to be 84.03 µM and 357.14 enzymatic units mg(-1), respectively. A noticeable difference of LAP activity between the two insect orders tested was observed. This method could be used to screen for natural LAP inhibitors.

  11. Identification and characterisation of a leucine aminopeptidase from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Takeshi; Kazama, Kouji; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Umemiya, Rika; Liao, Min; Inoue, Noboru; Xuan, Xuenan; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2006-09-01

    Aminopeptidases responsible for blood digestion have yet to be identified in haematophagous ticks. We report here the cloning and molecular characterisation of a cDNA encoding leucine aminopeptidase, a member of the M17 cytosolic aminopeptidase family, from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlLAP). Endogenous HlLAP was detected in the soluble fraction of adult tick extracts by immunoblotting. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that endogenous HlLAP expression mainly took place in the cytosol of midgut epithelial cells. Furthermore, expression of HlLAP was induced by a blood-feeding process. A functional recombinant HlLAP expressed in Escherichia coli efficiently hydrolyses synthetic substrates for aminopeptidase, a leucyl (with the Km value 0.19 +/- 0.011 mM and Vmax value 157.2 +/- 3.17 nmol/min/mgprotein) and a methionyl substrate (with the Km value 0.12+/-0.0052 mM and Vmax value 171.9 +/- 2.31 nmol/min/mgprotein). Enzyme activity was found to be optimum at pH 8 and 35 degrees C. The recombinant HlLAP enzyme activity was strongly dependent on metal divalent cations, Mn2+, and was inhibited by bestatin. These results indicate that HlLAP play an important role for host's blood digestion process.

  12. Overexpression of leucine aminopeptidase 3 contributes to malignant development of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Yang, Xiaojing; Shi, Hui; Li, Mei; Xue, Qun; Ren, Hanru; Yao, Li; Chen, Xueyu; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Huijie

    2014-06-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) were associated with tumor cell proliferation, invasion and/or angiogenesis. We aimed to examine the biological function of LAP3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). LAP3 expressions were examined in human ESCC tissue and cell lines ECA109 and TE1 cells. Recombinant pSilencer4.1-LAP3-shRNA was transfected into ECA109 cells to silence LAP3 expression. The effects of LAP3 silencing on ECA109 cell proliferation in vitro were evaluated. Flow cytometry profiling was used to detect the differentiate cell cycle distribution in LAP3-silenced ECA109 cells. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to examine the activities of migration and invasion in LAP3-silenced ECA109 cells. We overexpressed LAP3 in TE1 cells to find out the corresponding results. LAP3 expression level was abundance in ESCC tissue. LAP3 silencing significantly reduced ECA109 cell proliferation and colony formation. The knockdown of LAP3 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1-phase. Moreover, over expression of LAP3 favors TE1 cell proliferation and invasiveness which also confirms its contribution in malignant development. We came to the conclusion that LAP3 contributed to ESCC progression by overcoming cell cycle arrest. The proliferative and migration effects of LAP3 might contribute to malignant development of human ESCC.

  13. M17 leucine aminopeptidase of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yub; Song, Su-Min; Seok, Ji-Woong; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Han, Eun-Taek; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Yu, Hak-Sun; Hong, Yeonchul; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2010-03-01

    Amino acids derived from hemoglobin are essential to protein synthesis required for growth and development of the Plasmodium vivax malaria parasite. M17 leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) is a cytosolic metallo-exopeptidase that catalyzes the removal of amino acids from the peptide generated in the process of hemoglobin degradation. Inhibitors of the enzyme have shown promise as drugs against Plasmodium infections, implicating aminopeptidases as a novel potential anti-malarial chemotherapy target. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding a 68kDa P. vivax LAP (PvLAP). Deduced amino acid sequence of PvLAP exhibited significant sequence homology with LAP from Plasmodium falciparum. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant PvLAP protein produced in Escherichia coli demonstrated preferential substrate specificity for the fluorogenic peptide Leu-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin hydroxide and inhibition by EDTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, and bestatin, which are conserved characteristics of the M17 family of LAP. PvLAP was optimally active at slightly alkaline pH and its activity was dependent on divalent metal ions. Based on the biochemical properties and immunofluorescence localization, PvLAP is concluded to represent a LAP in P. vivax. The enzyme is most likely responsible for the catabolism of host hemoglobin and, hence, represents a potential target of both P. falciparum and P. vivax chemotherapy.

  14. Purpurin inhibits adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase and angiogenesis in a zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyomi; Shim, Joong Sup; Kim, Beom Seok; Jung, Hye Jin; Huh, Tae-Lin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-07-18

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (A-LAP) is a novel member of the M1 family of zinc metallopeptidases, which has been reported to play a crucial role in angiogenesis. In the present study, we conducted a target-based screening of natural products and synthetic chemical libraries using the purified enzyme to search novel inhibitors of A-LAP. Amongst several hits isolated, a natural product purpurin was identified as one of the most potent inhibitors of A-LAP from the screening. In vitro enzymatic analyses demonstrated that purpurin inhibited A-LAP activity in a non-competitive manner with a Ki value of 20 M. In addition, purpurin showed a strong selectivity toward A-LAP versus another member of M1 family of zinc metallopeptidase, aminopeptidase N (APN). In angiogenesis assays, purpurin inhibited the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Moreover, purpurin inhibited in vivo angiogenesis in zebrafish embryo without toxicity. These data demonstrate that purpurin is a novel specific inhibitor of A-LAP and could be developed as a new anti-angiogenic agent.

  15. Up-regulation of leucine aminopeptidase-A in cadmium-treated tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Boulila-Zoghlami, Latifa; Gallusci, Philippe; Holzer, Frances M; Basset, Gilles J; Djebali, Whabi; Chaïbi, Wided; Walling, Linda L; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-10-01

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) on aminopeptidase (AP) activities and Leucine-AP (LAP) expression were investigated in the roots of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., var Ibiza) plants. Three-week-old plants were grown for 10 days in the presence of 0.3-300 μM Cd and compared to control plants grown in the absence of Cd. AP activities were measured using six different p-nitroanilide (p-NA) substrates. Leu, Met, Arg, Pro and Lys hydrolyzing activities increased in roots of Cd-treated plants, while Phe-pNA cleavage was not enhanced after Cd treatments. The use of peptidase inhibitors showed that most of the Leu-pNA hydrolyzing activity was related to one or several metallo-APs. Changes in Lap transcripts, protein and activities were measured in the roots of 0 and 30-μM Cd-treated plants. LapA transcript levels increased in Cd-treated roots, whereas LapN RNAs levels were not modified. To assess amount of Leu-pNA hydrolyzing activity associated with the hexameric LAPs, LAP activity was measured following immunoprecipitation with a LAP polyclonal antiserum. LAP activity increased in Cd-treated roots. There was a corresponding increase in LAP-A protein levels detected in 2D-immunoblots. The role of LAP-A in the proteolytic response to Cd stress is discussed.

  16. Plant leucine aminopeptidases moonlight as molecular chaperones to alleviate stress-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Melissa A; Yee, Ashley; Park, Sang-Youl; Walling, Linda L

    2012-05-25

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are present in animals, plants, and microbes. In plants, there are two classes of LAPs. The neutral LAPs (LAP-N and its orthologs) are constitutively expressed and detected in all plants, whereas the stress-induced acidic LAPs (LAP-A) are expressed only in a subset of the Solanaceae. LAPs have a role in insect defense and act as a regulator of the late branch of wound signaling in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Although the mechanism of LAP-A action is unknown, it has been presumed that LAP peptidase activity is essential for regulating wound signaling. Here we show that plant LAPs are bifunctional. Using three assays to monitor protein protection from heat-induced damage, it was shown that the tomato LAP-A and LAP-N and the Arabidopsis thaliana LAP1 and LAP2 are molecular chaperones. Assays using LAP-A catalytic site mutants demonstrated that LAP-A chaperone activity was independent of its peptidase activity. Furthermore, disruption of the LAP-A hexameric structure increased chaperone activity. Together, these data identify a new class of molecular chaperones and a new function for the plant LAPs as well as suggesting new mechanisms for LAP action in the defense of solanaceous plants against stress.

  17. The Leucine-rich Pentatricopeptide-Repeat Containing Protein Regulates Mitochondrial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sondheimer, Neal; Fang, Ji-Kang; Polyak, Erzsebet; Falk, Marni; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function depends upon the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Although the basal factors that carry out the process of mitochondrial transcription are known, the regulation of this process is incompletely understood. To further our understanding of mitochondrial gene regulation we identified proteins that bound to the previously described point of termination for the major mRNA-coding transcript H2. One was the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein (LRPPRC), which has been linked to the French-Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome. Cells with reduced expression of LRPPRC had a reduction in oxygen consumption. The expression of mitochondrial mRNA and tRNA was dependent upon LRPPRC levels, but reductions in LRPPRC did not affect the expression of mitochondrial rRNA. Reduction of LRPPRC levels interfered with mitochondrial transcription in vitro but did not affect the stability of mitochondrial mRNAs or alter the expression of nuclear genes responsible for mitochondrial transcription in vivo. These findings demonstrate the control of mitochondrial mRNA synthesis by a protein that has an established role in regulating nuclear transcription, and a link to mitochondrial disease. PMID:20677761

  18. Gas-phase synthesis of solid state DNA nanoparticles stabilized by l-leucine.

    PubMed

    Raula, Janne; Hanzlíková, Martina; Rahikkala, Antti; Hautala, Juho; Kauppinen, Esko I; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2013-02-28

    Aerosol flow reactor is used to generate solid-state nanoparticles in a one-step process that is based on drying of aerosol droplets in continuous flow. We investigated the applicability of aerosol flow reactor method to prepare solid state DNA nanoparticles. Precursor solutions of plasmid DNA with or without complexing agent (polyethylenimine), coating material (l-leucine) and mannitol (bulking material) were dispersed to nanosized droplets and instantly dried in laminar heat flow. Particle morphology, integrity and stability were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The stability of DNA was studied by gel electrophoresis. Plasmid DNA as such degraded in the aerosol flow process. Complexing agent protected DNA from degradation and coating material enabled production of dispersed, non-aggregated, nanoparticles. The resulting nanoparticles were spherical and their mean diameter ranged from 65 to 125nm. The nanoparticles were structurally stable at room temperature and their DNA content was about 10%. We present herein the proof of principle for the production of dispersed solid state nanoparticles with relevant size and intact plasmid DNA.

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic DNA binding investigations of dibutyltin N-(5-chlorosalicylidene)-leucinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufang; Yuan, Hongyu; Tian, Laijin

    2017-02-01

    A new dibutyltin N-(5-Chlorosalicylidene)-leucinate (DNCL) was synthesized by the reaction of dibutyltin dichloride with in situ formed potassium N-(5-chlorosalicylidene)-L-isoleucinate 3 characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectra. The interaction between DNCL and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in a pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. It was found that DNCL molecules could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA, forming a DNCL-DNA complex with a binding constant of Kf = 5.75 × 105 L mol-1 (310 K). The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were calculated to be 1.16 × 105 J mol-1, 486.5 J K-1 mol -1 and -3.48 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the DNCL-DNA complex.

  20. Identification of the Leucine-to-2-Methylbutyric Acid Catabolic Pathway of Lactococcus lactis† ‡

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Dobrowolski, Piotr; Weimer, Bart C.

    2006-01-01

    Nutrient starvation and nonculturability in bacteria lead to changes in metabolism not found during the logarithmic phase. Substrates alternate to those used during growth are metabolized in these physiological states, yielding secondary metabolites. In firmicutes and actinobacteria, amino acid catabolic pathways are induced during starvation and nonculturability. Examination of lactococci showed that the population entered a nonculturable state after carbohydrate depletion and was incapable of growth on solid media; however, the cells gained the ability to produce branched-chain fatty acids from amino acids. Gene expression profiling and in silico pathway analysis coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to delineate the leucine catabolic pathway. Lactococci produced acetic and propionic acid during logarithmic growth and starvation. At the onset of nonculturability, 2-methylbutyric acid was produced via hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (CoA) and acetyl-CoA, along with ATP and oxidation/reduction precursors. Gene expression profiling and genome sequence analysis showed that lactococci contained redundant genes for branched-chain fatty acid production that were regulated by an unknown mechanism linked to carbon metabolism. This work demonstrated the ability of a firmicute to induce new metabolic capabilities in the nonculturable state for producing energy and intermediates needed for transcription and translation. Phylogenetic analyses showed that homologues of these enzymes and their functional motifs were widespread across the domains of life. PMID:16751541

  1. Spectroscopic evidence of β-turn in N-glycated peptidomimetics related to leucine-enkephalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vass, E.; Hollósi, M.; Kveder, M.; Kojić-Prodić, B.; Čudić, M.; Horvat, Š.

    2000-11-01

    The conformational differences caused by N-glycation of the amide bond in endogenous opioid pentapeptide leucine-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) have been explored in solution using FTIR spectroscopy, NMR and molecular modelling. The compounds studied include protected and unprotected enkephalin analogues N-alkylated at the second (Gly 2) amino acid residue with a 6-deoxy- D-galactose moiety ( 1- 3). Comparison of the amide I component bands in the FTIR spectra, measured in trifluoroethanol (TFE), CHCl 3 and DMSO, revealed significant differences in the intensity as well as shifts in component band frequencies for glycopeptides 1- 3. We found that only the FTIR spectrum of the fully protected compound 1 indicated the presence of a higher population of β-turns, while the spectra of the partially protected and unprotected glycopeptides 2 and 3 reflected the dominance of unordered or open structures, with some low population of turns. The observed NOE connectivities in CDCl 3 for both isomers of the fully protected compound 1, the all-trans one and another with Tyr 1-Gly 2 peptide bond in cis conformation, indicate the presence of a β-like turn conformation. Molecular dynamics simulations of the glycopeptide 1 obtained by unconstrained energy minimization of trans- and cis- 1 shows that one of trans form conformations is consistent with β-turn whereas cis isomer has revealed less-compact turn.

  2. Quantitative role of the splanchnic bed in whole body leucine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.M.; Wagner, D.A.; Tredget, E.; Walesreweski, J.; Burke, J.F.; Young, V.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of the splanchnic bed in the economy of whole body leucine (leu) metabolism was assessed in 5 chronically catheterized conscious fasting mongrel dogs. Using primed continuous intravenous infusions of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)-leu and L-1-/sup 14/C-leu the metabolic fate of leu carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the splanchnic region was compared with that in the body as a whole, by measurement of isotope and substrate balance across gut and liver. Sampling was from the portal and hepatic veins and arch of aorta. Blood flow estimation was made by dye dilution. Whole body leu N and C fluxes and oxidation were (Mean +/- SEM); 453 +/ 47, 197 +/- 37 and 41 +/- 5 ..mu..mol kg-1.h-1, respectively. The splanchnic bed accounted for (% of whole body) 36 +/- 13 of leu disappearance into proteins (liver 14%; gut 22%); 24 +/- 7 of leu appearance via protein breakdown (liver 8%; gut 16%) 12 +/- 2% of leu transamination to ..cap alpha..-ketoisocaproate (KIC) (liver 7%; gut 5%); 12 +/- 3 of KIC reamination to leu (liver 7%; gut 5%) and 11 +/- 3 of leu oxidation (liver 2%; gut 9%). Hence, in the fasting state the splanchnic region accounts for a small proportion of whole body leu-KIC interconversion and oxidation, but a more significant proportion of whole body of leu for protein synthesis.

  3. The role and effects of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in the context of inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Vago, Juliana P; Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Lima, Kátia M; Perucci, Luiza O; Vieira, Érica L; Nogueira, Camila R C; Soriani, Frederico M; Martins, Joilson O; Silva, Patrícia M R; Gomes, Karina B; Pinho, Vanessa; Bruscoli, Stefano; Riccardi, Carlo; Beaulieu, Elaine; Morand, Eric F; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2015-05-15

    Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has been shown to mediate or mimic several actions of GC. This study assessed the role of GILZ in self-resolving and GC-induced resolution of neutrophilic inflammation induced by LPS in mice. GILZ expression was increased during the resolution phase of LPS-induced pleurisy, especially in macrophages with resolving phenotypes. Pretreating LPS-injected mice with trans-activator of transcription peptide (TAT)-GILZ, a cell-permeable GILZ fusion protein, shortened resolution intervals and improved resolution indices. Therapeutic administration of TAT-GILZ induced inflammation resolution, decreased cytokine levels, and promoted caspase-dependent neutrophil apoptosis. TAT-GILZ also modulated the activation of the survival-controlling proteins ERK1/2, NF-κB and Mcl-1. GILZ deficiency was associated with an early increase of annexin A1 (AnxA1) and did not modify the course of neutrophil influx induced by LPS. Dexamethasone treatment resolved inflammation and induced GILZ expression that was dependent on AnxA1. Dexamethasone-induced resolution was not altered in GILZ(-/-) mice due to compensatory expression and action of AnxA1. Our results show that therapeutic administration of GILZ efficiently induces a proapoptotic program that promotes resolution of neutrophilic inflammation induced by LPS. Alternatively, a lack of endogenous GILZ during the resolution of inflammation is compensated by AnxA1 overexpression.

  4. A Combination of Leucine, Metformin, and Sildenafil Treats Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Steatohepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lizhi; Li, Fenfen; Cao, Qiang; Cui, Xin; Wu, Rui; Shi, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Sirt1, AMPK, and eNOS modulate hepatic energy metabolism and inflammation and are key players in the development of NASH. L-leucine, an allosteric Sirt1 activator, synergizes with low doses of metformin or sildenafil on the AMPK-eNOS-Sirt1 pathway to reverse mild NAFLD in preclinical mouse models. Here we tested a possible multicomponent synergy to yield greater therapeutic efficacy in NAFLD/NASH. Liver cells and macrophages or an atherogenic diet induced NASH mouse model was treated with two-way and three-way combinations. The three-way combination Sild-Met-Leu increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation and reduced lipogenic gene expression and inflammatory marker in vitro. In mice, Sild-Met-Leu reduced the diet induced increases of ALT, TGFβ, PAI-1, IL1β, and TNFα, hepatic collagen expression, and nearly completely reversed hepatocyte ballooning and triglyceride accumulation, while all two-way combinations had only modest effects. Therefore, these data provide preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Sild-Met-Leu in the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. PMID:28042486

  5. The Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) Is essential for spermatogonial survival and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Y; Vuandaba, M; Suarez, P; Grey, C; Calvel, P; Conne, B; Pearce, D; de Massy, B; Hummler, E; Nef, S

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis relies on the precise regulation of the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonia to provide a continuous supply of differentiating germ cells. The understanding of the cellular pathways regulating this equilibrium remains unfortunately incomplete. This investigation aimed to elucidate the testicular and ovarian functions of the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) encoded by the X-linked Tsc22d3 (Gilz) gene. We found that GILZ is specifically expressed in the cytoplasm of proliferating spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes. While Gilz mutant female mice were fully fertile, constitutive or male germ cell-specific ablation of Gilz led to sterility due to a complete absence of post-meiotic germ cells and mature spermatozoa. Alterations were observed as early as postnatal day 5 during the first spermatogenic wave and included extensive apoptosis at the spermatogonial level and meiotic arrest in the mid-late zygotene stage. Overall, these data emphasize the essential role played by GILZ in mediating spermatogonial survival and spermatogenesis.

  6. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protein Controls Macropinocytosis in Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Calmette, Joseph; Bertrand, Matthieu; Vétillard, Mathias; Ellouze, Mehdi; Flint, Shaun; Nicolas, Valérie; Biola-Vidamment, Armelle; Pallardy, Marc; Morand, Eric; Bachelerie, Françoise; Godot, Véronique; Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine

    2016-12-01

    Ag sampling is a key process in dendritic cell (DC) biology. DCs use constitutive macropinocytosis, receptor-mediated endocytosis, and phagocytosis to capture exogenous Ags for presentation to T cells. We investigated the mechanisms that regulate Ag uptake by DCs in the steady-state and after a short-term LPS exposure in vitro and in vivo. We show that the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ), already known to regulate effector versus regulatory T cell activation by DCs, selectively limits macropinocytosis, but not receptor-mediated phagocytosis, in immature and recently activated DCs. In vivo, the GILZ-mediated inhibition of Ag uptake is restricted to the CD8α(+) DC subset, which expresses the highest GILZ level among splenic DC subsets. In recently activated DCs, we further establish that GILZ limits p38 MAPK phosphorylation, providing a possible mechanism for GILZ-mediated macropinocytosis control. Finally, our results demonstrate that the modulation of Ag uptake by GILZ does not result in altered Ag presentation to CD4 T cells but impacts the efficiency of cross-presentation to CD8 T cells. Altogether, our results identify GILZ as an endogenous inhibitor of macropinocytosis in DCs, the action of which contributes to the fine-tuning of Ag cross-presentation.

  7. De novo simulations of the folding thermodynamics of the GCN4 leucine zipper.

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, D; Kolinski, A; Skolnick, J

    1999-01-01

    Entropy Sampling Monte Carlo (ESMC) simulations were carried out to study the thermodynamics of the folding transition in the GCN4 leucine zipper (GCN4-lz) in the context of a reduced model. Using the calculated partition functions for the monomer and dimer, and taking into account the equilibrium between the monomer and dimer, the average helix content of the GCN4-lz was computed over a range of temperatures and chain concentrations. The predicted helix contents for the native and denatured states of GCN4-lz agree with the experimental values. Similar to experimental results, our helix content versus temperature curves show a small linear decline in helix content with an increase in temperature in the native region. This is followed by a sharp transition to the denatured state. van't Hoff analysis of the helix content versus temperature curves indicates that the folding transition can be described using a two-state model. This indicates that knowledge-based potentials can be used to describe the properties of the folded and unfolded states of proteins. PMID:10388740

  8. Parkinson's disease-associated mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 augment kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew B.; Moore, Darren J.; Biskup, Saskia; Bugayenko, Artem; Smith, Wanli W.; Ross, Christopher A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) cause late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Initial studies suggest that LRRK2 mutations are the most common yet identified determinant of PD susceptibility, transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Herein, we characterize the LRRK2 gene and transcript in human brain and subclone the predominant ORF. Exogenously expressed LRRK2 protein migrates at ≈280 kDa and is present largely in the cytoplasm but also associates with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Familial-linked mutations G2019S or R1441C do not have an obvious effect on protein steady-state levels, turnover, or localization. However, in vitro kinase assays using full-length recombinant LRRK2 reveal an increase in activity caused by familial-linked mutations in both autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of a generic substrate. These results suggest a gain-of-function mechanism for LRRK2-linked disease with a central role for kinase activity in the development of PD. PMID:16269541

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+) and leucine transport by LeuT.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-08-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to gain insight into the binding of Na(+) and leucine substrate to the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, focusing on the crystal structures of LeuT in the outward-open and inward-open states. For both conformations of LeuT, a third Na(+) binding site involving Glu290 in addition to the two sites identified from the crystal structures is observed. Once the negative charge from Glu290 in the inward-open LeuT is removed, the ion bound to the third site is ejected from LeuT rapidly, suggesting that the protonation state of Glu290 regulates Na(+) binding and release. In Cl(-)-dependent transporters where Glu290 is replaced by a neutral serine, a Cl(-) ion would be required to replace the role of Glu290. Thus, the simulations provide insights into understanding Na(+) and substrate transport as well as Cl(-)-independence of LeuT.

  10. Leucine Modulation of the mTOR Pathway for Cognition Modulation: Kinetic and In Vitro Studies and Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Hall, 2008; Wang et al., 2008). mTOR complexes regulate many processes such as mRNA translation, autophagy, metabolism, biogenesis, and protein...amino acids, especially leucine (Lynch et al., 2003; Sancak and Sabatini, 2009; Tokunaga et al., 2004; Wang et al., 2008). Hypothalamic mTOR...blood, brain, kidney, liver, muscle, and brown and white fat (n=3 rats per time point). The tissues were kept frozen at -80°C prior to HPLC analysis

  11. Energetics and Dynamics of Fragmentation of Protonated Leucine Enkephalin from Time- and Energy-Resolved Surface-Induced Dissociation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2006-07-01

    Dissociation of singly protonated leucine enkephalin (YGGFL) was studied using surface-induced dissociation in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer specially configured for studying ion activation by collisions with surfaces. The energetics and dynamics of seven primary dissociation channels were deduced from modeling the time- and energy-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves for different fragment ions using an RRKM-based approach developed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL).

  12. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation.

  13. Self-assembled nanofibers from leucine derived amphiphiles as nanoreactors for growth of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karen T; Gribb, Theodore E; Smoak, Evan M; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2010-03-14

    We report a new method for the green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles. A new leucine-based diamine amphiphile was synthesized and self-assembled, which in the presence of Zn(2+) ions assembled into nanofibers, that efficiently formed ZnO nanoparticles upon heating in the presence of Zn(CH(3)COO)(2). Further, these ZnO nanoparticles functioned as efficient photocatalysts.

  14. Postprandial leucine and insulin responses and toxicological effects of a novel whey protein hydrolysate-based supplement in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was: aim 1) compare insulin and leucine serum responses after feeding a novel hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH)-based supplement versus a whey protein isolate (WPI) in rats during the post-absorptive state, and aim 2) to perform a thorough toxicological analysis on rats that consume different doses of the novel WPH-based supplement over a 30-day period. In male Wistar rats (~250 g, n = 40), serum insulin and leucine concentrations were quantified up to 120 min after one human equivalent dose of a WPI or the WPH-based supplement. In a second cohort of rats (~250 g, n = 20), we examined serum/blood and liver/kidney histopathological markers after 30 days of feeding low (1human equivalent dose), medium (3 doses) and high (6 doses) amounts of the WPH-based supplement. In aim 1, higher leucine levels existed at 15 min after WPH vs. WPI ingestion (p = 0.04) followed by higher insulin concentrations at 60 min (p = 0.002). In aim 2, liver and kidney histopathology/toxicology markers were not different 30 days after feeding with low, medium, high dose WPH-based supplementation or water only. There were no between-condition differences in body fat or lean mass or circulating clinical chemistry markers following the 30-day feeding intervention in aim 2. In comparison to WPI, acute ingestion of a novel WPH-based supplement resulted in a higher transient leucine response with a sequential increase in insulin. Furthermore, chronic ingestion of the tested whey protein hydrolysate supplement appears safe. PMID:22672725

  15. L-Leucine improves the anaemia in models of Diamond Blackfan anaemia and the 5q- syndrome in a TP53-independent way.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Payne, Elspeth M; Abayasekara, Nirmalee; Hurst, Slater N; Raiser, David M; Look, A Thomas; Berliner, Nancy; Ebert, Benjamin L; Khanna-Gupta, Arati

    2014-11-01

    Haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins (RPs) and upregulation of the tumour suppressor TP53 have been shown to be the common basis for the anaemia observed in Diamond Blackfan anaemia and 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome. We previously demonstrated that treatment with L-Leucine resulted in a marked improvement in anaemia in disease models. To determine if the L-Leucine effect was Tp53-dependent, we used antisense MOs to rps19 and rps14 in zebrafish; expression of tp53 and its downstream target cdkn1a remained elevated following L-leucine treatment. We confirmed this observation in human CD34+ cells. L-Leucine thus alleviates anaemia in RP-deficient cells in a TP53-independent manner.

  16. Maternal post-absorptive leucine kinetics during late pregnancy in US women with HIV taking antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cade, W. Todd; Singh, Gautam K.; Holland, Mark R.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Overton, E. Turner; Cibulka, Nancy; Bahow, Karen; Presti, Rachel; Stephens, Andrea; Cahill, Alison G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV, infants exposed to cART in utero frequently are born smaller and have mild cardiac abnormalities. The mechanisms responsible for lower birth weight and cardiac abnormalities in children exposed to cART are unclear but could be related to dysregulation of maternal amino acid metabolism during pregnancy. Previous data in HIV(−) women have shown a relationship between abnormal maternal protein metabolism during pregnancy and low infant birth weight and animal data demonstrate a relationship between altered maternal protein metabolism and increased risk for offspring cardiovascular abnormalities. Objective The objectives of this study were to: characterize post-absorptive maternal leucine kinetics during late pregnancy and examine the relationships between maternal leucine kinetics and offspring birth weight and cardiac function. Design Post-absorptive maternal leucine kinetics (evaluated by using stable isotope tracer methodology) in 16 HIV(+) women receiving cART and 14 HIV(−) US women during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy were compared. Relationships between post-absorptive maternal leucine kinetics, cardiac function (echocardiography) and birth weight were statistically examined. Results Maternal plasma leucine concentration (HIV(−): 82.8 ± 10.7 vs. HIV(+): 72.3 ± 13.5 μM, p=0.06) and leucine oxidation rate (HIV(−): 6.1 ± 1.6 vs. HIV(+): 4.9 ± 1.8 μmol/kgBW/min, p=0.03) were lower in HIV+ women compared to controls. Total leucine turnover rate, non-oxidative leucine disposal rate and post-absorptive maternal glucose and palmitate kinetics did not differ between groups. Left ventricular fractional shortening tended to be lower in children born to HIV(+) compared to controls (HIV(−): 42 ± 1 vs. HIV+: 36 ± 5 %, p=0.08) and associated with lower maternal plasma leucine concentration (r= 0.43, p=0.08). Conclusions

  17. Leucine Zipper Down-regulated in Cancer-1 (LDOC1) interacts with Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3-like (GNL3L) to modulate Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling during cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Thoompumkal, Indu Jose; Rehna, Krishnan; Anbarasu, Kumaraswamy; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy

    2016-12-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3-like (GNL3L) is an evolutionarily conserved putative nucleolar GTPase belonging to the HSR1-MMR1 family. In the present study, using protein-protein interaction assays, we show that Leucine Zipper Down-regulated in Cancer-1 (LDOC1) is a novel interacting partner of GNL3L. Furthermore, our results reveal that ectopic expression of LDOC1 destabilizes endogenous GNL3L levels and down modulates GNL3L-induced cell proliferation, in contrast, the knockdown of LDOC1 potentiates cell proliferation upon GNL3L expression. Interestingly, GNL3L upregulates NF-κB dependent transcriptional activity by modulating the expression of NF-κB subunit p65, which is reversed upon co-expression of LDOC1 with GNL3L. GNL3L also potentiates TNF-α mediated NF-κB activity. In addition, anti-apoptotic function of GNL3L is impaired upon p65 knockdown, suggesting its critical role in GNL3L mediated cell proliferation/survival. An inverse correlation of GNL3L and LDOC1 expression profiles in various tumor tissues from BioXpress database indicate their critical role in cancer. Collectively, our data provides evidence that GNL3L-LDOC1 interplay regulates cell proliferation through the modulation of NF-κB pathway during tumorigenesis.

  18. The influence of 8 weeks of whey-protein and leucine supplementation on physical and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Walker, Thomas B; Smith, Jessica; Herrera, Monica; Lebegue, Breck; Pinchak, Andrea; Fischer, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of whey-protein and leucine supplementation to enhance physical and cognitive performance and body composition. Thirty moderately fit participants completed a modified Air Force fitness test, a computer-based cognition test, and a dual-energy X-ray-absorptiometry scan for body composition before and after supplementing their daily diet for 8 wk with either 19.7 g of whey protein and 6.2 g leucine (WPL) or a calorie-equivalent placebo (P). Bench-press performance increased significantly from Week 1 to Week 8 in the WPL group, whereas the increase in the P group was not significant. Push-up performance increased significantly for WPL, and P showed a nonsignificant increase. Total mass, fat-free mass, and lean body mass all increased significantly in the WPL group but showed no change in the P group. No differences were observed within or between groups for crunches, chin-ups, 3-mile-run time, or cognition. The authors conclude that supplementing with whey protein and leucine may provide an advantage to people whose performance benefits from increased upper body strength and/or lean body mass.

  19. Friedelin Synthase from Maytenus ilicifolia: Leucine 482 Plays an Essential Role in the Production of the Most Rearranged Pentacyclic Triterpene

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Moreira, Tatiana M.; Alves, Thaís B.; Pinheiro, Karina A.; Felippe, Lidiane G.; De Lima, Gustavo M. A.; Watanabe, Tatiana F.; Barbosa, Cristina C.; Santos, Vânia A. F. F. M.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Furlan, Maysa; Zanelli, Cleslei F.

    2016-01-01

    Among the biologically active triterpenes, friedelin has the most-rearranged structure produced by the oxidosqualene cyclases and is the only one containing a cetonic group. In this study, we cloned and functionally characterized friedelin synthase and one cycloartenol synthase from Maytenus ilicifolia (Celastraceae). The complete coding sequences of these 2 genes were cloned from leaf mRNA, and their functions were characterized by heterologous expression in yeast. The cycloartenol synthase sequence is very similar to other known OSCs of this type (approximately 80% identity), although the M. ilicifolia friedelin synthase amino acid sequence is more related to β-amyrin synthases (65–74% identity), which is similar to the friedelin synthase cloned from Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Multiple sequence alignments demonstrated the presence of a leucine residue two positions upstream of the friedelin synthase Asp-Cys-Thr-Ala-Glu (DCTAE) active site motif, while the vast majority of OSCs identified so far have a valine or isoleucine residue at the same position. The substitution of the leucine residue with valine, threonine or isoleucine in M. ilicifolia friedelin synthase interfered with substrate recognition and lead to the production of different pentacyclic triterpenes. Hence, our data indicate a key role for the leucine residue in the structure and function of this oxidosqualene cyclase. PMID:27874020

  20. GCN2 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition by leucine deprivation through an ATF4 independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Parry, Laurent; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Proud, Christopher G.; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling pathways are regulated by amino acids and share common functions, in particular the control of translation. The regulation of GCN2 activity by amino acid availability relies on the capacity of GCN2 to sense the increased levels of uncharged tRNAs upon amino acid scarcity. In contrast, despite recent progress in the understanding of the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids, key aspects of this process remain unsolved. In particular, while leucine is well known to be a potent regulator of mTORC1, the mechanisms by which this amino acid is sensed and control mTORC1 activity are not well defined. Our data establish that GCN2 is involved in the inhibition of mTORC1 upon leucine or arginine deprivation. However, the activation of GCN2 alone is not sufficient to inhibit mTORC1 activity, indicating that leucine and arginine exert regulation via additional mechanisms. While the mechanism by which GCN2 contributes to the initial step of mTORC1 inhibition involves the phosphorylation of eIF2α, we show that it is independent of the downstream transcription factor ATF4. These data point to a novel role for GCN2 and phosphorylation of eIF2α in the control of mTORC1 by certain amino acids. PMID:27297692