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Sample records for puzzle imperfect knowledge

  1. KnowledgePuzzle: A Browsing Tool to Adapt the Web Navigation Process to the Learner's Mental Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlAgha, Iyad

    2012-01-01

    This article presents KnowledgePuzzle, a browsing tool for knowledge construction from the web. It aims to adapt the structure of web content to the learner's information needs regardless of how the web content is originally delivered. Learners are provided with a meta-cognitive space (e.g., a concept mapping tool) that enables them to plan…

  2. Puzzling Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Deventer, M. Oskar

    2009-01-01

    The basis of a good mechanical puzzle is often a puzzling mechanism. This article will introduce some new puzzling mechanisms, like two knots that engage like gears, a chain whose links can be interchanged, and flat gears that do not come apart. It illustrates how puzzling mechanisms can be transformed into real mechanical puzzles, e.g., by…

  3. Predicting community responses to perturbations in the face of imperfect knowledge and network complexity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novak, M.; Wootton, J.T.; Doak, D.F.; Emmerson, M.; Estes, J.A.; Tinker, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    How best to predict the effects of perturbations to ecological communities has been a long-standing goal for both applied and basic ecology. This quest has recently been revived by new empirical data, new analysis methods, and increased computing speed, with the promise that ecologically important insights may be obtainable from a limited knowledge of community interactions. We use empirically based and simulated networks of varying size and connectance to assess two limitations to predicting perturbation responses in multispecies communities: (1) the inaccuracy by which species interaction strengths are empirically quantified and (2) the indeterminacy of species responses due to indirect effects associated with network size and structure. We find that even modest levels of species richness and connectance (??25 pairwise interactions) impose high requirements for interaction strength estimates because system indeterminacy rapidly overwhelms predictive insights. Nevertheless, even poorly estimated interaction strengths provide greater average predictive certainty than an approach that uses only the sign of each interaction. Our simulations provide guidance in dealing with the trade-offs involved in maximizing the utility of network approaches for predicting dynamics in multispecies communities. ?? 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Predicting community responses to perturbations in the face of imperfect knowledge and network complexity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novak, Mark; Wootton, J. Timothy; Doak, Daniel F.; Emmerson, Mark; Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    How best to predict the effects of perturbations to ecological communities has been a long-standing goal for both applied and basic ecology. This quest has recently been revived by new empirical data, new analysis methods, and increased computing speed, with the promise that ecologically important insights may be obtainable from a limited knowledge of community interactions. We use empirically based and simulated networks of varying size and connectance to assess two limitations to predicting perturbation responses in multispecies communities: (1) the inaccuracy by which species interaction strengths are empirically quantified and (2) the indeterminacy of species responses due to indirect effects associated with network size and structure. We find that even modest levels of species richness and connectance (∼25 pairwise interactions) impose high requirements for interaction strength estimates because system indeterminacy rapidly overwhelms predictive insights. Nevertheless, even poorly estimated interaction strengths provide greater average predictive certainty than an approach that uses only the sign of each interaction. Our simulations provide guidance in dealing with the trade-offs involved in maximizing the utility of network approaches for predicting dynamics in multispecies communities.

  5. Blood Type Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Presents a blood type puzzle that provides a visual, hands-on mechanism by which students can examine blood group reactions. Offers students an opportunity to construct their own knowledge about blood types. (JRH)

  6. Theorising Knowledge Practices: A Missing Piece of the Educational Technology Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sarah; Maton, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Educational technology research has been characterised as lacking theoretical frameworks that can enable cumulative knowledge-building across the field. This article explores the value of Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) for addressing these issues by discussing research into the key of integration of information and communication technologies in…

  7. Puzzles & Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Pat, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception, produced by Exploratorium in collaboration with other participating museums. This issue focuses on puzzles and problem solving. Brain teasers, puzzles, and the strategies for solving them are included. Features include: (1) "Homework Assignment #3" (Paul Doherty); (2) "The Case of…

  8. Acquisition of the Constraints on "Wanna" Contraction by Advanced Second Language Learners: Universal Grammar and Imperfect Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kweon, Soo-Ok; Bley-Vroman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Contraction of "want to" to "wanna" is subject to constraints that have been related to the operation of Universal Grammar. Contraction appears to be blocked when the trace of an extracted "wh"-word intervenes. Evidence for knowledge of these constraints by young English-speaking children has been taken to show the operation of Universal Grammar…

  9. Regulatory component analysis: a semi-blind extraction approach to infer gene regulatory networks with imperfect biological knowledge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xuan, Jianhua; Shih, Ie-Ming; Clarke, Robert; Wang, Yue

    2012-08-01

    With the advent of high-throughput biotechnology capable of monitoring genomic signals, it becomes increasingly promising to understand molecular cellular mechanisms through systems biology approaches. One of the active research topics in systems biology is to infer gene transcriptional regulatory networks using various genomic data; this inference problem can be formulated as a linear model with latent signals associated with some regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). As common statistical assumptions may not hold for genomic signals, typical latent variable algorithms such as independent component analysis (ICA) are incapable to reveal underlying true regulatory signals. Liao et al. [1] proposed to perform inference using an approach named network component analysis (NCA), the optimization of which is achieved by a least-squares fitting approach with biological knowledge constraints. However, the incompleteness of biological knowledge and its inconsistency with gene expression data are not considered in the original NCA solution, which could greatly affect the inference accuracy. To overcome these limitations, we propose a linear extraction scheme, namely regulatory component analysis (RCA), to infer underlying regulatory signals even with partial biological knowledge. Numerical simulations show a significant improvement of our proposed RCA over NCA, not only when signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) is low, but also when the given biological knowledge is incomplete and inconsistent to gene expression data. Furthermore, real biological experiments on E. coli are performed for regulatory network inference in comparison with several typical linear latent variable methods, which again demonstrates the effectiveness and improved performance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Deductive Puzzling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    To help fifth- through eighth-grade students develop their deductive reasoning skills, the author used a ten-week supplementary curriculum so that students could answer logic questions. The curriculum, a series of lessons built around language-independent logic puzzles, has been used in classrooms of fifth through eighth grades. In most cases,…

  11. Incomplete Puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    15 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a mid-summer view of a portion of the south polar residual cap of Mars. The large, relatively flat-lying, puzzle-like pieces in this scene are mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide.

    Location near: 85.5oS, 76.8oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  12. Irregularities in Imperfective Derivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Maurice I.

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses presentation of Russian conjugation via the one-stem system advocated by Lipson and Townsend, and attempts a more unified and complete presentation of irregularities in imperfect derivation. Two major irregularities are occurrence of an unexpected suffix and unpredictable alternation in the root of the derived imperfective.…

  13. Benjamin Banneker's Mathematical Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Benjamin Banneker, a self-taught African American mathematician, kept a journal containing a number of mathematical puzzles. Explores four of these puzzles, 200 years later, with the aid of 21st century technology. (Author/NB)

  14. Puzzles, Pastimes, Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eperson, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Presents six mathematical problems (with answers) which focus on: (1) chess moves; (2) patterned numbers; (3) quadratics with rational roots; (4) number puzzles; (5) Euclidean geometry; and (6) Carrollian word puzzles. (JN)

  15. Imperfection Insensitive Thin Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin

    The buckling of axially compressed cylindrical shells and externally pressurized spherical shells is extremely sensitive to even very small geometric imperfections. In practice this issue is addressed by either using overly conservative knockdown factors, while keeping perfect axial or spherical symmetry, or adding closely and equally spaced stiffeners on shell surface. The influence of imperfection-sensitivity is mitigated, but the shells designed from these approaches are either too heavy or very expensive and are still sensitive to imperfections. Despite their drawbacks, these approaches have been used for more than half a century. This thesis proposes a novel method to design imperfection-insensitive cylindrical shells subject to axial compression. Instead of following the classical paths, focused on axially symmetric or high-order rotationally symmetric cross-sections, the method in this thesis adopts optimal symmetry-breaking wavy cross-sections (wavy shells). The avoidance of imperfection sensitivity is achieved by searching with an evolutionary algorithm for smooth cross-sectional shapes that maximize the minimum among the buckling loads of geometrically perfect and imperfect wavy shells. It is found that the shells designed through this approach can achieve higher critical stresses and knockdown factors than any previously known monocoque cylindrical shells. It is also found that these shells have superior mass efficiency to almost all previously reported stiffened shells. Experimental studies on a design of composite wavy shell obtained through the proposed method are presented in this thesis. A method of making composite wavy shells and a photogrametry technique of measuring full-field geometric imperfections have been developed. Numerical predictions based on the measured geometric imperfections match remarkably well with the experiments. Experimental results confirm that the wavy shells are not sensitive to imperfections and can carry axial compression

  16. Imperfect mirror copies of the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Jeffrey M.; de Gouvêa, André; Hernández, Daniel; Kelly, Kevin J.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by the standard model of particle physics, we discuss a mechanism for constructing chiral, anomaly-free gauge theories. The gauge symmetries and particle content of such theories are identified using subgroups and complex representations of simple anomaly-free Lie groups, such as S O (10 ) or E6. We explore, using mostly S O (10 ) and the 16 representation, several of these "imperfect copies" of the standard model, including U (1 )N theories, S U (5 )⊗U (1 ) theories, S U (4 )⊗U (1 )2 theories with 4-plets and 6-plets, and chiral S U (3 )⊗S U (2 )⊗U (1 ) . A few general properties of such theories are discussed, as is how they might shed light on nonzero neutrino masses, the dark matter puzzle, and other phenomenologically relevant questions.

  17. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  18. Puzzling Ways to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Shop, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Four authors present crossword and wordfind puzzles developed for students in the areas of electricity, principles of hydraulics, finishing, construction, thermoplastic materials, patternmaking, wood, occupations, and drafting. (BP)

  19. Imperfect Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzagholi, Leila; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: alexander.vikman@lmu.de

    2015-06-01

    We consider cosmology of the recently introduced mimetic matter with higher derivatives (HD). Without HD this system describes irrotational dust—Dark Matter (DM) as we see it on cosmologically large scales. DM particles correspond to the shift-charges—Noether charges of the shifts in the field space. Higher derivative corrections usually describe a deviation from the thermodynamical equilibrium in the relativistic hydrodynamics. Thus we show that mimetic matter with HD corresponds to an imperfect DM which: i) renormalises the Newton's constant in the Friedmann equations, ii) has zero pressure when there is no extra matter in the universe, iii) survives the inflationary expansion which puts the system on a dynamical attractor with a vanishing shift-charge, iv) perfectly tracks any external matter on this attractor, v) can become the main (and possibly the only) source of DM, provided the shift-symmetry in the HD terms is broken during some small time interval in the radiation domination époque. In the second part of the paper we present a hydrodynamical description of general anisotropic and inhomogeneous configurations of the system. This imperfect mimetic fluid has an energy flow in the field's rest frame. We find that in the Eckart and in the Landau-Lifshitz frames the mimetic fluid possesses nonvanishing vorticity appearing already at the first order in the HD. Thus, the structure formation and gravitational collapse should proceed in a rather different fashion from the simple irrotational DM models.

  20. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  1. Tangrams: Puzzles of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Challenging one's brain is the beginning of making great art. Tangrams are a great way to keep students thinking about their latest art project long after leaving the classroom. A tangram is a Chinese puzzle. The earliest known reference to tangrams appears in a Chinese book dated 1813, but the puzzles existed long before that date. The puzzle…

  2. Normal Birth Crossword Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    In this column, readers are introduced to Dawn Kersula and a crossword puzzle she designed to refresh and empower Lamaze childbirth education class participants with normal-birth information. The column's author goes on to demonstrate several ways crossword puzzles can be used in Lamaze classes. PMID:17322944

  3. Puzzles and Hunts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissblum, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    A company designs and delivers treasure and scavenger hunts for corporate and institutional clients. Groups are divided into teams that must solve puzzles for directions or clues. The hunts build creativity, teamwork, communication skills, and an appreciation of others' strengths. An insert includes a four-puzzle mini-treasure hunt. (TD)

  4. A Disciplined Chemical Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peris, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    A puzzle was developed as a resource for teaching intermediate chemistry students where they need to use general intelligence and logic skills. The puzzle involves identification of name, age, subdiscipline of chemistry and position of 6 students around the table by using certain data provided to them.

  5. Accelerating Student Learning of Technology Terms: "The Crossword Puzzle Exercise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisenand, Thomas G.; Dunphy, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors suggest using an alternative teaching methodology to impart knowledge regarding information systems phraseology and vocabulary. Specifically, a series of crossword puzzles or scrabbles are used to present information system (IS) terminology to students in an introductory business information systems course. The puzzle terms and answers…

  6. Learning receptor positions from imperfectly known motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1990-10-01

    An algorithm is described for learning image interpolation functions for sensor arrays whose sensor positions are somewhat disordered. The learning is based on failures of translation invariance, so it does not require knowledge of the images being presented to the visual system. Previously reported implementations of the method assumed the visual system to have precise knowledge of the translations. We demonstrate here that translation estimates computed from the imperfectly interpolated images can have enough accuracy to allow the learning process to converge to a correct interpolation.

  7. Boggle Logic Puzzles: Minimal Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needleman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Boggle logic puzzles are based on the popular word game Boggle played backwards. Given a list of words, the problem is to recreate the board. We explore these puzzles on a 3 x 3 board and find the minimum number of three-letter words needed to create a puzzle with a unique solution. We conclude with a series of open questions.

  8. Musical Traditions. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the changes in musical experiences, such as live versus recorded music, as society has developed technologically. Presents a crossword puzzle that focuses on the traditions and musicians of baroque, classical, and romantic music each originating in Europe. Includes the clues and word list. (CMK)

  9. More Pebble Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William M.

    This booklet is a collection of puzzles, investigations, and games. They are designed to be used with large objects such as tins or stones and diagrams marked on the ground. The children are to be encouraged to use an experimental, trial-and-error approach at first, and then develop methods of solution. (MNS)

  10. Equivalent Imperfections In Arched Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallemule, Marian

    2015-09-01

    There are currently three design methods to verify the in-plane buckling of an arched structure: substitute member method, the method of equivalent imperfection with recommendations for arched bridges, and the equivalent unique global and local initial imperfection method (EUGLI), which uses the critical elastic buckling mode as an imperfection. The latter method is included in the EN 1993-1-1 cl. 5.3.2 (11) since 2002; however, to this day it is neither utilized in the design practice nor is it incorporated in ordinary structural analysis software. The main purpose of this article is to show the application of the proposed methods in a step-by-step manner to the numerical example considered and to compare these design methods for various arched structures. Verification of the in-plane buckling of an arch is explained in detail.

  11. Nature's Greatest Puzzles

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-02-01

    It is a pleasure to be part of the SLAC Summer Institute again, not simply because it is one of the great traditions in our field, but because this is a moment of great promise for particle physics. I look forward to exploring many opportunities with you over the course of our two weeks together. My first task in talking about Nature's Greatest Puzzles, the title of this year's Summer Institute, is to deconstruct the premise a little bit.

  12. Modeling Being "Lost": Imperfect Situation Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Being "lost" is an exemplar of imperfect Situation Awareness/Situation Understanding (SA/SU) -- information/knowledge that is uncertain, incomplete, and/or just wrong. Being "lost" may be a geo-spatial condition - not knowing/being wrong about where to go or how to get there. More broadly, being "lost" can serve as a metaphor for uncertainty and/or inaccuracy - not knowing/being wrong about how one fits into a larger world view, what one wants to do, or how to do it. This paper discusses using agent based modeling (ABM) to explore imperfect SA/SU, simulating geo-spatially "lost" intelligent agents trying to navigate in a virtual world. Each agent has a unique "mental map" -- its idiosyncratic view of its geo-spatial environment. Its decisions are based on this idiosyncratic view, but behavior outcomes are based on ground truth. Consequently, the rate and degree to which an agent's expectations diverge from ground truth provide measures of that agent's SA/SU.

  13. Pebble Puzzles. A Source Book of Simple Puzzles and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William M.

    This booklet is a collection of puzzles, games, and investigations. All that children need are some stones or shells, on some of which they must write numerals. For playing with the whole class, the game or puzzles may be marked out on the floor or in sand; in that case, larger objects such as small rocks and empty tins may be used. Children are…

  14. Three Puzzles for Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, David; Pickering, Miles

    1988-01-01

    Notes that laboratory work should be more oriented towards puzzle solving rather than technique or illustration. Offers three organic laboratory puzzles which can be solved by melting point alone. Involves lab work at the 100-200-mg scale but still uses conventional glassware. (MVL)

  15. Darwin's puzzling Expression.

    PubMed

    Radick, Gregory

    2010-02-01

    Charles Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872) is a very different kind of work from On the Origin of Species (1859). This "otherness" is most extreme in the character of the explanations that Darwin offers in the Expression. Far from promoting his theory of natural selection, the Expression barely mentions that theory, instead drawing on explanatory principles which recall less Darwinian than Lamarckian and structuralist biological theorizing. Over the years, historians have offered a range of solutions to the puzzle of why the Expression is so "non-Darwinian". Close examination shows that none of these meets the case. However, recent research on Darwin's lifelong engagement with the controversies in his day over the unity of the human races makes possible a promising new solution. For Darwin, emotional expression served the cause of defending human unity precisely to the extent that natural selection theory did not apply. PMID:20338535

  16. Darwin's puzzling Expression.

    PubMed

    Radick, Gregory

    2010-02-01

    Charles Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872) is a very different kind of work from On the Origin of Species (1859). This "otherness" is most extreme in the character of the explanations that Darwin offers in the Expression. Far from promoting his theory of natural selection, the Expression barely mentions that theory, instead drawing on explanatory principles which recall less Darwinian than Lamarckian and structuralist biological theorizing. Over the years, historians have offered a range of solutions to the puzzle of why the Expression is so "non-Darwinian". Close examination shows that none of these meets the case. However, recent research on Darwin's lifelong engagement with the controversies in his day over the unity of the human races makes possible a promising new solution. For Darwin, emotional expression served the cause of defending human unity precisely to the extent that natural selection theory did not apply.

  17. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  18. The Puzzling Ophiuchus Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies or globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way can be pulled apart by tidal forces, leaving behind a trail of stars known as a stellar stream. One such trail, the Ophiuchus stream, has posed a serious dynamical puzzle since its discovery. But a recent study has identified four stars that might help resolve this streams mystery.Conflicting TimescalesThe stellar stream Ophiuchus was discovered around our galaxy in 2014. Based on its length, which appears to be 1.6 kpc, we can calculate the time that has passed since its progenitor was disrupted and the stream was created: ~250 Myr. But the stars within it are ~12 Gyr old, and the stream orbits the galaxy with a period of ~350 Myr.Given these numbers, we can assume that Ophiuchuss progenitor completed many orbits of the Milky Way in its lifetime. So why would it only have been disrupted 250 million years ago?Fanning StreamLed by Branimir Sesar (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), a team of scientists has proposed an idea that might help solve this puzzle. If the Ophiuchus stellar stream is on a chaotic orbit common in triaxial potentials, which the Milky Ways may be then the stream ends can fan out, with stars spreading in position and velocity.The fanned part of the stream, however, would be difficult to detect because of its low surface brightness. As a result, the Ophiuchus stellar stream could actually be longer than originally measured, implying that it was disrupted longer ago than was believed.Search for Fan StarsTo test this idea, Sesar and collaborators performed a search around the ends of the stream, looking for stars thatare of the right type to match the stream,are at the predicted distance of the stream,are located near the stream ends, andhave velocities that match the stream and dont match the background halo stars.Histogram of the heliocentric velocities of the 43 target stars. Six stars have velocities matching the stream velocity. Two of these are located in the main stream; the other

  19. A developmental perspective on the Imperfective Paradox.

    PubMed

    Kazanina, Nina; Phillips, Colin

    2007-10-01

    Imperfective or progressive verb morphology makes it possible to use the name of a whole event to refer to an activity that is clearly not a complete instance of that event, leading to what is known as the Imperfective Paradox. For example, a sentence like 'John was building a house' does not entail that a house ever got built. The Imperfective Paradox has received a number of different treatments in the philosophical and linguistic literature, but has received less attention from the perspective of language acquisition. This article presents developmental evidence on the nature of the Imperfective Paradox, based on a series of four experiments conducted with Russian-speaking 3 to 6 year olds. Despite the fact that Russian is a language in which the morphological form of imperfectives is highly salient and used appropriately at a very young age, younger children show a clearly non-adultlike pattern of comprehension in our experiments. The results from Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that Russian-speaking children incorrectly ascribe completion entailments to imperfectives. However, Experiments 3 and 4 indicate that the children recognize that imperfectives can describe incomplete events, and that their problem instead concerns their inability to find a suitable temporal interval against which to evaluate imperfective statements. Specifically, children are only willing to accept an imperfective predicate as a description of a past incomplete event when the sentence contains an explicit temporal modifier that highlights a time interval that ends before the failure point of the event. These findings are taken as support for an account of the imperfective that makes use of temporal perspectives in solving the Imperfective Paradox.

  20. A Developmental Perspective on the Imperfective Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanina, Nina; Phillips, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Imperfective or progressive verb morphology makes it possible to use the name of a whole event to refer to an activity that is clearly not a complete instance of that event, leading to what is known as the Imperfective Paradox. For example, a sentence like "John was building a house" does not entail that a house ever got built. The Imperfective…

  1. Puzzle Them First! Motivating Adolescent Readers with Question-Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardiello, A. Vincent

    2007-01-01

    In this book, the author suggests that to truly learn, students should be puzzled about new knowledge. Question-finding, the unique strategy described in the book, fosters this learning by leading adolescent students to probe the multiple meanings of text and ask challenging, open-ended questions. Focus units illustrate how teachers can use…

  2. The PRad experiment and the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparian, Ashot H.

    2014-06-01

    New results from the recent muonic hydrogen experiments seriously questioned our knowledge of the proton charge radius, r_p. The new value, with its unprecedented less than sub-percent precision, is currently up to eight standard deviation smaller than the average value from all previous experiments, triggering the well-known "proton charge radius puzzle" in nuclear and atomic physics. The PRad collaboration is currently preparing a novel, magnetic-spectrometer-free ep scattering experiment in Hall B at JLab for a new independent r_p measurement to address this growing "puzzle" in physics.

  3. Imperfect information facilitates the evolution of reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2016-06-01

    The existence of cooperation demands explanation since cooperation is costly to the actor. Reciprocity has long been regarded as a potential explanatory mechanism for the existence of cooperation. Reciprocity is a mechanism wherein a cooperator responds to an opponent's behavior by switching his/her own behavior. Hence, a possible problematic case relevant to the theory of reciprocity evolution arises when the mechanism is such that the information regarding an opponent's behavior is imperfect. Although it has been confirmed also by previous theoretical studies that imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity, this argument is based on the assumption that there are no mistakes in behavior. And, a previous study presumed that it might be expected that when such mistakes occur, reciprocity can more readily evolve in the case of imperfect information than in the case of perfect information. The reason why the previous study considers so is that in the former case, reciprocators can miss defections incurred by other reciprocators' mistakes due to imperfect information, allowing cooperation to persist when such reciprocators meet. However, contrary to this expectation, the previous study has shown that even when mistakes occur, imperfect information interferes with the evolution of reciprocity. Nevertheless, the previous study assumed that payoffs are linear (i.e., that the effect of behavior is additive and there are no synergetic effects). In this study, we revisited the same problem but removed the assumption that payoffs are linear. We used evolutionarily stable strategy analysis to compare the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is imperfect with the condition for reciprocity to evolve when mistakes occur and information is perfect. Our study revealed that when payoffs are not linear, imperfect information can facilitate the evolution of reciprocity when mistakes occur; while when payoffs are linear

  4. Understanding Your Vision: The "Imperfect Eye"

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Understanding Your Vision: The "Imperfect Eye" Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table ... are different and so are the types of vision that we have. Understanding how some of us ...

  5. Teaching Imperfect Competition at the Principles Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William V.; Highfill, Jannett K.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that, although most economics textbooks' explanations of imperfect competition may involve three to five models, the concept can be taught using a single, simple model. Uses several business/economic examples as illustrations. (DB)

  6. Chemistry of Art and Color Sudoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle format was used to teach light science and chemistry terms to students of Chemistry of Art and Color. The puzzles were used to motivate and encourage students to learn chemistry in an easier and in friendly fashion.

  7. Sudoku Puzzles as Chemistry Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crute, Thomas D.; Myers, Stephanie A.

    2007-01-01

    A sudoku puzzle was designed that incorporated lists of chemistry terms like polyatomic ions, organic functional groups or strong nucleophiles that students need to learn. It was found that students enjoyed solving such puzzles and also such puzzles made the boring tasks of memorizing basic chemical terms an exciting one.

  8. Puzzles: A Pathetically Neglected, Commonly Available Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado, Nancy S.

    1996-01-01

    States that puzzles are an important tool in helping children engage in the problem-solving process. Claims that children are interested in puzzles because they can be active as observers, problem solvers, and learners, with little or no assistance from adults and others. Defines nine characteristics of good puzzle-making situations. (MOK)

  9. Japanese Logic Puzzles and Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of proof does not start in a high school geometry course. Rather, attention to logical reasoning throughout a student's school experience can help the development of proof readiness. In the spirit of problem solving, the author has begun to use some Japanese logic puzzles other than sudoku to help students develop additional…

  10. Canadian Open Tennis. Puzzle Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ian A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the du Maurier Open, a women's tennis tournament. Explains that tennis becomes an elite sport at the level of the du Maurier Open. Presents a crossword puzzle that focuses on many of the female tennis stars and provides the across and down clues, a word list, and the answer key. (CMK)

  11. Predator cognition permits imperfect coral snake mimicry.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, David W; Pfennig, David W

    2010-12-01

    Batesian mimicry is often imprecise. An underexplored explanation for imperfect mimicry is that predators might not be able to use all dimensions of prey phenotype to distinguish mimics from models and thus permit imperfect mimicry to persist. We conducted a field experiment to test whether or not predators can distinguish deadly coral snakes (Micrurus fulvius) from nonvenomous scarlet kingsnakes (Lampropeltis elapsoides). Although the two species closely resemble one another, the order of colored rings that encircle their bodies differs. Despite this imprecise mimicry, we found that L. elapsoides that match coral snakes in other respects are not under selection to match the ring order of their model. We suggest that L. elapsoides have evolved only those signals necessary to deceive predators. Generally, imperfect mimicry might suffice if it exploits limitations in predator cognitive abilities.

  12. Construction-Paper Puzzle Masterpieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    Creating an appreciation of art history in her junior-high students has always been one of the author's greatest challenges as an art teacher. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students re-created a famous work of art--piece by piece, like a puzzle or a stained-glass window--out of construction paper. (Contains 1 resource.)

  13. Generic substitution, financial interests, and imperfect agency.

    PubMed

    Rischatsch, Maurus; Trottmann, Maria; Zweifel, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers around the world seek to encourage generic substitution. In this paper, the importance of prescribing physicians' imperfect agency is tested using the fact that some Swiss jurisdictions allow physicians to dispense drugs on their own account (physician dispensing, PD) while others disallow it. We estimate a model of physician drug choice with the help of drug claim data, finding a significant positive association between PD and the use of generics. While this points to imperfect agency, generics are prescribed more often to patients with high copayments or low incomes.

  14. Imperfect wetting of hydrogen in zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.S.; Rall, M.

    1995-11-01

    We have considered the theoretical dependencies of the amount of supercooling of liquid hydrogen as a function of pore size for constrained geometries in order to compare the different mechanisms for supercooling that can be observed: notably the inhibition of nucleation in small geometries and the use of surfaces for which there is imperfect wetting. Analysis of the dependence of the observed supercooling reported elsewhere for molecular hydrogen and hydrogen deuteride on the pore size in zeolites supports the view that imperfect wetting occurs for small pores that have rough surfaces and dimension less than approximately 10{angstrom}.

  15. Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on knowledge includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with knowledge and differences between how animals and humans learn. Sidebars discuss animal intelligence, learning proper behavior, and getting news from the Internet. (LRW)

  16. Incentives for Cheating Given Imperfect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-10-01

    The incentives for cheating given imperfect detection can be discussed within the context of first strike stability. The cost reduction due to is balanced against the sanctions that would be imposed if cheating was detected. For small political sanctions, the optimum level is at high levels of cheating. For large sanctions, the optimum is at quite low levels, which discourages cheating.

  17. (Anti)hypertriton lifetime puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang

    2016-05-01

    Most calculations on the lifetime of (anti)hypertriton gave a similar lifetime which is close to the lifetime of free Λ decays. However, recent measurements on (anti)hypertriton lifetime demonstrate a much short lifetime. All results for (anti)hypertriton lifetime by two-body decay channel of 3He + π for Au+Au collision at RHIC, Pb+Pb collision at LHC and Li + C collisions at GSI show a significant short lifetime in comparison with lifetime of free Λ decays. However, theoretical interpretation remains puzzle.

  18. Imperfect chimera states for coupled pendula.

    PubMed

    Kapitaniak, Tomasz; Kuzma, Patrycja; Wojewoda, Jerzy; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Maistrenko, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of chimera states in the systems of coupled, identical oscillators has attracted a great deal of recent theoretical and experimental interest. In such a state, different groups of oscillators can exhibit coexisting synchronous and incoherent behaviors despite homogeneous coupling. Here, considering the coupled pendula, we find another pattern, the so-called imperfect chimera state, which is characterized by a certain number of oscillators which escape from the synchronized chimera's cluster or behave differently than most of uncorrelated pendula. The escaped elements oscillate with different average frequencies (Poincare rotation number). We show that imperfect chimera can be realized in simple experiments with mechanical oscillators, namely Huygens clock. The mathematical model of our experiment shows that the observed chimera states are controlled by elementary dynamical equations derived from Newton's laws that are ubiquitous in many physical and engineering systems.

  19. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  20. Have a Book? Make a Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Notes that puzzles, the cornerstone of table-top or manipulative learning areas in early childhood programs, are structured materials, self-correcting toys that help children in a variety of developmental areas. Suggests that handmade puzzles are less expensive and can be tailored for specific concepts, themes, or skill levels. Provides…

  1. The evolution of imperfect floral mimicry.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, Nicolas J; Schiestl, Florian P

    2008-05-27

    The theory of mimicry predicts that selection favors signal refinement in mimics to optimally match the signals released by their specific model species. We provide here chemical and behavioral evidence that a sexually deceptive orchid benefits from its mimetic imperfection to its co-occurring and specific bee model by triggering a stronger response in male bees, which react more intensively to the similar, but novel, scent stimulus provided by the orchid.

  2. Quantum metrology with imperfect states and detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Animesh; Zhang Lijian; Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Smith, Brian J.; Walmsley, Ian A.; Dorner, Uwe

    2011-06-15

    Quantum enhancements of precision in metrology can be compromised by system imperfections. These may be mitigated by appropriate optimization of the input state to render it robust, at the expense of making the state difficult to prepare. In this paper, we identify the major sources of imperfection of an optical sensor: input state preparation inefficiency, sensor losses, and detector inefficiency. The second of these has received much attention; we show that it is the least damaging to surpassing the standard quantum limit in a optical interferometric sensor. Further, we show that photonic states that can be prepared in the laboratory using feasible resources allow a measurement strategy using photon-number-resolving detectors that not only attain the Heisenberg limit for phase estimation in the absence of losses, but also deliver close to the maximum possible precision in realistic scenarios including losses and inefficiencies. In particular, we give bounds for the tradeoff between the three sources of imperfection that will allow true quantum-enhanced optical metrology

  3. Shell Buckling Design Criteria Based on Manufacturing Imperfection Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis-based approach .for developing shell-buckling design criteria for laminated-composite cylindrical shells that accurately accounts for the effects of initial geometric imperfections is presented. With this approach, measured initial geometric imperfection data from six graphite-epoxy shells are used to determine a manufacturing-process-specific imperfection signature for these shells. This imperfection signature is then used as input into nonlinear finite-element analyses. The imperfection signature represents a "first-approximation" mean imperfection shape that is suitable for developing preliminary-design data. Comparisons of test data and analytical results obtained by using several different imperfection shapes are presented for selected shells. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis-based approach presented for developing reliable preliminary-design criteria has the potential to provide improved, less conservative buckling-load estimates, and to reduce the weight and cost of developing buckling-resistant shell structures.

  4. Solving the BM Camelopardalis puzzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teke, Mathias; Busby, Michael R.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1989-01-01

    BM Camelopardalis (=12 Cam) is a chromospherically active binary star with a relatively large orbital eccentricity. Systems with large eccentricities usually rotate pseudosynchronously. However, BM Cam has been a puzzle since its observed rotation rate is virtually equal to its orbital period indicating synchronization. All available photometry data for BM Cam have been collected and analyzed. Two models of modulated ellipticity effect are proposed, one based on equilibrium tidal deformation of the primary star and the other on a dynamical tidal effect. When the starspot variability is removed from the data, the dynamical tidal model was the better approximation to the real physical situation. The analysis indicates that BM Cam is not rotating pseudosynchronously but rotating in virtual synchronism after all.

  5. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  6. Trend estimation in populations with imperfect detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, Marc; Dorazio, Robert M.; Soldaat, Leo; Van Strien, Arco; Zuiderwijk, Annie; Royle, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    1. Trends of animal populations are of great interest in ecology but cannot be directly observed owing to imperfect detection. Binomial mixture models use replicated counts to estimate abundance, corrected for detection, in demographically closed populations. Here, we extend these models to open populations and illustrate them using sand lizard Lacerta agilis counts from the national Dutch reptile monitoring scheme. 2. Our model requires replicated counts from multiple sites in each of several periods, within which population closure is assumed. Counts are described by a hierarchical generalized linear model, where the state model deals with spatio-temporal patterns in true abundance and the observation model with imperfect counts, given that true state. We used WinBUGS to fit the model to lizard counts from 208 transects with 1–10 (mean 3) replicate surveys during each spring 1994–2005. 3. Our state model for abundance contained two independent log-linear Poisson regressions on year for coastal and inland sites, and random site effects to account for unexplained heterogeneity. The observation model for detection of an individual lizard contained effects of region, survey date, temperature, observer experience and random survey effects. 4. Lizard populations increased in both regions but more steeply on the coast. Detectability increased over the first few years of the study, was greater on the coast and for the most experienced observers, and highest around 1 June. Interestingly, the population increase inland was not detectable when the observed counts were analysed without account of detectability. The proportional increase between 1994 and 2005 in total lizard abundance across all sites was estimated at 86% (95% CRI 35–151). 5. Synthesis and applications. Open-population binomial mixture models are attractive for studying true population dynamics while explicitly accounting for the observation process, i.e. imperfect detection. We emphasize the important

  7. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Weed, John W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  8. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, Lipika Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O.; Karimi, Nader; Sailor, Anna; Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P.

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  9. Imperfection, practice and humility in clinical ethics.

    PubMed

    Garchar, Kim

    2012-10-01

    In this essay, I provide a description of the discipline of ethics using the philosophies of Aristotle and the American pragmatist John Dewey. Specifically, I argue that ethics is an active undertaking that is ambiguous and pluralistic. I then normatively prescribe the way in which clinical ethicists ought to approach their work in medicine. Rather than endeavouring to become, or behaving as if they are, experts, clinical ethicists must be humble. They must practise ethics. That is, they must admit ethics is the study and pursuit of the good life but that this study and pursuit occurs imperfectly in the face of problematic situations.

  10. Imperfect relativistic mirrors in the quantum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Serbeto, A.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2014-05-15

    The collective backscattering of intense laser radiation by energetic electron beams is considered in the relativistic quantum regime. Exact solutions for the radiation field are obtained, for arbitrary electron pulse shapes and laser intensities. The electron beams act as imperfect nonlinear mirrors on the incident laser radiation. This collective backscattering process can lead to the development of new sources of ultra-short pulse radiation in the gamma-ray domain. Numerical examples show that, for plausible experimental conditions, intense pulses of gamma-rays, due to the double Doppler shift of the harmonics of the incident laser radiation, can be produced using the available technology, with durations less than 1 as.

  11. Oriental Puzzle Gives Students Graphics Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddick, David B.; Johnson, Terri

    1985-01-01

    Describes a class assignment in which graphics students use an ancient Chinese puzzle called a tangram. Students arrange the five triangles, one square, and one rhomboid into an animate and an inanimate object. (HTH)

  12. Imperfect twinning: a clinical and ethical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Denardin, Daniela; Telles, Jorge Alberto B.; Betat, Rosilene da Silveira; Fell, Paulo Renato K.; da Cunha, André Campos; Targa, Luciano Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the history, epidemiology, etiology, gestational aspects, diagnosis and prognosis of imperfect twinning. DATA SOURCES Scientific articles were searched in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, using the descriptors "conjoined twins", "multiple pregnancy", "ultrasound", "magnetic resonance imaging" and "prognosis". The research was not delimited to a specific period of time and was supplemented with bibliographic data from books. DATA SYNTHESIS: The description of conjoined twins is legendary. The estimated frequency is 1/45,000-200,000 births. These twins are monozygotic, monochorionic and usually monoamniotic. They can be classified by the most prominent fusion site, by the symmetry between the conjoined twins or by the sharing structure. The diagnosis can be performed in the prenatal period or after birth by different techniques, such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography. These tests are of paramount importance for understanding the anatomy of both fetuses/children, as well as for prognosis and surgical plan determination. CONCLUSIONS Although imperfect twinning is a rare condition, the prenatal diagnosis is very important in order to evaluate the fusion site and its complexity. Hence, the evaluation of these children should be multidisciplinary, involving mainly obstetricians, pediatricians and pediatric surgeons. However, some decisions may constitute real ethical dilemmas, in which different points should be discussed and analyzed with the health team and the family. PMID:24142323

  13. Statistical analysis of imperfection effect on cylindrical buckling response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. S.; Purbolaksono, J.; Muhammad, N.; Andriyana, A.; Liew, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is widely reported that no efficient guidelines for modelling imperfections in composite structures are available. In response, this work evaluates the imperfection factors of axially compressed Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) cylinder with different ply angles through finite element (FE) analysis. The sensitivity of imperfection factors were analysed using design of experiment: factorial design approach. From the analysis it identified three critical factors that sensitively reacted towards buckling load. Furthermore empirical equation is proposed according to each type of cylinder. Eventually, critical buckling loads estimated by empirical equation showed good agreements with FE analysis. The design of experiment methodology is useful in identifying parameters that lead to structures imperfection tolerance.

  14. Tornillos: Pieces of a Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.; Seidl, D.

    2001-12-01

    In the past decade several of the ash eruptions at Galeras volcano (Colombia) have been preceded by tornillos. These unusual seismic events of unknown origin have screw-like profiles on seismograms and can last up to several minutes. Since 1997, a joint project between the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR) and the Instituto de Investigación e Información Geocientífica, Minero-Ambiental y Nuclear (INGEOMINAS) has supplemented the shortperiod network of the Observatorio Vulcanológico de Pasto with four broadband, three-component seismometer stations, continuous fumarole gas chemistry measurments, electromagnetic sensors, an infrasound sensor and weather observations in the hopes to learn more about the physical or chemical process which generates tornillos and their significance in the sequence leading to ash explosions. The events of a suite of tornillos which occurred at Galeras Volcano between 08 December 1999 and 11 February 2000 were recorded well at the crater rim broadband stations, ANG and ACH. They appear to be more complex than many of the tornillos recorded previously. They are multichromatic, having narrow spectral peaks at up to 9 frequencies. Some peaks last throughout the entire tornillo, others only contribute to the turn-on transient. We compare polarization, frequency, amplitudes and decay measured from this suite of tornillos in each frequency band at the stations ANG and ACH. They indicate a single source location for all these tornillos. While other parameters correlate well at both stations, the amplitude of the 1.9 Hz peak is nearly twice as large at ACH than at ANG. This may indicate a distinct radiation pattern at this frequency. While none of these observations gives us a clear picture of the source process of tornillos, they provide additional puzzle pieces we can add those collected from other measurements.

  15. Method for correcting imperfections on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Weed, J.W.

    1999-09-07

    A process for producing near perfect optical surfaces is disclosed. A previously polished optical surface is measured to determine its deviations from the desired perfect surface. A multi-aperture mask is designed based on this measurement and fabricated such that deposition through the mask will correct the deviations in the surface to an acceptable level. Various mask geometries can be used: variable individual aperture sizes using a fixed grid for the apertures or fixed aperture sizes using a variable aperture spacing. The imperfections are filled in using a vacuum deposition process with a very thin thickness of material such as silicon monoxide to produce an amorphous surface that bonds well to a glass substrate.

  16. Hidden imperfect synchronization of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardu, Sedat F.

    2010-03-01

    Instantaneous amplitude and phase concept emerging from analytical signal formulation is applied to the wavelet coefficients of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the buffer layer of a near wall turbulent flow. Experiments and direct numerical simulations show both the existence of long periods of inert zones wherein the local phase is constant. These regions are separated by random phase jumps. The local amplitude is globally highly intermittent, but not in the phase locked regions wherein it varies smoothly. These behaviors are reminiscent of phase synchronization phenomena observed in stochastic chaotic systems. The lengths of the constant phase inert (laminar) zones reveal a type I intermittency behavior, in concordance with saddle-node bifurcation, and the periodic orbits of saddle nature recently identified in Couette turbulence. The imperfect synchronization is related to the footprint of coherent Reynolds shear stress producing eddies convecting in the low buffer.

  17. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  18. Imperfect mimicry and the limits of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, David W; Pfennig, David W

    2013-12-01

    Mimicry--when one organism (the mimic) evolves a phenotypic resemblance to another (the model) due to selective benefits--is widely used to illustrate natural selection's power to generate adaptations. However, many putative mimics resemble their models imprecisely, and such imperfect mimicry represents a specific challenge to mimicry theory and a general one to evolutionary theory. Here, we discuss 11 nonmutually exclusive hypotheses for imperfect mimicry. We group these hypotheses according to whether imperfect mimicry reflects: an artifact of human perception, which is not shared by any naturally occurring predators and therefore is not truly an instance of imperfect mimicry; genetic, developmental or time-lag constraints, which (temporarily) prevent a response to selection for perfect mimicry; relaxed selection, where imperfect mimicry is as adaptive as perfect mimicry; or tradeoffs, where imperfect mimicry is (locally) more adaptive than perfect mimicry. We find that the relaxed selection hypothesis has garnered the most support. However, because only a few study systems have thus far been comprehensively evaluated, the relative contributions of the various hypotheses toward explaining the evolution of imperfect mimicry remain unclear. Ultimately, clarifying why imperfect mimicry exists should provide critical insights into the limits of natural selection in producing complex adaptations.

  19. Usefulness of Crossword Puzzles in Helping First-Year BVSc Students Learn Veterinary Terminology.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina; May, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate terminology is essential for successful communication among health professionals. However, students have traditionally been encouraged to learn terminology by rote memorization and recall, strategies that students try to avoid. The use of crossword puzzles as a learning tool has been evaluated in other education disciplines, but not for terminology related to veterinary science. Hence, the objective of this study was to test whether crossword puzzles might be an effective aid to learning veterinary terminology. Forty-two first-year students enrolled in a Bachelor of Veterinary Science program were randomly divided into two groups and their previous knowledge of veterinary terms tested. One group received a list of 30 terms with their definitions. The other group received the same list plus six specially designed puzzles incorporating these 30 terms. After 50 minutes, both groups completed a post-intervention test and the results were compared statistically. The results showed that the students using the crossword puzzles performed better in the post-intervention test, correctly retaining more terms than the students using only rote learning. In addition, qualitative data, gathered through an electronic survey and focus group discussions, revealed a positive attitude among students toward the use of crossword puzzles.

  20. Usefulness of Crossword Puzzles in Helping First-Year BVSc Students Learn Veterinary Terminology.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina; May, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate terminology is essential for successful communication among health professionals. However, students have traditionally been encouraged to learn terminology by rote memorization and recall, strategies that students try to avoid. The use of crossword puzzles as a learning tool has been evaluated in other education disciplines, but not for terminology related to veterinary science. Hence, the objective of this study was to test whether crossword puzzles might be an effective aid to learning veterinary terminology. Forty-two first-year students enrolled in a Bachelor of Veterinary Science program were randomly divided into two groups and their previous knowledge of veterinary terms tested. One group received a list of 30 terms with their definitions. The other group received the same list plus six specially designed puzzles incorporating these 30 terms. After 50 minutes, both groups completed a post-intervention test and the results were compared statistically. The results showed that the students using the crossword puzzles performed better in the post-intervention test, correctly retaining more terms than the students using only rote learning. In addition, qualitative data, gathered through an electronic survey and focus group discussions, revealed a positive attitude among students toward the use of crossword puzzles. PMID:27111003

  1. Optimizing imaging polarimeters constructed with imperfect optics.

    PubMed

    Tyo, J Scott; Wei, Hua

    2006-08-01

    Imaging polarimeters are often designed and optimized by assuming that the polarization properties of the optics are nearly ideal. For example, we often assume that the linear polarizers have infinite extinction ratios. It is also usually assumed that the retarding elements have retardances that do not vary either spatially or with the angle of incidence. We consider the case where the polarization optics used to develop an imaging polarimeter are imperfect. Specifically, we examine the expected performance of a system as the extinction ratio of the diattenuators degrades, as the retardance varies spatially, and as the retardance varies with incidence angle. It is found that the penalty in the signal-to-noise ratio for using diattenuators with low extinction ratios is not severe, as an extinction ratio of 5 causes only a 2.0 dB increase in the noise in the reconstructed Stokes parameter images compared with an ideal diattenuator. Likewise, we find that a system can be optimized in the presence of spatially varying retardance, but that angular positioning error is far more important in rotating retarder imaging polarimeters. PMID:16855648

  2. Reinforcing Geometric Properties with Shapedoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.; Nickell, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    Shapedoku is a new type of puzzle that combines logic and spatial reasoning with understanding of basic geometric concepts such as slope, parallelism, perpendicularity, and properties of shapes. Shapedoku can be solved by individuals and, as demonstrated here, can form the basis of a review for geometry students as they create their own. In this…

  3. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  4. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog, which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a…

  5. Ramanujan's Continued Fraction for a Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Poo-Sung

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a method of solution that Ramanujan may have used in solving the following puzzle: The number of a house is both the sum of the house numbers below it on the street and the sum of those above it. (The houses on a street are numbered consecutively, starting with 1.)

  6. Weird Stellar Pair Puzzles Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a speedy spinning pulsar in an elongated orbit around an apparent Sun-like star, a combination never seen before, and one that has them puzzled about how the strange system developed. Orbital Comparison Comparing Orbits of Pulsar and Its Companion to our Solar System. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for full caption information and available graphics. "Our ideas about how the fastest-spinning pulsars are produced do not predict either the kind of orbit or the type of companion star this one has," said David Champion of the Australia Telescope National Facility. "We have to come up with some new scenarios to explain this weird pair," he added. Astronomers first detected the pulsar, called J1903+0327, as part of a long-term survey using the National Science Foundation's Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico. They made the discovery in 2006 doing data analysis at McGill University, where Champion worked at the time. They followed up the discovery with detailed studies using the Arecibo telescope, the NSF's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia, the Westerbork radio telescope in the Netherlands, and the Gemini North optical telescope in Hawaii. The pulsar, a city-sized superdense stellar corpse left over after a massive star exploded as a supernova, is spinning on its axis 465 times every second. Nearly 21,000 light-years from Earth, it is in a highly-elongated orbit that takes it around its companion star once every 95 days. An infrared image made with the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii shows a Sun-like star at the pulsar's position. If this is an orbital companion to the pulsar, it is unlike any companions of other rapidly rotating pulsars. The pulsar, a neutron star, also is unusually massive for its type. "This combination of properties is unprecedented. Not only does it require us to figure out how this system was produced, but the large mass may help us understand how matter behaves at extremely

  7. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Lourdu Xavier, Paulraj; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are predominantly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation is access to high-quality crystals, to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields sufficiently high-resolution information that the crystal structure can be solved. The observation that crystals with shrunken unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks1,2 hints that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity but rather by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern, equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid single molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and hence with an increased information content3. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins4 —they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5 Å limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to directly phase5 the pattern. With the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 Å as a constraint, we then obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at 3.5 Å resolution. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome long-supposed resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, with a method that puts great value in commonly encountered imperfect crystals and opens up the possibility for model-free phasing6,7. PMID:26863980

  8. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Robinson, Joseph S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2016-02-11

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed--and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins--they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  9. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins—they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  10. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Robinson, Joseph S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2016-02-11

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed--and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins--they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing. PMID

  11. Magnetoelectric effects in multiferroic fibrous composite with imperfect interface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Pan, E.

    2007-12-01

    This paper investigates the magnetoelectroelastic responses of multiferroic fibrous composites with imperfectly bonded interface under longitudinal shear. The proposed imperfect interface model is a natural generalization of the shear lag (or the spring layer) model. By virtue of the complex variable method, we first consider the case where an isolated circular multiferroic fiber is imperfectly bonded to an infinite multiferroic matrix. Very concise expressions for the complex field potentials characterizing the magnetoelectroelastic fields inside and outside the circular fiber are obtained when the matrix is subjected to the remote uniform magnetoelectroelastic loading. The Mori-Tanaka mean-field method is then employed to derive the effective moduli of the multiferroic fibrous composite made of randomly distributed fibers reinforced to the matrix. Particularly we demonstrate that the interfacial imperfection in elasticity, electricity, and magnetism will always cause a significant reduction in the magnetoelectric coefficient of the BaTiO{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} fibrous composite.

  12. Quantification of the Forgiveness of Drugs to Imperfect Adherence.

    PubMed

    Assawasuwannakit, P; Braund, R; Duffull, S B

    2015-03-01

    The circumstance of how sensitive therapeutic success is under imperfect adherence is driven by the property known as forgiveness. To date, no studies have considered variability in the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic process in conjunction with imperfect adherence patterns in order to develop a comparative criterion to determine the forgiveness of a drug. In this study, we have proposed a criterion to quantify forgiveness; illustrated the criterion for a theoretical example and evaluated the forgiveness of a motivating example, namely warfarin. A forgiveness criterion, relative forgiveness, is defined as the number of times more likely that a target is successfully attained under perfect adherence compared to imperfect adherence; or when comparing two drugs under a standard setting of imperfect adherence. The relative forgiveness criterion may have important implications for both drug development and clinical practice since the choice of drug can account for the likely influence of its forgiveness. PMID:26225235

  13. Buckling Imperfection Sensitivity of Axially Compressed Orthotropic Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Structural stability is a major consideration in the design of lightweight shell structures. However, the theoretical predictions of geometrically perfect structures often considerably over predict the buckling loads of inherently imperfect real structures. It is reasonably well understood how the shell geometry affects the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed cylindrical shells; however, the effects of shell anisotropy on the imperfection sensitivity is less well understood. In the present paper, the development of an analytical model for assessing the imperfection sensitivity of axially compressed orthotropic cylinders is discussed. Results from the analytical model for four shell designs are compared with those from a general-purpose finite-element code, and good qualitative agreement is found. Reasons for discrepancies are discussed, and potential design implications of this line of research are discussed.

  14. Method and apparatus for evaluating multilayer objects for imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First, an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave, wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve, wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured, wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  15. Method and Apparatus for Evaluating Multilayer Objects for Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Abedin, Nurul (Inventor); Sun, Kuen J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A multilayer object having multiple layers arranged in a stacking direction is evaluated for imperfections such as voids, delaminations and microcracks. First. an acoustic wave is transmitted into the object in the stacking direction via an appropriate transducer/waveguide combination. The wave propagates through the multilayer object and is received by another transducer/waveguide combination preferably located on the same surface as the transmitting combination. The received acoustic wave is correlated with the presence or absence of imperfections by, e.g., generating pulse echo signals indicative of the received acoustic wave. wherein the successive signals form distinct groups over time. The respective peak amplitudes of each group are sampled and curve fit to an exponential curve. wherein a substantial fit of approximately 80-90% indicates an absence of imperfections and a significant deviation indicates the presence of imperfections. Alternatively, the time interval between distinct groups can be measured. wherein equal intervals indicate the absence of imperfections and unequal intervals indicate the presence of imperfections.

  16. Accounting for Imperfect Detection in Ecology: A Quantitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Kenneth F.; Swihart, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Detection in studies of species abundance and distribution is often imperfect. Assuming perfect detection introduces bias into estimation that can weaken inference upon which understanding and policy are based. Despite availability of numerous methods designed to address this assumption, many refereed papers in ecology fail to account for non-detection error. We conducted a quantitative literature review of 537 ecological articles to measure the degree to which studies of different taxa, at various scales, and over time have accounted for imperfect detection. Overall, just 23% of articles accounted for imperfect detection. The probability that an article incorporated imperfect detection increased with time and varied among taxa studied; studies of vertebrates were more likely to incorporate imperfect detection. Among articles that reported detection probability, 70% contained per-survey estimates of detection that were less than 0.5. For articles in which constancy of detection was tested, 86% reported significant variation. We hope that our findings prompt more ecologists to consider carefully the detection process when designing studies and analyzing results, especially for sub-disciplines where incorporation of imperfect detection in study design and analysis so far has been lacking. PMID:25356904

  17. Imperfect chemical female mimicry in males of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Sylvia; D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Drijfhout, Falko P.; Sledge, Matthew F.; Turillazzi, Stefano; Heinze, Jürgen

    2008-11-01

    Winged and wingless males coexist in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. Wingless (“ergatoid”) males never leave their maternal colony and fight remorselessly among each other for the access to emerging females. The peaceful winged males disperse after about 10 days, but beforehand also mate in the nest. In the first 5 days of their life, winged males perform a chemical female mimicry that protects them against attack and even makes them sexually attractive to ergatoid males. When older, the chemical profile of winged males no longer matches that of virgin females; nevertheless, they are still tolerated, which so far has been puzzling. Contrasting this general pattern, we have identified a single aberrant colony in which all winged males were attacked and killed by the ergatoid males. A comparative analysis of the morphology and chemical profile of these untypical attacked winged males and the tolerated males from several normal colonies revealed that normal old males are still performing some chemical mimicry to the virgin queens, though less perfect than in their young ages. The anomalous attacked winged males, on the other hand, had a very different odour to the females. Our study thus exemplifies that the analysis of rare malfunctioning can add valuable insight on functioning under normal conditions and allows the conclusion that older winged males from normal colonies of the ant C. obscurior are guarded through an imperfect chemical female mimicry, still close enough to protect against attacks by the wingless fighters yet dissimilar enough not to elicit their sexual interest.

  18. Role of Nitric Oxide in Glioblastoma Therapy: Another Step to Resolve the Terrible Puzzle ?

    PubMed

    Altieri, R; Fontanella, M; Agnoletti, A; Panciani, P P; Spena, G; Crobeddu, E; Pilloni, G; Tardivo, V; Lanotte, M; Zenga, F; Ducati, A; Garbossa, D

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme, the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor, remains incurable despite of the advent of modern surgical and medical treatments. This poor prognosis depends by the recurrence after surgery and intrinsic or acquired resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nitric oxide is a small molecule that plays a key roles in glioma pathophysiology. Many researches showing that NO is involved in induction of apoptosis, radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Therefore, NO role, if clarified, may improve the knowledge about this unsolved puzzle called GBM.

  19. Imperfection Insensitivity Analyses of Advanced Composite Tow-Steered Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Farrokh, Babak; Stanford, Bret K.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Two advanced composite tow-steered shells, one with tow overlaps and another without overlaps, were previously designed, fabricated and tested in end compression, both without cutouts, and with small and large cutouts. In each case, good agreement was observed between experimental buckling loads and supporting linear bifurcation buckling analyses. However, previous buckling tests and analyses have shown historically poor correlation, perhaps due to the presence of geometric imperfections that serve as failure initiators. For the tow-steered shells, their circumferential variation in axial stiffness may have suppressed this sensitivity to imperfections, leading to the agreement noted between tests and analyses. To investigate this further, a numerical investigation was performed in this study using geometric imperfections measured from both shells. Finite element models of both shells were analyzed first without, and then, with measured imperfections that were then, superposed in different orientations around the shell longitudinal axis. Small variations in both the axial prebuckling stiffness and global buckling load were observed for the range of imperfections studied here, which suggests that the tow steering, and resulting circumferentially varying axial stiffness, may result in the test-analysis correlation observed for these shells.

  20. Remote preparation of W states from imperfect bipartite sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M. G. M.; Cunha, Márcio M.; Parisio, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Several proposals to produce tripartite W-type entanglement are probabilistic even if no imperfections are considered in the processes. We provide a deterministic way to remotely create W states out of an EPR source. The proposal is made viable through measurements (which can be demolitive) in an appropriate three-qubit basis. The protocol becomes probabilistic only when source flaws are considered. It turns out that, even in this situation, it is robust against imperfections in two senses: (i) It is possible, after postselection, to create a pure ensemble of W states out of an EPR source containing a systematic error; (ii) If no postselection is done, the resulting mixed state has a fidelity, with respect to a pure |Wrangle , which is higher than that of the imperfect source in comparison with an ideal EPR source. This simultaneously amounts to entanglement concentration and lifting.

  1. Multiwave diffraction, phase problem, and extinction in imperfect crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrienko, V. E.

    2009-11-15

    The extinction effects of multiwave diffraction in imperfect crystals have been investigated. It is shown that the presence of extinction in the direct diffraction channel may lead to errors in determining the relative phases of structural amplitudes by the multiwave diffraction method (i.e., by interference with indirect excitation). The reason is that the dependence of the reflection intensity on the structural amplitude in imperfect crystals is generally nonquadratic (as in the kinematic theory), nonlinear (as in the dynamic theory), and is not even somewhat intermediate. These effects open up new possibilities for using multiwave diffraction for the direct study of the extinction and, therefore, quantitatively characterize the imperfection of crystal structures with known values and phases of structural amplitudes.

  2. Geoscience Data Puzzles: Developing Students' Ability to Make Meaning from Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastens, K. A.; Turrin, M.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most fundamental aspects of geoscience expertise is the ability to extract insights from observational earth data. Where an expert might see trends, patterns, processes, and candidate causal relationships, a novice could look at the same data representation and see dots, wiggles and blotches of color. The problem is compounded when the student was not personally involved in collecting the data or samples and thus has no experiential knowledge of the Earth setting that the data represent. In other words, the problem is especially severe when students tap into the vast archives of professionally-collected data that the geoscience community has worked so hard to make available for instructional use over the internet. Moreover, most high school and middle school teachers did not themselves learn Earth Science through analyzing data, and they may lack skills and/or confidence needed to scaffold students through the process of learning to interpret realistically-complex data sets. We have developed “Geoscience Data Puzzles” with the paired goals of (a) helping students learn about the earth from data, and (b) helping teachers learn to teach with data. Geoscience Data Puzzles are data-using activities that purposefully present a low barrier-to-entry for teachers and a high ratio of insight-to-effort for students. Each Puzzle uses authentic geoscience data, but the data are carefully pre-selected in order to illuminate a fundamental Earth process within tractable snippets of data. Every Puzzle offers "Aha" moments, when the connection between data and process comes clear in a rewarding burst of insight. Every Puzzle is accompanied by a Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) guide, which explicates the chain of reasoning by which the puzzle-solver can use the evidence provided by the data to construct scientific claims. Four types of reasoning are stressed: spatial reasoning, in which students make inferences from observations about location, orientation, shape

  3. Early Puzzle Play: A predictor of preschoolers’ spatial transformation skill

    PubMed Central

    Levine, S.C.; Ratliff, K.R.; Huttenlocher, J.; Cannon, J.

    2011-01-01

    Individual differences in spatial skill emerge prior to kindergarten entry. However, little is known about the early experiences that may contribute to these differences. The current study examines the relation between children’s early puzzle play and their spatial skill. Children and parents (n = 53) were observed at home for 90 minutes every four months (six times) between 2 and 4 years of age (26 to 46 months). When children were 4 years 6 months old, they completed a spatial task involving mental transformations of 2D shapes. Children who were observed playing with puzzles performed better on this task than those who did not, controlling for parent education, income, and overall parent word types. Moreover, among those children who played with puzzles, frequency of puzzle play predicted performance on the spatial transformation task. Although the frequency of puzzle play did not differ for boys and girls, the quality of puzzle play (a composite of puzzle difficulty, parent engagement, and parent spatial language) was higher for boys than girls. In addition, variation in puzzle play quality predicted performance on the spatial transformation task for girls but not boys. Implications of these findings as well as future directions for research on the role of the role of puzzle play in the development of spatial skill are discussed. PMID:22040312

  4. Early puzzle play: a predictor of preschoolers' spatial transformation skill.

    PubMed

    Levine, Susan C; Ratliff, Kristin R; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Cannon, Joanna

    2012-03-01

    Individual differences in spatial skill emerge prior to kindergarten entry. However, little is known about the early experiences that may contribute to these differences. The current study examined the relation between children's early puzzle play and their spatial skill. Children and parents (n = 53) were observed at home for 90 min every 4 months (6 times) between 2 and 4 years of age (26 to 46 months). When children were 4 years 6 months old, they completed a spatial task involving mental transformations of 2-dimensional shapes. Children who were observed playing with puzzles performed better on this task than those who did not, controlling for parent education, income, and overall parent word types. Moreover, among those children who played with puzzles, frequency of puzzle play predicted performance on the spatial transformation task. Although the frequency of puzzle play did not differ for boys and girls, the quality of puzzle play (a composite of puzzle difficulty, parent engagement, and parent spatial language) was higher for boys than for girls. In addition, variation in puzzle play quality predicted performance on the spatial transformation task for girls but not for boys. Implications of these findings as well as future directions for research on the role of puzzle play in the development of spatial skill are discussed. PMID:22040312

  5. Cold climate BMPs: solving the management puzzle.

    PubMed

    Oberts, G L

    2003-01-01

    Snowmelt runoff and rain-on-snow events present some of the highest pollutant loading and most difficult management challenges in the course of a year in regions with cold climate. Frozen conduits, thick ice layers, low biological activity, altered chemistry, and saturated or frozen ground conditions all work against effective treatment of melt runoff. Understanding the source, evolution and transition that occurs within a melt event, and defining the management objectives for specific receiving waters will help focus the search for effective management techniques. Solving the management puzzle means putting together a strategy for both soluble and solids-associated water pollutants.

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  7. Electrophobic Scalar Boson and Muonic Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; McKeen, David; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-09-01

    A new scalar boson which couples to the muon and proton can simultaneously solve the proton radius puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Using a variety of measurements, we constrain the mass of this scalar and its couplings to the electron, muon, neutron, and proton. Making no assumptions about the underlying model, these constraints and the requirement that it solve both problems limit the mass of the scalar to between about 100 keV and 100 MeV. We identify two unexplored regions in the coupling constant-mass plane. Potential future experiments and their implications for theories with mass-weighted lepton couplings are discussed.

  8. Modified Sigmund sputtering theory: isotopic puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Zhang, L.

    2005-05-01

    The theory of anisotropic sputtering proposed by Zhang [Z.L. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 71 026101 (2005).] and [Z.L. Zhang and L. Zhang, Radiat. Eff. Defects Solids 159(5) 301 (2004).] has been generalized to sputtering of isotopic mixtures. The present theory (modified Sigmund theory) has been shown to fit numerous simulations and experimental measurements, including energy and angular distribution of sputtered atoms. In particular, the theory has successfully solved the isotope puzzle of sputtering induced by low energy and heavy ion bombardment.

  9. Evaluation Strategies in Financial Education: Evaluation with Imperfect Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lauren; Dudensing, Rebekka; Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Program evaluation often suffers due to time constraints, imperfect instruments, incomplete data, and the need to report standardized metrics. This article about the evaluation process for the Wi$eUp financial education program showcases the difficulties inherent in evaluation and suggests best practices for assessing program effectiveness. We…

  10. Modelling occurrence and abundance of species when detection is imperfect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Nichols, J.D.; Kery, M.

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between species abundance and occupancy are of considerable interest in metapopulation biology and in macroecology. Such relationships may be described concisely using probability models that characterize variation in abundance of a species. However, estimation of the parameters of these models in most ecological problems is impaired by imperfect detection. When organisms are detected imperfectly, observed counts are biased estimates of true abundance, and this induces bias in stated occupancy or occurrence probability. In this paper we consider a class of models that enable estimation of abundance/occupancy relationships from counts of organisms that result from surveys in which detection is imperfect. Under such models, parameter estimation and inference are based on conventional likelihood methods. We provide an application of these models to geographically extensive breeding bird survey data in which alternative models of abundance are considered that include factors that influence variation in abundance and detectability. Using these models, we produce estimates of abundance and occupancy maps that honor important sources of spatial variation in avian abundance and provide clearly interpretable characterizations of abundance and occupancy adjusted for imperfect detection.

  11. Magic star puzzle for educational mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yee Siang; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    One of the interesting fields in recreational mathematics is the magic number arrangement. There are different kinds of arrays in the arrangement for a group of numbers. In particular, one of the arrays in magic number arrangement is called magic star. In fact, magic star involves combinatorics that contributes to geometrical analysis and number theory. Hence, magic star is suitable to be introduced as educational mathematics to cultivate interest in different area of mathematics. To obtain the solutions of normal magic stars of order six, the possible sets of numbers for every line in a magic star have been considered. Previously, the calculation for obtaining the solutions has been done manually which is time-consuming. Therefore, a programming code to generate all the fundamental solutions for normal magic star of order six without including the properties of rotation and reflection has been done. In this puzzle, a magic star puzzle is created by using Matlab software, which enables a user to verify the entries for the cells of magic star of order six. Moreover, it is also user-friendly as it provides interactive commands on the inputs given by the user, which enables the user to detect the incorrect inputs. In addition, user can also choose to view all the fundamental solutions as generated by the programming code.

  12. Quantum key distribution: vulnerable if imperfectly implemented

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchs, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report several vulnerabilities found in Clavis2, the flagship quantum key distribution (QKD) system from ID Quantique. We show the hacking of a calibration sequence run by Clavis2 to synchronize the Alice and Bob devices before performing the secret key exchange. This hack induces a temporal detection efficiency mismatch in Bob that can allow Eve to break the security of the cryptosystem using faked states. We also experimentally investigate the superlinear behaviour in the single-photon detectors (SPDs) used by Bob. Due to this superlinearity, the SPDs feature an actual multi-photon detection probability which is generally higher than the theoretically-modelled value. We show how this increases the risk of detector control attacks on QKD systems (including Clavis2) employing such SPDs. Finally, we review the experimental feasibility of Trojan-horse attacks. In the case of Clavis2, the objective is to read Bob's phase modulator to acquire knowledge of his basis choice as this information suffices for constructing the raw key in the Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) protocol. We work in close collaboration with ID Quantique and for all these loopholes, we notified them in advance. Wherever possible, we or ID Quantique proposed countermeasures and they implemented suitable patches and upgrade their systems.

  13. A Puzzle Used to Teach the Cardiac Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcondes, Fernanda K.; Moura, Maria J. C. S.; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; Oliveira de Lima, Patricia; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E. C.; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided…

  14. Categorization Competence by Youth in Non-School Material (Puzzles)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Robert R.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results, and conclusions of a study to investigate the effects of (1) sex, (2) intelligence, and (3) prior experience in puzzle solving on the categorization skills of youth. A two-dimensional type puzzle involving 4 sorting variables was given to 110 ninth graders. 22 subjects, age from 7 to 18 were given a 3-dimensional…

  15. Jigsaw Puzzles. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    This booklet examines the educational value of jigsaw puzzles and gives practical suggestions on how to select and make them for use by children ages 1 through 8. It asserts that jigsaw puzzles provide children with the opportunity to develop problem-solving strategies, and discusses a theory of adult-child interaction that encourages the…

  16. Crossword Puzzles as Learning Tools in Introductory Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarick, K. A.

    2010-01-01

    Students in introductory courses generally respond favorably to novel approaches to learning. To this end, I developed and used three crossword puzzles in spring and fall 2009 semesters in Introductory Soil Science Laboratory at Colorado State University. The first hypothesis was that crossword puzzles would improve introductory soil science…

  17. The Crossword Puzzle as a Teaching Examination Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borcher, Glenda; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Animal science students (n=107) answered questions in both crossword puzzle and fill-in-the-blank format; 41 students in another study received either format as weekly review/quizzes. Students answered more questions correctly with crossword puzzles and enjoyed the challenge, although they appeared more willing to attempt answers with the fill-in…

  18. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  19. Decoding Codewords: Statistical Analysis of a Newspaper Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meacock, Susan; Meacock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In recent years English newspapers have started featuring a number of puzzles other than the ubiquitous crossword. Many of the puzzles are of Japanese origin such as Sudoku, Kakuro or Hidato. However, one recent one is very English and is called variously Cross-code, Alphapuzzle or some other name. In this article, it will be known as Codeword.…

  20. Enumerating Small Sudoku Puzzles in a First Abstract Algebra Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorch, Crystal; Lorch, John

    2008-01-01

    Two methods are presented for counting small "essentially different" sudoku puzzles using elementary group theory: one method (due to Jarvis and Russell) uses Burnside's counting formula, while the other employs an invariant property of sudoku puzzles. Ideas are included for incorporating this material into an introductory abstract algebra course.…

  1. Update On the Puzzling Boyajian's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Photometric time series for a neighboring star thats 25 NNW of Boyajians Star. No significant long-term dimming is seen which constrains the size of potential material obscuring Boyajians Star. [Wright et al. 2016/Benjamin Montet]Whats causing the mysterious light-curve dips of the so-called alien megastructure star, Boyajians Star? A recent study analyzes a variety of possible explanations to determine which ones are the most plausible.An Unusual Light CurveEarlier this year, astronomer Tabetha Boyajian reported on the unusual light curve of the star KIC 8462852. This star, now nicknamed Tabbys Star or Boyajians Star, showsunusual dips on day-long timescales that are too large to be explained by planet transits or similar phenomena.In addition to these short dips in luminosity, recent observations have also indicated that the star has faded by roughly 20% over the past hundred years. What could be causing both the short-term dips in the stars light and the long-term dimming over a century?Could the dimming be caused by an alien megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization? The authors find that a spherical structure is very unlikely. [Danielle Futselaar/SETI International]Alien Megastructures? Or Another Explanation?Boyajians Star was vaulted into the media spotlight when astronomer Jason Wright (Pennsylvania State University and University of California, Berkeley) proposed that its unusual light curve could potentially be explained by a surrounding megastructure built by an extraterrestrial civilization.Now Wright is back with co-author Steinn Sigurdsson (Pennsylvania State University). In a new study, Wright and Sigurdsson analyze an extensive list of explanations for the puzzling apparent behavior of Boyajians Star, based on our latest knowledge about this strange object.The Realm of PossibilitiesHere are just a few possible causes of Boyajians Stars dimming, as well as the authors assessment of their plausibility. For the full list, see the authors

  2. The electron screening puzzle and nuclear clustering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-02-12

    Accurate measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest within, or close to, the Gamow peak show evidence of an unexpected effect attributed to the presence of atomic electrons in the target. The experiments need to include an effective "screening" potential to explain the enhancement of the cross sections at the lowest measurable energies. Despite various theoretical studies conducted over the past 20 years and numerous experimental measurements, a theory has not yet been found that can explain the cause of the exceedingly high values of the screening potential needed to explain the data. Furthermore, in this letter we show thatmore » instead of an atomic physics solution of the "electron screening puzzle", the reason for the large screening potential values is in fact due to clusterization effects in nuclear reactions, in particular for reaction involving light nuclei.« less

  3. Electrophobic Scalar Boson and Muonic Puzzles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; McKeen, David; Miller, Gerald A

    2016-09-01

    A new scalar boson which couples to the muon and proton can simultaneously solve the proton radius puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Using a variety of measurements, we constrain the mass of this scalar and its couplings to the electron, muon, neutron, and proton. Making no assumptions about the underlying model, these constraints and the requirement that it solve both problems limit the mass of the scalar to between about 100 keV and 100 MeV. We identify two unexplored regions in the coupling constant-mass plane. Potential future experiments and their implications for theories with mass-weighted lepton couplings are discussed. PMID:27636468

  4. A PUZZLE INVOLVING GALACTIC BULGE MICROLENSING EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Judith G.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Feltzing, Sofia; Bensby, Thomas; Huang Wenjin; Melendez, Jorge; Lucatello, Sara; Asplund, Martin E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ian@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: tbensby@eso.org E-mail: jorge@astro.up.pt E-mail: asplund@MPA-Garching.MPG.DE

    2010-03-01

    We study a sample of 16 microlensed Galactic bulge main-sequence turnoff region stars for which high-dispersion spectra have been obtained with detailed abundance analyses. We demonstrate that there is a very strong and highly statistically significant correlation between the maximum magnification of the microlensed bulge star and the value of the [Fe/H] deduced from the high resolution spectrum of each object. Physics demands that this correlation, assuming it to be real, be the result of some sample bias. We suggest several possible explanations, but are forced to reject them all, and are left puzzled. To obtain a reliable metallicity distribution in the Galactic bulge based on microlensed dwarf stars, it will be necessary to resolve this issue through the course of additional observations.

  5. Bullet-Block Science Video Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A science video blog,1 which has gone viral, shows a wooden block shot by a vertically aimed rifle. The video2 shows that the block hit dead center goes exactly as high as the one shot off-center. (Fig. 1). The puzzle is that the block shot off-center carries rotational kinetic energy in addition to the gravitational potential energy. This leads a majority of the bloggers to claim that the block shot off-center should not go as high as the one shot dead center. Others have claimed that the energy tied up as rotational energy is insignificant and the two blocks should rise to the same height within experimental error.

  6. What is an `ideally imperfect' crystal? Is kinematical theory appropriate?

    PubMed

    Fewster, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Most materials are crystalline because atoms and molecules tend to form ordered arrangements, and since the interatomic distances are comparable with the wavelength of X-rays, their interaction creates diffraction patterns. The intensity in these patterns changes with crystal quality. Perfect crystals, e.g. semiconductors, fit well to dynamical theory, whereas crystals that reveal the stereochemistry of complex biological molecules, the structure of organic and inorganic molecules and powders are required to be fragmented (termed `ideally imperfect') to justify the use of the simpler kinematical theory. New experimental results of perfect and imperfect crystals are interpreted with a fundamental description of diffraction, which does not need fragmented crystals but just ubiquitous defects. The distribution of the intensity is modified and can influence the interpretation of the patterns. PMID:26697866

  7. Distribution of radiative crystal imperfections through a silicon ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flo̸, A.; Burud, I.; Kvaal, K.; So̸ndenå, R.; Olsen, E.

    2013-11-01

    Crystal imperfections limit the efficiency of multicrystalline silicon solar cells. Recombination through traps is more prominent in areas with high density of crystal imperfections. A method to visualize the distribution of radiative emission from Shockley Read Hall recombination in silicon is demonstrated. We use hyperspectral photoluminescence, a fast non-destructive method, to image radiatively active recombination processes on a set of 50 wafers through a silicon block. The defect related emission lines D1 and D2 may be detected together or alone. The D3 and D4 seem to be correlated if we assume that an emission at the similar energy as D3 (VID3) is caused by a separate mechanism. The content of interstitial iron (Fei) correlates with D4. This method yields a spectral map of the inter band gap transitions, which opens up for a new way to characterize mechanisms related to loss of efficiency for solar cells processed from the block.

  8. Evidences of global bifurcations of an imperfect circular plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, M. H.; Lee, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    The global bifurcations in modal interactions of an imperfect circular plate with one-to-one internal resonance are investigated. The case of the third-order subharmonic resonance, in which an excitation frequency is near triple natural frequencies, is considered. The equations governing nonlinear oscillations of an imperfect circular plate are reduced to a system of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations via Galerkin's procedure. The method of multiple scales is used to obtain a system of autonomous ordinary differential equations, and then Kovačič and Wiggins' method is used to investigate the global dynamics of the plate. Having found a sufficient condition under which Silnikov-type homoclinic orbit can exist, we failed to observe any numerical evidences of global bifurcation.

  9. Noncontacting thermoelectric detection of material imperfections in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B. Nagy; Adnan H. Nayfeh; Waseem I. Faidi; Hector Carreon; Balachander Lakshminaraya; Feng Yu; Bassam Abu-Nabah

    2005-06-17

    This project was aimed at developing a new noncontacting thermoelectric method for nondestructive detection of material imperfections in metals. The method is based on magnetic sensing of local thermoelectric currents around imperfections when a temperature gradient is established throughout a conducting specimen by external heating and cooling. The surrounding intact material serves as the reference electrode therefore the detection sensitivity could be very high if a sufficiently sensitive magnetometer is used in the measurements. This self-referencing, noncontacting, nondestructive inspection technique offers the following distinct advantages over conventional methods: high sensitivity to subtle variations in material properties, unique insensitivity to the size, shape, and other geometrical features of the specimen, noncontacting nature with a substantial stand-off distance, and the ability to probe relatively deep into the material. The potential applications of this method cover a very wide range from detection metallic inclusions and segregations, inhomogeneities, and tight cracks to characterization of hardening, embrittlement, fatigue, texture, and residual stresses.

  10. Stability, vibration and passive damping of partially restrained imperfect columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Z.; Voland, R. T.; Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of slender tubular columns for possible use in space structures is conducted in the presence of partial rotational end restraints. Explicit formulas are derived for computing the buckling load and the lowest natural frequency of perfectly straight uniform elastic members with rotational end restraints possessing linear moment-rotation characteristics. An exact solution in the form of a transcendental equation, and a numerical solution using second-order finite-differences are also presented. The presence of an initial imperfection is also incorporated into the numerical procedure. Vibration tests are conducted on an imperfect tubular steel member in the absence of an axial load. A damping concept consisting of a string-mass assembly is explored. Three passive damping configurations involving combinations of three lead shots were investigated. The three lead shot configurations provided considerably greater damping than the single lead shot.

  11. Parametric Multi-Level Tiling of Imperfectly Nested Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Baskaran, Muthu M.; Bastoul, Cedric; Cohen, Albert; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Norris, Boyana; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-05-18

    Tiling is a critical loop transformation for generating high-performance code on modern architectures. Efficient generation of multilevel tiled code is essential to exploit several levels of parallelism and/or to maximize data reuse in deep memory hierarchies. Tiled loops with parameterized tile sizes (not compile time constants) facilitate runtime feedback and dynamic optimizations used in iterative compilation and automatic tuning. The existing parametric multilevel tiling approach has focused on transformation for perfectly nested loops, where all assignment statements are contained inside the innermost loop of a loop nest. Previous solutions to tiling for imperfect loop nests are limited to the case where tile sizes are fixed. In this paper, we present an approach to parameterized multilevel tiling for imperfectly nested loops. Our tiling algorithm generates loops that iterate over full rectangular tiles that are amenable for potential compiler optimizations such as register tiling. Experimental results using a number of computational benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our tiling approach.

  12. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity.

  13. Coarse grain modeling of imperfect networks and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliozberg, Yelena; Chantawansri, Tanya; Sirk, Timothy; Andzelm, Jan; Mrozek, Randy; Lenhart, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    There is a strong interest in chemically and physically cross-linked entangled polymer networks and gels due to their tailorability in respect to both mechanical and structural properties. Even so, these properties are sensitive to imperfections in the polymer networks, such as dangling ends and loops. Computational modeling is a viable tool to understand the effects of these imperfections on properties in a controlled environment, in which specific defects can be systematically created and varied. In this study, we have employed generic bead-spring models of flexible chains to study a chemically and physically cross-linked network. Our results will show the importance defects, such as dangling ends and loops, on the mechanical and structural properties of these networks. We will also discuss the effects of these defects on the time-dependent elastic modulus. The simulation results qualitatively agree with experimental results and the other theoretical predictions.

  14. A puzzle used to teach the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Fernanda K; Moura, Maria J C S; Sanches, Andrea; Costa, Rafaela; de Lima, Patricia Oliveira; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Amaral, Maria E C; Zeni, Paula; Gaviao, Kelly Cristina; Montrezor, Luís H

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to describe a puzzle developed for use in teaching cardiac physiology classes. The puzzle presents figures of phases of the cardiac cycle and a table with five columns: phases of cardiac cycle, atrial state, ventricular state, state of atrioventricular valves, and pulmonary and aortic valves. Chips are provided for use to complete the table. Students are requested to discuss which is the correct sequence of figures indicating the phases of cardiac cycle. Afterward, they should complete the table with the chips. Students of biology, dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing graduation courses from seven institutions performed the puzzle evaluation. They were invited to indicate whether the puzzle had been useful for learning about the subject by filling one of four alternatives. Of the students, 4.6% answered that it was not necessary but helped them to confirm what they had learned, 64.5% reported that although they had previously understood the cardiac cycle, the puzzle helped them to solve doubts and promoted a better understanding of it, and 30.9% said that they needed the puzzle to understand the cardiac cycle, without differences among courses, institutions, and course semesters. The results of the present study suggest that a simple and inexpensive puzzle may be useful as an active learning methodology applied after the theoretical lecture, as a complementary tool for studying cardiac cycle physiology.

  15. Imperfect Geometric Control and Overdamping for The Damped Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burq, Nicolas; Christianson, Hans

    2015-05-01

    We consider the damped wave equation on a manifold with imperfect geometric control. We show the sub-exponential energy decay estimate in (Christianson, J Funct Anal 258(3):1060-1065, 2010) is optimal in the case of one hyperbolic periodic geodesic. We show if the equation is overdamped, then the energy decays exponentially. Finally we show if the equation is overdamped but geometric control fails for one hyperbolic periodic geodesic, then nevertheless the energy decays exponentially.

  16. Buckling of structures with uncertain imperfections - Personal perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    1998-01-01

    The previous review on stochastic buckling of structures was written by Amazigo in 1976. This review summarizes some of the developments which took place in recent two decades. A brief overview is given of the effect on uncertainty in the initial geometric imperfections, elastic moduli, applied forces, and thickness variation. For the benefit of the thinking reader, the review has a critical nature. It should be noted that this manuscript has yet to be completed.

  17. Puzzling through General Chemistry: A Light-Hearted Approach to Engaging Students with Chemistry Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    Several puzzles are designed to be used by chemistry students as learning tools and teach them basic chemical concepts. The topics of the puzzles are based on the chapters from Chemistry, The Central Science used in general chemistry course and the puzzles are in various forms like crosswords, word searches, number searches, puzzles based on…

  18. Teaching the Blue-Eyed Islanders Puzzle in a Liberal Arts Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The blue-eyed islanders puzzle is an old and challenging logic puzzle. This is a narrative of an experience introducing a variation of this puzzle on the first day of classes in a liberal arts mathematics course for non-majors. I describe an exercise that was used to facilitate the class's understanding of the puzzle.

  19. Solar System Puzzle Kit: An Activity for Earth and Space Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    This Solar System Puzzle Kit for grades 5-8, allows students to create an eight-cube paper puzzle of the solar system and may be duplicated for classroom use or used as a take home activity for children and parents. By assembling the puzzle, hand-coloring the bodies of the solar system, and viewing the puzzle's 12 sides, students can reinforce…

  20. Error-Driven Knowledge Restructuring in Categorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalish, Michael L.; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Davies, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge restructuring occurs when people shift to a new strategy or representation during learning. Although knowledge restructuring can frequently be experimentally encouraged, there are instances in which people resist restructuring and continue to use an expedient but imperfect initial strategy. The authors report 3 category learning…

  1. The Meibomian Puzzle: Combining Pieces Together

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize the available information on lipidomic analysis of human meibum and tear film, and critically evaluate the pertinent past and present analytical procedures and results obtained in various laboratories. Human meibum was shown to be a very complex mixture of lipids of various classes. For decades, their exact structures have remained elusive. Because of the limitations of the then-current techniques, most of the complex lipids that constitute meibum could not be analyzed as whole molecules and required prior hydrolysis and/or transesterification of the entire lipid pool. These procedures effectively made it very difficult, and often impossible, to reconstruct the complete structures of the original intact compounds, which prompted us to call this The Meibomian Puzzle. Modern techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry help in solving this puzzle by allowing a researcher to detect and analyze intact molecules of complex lipid compounds, even if present in extremely low concentrations. This current de-facto standard procedure in lipidomic analysis of natural lipids and their mixtures is compared with other experimental techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and thin layer chromatography, among the others. The results obtained by older techniques, and their limitations and deficiencies are discussed. It appears that some of the earlier findings did not withstand a scrupulous re-evaluation and need to be modified and/or corrected. The most intriguing development is the virtual absence in meibum of typical phospholipids – an important group of amphiphilic compounds whose role in the human tear film was thought to be to stabilize the entire tear film structure. Instead, another group of previously unidentified compounds, very long chain (O-acyl)-omega-hydroxy fatty acids, appears to be a stabilizing factor which

  2. Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159925.html Latest Zika Puzzle: How U.S. Patient Infected Caregiver Officials say ... MONDAY, July 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The mysterious Zika virus continues to surprise health scientists. On Monday, ...

  3. Experiments towards resolving the proton charge radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antognini, A.; Schuhmann, K.; Amaro, F. D.; Amaro, P.; Abdou-Ahmed, M.; Biraben, F.; Chen, T.-L.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A. J.; Diepold, M.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Franke, B.; Galtier, S.; Gouvea, A. L.; Götzfried, J.; Graf, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Hildebrandt, M.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kirch, K.; Knecht, A.; Kottmann, F.; Krauth, J. J.; Liu, Y.-W.; Machado, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nez, F.; Santos, J. P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Voss, A.; Weichelt, B.; Pohl, R.

    2016-03-01

    We review the status of the proton charge radius puzzle. Emphasis is given to the various experiments initiated to resolve the conflict between the muonic hydrogen results and the results from scattering and regular hydrogen spectroscopy.

  4. Formative Assessment Probes: Mountaintop Fossil: A Puzzling Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2015-01-01

    This column focuses on promoting learning through assessment. This month's issue describes using formative assessment probes to uncover several ways of thinking about the puzzling discovery of a marine fossil on top of a mountain.

  5. Role of Nitric Oxide in Glioblastoma Therapy: Another Step to Resolve the Terrible Puzzle ?

    PubMed Central

    Altieri, R.; Fontanella, M.; Agnoletti, A.; Panciani, P.P.; Spena, G.; Crobeddu, E.; Pilloni, G.; Tardivo, V.; Lanotte, M.; Zenga, F.; Ducati, A.; Garbossa, D.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme, the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor, remains incurable despite of the advent of modern surgical and medical treatments. This poor prognosis depends by the recurrence after surgery and intrinsic or acquired resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nitric oxide is a small molecule that plays a key roles in glioma pathophysiology. Many researches showing that NO is involved in induction of apoptosis, radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Therefore, NO role, if clarified, may improve the knowledge about this unsolved puzzle called GBM. PMID:26535188

  6. Stability of continuous-time quantum filters with measurement imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, H.; Pellegrini, C.; Rouchon, P.

    2014-07-01

    The fidelity between the state of a continuously observed quantum system and the state of its associated quantum filter, is shown to be always a submartingale. The observed system is assumed to be governed by a continuous-time Stochastic Master Equation (SME), driven simultaneously by Wiener and Poisson processes and that takes into account incompleteness and errors in measurements. This stability result is the continuous-time counterpart of a similar stability result already established for discrete-time quantum systems and where the measurement imperfections are modelled by a left stochastic matrix.

  7. Analysis of resonance-driving imperfections in the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Shoji, Y.; Danby, G.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, G.J.; Soukas, A.; van Asselt, W.; Whalen, C.

    1994-08-01

    At the design intensity of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} ppp, the space charge tune shift in the AGS Booster at injection has been estimated to be about 0.35. The beam tunes are therefore spread over many lower order resonance lines and the associated stopbands must be corrected in order to minimize the amplitude growth due to resonance excitation. This requires proper compensation of the resonance-driving harmonics which result from random magnetic field errors. The observation and correction of second and third order resonance stopbands in the AGS Booster is reviewed, and an analysis of magnetic field imperfections based on the required corrections is given.

  8. Heavy quarkonium: progress, puzzles, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, N; Heltsley, B K; Vogt, R; Bodwin, G T; Eichten, E; Frawley, A D; Meyer, A B; Mitchell, R E; Papdimitriou, V; Petreczky, P; Petrov, A A; Robbe, P; Vairo, A; Andronic, A; Arnaldi, R; Artoisenet, P; Bali, G; Bertolin, A; Bettoni, D; Brodzicka, J; Bruno, G E; Caldwell, A; Catmore, J; Chang, C -H; Chao, K -T; Chudakov, E; Cortese, P; Crochet, P; Drutskoy, A; Ellwanger, U; Faccioli, P; Gabareen Mokhtar, A; Garcia i Tormo, X; Hanhart, C; Harris, F A; Kaplan, D M; Klein, S R; Kowalski, H; Lansberg, J -P; Levichev, E; Lombardo, V; Loureno, C; Maltoni, F; Mocsy, A; Mussa, R; Navarra, F S; Negrini, M; Nielsen, M; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Peters, K; Polosa, A D; Qian, W; Qiu, J -W; Rong, G; Sanchis-Lozano, M A; Scomparin, E; Senger, P; Simon, F; Stracka, S; Sumino, Y; Voloshin, M; Weiss, C; Wohri, H K; Yuan, C -Z

    2011-02-01

    A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the $B$-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA, JLab, and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations. The plethora of newly-found quarkonium-like states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c\\bar{c}, b\\bar{b}, and b\\bar{c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.

  9. Heavy quarkonium: progress, puzzles, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Petreczky, P.; Brambilla, N.; Eidelman,S; B.K. Heltsley; Vogt, R.; Bodwiny, G.T.; Eichteny, E., et. al.

    2011-02-08

    A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the $B$-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations. The plethora of newly-found quarkonium-like states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c{bar c}, b{bar b}, and b{bar c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.

  10. Local associations and the barium puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Arumalla B. S.; Lambert, David L.

    2015-12-01

    We have observed high-dispersion echelle spectra of main-sequence stars in five nearby young associations - Argus, Carina-Near, Hercules-Lyra, Orion and Subgroup B4 - and derived abundances for elements ranging from Na to Eu. These are the first chemical abundance measurements for two of the five associations, while the remaining three associations are analysed more extensively in our study. Our results support the presence of chemical homogeneity among association members with a typical star-to-star abundance scatter of about 0.06 dex or less over many elements. The five associations show log ɛ(Li) consistent with their age and share a solar chemical composition for all elements with the exception of Ba. We find that all the heavy elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Sm and Eu) exhibit solar ratios, i.e. [X/Fe] ≃ 0, while Ba is overabundant by about 0.2-0.3 dex. The origin of the overabundance of Ba is a puzzle. Within the formulation of the s-process, it is difficult to create a higher Ba abundance without a similar increase in the s-process contributions to other heavy elements (La-Sm). Given that Ba is represented by strong lines of Ba II and La-Sm are represented by rather weak ionized lines, the suggestion, as previously made by other studies, is that the Ba abundance may be systematically overestimated by standard methods of abundance analysis perhaps because the upper reaches of the stellar atmospheres are poorly represented by standard model atmospheres. A novel attempt to analyse the Ba I line at 5535 Å gives a solar Ba abundance for stars with effective temperatures hotter than about 5800 K but increasingly subsolar Ba abundances for cooler stars with apparent Ba deficiencies of 0.5 dex at 5100 K. This trend with temperature may signal a serious non-local thermodynamical equilibrium effect on the Ba I line.

  11. The evolutionary consequences of alternative types of imperfect vaccines.

    PubMed

    Magori, Krisztian; Park, Andrew W

    2014-03-01

    The emergence and spread of mutant pathogens that evade the effects of prophylactic interventions, including vaccines, threatens our ability to control infectious diseases globally. Imperfect vaccines (e.g. those used against influenza), while not providing life-long immunity, confer protection by reducing a range of pathogen life-history characteristics; conversely, mutant pathogens can gain an advantage by restoring the same range of traits in vaccinated hosts. Using an SEIR model motivated by equine influenza, we investigate the evolutionary consequences of alternative types of imperfect vaccination, by comparing the spread rate of three types of mutant pathogens, in response to three types of vaccines. All mutant types spread faster in response to a transmission-blocking vaccine, relative to vaccines that reduce the proportion of exposed vaccinated individuals becoming infectious, and to vaccines that reduce the length of the infectious period; this difference increases with increasing vaccine efficacy. We interpret our results using the first published Price equation formulation for an SEIR model, and find that our main result is explained by the effects of vaccines on the equilibrium host distribution across epidemiological classes. In particular, the proportion of vaccinated infectious individuals among all exposed and infectious hosts, which is relatively higher in the transmission-blocking vaccine scenario, is important in explaining the faster spread of mutant strains in response to that vaccine. Our work illustrates the connection between epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics, and the need to incorporate both in order to explain and interpret findings of complicated infectious disease dynamics. PMID:23455568

  12. Efficient logistic regression designs under an imperfect population identifier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Paul S; Liu, Aiyi; Nansel, Tonja

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by actual study designs, this article considers efficient logistic regression designs where the population is identified with a binary test that is subject to diagnostic error. We consider the case where the imperfect test is obtained on all participants, while the gold standard test is measured on a small chosen subsample. Under maximum-likelihood estimation, we evaluate the optimal design in terms of sample selection as well as verification. We show that there may be substantial efficiency gains by choosing a small percentage of individuals who test negative on the imperfect test for inclusion in the sample (e.g., verifying 90% test-positive cases). We also show that a two-stage design may be a good practical alternative to a fixed design in some situations. Under optimal and nearly optimal designs, we compare maximum-likelihood and semi-parametric efficient estimators under correct and misspecified models with simulations. The methodology is illustrated with an analysis from a diabetes behavioral intervention trial.

  13. Three Modes of Hydrogeophysical Investigation: Puzzles, Mysteries, and Conundrums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    In an article in the New Yorker in 2007, Malcolm Gladwell discussed the distinction that national security expert Gregory Treverton has made between puzzles and mysteries. Specifically, puzzles are problems that we understand and that will eventually be solved when we amass enough information. (Think crossword puzzles.) Mysteries are problems for which we have the necessary information, but it is often overwhelmed by irrelevant or misleading input. To solve a mystery, we require improved analysis. (Think find-a-word.) Gladwell goes on to explain that, in the national security realm, the Cold War was a puzzle while the current national security condition is a mystery. I will discuss the past, current, and future trajectories of hydrogeophysics in terms of puzzles and mysteries. I will also add a third class of problem: conundrums - those for which we lack sufficient information about their structure to know how to solve them. A conundrum is a mystery with an unexpected twist. I hope to make the case that the future growth of hydrogeophysics lies in our ability to address this more challenging and more interesting class of problem.

  14. International Trade Network: Fractal Properties and Globalization Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpiarz, Mariusz; Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata

    2014-12-01

    Globalization is one of the central concepts of our age. The common perception of the process is that, due to declining communication and transport costs, distance becomes less and less important. However, the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade, which grows in time, indicates that the role of distance increases rather than decreases. This, in essence, captures the notion of the globalization puzzle. Here, we show that the fractality of the international trade system (ITS) provides a simple solution for the puzzle. We argue that the distance coefficient corresponds to the fractal dimension of ITS. We provide two independent methods, the box counting method and spatial choice model, which confirm this statement. Our results allow us to conclude that the previous approaches to solving the puzzle misinterpreted the meaning of the distance coefficient in the gravity model of trade.

  15. The Puzzle of Science; Making Sense of Incomplete Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorey, B. U.

    2015-12-01

    There are many topics within Earth science including evolution, historical geology, and climate change, which have gained the status of theory becuse they have overwhelming evidence, yet there is still fragmentary information which can frustrate a student from coming to solid conclusions. Using a jigsaw puzzle whose image has been hidden, and the pieces only given out sparingly, students go though the process of getting more information. How does one get more puzzle pieces and what is the interpretive process? Experience with this exercise demonstrates how students can sketch out an incredibly accurate conception of the "big picture", despite not having all the puzzle pieces. The goal of this talk is to give a complete tool kit to perform as a comprehensive lesson plan. Guiding questions and copies of lesson plans and materials are supplied for this exercise.

  16. Imperfect traveling chimera states induced by local synaptic gradient coupling.

    PubMed

    Bera, Bidesh K; Ghosh, Dibakar; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the occurrence of chimera patterns in a network of neuronal oscillators, which are coupled through local, synaptic gradient coupling. We discover a new chimera pattern, namely the imperfect traveling chimera state, where the incoherent traveling domain spreads into the coherent domain of the network. Remarkably, we also find that chimera states arise even for one-way local coupling, which is in contrast to the earlier belief that only nonlocal, global, or nearest-neighbor local coupling can give rise to chimera state; this find further relaxes the essential connectivity requirement of getting a chimera state. We choose a network of identical bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal oscillators, and we show that depending upon the relative strength of the synaptic and gradient coupling, several chimera patterns emerge. We map all the spatiotemporal behaviors in parameter space and identify the transitions among several chimera patterns, an in-phase synchronized state, and a global amplitude death state.

  17. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-04

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, R{sub QKD}. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  18. Imperfect traveling chimera states induced by local synaptic gradient coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the occurrence of chimera patterns in a network of neuronal oscillators, which are coupled through local, synaptic gradient coupling. We discover a new chimera pattern, namely the imperfect traveling chimera state, where the incoherent traveling domain spreads into the coherent domain of the network. Remarkably, we also find that chimera states arise even for one-way local coupling, which is in contrast to the earlier belief that only nonlocal, global, or nearest-neighbor local coupling can give rise to chimera state; this find further relaxes the essential connectivity requirement of getting a chimera state. We choose a network of identical bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal oscillators, and we show that depending upon the relative strength of the synaptic and gradient coupling, several chimera patterns emerge. We map all the spatiotemporal behaviors in parameter space and identify the transitions among several chimera patterns, an in-phase synchronized state, and a global amplitude death state.

  19. Generalized random sign and alert delay models for imperfect maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dijoux, Yann; Gaudoin, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers the modelling of the process of Corrective and condition-based Preventive Maintenance, for complex repairable systems. In order to take into account the dependency between both types of maintenance and the possibility of imperfect maintenance, Generalized Competing Risks models have been introduced in "Doyen and Gaudoin (J Appl Probab 43:825-839, 2006)". In this paper, we study two classes of these models, the Generalized Random Sign and Generalized Alert Delay models. A Generalized Competing Risks model can be built as a generalization of a particular Usual Competing Risks model, either by using a virtual age framework or not. The models properties are studied and their parameterizations are discussed. Finally, simulation results and an application to real data are presented.

  20. Long-distance quantum key distribution with imperfect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Piparo, Nicoló; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Quantum key distribution over probabilistic quantum repeaters is addressed. We compare, under practical assumptions, two such schemes in terms of their secure key generation rate per memory, RQKD. The two schemes under investigation are the one proposed by Duan et al. in [Nat. 414, 413 (2001)] and that of Sangouard et al. proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 76, 050301 (2007)]. We consider various sources of imperfections in the latter protocol, such as a nonzero double-photon probability for the source, dark count per pulse, channel loss and inefficiencies in photodetectors and memories, to find the rate for different nesting levels. We determine the maximum value of the double-photon probability beyond which it is not possible to share a secret key anymore. We find the crossover distance for up to three nesting levels. We finally compare the two protocols.

  1. How to Introduce the Imperfection Sensitivity Concept into Design 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac

    1998-01-01

    The previous review on stochastic buckling of structures was written by Amazigo in 1976. The present review summarizes some of the developments which took place in recent two decades. A brief overview is given of the effect on uncertainty in the initial geometric imperfections, elastic moduli, applied forces, and thickness variation. For the benefit of the thinking reader, the review has a critical nature. Present essay should be viewed as a direct continuation of our previous paper (1983) with the same title. In order not to repeat what was covered there, it appears instructive to read it although not necessarily prior to dwelling on this article. Accordingly the title is appended with the serial number. It is not promised that the third review will follow since the university science, both fortunately and unfortunately, stands on three things: relevance, interest, and grants.

  2. Imperfect traveling chimera states induced by local synaptic gradient coupling.

    PubMed

    Bera, Bidesh K; Ghosh, Dibakar; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report the occurrence of chimera patterns in a network of neuronal oscillators, which are coupled through local, synaptic gradient coupling. We discover a new chimera pattern, namely the imperfect traveling chimera state, where the incoherent traveling domain spreads into the coherent domain of the network. Remarkably, we also find that chimera states arise even for one-way local coupling, which is in contrast to the earlier belief that only nonlocal, global, or nearest-neighbor local coupling can give rise to chimera state; this find further relaxes the essential connectivity requirement of getting a chimera state. We choose a network of identical bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal oscillators, and we show that depending upon the relative strength of the synaptic and gradient coupling, several chimera patterns emerge. We map all the spatiotemporal behaviors in parameter space and identify the transitions among several chimera patterns, an in-phase synchronized state, and a global amplitude death state. PMID:27575131

  3. Generalized random sign and alert delay models for imperfect maintenance.

    PubMed

    Dijoux, Yann; Gaudoin, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    This paper considers the modelling of the process of Corrective and condition-based Preventive Maintenance, for complex repairable systems. In order to take into account the dependency between both types of maintenance and the possibility of imperfect maintenance, Generalized Competing Risks models have been introduced in "Doyen and Gaudoin (J Appl Probab 43:825-839, 2006)". In this paper, we study two classes of these models, the Generalized Random Sign and Generalized Alert Delay models. A Generalized Competing Risks model can be built as a generalization of a particular Usual Competing Risks model, either by using a virtual age framework or not. The models properties are studied and their parameterizations are discussed. Finally, simulation results and an application to real data are presented. PMID:23460491

  4. FEL gain calculation for imperfectly matched electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swent, R. L.; Berryman, K. W.

    1995-04-01

    We present here the details of an analytical small-signal gain calculation. The analysis builds on the basic one-dimensional analytical calculation by modeling the effects of finite electron beam size and imperfect matching of the electron beam to the wiggler. The calculation uses TRANSPORT [SLAC-91, Rev. 2 (1977)] parameters to describe the electron beam in order to easily take the output of beam transport calculations and use them as the input for FEL gain calculations. The model accepts an arbitrary TRANSPORT beam and includes the effects of energy spread, beam size, betatron oscillations, and focussing in the wiggle plane. The model has allowed us to calculate the range over which our FEL can be tuned by changing the electron energy alone (i.e., without changing any magnets).

  5. Cycles of cooperation and defection in imperfect learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galla, Tobias

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a model of learning the iterated prisoner's dilemma game. Players have the choice between three strategies: always defect (ALLD), always cooperate (ALLC) and tit-for-tat (TFT). The only strict Nash equilibrium in this situation is ALLD. When players learn to play this game convergence to the equilibrium is not guaranteed, for example we find cooperative behaviour if players discount observations in the distant past. When agents use small samples of observed moves to estimate their opponent's strategy the learning process is stochastic, and sustained oscillations between cooperation and defection can emerge. These cycles are similar to those found in stochastic evolutionary processes, but the origin of the noise sustaining the oscillations is different and lies in the imperfect sampling of the opponent's strategy. Based on a systematic expansion technique, we are able to predict the properties of these learning cycles, providing an analytical tool with which the outcome of more general stochastic adaptation processes can be characterised.

  6. Improving aquatic warbler population assessments by accounting for imperfect detection.

    PubMed

    Oppel, Steffen; Marczakiewicz, Piotr; Lachmann, Lars; Grzywaczewski, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring programs designed to assess changes in population size over time need to account for imperfect detection and provide estimates of precision around annual abundance estimates. Especially for species dependent on conservation management, robust monitoring is essential to evaluate the effectiveness of management. Many bird species of temperate grasslands depend on specific conservation management to maintain suitable breeding habitat. One such species is the Aquatic Warbler (Acrocephalus paludicola), which breeds in open fen mires in Central Europe. Aquatic Warbler populations have so far been assessed using a complete survey that aims to enumerate all singing males over a large area. Because this approach provides no estimate of precision and does not account for observation error, detecting moderate population changes is challenging. From 2011 to 2013 we trialled a new line transect sampling monitoring design in the Biebrza valley, Poland, to estimate abundance of singing male Aquatic Warblers. We surveyed Aquatic Warblers repeatedly along 50 randomly placed 1-km transects, and used binomial mixture models to estimate abundances per transect. The repeated line transect sampling required 150 observer days, and thus less effort than the traditional 'full count' approach (175 observer days). Aquatic Warbler abundance was highest at intermediate water levels, and detection probability varied between years and was influenced by vegetation height. A power analysis indicated that our line transect sampling design had a power of 68% to detect a 20% population change over 10 years, whereas raw count data had a 9% power to detect the same trend. Thus, by accounting for imperfect detection we increased the power to detect population changes. We recommend to adopt the repeated line transect sampling approach for monitoring Aquatic Warblers in Poland and in other important breeding areas to monitor changes in population size and the effects of habitat management.

  7. Correcting length-frequency distributions for imperfect detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breton, André R.; Hawkins, John A.; Winkelman, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Sampling gear selects for specific sizes of fish, which may bias length-frequency distributions that are commonly used to assess population size structure, recruitment patterns, growth, and survival. To properly correct for sampling biases caused by gear and other sources, length-frequency distributions need to be corrected for imperfect detection. We describe a method for adjusting length-frequency distributions when capture and recapture probabilities are a function of fish length, temporal variation, and capture history. The method is applied to a study involving the removal of Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu by boat electrofishing from a 38.6-km reach on the Yampa River, Colorado. Smallmouth Bass longer than 100 mm were marked and released alive from 2005 to 2010 on one or more electrofishing passes and removed on all other passes from the population. Using the Huggins mark–recapture model, we detected a significant effect of fish total length, previous capture history (behavior), year, pass, year×behavior, and year×pass on capture and recapture probabilities. We demonstrate how to partition the Huggins estimate of abundance into length frequencies to correct for these effects. Uncorrected length frequencies of fish removed from Little Yampa Canyon were negatively biased in every year by as much as 88% relative to mark–recapture estimates for the smallest length-class in our analysis (100–110 mm). Bias declined but remained high even for adult length-classes (≥200 mm). The pattern of bias across length-classes was variable across years. The percentage of unadjusted counts that were below the lower 95% confidence interval from our adjusted length-frequency estimates were 95, 89, 84, 78, 81, and 92% from 2005 to 2010, respectively. Length-frequency distributions are widely used in fisheries science and management. Our simple method for correcting length-frequency estimates for imperfect detection could be widely applied when mark–recapture data

  8. Finding optimal solutions to the twenty-four puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Korf, R.E.; Taylor, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    We have found the first optimal solutions to random instances of the Twenty-Four Puzzle, the 5 x 5 version of the well-known sliding-tile puzzles. Our new contribution to this problem is a more powerful admissible heuristic function. We present a general theory for the automatic discovery of such heuristics, which is based on considering multiple subgoals simultaneously. In addition, we apply a technique for pruning duplicate nodes in depth-first search using a finite-state machine. Finally, we observe that as heuristic search problems are scaled up, more powerful heuristic functions become both necessary and cost-effective.

  9. Heavy quarkonium : progress, puzzles, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, N.; Eidelman, S.; Heltsley, B. K.; Vogt, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Quarkonium Working Group; High Energy Physics; Technische Univ. Munchen; Budker Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Cornell Univ.; LLNL; Univ. of California at Davis

    2011-01-01

    A golden age for heavy-quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the B-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations at BESIII, the LHC, RHIC, FAIR, the Super Flavor and/or Tau-Charm factories, JLab, the ILC, and beyond. The list of newly found conventional states expanded to include h{sub c}(1P), {chi}{sub c2} (2P), B{sub c}{sup +}, and {eta}{sub b} (1S). In addition, the unexpected and still-fascinating X(3872) has been joined by more than a dozen other charmonium- and bottomonium-like 'XYZ' states that appear to lie outside the quark model. Many of these still need experimental confirmation. The plethora of new states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c{bar c}, b{bar b}, and b{bar c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. Lattice QCD has grown from a tool with computational possibilities to an

  10. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of pipe in a steel transmission line operating at or... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair...

  11. Dis How It Does Go: The Organisation of Imperfective Aspect in Urban Bahamian Creole English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Kendra Chanti Nicolette

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the Imperfective aspectual system of urban Bahamian Creole English (BahE), a mesolectal creole spoken in The Bahamas. Specifically, following Comrie (1976) I examine three Imperfective aspectual categories in the creole--continuous progressiveness (variable auxiliary "be" use with V- "ing" verbs and verbs in future…

  12. Effects of the Interfering Harmonics Caused by Imperfect Data Streams on BPSK and QPSK Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. M.; Yeh, H-G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most pernicious cause for spurious emission and performance degradation in space telemetry systems is the imperfect data stream at the input of the modulator. The imperfection of the data stream can be caused by impalance between -1s and +1s (unbalanced data) and/or by data asymmetry.

  13. Parametric Study on the Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of a parametric study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling and postbuckling response of three unstiffened thinwalled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells with different orthotropic and quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates are presented. The imperfections considered include initial geometric shell-wall midsurface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform applied end loads, and variations in the boundary conditions including the effects of elastic boundary conditions. A high-fidelity nonlinear shell analysis procedure that accurately accounts for the effects of these imperfections on the nonlinear responses and buckling loads of the shells is described. The analysis procedure includes a nonlinear static analysis that predicts stable response characteristics of the shells and a nonlinear transient analysis that predicts unstable response characteristics.

  14. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  15. Identifying sediment discontinuities and solving dating puzzles using monitoring and palaeolimnological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuhui; Sayer, Carl D.; Bennion, Helen; Maberly, Stephen C.; Yang, Handong; Battarbee, Richard W.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeolimnological studies should ideally be based upon continuous, undisturbed sediment sequences with reliable chronologies. However for some lake cores, these conditions are not met and palaeolimnologists are often faced with dating puzzles caused by sediment disturbances in the past. This study chooses Esthwaite Water from England to illustrate how to identify sedimentation discontinuities in lake cores and how chronologies can be established for imperfect cores by correlation of key sediment signatures in parallel core records and with long-term monitoring data (1945-2003). Replicated short cores (ESTH1, ESTH7, and ESTH8) were collected and subjected to loss-on-ignition, radiometric dating (210Pb, 137Cs, and 14C), particle size, trace metal, and fossil diatom analysis. Both a slumping and a hiatus event were detected in ESTH7 based on comparisons made between the cores and the long-term diatom data. Ordination analysis suggested that the slumped material in ESTH7 originated from sediment deposited around 1805-1880 AD. Further, it was inferred that the hiatus resulted in a loss of sediment deposited from 1870 to 1970 AD. Given the existence of three superior 14C dates in ESTH7, ESTH1 and ESTH7 were temporally correlated by multiple palaeolimnological proxies for age-depth model development. High variability in sedimentation rates was evident, but good agreement across the various palaeolimnological proxies indicated coherence in sediment processes within the coring area. Differences in sedimentation rates most likely resulted from the natural morphology of the lake basin. Our study suggests that caution is required in selecting suitable coring sites for palaeolimnological studies of small, relatively deep lakes and that proximity to steep slopes should be avoided wherever possible. Nevertheless, in some cases, comparisons between a range of contemporary and palaeolimnological records can be employed to diagnose sediment disturbances and establish a chronology.

  16. Teaching Proofs and Algorithms in Discrete Mathematics with Online Visual Logic Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigas, John; Hsin, Wen-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Visual logic puzzles provide a fertile environment for teaching multiple topics in discrete mathematics. Many puzzles can be solved by the repeated application of a small, finite set of strategies. Explicitly reasoning from a strategy to a new puzzle state illustrates theorems, proofs, and logic principles. These provide valuable, concrete…

  17. An Analysis of Instructor-Created Crossword Puzzles for Student Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisskirch, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This article evaluates the use of instructor-created crossword puzzles as a means of reviewing course material. Students completed one crossword puzzle in class to prepare for an exam, and then they had the opportunity to complete a second crossword puzzle outside of class to prepare for the second exam. Students generally rated the crossword…

  18. To Txt or Not to Txt: That's the Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Tiong-Thye; Hooper, Val

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the potential use of a mobile phone Short Message Service (SMS) crossword puzzle system to promote interaction through learning activities in a large classroom environment. While personal response systems (PRS) have been used in the classroom environment to foster interaction, it is not an ideal tool with respect to cost and…

  19. A Jigsaw Puzzle Approach To Learning History in Introductory Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Judith

    1999-01-01

    Believes that it may be daunting for some students to learn about the history of psychology. Describes a teaching strategy that uses jigsaw puzzles to teach about the historical terms of structuralism, functionalism, and gestalt psychology. Finds that students performed better on test questions related to these three concepts after using this…

  20. Unraveling "Braid": Puzzle Games and Storytelling in the Imperative Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Luke

    2012-01-01

    "Unraveling Braid" analyzes how unconventional, non-linear narrative fiction can help explain the ways in which video games signify. Specifically, this essay looks at the links between the semiotic features of Jonathan Blow's 2008 puzzle-platform video game Braid and similar elements in Georges Perec's 1978 novel "Life A User's Manual," as well as…

  1. Tangram Puzzles: Focus on Search Terms, Descriptors, and Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes the history of tangrams and their use as mathematical puzzles and explains how they can be adapted for library media specialists to use for developing subject headings on a particular topic. An example is given; and 28 resources on tangrams are listed, including books, nonprint materials, and addresses. (LRW)

  2. Crossword Puzzles as a Learning Tool for Vocabulary Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Since vocabulary is a key basis on which reading achievement depends, various vocabulary acquisition techniques have become pivotal. Among the many teaching approaches, traditional or otherwise, the use of crossword puzzles seems to offer potential and a solution for the problem of learning vocabulary. Method: This study was…

  3. How to predict community responses to perturbations in the face of imperfect knowledge and network complexity.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Helge; Rudolf, Lars; Gross, Thilo; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2013-12-22

    Recent attempts to predict the response of large food webs to perturbations have revealed that in larger systems increasingly precise information on the elements of the system is required. Thus, the effort needed for good predictions grows quickly with the system's complexity. Here, we show that not all elements need to be measured equally well, suggesting that a more efficient allocation of effort is possible. We develop an iterative technique for determining an efficient measurement strategy. In model food webs, we find that it is most important to precisely measure the mortality and predation rates of long-lived, generalist, top predators. Prioritizing the study of such species will make it easier to understand the response of complex food webs to perturbations. PMID:24197416

  4. How to predict community responses to perturbations in the face of imperfect knowledge and network complexity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aufderheide, Helge; Rudolf, Lars; Gross, Thilo; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent attempts to predict the response of large food webs to perturbations have revealed that in larger systems increasingly precise information on the elements of the system is required. Thus, the effort needed for good predictions grows quickly with the system's complexity. Here, we show that not all elements need to be measured equally well, suggesting that a more efficient allocation of effort is possible. We develop an iterative technique for determining an efficient measurement strategy. In model food webs, we find that it is most important to precisely measure the mortality and predation rates of long-lived, generalist, top predators. Prioritizing the study of such species will make it easier to understand the response of complex food webs to perturbations.

  5. Synthesis of Optimal and Imperfect Main Chain Smectic Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Harshad; Hedden, Ronald

    2007-03-01

    Liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) and elastomers (LCEs) are mesomorphic polymers that exhibit unique rheological characteristics. Smectic LCE, rubber-like materials which exhibit lamellar mesophases, exhibit high values of the mechanical loss factor (tan delta) over several decades of frequency. We are designing a model LCE system for study of the underlying molecular-level relaxation mechanisms responsible for this broad spectrum of relaxation times. We seek to distinguish to what extent the dynamic evolution of defects (e.g. focal conic defects and dislocations) contributes to the broad loss spectrum, as opposed to other ordinary processes such as relaxation of dangling and free chains. We are studying main chain, smectic LCPs and LCEs consisting of alternating flexible siloxane segments and mesogens. Elastomers are prepared by a three-monomer (A2 + B2 + A4) non-linear polycondensation. Synthetic methods are needed to prepare ``optimal'' and ``imperfect'' networks by introducing controlled amounts of dangling and free chains, and to control the phase behavior of the networks through mesogen chemical structure and crosslinking. Dynamic mechanical behavior of model networks, in conjunction with X-ray and neutron scattering studies, will distinguish the underlying physical processes responsible for the broad loss spectrum in smectic LCE.

  6. Modeling species occurrence dynamics with multiple states and imperfect detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Nichols, J.D.; Seamans, M.E.; Gutierrez, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent extensions of occupancy modeling have focused not only on the distribution of species over space, but also on additional state variables (e.g., reproducing or not, with or without disease organisms, relative abundance categories) that provide extra information about occupied sites. These biologist-driven extensions are characterized by ambiguity in both species presence and correct state classification, caused by imperfect detection. We first show the relationships between independently published approaches to the modeling of multistate occupancy. We then extend the pattern-based modeling to the case of sampling over multiple seasons or years in order to estimate state transition probabilities associated with system dynamics. The methodology and its potential for addressing relevant ecological questions are demonstrated using both maximum likelihood (occupancy and successful reproduction dynamics of California Spotted Owl) and Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation approaches (changes in relative abundance of green frogs in Maryland). Just as multistate capture-recapture modeling has revolutionized the study of individual marked animals, we believe that multistate occupancy modeling will dramatically increase our ability to address interesting questions about ecological processes underlying population-level dynamics. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Modeling species occurrence dynamics with multiple states and imperfect detection.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Darryl I; Nichols, James D; Seamans, Mark E; Gutiérrez, R J

    2009-03-01

    Recent extensions of occupancy modeling have focused not only on the distribution of species over space, but also on additional state variables (e.g., reproducing or not, with or without disease organisms, relative abundance categories) that provide extra information about occupied sites. These biologist-driven extensions are characterized by ambiguity in both species presence and correct state classification, caused by imperfect detection. We first show the relationships between independently published approaches to the modeling of multistate occupancy. We then extend the pattern-based modeling to the case of sampling over multiple seasons or years in order to estimate state transition probabilities associated with system dynamics. The methodology and its potential for addressing relevant ecological questions are demonstrated using both maximum likelihood (occupancy and successful reproduction dynamics of California Spotted Owl) and Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation approaches (changes in relative abundance of green frogs in Maryland). Just as multistate capture-recapture modeling has revolutionized the study of individual marked animals, we believe that multistate occupancy modeling will dramatically increase our ability to address interesting questions about ecological processes underlying population-level dynamics. PMID:19341151

  8. A comparative analysis of the evolution of imperfect mimicry.

    PubMed

    Penney, Heather D; Hassall, Christopher; Skevington, Jeffrey H; Abbott, Kevin R; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2012-03-21

    Although exceptional examples of adaptation are frequently celebrated, some outcomes of natural selection seem far from perfect. For example, many hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) are harmless (Batesian) mimics of stinging Hymenoptera. However, although some hoverfly species are considered excellent mimics, other species bear only a superficial resemblance to their models and it is unclear why this is so. To evaluate hypotheses that have been put forward to explain interspecific variation in the mimetic fidelity of Palearctic Syrphidae we use a comparative approach. We show that the most plausible explanation is that predators impose less selection for mimetic fidelity on smaller hoverfly species because they are less profitable prey items. In particular, our findings, in combination with previous results, allow us to reject several key hypotheses for imperfect mimicry: first, human ratings of mimetic fidelity are positively correlated with both morphometric measures and avian rankings, indicating that variation in mimetic fidelity is not simply an illusion based on human perception; second, no species of syrphid maps out in multidimensional space as being intermediate in appearance between several different hymenopteran model species, as the multimodel hypothesis requires; and third, we find no evidence for a negative relationship between mimetic fidelity and abundance, which calls into question the kin-selection hypothesis. By contrast, a strong positive relationship between mimetic fidelity and body size supports the relaxed-selection hypothesis, suggesting that reduced predation pressure on less profitable prey species limits the selection for mimetic perfection.

  9. OLD PUZZLE, NEW INSIGHTS: A LITHIUM-RICH GIANT QUIETLY BURNING HELIUM IN ITS CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, V. Silva; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Ruchti, G. R.; Hekker, S.; Cassisi, S.; Datta, A.; Jendreieck, A.; Mazumdar, A.; Mosser, B.; Stello, D.; Beck, P. G.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-03-20

    About 1% of giant stars have been shown to have large surface Li abundances, which is unexpected according to standard stellar evolution models. Several scenarios for lithium production have been proposed, but it is still unclear why these Li-rich giants exist. A missing piece in this puzzle is the knowledge of the exact stage of evolution of these stars. Using low- and-high-resolution spectroscopic observations, we have undertaken a survey of lithium-rich giants in the Kepler field. In this Letter, we report the finding of the first confirmed Li-rich core-helium-burning giant, as revealed by asteroseismic analysis. The evolutionary timescales constrained by its mass suggest that Li production most likely took place through non-canonical mixing at the RGB tip, possibly during the helium flash.

  10. Quantum state tomography with noninstantaneous measurements, imperfections, and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, P.; Campagne-Ibarcq, Ph.; Dotsenko, I.; Sarlette, A.; Huard, B.; Rouchon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tomography of a quantum state is usually based on a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) and on their experimental statistics. Among the available reconstructions, the maximum-likelihood (MaxLike) technique is an efficient one. We propose an extension of this technique when the measurement process cannot be simply described by an instantaneous POVM. Instead, the tomography relies on a set of quantum trajectories and their measurement records. This model includes the fact that, in practice, each measurement could be corrupted by imperfections and decoherence, and could also be associated with the record of continuous-time signals over a finite amount of time. The goal is then to retrieve the quantum state that was present at the start of this measurement process. The proposed extension relies on an explicit expression of the likelihood function via the effective matrices appearing in quantum smoothing and solutions of the adjoint quantum filter. It allows us to retrieve the initial quantum state as in standard MaxLike tomography, but where the traditional POVM operators are replaced by more general ones that depend on the measurement record of each trajectory. It also provides, aside from the MaxLike estimate of the quantum state, confidence intervals for any observable. Such confidence intervals are derived, as the MaxLike estimate, from an asymptotic expansion of multidimensional Laplace integrals appearing in Bayesian mean estimation. A validation is performed on two sets of experimental data: photon(s) trapped in a microwave cavity subject to quantum nondemolition measurements relying on Rydberg atoms, and heterodyne fluorescence measurements of a superconducting qubit.

  11. Monitoring programs need to take into account imperfect species detectability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kery, M.; Schmid, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Biodiversiry monitoring is important to identify biological units in need of conservation and to check the effectiveness of conservation actions. Programs generally monitor species richness and its changes (trend). Usually, no correction is made for imperfect species detectability. Instead, it is assumed that each species present has the same probability of being recorded and that there is no difference in this detectability across space and time, e.g. among observers and habitats. Consequently, species richness is determined by enumeration as the sum of species recorded. In Switzerland, the federal government has recently launched a comprehensive program that aims at detecting changes in biodiversity at all levels of biological integration. Birds are an important part of that program. Since 1999, 23 visits per breeding season are made to each of >250 1 km2 squares to map the territories of all detected breeding bird species. Here, we analyse data from three squares to illustrate the use of capture-recapture models in monitoring to obtain detectability-corrected estimates of species richness and trend. Species detectability averaged only 85%. Hence an estimated 15% of species present remained overlooked even after three visits. Within a square, changes in detectability for different years were of the same magnitude when surveys were conducted by the same observer as when they were by different observers. Estimates of trend were usually biased and community turnover was overestimated when based on enumeration. Here we use bird data as an illustration of methods. However, species detectability for any taxon is unlikely ever to be perfect or even constant across categories to be compared. Therefore, monitoring programs should correct for species detectability.

  12. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Hydrogen and the Puzzling Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf

    2016-09-01

    Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen atoms, μp, has revealed a proton root-mean-square (rms) charge radius rE that is an order of magnitude more accurate than the CODATA world average from elastic electron-proton scattering and precision spectroscopy of regular (electronic) hydrogen. Interestingly, though, the value of rE from μp is 4%, or 7 combined standard deviations smaller than the CODATA value of rE. This discrepancy has been coined "proton radius puzzle". We summarize the experiment and give a brief overview of the theory in muonic hydrogen. Finally we discuss some possible scenarios for the resolution of the "proton radius puzzle".

  13. Is there really a W →τ ν puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; London, David; Datta, Alakabha

    2016-05-01

    According to the Particle Data Group, the measurements of B (W+→τ+ντ) and B (W+→ℓ+νℓ)(ℓ=e , μ ) disagree with one another at the 2.3 σ level. In this paper, we search for a new-physics (NP) explanation of this W →τ ν puzzle. We consider two NP scenarios: (i) the W mixes with a W ' boson that couples preferentially to the third generation, (ii) τ L ,R and ντ L mix with isospin-triplet leptons. Unfortunately, once other experimental constraints are taken into account, neither scenario can explain the above experimental result. Our conclusion is that the W →τ ν puzzle is almost certainly just a statistical fluctuation.

  14. Validation of Italian rebus puzzles and compound remote associate problems.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Carola; Costantini, Giulio; Bricolo, Emanuela; Perugini, Marco; Beeman, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rebus puzzles and compound remote associate problems have been successfully used to study problem solving. These problems are physically compact, often can be solved within short time limits, and have unambiguous solutions, and English versions have been normed for solving rates and levels of difficulty. Many studies on problem solving with sudden insight have taken advantage of these features in paradigms that require many quick solutions (e.g., solution priming, visual hemifield presentations, electroencephalography, fMRI, and eyetracking). In order to promote this vein of research in Italy, as well, we created and tested Italian versions of both of these tests. The data collected across three studies yielded a pool of 88 rebus puzzles and 122 compound remote associate problems within a moderate range of difficulty. This article provides both sets of problems with their normative data, for use in future research. PMID:26148823

  15. Abortion in Vietnam: measurements, puzzles, and concerns.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, D

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes current knowledge about abortion in Vietnam, drawing upon government statistics, survey data, and fieldwork undertaken by the author in Vietnam throughout 1993 and part of 1994. The official total abortion rate in Vietnam in 1992 was about 2.5 per woman, the highest in Asia and worrisome for a country with a still-high total fertility rate of 3.7 children per woman. Vietnamese provinces exhibited substantial variation in both the rate of abortion and the type of procedures performed. Among the hypotheses explored to explain Vietnam's high rate of abortion are the borrowing of family planning strategies from other poor socialist states where abortion is common; current antinatal population policies that interact with a lack of contraceptive alternatives; and a rise in pregnancies among young and unmarried women in the wake of recent free-market reforms. Because family-size preferences are still declining, abortion rates may continue to increase unless the incidence of unwanted pregnancy can be reduced, a goal that Vietnamese population specialists are seeking to achieve.

  16. Abortion in Vietnam: measurements, puzzles, and concerns.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, D

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes current knowledge about abortion in Vietnam, drawing upon government statistics, survey data, and fieldwork undertaken by the author in Vietnam throughout 1993 and part of 1994. The official total abortion rate in Vietnam in 1992 was about 2.5 per woman, the highest in Asia and worrisome for a country with a still-high total fertility rate of 3.7 children per woman. Vietnamese provinces exhibited substantial variation in both the rate of abortion and the type of procedures performed. Among the hypotheses explored to explain Vietnam's high rate of abortion are the borrowing of family planning strategies from other poor socialist states where abortion is common; current antinatal population policies that interact with a lack of contraceptive alternatives; and a rise in pregnancies among young and unmarried women in the wake of recent free-market reforms. Because family-size preferences are still declining, abortion rates may continue to increase unless the incidence of unwanted pregnancy can be reduced, a goal that Vietnamese population specialists are seeking to achieve. PMID:7716799

  17. Particle Filter with State Permutations for Solving Image Jigsaw Puzzles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingwei; Adluru, Nagesh; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2016-01-01

    We deal with an image jigsaw puzzle problem, which is defined as reconstructing an image from a set of square and non-overlapping image patches. It is known that a general instance of this problem is NP-complete, and it is also challenging for humans, since in the considered setting the original image is not given. Recently a graphical model has been proposed to solve this and related problems. The target label probability function is then maximized using loopy belief propagation. We also formulate the problem as maximizing a label probability function and use exactly the same pairwise potentials. Our main contribution is a novel inference approach in the sampling framework of Particle Filter (PF). Usually in the PF framework it is assumed that the observations arrive sequentially, e.g., the observations are naturally ordered by their time stamps in the tracking scenario. Based on this assumption, the posterior density over the corresponding hidden states is estimated. In the jigsaw puzzle problem all observations (puzzle pieces) are given at once without any particular order. Therefore, we relax the assumption of having ordered observations and extend the PF framework to estimate the posterior density by exploring different orders of observations and selecting the most informative permutations of observations. This significantly broadens the scope of applications of the PF inference. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed inference framework significantly outperforms the loopy belief propagation in solving the image jigsaw puzzle problem. In particular, the extended PF inference triples the accuracy of the label assignment compared to that using loopy belief propagation.

  18. Understanding Your Vision: The “Imperfect Eye” | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Vision Understanding Your Vision: The “Imperfect Eye” Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table ... are different and so are the types of vision that we have. Understanding how some of us ...

  19. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Cylindrical Shells With Geometric and Material Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response and failure of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The shells considered in the study have six different orthotropic or quasi-isotropic shell-wall laminates and two different shell-radius-to-thickness ratios. The numerical results include the effects of geometric shell-wall mid-surface imperfections, shell-wall thickness variations, local shell-wall ply-gaps associated with the fabrication process, shell-end geometric imperfections, nonuniform end loads, and the effects of elastic boundary conditions. Selected cylinder parameter uncertainties were also considered. Results that illustrate the effects of imperfections and uncertainties on the nonlinear response characteristics, buckling loads and failure the shells are presented. In addition, a common failure analysis is used to predict material failures in the shells.

  20. Lorentz violation in the gravity sector: The t puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonder, Yuri

    2015-06-01

    Lorentz violation is a candidate quantum-gravity signal, and the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is a widely used parametrization of such a violation. In the gravitational SME sector, there is an elusive coefficient for which no effects have been found. This is known as the t puzzle and, to date, it has no compelling explanation. This paper analyzes whether there is a fundamental explanation for the t puzzle. To tackle this question, several approaches are followed. Mainly, redefinitions of the dynamical fields are studied, showing that other SME coefficients can be moved to nongravitational sectors. It is also found that the gravity SME sector can be consistently treated à la Palatini, and that, in the presence of spacetime boundaries, it is possible to correct its action to get the desired equations of motion. Moreover, through a reformulation as a Lanczos-type tensor, some problematic features of the t term, which should arise at the phenomenological level, are revealed. The most important conclusion of the paper is that there is no evidence of a fundamental explanation for the t puzzle, suggesting that it may be linked to the approximations taken at the phenomenological level.

  1. The Influence of Hollow Imperfections of Adhesive on Performances of Interface of RC Beams Strengthened with HFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yongchang; Li Lijuan; Deng Jun; Zhong Genquan

    2010-05-21

    The mechanical characteristics of the interface with hollow imperfections for reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with Carbon-Glass fiber sheet is discussed, which is a new hybrid strengthening method. By establishing the constitutive equations of different materials, three interfacial models including imperfection dimension, imperfection location and imperfection amount are simulated using nonlinear finite element method. The shear stress and normal stress of glue layer, the first principal stress of concrete at the end of the interface and the stress distributions of different strengthening modes are analyzed. The results show that the shear stress of glue layer is sensitive for imperfection dimension and significantly increases with the imperfection dimension. However, the first principal stress of the concrete at the end of the interface marginally decreases with the imperfection dimension.

  2. Three-dimensional piezoelasticity solution for piezolaminated angle-ply cylindrical shells featuring imperfect interfacial bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapuria, S.; Kumar, Amit

    2010-04-01

    The work presents an analytical three-dimensional solution for simply supported angle-ply piezoelectric (hybrid) laminated cylindrical shells in cylindrical bending with interlaminar bonding imperfections, in an electro-thermomechanical loading environment. The jumps in displacements, electric potential and temperature at the imperfect interfaces are modeled using linear spring-layer model. The solution includes the case when, besides at inner and outer surfaces, electric potentials are prescribed at layer interfaces also for effective actuation/sensing. The entities for each layer are expanded in Fourier series in circumferential coordinate to satisfy the boundary conditions at the simply supported ends. The resulting ordinary differential equations in thickness coordinate with variable coefficients are solved by the modified Frobenius method. Numerical results are presented for hybrid composite and sandwich shells with varying imperfection compliance. The effect of location of imperfect interface on the response is studied for cross-ply panels while the effect of ply angle on the sensitivity towards imperfection is studied for angle-ply panels. The effect of weak bonding at actuator/sensor interface on the actuation/sensing authority is investigated. The presented results would also help assessing 2D shell theories that incorporate interlaminar bonding imperfections.

  3. Ecological and Evolutionary Processes Drive the Origin and Maintenance of Imperfect Mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Joseph S.; Jahner, Joshua P.; Williams, Kevin A.; Forister, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the forces behind the evolution of imperfect mimicry remain poorly studied, recent hypotheses suggest that relaxed selection on small-bodied individuals leads to imperfect mimicry. While evolutionary history undoubtedly affects the development of imperfect mimicry, ecological community context has largely been ignored and may be an important driver of imperfect mimicry. Here we investigate how evolutionary and ecological contexts might influence mimetic fidelity in Müllerian and Batesian mimicry systems. In Batesian hoverfly systems we find that body size is not a strong predictor of mimetic fidelity. However, in Müllerian velvet ants we find a weak positive relationship between body size and mimetic fidelity when evolutionary context is controlled for and a much stronger relationship between community diversity and mimetic fidelity. These results suggest that reduced selection on small-bodied individuals may not be a major driver of the evolution of imperfect mimicry and that other factors, such as ecological community context, should be considered when studying the evolution of imperfect mimicry. PMID:23593490

  4. Ecological and evolutionary processes drive the origin and maintenance of imperfect mimicry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph S; Jahner, Joshua P; Williams, Kevin A; Forister, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    Although the forces behind the evolution of imperfect mimicry remain poorly studied, recent hypotheses suggest that relaxed selection on small-bodied individuals leads to imperfect mimicry. While evolutionary history undoubtedly affects the development of imperfect mimicry, ecological community context has largely been ignored and may be an important driver of imperfect mimicry. Here we investigate how evolutionary and ecological contexts might influence mimetic fidelity in Müllerian and Batesian mimicry systems. In Batesian hoverfly systems we find that body size is not a strong predictor of mimetic fidelity. However, in Müllerian velvet ants we find a weak positive relationship between body size and mimetic fidelity when evolutionary context is controlled for and a much stronger relationship between community diversity and mimetic fidelity. These results suggest that reduced selection on small-bodied individuals may not be a major driver of the evolution of imperfect mimicry and that other factors, such as ecological community context, should be considered when studying the evolution of imperfect mimicry.

  5. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B.; Bannerman, David M.; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  6. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  7. Nursing education: current themes, puzzles and paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    have been tremendously changed, with an emphasis on case-based instruction, integrating distance delivery technologies, and using simulation, drawing on best practices in the development of these approaches (Billings, et al., 2001; Issenberg, et al .2005; Jeffries, 2005). OCNE leaders obtained funding from Kaiser Permanente Northwest to begin the long, collaborative, consensus building process to transform clinical education. Evaluation has and will continue to be an integral part of this work, with an eye to adding to our collective knowledge of best practices in nursing education. We see evidence of similar efforts, mostly state or regional, in order to build on prior alliances, acknowledge geographic particularities, and respond to local needs in many other parts of the country, from Hawaii to New Jersey, Texas to Montana. The nursing shortage has been a primary catalyst. It has captured the interest of potential funders, individual donors, foundations to the Federal government. The keys are collaboration and a collective voice for nursing, a willingness to work through long-standing and divisive issues, and most importantly, a moral commitment to the populations we serve. PMID:17900063

  8. Nursing education: current themes, puzzles and paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    have been tremendously changed, with an emphasis on case-based instruction, integrating distance delivery technologies, and using simulation, drawing on best practices in the development of these approaches (Billings, et al., 2001; Issenberg, et al .2005; Jeffries, 2005). OCNE leaders obtained funding from Kaiser Permanente Northwest to begin the long, collaborative, consensus building process to transform clinical education. Evaluation has and will continue to be an integral part of this work, with an eye to adding to our collective knowledge of best practices in nursing education. We see evidence of similar efforts, mostly state or regional, in order to build on prior alliances, acknowledge geographic particularities, and respond to local needs in many other parts of the country, from Hawaii to New Jersey, Texas to Montana. The nursing shortage has been a primary catalyst. It has captured the interest of potential funders, individual donors, foundations to the Federal government. The keys are collaboration and a collective voice for nursing, a willingness to work through long-standing and divisive issues, and most importantly, a moral commitment to the populations we serve.

  9. Security issues of quantum cryptographic systems with imperfect detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenkov, Viacheslav

    The laws of quantum physics can be used to secure communications between two distant parties in a scheme called quantum key distribution (QKD), even against a technologically unlimited eavesdropper. While the theoretical security of QKD has been proved rigorously, current implementations of QKD are generally insecure. In particular, mathematical models of devices, such as detectors, do not accurately describe their real-life behaviour. Such seemingly insignificant discrepancies can compromise the security of the entire scheme, especially as novel detector technologies are being developed with little regard for potential vulnerabilities. In this thesis, we study how detector imperfections can impact the security of QKD and how to overcome such technological limitations. We first analyze the security of a high-speed QKD system with finite detector dead time tau. We show that the previously reported sifting approaches are not guaranteed to be secure in this regime. More specifically, Eve can induce a basis-dependent detection efficiency at the receiver's end. Modified key sifting schemes that are basis-independent, and thus secure in the presence of dead time and an active eavesdropper, are discussed and compared. It is shown that the maximum key generation rate is 1/(2tau) for passive basis selection, and 1/tau for active basis selection. The security analysis is also extended to the decoy state BB84 protocol. We then study a relatively new type of single-photon detector called the superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), and discover some unexpected behaviour. We report an afterpulsing effect present when the SNSPD is operated in the high bias current regime. In our standard set-up, the afterpulsing is most likely to occur at around 180 ns following a detection event, for both real counts and dark counts. We characterize the afterpulsing behaviour and speculate that it is not due to the SNSPD itself but rather the associated read-out circuit. We also

  10. The placebo puzzle: examining the discordant space between biomedical science and illness/healing.

    PubMed

    Pohlman, Shawn; Cibulka, Nancy J; Palmer, Janice L; Lorenz, Rebecca A; SmithBattle, Lee

    2013-03-01

    The placebo response presents an enigma to biomedical science: how can 'inert' or 'sham' procedures reduce symptoms and produce physiological changes that are comparable to prescribed treatments? In this study, we examine this puzzle by explicating the discordant space between the prevailing biomedical paradigm, which focuses on a technical understanding of diagnosis and treatment, and a broader understanding of illness and healing as relational and embodied. Although biomedical achievements are impressive, the knowledge resulting from this paradigm is limited by its ontological and epistemological assumptions. When the body and world are objectified, illness meanings, therapeutic relationships, and healing practices are dismissed or distorted. In spite of a robust critique of the tenets of biomedicine for guiding practice, the biomedical paradigm retains a tenacious hold on evidence-based medicine and nursing, downplaying our clinical understanding of the sentient body, patients' life-worlds, and illness and healing. In reality, skilled nurses rely on multiple forms of knowledge in providing high-quality care to particular patients. Clinically wise nurses integrate their experience and knowledge of patients' priorities, fears, and illness trajectories along with biomedical findings to make astute judgments and promote health and healing.

  11. Strategies and correlates of jigsaw puzzle and visuospatial performance by persons with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Brian N; Troseth, Georgene L; Hodapp, Robert M; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2008-09-01

    Some individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibit strengths in solving jigsaw puzzles. We compared visuospatial ability and jigsaw puzzle performance and strategies of 26 persons with Prader-Willi syndrome and 26 MA-matched typically developing controls. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome relied on piece shape. Those in the control group used a different, picture-focused strategy. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome performed better than did the control group on an achromatic interlocking puzzle, whereas scores on puzzles with pictures (interlocking or noninterlocking) did not differ. Visuospatial scores related to performance on all puzzles in the control group and on the noninterlocking puzzle in the Prader-Willi syndrome group. The most proficient jigsaw puzzlers with Prader-Willi syndrome tended to be older and have shape-based strategies. PMID:18702555

  12. Crossword Puzzles as a Tool to Enhance Learning About Anti-Ulcer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Launa M. J.; Macias-Moriarity, Lilia Z.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To design, implement, and evaluate the use of crossword puzzles as a low-stakes educational tool for enhancing learning about anti-ulcer agents. Design Crossword puzzles were created using a free Internet resource and administered to students during 3 consecutive lectures covering the pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of anti-ulcer agents. Student perceptions of the crossword puzzle were examined using an 8-item survey instrument. Assessment Over 90% of students indicated that crossword puzzles enhanced their learning, oriented them to the important topics, and served as good reviews of the lecture material. Conclusion Students perceived that crossword puzzles enhanced their learning of anti-ulcer agents. Use of crossword puzzles provides a simple and creative way to incorporate active learning into pharmacy classroom instruction. PMID:21088722

  13. The role of genetics in estrogen responses: a critical piece of an intricate puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma H.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Case, Laure K.; Lin, Chin-Yo; Korach, Kenneth S.; Teuscher, Cory

    2014-01-01

    The estrogens are female sex hormones that are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including reproductive development and function, wound healing, and bone growth. They are mainly known for their roles in reproductive tissues—specifically, 17β-estradiol (E2), the primary estrogen, which is secreted by the ovaries and induces cellular proliferation and growth of the uterus and mammary glands. In addition to the role of estrogens in promoting tissue growth and development during normal physiological states, they have a well-established role in determining susceptibility to disease, particularly cancer, in reproductive tissues. The responsiveness of various tissues to estrogen is genetically controlled, with marked quantitative variation observed across multiple species, including humans. This variation presents both researchers and clinicians with a veritable physiological puzzle, the pieces of which—many of them unknown—are complex and difficult to fit together. Although genetics is known to play a major role in determining sensitivity to estrogens, there are other factors, including parent of origin and the maternal environment, that are intimately linked to heritable phenotypes but do not represent genotype, per se. The objectives of this review article were to summarize the current knowledge of the role of genotype, and uterine and neonatal environments, in phenotypic variation in the response to estrogens; to discuss recent findings and the potential mechanisms involved; and to highlight exciting research opportunities for the future.—Wall, E. H., Hewitt, S. C., Case, L. K, Lin, C.-Y., Korach, K. S., Teuscher, C. The role of genetics in estrogen responses: a critical piece of an intricate puzzle. PMID:25212221

  14. Nonlinear analysis of wiggler-imperfections in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Yu, L.H.

    1995-12-31

    We present an analysis of the effect of wiggler imperfections in FELs using a variety of techniques. Our basic intention is to compare wiggler averaged nonlinear simulations to determine the effect of various approximations on the estimates of gain degradation due to wiggler imperfections. The fundamental assumption in the wiggler-averaged formulations is that the electrons are described by a random walk model, and an analytic representation of the orbits is made. This is fundamentally different from the approach taken for the non-wiggler-averaged formulation in which the wiggler imperfections are specified at the outset, and the orbits are integrated using a field model that is consistent with the Maxwell equations. It has been conjectured on the basis of prior studies using the non-wiggler-averaged formalism that electrons follow a {open_quotes}meander line{close_quotes} through the wiggler governed by the specific imperfections; hence, the electrons behave more as a ball-in-groove than as a random walk. This conjecture is tested by comparison of the wiggler-averaged and non-wiggler-averaged simulations. In addition, two different wiggler models are employed in the non-wiggler-averaged simulation: one based upon a parabolic pole face wiggler which is not curl and divergence free in the presence of wiggler imperfections, and a second model in which the divergence and z-component of the curl vanish identically. This will gauge the effect of inconsistencies in the wiggler model on the estimation of the effect of the imperfections. Preliminary results indicate that the inconsistency introduced by the non-vanishing curl and divergence result in an overestimation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on the orbit. The wiggler-averaged simulation is based upon the TDA code, and the non-wiggler-averaged simulation is a variant of the ARACHNE and WIGGLIN codes called MEDUSA developed to treat short-wavelength Gauss-Hermite modes.

  15. The problem of the imperfection of a world, itself created by a perfect god

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, André

    1992-02-01

    The two main arguments concern (1) the presence of an “enlightened complementarity” between philosophic (including scientific) and religious ( not including mystic) thought, and (2) the necessity to postulate a “threefold relationship” whenever one is to gain knowledge of any kind. They are both inspired by physics (from Bohr's “strict complementarity”, resp. from Newton's fundamental postulate). God's perfection resides at least in Symmetry in a generalized (not restrictively spatial) sense. Yet, as the argument goes, Space does not “exist” as a thing. Consequently, the Great Geometer (God) cannot dwell within a World He creates, and it is wrong to speak about His (God's) ‘existence’; for, existence is bound to the temporal, and Time is, together with the World, part of God's creation. Thus the only possible creation consists in God separating World and Time from Himself: This is the paradigm of Symmetry-breaking. Polytheistic mythologies all assume such and such imperfection of their deities; hence perfection is meaningful for monotheism only. A relationship of a threefold (‘trinitary’) nature must then obtain between God, World, and Time; this is analogous to Newton's postulate relating force, momentum and time. Just as the latter and its specific generalizations must be “found true” by verification, the said threefold relationship must also be found true: within philosophic thought more geometrico (in a generalized sense), within religious thought more “hymnometrico”. Yet the complementarity (called “enlightened”) arising between the two kinds of thought is of a higher nature than Bohr's “strict” complementarity. While it can be understood from the role assumed by language itself, it can however only be disposed of within mystic contemplation.

  16. Evaluating the predictive abilities of community occupancy models using AUC while accounting for imperfect detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zipkin, Elise F.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Fagan, William F.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict patterns of species' occurrences is fundamental to the successful management of animal communities. To determine optimal management strategies, it is essential to understand species-habitat relationships and how species habitat use is related to natural or human-induced environmental changes. Using five years of monitoring data in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Maryland, USA, we developed four multi-species hierarchical models for estimating amphibian wetland use that account for imperfect detection during sampling. The models were designed to determine which factors (wetland habitat characteristics, annual trend effects, spring/summer precipitation, and previous wetland occupancy) were most important for predicting future habitat use. We used the models to make predictions of species occurrences in sampled and unsampled wetlands and evaluated model projections using additional data. Using a Bayesian approach, we calculated a posterior distribution of receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) values, which allowed us to explicitly quantify the uncertainty in the quality of our predictions and to account for false negatives in the evaluation dataset. We found that wetland hydroperiod (the length of time that a wetland holds water) as well as the occurrence state in the prior year were generally the most important factors in determining occupancy. The model with only habitat covariates predicted species occurrences well; however, knowledge of wetland use in the previous year significantly improved predictive ability at the community level and for two of 12 species/species complexes. Our results demonstrate the utility of multi-species models for understanding which factors affect species habitat use of an entire community (of species) and provide an improved methodology using AUC that is helpful for quantifying the uncertainty in model predictions while explicitly accounting for

  17. Evaluating the predictive abilities of community occupancy models using AUC while accounting for imperfect detection.

    PubMed

    Zipkin, Elise F; Grant, Evan H Campbell; Fagan, William F

    2012-10-01

    The ability to accurately predict patterns of species' occurrences is fundamental to the successful management of animal communities. To determine optimal management strategies, it is essential to understand species-habitat relationships and how species habitat use is related to natural or human-induced environmental changes. Using five years of monitoring data in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Maryland, USA, we developed four multispecies hierarchical models for estimating amphibian wetland use that account for imperfect detection during sampling. The models were designed to determine which factors (wetland habitat characteristics, annual trend effects, spring/summer precipitation, and previous wetland occupancy) were most important for predicting future habitat use. We used the models to make predictions about species occurrences in sampled and unsampled wetlands and evaluated model projections using additional data. Using a Bayesian approach, we calculated a posterior distribution of receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) values, which allowed us to explicitly quantify the uncertainty in the quality of our predictions and to account for false negatives in the evaluation data set. We found that wetland hydroperiod (the length of time that a wetland holds water), as well as the occurrence state in the prior year, were generally the most important factors in determining occupancy. The model with habitat-only covariates predicted species occurrences well; however, knowledge of wetland use in the previous year significantly improved predictive ability at the community level and for two of 12 species/species complexes. Our results demonstrate the utility of multispecies models for understanding which factors affect species habitat use of an entire community (of species) and provide an improved methodology using AUC that is helpful for quantifying the uncertainty in model predictions while explicitly accounting for

  18. Scattering effects induced by imperfections on an acoustic black hole placed at a structural waveguide termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, V.; Pelat, A.; Gautier, F.

    2016-02-01

    The so-called "acoustic black hole" (ABH) effect is a passive vibration control technique based on the flexural waves properties in thin structure of varying thickness. A usual implementation consists in using a plate with tapered extremity with a power-law profile, covered with a thin damping layer. The inhomogeneity of the structure leads to a decrease of flexural wave speed and an increase of their amplitude, therefore resulting in an efficient energy dissipation if damping layer is placed where the thickness is minimal. The manufacture of an efficient extremity is difficult because of the small thickness, and often generates imperfections and tearing. Moreover, previous works suggest that multiple flexural modes are propagating across the width of the ABH tip. A model of an ABH multimodal waveguide taking into account an imperfect termination is developed. It shows that an elementary imperfection can affect the reflection coefficient of the extremity and reduce it. Scattering and propagation properties of the extremity are also studied. An incident mode excites several modes that are localised in the tapered region and local resonances explain the drops in the reflection coefficient. Experimental evidence of the influence of the imperfection on the reflection coefficient is provided. A key result of the paper is that manufacturing imperfections are not detrimental to the ABH effect.

  19. Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Compression-Loaded Composite Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the effects of imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled composite cylindrical shells are presented. Results that identify the individual and combined effects of traditional initial geometric shell-wall imperfections and non-traditional shell-wall thickness variations, shell-end geometric imperfections and variations in loads applied to the ends of the shells on the shell buckling response are included. In addition, results illustrating the effects of manufacturing flaws in the form of gaps between adjacent pieces of graphite-epoxy tape in some of the laminate plies are presented in detail. The shells have been analyzed with a nonlinear finite-element analysis code that accurately accounts for these effects on the buckling and nonlinear responses of the shells. The numerical results indicate that traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections can cause a significant reduction in the buckling load of a compression-loaded composite shell. Furthermore, the results indicate that the imperfections couple in a nonlinear manner. The numerical results correlate well with the experimental results. The nonlinear analysis results are also compared to the results from a traditional linear bifurcation buckling analysis. The results suggest that the nonlinear analysis procedure can be used for determining accurate, high-fidelity design knockdown factors for shell buckling and collapse. The results can also be used to determine the effects of manufacturing tolerances on the buckling response of composite shells.

  20. Production inventory policies for defective items with inspection errors, sales return, imperfect rework process and backorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggi, Chandra K.; Khanna, Aditi; Kishore, Aakanksha

    2016-03-01

    In order to sustain the challenges of maintaining good quality and perfect screening process, rework process becomes a rescue to compensate for the imperfections present in the production system. The proposed model attempts to explore the existing real-life situation with a more practical approach by incorporating the concept of imperfect rework as this occurs as an unavoidable problem to the firm due to irreparable disorders even in the reworked items. Hence, a production inventory model is formulated here to study the combined effect of imperfect quality items, faulty inspection process and imperfect rework process on the optimal production quantity and optimal backorder level. An analytical method is employed to maximize the expected total profit per unit time. Moreover, the results of several previous research articles namely Chiu et al (2006), Chiu et al (2005), Salameh and Hayek (2001), and classical EPQ with shortages are deduced as special cases. To demonstrate the applicability of the model, and to observe the effects of key parameters on the optimal replenishment policy, a numerical example along with a comprehensive sensitivity analysis has been presented. The pertinence of the model can be found in most of the manufacturing industries like textile, electronics, furniture, footwear, plastics etc. A production lot size model has been explored for defectives items with inspection errors and an imperfect rework process.

  1. Thermo-electro-mechanical postbuckling of piezoelectric FG-CNTRC beams with geometric imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Helong; Kitipornchai, Sritawat; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents thermo-electro-mechanical postbuckling analysis of geometrically imperfect functionally graded carbon nanotube-reinforced composite (FG-CNTRC) hybrid beams that are integrated with surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators. The material properties of FG-CNTRCs are assumed to be temperature-dependent and graded in the thickness direction. By using a generic imperfection function, various possible imperfections with different shapes and locations in the beam are considered. The theoretical formulations are based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory with von-Kármán nonlinearity. A differential quadrature approximation based iteration process is employed to obtain the postbuckling equilibrium path of piezoelectric FG-CNTRC hybrid beams under thermo-electro-mechanical loading. Parametric studies are conducted to examine the effect of geometric imperfection, distribution pattern and volume fraction of carbon nanotubes, temperature rise, actuator voltage, beam geometry and boundary conditions on the thermo-electro-mechanical postbuckling behaviour. The results show that the thermo-electro-mechanical postbuckling is considerably affected by the imperfection mode, half-wave number, location and amplitude, as well as the temperature rise and boundary conditions. The effect of applied actuator voltage is much less pronounced but tends to be relatively more noticeable as the slenderness ratio increases.

  2. Propagation of SH waves in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate: Effects of interfacial imperfection couplings and the related physical mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong-Xing; Li, Yong-Dong; Xiong, Tao; Guan, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The problem of dispersive SH wave in a piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plate that contains an imperfect interface is considered in the present work. An imperfection coupling model is adopted to describe the magnetic, electric and mechanical imperfections on the interface. A transcendental dispersion equation is derived and numerically solved to get the phase velocity. The validity of the numerical procedure is verified in a degenerated case. The effects of the coupled interfacial imperfections on the dispersion behavior of SH waves are discussed in detail and the related underlying physical mechanisms are explained.

  3. Explaining the proton radius puzzle with disformal scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the consequences of a disformal interaction between a massless scalar and matter particles in the context of atomic physics. We focus on the displacement of the atomic energy levels that it induces, and in particular the change in the Lamb shift between the 2s and 2p states. We find that the correction to the Lamb shift depends on the mass of the fermion orbiting around the nucleus, implying a larger effect for muonic atoms. Taking the cutoff scale describing the effective scalar field theory close to the QCD scale, we find that the disformal interaction can account for the observed difference in the proton radius of muonic versus electronic hydrogen. Explaining the proton radius puzzle is only possible when the scalar field is embedded in nonlinear theories which alleviate constraints from collider and stellar physics. Short distance properties of the Galileon where nonperturbative effects in vacuum are present ensure that unitarity is preserved in high-energy particle collisions. In matter, the chameleon mechanism alleviates the constraints on disformal interactions coming from the burning rates for stellar objects. We show how to combine these two properties in a single model which renders the proposed explanation of the proton radius puzzle viable.

  4. Tiny bubbles challenge giant turbines: Three Gorges puzzle.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengcai

    2015-10-01

    Since the birth of the first prototype of the modern reaction turbine, cavitation as conjectured by Euler in 1754 always presents as a challenge. Following his theory, the evolution of modern reaction (Francis and Kaplan) turbines has been completed by adding the final piece of the element 'draft-tube' that enables turbines to explore water energy at efficiencies of almost 100%. However, during the last two and a half centuries, with increasing unit capacity and specific speed, the problem of cavitation has been manifested and complicated by the draft-tube surges rather than being solved. Particularly, during the last 20 years, the fierce competition in the international market for extremely large turbines with compact design has encouraged the development of giant Francis turbines of 700-1000 MW. The first group (24 units) of such giant turbines of 700 MW each was installed in the Three Gorges project. Immediately after commission, a strange erosion phenomenon appeared on the guide vane of the machines that has puzzled professionals. From a multi-disciplinary analysis, this Three Gorges puzzle could reflect an unknown type of cavitation inception presumably triggered by turbulence production from the boundary-layer streak transitional process. It thus presents a fresh challenge not only to this old turbine industry, but also to the fundamental sciences. PMID:26442144

  5. Tiny bubbles challenge giant turbines: Three Gorges puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengcai

    2015-01-01

    Since the birth of the first prototype of the modern reaction turbine, cavitation as conjectured by Euler in 1754 always presents as a challenge. Following his theory, the evolution of modern reaction (Francis and Kaplan) turbines has been completed by adding the final piece of the element ‘draft-tube’ that enables turbines to explore water energy at efficiencies of almost 100%. However, during the last two and a half centuries, with increasing unit capacity and specific speed, the problem of cavitation has been manifested and complicated by the draft-tube surges rather than being solved. Particularly, during the last 20 years, the fierce competition in the international market for extremely large turbines with compact design has encouraged the development of giant Francis turbines of 700–1000 MW. The first group (24 units) of such giant turbines of 700 MW each was installed in the Three Gorges project. Immediately after commission, a strange erosion phenomenon appeared on the guide vane of the machines that has puzzled professionals. From a multi-disciplinary analysis, this Three Gorges puzzle could reflect an unknown type of cavitation inception presumably triggered by turbulence production from the boundary-layer streak transitional process. It thus presents a fresh challenge not only to this old turbine industry, but also to the fundamental sciences. PMID:26442144

  6. Yet another possible explanation of the solar-neutrino puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Walker, T.P.

    1986-04-01

    Mikheyev and Smirnov have shown that the interactions of neutrinos with matter can result in the conversion of electron neutrinos produced in the center of the sun to muon neutrinos. Bethe has exploited this and has pointed out that the solar-neutrino puzzle can be resolved if the mass difference squared of the two neutrinos is m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m /sub 1//sup 2/ approx. = 6 x 10/sup -5/ eV/sup 2/, and the mixing angle satisfies sin theta/sub v/ > 0.0065. We discuss a qualitatively different solution to the solar-neutrino puzzle which requires 1.0 x 10/sup -8/ < (m/sub 2//sup 2/ - m/sub 1//sup 2/) (sin/sup 2/ 2theta/sub v//cos 2theta/sub v/) < 6.1 x 10/sup -8/ eV/sup 2/. Our solutions result in a much smaller flux of neutrinos from the p - p process than predicted by standard solar models, while Bethe's solution results in a flux of neutrinos from the p - process that is about the same as standard solar models.

  7. Maximum likelihood estimation of label imperfections and its use in the identification of mislabeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of estimating label imperfections and the use of the estimation in identifying mislabeled patterns is presented. Expressions for the maximum likelihood estimates of classification errors and a priori probabilities are derived from the classification of a set of labeled patterns. Expressions also are given for the asymptotic variances of probability of correct classification and proportions. Simple models are developed for imperfections in the labels and for classification errors and are used in the formulation of a maximum likelihood estimation scheme. Schemes are presented for the identification of mislabeled patterns in terms of threshold on the discriminant functions for both two-class and multiclass cases. Expressions are derived for the probability that the imperfect label identification scheme will result in a wrong decision and are used in computing thresholds. The results of practical applications of these techniques in the processing of remotely sensed multispectral data are presented.

  8. Homogenized Finite Element Analysis on Effective Elastoplastic Mechanical Behaviors of Composite with Imperfect Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wu-Gui; Zhong, Ren-Zhi; Qin, Qing H.; Tong, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) model was developed for analyzing effective mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with imperfect interfaces. In the model, the fiber is assumed to be perfectly elastic until its tensile strength, and the ceramic material is modeled by an elasto-plastic Drucker-Prager constitutive law. The RVE model is then used to study the elastic properties and the tensile strength of composites with imperfect interfaces and validated through experiments. The imperfect interfaces between the fiber and the matrix are taken into account by introducing some cohesive contact surfaces. The influences of the interface on the elastic constants and the tensile strengths are examined through these interface models. PMID:25522170

  9. Algorithm for the evaluation of imperfections in auto bodywork using profiles from a retroreflective image.

    PubMed

    Barber, Ramon; Zwilling, Valerie; Salichs, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays the automobile industry is becoming more and more demanding as far as quality is concerned. Within the wide variety of processes in which this quality must be ensured, those regarding the squeezing of the auto bodywork are especially important due to the fact that the quality of the resulting product is tested manually by experts, leading to inaccuracies of all types. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed for the automated evaluation of the imperfections in the sheets of the bodywork after the squeezing process. The algorithm processes the profile signals from a retroreflective image and characterizes an imperfection. It is based on a convergence criterion that follows the line of the maximum gradient of the imperfection and gives its geometrical characteristics as a result: maximum gradient, length, width, and area.

  10. Stochastic analysis of the lateral-torsional buckling resistance of steel beams with random imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Zdeněk

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with the statistical analysis of resistance of a hot-rolled steel IPE beam under major axis bending. The lateral-torsional buckling stability problem of imperfect beam is described. The influence of bending moments and warping torsion on the ultimate limit state of the IPE beam with random imperfections is analyzed. The resistance is calculated by means of the close form solution. The initial geometrical imperfections of the beam are considered as the formatively identical to the first eigen mode of buckling. Changes of mean values of the resistance, of mean values of internal bending moments, of the variance of resistance and of the variance of internal bending moments were studied in dependence on the beam non-dimensional slenderness. The values of non-dimensional slenderness for which the statistical characteristics of internal moments associated with random resistance are maximal were determined.

  11. Crossword Puzzle Makes It Fun: Introduce Green Manufacturing in Wood Technology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John L.; Hague, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable, or "green," manufacturing and its practices are becoming more and more a part of today's industry, including wood product manufacturing. This article provides introductory information on green manufacturing in wood technology and a crossword puzzle based on green manufacturing terms. The authors use the puzzle at the college level to…

  12. An Alternative Evaluation: Online Puzzle as a Course-End Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genç, Zülfü; Aydemir, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of online puzzles in the instructional process has an effect on student achievement and learning retention. This study examined students ' perception and experiences on use of puzzle as an alternative evaluation tool. To achieve this aim, the following hypotheses were tested: using…

  13. Using the Tower of Hanoi Puzzle to Infuse Your Mathematics Classroom with Computer Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzocchi, Alison S.

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that logic puzzles, such as the well-known Tower of Hanoi puzzle, can be used to introduce computer science concepts to mathematics students of all ages. Mathematics teachers introduce their students to computer science concepts that are enacted spontaneously and subconsciously throughout the solution to the Tower of Hanoi…

  14. A Teacher's Ready-to-Use Packet of General Business Subjects Crossword Puzzles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacyk, Peter

    Eleven crossword puzzles, designed to give the student practice with the correct spelling and usage of those words needed to indicate his mastery of the concepts and understandings taught in business courses, are contained, with answer keys, in a teacher's packet. Any puzzle can be reproduced by ditto or by transparency for classroom use. There is…

  15. Studying the proton 'radius' puzzle with μp elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.

    2013-11-07

    The disagreement between the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen and from electronic measurements is called the proton radius puzzle. The resolution of the puzzle remains unclear and appears to require new experimental results. An experiment to measure muon-proton elastic scattering is presented here.

  16. Strategies and Correlates of Jigsaw Puzzle and Visuospatial Performance by Persons with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdine, Brian N.; Troseth, Georgene L.; Hodapp, Robert M.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Some individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibit strengths in solving jigsaw puzzles. We compared visuospatial ability and jigsaw puzzle performance and strategies of 26 persons with Prader-Willi syndrome and 26 MA-matched typically developing controls. Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome relied on piece shape. Those in the control group…

  17. The King and Prisoner Puzzle: A Way of Introducing the Components of Logical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roh, Kyeong Hah; Lee, Yong Hah; Tanner, Austin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide issues related to student understanding of logical components that arise when solving word problems. We designed a logic problem called the King and Prisoner Puzzle--a linguistically simple, yet logically challenging problem. In this paper, we describe various student solutions to the puzzle and discuss the…

  18. Two-Dimensional Parson's Puzzles: The Concept, Tools, and First Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihantola, Petri; Karavirta, Ville

    2011-01-01

    Parson's programming puzzles are a family of code construction assignments where lines of code are given, and the task is to form the solution by sorting and possibly selecting the correct code lines. We introduce a novel family of Parson's puzzles where the lines of code need to be sorted in two dimensions. The vertical dimension is used to order…

  19. Three- and Four-Year-Olds Completing 150-Piece Puzzles? Impossible!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Marlene

    1999-01-01

    Documented strategies preschool children used in completing complex, multipiece puzzles, which included focus on color, design, or shape. Found that all children could benefit and enjoy working on larger puzzles in the classroom and that the activity encouraged social literacy, completing a long-term project, scaffolding, and child development.…

  20. The performance of a piezoelectric cantilevered energy harvester with an imperfectly bonded interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. M.; Zou, L.

    2013-05-01

    A model based on linear electromechanical coupling theory is developed to analyze the performance of a piezoelectric cantilevered energy harvester (PCEH) with an imperfectly bonded interface. The PCEH is made of a piezoelectric layer bonded to a metallic layer and works in flexural mode. The imperfectly bonded interface is modeled by the shear-lag model. A sixth-order governing differential equation is derived and its analytical solution is obtained. The effect of the interfacial property on the dynamic behaviors and the electrical power output of the vibration-based PCEH is investigated. The presented results demonstrate that the interfacial property plays a critical role in the performance characteristics of the PCEHs.

  1. Synchronizing spatio-temporal chaos with imperfect models: A stochastic surface growth picture

    SciTech Connect

    Pazó, Diego López, Juan M.; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Gallego, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    We study the synchronization of two spatially extended dynamical systems where the models have imperfections. We show that the synchronization error across space can be visualized as a rough surface governed by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation with both upper and lower bounding walls corresponding to nonlinearities and model discrepancies, respectively. Two types of model imperfections are considered: parameter mismatch and unresolved fast scales, finding in both cases the same qualitative results. The consistency between different setups and systems indicates that the results are generic for a wide family of spatially extended systems.

  2. Postbuckling analysis of shear deformable composite flat panels taking into account geometrical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Stein, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of initial geometrical imperfections on the postbuckling response of flat laminated composite panels to uniaxial and biaxial compressive loading are investigated analytically. The derivation of the mathematical model on the basis of first-order transverse shear deformation theory is outlined, and numerical results for perfect and imperfect, single-layer and three-layer square plates with free-free, clamped-clamped, or free-clamped edges are presented in graphs and briefly characterized. The present approach is shown to be more accurate than analyses based on the classical Kirchhoff plate model.

  3. Controlled three-party communication using GHZ-like state and imperfect Bell-state measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Li; Xiu, Xiao-Ming; Gao, Ya-Jun; Ren, Yuan-Peng; Liu, Hui-Wei

    2011-02-01

    We present a controlled three-party communication protocol using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-like state and imperfect Bell-state measurement. Using the idea of controlled quantum teleportation, it can realize the secret information transmission between the legitimate participants under the control of the controller. It needs no unitary operation to recover the original state for the receiver, and it saves half of communication cost publicized by the sender. The order rearrangement of particles and data block transmission ensure the security of communication. With imperfect Bell-state measurement, it is tolerant of some noise effects and is feasible by using the present optical technique.

  4. A 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein.

  5. The puzzle-feeder as feeding enrichment for common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Rosa, C; Vitale, A; Puopolo, M

    2003-04-01

    The use of a puzzle-feeder, as feeding enrichment, was investigated in three families of captive common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). The study was carried out as a simultaneous choice test between two cages: one contained the puzzle-feeder, the other contained the usual food dishes, but otherwise both were arranged similarly. The monkeys were allowed to choose whether to feed from the usual dishes, or from the puzzle-feeder which required more effort. They were observed for two sessions in which they were differently motivated to feed. The enriched cage was always visited first, the marmosets managed to extract food from the puzzle-feeder, and spent more time eating from the puzzle-feeder when less hungry. These data contribute to a wider understanding on the use, and the effects, of feeding enrichments with different captive non-human primates. PMID:12689420

  6. An Empirical Evaluation of Puzzle-Based Learning as an Interest Approach for Teaching Introductory Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, K. E.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence describes an adaptation of puzzle-based learning to teaching an introductory computer programming course. Students from two offerings of the course--with and without the puzzle-based learning--were surveyed over a two-year period. Empirical results show that the synthesis of puzzle-based learning concepts with existing course…

  7. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  8. Resolution to the B{yields}{pi}K puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hsiangnan; Mishima, Satoshi; Sanda, A.I.

    2005-12-01

    We calculate the important next-to-leading-order contributions to the B{yields}{pi}K, {pi}{pi} decays from the vertex corrections, the quark loops, and the magnetic penguins in the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the latter two reduce the leading-order penguin amplitudes by about 10% and modify only the B{yields}{pi}K branching ratios. The main effect of the vertex corrections is to increase the small color-suppressed tree amplitude by a factor of 3, which then resolves the large difference between the direct CP asymmetries of the B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}K{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}} modes. The puzzle from the large B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} branching ratio still remains.

  9. Peelle's pertinent puzzle using the Monte Carlo technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Burr, Thomas; Pan, Feng

    2009-01-01

    We try to understand the long-standing problem of the Peelle's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) using the Monte Carlo technique. We allow the probability density functions to be any kind of form to assume the impact of distribution, and obtain the least-squares solution directly from numerical simulations. We found that the standard least squares method gives the correct answer if a weighting function is properly provided. Results from numerical simulations show that the correct answer of PPP is 1.1 {+-} 0.25 if the common error is multiplicative. The thought-provoking answer of 0.88 is also correct, if the common error is additive, and if the error is proportional to the measured values. The least squares method correctly gives us the most probable case, where the additive component has a negative value. Finally, the standard method fails for PPP due to a distorted (non Gaussian) joint distribution.

  10. A Jigsaw Puzzle Layer Cake of Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaogang; Fox, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE; http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu) is a European Union (EU) directive that aims to provide a legal framework to share environmental spatial data among public sector organizations across Europe and to facilitate public access to data. To meet these goals, INSPIRE's organization is analogous to a layer cake in which each layer is composed of interlocking pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The metaphor, although mixed, is apt (see additional supporting information in the online version of this article), and as researchers outside the program, we offer our perspective on how INSPIRE may address challenges raised by the variety of data themes and the wide coverage of collaborators.

  11. The puzzling reliability of the Force Concept Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Rosenfield, Steven; Dedic, Helena; Dahan, Ariel; Reshef, Orad

    2011-09-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has influenced the development of many research-based pedagogies. However, no data exists on the FCI's internal consistency or test-retest reliability. The FCI was administered twice to one hundred students during the first week of classes in an electricity and magnetism course with no review of mechanics between test administrations. High Kuder-Richardson reliability coefficient values, which estimate the average correlation of scores obtained on all possible halves of the test, suggest strong internal consistency. However, 31% of the responses changed from test to retest, suggesting weak reliability for individual questions. A chi-square analysis shows that change in responses was neither consistent nor completely random. The puzzling conclusion is that although individual FCI responses are not reliable, the FCI total score is highly reliable.

  12. A cellular automaton implementation of a quantum battle of the sexes game with imperfect information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a spatial quantum formulation of the iterated battle of the sexes game with imperfect information is studied in this work. The game is played with variable entangling in a cellular automata manner, i.e. with local and synchronous interaction. The effect of spatial structure is assessed in fair and unfair scenarios.

  13. Let Cinderella and Luke Skywalker Help You Teach the Passe Compose and Imperfect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Robert M.

    Instructional materials for the passe compose and imperfect tenses in French use the technique of presenting familiar stories in the foreign language, written in the present tense, which students must place in the past by changing verb forms. The objective is to avoid the disadvantages of simply translating verb tenses and to allow the student to…

  14. Security analysis on some experimental quantum key distribution systems with imperfect optical and electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lin-Mei; Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Li, Chun-Yan

    2014-10-01

    In general, quantum key distribution (QKD) has been proved unconditionally secure for perfect devices due to quantum uncertainty principle, quantum noncloning theorem and quantum nondividing principle which means that a quantum cannot be divided further. However, the practical optical and electrical devices used in the system are imperfect, which can be exploited by the eavesdropper to partially or totally spy the secret key between the legitimate parties. In this article, we first briefly review the recent work on quantum hacking on some experimental QKD systems with respect to imperfect devices carried out internationally, then we will present our recent hacking works in details, including passive faraday mirror attack, partially random phase attack, wavelength-selected photon-number-splitting attack, frequency shift attack, and single-photon-detector attack. Those quantum attack reminds people to improve the security existed in practical QKD systems due to imperfect devices by simply adding countermeasure or adopting a totally different protocol such as measurement-device independent protocol to avoid quantum hacking on the imperfection of measurement devices [Lo, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2012, 108: 130503].

  15. Intrinsic hierarchical structural imperfections in a natural ceramic of bivalve shell with distinctly graded properties

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Da; Liu, Zengqian; Zhang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Zhefeng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive investigation on the structure of natural biological materials, insufficient attention has been paid to the structural imperfections by which the mechanical properties of synthetic materials are dominated. In this study, the structure of bivalve Saxidomus purpuratus shell has been systematically characterized quantitatively on multiple length scales from millimeter to sub-nanometer. It is revealed that hierarchical imperfections are intrinsically involved in the crossed-lamellar structure of the shell despite its periodically packed platelets. In particular, various favorable characters which are always pursued in synthetic materials, e.g. nanotwins and low-angle misorientations, have been incorporated herein. The possible contributions of these imperfections to mechanical properties are further discussed. It is suggested that the imperfections may serve as structural adaptations, rather than detrimental defects in the real sense, to help improve the mechanical properties of natural biological materials. This study may aid in understanding the optimizing strategies of structure and properties designed by nature, and accordingly, provide inspiration for the design of synthetic materials. PMID:26198844

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of initially imperfect functionally graded circular cylindrical shell under complex loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. Z.; Hao, Y. X.; Zhang, W.; Chen, J.; Li, S. B.

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear vibration of a simply supported FGM cylindrical shell with small initial geometric imperfection under complex loads is studied. The effects of radial harmonic excitation, compressive in-plane force combined with supersonic aerodynamic and thermal loads are considered. The small initial geometric imperfection of the cylindrical shell is characterized in the form of the sine-type trigonometric functions. The effective material properties of this FGM cylindrical shell are graded in the radial direction according to a simple power law in terms of the volume fractions. Based on Reddy's third-order shear deformation theory, von Karman-type nonlinear kinematics and Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear partial differential equation that controls the shell dynamics is derived. Both axial symmetric and driven modes of the cylindrical shell deflection pattern are included. Furthermore, the equations of motion can be reduced into a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by applying Galerkin's method. In the study of the nonlinear dynamics responses of small initial geometric imperfect FGM cylindrical shell under complex loads, the 4th order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain time history, phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Poincare maps with different parameters. The effects of external loads, geometric imperfections and volume fractions on the nonlinear dynamics of the system are discussed.

  17. On Crosslinguistic Variations in Imperfective Aspect: The Case of L2 Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, EunHee; Kim, Hae-Young

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the acquisition of Korean imperfective markers, the progressive "-ko iss-" and the resultative "-a iss-," with a view to understanding how tense/aspect morphology expands beyond prototype associations with inherent aspects of the verbs. We hypothesized that "-a iss-" will develop later than "-ko iss-," but that the…

  18. Improving Prediction Skill of Imperfect Turbulent Models Through Statistical Response and Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di

    2016-02-01

    Turbulent dynamical systems with a large phase space and a high degree of instabilities are ubiquitous in climate science and engineering applications. Statistical uncertainty quantification (UQ) to the response to the change in forcing or uncertain initial data in such complex turbulent systems requires the use of imperfect models due to the lack of both physical understanding and the overwhelming computational demands of Monte Carlo simulation with a large-dimensional phase space. Thus, the systematic development of reduced low-order imperfect statistical models for UQ in turbulent dynamical systems is a grand challenge. This paper applies a recent mathematical strategy for calibrating imperfect models in a training phase and accurately predicting the response by combining information theory and linear statistical response theory in a systematic fashion. A systematic hierarchy of simple statistical imperfect closure schemes for UQ for these problems is designed and tested which are built through new local and global statistical energy conservation principles combined with statistical equilibrium fidelity. The forty mode Lorenz 96 (L-96) model which mimics forced baroclinic turbulence is utilized as a test bed for the calibration and predicting phases for the hierarchy of computationally cheap imperfect closure models both in the full phase space and in a reduced three-dimensional subspace containing the most energetic modes. In all of phase spaces, the nonlinear response of the true model is captured accurately for the mean and variance by the systematic closure model, while alternative methods based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem alone are much less accurate. For reduced-order model for UQ in the three-dimensional subspace for L-96, the systematic low-order imperfect closure models coupled with the training strategy provide the highest predictive skill over other existing methods for general forced response yet have simple design principles based on a

  19. Investigation on the Geometric Imperfections driven Local Buckling Onset in Composite Conical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pasqua, Maria Francesca; Khakimova, Regina; Castro, Saullo G. P.; Arbelo, Mariano A.; Riccio, Aniello; Raimondo, Antonio; Degenhardt, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Buckling is a critical failure phenomenon for structures, and represents a threat for thin shells subjected to compressive forces. The global buckling load, for a conical structure, depends on the geometry and material properties of the shell, on the stacking sequence, on the type of applied load and on the initial geometric imperfections. Geometric imperfections, occurring inevitably during manufacturing and assembly of thin-walled composite structures, produce a reduction in the carrying load capability with respect to the design value. This is the reason why investigating these defects is of major concern in order to avoid over-conservative design structures. In this paper, the buckling behavior a conical structure with 45° semi-vertical angle is numerically investigated. The initial imperfections are taken into account by using different strategies. At first, the Single Perturbation Load Approach (SPLA), which accounts for defects in the form of a lateral load, normal to the surface, has been adopted. Then, the actual measured defects have been applied to the structure by using the Real Measured Mid-Surface Imperfections (MSI) approach. Investigations on cylindrical shells using the first strategy have already shown the occurrence of a particular phenomenon called "local snap-through", which represents a preliminary loss of stiffness. In order to better understand this phenomenon for conical shells, both the aforementioned techniques have been used to provide an exhaustive overview of the imperfections sensitiveness in conical composite shells. This study is related to part of the work performed in the frame of the European Union (EU) project DESICOS.

  20. Beyond Knowledge: Exploring Why Some Teachers Are More Thoughtfully Adaptive than Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbanks, Colleen M.; Duffy, Gerald G.; Faircloth, Beverly S.; He, Ye; Levin, Barbara; Rohr, Jean; Stein, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    As teacher educators, we have observed that knowledge alone does not lead to the kinds of thoughtful teaching we strive for. Puzzled by differences in the teaching practices of teacher candidates having similar professional knowledge, we explore what might account for these differences. We address what is necessary, beyond traditional forms of…

  1. The psychology of coordination and common knowledge.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kyle A; DeScioli, Peter; Haque, Omar Sultan; Pinker, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Research on human cooperation has concentrated on the puzzle of altruism, in which 1 actor incurs a cost to benefit another, and the psychology of reciprocity, which evolved to solve this problem. We examine the complementary puzzle of mutualism, in which actors can benefit each other simultaneously, and the psychology of coordination, which ensures such benefits. Coordination is facilitated by common knowledge: the recursive belief state in which A knows X, B knows X, A knows that B knows X, B knows that A knows X, ad infinitum. We test whether people are sensitive to common knowledge when deciding whether to engage in risky coordination. Participants decided between working alone for a certain profit and working together for a potentially higher profit that they would receive only if their partner made the same choice. Results showed that more participants attempted risky coordination when they and their prospective partner had common knowledge of the payoffs (broadcast over a loudspeaker) than when they had only shared knowledge (conveyed to both by a messenger) or private knowledge (revealed to each partner separately). These results support the hypothesis that people represent common knowledge as a distinct cognitive category that licenses them to coordinate with others for mutual gain. We discuss how this hypothesis can provide a unified explanation for diverse phenomena in human social life, including recursive mentalizing, performative speech acts, public protests, hypocrisy, and self-conscious emotional expressions.

  2. Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia: A Puzzling and Painful Condition Past Issues / Spring ... or internal organs. Wise Choices: Feeling Better with Fibromyalgia Get enough sleep. Getting the right kind of ...

  3. Reading, Writing, and Language: Young Children Solving the Written Language Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    1982-01-01

    Reviews literature defining the characteristics of the complex puzzle children encounter moving from oral language to print. Illustrates that, by reading their own writing, children discover the precise connection between reading, writing, and language. (HTH)

  4. Propagation of shear horizontal surface waves in a layered piezoelectric half-space with an imperfect interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxi; Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Baolin

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the dispersive behavior of shear horizontal (SH) surface waves propagating in a layered structure consisting of a piezoelectric layer and an elastic half-space, in which the top and bottom of the layer are electrically shorted. The interface between the layer and the half-space is assumed to be imperfect bonding. The degree of imperfection of the interface is described by the so-called shear-lag model. The dispersion equations are expressed in an explicit closed form. The phase velocities are calculated to show the influences of the interfacial imperfection and the material properties of piezoelectric layers on the dispersive characteristics. PMID:20679017

  5. A Play on Words: Using Cognitive Computing as a Basis for AI Solvers in Word Puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzini, Thomas; Ellis, Simon; Hendler, James

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we offer a model, drawing inspiration from human cognition and based upon the pipeline developed for IBM's Watson, which solves clues in a type of word puzzle called syllacrostics. We briefly discuss its situation with respect to the greater field of artificial general intelligence (AGI) and how this process and model might be applied to other types of word puzzles. We present an overview of a system that has been developed to solve syllacrostics.

  6. A (15)N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein. PMID:26037134

  7. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage. PMID:26698068

  8. EPQ model with learning consideration, imperfect production and partial backlogging in fuzzy random environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar Kumar, Ravi; Goswami, A.

    2015-06-01

    The article scrutinises the learning effect of the unit production time on optimal lot size for the uncertain and imprecise imperfect production process, wherein shortages are permissible and partially backlogged. Contextually, we contemplate the fuzzy chance of production process shifting from an 'in-control' state to an 'out-of-control' state and re-work facility of imperfect quality of produced items. The elapsed time until the process shifts is considered as a fuzzy random variable, and consequently, fuzzy random total cost per unit time is derived. Fuzzy expectation and signed distance method are used to transform the fuzzy random cost function into an equivalent crisp function. The results are illustrated with the help of numerical example. Finally, sensitivity analysis of the optimal solution with respect to major parameters is carried out.

  9. Hyperon puzzle of neutron stars with Skyrme force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho; Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    We consider the so-called hyperon puzzle of neutron star (NS). We employ Skyrme force models for the description of in-medium nucleon-nucleon (NN), nucleon-Lambda hyperon (NΛ) and Lambda-Lambda (ΛΛ) interactions. A phenomenological finite-range force (FRF) for the ΛΛ interaction is considered as well. Equation of state (EoS) of NS matter is obtained in the framework of density functional theory, and Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations are solved to obtain the mass-radius relations of NSs. It has been generally known that the existence of hyperons in the NS matter is not well supported by the recent discovery of large-mass NSs (M ≃ 2M⊙) since hyperons make the EoS softer than the one without them. For the selected interaction models, NΛ interactions reduce the maximum mass of NS by about 30%, while ΛΛ interactions can give about 10% enhancement. Consequently, we find that some Skyrme force models predict the maximum mass of NS consistent with the observation of 2M⊙ NSs, and at the same time satisfy observationally constrained mass-radius relations.

  10. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  11. The puzzling origin of the Martian Northern Lowlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, F.; Carrozzo, G.; Carli, C.; Geminale, A.; Bellucci, G.

    Surface studies of the northern lowlands of Mars have shown that this region has undergone a complex history including volcanism, sedimentary deposition and secondary modification by climate change. Despite these analyses, the origin and the evolution of this region are still debated. No clear and definitive evidences have been found so far to conclude whether these plains were formed by a giant impact, were once covered by an ocean or were filled by a large quantity of lavas. In the visible and infrared spectral range, the northern lowlands differ from southern terrains in the NIR negative slope while they exhibit VNIR spectra similar to the southern pyroxene-rich areas (Carrozzo et al., 2012). These observations, combined with both recent detection of mafic minerals at higher spatial resolution by CRISM (Salvatore et al., 2010) and recent results of Horgan and Bell (2012), supports that their mineralogy is linked to weathered basalts with a glassy component. In addition to this, the spectral similarity of Acidalia area with the northern circumpolar sand dunes, apart from the hydration features, suggests that the weathering processes that took place there could be related to past glacial activity, in agreement with superficial morphology showing glacial structures. Aim of this work is to combine the OMEGA mineralogical maps with morphological features (Tanaka et al., 2011) and investigate possible terrestrial analogues in order to give some constrains on the composition and origin of these puzzling Martian terrains.

  12. The Puzzling Case of Hyperexcitability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong Seok; Simon, Neil G.; Menon, Parvathi; Vucic, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The development of hyperexcitability in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a well-known phenomenon. Despite controversy as to the underlying mechanisms, cortical hyperexcitability appears to be closely related to the interplay between excitatory corticomotoneurons and inhibitory interneurons. Hyperexcitability is not a static phenomenon but rather shows a pattern of progression in a spatiotemporal aspect. Cortical hyperexcitability may serve as a trigger to the development of anterior horn cell degeneration through a 'dying forward' process. Hyperexcitability appears to develop during the early disease stages and gradually disappears in the advanced stages of the disease, linked to the destruction of corticomotorneuronal pathways. As such, a more precise interpretation of these unique processes may provide new insight regarding the pathophysiology of ALS and its clinical features. Recently developed technologies such as threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation and automated nerve excitability tests have provided some clues about underlying pathophysiological processes linked to hyperexcitability. Additionally, these novel techniques have enabled clinicians to use the specific finding of hyperexcitability as a useful diagnostic biomarker, enabling clarification of various ALS-mimic syndromes, and the prediction of disease development in pre-symptomatic carriers of familial ALS. In terms of nerve excitability tests for peripheral nerves, an increase in persistent Na+ conductances has been identified as a major determinant of peripheral hyperexcitability in ALS, inversely correlated with the survival in ALS. As such, the present Review will focus primarily on the puzzling theory of hyperexcitability in ALS and summarize clinical and pathophysiological implications for current and future ALS research. PMID:23626643

  13. Nonlinear vibrations and imperfection sensitivity of a cylindrical shell containing axial fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Prado, Z.; Gonçalves, P. B.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    The high imperfection sensitivity of cylindrical shells under static compressive axial loads is a well-known phenomenon in structural stability. On the other hand, less is known of the influence of imperfections on the nonlinear vibrations of these shells under harmonic axial loads. The aim of this work is to study the simultaneous influence of geometric imperfections and an axial fluid flow on the nonlinear vibrations and instabilities of simply supported circular cylindrical shells under axial load. The fluid is assumed to be non-viscous and incompressible and the flow to be isentropic and irrotational. The behavior of the thin-walled shell is modeled by Donnell's nonlinear shallow-shell equations. It is subjected to a static uniform compressive axial pre-load plus a harmonic axial load. A low-dimensional modal expansion, which satisfies the relevant boundary and continuity conditions, and takes into account all relevant nonlinear modal interactions observed in the past in the nonlinear vibrations of cylindrical shells with and without flow is used together with the Galerkin method to derive a set of eight coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion which are, in turn, solved by the Runge-Kutta method. The shell is considered to be initially at rest, in a position corresponding to a pre-buckling configuration. Then, a harmonic excitation is applied and conditions for parametric instability and dynamic snap-through are sought. The results clarify the marked influence of geometric imperfections and fluid flow on the dynamic stability boundaries, bifurcations and basins of attraction.

  14. Sensitivity of buckling loads of anisotropic shells of revolution to geometric imperfections and design changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1989-01-01

    Buckling load sensitivity calculations in the shell-of-revolution program FASOR are discussed. This development is based on Koiter's initial postbuckling theory, which has been generalized to include the effect of stiffness changes, as well as geometric imperfections. The implementation in FASOR is valid for anisotropic, as well as orthotropic, shells. Examples are presented for cylindrical panels under axial compression, complete cylindrical shells in torsion, and antisymmetric angle-ply cylindrical panels under edge shear.

  15. Effect of a puzzle on the process of students' learning about cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Lais Tono; Miranda, Aline Soares; Moura, Maria José Costa Sampaio; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of using a puzzle to learn about cardiac physiology. Students were divided into control and game groups. In class 1, the control group had a 2-h theoretical class about cardiac physiology, including a detailed description of the phases of the cardiac cycle, whereas the game group had a 50-min theoretical class without the description of the cardiac cycle. In class 2, the control group did an assessment exercise before an activity with the cardiac puzzle and the game group answered questions after the above-mentioned activity. While solving the puzzle, the students had to describe the cardiac cycle by relating the concepts of heart morphology and physiology. To evaluate short-term learning, the number of wrong answers and grades in the assessment exercise were compared between the control and game groups. To evaluate medium-term learning, we compared the grades obtained by students of the control and game groups in questions about cardiac physiology that formed part of the academic exam. In the assessment exercise, the game group presented a lower number of errors and higher score compared with the control group. In the academic exam, applied after both groups had used the puzzle, there was no difference in the scores obtained by the control and game groups in questions about cardiac physiology. These results showed a positive effect of the puzzle on students' learning about cardiac physiology compared with those not using the puzzle. PMID:27516391

  16. Economic production quantity (EPQ) models under an imperfect production process with shortages backordered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Lie-Fern; Hsu, Jia-Tzer

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we develop economic production quantity (EPQ) models to determine the optimal production lot size and backorder quantity for a manufacturer under an imperfect production process. The imperfect production process is characterised by the fraction of defective items at the time of production γ. The paper considers different cases of the EPQ model depending on (1) whether γ is known with certainty or is a random variable, and (2) whether imperfect items are drawn from inventory (a) as they are detected, (b) at the end of each production period or (c) at the end of each production cycle. Straightforward convexity results are shown and closed-form solutions are provided for the optimal order and backorder quantities for each of the cases we considered. We provide two numerical examples: one in which the defective probability follows a uniform distribution and the second which we assume follows a beta distribution, to illustrate the effects of yield variability and timing of the withdrawal of defectives on the optimal solutions. We obtain similar results for both numerical examples, which show that both the yield variability and the withdrawal timing are not critical factors.

  17. Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/metal/PZT sandwich plate with imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Ilkay; Akbarov, Surkay D.; Sezer, Semih

    2016-07-01

    The Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/Metal/PZT sandwich plate is investigated by employing the exact linear equations of electro-elastic waves in piezoelectric materials within the scope of the plane-strain state. It is assumed that at the interfaces between the piezoelectric face layers and metal core layer, shear-spring and normal-spring type imperfect conditions are satisfied. The degree of this imperfectness is estimated through the corresponding shear-spring and normal-spring type parameters which appear in the contact condition characterizing the transverse and normal displacements' discontinuity. The corresponding dispersion equation is derived, and as a result of the numerical solution to this equation, the dispersion curves are constructed for the first and second lowest modes in the cases where the material of the face layers is PZT and the material of the middle layer is Steel (St). Consequently, for the PZT/St/PZT sandwich plate, the study of the influence of the problem parameters such as the piezoelectric and dielectric constants, layer thickness ratios, non-dimensional shear-spring, and normal-spring type parameters, is carried out. In particular, it is established that the imperfectness of the contact between the layers of the plate causes a decrease in the values of the wave propagation velocity.

  18. Buckling Analysis of a Honeycomb-Core Composite Cylinder with Initial Geometric Imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Gene; Schultz, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Thin-walled cylindrical shell structures often have buckling as the critical failure mode, and the buckling of such structures can be very sensitive to small geometric imperfections. The buckling analyses of an 8-ft-diameter, 10-ft-long honeycomb-core composite cylinder loaded in pure axial compression is discussed in this document. Two loading configurations are considered configuration 1 uses simple end conditions, and configuration 2 includes additional structure that may more closely approximate experimental loading conditions. Linear eigenvalue buckling analyses and nonlinear analyses with and without initial geometric imperfections were performed on both configurations. The initial imperfections were introduced in the shell by applying a radial load at the midlength of the cylinder to form a single inward dimple. The critical bifurcation buckling loads are predicted to be 924,190 lb and 924,020 lb for configurations 1 and 2, respectively. Nonlinear critical buckling loads of 918,750 lb and 954,900 lb were predicted for geometrically perfect configurations 1 and 2, respectively. Lower-bound critical buckling loads for configurations 1 and 2 with radial perturbations were found to be 33% and 36% lower, respectively, than the unperturbed critical loads. The inclusion of the load introduction cylinders in configuration 2 increased the maximum bending-boundary-layer rotation up to 11%.

  19. Development of a diagnostic test based on multiple continuous biomarkers with an imperfect reference test.

    PubMed

    García Barrado, Leandro; Coart, Els; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-20

    Ignoring the fact that the reference test used to establish the discriminative properties of a combination of diagnostic biomarkers is imperfect can lead to a biased estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the combination. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian latent-class mixture model to select a combination of biomarkers that maximizes the area under the ROC curve (AUC), while taking into account the imperfect nature of the reference test. In particular, a method for specification of the prior for the mixture component parameters is developed that allows controlling the amount of prior information provided for the AUC. The properties of the model are evaluated by using a simulation study and an application to real data from Alzheimer's disease research. In the simulation study, 100 data sets are simulated for sample sizes ranging from 100 to 600 observations, with a varying correlation between biomarkers. The inclusion of an informative as well as a flat prior for the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test is investigated. In the real-data application, the proposed model was compared with the generally used logistic-regression model that ignores the imperfectness of the reference test. Conditional on the selected sample size and prior distributions, the simulation study results indicate satisfactory performance of the model-based estimates. In particular, the obtained average estimates for all parameters are close to the true values. For the real-data application, AUC estimates for the proposed model are substantially higher than those from the 'traditional' logistic-regression model.

  20. The relationship between mimetic imperfection and phenotypic variation in insect colour patterns.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Graham; Gilbert, Francis; Brandt, Amoret

    2002-02-22

    Many hoverflies (Syrphidae) mimic wasps or bees through colour or behavioural adaptations. The relationship between phenotypic variation in colour pattern and mimetic perfection (as determined by pigeons) was investigated in three species of Müllerian mimics (Vespula spp.) and 10 Batesian hoverfly mimics, plus two non-mimetic species of flies. Four predictions were tested: (i) Batesian mimics might be imperfect because they are in the process of evolving towards perfection, hence there should be a positive relationship between variation and imperfection; (ii) some Batesian mimics are imperfect because they do not have the appropriate genetic variation to improve and have evolved to be as good as possible, hence there should be no differences between species, all displaying a low level of variation; (iii) very common hoverflies should show the highest levels of variation because they outnumber their models, resulting in high predation and a breakdown in the mimetic relationship; and (iv) social wasps (Vespula) have such a powerful defence that anything resembling a wasp, both Müllerian and perfect Batesian mimics, would be avoided, resulting in relaxed selection and high variance. Poor mimics may still evolve to resemble wasps as well as possible and display lower levels of variation. The data only provided support for the fourth prediction. The Müllerian mimics, one of the most perfect Batesian mimics, and the non-mimetic flies displayed much higher levels of variation than the other species of Batesian mimics.

  1. The relationship between mimetic imperfection and phenotypic variation in insect colour patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Graham; Gilbert, Francis; Brandt, Amoret

    2002-01-01

    Many hoverflies (Syrphidae) mimic wasps or bees through colour or behavioural adaptations. The relationship between phenotypic variation in colour pattern and mimetic perfection (as determined by pigeons) was investigated in three species of Müllerian mimics (Vespula spp.) and 10 Batesian hoverfly mimics, plus two non-mimetic species of flies. Four predictions were tested: (i) Batesian mimics might be imperfect because they are in the process of evolving towards perfection, hence there should be a positive relationship between variation and imperfection; (ii) some Batesian mimics are imperfect because they do not have the appropriate genetic variation to improve and have evolved to be as good as possible, hence there should be no differences between species, all displaying a low level of variation; (iii) very common hoverflies should show the highest levels of variation because they outnumber their models, resulting in high predation and a breakdown in the mimetic relationship; and (iv) social wasps (Vespula) have such a powerful defence that anything resembling a wasp, both Müllerian and perfect Batesian mimics, would be avoided, resulting in relaxed selection and high variance. Poor mimics may still evolve to resemble wasps as well as possible and display lower levels of variation. The data only provided support for the fourth prediction. The Müllerian mimics, one of the most perfect Batesian mimics, and the non-mimetic flies displayed much higher levels of variation than the other species of Batesian mimics. PMID:11886630

  2. The effect of alternative prey on the dynamics of imperfect Batesian and Müllerian mimicries.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Leena; Alatalo, Rauno V; Lyytinen, Anne; Mappes, Johanna

    2004-06-01

    Both Batesian and Müllerian mimicries are considered classical evidence of natural selection where predation pressure has, at times, created a striking similarity between unrelated prey species. Batesian mimicry, in which palatable mimics resemble unpalatable aposematic species, is parasitic and only beneficial to the mimics. By contrast, in classical Müllerian mimicry the cost of predators' avoidance learning is shared between similar unpalatable co-mimics, and therefore mimicry benefits all parties. Recent studies using mathematical modeling have questioned the dynamics of Müllerian mimicry, suggesting that fitness benefits should be calculated in a way similar to Batesian mimicry; that is, according to the relative unpalatability difference between co-mimics. Batesian mimicry is very sensitive to the availability of alternative prey, but the effects of alternative prey for Müllerian dynamics are not known and experiments are rare. We designed two experiments to test the effect of alternative prey on imperfect Batesian and Müllerian mimicry complexes. When alternative prey were scarce, imperfect Batesian mimics were selected out from the population, but abundantly available alternative prey relaxed selection against imperfect mimics. Birds learned to avoid both Müllerian models and mimics irrespective of the availability of alternative prey. However, the rate of avoidance learning of models increased when alternative prey were abundant. This experiment suggests that the availability of alternative prey affects the dynamics of both Müllerian and Batesian mimicry, but in different ways.

  3. How might Model-based Probabilities Extracted from Imperfect Models Guide Rational Decisions: The Case for non-probabilistic odds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leonard A.

    2010-05-01

    whether or not probabilities based on imperfect models can be expected to yield probabilistic odds which are sustainable. Evidence is provided that suggest this is not the case. Even with very good models (good in an Root-Mean-Square sense), the risk of ruin of probabilistic odds is significantly higher than might be expected. Methods for constructing model-based non-probabilistic odds which are sustainable are discussed. The aim here is to be relevant to real world decision support, and so unrealistic assumptions of equal knowledge, equal compute power, or equal access to information are to be avoided. Finally, the use of non-probabilistic odds as a method for communicating deep uncertainty (uncertainty in a probability forecast itself) is discussed in the context of other methods, such as stating one's subjective probability that the models will prove inadequate in each particular instance (that is, the Probability of a "Big Surprise").

  4. Buckling Design and Imperfection Sensitivity of Sandwich Composite Launch-Vehicle Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R.; Sleight, David W.; Myers, David E.; Waters, W. Allen, Jr.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Lovejoy, Andrew W.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being considered and used for launch-vehicle structures. For shell structures, such as interstages, skirts, and shrouds, honeycomb-core sandwich composites are often selected for their structural efficiency. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the structural response, including buckling, of sandwich composite shell structures. Additionally, small geometric imperfections can significantly influence the buckling response, including considerably reducing the buckling load, of shell structures. Thus, both the response of the theoretically perfect structure and the buckling imperfection sensitivity must be considered during the design of such structures. To address the latter, empirically derived design factors, called buckling knockdown factors (KDFs), were developed by NASA in the 1960s to account for this buckling imperfection sensitivity during design. However, most of the test-article designs used in the development of these recommendations are not relevant to modern launch-vehicle constructions and material systems, and in particular, no composite test articles were considered. Herein, a two-part study on composite sandwich shells to (1) examine the relationship between the buckling knockdown factor and the areal mass of optimized designs, and (2) to interrogate the imperfection sensitivity of those optimized designs is presented. Four structures from recent NASA launch-vehicle development activities are considered. First, designs optimized for both strength and stability were generated for each of these structures using design optimization software and a range of buckling knockdown factors; it was found that the designed areal masses varied by between 6.1% and 19.6% over knockdown factors ranging from 0.6 to 0.9. Next, the buckling imperfection sensitivity of the optimized designs is explored using nonlinear finite-element analysis and the as-measured shape of a large-scale composite cylindrical

  5. Shear-horizontal waves in a rotated Y-cut quartz plate with an imperfectly bonded mass layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Du, Jianke; Wang, Ji; Yang, Jiashi

    2011-03-01

    We study shear-horizontal (SH) waves in an unbounded plate of rotated Y-cut quartz carrying a thin mass layer imperfectly or nonrigidly bonded to the surface of the quartz plate. The imperfect interface is described by the socalled shear-lag model that allows the displacement to be discontinuous across the interface. A transcendental frequency equation that determines the dispersion relations of the waves is obtained. Exact and approximate solutions to the frequency equation are presented. The effects of the mass layer and the imperfect interface on the dispersion relations are examined. A quantitative criterion is given which distinguishes whether the combined effect of the mass layer and the imperfect interface raises or lowers the wave frequencies. PMID:21429853

  6. The Effects of Geometric and Loading Imperfections on the Response and Lower-Bound Buckling Load of a Compression-Loaded Cylindrical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, Benedikt; Hilburger, Mark W.; Rolfes, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    Results from a numerical study of the buckling response of a thin-walled compressionloaded isotropic circular cylindrical shell with initial geometric and loading imperfections are used to determine a lower bound buckling load estimate suitable for preliminary design. The lower bound prediction techniques presented herein include an imperfection caused by a lateral perturbation load, an imperfection in the shape of a single stress-free dimple (similar to the lateral pertubation imperfection), and a distributed load imperfection that induces a nonuniform load in the shell. The ABAQUS finite element code is used for the analyses. Responses of the cylinders for selected imperfection amplitudes and imperfection types are considered, and the effect of each imperfection is compared to the response of a geometrically perfect cylinder. The results indicate that compression-loaded shells subjected to a lateral perturbation load or a single dimple imperfection, and a nonuniform load imperfection, exhibit similar buckling behavior and lower bound trends and the predicted lower bounds are much less conservative than the corresponding design recommendation NASA SP-8007 for the design of buckling-critical shells. In addition, the lateral perturbation technique and the distributed load imperfection produce response characteristics that are physically meaningful and can be validated via laboratory testing.

  7. Letter Imperfect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    In this essay, the author, a 5th-grade teacher, questions how well a standardized test can measure his students. This article presents a letter he wrote for the Washington state science test scorer regarding his students' test scores. He shares stories about some of the students in his class. He points out that tests can turn out to be more like…

  8. Imperfect Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Betty

    1975-01-01

    Examines the art of professional verse speaking and suggests the creation of standards for the training of specialized speakers. Available from: Speech and Drama, Anthony Jackman, Editor, 205 Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leics LE11 3AD. Subscription Rates: non-members (USA) $6.00 p.a.; singles $2.50 surface post free. (MH)

  9. ON THE PUZZLE OF SPACE WEATHERING ALTERATION OF BASALTIC ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchi, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Magrin, S.; De Sanctis, M. C. E-mail: monica.lazzarin@unipd.i E-mail: mariacristina.desanctis@iasf-roma.inaf.i

    2010-10-01

    The majority of basaltic asteroids are found in the inner main belt, although a few have also been observed in the outer main belt and near-Earth space. These asteroids-referred to as V-types-have surface compositions that resemble that of the 530 km sized asteroid Vesta. Besides the compositional similarity, dynamical evidence also links many V-type asteroids to Vesta. Moreover, Vesta is one of the few asteroids to have been identified as source of specific classes of meteorites, the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite achondrites (HEDs). Despite the general consensus on the outlined scenario, several questions remain unresolved. In particular, it is not clear if the observed spectral diversity among Vesta, V-types, and HEDs is due to space weathering, as is thought to be the case for S-type asteroids. In this Letter, SDSS photometry is used to address the question of whether the spectral diversity among candidate V-types and HEDs can be explained by space weathering. We show that visible spectral slopes of V-types are systematically redder with respect to HEDs, in a similar way to what is found for ordinary chondrite meteorites and S-types. On the assumption that space weathering is responsible for the slope mismatch, we estimated an upper limit for the reddening timescale of about 0.5 Ga. Nevertheless, the observed slope mismatch between HEDs and V-types poses several puzzles to understanding its origin. The implication of our findings is also discussed in light of the Dawn mission to Vesta.

  10. Hyperon puzzle, hadron-quark crossover and massive neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars are studied on the basis of the hadron-quark crossover picture where a smooth transition from the hadronic phase to the quark phase takes place at finite baryon density. By using a phenomenological equation of state (EOS) "CRover", which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0, it is found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M_{odot} can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition. The radii of the cold NSs with the CRover EOS are in the narrow range (12.5 ± 0.5) km which is insensitive to the NS masses. Due to the stiffening of the EOS induced by the hadron-quark crossover, the central density of the NSs is at most 4 ρ0 and the hyperon-mixing barely occurs inside the NS core. This constitutes a solution of the long-standing hyperon puzzle. The effect of color superconductivity (CSC) on the NS structures is also examined with the hadron-quark crossover. For the typical strength of the diquark attraction, a slight softening of the EOS due to two-flavor CSC (2SC) takes place and the maximum mass is reduced by about 0.2M_{odot}. The CRover EOS is generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition. The gravitational energy release and the spin-up rate during the contraction from the hot NS to the cold NS are also estimated.

  11. The puzzle of immune phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Landgraf-Rauf, Katja; Anselm, Bettina; Schaub, Bianca

    2016-12-01

    new immunological molecules, the complex puzzle of childhood asthma is still far from being completed. Addressing the current challenges of distinct clinical asthma and wheeze phenotypes, including their stability and underlying endotypes, involves addressing the interplay of innate and adaptive immune regulatory mechanisms in large, interdisciplinary cohorts. PMID:27468754

  12. Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual framework for…

  13. Development of a diagnostic test based on multiple continuous biomarkers with an imperfect reference test.

    PubMed

    García Barrado, Leandro; Coart, Els; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-02-20

    Ignoring the fact that the reference test used to establish the discriminative properties of a combination of diagnostic biomarkers is imperfect can lead to a biased estimate of the diagnostic accuracy of the combination. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian latent-class mixture model to select a combination of biomarkers that maximizes the area under the ROC curve (AUC), while taking into account the imperfect nature of the reference test. In particular, a method for specification of the prior for the mixture component parameters is developed that allows controlling the amount of prior information provided for the AUC. The properties of the model are evaluated by using a simulation study and an application to real data from Alzheimer's disease research. In the simulation study, 100 data sets are simulated for sample sizes ranging from 100 to 600 observations, with a varying correlation between biomarkers. The inclusion of an informative as well as a flat prior for the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test is investigated. In the real-data application, the proposed model was compared with the generally used logistic-regression model that ignores the imperfectness of the reference test. Conditional on the selected sample size and prior distributions, the simulation study results indicate satisfactory performance of the model-based estimates. In particular, the obtained average estimates for all parameters are close to the true values. For the real-data application, AUC estimates for the proposed model are substantially higher than those from the 'traditional' logistic-regression model. PMID:26388206

  14. Splitter imperfections in annular split-flow thin separation channels: experimental study of nonspecific crossover.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Decker, Keith; Nakamura, Masayuki; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Moore, Lee R; Zborowski, Maciej

    2003-12-01

    The separation performance of a split-flow thin (SPLITT) separation device depends on uniformity of channel thickness and the precise placement of the flow splitters at fixed distances between the channel walls. The observation of nonspecific crossover, that is, the transport of sample materials across the channel thickness without the influence of an applied field, has routinely been taken to indicate the presence of irregularities in splitter shape or placement. Computational fluid dynamics software may be used to predict the influence of splitter imperfections on nonspecific crossover, where it is assumed that sample transport is by convection alone. A previous study has shown how small inlet splitter imperfections can account for the relatively low levels of nonspecific crossover observed with typical annular SPLITT devices. This study, however, could not distinguish between the possible sources of nonspecific crossover; hydrodynamic lift or shear-induced diffusion could have contributed. To confirm the validity of the computational approach, a series of experiments has been carried out on a channel having a deliberately and severely bent splitter. Nonspecific crossover was measured for a range of inlet and outlet flow rate ratios, with the bent splitter placed at both the channel inlet and outlet. The severity of the splitter distortion was sufficient to produce significant nonspecific crossover over a wide range of flow conditions. Good agreement was found between experiment and prediction based on computational fluid dynamics, with experiment generally showing only slightly higher crossover than prediction. The quantitative agreement for this extreme case suggests that the contribution to nonspecific crossover due to geometrical imperfections can be well described using computational fluid dynamics. PMID:14640746

  15. Imperfection and Thickness Measurement of Panels Using a Coordinate Measurement Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology used to measure imperfection and thickness variation for flat and curved panels using a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) and the software program MeasPanel. The objective is to provide a reference document so that someone with a basic understanding of CMM operation can measure a panel with minimal training. Detailed information about both the measurement system setup and computer software is provided. Information is also provided about the format of the raw data, as well as how it is post-processed for use in finite-element analysis.

  16. Change in the structural imperfection of lithium niobate crystals doped with zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, V. A. Litvinova, M. N.

    2015-01-15

    The changes in the degree of structural imperfection of lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) single crystals with an increase in the Li content and doping with zinc (to 1 wt %) have been investigated by the nonlinear optics methods and Raman spectroscopy. The conversion of broadband IR radiation in LiNbO{sub 3} crystals under noncritical (90°) phase-matching condition with vector interactions implemented is investigated. It is shown that the conversion efficiency, spectral width, and the position of maximum in the converted radiation spectrum depend on the ratio R = Li/Nb in LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and the impurity concentration.

  17. Broadband second harmonic generation in an imperfect nonlinear photonic crystal with random defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kun; Liu, Yali; Ren, Xiaobin; Fan, Jingyang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study broadband second harmonic generation (SHG) in an imperfect nonlinear photonic crystal in which defects are introduced with random lengths. We show that the efficient SHG output is obtained when the length of each defect varies near certain specialized values. The bandwidth of the SHG output broadens with the increasing randomness of defect length. Moreover, the SHG bandwidth is nearly unaffected only when the total length of the whole structure is long enough. The disordered structure also exhibits good tolerance to the fabrication error, which provides a way to control SHG intensity and bandwidth separately.

  18. Put Your Imperfections Behind You: Temporal Landmarks Spur Goal Initiation When They Signal New Beginnings.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hengchen; Milkman, Katherine L; Riis, Jason

    2015-12-01

    People often fail to muster the motivation needed to initiate goal pursuit. Across five laboratory experiments, we explored occasions when people naturally experience enhanced motivation to take actions that facilitate goal pursuit and why certain dates are more likely to spur goal initiation than others. We present causal evidence that emphasizing a temporal landmark denoting the beginning of a new time period increases people's intentions to initiate goal pursuit. In addition, we propose and show that people's strengthened motivation to begin pursuing their aspirations following such temporal landmarks originates in part from the psychological disassociation these landmarks induce from a person's past, imperfect self.

  19. a Diffusive-Transport Approach to Determine the Electrical Conductance of AN Imperfect Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, Maria Angeles; Grado-Caffaro, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a diffusive-transport-based analytical formulation to calculate the linear electrical conductance through a multiwalled carbon nanotube with defects. In fact, on the one hand, by considerations on diffusive transport and, on the other hand, using the Drude model, we find out that the conductance (at Fermi energy) of an imperfect multiwalled carbon nanotube is approximately equal to the fundamental conductance quantum multiplied by the number of layers (or shells) of the tube. Our result agrees with experimental data.

  20. [The debate on the generation of imperfect plants in the 17th and 18th centuries].

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    18th-century discussions on the generation of imperfect plants were often linked with the question of their position in the natural world, namely as whether they were part of the vegetable or mineral realm. As attested by the work of Joseph Gaertner, Johann Jakob Dillen, Pier Antonio Micheli and René-Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur, as well as of Antonio Vallisneri, and Lazzaro Spallanzani, the different images of nature - continuity and discontinuity - adopted by naturalists influenced their solution to this question.

  1. On continuous-time two person full-information best choice problem with imperfect observation

    SciTech Connect

    Porosinski, Z.; Szajowski, K.

    1994-12-31

    A zero-sum game version of the continuous-time full-information best choice problem is considered. Two players observe sequentially a stream of iid random variables from a known continuous distribution appearing according to some renewal process with the object of choosing the largest one. The horizon of observation is a positive random variable independent of observations. The observations of the random variables are imperfect and the players are informed only whether it is greater than or less than some levels specified by both of them. The normal form of the game is derived. Poisson horizon case is examined in detail.

  2. Put Your Imperfections Behind You: Temporal Landmarks Spur Goal Initiation When They Signal New Beginnings.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hengchen; Milkman, Katherine L; Riis, Jason

    2015-12-01

    People often fail to muster the motivation needed to initiate goal pursuit. Across five laboratory experiments, we explored occasions when people naturally experience enhanced motivation to take actions that facilitate goal pursuit and why certain dates are more likely to spur goal initiation than others. We present causal evidence that emphasizing a temporal landmark denoting the beginning of a new time period increases people's intentions to initiate goal pursuit. In addition, we propose and show that people's strengthened motivation to begin pursuing their aspirations following such temporal landmarks originates in part from the psychological disassociation these landmarks induce from a person's past, imperfect self. PMID:26546079

  3. Assessing the utility of statistical adjustments for imperfect detection in tropical conservation science

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Leite, Cristina; Pardini, Renata; Boscolo, Danilo; Cassano, Camila Righetto; Püttker, Thomas; Barros, Camila Santos; Barlow, Jos

    2014-01-01

    1. In recent years, there has been a fast development of models that adjust for imperfect detection. These models have revolutionized the analysis of field data, and their use has repeatedly demonstrated the importance of sampling design and data quality. There are, however, several practical limitations associated with the use of detectability models which restrict their relevance to tropical conservation science. 2. We outline the main advantages of detectability models, before examining their limitations associated with their applicability to the analysis of tropical communities, rare species and large-scale data sets. Finally, we discuss whether detection probability needs to be controlled before and/or after data collection. 3. Models that adjust for imperfect detection allow ecologists to assess data quality by estimating uncertainty and to obtain adjusted ecological estimates of populations and communities. Importantly, these models have allowed informed decisions to be made about the conservation and management of target species. 4. Data requirements for obtaining unadjusted estimates are substantially lower than for detectability-adjusted estimates, which require relatively high detection/recapture probabilities and a number of repeated surveys at each location. These requirements can be difficult to meet in large-scale environmental studies where high levels of spatial replication are needed, or in the tropics where communities are composed of many naturally rare species. However, while imperfect detection can only be adjusted statistically, covariates of detection probability can also be controlled through study design. Using three study cases where we controlled for covariates of detection probability through sampling design, we show that the variation in unadjusted ecological estimates from nearly 100 species was qualitatively the same as that obtained from adjusted estimates. Finally, we discuss that the decision as to whether one should control for

  4. Imperfections of the crystal structure of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting ceramic following shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudiakov, A. V.; Malovitskii, Iu. N.; Safronov, P. P.; Kotov, E. A.; Abramova, E. B.

    1989-10-01

    Cylindrical (20 mm in diameter, 160 mm long) specimens produced by the shock compression of a superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O powder were characterized by a variety of methods, including differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, gravimetry, and resistance measurements. The experimentally observed scatter of the critical temperature along the length of the specimens in the range 88-91 K and the broadening of the superconducting transition are attributed to the imperfections in the crystal structure of the specimens resulting from the shock loading.

  5. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  6. The DS86 neutron dosimetry enigma: Some missing pieces to the puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.

    1994-12-31

    International programs have been conducted over the last four decades to quantify the exposure of atom bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Unfortunately, the quest for accurate gamma-ray and neutron exposure doses of atom bomb survivors has proven illusive. Efforts in the most recent of these programs, designated as Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86), have revealed a serious and persistent discrepancy between neutron transport calculations and thermal neutron activation measurements at the Hiroshima site, which will be called the DS86 neutron dosimetry enigma. It is established that this enigma is a complex puzzle that precludes simple solutions. This conclusion is deduced through the identification of a number of missing pieces to the puzzle. Implications and conclusions that can be inferred from these missing puzzle pieces are advanced.

  7. Puzzle Imaging: Using Large-Scale Dimensionality Reduction Algorithms for Localization

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Joshua I.; Zamft, Bradley M.; Church, George M.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    Current high-resolution imaging techniques require an intact sample that preserves spatial relationships. We here present a novel approach, “puzzle imaging,” that allows imaging a spatially scrambled sample. This technique takes many spatially disordered samples, and then pieces them back together using local properties embedded within the sample. We show that puzzle imaging can efficiently produce high-resolution images using dimensionality reduction algorithms. We demonstrate the theoretical capabilities of puzzle imaging in three biological scenarios, showing that (1) relatively precise 3-dimensional brain imaging is possible; (2) the physical structure of a neural network can often be recovered based only on the neural connectivity matrix; and (3) a chemical map could be reproduced using bacteria with chemosensitive DNA and conjugative transfer. The ability to reconstruct scrambled images promises to enable imaging based on DNA sequencing of homogenized tissue samples. PMID:26192446

  8. Parents' attributions of their child's jigsaw-puzzle performance: comparing two genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tran M; Hodapp, Robert M

    2005-04-01

    Parents' attributions of the jigsaw-puzzle performance of their child with Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 20) or Williams syndrome (n = 21) were examined. Parents in both groups placed more importance on internal versus external attributions. Parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibited a hedonic bias by attributing their child's success to internal factors (particularly when the child was good at puzzles), downplayed the role of chance when their child had higher puzzle skills and higher cognitive functioning, and differentiated between internal and external attributions. In contrast, parents of children with Williams syndrome showed an inconsistent attributional pattern. These findings help identify how parents understand the intellectual performance of their child with disabilities and how interventions might be beneficial. PMID:15757368

  9. The role of inhibitory control in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task.

    PubMed

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Burk, William J; Ciairano, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated Stroop task, were paired with classmates into 125 dyads, and were observed during a 10-min puzzle task. Results confirmed that interaction partners exhibited similar levels of cooperative behaviors, and the cooperative behaviors of children predicted changes in the cooperative behaviors of their partners throughout the puzzle task. Cooperative behaviors of each interaction partner were predicted by the child's own inhibitory control as well as the inhibitory control of the partner. Findings are discussed within a developmental contextual framework. PMID:21645907

  10. Using the Tower of Hanoi puzzle to infuse your mathematics classroom with computer science concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, Alison S.

    2016-07-01

    This article suggests that logic puzzles, such as the well-known Tower of Hanoi puzzle, can be used to introduce computer science concepts to mathematics students of all ages. Mathematics teachers introduce their students to computer science concepts that are enacted spontaneously and subconsciously throughout the solution to the Tower of Hanoi puzzle. These concepts include, but are not limited to, conditionals, iteration, and recursion. Lessons, such as the one proposed in this article, are easily implementable in mathematics classrooms and extracurricular programmes as they are good candidates for 'drop in' lessons that do not need to fit into any particular place in the typical curriculum sequence. As an example for readers, the author describes how she used the puzzle in her own Number Sense and Logic course during the federally funded Upward Bound Math/Science summer programme for college-intending low-income high school students. The article explains each computer science term with real-life and mathematical examples, applies each term to the Tower of Hanoi puzzle solution, and describes how students connected the terms to their own solutions of the puzzle. It is timely and important to expose mathematics students to computer science concepts. Given the rate at which technology is currently advancing, and our increased dependence on technology in our daily lives, it has become more important than ever for children to be exposed to computer science. Yet, despite the importance of exposing today's children to computer science, many children are not given adequate opportunity to learn computer science in schools. In the United States, for example, most students finish high school without ever taking a computing course. Mathematics lessons, such as the one described in this article, can help to make computer science more accessible to students who may have otherwise had little opportunity to be introduced to these increasingly important concepts.

  11. Scaled behavior of interface waves at an imperfect solid-solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Dehoux, Thomas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2012-07-01

    Laser ultrasonic techniques allow the remote analysis of adhesion mechanisms at imperfect interfaces up to GHz frequencies. However, the sensitivity of interface waves to the properties of the contact is not very well known. In the present work, the mechanical boundary conditions are described considering that the contacting solid half-spaces are connected by tangential and normal springs. Such a modeling implies a discontinuity of the displacement field across the interface. To identify the relative amplitudes of the different types of interface waves—skimming, leaky Rayleigh (LR) and Stoneley (St) waves—a semi-analytical time domain model describing the thermoelastic laser generation is derived. The results illustrate the influence of the boundary conditions on the attenuation of the LR wave and on the existence of the St wave. In addition, a single compact and elegant dispersion equation is presented to investigate the behaviour of the interface waves propagating along a generalized imperfect boundary. Such analysis reveals the existence of a cutoff frequency fc close to which the St wave behaves like a skimming transverse wave. A scaled analysis demonstrates that two master curves suffice to describe the dispersion of LR and St waves and that fc is inversely proportional to the tangential interfacial spring constant.

  12. The effect of system aesthetics on trust, cooperation, satisfaction and annoyance in an imperfect automated system.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Alona; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Parmet, Yisrael

    2012-01-01

    Lack of system reliability has been repeatedly identified as a factor that decreases trust. However, aesthetics has an important role in the development of trust. Most of the research concerning the connection between aesthetics and trust focused on mobile commerce and websites while very little has been done in examining aesthetics in automated systems. This study integrated aesthetics manipulations into an imperfect in-vehicle automation system and focused on the power of aesthetics to decrease the negative effects of errors on trust, satisfaction, annoyance, and human-automation cooperation perceptions. Participants used the navigation system in either 100% or 85% accuracy levels with an aesthetic or non aesthetic system (4 conditions). In both aesthetic and non aesthetic systems, perceptions of trust, satisfaction and human automation cooperation were decreased in the imperfect system compared to the perfect one. However, in the annoyance rating, this trend was found only in the aesthetic system while in the non-aesthetic system no difference was found between the two levels of accuracy. This single effect may indicate upon the possibility that in automated systems aesthetics affects trust and satisfaction more moderately compared to mobile commerce applications and websites. However, more research is needed to assess this assumption.

  13. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT. PMID:24003003

  14. Finite-key security analysis of quantum key distribution with imperfect light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Curty, Marcos; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-09

    In recent years, the gap between theory and practice in quantum key distribution (QKD) has been significantly narrowed, particularly for QKD systems with arbitrarily flawed optical receivers. The status for QKD systems with imperfect light sources is however less satisfactory, in the sense that the resulting secure key rates are often overly dependent on the quality of state preparation. This is especially the case when the channel loss is high. Very recently, to overcome this limitation, Tamaki et al proposed a QKD protocol based on the so-called 'rejected data analysis', and showed that its security in the limit of infinitely long keys is almost independent of any encoding flaw in the qubit space, being this protocol compatible with the decoy state method. Here, as a step towards practical QKD, we show that a similar conclusion is reached in the finite-key regime, even when the intensity of the light source is unstable. More concretely, we derive security bounds for a wide class of realistic light sources and show that the bounds are also efficient in the presence of high channel loss. Our results strongly suggest the feasibility of long distance provably secure communication with imperfect light sources.

  15. Shimming Halbach magnets utilizing genetic algorithms to profit from material imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Anna J.; Zia, Wasif; Rehorn, Christian W. G.; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, permanent magnet-based NMR spectrometers have resurfaced as low-cost portable alternatives to superconducting instruments. While the development of these devices as well as clever shimming methods have yielded impressive advancements, scaling the size of these magnets to miniature lengths remains a problem to be addressed. Here we present the results of a study of a discrete shimming scheme for NMR Mandhalas constructed from a set of individual magnet blocks. While our calculations predict a modest reduction in field deviation by a factor of 9.3 in the case of the shimmed ideal Mandhala, a factor of 28 is obtained in the case of the shimmed imperfect Mandhala. This indicates that imperfections of magnet blocks can lead to improved field homogeneity. We also present a new algorithm to improve the homogeneity of a permanent magnet assembly. Strategies for future magnet construction can improve the agreement between simulation and practical implementation by using data from real magnets in these assemblies as the input to such an algorithm to optimize the homogeneity of a given design.

  16. Shimming Halbach magnets utilizing genetic algorithms to profit from material imperfections.

    PubMed

    Parker, Anna J; Zia, Wasif; Rehorn, Christian W G; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, permanent magnet-based NMR spectrometers have resurfaced as low-cost portable alternatives to superconducting instruments. While the development of these devices as well as clever shimming methods have yielded impressive advancements, scaling the size of these magnets to miniature lengths remains a problem to be addressed. Here we present the results of a study of a discrete shimming scheme for NMR Mandhalas constructed from a set of individual magnet blocks. While our calculations predict a modest reduction in field deviation by a factor of 9.3 in the case of the shimmed ideal Mandhala, a factor of 28 is obtained in the case of the shimmed imperfect Mandhala. This indicates that imperfections of magnet blocks can lead to improved field homogeneity. We also present a new algorithm to improve the homogeneity of a permanent magnet assembly. Strategies for future magnet construction can improve the agreement between simulation and practical implementation by using data from real magnets in these assemblies as the input to such an algorithm to optimize the homogeneity of a given design. PMID:26874333

  17. Bayesian meta-analysis of diagnostic tests allowing for imperfect reference standards.

    PubMed

    Menten, J; Boelaert, M; Lesaffre, E

    2013-12-30

    There is an increasing interest in meta-analyses of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for infectious diseases. To avoid spectrum bias, these meta-analyses should focus on phase IV studies performed in the target population. For many infectious diseases, these target populations attend primary health care centers in resource-constrained settings where it is difficult to perform gold standard diagnostic tests. As a consequence, phase IV diagnostic studies often use imperfect reference standards, which may result in biased meta-analyses of the diagnostic accuracy of novel RDTs. We extend the standard bivariate model for the meta-analysis of diagnostic studies to correct for differing and imperfect reference standards in the primary studies and to accommodate data from studies that try to overcome the absence of a true gold standard through the use of latent class analysis. Using Bayesian methods, improved estimates of sensitivity and specificity are possible, especially when prior information is available on the diagnostic accuracy of the reference test. In this analysis, the deviance information criterion can be used to detect conflicts between the prior information and observed data. When applying the model to a dataset of the diagnostic accuracy of an RDT for visceral leishmaniasis, the standard meta-analytic methods appeared to underestimate the specificity of the RDT.

  18. Coordinating vendor-buyer decisions for imperfect quality items considering trade credit and fully backlogged shortages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Aditi; Gautam, Prerna; Jaggi, Chandra K.

    2016-03-01

    Supply chain management has become a critical issue for modern business environments. In today's world of cooperative decision-making, individual decisions in order to reduce inventory costs may not lead to an overall optimal solution. Coordination is necessary among participants of supply chain to achieve better performance. There are legitimate and important efforts from the vendor to enhance the relation with buyer; one such effort is offering trade credit which has been a driver of growth and development of business between them. The cost of financing is a core consideration in effective financial management, in general and in context of business. Also, due to imperfect production a vendor may produce defective items which results in shortages. Motivated with these aspects, an integrated vendor-buyer inventory model is developed for imperfect quality items with allowable shortages; in which the vendor offers credit period to the buyer for payment. The objective is to minimize the total joint annual costs incurred by the vendor and the buyer by using integrated decision making approach. The expected total annual integrated cost is derived and a solution procedure is provided to find the optimal solution. Numerical analysis shows that the integrated model gives an impressive cost reduction, in comparison to independent decision policies by the vendor and the buyer.

  19. Finite-key security analysis of quantum key distribution with imperfect light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Curty, Marcos; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the gap between theory and practice in quantum key distribution (QKD) has been significantly narrowed, particularly for QKD systems with arbitrarily flawed optical receivers. The status for QKD systems with imperfect light sources is however less satisfactory, in the sense that the resulting secure key rates are often overly dependent on the quality of state preparation. This is especially the case when the channel loss is high. Very recently, to overcome this limitation, Tamaki et al proposed a QKD protocol based on the so-called ‘rejected data analysis’, and showed that its security—in the limit of infinitely long keys—is almost independent of any encoding flaw in the qubit space, being this protocol compatible with the decoy state method. Here, as a step towards practical QKD, we show that a similar conclusion is reached in the finite-key regime, even when the intensity of the light source is unstable. More concretely, we derive security bounds for a wide class of realistic light sources and show that the bounds are also efficient in the presence of high channel loss. Our results strongly suggest the feasibility of long distance provably secure communication with imperfect light sources.

  20. Diffraction and imaging study of imperfections of crystallized lysozyme with coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray diffraction imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase-contrast radiographic imaging were employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the symmetric Laue case. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal was approximately 16.7 arcsec and imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <1 1 0> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Inclusions of impurities or formations of foreign particles in the central growth region are resolved in the images with high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in X-ray diffraction images. The details of the observed defects and the significant change in the revealed microstructures with drying provide insight into the nature of imperfections, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  1. Shimming Halbach magnets utilizing genetic algorithms to profit from material imperfections.

    PubMed

    Parker, Anna J; Zia, Wasif; Rehorn, Christian W G; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, permanent magnet-based NMR spectrometers have resurfaced as low-cost portable alternatives to superconducting instruments. While the development of these devices as well as clever shimming methods have yielded impressive advancements, scaling the size of these magnets to miniature lengths remains a problem to be addressed. Here we present the results of a study of a discrete shimming scheme for NMR Mandhalas constructed from a set of individual magnet blocks. While our calculations predict a modest reduction in field deviation by a factor of 9.3 in the case of the shimmed ideal Mandhala, a factor of 28 is obtained in the case of the shimmed imperfect Mandhala. This indicates that imperfections of magnet blocks can lead to improved field homogeneity. We also present a new algorithm to improve the homogeneity of a permanent magnet assembly. Strategies for future magnet construction can improve the agreement between simulation and practical implementation by using data from real magnets in these assemblies as the input to such an algorithm to optimize the homogeneity of a given design.

  2. How imperfect interfaces affect the nonlinear transport properties in composite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Nanomaterials composed of a population of particles dispersed in a matrix represent the building block for the next generation of several technologies: energy storage and conversion, thermal management, electronics, and photovoltaics. When interfaces between particles and matrix are imperfect, the size of the particles may strongly influence the effective linear and nonlinear response of the whole system. Here, we study these scale effects mainly focussing on the nonlinear transport behavior of composite structures. The theory is developed, in the framework of the electrical conductivity, for an arbitrary nonlinearity of the constituents; however, explicit results are discussed for Kerr-like nonlinear responses. Two kinds of imperfect interfaces are considered: the T-model and the Π-model, which represent a generalization of the classical schemes largely employed in literature, namely the low and the high conducting interface models. The dependence of the nonlinear effective properties on the size of the dispersed particles is explained through intrinsic length scales governing some universal scaling laws.

  3. Finite-key security analysis of quantum key distribution with imperfect light sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Curty, Marcos; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-09

    In recent years, the gap between theory and practice in quantum key distribution (QKD) has been significantly narrowed, particularly for QKD systems with arbitrarily flawed optical receivers. The status for QKD systems with imperfect light sources is however less satisfactory, in the sense that the resulting secure key rates are often overly dependent on the quality of state preparation. This is especially the case when the channel loss is high. Very recently, to overcome this limitation, Tamaki et al proposed a QKD protocol based on the so-called 'rejected data analysis', and showed that its security in the limit of infinitelymore » long keys is almost independent of any encoding flaw in the qubit space, being this protocol compatible with the decoy state method. Here, as a step towards practical QKD, we show that a similar conclusion is reached in the finite-key regime, even when the intensity of the light source is unstable. More concretely, we derive security bounds for a wide class of realistic light sources and show that the bounds are also efficient in the presence of high channel loss. Our results strongly suggest the feasibility of long distance provably secure communication with imperfect light sources.« less

  4. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with imperfect sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wei, Kejin; Bedroya, Olinka; Qian, Li; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2016-04-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), which is immune to all detector side-channel attacks, is the most promising solution to the security issues in practical quantum key distribution systems. Although several experimental demonstrations of MDI-QKD have been reported, they all make one crucial but not yet verified assumption, that is, there are no flaws in state preparation. Such an assumption is unrealistic and security loopholes remain in the source. Here we present a MDI-QKD experiment with the modulation error taken into consideration. By applying the loss-tolerant security proof by Tamaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052314, we distribute secure keys over fiber links up to 40 km with imperfect sources, which would not have been possible under previous security proofs. By simultaneously closing loopholes at the detectors and a critical loophole—modulation error in the source, our work shows the feasibility of secure QKD with practical imperfect devices.

  5. Jigsaw puzzle metasurface for multiple functions: polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Cao, Xiangyu; Gao, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Li, Sijia

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate a simple reconfigurable metasurface with multiple functions. Anisotropic tiles are investigated and manufactured as fundamental elements. Then, the tiles are combined in a certain sequence to construct a metasurface. Each of the tiles can be adjusted independently which is like a jigsaw puzzle and the whole metasurface can achieve diverse functions by different layouts. For demonstration purposes, we realize polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion by a jigsaw puzzle metasurface with 6 × 6 pieces of anisotropic tile. Simulated and measured results prove that our method offers a simple and effective strategy for metasurface design. PMID:27409942

  6. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premalatha, K.; Chandrasekar, V. K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations.

  7. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, K; Chandrasekar, V K; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations. PMID:27575152

  8. Imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, K; Chandrasekar, V K; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the emergence of different kinds of imperfectly synchronized states and chimera states in two interacting populations of nonlocally coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators. We find that the complete synchronization in population I and existence of solitary oscillators which escape from the synchronized group in population II lead to imperfectly synchronized states for sufficiently small values of nonisochronicity parameter. Interestingly, upon increasing the strength of this parameter further there occurs an onset of mixed imperfectly synchronized states where the solitary oscillators occur from both the populations. Synchronized oscillators from both the populations are locked to a common average frequency. In both cases of imperfectly synchronized states, synchronized oscillators exhibit periodic motion while the solitary oscillators are quasiperiodic in nature. In this region, for spatially prepared initial conditions, we can observe the mixed chimera states where the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized oscillations occur from both the populations. On the other hand, imperfectly synchronized states are not always stable, and they can drift aperiodically due to instability caused by an increase of nonisochronicity parameter. We observe that these states are robust to the introduction of frequency mismatch between the two populations.

  9. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  10. Having Fun and Accepting Challenges Are Natural Instincts: Jigsaw Puzzles to Challenge Students and Test Their Abilities While Having Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbaugh, Hanna R.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Because jigsaw puzzles are fun, and challenging, students will endure and discover that persistence and grit are rewarded. Importantly, play and fun have a biological place just like sleep and dreams. Students also feel a sense of accomplishment when they have completed a puzzle. Importantly, the reward of mastering a challenge builds confidence…

  11. An Easy & Fun Way to Teach about How Science "Works": Popularizing Haack's Crossword-Puzzle Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlova, Iglika V.; Lewis, Kayla C.

    2013-01-01

    Science is a complex process, and we must not teach our students overly simplified versions of "the" scientific method. We propose that students can uncover the complex realities of scientific thinking by exploring the similarities and differences between solving the familiar crossword puzzles and scientific "puzzles."…

  12. Utility of Self-Made Crossword Puzzles as an Active Learning Method to Study Biochemistry in Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coticone, Sulekha Rao

    2013-01-01

    To incorporate an active learning component in a one-semester biochemistry course, students were asked to create crossword puzzles using key concepts. Student observations on the use of self-made crossword puzzles as an active-learning instructional tool were collected using a 5-point Likert survey at the end of the semester. A majority of the…

  13. Herschel unveils a puzzling uniformity of distant dusty galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, D.; Hwang, H. S.; Magnelli, B.; Daddi, E.; Aussel, H.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Andreani, P.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Babbedge, T.; Berta, S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Bongiovanni, A.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Chanial, P.; Chary, R.-R.; Cimatti, A.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dickinson, M.; Dominguez, H.; Dowell, C. D.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Förster Schreiber, N.; Fox, M.; Franceschini, A.; Gear, W.; Genzel, R.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Halpern, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Isaak, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Le Borgne, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Lutz, D.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Magdis, G.; Mainetti, G.; Maiolino, R.; Marchetti, L.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nordon, R.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Page, M. J.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Perez Fournon, I.; Pérez García, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Pohlen, M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Rawlings, J. I.; Rigopoulou, D.; Riguccini, L.; Rizzo, D.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Seymour, N.; Shao, L.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Stevens, J. A.; Sturm, E.; Symeonidis, M.; Tacconi, L.; Trichas, M.; Tugwell, K. E.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J.; Vigroux, L.; Wang, L.; Ward, R.; Wright, G.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2010-07-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory enables us to accurately measure the bolometric output of starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) by directly sampling the peak of their far-infrared (IR) emission. Here we examine whether the spectral energy distribution (SED) and dust temperature of galaxies have strongly evolved over the last 80% of the age of the Universe. We discuss possible consequences for the determination of star-formation rates (SFR) and any evidence for a major change in their star-formation properties. We use Herschel deep extragalactic surveys from 100 to 500 μm to compute total IR luminosities in galaxies down to the faintest levels, using PACS and SPIRE in the GOODS-North field (PEP and HerMES key programs). An extension to fainter luminosities is done by stacking images on 24 μm prior positions. We show that measurements in the SPIRE bands can be used below the statistical confusion limit if information at higher spatial resolution is used, e.g. at 24 μm, to identify “isolated” galaxies whose flux is not boosted by bright neighbors. Below z 1.5, mid-IR extrapolations are correct for star-forming galaxies with a dispersion of only 40% (0.15 dex), therefore similar to z 0 galaxies, over three decades in luminosity below the regime of ultra-luminous IR galaxies (ULIRGs, LIR ≥ 1012 Lsun). This narrow distribution is puzzling when considering the range of physical processes that could have affected the SED of these galaxies. Extrapolations from only one of the 160 μm, 250 μm or 350 μm bands alone tend to overestimate the total IR luminosity. This may be explained by the lack of far-IR constraints around and above 150 μm (rest-frame) before Herschel on those templates. We also note that the dust temperature of luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs, LIR ≥ 1011 Lsun) around z 1 is mildly colder by 10-15% than their local analogs and up to 20% for ULIRGs at z 1.6 (using a single modified blackbody-fit to the peak far-IR emission with an

  14. Connectives: Fitting Another Piece of the Vocabulary Instruction Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Amy C.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2013-01-01

    Connectives (e.g., although, consequently, in contrast) are often considered the "signposts" of texts. In this article we argue that connectives represent a special kind of vocabulary knowledge that students need to develop both in order to read challenging, academic texts with understanding and to produce academic writing. Yet tapping…

  15. Microstructural and crystallographic imperfections of MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire and their correlation with the critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Oh, Sangjun; Choi, Seyong; Maeda, Minoru; Hata, Satoshi; Shimada, Yusuke; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Kim, Jung Ho

    2014-01-15

    A comprehensive study of the effects of structural imperfections in MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire has been conducted. As the sintering temperature becomes lower, the structural imperfections of the MgB{sub 2} material are increased, as reflected by detailed X-ray refinement and the normal state resistivity. The crystalline imperfections, caused by lattice disorder, directly affect the impurity scattering between the π and σ bands of MgB{sub 2}, resulting in a larger upper critical field. In addition, low sintering temperature keeps the grain size small, which leads to a strong enhancement of pinning, and thereby, enhanced critical current density. Owing to both the impurity scattering and the grain boundary pinning, the critical current density, irreversibility field, and upper critical field are enhanced. Residual voids or porosities obviously remain in the MgB{sub 2}, however, even at low sintering temperature, and thus block current transport paths.

  16. Lower bound for the spatial extent of localized modes in photonic-crystal waveguides with small random imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggiani, Rémi; Baron, Alexandre; Zang, Xiaorun; Lalouat, Loïc; Schulz, Sebastian A.; O'Regan, Bryan; Vynck, Kevin; Cluzel, Benoît; de Fornel, Frédérique; Krauss, Thomas F.; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Light localization due to random imperfections in periodic media is paramount in photonics research. The group index is known to be a key parameter for localization near photonic band edges, since small group velocities reinforce light interaction with imperfections. Here, we show that the size of the smallest localized mode that is formed at the band edge of a one-dimensional periodic medium is driven instead by the effective photon mass, i.e. the flatness of the dispersion curve. Our theoretical prediction is supported by numerical simulations, which reveal that photonic-crystal waveguides can exhibit surprisingly small localized modes, much smaller than those observed in Bragg stacks thanks to their larger effective photon mass. This possibility is demonstrated experimentally with a photonic-crystal waveguide fabricated without any intentional disorder, for which near-field measurements allow us to distinctly observe a wavelength-scale localized mode despite the smallness (~1/1000 of a wavelength) of the fabrication imperfections.

  17. Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariq, Syed Z.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of rapidly expanding technologies for distribution and dissemination of information and knowledge has brought to focus the opportunities for development of knowledge-based networks, knowledge dissemination and knowledge management technologies and their potential applications for enhancing productivity of knowledge work. The challenging and complex problems of the future can be best addressed by developing the knowledge management as a new discipline based on an integrative synthesis of hard and soft sciences. A knowledge management professional society can provide a framework for catalyzing the development of proposed synthesis as well as serve as a focal point for coordination of professional activities in the strategic areas of education, research and technology development. Preliminary concepts for the development of the knowledge management discipline and the professional society are explored. Within this context of knowledge management discipline and the professional society, potential opportunities for application of information technologies for more effectively delivering or transferring information and knowledge (i.e., resulting from the NASA's Mission to Planet Earth) for the development of policy options in critical areas of national and global importance (i.e., policy decisions in economic and environmental areas) can be explored, particularly for those policy areas where a global collaborative knowledge network is likely to be critical to the acceptance of the policies.

  18. Analytical predictions for vibration phase shifts along fluid-conveying pipes due to Coriolis forces and imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Dahl, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    Resonant vibrations of a fluid-conveying pipe are investigated, with special consideration to axial shifts in vibration phase accompanying fluid flow and various imperfections. This is relevant for understanding elastic wave propagation in general, and for the design and trouble-shooting of phase-shift measuring devices such as Coriolis mass flowmeters in particular. Small imperfections related to elastic and dissipative support conditions are specifically addressed, but the suggested approach is readily applicable to other kinds of imperfection, e.g. non-uniform stiffness or mass, non-proportional damping, weak nonlinearity, and flow pulsation. A multiple time scaling perturbation analysis is employed for a simple model of an imperfect fluid-conveying pipe. This leads to simple analytical expressions for the approximate prediction of phase shift, providing direct insight into which imperfections affect phase shift, and in which manner. The analytical predictions are tested against results obtained by pure numerical analysis using a Galerkin expansion, showing very good agreement. For small imperfections the analytical predictions are thus comparable in accuracy to numerical simulation, but provide much more insight. This may aid in creating practically useful hypotheses that hold more generally for real systems of complex geometry, e.g. that asymmetry or non-proportionality in axial distribution of damping will induce phase shifts in a manner similar to that of fluid flow, while the symmetric part of damping as well as non-uniformity in mass or stiffness do not affect phase shift. The validity of such hypotheses can be tested using detailed fluid-structure interaction computer models or laboratory experiments.

  19. Automated knowledge-base refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Raymond J.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last several years, we have developed several systems for automatically refining incomplete and incorrect knowledge bases. These systems are given an imperfect rule base and a set of training examples and minimally modify the knowledge base to make it consistent with the examples. One of our most recent systems, FORTE, revises first-order Horn-clause knowledge bases. This system can be viewed as automatically debugging Prolog programs based on examples of correct and incorrect I/O pairs. In fact, we have already used the system to debug simple Prolog programs written by students in a programming language course. FORTE has also been used to automatically induce and revise qualitative models of several continuous dynamic devices from qualitative behavior traces. For example, it has been used to induce and revise a qualitative model of a portion of the Reaction Control System (RCS) of the NASA Space Shuttle. By fitting a correct model of this portion of the RCS to simulated qualitative data from a faulty system, FORTE was also able to correctly diagnose simple faults in this system.

  20. Stochastic modeling of imperfect Salmonella vaccines in an adult dairy herd.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Smith, Rebecca L; Karns, Jeffrey S; Hovingh, Ernest; Schukken, Ynte H

    2014-03-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of bacterial foodborne disease. Human salmonellosis results in significant public health concerns and a considerable economic burden. Dairy cattle are recognized as a key source of several Salmonella serovars that are a threat to human health. To lower the risk of Salmonella infection, reduction of Salmonella prevalence in dairy cattle is important. Vaccination as a control measure has been applied for reduction of preharvest Salmonella prevalence on dairy farms. Salmonella vaccines are usually imperfect (i.e., vaccines may provide a partial protection for susceptible animals, reduce the infectiousness and shedding level, shorten the infectious period of infected animals, and/or curb the number of clinical cases), and evaluation of the potential impacts of imperfect Salmonella vaccines at the farm level is valuable to design effective intervention strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of imperfect Salmonella vaccines on the stochastic transmission dynamics in an adult dairy herd. To this end, we developed a semi-stochastic and individual-based continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) vaccination model with both direct and indirect transmission, and applied the CTMC vaccination model to Salmonella Cerro transmission in an adult dairy herd. Our results show that vaccines shortening the infectious period are most effective in reducing prevalence, and vaccines decreasing host susceptibility are most effective in reducing the outbreak size. Vaccines with multiple moderate efficacies may have the same effectiveness as vaccines with a single high efficacy in reducing prevalence, time to extinction, and outbreak size. Although the environment component has negligible contributions to the prevalence, time to extinction, and outbreak size for Salmonella Cerro in the herd, the relative importance of environment component was not assessed. This study indicates that an effective vaccination program against Salmonella Cerro

  1. A numerical investigation of the effects of imperfect premixing on flame propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido-Lopez, David

    2005-07-01

    Gasoline direct-injection engines and lean-premixed prevaporized combustors have recently emerged as promising technologies for improving combustion efficiency and pollutant emission. In both applications, the time available for the mixing of fuel and oxidizer prior to combustion may be insufficient for the mixture to acquire a homogeneous composition, and this thesis addresses the propagation of premixed flames under such conditions. Previous numerical studies, owing to severe spatio-temporal limitations, have been unable to provide a clear picture of what to expect from the effects of imperfect premixing on turbulent flames, and have not found agreement with existing experimental data. In this study, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flame propagation in inhomogeneous mixtures with imposed velocity fluctuations are carried out. To avoid aforementioned limitations and to account for important flame dynamics such as the hydrodynamic instability, a configuration that permits larger domains and longer times than previously accessed by DNS is employed. The simulated flows are unavoidably restricted to two dimensions. One-step chemistry and Fick's diffusion law are considered, along with unity Lewis number assumption. It is observed that relatively weak fluctuations in composition alone may lead to a large increase in flame wrinkling and propagation speed, consistent with experimental findings. The hydrodynamic instability caused by gas expansion is found to be responsible for such strong flame response. However, the impact of composition fluctuations diminishes as velocity fluctuations present become more intense, and eventually imperfect premixing ceases to affect the flame brush speed. This effect is explained based on the numerical results, and a criterion for the transition from one regime to the other is provided. It is also found that imperfect premixing always affects the structure of the flame brush. A gradual change in the composition of the unburnt

  2. Hierarchical spatial models of abundance and occurrence from imperfect survey data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Kery, M.; Gautier, R.; Schmid, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Many estimation and inference problems arising from large-scale animal surveys are focused on developing an understanding of patterns in abundance or occurrence of a species based on spatially referenced count data. One fundamental challenge, then, is that it is generally not feasible to completely enumerate ('census') all individuals present in each sample unit. This observation bias may consist of several components, including spatial coverage bias (not all individuals in the Population are exposed to sampling) and detection bias (exposed individuals may go undetected). Thus, observations are biased for the state variable (abundance, occupancy) that is the object of inference. Moreover, data are often sparse for most observation locations, requiring consideration of methods for spatially aggregating or otherwise combining sparse data among sample units. The development of methods that unify spatial statistical models with models accommodating non-detection is necessary to resolve important spatial inference problems based on animal survey data. In this paper, we develop a novel hierarchical spatial model for estimation of abundance and occurrence from survey data wherein detection is imperfect. Our application is focused on spatial inference problems in the Swiss Survey of Common Breeding Birds. The observation model for the survey data is specified conditional on the unknown quadrat population size, N(s). We augment the observation model with a spatial process model for N(s), describing the spatial variation in abundance of the species. The model includes explicit sources of variation in habitat structure (forest, elevation) and latent variation in the form of a correlated spatial process. This provides a model-based framework for combining the spatially referenced samples while at the same time yielding a unified treatment of estimation problems involving both abundance and occurrence. We provide a Bayesian framework for analysis and prediction based on the

  3. Imperfect asymmetry of life: earth microbial communities prefer D-lactate but can use L-lactate also.

    PubMed

    Moazeni, Faegheh; Zhang, Gaosen; Sun, Henry J

    2010-05-01

    Asymmetrical utilization of chiral compounds has been sought on Mars as evidence for biological activity. This method was recently validated in glucose. Earth organisms utilize D-glucose, not L-glucose, a perfect asymmetry. In this study, we tested the method in lactate and found utilization of both enantiomers. Soil-, sediment-, and lake-borne microbial communities prefer D-lactate but can consume L-lactate if given extra time to acclimate. This situation is termed imperfect asymmetry. Future life-detection mission investigators need to be aware of imperfect asymmetry so as not to miss relatively subtle signs of life. PMID:20528194

  4. The Role of Inhibitory Control in Children's Cooperative Behaviors during a Structured Puzzle Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Burk, William J.; Ciairano, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated…

  5. Games and Puzzles in the Second Language Classroom: A Second Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danesi, Marcel; Mollica, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Revisits puzzleology (the study of puzzles and games in human cultures) in second language teaching to give the teacher an overview of the relevant facts "vis-a-vis" their incorporation into classroom instruction and to provide an elementary typology of puzzleological techniques for the teacher interested in incorporating them in language classes.…

  6. Children with Praderwilli Syndrome Vs. Williams Syndrome: Indirect Effects on Parents during a Jigsaw Puzzle Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ly, T. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Genetic disorders predispose individuals to exhibit characteristic behaviours, which in turn elicit particular behaviours from others. In response to the strength of Prader?Willi syndrome (PWS) and weakness of Williams syndrome (WS) in visual-spatial tasks such as jigsaw puzzles, parents' behaviours can be affected by their child's…

  7. Gardner's Two Children Problems and Variations: Puzzles with Conditional Probability and Sample Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Wendy; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This article presents "The Two Children Problem," published by Martin Gardner, who wrote a famous and widely-read math puzzle column in the magazine "Scientific American," and a problem presented by puzzler Gary Foshee. This paper explains the paradox of Problems 2 and 3 and many other variations of the theme. Then the authors…

  8. (Mis)perception of Sleep in Insomnia: A Puzzle and a Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Allison G.; Tang, Nicole K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is prevalent, causing severe distress and impairment. This review focuses on illuminating the puzzling finding that many insomnia patients misperceive their sleep. They overestimate their sleep onset latency (SOL) and underestimate their total sleep time (TST), relative to objective measures. This tendency is ubiquitous (although not…

  9. The Retention Puzzle Reconsidered: Second Year Student Attitudes and Experiences with Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Michael Edward

    2013-01-01

    College student retention has been described as a puzzle because retention rates have stagnated, and in some cases declined, despite over seventy years of research into the problem. The magnitude of the problem is that 50 percent of college students will leave their institution before obtaining a degree (Braxton, Hirschy, & McClendon, 2011).…

  10. New Light on Autism and Other Puzzling Disorders of Childhood. Science Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahraes, Herbert

    The pamphlet discusses several puzzling disorders of childhood, including autism, atypical personality development (childhood psychosis), psychosocial dwarfism, and Tourette's syndrome. Psychosocial dwarfism is said to be characterized by a marked reduction in physical development and by immaturity in behavior, while Tourette's syndrome involves…

  11. Random Tree-Puzzle leads to the Yule-Harding distribution.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Le Sy; Fuehrer, Andrea; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2011-02-01

    Approaches to reconstruct phylogenies abound and are widely used in the study of molecular evolution. Partially through extensive simulations, we are beginning to understand the potential pitfalls as well as the advantages of different methods. However, little work has been done on possible biases introduced by the methods if the input data are random and do not carry any phylogenetic signal. Although Tree-Puzzle (Strimmer K, von Haeseler A. 1996. Quartet puzzling: a quartet maximum-likelihood method for reconstructing tree topologies. Mol Biol Evol. 13:964-969; Schmidt HA, Strimmer K, Vingron M, von Haeseler A. 2002. Tree-Puzzle: maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis using quartets and parallel computing. Bioinformatics 18:502-504) has become common in phylogenetics, the resulting distribution of labeled unrooted bifurcating trees when data do not carry any phylogenetic signal has not been investigated. Our note shows that the distribution converges to the well-known Yule-Harding distribution. However, the bias of the Yule-Harding distribution will be diminished by a tiny amount of phylogenetic information. maximum likelihood, phylogenetic reconstruction, Tree-Puzzle, tree distribution, Yule-Harding distribution.

  12. Booklists for the Teaching of Mathematics in Schools: Puzzles, Problems, Games and Mathematical Recreations (Ref: PGR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association, Leicester (England).

    Presented is a listing of books recommended by the Mathematical Association of the United Kingdom dealing with Puzzles, Problems, Games, and Mathematical Recreations. The following information on each book is provided: author; title; publisher; cost to the nearest pound; categories of use; and a code that indicates if the book in question is out…

  13. A Public-Key Based Authentication and Key Establishment Protocol Coupled with a Client Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, M. C.; Fung, Chun-Kan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses network denial-of-service attacks which have become a security threat to the Internet community and suggests the need for reliable authentication protocols in client-server applications. Presents a public-key based authentication and key establishment protocol coupled with a client puzzle protocol and validates it through formal logic…

  14. Spatial Puzzles and the Assessment of Children's Problem-Solving Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Douglas M.; Redden, Michael G.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy fifth-grade students in Australia were observed as each solved a jigsaw puzzle. Boys obtained higher scores on a measure of cognitive style and took less time to complete the jigsaw task; the two measures were significantly correlated. Uses of tangrams are also discussed. (MNS)

  15. Tangrams: An Ancient Chinese Puzzle. A Conceptual Skill Development Kit for All Grade Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubota, Carol

    A multi-subject approach to using tangram puzzles in the classroom is included along with a short history section and accompanying lessons. These lessons provide an introduction to tangrams; methods for teaching bilingual and English-dominant children concepts and skills through activities that do not require strong English skills; and activities…

  16. Jigsaw Puzzles and River Banks: Two Ways of Picturing Our Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretchmar, R. Scott

    2005-01-01

    The papers presented at the 2004 Academy meetings can be thought of as pieces from jigsaw puzzles. While the employment of this metaphor over the years has been useful, we may be ready for a new image, one that is both more accurate and inspiring. We can picture ourselves working at different locations along a river bank. Some of us work upstream,…

  17. High-mass twins & resolution of the reconfinement, masquerade and hyperon puzzles of compact star interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, David; Alvarez-Castillo, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We aim at contributing to the resolution of three of the fundamental puzzles related to the still unsolved problem of the structure of the dense core of compact stars (CS): (i) the hyperon puzzle: how to reconcile pulsar masses of 2 M⊙ with the hyperon softening of the equation of state (EoS); (ii) the masquerade problem: modern EoS for cold, high density hadronic and quark matter are almost identical; and (iii) the reconfinement puzzle: what to do when after a deconfinement transition the hadronic EoS becomes favorable again? We show that taking into account the compositeness of baryons (by excluded volume and/or quark Pauli blocking) on the hadronic side and confining and stiffening effects on the quark matter side results in an early phase transition to quark matter with sufficient stiffening at high densities which removes all three present-day puzzles of CS interiors. Moreover, in this new class of EoS for hybrid CS falls the interesting case of a strong first order phase transition which results in the observable high mass twin star phenomenon, an astrophysical observation of a critical endpoint in the QCD phase diagram.

  18. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  19. Instructional Media Production for Early Childhood Education: A. B. C. Jig-Saw Puzzle, a Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudashiru Olalere; Olanrewaju, Olatayo Solomon; Soetan, Aderonke K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a. b. c. jig-saw puzzle was produced for early childhood education using local materials. This study was a production based type of research, to serve as a supplemental or total learning resource. Its production followed four phases of development referred to as information, design, production and evaluation. The storyboard cards,…

  20. Parents' Attributions of Their Child's Jigsaw-Puzzle Performance: Comparing Two Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ly, Tran M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    Parents' attributions of the jigsaw-puzzle performance of their child with Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 20) or Williams syndrome (n = 21) were examined. Parents in both groups placed more importance on internal versus external attributions. Parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome exhibited a hedonic bias by attributing their child's success…

  1. Enhancing the Understanding of Government and Nonprofit Accounting with THE PUZZLE GAME: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elson, Raymond J.; Ostapski, S. Andrew; O'Callaghan, Susanne; Walker, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional teaching aids such as crossword puzzles have been successfully used in the classroom to enhance student learning. Government and nonprofit accounting is a confusing course for students since it has strange terminologies and contradicts the accounting concepts learned in other courses. As such, it is an ideal course for a…

  2. Puzzling Moments, Teachable Moments: Practicing Teacher Research in Urban Classrooms. Practitioners Inquiry Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballenger, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    In her new book, bestselling author Cynthia Ballenger explores the intellectual strengths of students that teachers find "puzzling"--poor, urban, immigrant, or bilingual children who do not traditionally excel in school. Ballenger challenges the assumption that these children--whose families in many cases have less formal education, read fewer…

  3. Engaging Students in a Large Lecture: An Experiment Using Sudoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Caroline; Hahn, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an in-class experiment that is easy to implement with large groups of students. The experiment takes approximately 15-20 minutes to run and involves each student completing one of four types of Sudoku puzzles and recording the time it takes to completion. The resulting data set can be used as a teaching tool at an…

  4. The Quark Puzzle: A Novel Approach to Visualizing the Color Symmetries of Quarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettrust, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple hands-on and visual-method designed to introduce physics students of many age groups to the topic of quarks and their role in forming composite particles (baryons and mesons). A set of puzzle pieces representing individual quarks that fit together in ways consistent with known restrictions of flavor, color, and charge…

  5. Schooling, Cognitive Skills, and the Latin American Growth Puzzle. NBER Working Paper No. 15066

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Woessmann, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Economic development in Latin America has trailed most other world regions over the past four decades despite its relatively high initial development and school attainment levels. This puzzle can be resolved by considering the actual learning as expressed in tests of cognitive skills, on which Latin American countries consistently perform at the…

  6. Model On DROID Response With Imperfect Trapping Tested On Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Wigmore, J. K.; Venn, R.

    2009-12-01

    The DROID (Distributed Read-Out Imaging Detector) is being developed to overcome the limitation in sensitive area with the use of single STJ's (Superconducting Tunnel Junctions). The DROID configuration allows the reconstruction of the position of the photon absorption and therefore it can replace a number of single STJ's in a detector array. We present a 2D model which describes the response of DROIDs with partial trapping in the STJs. The model describes diffusion of quasiparticles (qps) and imperfect confinement via exchange of qps between the absorber and STJ. It incorporates possible diffusion mismatch between absorber and STJ, possible asymmetry between the STJs as well as between the base and top electrodes of the STJs, and photon absorption in the absorber or base or top film of the STJ. Dedicated experiments have been conducted to test the different aspects of the model. We find a good agreement between the model and experimental results.

  7. The perimeter generating functions of three-choice, imperfect, and one-punctured staircase polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, M.; van Hoeij, M.; Maillard, J.-M.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the isotropic perimeter generating functions of three-choice, imperfect, and one-punctured staircase polygons, whose 8th order linear Fuchsian ODEs are previously known. We derive simple relationships between the three generating functions, and show that all three generating functions are joint solutions of a common 12th order Fuchsian linear ODE. We find that the 8th order differential operators can each be rewritten as a direct sum of a direct product, with operators no larger than 3rd order. We give closed-form expressions for all the solutions of these operators in terms of 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions with rational and algebraic arguments. The solutions of these linear differential operators can in fact be expressed in terms of two modular forms, since these 2 F 1 hypergeometric functions can be expressed with two, rational or algebraic, pullbacks. Dedicated to A J Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  8. Modal interactions in primary and subharmonic resonant dynamics of imperfect microplates with geometric nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhi, Hamed; Ghayesh, Mergen H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyses the modal interactions in the nonlinear, size-dependent dynamics of geometrically imperfect microplates. Based on the modified couple stress theory, the equations of motion for the in-plane and out-of-plane motions are obtained employing the von Kármán plate theory as well as Kirchhoff's hypotheses by means of the Lagrange equations. The equations of motions are solved using the pseudo-arclength continuation technique and direct time-integration method. The system parameters are tuned to the values associated with modal interactions, and then nonlinear resonant responses and energy transfer are analysed. Nonlinear motion characteristics are shown in the form of frequency-response and force-response curves, time histories, phase-plane portraits, and fast Fourier transforms.

  9. Arrival times and temporal moments of breakthrough curves for an imperfectly stratified aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    A solution in Laplace transform space is obtained for transport of resident concentration in an imperfectly but yet highly stratified porous medium. From this transform-space solution either temporal moments can be derived by taking derivatives with respect to the Laplace parameter, or the transform-space solution can be inverted numerically to obtain breakthrough curves for the mean concentration. When compared to an equivalent solution with a Fickian dispersive flux, these temporal moments indicate the extent to which transport in heterogeneous porous media deviates from classifical Fickian behaviour. The numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution gives partial breakthrough curves for the mean concentration which have the appearance of conflicting with the derived moment information. A hypothesis is put forth which resolves this apparent conflict; this hypothesis is verified by adding a component of local dispersion to the governing transport equation. -from Author

  10. A multiple-scales model of the shock-cell structure of imperfectly expanded supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Jackson, J. A.; Seiner, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the development of an analytical model of the quasi-periodic shock-cell structure of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet. The investigation represents a part of a program to develop a mathematical theory of broadband shock-associated noise of supersonic jets. Tam and Tanna (1982) have suggested that this type of noise is generated by the weak interaction between the quasi-periodic shock cells and the downstream-propagating large turbulence structures in the mixing layer of the jet. In the model developed in this paper, the effect of turbulence in the mixing layer of the jet is simulated by the addition of turbulent eddy-viscosity terms to the momentum equation. Attention is given to the mean-flow profile and the numerical solution, and a comparison of the numerical results with experimental data.

  11. Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Protein Crystals with Coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    High angular-resolution x-ray diffraction and phase contrast x-ray imaging were combined to study defects and perfection of protein crystals. Imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of a uniformly grown lysozyme crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in diffraction images. X-ray imaging and diffraction characterization of the quality of apoferritin crystals will also be discussed in the presentation.

  12. Resource distribution in multiple attacks with imperfect detection of the attack outcome.

    PubMed

    Levitin, Gregory; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-02-01

    This article extends the previous research of consecutive attacks strategy by assuming that an attacker observes the outcome of each attack imperfectly. With given probabilities it may wrongly identify a destroyed target as undestroyed, and wrongly identify an undestroyed target as destroyed. The outcome of each attack is determined by a contest success function that depends on the amount of resources allocated by the defender and the attacker to each attack. The article suggests a probabilistic model of the multiple attacks and analyzes how the target destruction probability and the attacker's relative resource expenditure are impacted by the two probabilities of incorrect observation, the attacker's and defender's resource ratio, the contest intensity, the number of attacks, and the resource distribution across attacks. We analyze how the attacker chooses the number of attacks, the attack stopping rule, and the optimal resource distribution across attacks to maximize its utility.

  13. Fabrication of colloidal photonic crystal heterostructures free of interface imperfection based on solvent vapor annealing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomiao; Zhao, Duobiao; Geng, Chong; Zhang, Lijing; Tan, Tianya; Hu, Mingzhe; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-11-15

    We describe the transformation of a colloidal photonic crystal into a photonic crystal heterostructure. It was achieved by annealing a polystyrene multilayer colloidal photonic crystal partially immersed in water using a solvent vapor. The floating polystyrene colloidal photonic crystal was divided into two parts by the liquid level, which can be manipulated by the addition of ethanol into the water. The top part protruding out of the water experienced a uniform lattice stretching upon exposure to the solvent vapor. The bottom part that stayed immersed in the water remained unaffected due to the protection by the water. The inconsistent behaviors of the two parts resulted in the formation of a colloidal photonic crystal heterostructure. Such a heterostructure was free of interface imperfection since it was a direct descendant of the original colloidal crystal. Meanwhile, optical measurements demonstrated the presence of a wider photonic band gap along the crystallographic [111] direction in these photonic crystal heterostructures compared with the original colloidal photonic crystals.

  14. On the role of interface imperfections in thermoelectric nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangtao; Nagy, Peter B.

    1998-07-01

    This letter draws attention to a previously unnoticed artifact associated with the most common type of thermoelectric nondestructive materials characterization technique. It is shown that contact heating between the specimen to be tested and the reference electrode gives rise to a considerable offset in the measured thermoelectric voltage. The resulting bias significantly reduces the feasibility of thermoelectric measurements in nondestructive testing applications that require sensitive materials discrimination, for example, to sort metals of similar alloying content, to distinguish similar grades of heat treatment, and to detect slight variations in the thermoelectric power of metals due to hardening, texture, fatigue, etc. It is also suggested that the demonstrated intrinsic sensitivity of the thermoelectric contact technique to imperfect interfaces could be exploited for nondestructive detection of tightly compressed but metallurgically not bonded interfaces in spot welds, diffusion bonds, and other types of solid-state bonds.

  15. Do cancer cells undergo phenotypic switching? The case for imperfect cancer stem cell markers

    PubMed Central

    Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of cancer stem cells in vivo and in vitro relies on specific surface markers that should allow to sort cancer cells in phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Experiments report that sorted cancer cell populations after some time tend to express again all the original markers, leading to the hypothesis of phenotypic switching, according to which cancer cells can transform stochastically into cancer stem cells. Here we explore an alternative explanation based on the hypothesis that markers are not perfect and are thus unable to identify all cancer stem cells. Our analysis is based on a mathematical model for cancer cell proliferation that takes into account phenotypic switching, imperfect markers and error in the sorting process. Our conclusion is that the observation of reversible expression of surface markers after sorting does not provide sufficient evidence in support of phenotypic switching. PMID:22679555

  16. Some Classes of Imperfect Information Finite State-Space Stochastic Games with Finite-Dimensional Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McEneaney, William M.

    2004-08-15

    Stochastic games under imperfect information are typically computationally intractable even in the discrete-time/discrete-state case considered here. We consider a problem where one player has perfect information.A function of a conditional probability distribution is proposed as an information state.In the problem form here, the payoff is only a function of the terminal state of the system,and the initial information state is either linear ora sum of max-plus delta functions.When the initial information state belongs to these classes, its propagation is finite-dimensional.The state feedback value function is also finite-dimensional,and obtained via dynamic programming,but has a nonstandard form due to the necessity of an expanded state variable.Under a saddle point assumption,Certainty Equivalence is obtained and the proposed function is indeed an information state.

  17. Intraocular Ossification in the GSP/pe Chicken With Imperfect Albinism.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, K; Kinoshita, K; Mizutani, M; Oshima, A; Yamashita, R; Matsuda, Y

    2015-07-01

    The eyes of 2 male and 2 female GSP/pe chickens, the imperfect albino strain, were investigated at 52 weeks of age. Aged chickens of the GSP/pe colony became blind with bilateral ocular enlargement and opaque lenses. Affected eyes (bilateral in 2 males and unilateral in 2 females) were hard and difficult to section; histologic specimens were processed after decalcification. A large portion of the posterior chamber was occupied by cancellous bone containing fibrous and cartilaginous foci. Osseous tissues developed adjacent to the choroid, and no retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected between osseous tissues and the choroid. Small segments of degenerate neuronal retina were scattered in the osseous tissue. The irises and ciliary bodies were deformed by osseous tissue, and the lenses had severe cataracts. These observations suggest that the intraocular osseous tissue may be derived from RPE in the hereditary incomplete-albino strain of chickens.

  18. Intraocular Ossification in the GSP/pe Chicken With Imperfect Albinism.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, K; Kinoshita, K; Mizutani, M; Oshima, A; Yamashita, R; Matsuda, Y

    2015-07-01

    The eyes of 2 male and 2 female GSP/pe chickens, the imperfect albino strain, were investigated at 52 weeks of age. Aged chickens of the GSP/pe colony became blind with bilateral ocular enlargement and opaque lenses. Affected eyes (bilateral in 2 males and unilateral in 2 females) were hard and difficult to section; histologic specimens were processed after decalcification. A large portion of the posterior chamber was occupied by cancellous bone containing fibrous and cartilaginous foci. Osseous tissues developed adjacent to the choroid, and no retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) was detected between osseous tissues and the choroid. Small segments of degenerate neuronal retina were scattered in the osseous tissue. The irises and ciliary bodies were deformed by osseous tissue, and the lenses had severe cataracts. These observations suggest that the intraocular osseous tissue may be derived from RPE in the hereditary incomplete-albino strain of chickens. PMID:25421422

  19. Correction of small imperfections on white glazed china surfaces by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Képíró, I.; Osvay, K.; Divall, M.

    2007-07-01

    A laser-assisted technique has been developed for correction of small diameter (1 mm) and shallow (0.5 mm) imperfections on the surface of gloss fired porcelain. To study the physics and establish the important parameters, artificially made holes in a porcelain sample have been first filled with correction material, then covered with raw glaze and treated by a pulsed, 7 kHz repetition rate CO 2 laser at 10.6 μm. The modification of the surface and the surrounding area have been quantified and studied with a large range of parameters of incident laser power (1-10 W), width of the laser pulses (10-125 μs) and duration of laser heating (60-480 s). Although the shine of the treated area, defined as the distribution of micro-droplets on the surface, is very similar to the untreated surfaces, the surroundings of the treated area usually show cracks. The measurement of both the spatial temperature distribution and the temporal cooling rate of the treated surface has revealed that a simple melting process always results in high gradient temperature distribution within the irradiated zone. Its inhomogeneous and fast cooling always generate at least micro-cracks on the surface within a few seconds after the laser was turned off. The duration and intensity of the laser irradiation have been then optimized in order to achieve the fastest possible melting of the surface, but without producing such high temperature gradients. To eliminate the cracks, more elaborated pre-heating and slowed-cooling-rate processes have been tried with prosperous results. These achievements complete our previous study, making possible to repair the most common surface imperfections and holes of gloss fired china samples.

  20. Ignoring imperfect detection in biological surveys is dangerous: a response to 'fitting and interpreting occupancy models'.

    PubMed

    Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Lahoz-Monfort, José J; MacKenzie, Darryl I; Wintle, Brendan A; McCarthy, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper, Welsh, Lindenmayer and Donnelly (WLD) question the usefulness of models that estimate species occupancy while accounting for detectability. WLD claim that these models are difficult to fit and argue that disregarding detectability can be better than trying to adjust for it. We think that this conclusion and subsequent recommendations are not well founded and may negatively impact the quality of statistical inference in ecology and related management decisions. Here we respond to WLD's claims, evaluating in detail their arguments, using simulations and/or theory to support our points. In particular, WLD argue that both disregarding and accounting for imperfect detection lead to the same estimator performance regardless of sample size when detectability is a function of abundance. We show that this, the key result of their paper, only holds for cases of extreme heterogeneity like the single scenario they considered. Our results illustrate the dangers of disregarding imperfect detection. When ignored, occupancy and detection are confounded: the same naïve occupancy estimates can be obtained for very different true levels of occupancy so the size of the bias is unknowable. Hierarchical occupancy models separate occupancy and detection, and imprecise estimates simply indicate that more data are required for robust inference about the system in question. As for any statistical method, when underlying assumptions of simple hierarchical models are violated, their reliability is reduced. Resorting in those instances where hierarchical occupancy models do no perform well to the naïve occupancy estimator does not provide a satisfactory solution. The aim should instead be to achieve better estimation, by minimizing the effect of these issues during design, data collection and analysis, ensuring that the right amount of data is collected and model assumptions are met, considering model extensions where appropriate.

  1. Robust THP Transceiver Designs for Multiuser MIMO Downlink with Imperfect CSIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubaidulla, P.; Chockalingam, A.

    2009-12-01

    We present robust joint nonlinear transceiver designs for multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) downlink in the presence of imperfections in the channel state information at the transmitter (CSIT). The base station (BS) is equipped with multiple transmit antennas, and each user terminal is equipped with one or more receive antennas. The BS employs Tomlinson-Harashima precoding (THP) for interuser interference precancellation at the transmitter. We consider robust transceiver designs that jointly optimize the transmit THP filters and receive filter for two models of CSIT errors. The first model is a stochastic error (SE) model, where the CSIT error is Gaussian-distributed. This model is applicable when the CSIT error is dominated by channel estimation error. In this case, the proposed robust transceiver design seeks to minimize a stochastic function of the sum mean square error (SMSE) under a constraint on the total BS transmit power. We propose an iterative algorithm to solve this problem. The other model we consider is a norm-bounded error (NBE) model, where the CSIT error can be specified by an uncertainty set. This model is applicable when the CSIT error is dominated by quantization errors. In this case, we consider a worst-case design. For this model, we consider robust (i) minimum SMSE, (ii) MSE-constrained, and (iii) MSE-balancing transceiver designs. We propose iterative algorithms to solve these problems, wherein each iteration involves a pair of semidefinite programs (SDPs). Further, we consider an extension of the proposed algorithm to the case with per-antenna power constraints. We evaluate the robustness of the proposed algorithms to imperfections in CSIT through simulation, and show that the proposed robust designs outperform nonrobust designs as well as robust linear transceiver designs reported in the recent literature.

  2. The missing piece in the acid-rain puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Powicki, C.R.

    1989-09-01

    This article discusses the role of geology in acid precipitation research and water quality. Knowledge of the composition and reactivity of the soil and bedrock through which acid precipitation flows is necessary to predict its effects on a body of water. Acidification not only has direct impacts, through water quality changes in water bodies, but also indirect long-term effects attributable to weathering rates. Once the capacity of the soil to buffer acidic loading is exceeded, sudden changes in soil chemistry may occur with dramatic effects on dependent biota.

  3. The puzzle of Italian rice origin and evolution: determining genetic divergence and affinity of rice germplasm from Italy and Asia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xingxing; Fan, Jing; Jiang, Zhuxi; Basso, Barbara; Sala, Francesco; Spada, Alberto; Grassi, Fabrizio; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of genetic divergence and relationships of a set of germplasm is essential for its efficient applications in crop breeding and understanding of the origin/evolution of crop varieties from a given geographical region. As the largest rice producing country in Europe, Italy holds rice germplasm with abundant genetic diversity. Although Italian rice varieties and the traditional ones in particular have played important roles in rice production and breeding, knowledge concerning the origin and evolution of Italian traditional varieties is still limited. To solve the puzzle of Italian rice origin, we characterized genetic divergence and relationships of 348 rice varieties from Italy and Asia based on the polymorphisms of microsatellite fingerprints. We also included common wild rice O. rufipogon as a reference in the characterization. Results indicated relatively rich genetic diversity (H(e) = 0.63-0.65) in Italian rice varieties. Further analyses revealed a close genetic relationship of the Italian traditional varieties with those from northern China, which provides strong genetic evidence for tracing the possible origin of early established rice varieties in Italy. These findings have significant implications for the rice breeding programs, in which appropriate germplasm can be selected from a given region and utilized for transferring unique genetic traits based on its genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships.

  4. The Puzzle of Italian Rice Origin and Evolution: Determining Genetic Divergence and Affinity of Rice Germplasm from Italy and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhuxi; Basso, Barbara; Sala, Francesco; Spada, Alberto; Grassi, Fabrizio; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of genetic divergence and relationships of a set of germplasm is essential for its efficient applications in crop breeding and understanding of the origin/evolution of crop varieties from a given geographical region. As the largest rice producing country in Europe, Italy holds rice germplasm with abundant genetic diversity. Although Italian rice varieties and the traditional ones in particular have played important roles in rice production and breeding, knowledge concerning the origin and evolution of Italian traditional varieties is still limited. To solve the puzzle of Italian rice origin, we characterized genetic divergence and relationships of 348 rice varieties from Italy and Asia based on the polymorphisms of microsatellite fingerprints. We also included common wild rice O. rufipogon as a reference in the characterization. Results indicated relatively rich genetic diversity (He = 0.63-0.65) in Italian rice varieties. Further analyses revealed a close genetic relationship of the Italian traditional varieties with those from northern China, which provides strong genetic evidence for tracing the possible origin of early established rice varieties in Italy. These findings have significant implications for the rice breeding programs, in which appropriate germplasm can be selected from a given region and utilized for transferring unique genetic traits based on its genetic diversity and evolutionary relationships. PMID:24265814

  5. El uso periodistico de las formas -ra y -se del imperfecto de subjunctivo. (The Use and Frequency of the -ra and -se Forms of the Imperfect Subjunctive.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Ford, Pilar; Georgalas, Sotiri

    1983-01-01

    Results of a statistical study of the two imperfect subjunctive endings in Spanish and Latin American journalism show the use of "-se" to be decreasing, although usage is slightly higher in Spain. Use of the imperfect subjuntive with an indicative meaning is also slightly more common in Spain. (MSE)

  6. From Theory to Practice: A Path through Imperfection--Lessons from Evaluation of Policy Oriented Environmental Health Research in Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keune, Hans; Morrens, Bert; Loots, Ilse; Springael, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dealing with complex issues per definition bears the burden of imperfection. Whatever comforting theoretical concepts may promise, real life complexity will take its messy toll once travelling from conceptual ambition to real life practice. We specifically reflect on the social scientific contribution to these inter- and…

  7. Acquisition of the Korean Imperfective Aspect Markers "-ko iss-" and "-a iss-" by Japanese Learners: A Multiple-Factor Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Ju-Yeon; Horie, Kaoru; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Although cross-linguistic research on second language tense-aspect acquisition has uncovered universal tendencies concerning the association between verbal semantics and tense-aspect markers, it is still unclear what mechanisms underlie this link. This study investigates the acquisition of two imperfective aspect markers ("-ko iss-" and…

  8. Competence Similarities between Native and Near-Native Speakers: An Investigation of the Preterite-Imperfect Contrast in Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina; Slabakova, Roumyana

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that tense and aspect distributions are very difficult to learn in a second language (L2), they are prone to fossilize universally, and their interpretive properties are subject to a critical period (Coppieters, 1987). This study focuses on the acquisition of the semantic implications of the preterite-imperfect contrast in…

  9. Consequences of CCD Imperfections for Cosmology Determined by Weak Lensing Surveys: From Laboratory Measurements to Cosmological Parameter Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Plazas, Andrés A.; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-07-01

    Weak gravitational lensing causes subtle changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies due to the bending of light by the gravity of foreground masses. By measuring the shapes of large numbers of galaxies (millions in recent surveys, up to tens of billions in future surveys) we can infer the parameters that determine cosmology. Imperfections in the detectors used to record images of the sky can introduce changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies, which in turn can bias the inferred cosmological parameters. In this paper we consider the effect of two widely discussed sensor imperfections: tree rings, due to impurity gradients that cause transverse electric fields in the charge-coupled devices (CCDs), and pixel size variation, due to periodic CCD fabrication errors. These imperfections can be observed when the detectors are subject to uniform illumination (flat-field images). We develop methods to determine the spurious shear and convergence (due to the imperfections) from the flat-field images. We calculate how the spurious shear when added to the lensing shear will bias the determination of cosmological parameters. We apply our methods to candidate sensors of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) as a timely and important example, analyzing flat-field images recorded with LSST prototype CCDs in the laboratory. We find that tree rings and periodic pixel size variation present in the LSST CCDs will introduce negligible bias to cosmological parameters determined from the lensing power spectrum, specifically w, {{{Ω }}}m, and {σ }8.

  10. ChloroMitoSSRDB: open source repository of perfect and imperfect repeats in organelle genomes for evolutionary genomics.

    PubMed

    Sablok, Gaurav; Mudunuri, Suresh B; Patnana, Sujan; Popova, Martina; Fares, Mario A; Porta, Nicola La

    2013-04-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are repetitive stretches of nucleotides (A, T, G, C) that are distributed either as single base pair stretches or as a combination of two- to six-nucleotides units that are non-randomly distributed within coding and in non-coding regions of the genome. ChloroMitoSSRDB is a complete curated web-oriented relational database of perfect and imperfect repeats in organelle genomes. The present version of the database contains perfect and imperfect SSRs of 2161 organelle genomes (1982 mitochondrial and 179 chloroplast genomes). We detected a total of 5838 chloroplast perfect SSRs, 37 297 chloroplast imperfect SSRs, 5898 mitochondrial perfect SSRs and 50 355 mitochondrial imperfect SSRs across these genomes. The repeats have been further hyperlinked to the annotated gene regions (coding or non-coding) and a link to the corresponding gene record in National Center for Biotechnology Information(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/) to identify and understand the positional relationship of the repetitive tracts. ChloroMitoSSRDB is connected to a user-friendly web interface that provides useful information associated with the location of the repeats (coding and non-coding), size of repeat, motif and length polymorphism, etc. ChloroMitoSSRDB will serve as a repository for developing functional markers for molecular phylogenetics, estimating molecular variation across species. Database URL: ChloroMitoSSRDB can be accessed as an open source repository at www.mcr.org.in/chloromitossrdb.

  11. Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) is the process through which organizations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge-based assets. Frequently generating value from such assets means sharing them among employees, divisions and even with other companies in order to develop best practices. This article discusses three basic aspects of…

  12. Knowledge Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, David

    2004-01-01

    The strategies that expose learners to the large volume of knowledge, enables them for creative thinking, self-management and deep reading. The different ways of creating knowledge with the help of creativity, communication, organization, problem solving and decision-making are discussed.

  13. Some puzzles about logarithmic relaxations and a few possible resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, M.

    2014-08-20

    Three subjects are examined in connection with the relaxation of an electron glass. 1. In most cases the experimental decay time τ is found to relate to a history of the system rather than to the time it takes to reach equilibrium. The reason is that in a non-ergodic system equilibrium cannot be reached in any experiment but the knowledge of an equilibrium property is essential in evaluating the time to reach it. 2. An alternative theory is proposed for the interpretation of aging experiments. The proposed theory is deemed to better represent the physics and is more in keeping with the relaxation theory. 3. A current relaxation theory for the electron glass fails to take into account a certain renewal process during the evolution of the relaxation, namely the possibility of fast transitions following a slow transition. Ramifications of such a neglect are explored.

  14. Hereditary breast cancer: ever more pieces to the polygenic puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several susceptibility genes differentially impact on the lifetime risk for breast cancer. Technological advances over the past years have enabled the detection of genetic risk factors through high-throughput screening of large breast cancer case–control series. High- to intermediate penetrance alleles have now been identified in more than 20 genes involved in DNA damage signalling and repair, and more than 70 low-penetrance loci have been discovered through recent genome-wide association studies. In addition to classical germ-line mutation and single-nucleotide polymorphism, copy number variation and somatic mosaicism have been proposed as potential predisposing mechanisms. Many of the identified loci also appear to influence breast tumour characteristics such as estrogen receptor status. In this review, we briefly summarize present knowledge about breast cancer susceptibility genes and discuss their implications for risk prediction and clinical practice. PMID:24025454

  15. Precision astronomy with imperfect fully depleted CCDs — an introduction and a suggested lexicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, C. W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the introductory presentation for a workshop (held Nov 18, 19 2013 at Brookhaven National Laboratory) that explored the challenges associated with making precision astronomical measurements using deeply depleted = ``thick" =``high-ρ'' CCDs. While thick CCDs do provide definite advantages in terms of increased quantum efficiency at wavelengths 700 nm < λ < 1.1 μm and reduced fringing from atmospheric emission lines, these devices also exhibit undesirable features that pose a challenge to precision determination of the positions, fluxes, and shapes of astronomical objects, and for the precision extraction of features in astronomical spectra. For example, the assumptions of a perfectly rectilinear pixel grid and of an intensity-independent point spread function become increasingly invalid as we push to higher precision measurements. Many of the effects seen in these devices arise from lateral electrical fields within the detector, that produce charge transport anomalies that have been previously misinterpreted as quantum efficiency variations. Performing simplistic flat-fielding therefore introduces systematic errors in the image processing pipeline. One measurement challenge we face is devising a combination of calibration methods and algorithms that can distinguish genuine quantum efficiency variations from charge transport effects. These device imperfections also confront spectroscopic applications, such as line centroid determination for precision radial velocity studies. Given the scientific benefits of improving both the precision and accuracy of astronomical measurements, we need to identify, characterize, and overcome these various detector artifacts. In retrospect, many of the detector features first identified in thick CCDs also afflict measurements made with more traditional CCD detectors, albeit often at a reduced level since the photocharge is subject to the perturbing influence of lateral electric fields for a shorter time

  16. Characterization of weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li alloy: Experimental approaches towards mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Anwer Arif

    1997-10-01

    2195 Al-Li alloy apparently offers significantly higher strength to weight ratio than the 2219 aluminum alloy. It was discovered that 2195 Al-Li has a greater tendency to crack, generates peculiar kind of porosity, and is vulnerable to deleterious microparticulate emission during welding than its 2219 predecessor. An experimental investigation has been carried to characterize these weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li alloy. This work presents a scientific account of an analytical study and of the clues it has provided towards an understanding of the weld imperfections in 2195 Al-Li welds. The study begins with the observation of peculiar pore formation in 2195 welds, which occurs not as in the case of 2219 welds upon solidification, but in a thermal ageing process subsequent to solidification. An apparent reaction (DTA) between the fusion zone dendritic surface and nitrogen gas implies a porous fusion zone. Tiny surface melting sites, designated as Blisters, due to its resemblance to skin blisters, testify to the conjunction of outgassing and melting effects and suggest that porosity formation in the solid phase depends upon local melting as well as outgassing. The absence of a dark magnesium rich substance, designated as smut in the immediate vicinity of a crack opening next to a weld repair bead implies either an umbrella of gas emission keeping off a condensate evaporated under the welding arc or, possibly an expulsion of atomized, liquified metal from the crack itself in the form of microparticulate emission. These microparticulate emission from VPPA welds takes various forms herein labeled as smut, snow, and Lava. It is attributed to a gas generating reaction taking place at molten grain boundaries or crack surfaces. The reaction could only be release of hydrogen displaced from lithium hydrides by a coming influx of dissolved nitrogen. There appears to be a close link between porosity, cracking and microparticulate emission. Observations of melting on the surface

  17. Charge Distribution and Imperfect Amphipathicity Affect Pore Formation by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides often permeabilize biological membranes via a pore mechanism. Two pore types have been proposed: toroidal, where the pore is partly lined by lipid, and barrel-stave, where a cylindrical pore is completely lined by peptides. What drives the preference of antimicrobial peptides for a certain pore type is not yet fully understood. According to neutron scattering and oriented circular dichroism, melittin and MG-H2 induce toroidal pores whereas alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores. In previous work we found that indeed melittin seems to favor toroidal pores whereas alamethicin favors cylindrical pores. Here we designed mutants of these two peptides and the magainin analogue MG-H2, aimed to probe how the distribution of charges along the helix and its imperfectly amphipathic structure influence pore formation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in a pre-formed cylindrical pore have been performed. The duration of the simulations was 136 ns to 216 ns. We found that a melittin mutant with lysine 7 neutralized favors cylindrical pores whereas a MG-H2 mutant with lysines in the N-terminal half of these peptides neutralized and an alamethicin mutant with a positive charge at the position 7 form semitoroidal pores. These results suggest that charged residues within the N-terminal half are important for the toroidal pore formation. Toroidal pores produced by MG-H2 are more disordered than the melittin pores, likely because of the charged residues located in the middle of the MG-H2 helix (K11 and K14). Imperfect amphipathicity of melitin seems to play a role in its preference for toroidal pores since the substitutions of charged residues located within the nonpolar face by hydrophobic residues suppress evolution of a toroidal pore. The mutations change the position of lysine 7 near the N-terminus, relative to the lower leaflet headgroups. The MD simulations also show that the melittin P14A mutant forms a toroidal pore, but its

  18. Action and puzzle video games prime different speed/accuracy tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rolf A; Strachan, Ian

    2009-01-01

    To understand the way in which video-game play affects subsequent perception and cognitive strategy, two experiments were performed in which participants played either a fast-action game or a puzzle-solving game. Before and after video-game play, participants performed a task in which both speed and accuracy were emphasized. In experiment 1 participants engaged in a location task in which they clicked a mouse on the spot where a target had appeared, and in experiment 2 they were asked to judge which of four shapes was most similar to a target shape. In both experiments, participants were much faster but less accurate after playing the action game, while they were slower but more accurate after playing the puzzle game. Results are discussed in terms of a taxonomy of video games by their cognitive and perceptual demands.

  19. [Analysis of the Puzzle between Acupuncture Community and Acupuncture Clinical Trials].

    PubMed

    Huo, Rui-li; Ma, Sheng-xing

    2016-03-01

    Recently a number of acupuncture clinical trial projects mainly conducted by conventional scientists have generated many negative results. A large meta-analysis of patient-level acupuncture data for the treatment of chronic pain conditions have demonstrated that the effects of verum acupuncture on pain improvement have statistically significant, but small, differences compared with sham-acupuncture procedures and no difference between acupuncture points and non-points. These conclusions have puzzled the acupuncture community and made confusion for acupuncture research and practices. The purpose of this paper was to compare differences between acupuncture clinical practices and the trial studies, which include "acupuncture technical principles", "acupuncture clinical trial design", and "acupuncture practice based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine". These factors contribute to the puzzle between the acupuncture community/practice and acupuncture clinical trials, which can be improved in future studies. PMID:27236879

  20. The Buzzword Puzzle: Finding the Right Technology for the Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Walker, R. J.; Joy, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    What is the best way to move data from point A to point B? That all depends on what connects the two points and what kind of data you are trying to move. Selecting the right technology requires a careful consideration of the problem, an awareness of existing solutions and knowledge of appropriate standards. When moving a solution through the design, implementation and deployment stages there are a variety of development methods. Matching the development method to the scale of the task is important. Some of the technology challenges that the science community must address overlap with our commercial counterparts. However, there are some technology challenges which are unique to science and require new and innovative approaches. Based on our experience developing solutions for NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS), Dawn Science Center, and the Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project we have considerable experience in what does and does not work. We present an assessment of the adoption threshold of selected standards, technology and development methods. We will discuss how changing expectations and evolving requirements impact the effectiveness of chosen solutions.

  1. On the puzzling feature of the silence of precursory electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftaxias, K.; Potirakis, S. M.; Chelidze, T.

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that fracture-induced MHz-kHz electromagnetic emissions (EME), which emerge from a few days up to a few hours before the main seismic shock occurrence permit a real-time monitoring of the damage process during the last stages of earthquake preparation, as it happens at the laboratory scale. Despite fairly abundant evidence, electromagnetic (EM) precursors have not been adequately accepted as credible physical phenomena. These negative views are enhanced by the fact that certain "puzzling features" are repetitively observed in candidate fracture-induced pre-seismic EME. More precisely, EM silence in all frequency bands appears before the main seismic shock occurrence, as well as during the aftershock period. Actually, the view that "acceptance of "precursive" EM signals without convincing co-seismic signals should not be expected" seems to be reasonable. In this work we focus on this point. We examine whether the aforementioned features of EM silence are really puzzling ones or, instead, reflect well-documented characteristic features of the fracture process, in terms of universal structural patterns of the fracture process, recent laboratory experiments, numerical and theoretical studies of fracture dynamics, critical phenomena, percolation theory, and micromechanics of granular materials. Our analysis shows that these features should not be considered puzzling.

  2. A puzzle assembly strategy for fabrication of large engineered cartilage tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Nover, Adam B; Jones, Brian K; Yu, William T; Donovan, Daniel S; Podolnick, Jeremy D; Cook, James L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Hung, Clark T

    2016-03-21

    Engineering of large articular cartilage tissue constructs remains a challenge as tissue growth is limited by nutrient diffusion. Here, a novel strategy is investigated, generating large constructs through the assembly of individually cultured, interlocking, smaller puzzle-shaped subunits. These constructs can be engineered consistently with more desirable mechanical and biochemical properties than larger constructs (~4-fold greater Young׳s modulus). A failure testing technique was developed to evaluate the physiologic functionality of constructs, which were cultured as individual subunits for 28 days, then assembled and cultured for an additional 21-35 days. Assembled puzzle constructs withstood large deformations (40-50% compressive strain) prior to failure. Their ability to withstand physiologic loads may be enhanced by increases in subunit strength and assembled culture time. A nude mouse model was utilized to show biocompatibility and fusion of assembled puzzle pieces in vivo. Overall, the technique offers a novel, effective approach to scaling up engineered tissues and may be combined with other techniques and/or applied to the engineering of other tissues. Future studies will aim to optimize this system in an effort to engineer and integrate robust subunits to fill large defects. PMID:26895780

  3. Safety of gene therapy: new insights to a puzzling case.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Biasco, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, the transfer of therapeutic genes via gammaretro- or lentiviral vector systems has proven its virtue as an alternative treatment for a series of genetic disorders. The number of approved phase I/II clinical trials, especially for rare diseases, is steadily increasing, but the overall hurdles to become a broadly acceptable therapy remain numerous. The efforts by clinicians and basic scientists have tremendously improved the knowledge available about feasibility and biosafety of gene therapy. Nonetheless, despite the generation of a plethora of clinical and preclinical safety data, we still lack sufficiently powerful assays to predictively assess the exact levels of toxicity that might be observed in any given clinical gene therapy. Insertional mutagenesis is one of the major concerns when using integrating vectors for permanent cell modification, and the occurrence of adverse events related to genotoxicity, in early gene therapy trials, has refrained the field of gene therapy from emerging further. In this review, we provided a comprehensive overview on the basic principles and potential co-factors concurring in the generation of adverse events reported in gene therapy clinical trials using integrating vectors. Additionally, we summarized the available systems to assess genotoxicity at the preclinical level and we shed light on the issues affecting the predictive value of these assays when translating their results into the clinical arena. In the last section of the review we briefly touched on the future trends and how they could increase the safety of gene therapy employing integrating vector technology to take it to the next level.

  4. Imperfect morphological convergence: variable changes in cranial structures underlie transitions to durophagy in moray eels.

    PubMed

    Collar, David C; Reece, Joshua S; Alfaro, Michael E; Wainwright, Peter C; Mehta, Rita S

    2014-06-01

    Convergence is central to the study of evolution because it demonstrates the power of natural selection to deterministically shape phenotypic diversity. However, the conditions under which a common morphology repeatedly evolves may be restrictive. Many factors, such as differing genetic and environmental backgrounds and many-to-one mapping of form to function, contribute to variability in responses to selection. Nevertheless, lineages may evolve similar, even if not identical, forms given a shared selective regime, providing opportunities to examine the relative importance of natural selection, constraint, and contingency. Here, we show that following 10 transitions to durophagy (eating hard-shelled prey) in moray eels (Muraenidae), cranial morphology repeatedly evolved toward a novel region of morphological space indicative of enhanced feeding performance on hard prey. Disparity among the resulting 15 durophagous species, however, is greater than disparity among ancestors that fed on large evasive prey, contradicting the pattern expected under convergence. This elevated disparity is a consequence of lineage-specific responses to durophagy, in which independent transitions vary in the suites of traits exhibiting the largest changes. Our results reveal a pattern of imperfect convergence, which suggests shared selection may actually promote diversification because lineages often differ in their phenotypic responses to similar selective demands.

  5. Probabilistic Planning with Imperfect Sensing Actions Using Hybrid Probabilistic Logic Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Emad

    Effective planning in uncertain environment is important to agents and multi-agents systems. In this paper, we introduce a new logic based approach to probabilistic contingent planning (probabilistic planning with imperfect sensing actions), by relating probabilistic contingent planning to normal hybrid probabilistic logic programs with probabilistic answer set semantics [24]. We show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem can be encoded as a normal hybrid probabilistic logic program. We formally prove the correctness of our approach. Moreover, we show that the complexity of finding a probabilistic contingent plan in our approach is NP-complete. In addition, we show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem, \\cal PP, can be encoded as a classical normal logic program with answer set semantics, whose answer sets corresponds to valid trajectories in \\cal PP. We show that probabilistic contingent planning problems can be encoded as SAT problems. We present a new high level probabilistic action description language that allows the representation of sensing actions with probabilistic outcomes.

  6. Imperfect in-vehicle collision avoidance warning systems can aid drivers.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Masha; Shinar, David

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of an in-vehicle collision avoidance warning system (IVCAWS) on driver performance. A driving simulator was driven by 135 licensed drivers. Of these, 120 received alerts from the IVCAWS when their headway to a lead car was less than 2 s, and the other 15 (the control group) received no alerts. Drivers received varied alert interfaces: auditory, visual, and multimodal. The system had varied levels of reliability, determined by both false alarm rate and failure of the IVCAWS to alert to short headway. Results indicated that the IVCAWS led to safer (longer) headway maintenance. High false alarm rates induced drivers to slow down unnecessarily; large numbers of missed alerts did not have any significant impact on drivers. Driver acceptance of the system was mixed. Interface played a role in driver reliance on the system, with the multimodal interfaces generating least reliance. Actual or potential applications of this research include IVCAWS interface selection for greater system efficacy and user acceptance and the advisability of implementation, even of imperfect systems, for drivers who seek to maintain a safer headway.

  7. Quantum sine-Gordon dynamics on analogue curved spacetime in a weakly imperfect scalar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, T. J.; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the coherent state functional integral expression of the partition function, we show that the sine-Gordon model on an analogue curved spacetime arises as the effective quantum field theory for phase fluctuations of a weakly imperfect Bose gas on an incompressible background superfluid flow when these fluctuations are restricted to a subspace of the single-particle Hilbert space. We consider bipartitions of the single-particle Hilbert space relevant to experiments on ultracold bosonic atomic or molecular gases, including, e.g., restriction to high- or low-energy sectors of the dynamics and spatial bipartition corresponding to tunnel-coupled planar Bose gases. By assuming full unitary quantum control in the low-energy subspace of a trapped gas, we show that (1) appropriately tuning the particle number statistics of the lowest-energy mode partially decouples the low- and high-energy sectors, allowing any low-energy single-particle wave function to define a background for sine-Gordon dynamics on curved spacetime and (2) macroscopic occupation of a quantum superposition of two states of the lowest two modes produces an analogue curved spacetime depending on two background flows, with respective weights continuously dependent on the corresponding weights of the superposed quantum states.

  8. Imperfect physician assistant and physical therapist admissions processes in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We compared and contrasted physician assistant and physical therapy profession admissions processes based on the similar number of accredited programs in the United States and the co-existence of many programs in the same school of health professions, because both professions conduct similar centralized application procedures administered by the same organization. Many studies are critical of the fallibility and inadequate scientific rigor of the high-stakes nature of health professions admissions decisions, yet typical admission processes remain very similar. Cognitive variables, most notably undergraduate grade point averages, have been shown to be the best predictors of academic achievement in the health professions. The variability of non-cognitive attributes assessed and the methods used to measure them have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. The variance in health professions students’ performance in the classroom and on certifying examinations remains unexplained, and cognitive considerations vary considerably between and among programs that describe them. One uncertainty resulting from this review is whether or not desired candidate attributes highly sought after by individual programs are more student-centered or graduate-centered. Based on the findings from the literature, we suggest that student success in the classroom versus the clinic is based on a different set of variables. Given the range of positions and general lack of reliability and validity in studies of non-cognitive admissions attributes, we think that health professions admissions processes remain imperfect works in progress. PMID:24810020

  9. Participation in biomedical research is an imperfect moral duty: a response to John Harris

    PubMed Central

    Shapshay, Sandra; Pimple, Kenneth D

    2007-01-01

    In his paper “Scientific research is a moral duty”, John Harris argues that individuals have a moral duty to participate in biomedical research by volunteering as research subjects. He supports his claim with reference to what he calls the principle of beneficence as embodied in the “rule of rescue” (the moral obligation to prevent serious harm), and the principle of fairness embodied in the prohibition on “free riding” (we are obliged to share the sacrifices that make possible social practices from which we benefit). His view that biomedical research is an important social good is agreed upon, but it is argued that Harris succeeds only in showing that such participation and support is a moral good, among many other moral goods, while failing to show that there is a moral duty to participate in biomedical research in particular. The flaws in Harris's arguments are detailed here, and it is shown that the principles of beneficence and fairness yield only a weaker discretionary or imperfect obligation to help others in need and to reciprocate for sacrifices that others have made for the public good. This obligation is discretionary in the sense that the individuals are free to choose when, where, and how to help others in need and reciprocate for earlier sacrifices. That Harris has not succeeded in claiming a special status for biomedical research among all other social goods is shown here. PMID:17601870

  10. Culling Dogs in Scenarios of Imperfect Control: Realistic Impact on the Prevalence of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Danielle N. C. C.; Codeço, Cláudia T.; Silva, Moacyr A.; Werneck, Guilherme L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis belongs to the list of neglected tropical diseases and is considered a public health problem worldwide. Spatial correlation between the occurrence of the disease in humans and high rates of canine infection suggests that in the presence of the vector, canine visceral leishmaniasis is the key factor for triggering transmission to humans. Despite the control strategies implemented, such as the sacrifice of infected dogs being put down, the incidence of American visceral leishmaniasis remains high in many Latin American countries. Methodology/Principal Findings Mathematical models were developed to describe the transmission dynamics of canine leishmaniasis and its control by culling. Using these models, imperfect control scenarios were implemented to verify the possible factors which alter the effectiveness of controlling this disease in practice. Conclusions/Significance A long-term continuous program targeting both asymptomatic and symptomatic dogs should be effective in controlling canine leishmaniasis in areas of low to moderate transmission (R0 up to 1.4). However, the indiscriminate sacrifice of asymptomatic dogs with positive diagnosis may jeopardize the effectiveness of the control program, if tests with low specificity are used, increasing the chance of generating outrage in the population, and leading to lower adherence to the program. Therefore, culling must be planned accurately and implemented responsibly and never as a mechanical measure in large scale. In areas with higher transmission, culling alone is not an effective control strategy. PMID:23951375

  11. Online and Social Media Data As an Imperfect Continuous Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of research on utilizing online activity as a survey of political opinion to predict real world election outcomes. There is considerably less work, however, on using this data to understand topic-specific interest and opinion amongst the general population and specific demographic subgroups, as currently measured by relatively expensive surveys. Here we investigate this possibility by studying a full census of all Twitter activity during the 2012 election cycle along with the comprehensive search history of a large panel of Internet users during the same period, highlighting the challenges in interpreting online and social media activity as the results of a survey. As noted in existing work, the online population is a non-representative sample of the offline world (e.g., the U.S. voting population). We extend this work to show how demographic skew and user participation is non-stationary and difficult to predict over time. In addition, the nature of user contributions varies substantially around important events. Furthermore, we note subtle problems in mapping what people are sharing or consuming online to specific sentiment or opinion measures around a particular topic. We provide a framework, built around considering this data as an imperfect continuous panel survey, for addressing these issues so that meaningful insight about public interest and opinion can be reliably extracted from online and social media data. PMID:26730933

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity and Imperfect Mixing in Chemical Reactions: Visualization of Density-Driven Pattern Formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobel, Sabrina G.; Hastings, Harold M.; Testa, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Imore » mperfect mixing is a concern in industrial processes, everyday processes (mixing paint, bread machines), and in understanding salt water-fresh water mixing in ecosystems. The effects of imperfect mixing become evident in the unstirred ferroin-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, the prototype for chemical pattern formation. Over time, waves of oxidation (high ferriin concentration, blue) propagate into a background of low ferriin concentration (red); their structure reflects in part the history of mixing in the reaction vessel. However, it may be difficult to separate mixing effects from reaction effects. We describe a simpler model system for visualizing density-driven pattern formation in an essentially unmixed chemical system: the reaction of pale yellow Fe 3 + with colorless SCN − to form the blood-red Fe ( SCN ) 2 + complex ion in aqueous solution. Careful addition of one drop of Fe ( NO 3 ) 3 to KSCN yields striped patterns after several minutes. The patterns appear reminiscent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and convection rolls, arguing that pattern formation is caused by density-driven mixing.« less

  13. Speaking to the yet unknowing world: Hamlet, Horatio and the problem of imperfect witness.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christine

    2010-12-01

    Every day doctors bear witness to others about the experiences, needs and feelings of their patients, drawing on what they have learnt from clinical consultations. This paper considers the medical task of bearing honourable and truthful witness through an examination of the role and actions of Horatio in Hamlet. Horatio is simultaneously located among the background machinery of the play, separate from the lives of the protagonists, and in the foreground, where his authoritative witness is repeatedly called upon by the play's characters. Horatio is invited to watch an unfolding disaster, his warnings are not heard, and at its conclusion he stands apart from the drama to give its account. The tensions between engagement and observation, and between partial and impartial accounting echo those faced by doctors in everyday clinical practice. The act of bearing witness, Shakespeare suggests, even for those who are tasked with being objective, is necessarily imperfect, and not dispassionate. Those people, including doctors, who are expected to construct authoritative accounts of the motives and actions of others may find in Hamlet a small lesson on the need to approach their summary narratives about others more humbly, aware of the narrowness and partiality of their perspective.

  14. Boundary-layer receptivity due to distributed surface imperfections of a deterministic or random nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity of a Blasius boundary layer in the presence of distributed surface irregularities is investigated analytically. It is shown that, out of the entire spatial spectrum of the surface irregularities, only a small band of Fourier components can lead to an efficient conversion of the acoustic input at any given frequency to an unstable eigenmode of the boundary layer flow. The location, and width, of this most receptive band of wavenumbers corresponds to a relative detuning of O(R sub l.b.(exp -3/8)) with respect to the lower-neutral instability wavenumber at the frequency under consideration, R sub l.b. being the Reynolds number based on a typical boundary-layer thickness at the lower branch of the neutral stability curve. Surface imperfections in the form of discrete mode waviness in this range of wavenumbers lead to initial instability amplitudes which are O(R sub l.b.(exp 3/8)) larger than those caused by a single, isolated roughness element. In contrast, irregularities with a continuous spatial spectrum produce much smaller instability amplitudes, even compared to the isolated case, since the increase due to the resonant nature of the response is more than that compensated for by the asymptotically small band-width of the receptivity process. Analytical expressions for the maximum possible instability amplitudes, as well as their expectation for an ensemble of statistically irregular surfaces with random phase distributions, are also presented.

  15. Estimating distributions with increasing failure rate in an imperfect repair model.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Paul H; Singh, Harshinder; Whitaker, Lyn R

    2002-03-01

    A failed system is repaired minimally if after failure, it is restored to the working condition of an identical system of the same age. We extend the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a system's lifetime distribution function to test units that are known to have an increasing failure rate. Such items comprise a significant portion of working components in industry. The order-restricted MLE is shown to be consistent. Similar results hold for the Brown-Proschan imperfect repair model, which dictates that a failed component is repaired perfectly with some unknown probability, and is otherwise repaired minimally. The estimators derived are motivated and illustrated by failure data in the nuclear industry. Failure times for groups of emergency diesel generators and motor-driven pumps are analyzed using the order-restricted methods. The order-restricted estimators are consistent and show distinct differences from the ordinary MLEs. Simulation results suggest significant improvement in reliability estimation is available in many cases when component failure data exhibit the IFR property. PMID:11878225

  16. A structured avian influenza model with imperfect vaccination and vaccine-induced asymptomatic infection.

    PubMed

    Gulbudak, Hayriye; Martcheva, Maia

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a model of avian influenza in domestic birds with imperfect vaccination and age-since-vaccination structure. The model has four components: susceptible birds, vaccinated birds (stratified by vaccination age), asymptomatically infected birds, and infected birds. The model includes reduction in the probability of infection, decreasing severity of disease of vaccinated birds and vaccine waning. The basic reproduction number, [Formula: see text], is calculated. The disease-free equilibrium is found to be globally stable under certain conditions when [Formula: see text]. When [Formula: see text], existence of an endemic equilibrium is proved (with uniqueness for the ODE case and local stability under stricter conditions) and uniform persistence of the disease is established. The inclusion of reduction in susceptibility of vaccinated birds, reduction in infectiousness of asymptomatically infected birds and vaccine waning can have important implications for disease control. We analytically and numerically demonstrate that vaccination can paradoxically increase the total number of infected, resulting in the "silent spread" of the disease. We also study the effects of vaccine efficacy on disease prevalence and the minimum critical vaccination coverage, a threshold value for vaccination coverage to avoid an increase in total disease prevalence due to asymptomatic infection. PMID:25230802

  17. Novel mutational mechanism in the thyroglobulin gene: imperfect DNA inversion as a cause for hereditary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Citterio, Cintia E; Rossetti, Liliana C; Souchon, Pierre F; Morales, Cecilia; Thouvard-Viprey, Mathilde; Salmon-Musial, Anne S; Mauran, Pierre L A; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Rivolta, Carina M; De Brasi, Carlos D; Targovnik, Héctor M

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform genetic analysis in three brothers of Turkish origin born from consanguineus parents and affected by congenital hypothyroidism, goiter and low levels of serum TG. The combination of sequencing of DNA, PCR mapping, quantitative real-time PCR, inverse-PCR (I-PCR), multiplex PCR and bioinformatics analysis were used in order to detect TG mutations. We demonstrated that the three affected siblings are homozygous for a DNA inversion of 16,962bp in the TG gene associated with two deleted regions at both sides of the inversion limits. The inversion region includes the first 9bp of exon 48, 1015bp of intron 47, 191bp of exon 47, 1523bp of intron 46, 135bp of exon 46 and the last 14,089bp of intron 45. The proximal deletion corresponds to 27bp of TG intron 45, while the distal deletion spans the last 230bp of TG exon 48 and the first 588bp of intergenic region downstream TG end. The parents were heterozygous carriers of the complex rearrangement. In conclusion, a novel large imperfect DNA inversion within the TG gene was identified by the strategy of I-PCR. This aberration was not detectable by normal sequencing of the exons and exon/intron boundaries. Remarkably, the finding represents the first description of a TG deficiency disease caused by a DNA inversion. PMID:23933148

  18. Testing hypotheses in evolutionary ecology with imperfect detection: capture-recapture structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Cubaynes, Sarah; Doutrelant, Claire; Grégoire, Arnaud; Perret, Philippe; Faivre, Bruno; Gimenez, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Studying evolutionary mechanisms in natural populations often requires testing multifactorial scenarios of causality involving direct and indirect relationships among individual and environmental variables. It is also essential to account for the imperfect detection of individuals to provide unbiased demographic parameter estimates. To cope with these issues, we developed a new approach combining structural equation models with capture-recapture models (CR-SEM) that allows the investigation of competing hypotheses about individual and environmental variability observed in demographic parameters. We employ Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling in a Bayesian framework to (1) estimate model parameters, (2) implement a model selection procedure to evaluate competing hypotheses about causal mechanisms, and (3) assess the fit of models to data using posterior predictive checks. We illustrate the value of our approach using two case studies on wild bird populations. We first show that CR-SEM can be useful to quantify the action of selection on a set of phenotypic traits with an analysis of selection gradients on morphological traits in Common Blackbirds (Turdus merula). In a second case study on Blue Tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), we illustrate the use of CR-SEM to study evolutionary trade-offs in the wild, while accounting for varying environmental conditions. PMID:22624306

  19. Imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kamper, S. J.; Herbert, R. D.; Maher, C. G.; McAuley, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The placebo is an important tool to blind patients to treatment allocation and therefore minimise some sources of bias in clinical trials. However, placebos that are improperly designed or implemented may introduce bias into trials. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the adequacy of placebo interventions used in low back pain trials. Electronic databases were searched systematically for randomised placebo-controlled trials of conservative interventions for low back pain. Trial selection and data extraction were performed by two reviewers independently. A total of 126 trials using over 25 different placebo interventions were included. The strategy most commonly used to enhance blinding was the provision of structurally equivalent placebos. Adequacy of blinding was assessed in only 13% of trials. In 20% of trials the placebo intervention was a potentially genuine treatment. Most trials that assessed patients’ expectations showed that the placebo generated lower expectations than the experimental intervention. Taken together, these results demonstrate that imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials; a result suggesting that many trials provide potentially biased estimates of treatment efficacy. This finding has implications for the interpretation of published trials and the design of future trials. Implementation of strategies to facilitate blinding and balance expectations in randomised groups need a higher priority in low back pain research. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00586-008-0664-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18421484

  20. Imperfect Batesian mimicry—the effects of the frequency and the distastefulness of the model

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, L.; Alatalo, R. V.; Mappes, J.

    1997-01-01

    Batesian mimicry is the resemblance between unpalatable models and palatable mimics. The widely accepted idea is that the frequency and the unprofitability of the model are crucial for the introduction of a Batesian mimic into the prey population. However, experimental evidence is limited and furthermore, previous studies have considered mainly perfect mimicry (automimicry). We investigated imperfect Batesian mimicry by varying the frequency of an aposematic model at two levels of distastefulness. The predator encountered prey in a random order, one prey item at a time. The prey were thus presented realistically in a sequential way. Great tits (Parus major) were used as predators. This experiment, with a novel signal, supports the idea that Batesian mimics gain most when the models outnumber them. The mortalities of the mimics as well as the models were significantly dependent on the frequency of the model. Both prey types survived better the fewer mimics there were confusing the predator. There were also indications that the degree of distastefulness of the model had an effect on the survival of the Batesian mimic: the models survived significantly better the more distasteful they were. The experiment supports the most classical predictions in the theories of the origin and maintenance of Batesian mimicry.

  1. Procedural knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeff, M.P.; Lansky, A.L.

    1986-10-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, our formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's space shuttle are provided.

  2. The early emergence and puzzling decline of relational reasoning: Effects of knowledge and search on inferring abstract concepts.

    PubMed

    Walker, Caren M; Bridgers, Sophie; Gopnik, Alison

    2016-11-01

    We explore the developmental trajectory and underlying mechanisms of abstract relational reasoning. We describe a surprising developmental pattern: Younger learners are better than older ones at inferring abstract causal relations. Walker and Gopnik (2014) demonstrated that toddlers are able to infer that an effect was caused by a relation between two objects (whether they are the same or different), rather than by individual kinds of objects. While these findings are consistent with evidence that infants recognize same-different relations, they contrast with a large literature suggesting that older children tend to have difficulty inferring these relations. Why might this be? In Experiment 1a, we demonstrate that while younger children (18-30-month-olds) have no difficulty learning these relational concepts, older children (36-48-month-olds) fail to draw this abstract inference. Experiment 1b replicates the finding with 18-30-month-olds using a more demanding intervention task. Experiment 2 tests whether this difference in performance might be because older children have developed the general hypothesis that individual kinds of objects are causal - the high initial probability of this alternative hypothesis might override the data that favors the relational hypothesis. Providing additional information falsifying the alternative hypothesis improves older children's performance. Finally, Experiment 3 demonstrates that prompting for explanations during learning also improves performance, even without any additional information. These findings are discussed in light of recent computational and algorithmic theories of learning.

  3. The early emergence and puzzling decline of relational reasoning: Effects of knowledge and search on inferring abstract concepts.

    PubMed

    Walker, Caren M; Bridgers, Sophie; Gopnik, Alison

    2016-11-01

    We explore the developmental trajectory and underlying mechanisms of abstract relational reasoning. We describe a surprising developmental pattern: Younger learners are better than older ones at inferring abstract causal relations. Walker and Gopnik (2014) demonstrated that toddlers are able to infer that an effect was caused by a relation between two objects (whether they are the same or different), rather than by individual kinds of objects. While these findings are consistent with evidence that infants recognize same-different relations, they contrast with a large literature suggesting that older children tend to have difficulty inferring these relations. Why might this be? In Experiment 1a, we demonstrate that while younger children (18-30-month-olds) have no difficulty learning these relational concepts, older children (36-48-month-olds) fail to draw this abstract inference. Experiment 1b replicates the finding with 18-30-month-olds using a more demanding intervention task. Experiment 2 tests whether this difference in performance might be because older children have developed the general hypothesis that individual kinds of objects are causal - the high initial probability of this alternative hypothesis might override the data that favors the relational hypothesis. Providing additional information falsifying the alternative hypothesis improves older children's performance. Finally, Experiment 3 demonstrates that prompting for explanations during learning also improves performance, even without any additional information. These findings are discussed in light of recent computational and algorithmic theories of learning. PMID:27472036

  4. The Origin of Aging: Imperfectness-Driven Non-Random Damage Defines the Aging Process and Control of Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties preclude ideal biomolecules and perfect biological functions. This inherent imperfectness leads to the generation of damage by every biological process, at all levels, from small molecules to cells. The damage is too numerous to be repaired, is partially invisible to natural selection and manifests as aging. I propose that it is the inherent imperfectness of biological systems that is the true root of the aging process. As each biomolecule generates specific forms of damage, the cumulative damage is largely non-random and is indirectly encoded in the genome. I consider this concept in light of other proposed theories of aging and integrate these disparate ideas into a single model. I also discuss the evolutionary significance of damage accumulation and strategies for reducing damage. Finally, I suggest ways to test this integrated model of aging. PMID:23769208

  5. Consequences of CCD imperfections for cosmology determined by weak lensing surveys: from laboratory measurements to cosmological parameter bias

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Okura, Yuki; Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Plazas, Andrés A.; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-06-27

    Weak gravitational lensing causes subtle changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies due to the bending of light by the gravity of foreground masses. By measuring the shapes of large numbers of galaxies (millions in recent surveys, up to tens of billions in future surveys) we can infer the parameters that determine cosmology. Imperfections in the detectors used to record images of the sky can introduce changes in the apparent shape of galaxies, which in turn can bias the inferred cosmological parameters. Here in this paper we consider the effect of two widely discussed sensor imperfections: tree-rings, due to impuritymore » gradients which cause transverse electric fields in the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD), and pixel-size variation, due to periodic CCD fabrication errors. These imperfections can be observed when the detectors are subject to uniform illumination (flat field images). We develop methods to determine the spurious shear and convergence (due to the imperfections) from the flat-field images. We calculate how the spurious shear when added to the lensing shear will bias the determination of cosmological parameters. We apply our methods to candidate sensors of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) as a timely and important example, analyzing flat field images recorded with LSST prototype CCDs in the laboratory. In conclusion, we find that tree-rings and periodic pixel-size variation present in the LSST CCDs will introduce negligible bias to cosmological parameters determined from the lensing power spectrum, specifically w,Ωm and σ8.« less

  6. Heralded single-photon generation using imperfect single-photon sources and a two-photon-absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, Thomas; Scherer, Artur; Nock, Michael; Audretsch, Juergen

    2006-03-15

    We propose a setup for a heralded, i.e., announced generation of a pure single-photon state given two imperfect sources whose outputs are represented by mixtures of the single-photon Fock state [1> with the vacuum [0>. Our purification scheme uses beam splitters, photodetection, and a two-photon-absorbing medium. The admixture of the vacuum is fully eliminated. We discuss two potential realizations of the scheme.

  7. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and work-based responsibilities.…

  8. Stolen Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, John Seely; Duguid, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Discusses situated learning in the workplace and in the classroom. Topics addressed include operationalization versus legitimization of educational theories; instruction versus learning; explicit versus implicit instruction and knowledge; individual versus social context; systems narrowly construed versus systems broadly construed; and legitimate…

  9. Knowledge River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2004-01-01

    One of the most promising of all diversity initiatives in library and information studies (LIS) is Knowledge River (KR) at the School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) at the University of Arizona, Tucson. Created and directed by Patricia A. Tarin, the program has already recruited some 42 students into the profession, 20 of…

  10. Lower bound for the spatial extent of localized modes in photonic-crystal waveguides with small random imperfections.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, Rémi; Baron, Alexandre; Zang, Xiaorun; Lalouat, Loïc; Schulz, Sebastian A; O'Regan, Bryan; Vynck, Kevin; Cluzel, Benoît; de Fornel, Frédérique; Krauss, Thomas F; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Light localization due to random imperfections in periodic media is paramount in photonics research. The group index is known to be a key parameter for localization near photonic band edges, since small group velocities reinforce light interaction with imperfections. Here, we show that the size of the smallest localized mode that is formed at the band edge of a one-dimensional periodic medium is driven instead by the effective photon mass, i.e. the flatness of the dispersion curve. Our theoretical prediction is supported by numerical simulations, which reveal that photonic-crystal waveguides can exhibit surprisingly small localized modes, much smaller than those observed in Bragg stacks thanks to their larger effective photon mass. This possibility is demonstrated experimentally with a photonic-crystal waveguide fabricated without any intentional disorder, for which near-field measurements allow us to distinctly observe a wavelength-scale localized mode despite the smallness (~1/1000 of a wavelength) of the fabrication imperfections. PMID:27246902

  11. Effects of Initial Geometric Imperfections On the Non-Linear Response of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Young, Richard D.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the elastic buckling and nonlinear behavior of the liquid-oxygen tank for the new Space Shuttle superlightweight external fuel tank are presented. Selected results that illustrate three distinctly different types of non-linear response phenomena for thin-walled shells which are subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads are presented. These response phenomena consist of a bifurcation-type buckling response, a short-wavelength non-linear bending response and a non-linear collapse or "snap-through" response associated with a limit point. The effects of initial geometric imperfections on the response characteristics are emphasized. The results illustrate that the buckling and non-linear response of a geometrically imperfect shell structure subjected to complex loading conditions may not be adequately characterized by an elastic linear bifurcation buckling analysis, and that the traditional industry practice of applying a buckling-load knock-down factor can result in an ultraconservative design. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections, and that the use a buckling-load knock-down factor is needed for this case.

  12. Effect of imperfect detectability on adaptive and conventional sampling: simulated sampling of freshwater mussels in the upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Smith, David R; Gray, Brian R; Newton, Teresa J; Nichols, Doug

    2010-11-01

    Adaptive sampling designs are recommended where, as is typical with freshwater mussels, the outcome of interest is rare and clustered. However, the performance of adaptive designs has not been investigated when outcomes are not only rare and clustered but also imperfectly detected. We address this combination of challenges using data simulated to mimic properties of freshwater mussels from a reach of the upper Mississippi River. Simulations were conducted under a range of sample sizes and detection probabilities. Under perfect detection, efficiency of the adaptive sampling design increased relative to the conventional design as sample size increased and as density decreased. Also, the probability of sampling occupied habitat was four times higher for adaptive than conventional sampling of the lowest density population examined. However, imperfect detection resulted in substantial biases in sample means and variances under both adaptive sampling and conventional designs. The efficiency of adaptive sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Also, the probability of encountering an occupied unit during adaptive sampling, relative to conventional sampling declined with decreasing detectability. Thus, the potential gains in the application of adaptive sampling to rare and clustered populations relative to conventional sampling are reduced when detection is imperfect. The results highlight the need to increase or estimate detection to improve performance of conventional and adaptive sampling designs.

  13. Lower bound for the spatial extent of localized modes in photonic-crystal waveguides with small random imperfections

    PubMed Central

    Faggiani, Rémi; Baron, Alexandre; Zang, Xiaorun; Lalouat, Loïc; Schulz, Sebastian A.; O’Regan, Bryan; Vynck, Kevin; Cluzel, Benoît; de Fornel, Frédérique; Krauss, Thomas F.; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Light localization due to random imperfections in periodic media is paramount in photonics research. The group index is known to be a key parameter for localization near photonic band edges, since small group velocities reinforce light interaction with imperfections. Here, we show that the size of the smallest localized mode that is formed at the band edge of a one-dimensional periodic medium is driven instead by the effective photon mass, i.e. the flatness of the dispersion curve. Our theoretical prediction is supported by numerical simulations, which reveal that photonic-crystal waveguides can exhibit surprisingly small localized modes, much smaller than those observed in Bragg stacks thanks to their larger effective photon mass. This possibility is demonstrated experimentally with a photonic-crystal waveguide fabricated without any intentional disorder, for which near-field measurements allow us to distinctly observe a wavelength-scale localized mode despite the smallness (~1/1000 of a wavelength) of the fabrication imperfections. PMID:27246902

  14. The puzzle of massive negative ions above the ionospheric D-region - Revisit, new insights, and suggestion of a puzzle solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by new experimental possibilities, previous pioneering rocket borne ion-mass spectrometer measurements, made by our MPIK-Heidelberg research group in the lower ionosphere, are revisited and reanalyzed. The most puzzling observation made in two of our previous rocket missions is the detection of a layer of massive negative ions (about 100-400 atomic mass units), dominating the negative ion population present at heights between the top of the ionospheric D-region and about 90 km. The presence of these massive negative ions suggests that they are relatively stable against electron detachment by UV-photons and by free oxygen atoms. Loss of these ions should, at least, occur by recombination with positive ions. Since charge neutralization via negative ion-positive ion recombination is much slower than positive ion-electron recombination, negative ions should live much longer than positive ions and therefore may grow more efficiently. Previously, we have hypothesized that the formation of, at least, some of the massive negative ions may involve meteoric material. Interestingly, the massive negative ions may have potentially important direct and indirect roles. They may influence noctilucent cloud formation and their formation may significantly influence free electron loss. Furthermore the massive negative ions have an important indirect role as an analytical tool for highly sensitive detection of ultra-trace gases, particularly certain meteoric molecular gases, present in the lower ionosphere. However, the sparse previous rocket borne measurements of the massive negative ions suffered from limited sensitivity and relatively poor mass resolution. Therefore, unambiguous identification of their mass numbers and chemical nature was not possible. In the present contribution is suggested a powerful novel rocket borne ion mass spectrometer technique with greatly improved sensitivity and mass resolution, which should have the potential of contributing markedly to

  15. Darwin's finches and their diet niches: the sympatric coexistence of imperfect generalists.

    PubMed

    De León, L F; Podos, J; Gardezi, T; Herrel, A; Hendry, A P

    2014-06-01

    Adaptive radiation can be strongly influenced by interspecific competition for resources, which can lead to diverse outcomes ranging from competitive exclusion to character displacement. In each case, sympatric species are expected to evolve into distinct ecological niches, such as different food types, yet this expectation is not always met when such species are examined in nature. The most common hypotheses to account for the coexistence of species with substantial diet overlap rest on temporal variation in niches (often diets). Yet spatial variation in niche overlap might also be important, pointing to the need for spatiotemporal analyses of diet and diet overlap between closely related species persisting in sympatry. We here perform such an analysis by characterizing the diets of, and diet overlap among, four sympatric Darwin's ground finch species at three sites and over 5 years on a single Galápagos island (Santa Cruz). We find that the different species have broadly similar and overlapping diets - they are to some extent generalists and opportunists - yet we also find that each species retains some 'private' resources for which their morphologies are best suited. Importantly, use of these private resources increased considerably, and diet overlap decreased accordingly, when the availability of preferred shared foods, such as arthropods, was reduced during drought conditions. Spatial variation in food resources was also important. These results together suggest that the ground finches are 'imperfect generalists' that use overlapping resources under benign conditions (in space or time), but then retreat to resources for which they are best adapted during periods of food limitation. These conditions likely promote local and regional coexistence. PMID:24750315

  16. Estimating indices of range shifts in birds using dynamic models when detection is imperfect.

    PubMed

    Clement, Matthew J; Hines, James E; Nichols, James D; Pardieck, Keith L; Ziolkowski, David J

    2016-10-01

    There is intense interest in basic and applied ecology about the effect of global change on current and future species distributions. Projections based on widely used static modeling methods implicitly assume that species are in equilibrium with the environment and that detection during surveys is perfect. We used multiseason correlated detection occupancy models, which avoid these assumptions, to relate climate data to distributional shifts of Louisiana Waterthrush in the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. We summarized these shifts with indices of range size and position and compared them to the same indices obtained using more basic modeling approaches. Detection rates during point counts in BBS surveys were low, and models that ignored imperfect detection severely underestimated the proportion of area occupied and slightly overestimated mean latitude. Static models indicated Louisiana Waterthrush distribution was most closely associated with moderate temperatures, while dynamic occupancy models indicated that initial occupancy was associated with diurnal temperature ranges and colonization of sites was associated with moderate precipitation. Overall, the proportion of area occupied and mean latitude changed little during the 1997-2013 study period. Near-term forecasts of species distribution generated by dynamic models were more similar to subsequently observed distributions than forecasts from static models. Occupancy models incorporating a finite mixture model on detection - a new extension to correlated detection occupancy models - were better supported and may reduce bias associated with detection heterogeneity. We argue that replacing phenomenological static models with more mechanistic dynamic models can improve projections of future species distributions. In turn, better projections can improve biodiversity forecasts, management decisions, and understanding of global change biology. PMID:26990459

  17. Anisotropic elliptical dichroism and influence of imperfection of circular polarization upon anisotropic circular dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Yokojima, Satoshi; Fukaminato, Tuyoshi; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-04-21

    In spite of the importance of anisotropic circular dichroism, in practice, it is difficult to get rid of the artifacts that arise from the imperfection of the circular polarization. Undesirable linear dichroism, interference of two orthogonal polarization states, and linear birefringence prevent us from making accurate measurements. We propose a theoretical method for evaluating the contributions of the first two, which are thought to be the main artifacts when specimens are not thick enough. Using the time-dependent perturbation theory and taking into account the direction of light propagation toward an orientationally fixed molecule, we formulated the transition probability of systems perturbed by arbitrarily polarized light and the absorption difference associated with two kinds of polarized light. We also formulated, as an extension of the dissymmetry factor of circular dichroism, a newly defined dissymmetry factor associated with two arbitrary polarization states. Furthermore, we considered a mixed-state of photon ensemble in which polarization states distribute at a certain width around a certain average. Although the purity of polarization and ellipticity does not correspond immediately, by considering the mixed state it is possible to treat them consistently. We used quantum statistical mechanics to describe the absorption difference for two kinds of photon ensembles and applied the consequent formula to examine the reported experimental results of single-molecule chiroptical responses under discussion in the recent past. The artifacts are theoretically suggested to be sensitive to the incident direction of elliptically polarized light and to the oriented systems, the ellipticity, and the orientation of ellipse. The mixed state has little, if any, effect when the polarization state distribution is narrow.

  18. [Screening of bone-related microRNAs in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziqiang; Lu, Yanqin; Ren, Xiuzhi; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Zhiliang; Xu, Chao; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-10-01

    We screened differential expression bone-related microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect (OI). First, we selected the reference gene (s) fit for quantitative detection of serum miRNAs by using geNorm and several other programmes. Then real-time fluorescent quntitative PCR was used to detect the expression level of bone-related miRNAs gained by means of miRanda, Targetscan and Pictar softwares caculation and reading literature. Then, the results were analyzed with the matched t test. All 6 candidate reference genes had a stable expression level in serum of healthy controls and patients with different characters, and the optimal number of reference genes is 4 (miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6, miR-92a) after Pairwise Variations analysis (V4/5 = 0.133 < 0.15). For validating the universality of expression stability, we detected the relative expression value of miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6 and miR-92a in another 8 healthy controls and 16 patients with OI and the result revealed that the expression of 4 genes remained stable (M < 1.5). After measuring serum levels of more than 100 bone-related miRNAs in patients with real-time qPCR, 11 miRNAs showed differential expression, and bioinformatic analysis suggested these altered expressional mioRNAs had possibilities to participate in the process of OI. So the experiment indicated that there existed many differential expression bone-related miRNAs in serum of patients with OI, and these miRNAs had potentials to be promising biomarkers for serologic tests and diagnosis of OI. PMID:23311139

  19. Estimating indices of range shifts in birds using dynamic models when detection is imperfect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Hines, James E.; Nichols, James D.; Pardieck, Keith L.; Ziolkowski, David J.

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in basic and applied ecology about the effect of global change on current and future species distributions. Projections based on widely used static modeling methods implicitly assume that species are in equilibrium with the environment and that detection during surveys is perfect. We used multiseason correlated detection occupancy models, which avoid these assumptions, to relate climate data to distributional shifts of Louisiana Waterthrush in the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. We summarized these shifts with indices of range size and position and compared them to the same indices obtained using more basic modeling approaches. Detection rates during point counts in BBS surveys were low, and models that ignored imperfect detection severely underestimated the proportion of area occupied and slightly overestimated mean latitude. Static models indicated Louisiana Waterthrush distribution was most closely associated with moderate temperatures, while dynamic occupancy models indicated that initial occupancy was associated with diurnal temperature ranges and colonization of sites was associated with moderate precipitation. Overall, the proportion of area occupied and mean latitude changed little during the 1997–2013 study period. Near-term forecasts of species distribution generated by dynamic models were more similar to subsequently observed distributions than forecasts from static models. Occupancy models incorporating a finite mixture model on detection – a new extension to correlated detection occupancy models – were better supported and may reduce bias associated with detection heterogeneity. We argue that replacing phenomenological static models with more mechanistic dynamic models can improve projections of future species distributions. In turn, better projections can improve biodiversity forecasts, management decisions, and understanding of global change biology.

  20. Investigating species co-occurrence patterns when species are detected imperfectly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Bailey, L.L.; Nichols, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    1. Over the last 30 years there has been a great deal of interest in investigating patterns of species co-occurrence across a number of locations, which has led to the development of numerous methods to determine whether there is evidence that a particular pattern may not have occurred by random chance. 2. A key aspect that seems to have been largely overlooked is the possibility that species may not always be detected at a location when present, which leads to 'false absences' in a species presence/absence matrix that may cause incorrect inferences to be made about co-occurrence patterns. Furthermore, many of the published methods for investigating patterns of species co-occurrence do not account for potential differences in the site characteristics that may partially (at least) explain non-random patterns (e.g. due to species having similar/different habitat preferences). 3. Here we present a statistical method for modelling co-occurrence patterns between species while accounting for imperfect detection and site characteristics. This method requires that multiple presence/absence surveys for the species be conducted over a reasonably short period of time at most sites. The method yields unbiased estimates of probabilities of occurrence, and is practical when the number of species is small (< 4). 4. To illustrate the method we consider data collected on two terrestrial salamander species, Plethodonjordani and members of the Plethodon glutinosus complex, collected in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. We find no evidence that the species do not occur independently at sites once site elevation has been allowed for, although we find some evidence of a statistical interaction between species in terms of detectability that we suggest may be due to changes in relative abundances.

  1. A study for the propagation of electromagnetic waves over imperfect ground planes based on Schelkunoff integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyab, Walid Mohamed Galal

    A new formulation for the analysis of propagation of electromagnetic waves over imperfectly conducting planar surfaces is proposed. The classical approach for the analysis of this problem uses the Sommerfeld formulation. In Sommerfeld formulation, the wave function corresponding to a point source is expanded in terms of the propagation constants of the various waves in the radial direction from the source. This gives rise to the well-known Sommerfeld integrals which are highly oscillatory and slowly-decaying in nature, especially when the source is mounted just on top of a planar boundary between two media of arbitrary conductivity. In addition, the nature of the convergence for these integrals is extremely slow and may not yield stable results. In this dissertation we present an approach, developed originally by Schelkunoff, which expands the wave function in terms of the waves emanating perpendicular to the planar interface, not parallel to it as in Sommerfeld formulation. Expressions are given for both cases of vertical and horizontal electric dipoles on top of a planar interface. The debatable nature of this problem is unavoidable, thus a detailed analytical comparison between the Sommerfeld integrals and the expressions derived here is given. Based on the study given in this dissertation, the true rationale in relating the work of Zenneck and Sommerfeld to the relatively new field of surface plasmons is exposed. A detailed literature study as well as an analytical critique of the field of plasmonics and its relation to Sommerfeld-Zenneck surface waves is presented. Finally, some applications of the new formulation are discussed using numerical simulations.

  2. On the effects of a plant extract of Orthosiphon stamineus on sebum-related skin imperfections.

    PubMed

    Vogelgesang, B; Abdul-Malak, N; Reymermier, C; Altobelli, C; Saget, J

    2011-02-01

    Overproduction of sebum is very common and results in an undesirable oily, shiny complexion with enlarged pores. Sebum secretion is basically under the control of 5-α reductase, and more particularly under that of type 1 isozyme. But it is also highly sensitive to environmental factors such as temperature, humidity and food. Moreover, in Asia, the edicts of a flawless facial skin turn oily skin into a major concern for Asian women. We identified Orthosiphon stamineus leaf extract as an interesting ingredient for reducing the oily appearance of skin thanks to its ability to reduce 5-α reductase type 1 expression in normal human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro. This was confirmed ex vivo, where Orthosiphon stamineus leaf extract was shown to reduce 5-α reductase activity as well as the production of squalene, one of the main components of sebum that was used as a tracer of sebum. To evaluate the efficacy of Orthosiphon stamineus leaf extract at reducing sebum-related skin imperfections in vivo, we performed two different clinical studies, one in France on a panel of Caucasian volunteers and the other one in Thailand on a panel of Asian volunteers. Using instrumental techniques as well as clinical evaluation and self-evaluation, we could highlight that an O/W cosmetic formula containing 2% of Orthosiphon stamineus leaf extract could visibly reduce the oily appearance of skin as well as the size of pores, thus leading to a significant improvement of complexion evenness and radiance. Overall, the results obtained were better than those observed with the same formula containing 1% of zinc gluconate, an ingredient frequently used in oily skin care products. PMID:20807263

  3. Multivariate probabilistic projections using imperfect climate models part I: outline of methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, David M. H.; Murphy, James M.; Collins, Mat; Webb, Mark J.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for making probabilistic projections of climate change at global and regional scales, using examples consisting of the equilibrium response to doubled CO2 concentrations of global annual mean temperature and regional climate changes in summer and winter temperature and precipitation over Northern Europe and England-Wales. This method combines information from a perturbed physics ensemble, a set of international climate models, and observations. Our approach is based on a multivariate Bayesian framework which enables the prediction of a joint probability distribution for several variables constrained by more than one observational metric. This is important if different sets of impacts scientists are to use these probabilistic projections to make coherent forecasts for the impacts of climate change, by inputting several uncertain climate variables into their impacts models. Unlike a single metric, multiple metrics reduce the risk of rewarding a model variant which scores well due to a fortuitous compensation of errors rather than because it is providing a realistic simulation of the observed quantity. We provide some physical interpretation of how the key metrics constrain our probabilistic projections. The method also has a quantity, called discrepancy, which represents the degree of imperfection in the climate model i.e. it measures the extent to which missing processes, choices of parameterisation schemes and approximations in the climate model affect our ability to use outputs from climate models to make inferences about the real system. Other studies have, sometimes without realising it, treated the climate model as if it had no model error. We show that omission of discrepancy increases the risk of making over-confident predictions. Discrepancy also provides a transparent way of incorporating improvements in subsequent generations of climate models into probabilistic assessments. The set of international climate models is used to derive

  4. Anisotropic elliptical dichroism and influence of imperfection of circular polarization upon anisotropic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Yokojima, Satoshi; Fukaminato, Tuyoshi; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2015-04-01

    In spite of the importance of anisotropic circular dichroism, in practice, it is difficult to get rid of the artifacts that arise from the imperfection of the circular polarization. Undesirable linear dichroism, interference of two orthogonal polarization states, and linear birefringence prevent us from making accurate measurements. We propose a theoretical method for evaluating the contributions of the first two, which are thought to be the main artifacts when specimens are not thick enough. Using the time-dependent perturbation theory and taking into account the direction of light propagation toward an orientationally fixed molecule, we formulated the transition probability of systems perturbed by arbitrarily polarized light and the absorption difference associated with two kinds of polarized light. We also formulated, as an extension of the dissymmetry factor of circular dichroism, a newly defined dissymmetry factor associated with two arbitrary polarization states. Furthermore, we considered a mixed-state of photon ensemble in which polarization states distribute at a certain width around a certain average. Although the purity of polarization and ellipticity does not correspond immediately, by considering the mixed state it is possible to treat them consistently. We used quantum statistical mechanics to describe the absorption difference for two kinds of photon ensembles and applied the consequent formula to examine the reported experimental results of single-molecule chiroptical responses under discussion in the recent past. The artifacts are theoretically suggested to be sensitive to the incident direction of elliptically polarized light and to the oriented systems, the ellipticity, and the orientation of ellipse. The mixed state has little, if any, effect when the polarization state distribution is narrow.

  5. Is it Code Imperfection or 'garbage in Garbage Out'? Outline of Experiences from a Comprehensive Adr Code Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, K.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    ADR equation describes many physical phenomena of interest in the field of water quality in natural streams and groundwater. In many cases such as: density driven flow, multiphase reactive transport, and sediment transport, either one or a number of terms in the ADR equation may become nonlinear. For that reason, numerical tools are the only practical choice to solve these PDEs. All numerical solvers developed for transport equation need to undergo code verification procedure before they are put in to practice. Code verification is a mathematical activity to uncover failures and check for rigorous discretization of PDEs and implementation of initial/boundary conditions. In the context computational PDE verification is not a well-defined procedure on a clear path. Thus, verification tests should be designed and implemented with in-depth knowledge of numerical algorithms and physics of the phenomena as well as mathematical behavior of the solution. Even test results need to be mathematically analyzed to distinguish between an inherent limitation of algorithm and a coding error. Therefore, it is well known that code verification is a state of the art, in which innovative methods and case-based tricks are very common. This study presents full verification of a general transport code. To that end, a complete test suite is designed to probe the ADR solver comprehensively and discover all possible imperfections. In this study we convey our experiences in finding several errors which were not detectable with routine verification techniques. We developed a test suit including hundreds of unit tests and system tests. The test package has gradual increment in complexity such that tests start from simple and increase to the most sophisticated level. Appropriate verification metrics are defined for the required capabilities of the solver as follows: mass conservation, convergence order, capabilities in handling stiff problems, nonnegative concentration, shape preservation, and

  6. An Interactive 3D Virtual Anatomy Puzzle for Learning and Simulation - Initial Demonstration and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Messier, Erik; Wilcox, Jascha; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Diaz, Gabriel; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    To inspire young students (grades 6-12) to become medical practitioners and biomedical engineers, it is necessary to expose them to key concepts of the field in a way that is both exciting and informative. Recent advances in medical image acquisition, manipulation, processing, visualization, and display have revolutionized the approach in which the human body and internal anatomy can be seen and studied. It is now possible to collect 3D, 4D, and 5D medical images of patient specific data, and display that data to the end user using consumer level 3D stereoscopic display technology. Despite such advancements, traditional 2D modes of content presentation such as textbooks and slides are still the standard didactic equipment used to teach young students anatomy. More sophisticated methods of display can help to elucidate the complex 3D relationships between structures that are so often missed when viewing only 2D media, and can instill in students an appreciation for the interconnection between medicine and technology. Here we describe the design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a 3D virtual anatomy puzzle dedicated to helping users learn the anatomy of various organs and systems by manipulating 3D virtual data. The puzzle currently comprises several components of the human anatomy and can be easily extended to include additional organs and systems. The 3D virtual anatomy puzzle game was implemented and piloted using three display paradigms - a traditional 2D monitor, a 3D TV with active shutter glass, and the DK2 version Oculus Rift, as well as two different user interaction devices - a space mouse and traditional keyboard controls. PMID:27046584

  7. Active buckling control of an imperfect beam-column with circular cross-section using piezo-elastic supports and integral LQR control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Platz, Roland

    2016-09-01

    For slender beam-columns loaded by axial compressive forces, active buckling control provides a possibility to increase the maximum bearable axial load above that of a purely passive structure. In this paper, the potential of active buckling control of an imperfect beam-column with circular cross-section using piezo-elastic supports is investigated numerically. Imperfections are given by an initial deformation of the beam-column caused by a constant imperfection force. With the piezo-elastic supports, active bending moments in arbitrary directions orthogonal to the beam-column's longitudinal axis can be applied at both beam- column's ends. The imperfect beam-column is loaded by a gradually increasing axial compressive force resulting in a lateral deformation of the beam-column. First, a finite element model of the imperfect structure for numerical simulation of the active buckling control is presented. Second, an integral linear-quadratic regulator (LQR) that compensates the deformation via the piezo-elastic supports is derived for a reduced modal model of the ideal beam-column. With the proposed active buckling control it is possible to stabilize the imperfect beam-column in arbitrary lateral direction for axial loads above the theoretical critical buckling load and the maximum bearable load of the passive structure.

  8. Knowledge Grid Based Knowledge Supply Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Lu; Jiang, Zuhua

    This paper is mainly concerned with a knowledge supply model in the environment of knowledge grid to realize the knowledge sharing globally. By integrating members, roles, and tasks in a workflow, three sorts of knowledge demands are gained. Based on knowledge demand information, a knowledge supply model is proposed for the purpose of delivering the right knowledge to the right persons. Knowledge grid, acting as a platform for implementing the knowledge supply, is also discussed mainly from the view of knowledge space. A prototype system of knowledge supply has been implemented and applied in product development.

  9. RNA-Puzzles: A CASP-like evaluation of RNA three-dimensional structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, José Almeida; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cao, Song; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn; Huang, Lili; Lavender, Christopher A.; Lisi, Véronique; Major, François; Mikolajczak, Katarzyna; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Philips, Anna; Puton, Tomasz; Santalucia, John; Sijenyi, Fredrick; Hermann, Thomas; Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Serganov, Alexander; Skorupski, Marcin; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Sripakdeevong, Parin; Tuszynska, Irina; Weeks, Kevin M.; Waldsich, Christina; Wildauer, Michael; Leontis, Neocles B.; Westhof, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a first, collective, blind experiment in RNA three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction, encompassing three prediction puzzles. The goals are to assess the leading edge of RNA structure prediction techniques; compare existing methods and tools; and evaluate their relative strengths, weaknesses, and limitations in terms of sequence length and structural complexity. The results should give potential users insight into the suitability of available methods for different applications and facilitate efforts in the RNA structure prediction community in ongoing efforts to improve prediction tools. We also report the creation of an automated evaluation pipeline to facilitate the analysis of future RNA structure prediction exercises. PMID:22361291

  10. Does random tree puzzle produce Yule-Harding trees in the many-taxon limit?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Sha; Steel, Mike

    2013-05-01

    It has been suggested that a random tree puzzle (RTP) process leads to a Yule-Harding (YH) distribution, when the number of taxa becomes large. In this study, we formalize this conjecture, and we prove that the two tree distributions converge for two particular properties, which suggests that the conjecture may be true. However, we present statistical evidence that, while the two distributions are close, the RTP appears to converge on a different distribution than does the YH. By way of contrast, in the concluding section we show that the maximum parsimony method applied to random two-state data leads a very different (PDA, or uniform) distribution on trees.

  11. Sirtuin Activation: A Role for Plasma Membrane in the Cell Growth Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the observation that impermeable oxidants can stimulate cell growth has not been satisfactorily explained. The discovery of sirtuins provides a logical answer to the puzzle. The NADH-dependent transplasma membrane electron transport system, which is stimulated by growth factors and interventions such as calorie restriction, can transfer electrons to external acceptors and protect against stress-induced apoptosis. We hypothesize that the activation of plasma membrane electron transport contributes to the cytosolic NAD+ pool required for sirtuin to activate transcription factors necessary for cell growth and survival. PMID:23033342

  12. Exchange rate regimes, saving glut and the Feldstein Horioka puzzle: The East Asian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya-Bahçe, Seçil; Özmen, Erdal

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates whether the recent experience of the emerging East Asian countries with current account surpluses is consistent with the “saving glut” hypothesis and the Feldstein and Horioka puzzle. The evidence suggests that the saving retention coefficients declined substantially in most of the countries after an endogenous break date coinciding with a major exchange rate regime change with the 1997-1998 crisis. Exchange rate flexibility appears to be enhancing financial integration. The results are consistent with an “investment slump” explanation rather than the “saving glut” postulation.

  13. A 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Senjanovic, G.; Tao, Zhijian; Berezhiani, Z. G.

    1992-08-01

    Zee-type models with Majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, a particularly simple solution is found to the solar neutrino problem, which besides nu(sub 17) predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino nu(sub light) = nu(sub e) + nu(sub mu)(sup c) with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10(exp -11)(mu)(sub B) through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  14. 17 keV neutrino and large magnetic moment solution of the solar neutrino puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Eugeni Kh.; Berezhiani, Zurab G.; Senjanović, Goran; Tao, Zhijian

    1993-01-01

    Zee-type models with majorons naturally incorporate the 17 keV neutrino but in their minimal version fail to simultaneously solve the solar neutrino puzzle. If there is a sterile neutrino state, we find a particularly simple solution to the solar neutrino problem, which besides ν17 predicts a light Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud neutrino νlight = νe + νcμ with a magnetic moment being easily as large as 10 -11μB through the Barr-Freire-Zee mechanism.

  15. Goal anticipation during action observation is influenced by synonymous action capabilities, a puzzling developmental study.

    PubMed

    Gredebäck, Gustaf; Kochukhova, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Eighteen- and 25-month-old human toddlers' ability to manually solve a puzzle and their ability to anticipate the goal during observation of similar actions were investigated. Results demonstrate that goal anticipation during action observation is dependent on manual ability, both on a group level (only 25-month-olds solved the manual task and anticipated the goal during observation) and individually within the older age group (r (xy) = 0.53). These findings suggests a connection between manual ability and the ability to anticipate the goal of others' actions in toddlers, in accordance with the direct matching hypothesis. PMID:20041233

  16. An accurate algorithm to match imperfectly matched images for lung tumor detection without markers.

    PubMed

    Rozario, Timothy; Bereg, Sergey; Yan, Yulong; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Kearney, Vasant; Jiang, Lan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-05-08

    In order to locate lung tumors on kV projection images without internal markers, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) are created and compared with projection images. However, lung tumors always move due to respiration and their locations change on projection images while they are static on DRRs. In addition, global image intensity discrepancies exist between DRRs and projections due to their different image orientations, scattering, and noises. This adversely affects comparison accuracy. A simple but efficient comparison algorithm is reported to match imperfectly matched projection images and DRRs. The kV projection images were matched with different DRRs in two steps. Preprocessing was performed in advance to generate two sets of DRRs. The tumors were removed from the planning 3D CT for a single phase of planning 4D CT images using planning contours of tumors. DRRs of background and DRRs of tumors were generated separately for every projection angle. The first step was to match projection images with DRRs of background signals. This method divided global images into a matrix of small tiles and similarities were evaluated by calculating normalized cross-correlation (NCC) between corresponding tiles on projections and DRRs. The tile configuration (tile locations) was automatically optimized to keep the tumor within a single projection tile that had a bad matching with the corresponding DRR tile. A pixel-based linear transformation was determined by linear interpolations of tile transformation results obtained during tile matching. The background DRRs were transformed to the projection image level and subtracted from it. The resulting subtracted image now contained only the tumor. The second step was to register DRRs of tumors to the subtracted image to locate the tumor. This method was successfully applied to kV fluoro images (about 1000 images) acquired on a Vero (BrainLAB) for dynamic tumor tracking on phantom studies. Radiation opaque markers were

  17. A new framework for interpreting the outcomes of imperfectly blinded controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Arandjelović, Ognjen

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the outcome of an intervention is affected both by the inherent effects of the intervention and the patient's expectations. For this reason in comparative clinical trials an effort is made to conceal the nature of the administered intervention from the participants in the trial i.e. to blind the trial. Yet, in practice perfect blinding is impossible to ensure or even verify post hoc. The current clinical standard is to follow up the trial with an auxiliary questionnaire, which allows trial participants to express in closed form their belief concerning the intervention, i.e. trial group assignment (treatment or control). Auxiliary questionnaire responses are then used to compute the extent of blinding in the trial in the form of a blinding index. If the estimated extent of blinding exceeds a particular threshold the trial is deemed sufficiently blinded; otherwise, the strength of evidence of the trial is brought into question. This may necessitate that the trial is repeated. In this paper we make several contributions. Firstly, we identify a series of problems of the aforesaid clinical practice and discuss them in context of the most commonly used blinding indexes. Secondly, we formulate a novel approach for handling imperfectly blinded trials. We adopt a feedback questionnaire of the same form as that which is currently in use, but interpret the collected data using a novel statistical method, significantly different from that proposed in the previous work. Unlike the previously proposed approaches, our method is void of any ad hoc free parameters and robust to small changes in the participants' feedback responses. Our method also does not discard any data and is not predicated on any strong assumptions used to interpret participants' feedback. The key idea behind the present method is that it is meaningful to compare only the corresponding treatment and control participant sub-groups, that is, sub-groups matched by their auxiliary responses

  18. The 45-kb unit of major urinary protein gene organization is a gigantic imperfect palindrome.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J O; Selman, G G; Hickman, J; Black, L; Saunders, R D; Clark, A J

    1985-07-01

    The multigene family which codes for the mouse major urinary proteins consists of about 35 genes. Most of these are members of two distinct groups, group 1 and group 2. The group 1 and group 2 genes are organized in head-to-head pairs within 12 to 15 remarkably uniform chromosomal units or domains about 45 kilobase pairs (kb) in size. The 45-kb units are located on chromosome 4, and many of them are adjacent to each other. We propose that the 45-kb unit is a unit both of organization and of evolutionary change. In this study the homologies within the unit were observed by examining, in an electron microscope, heteroduplex and foldback structures made from cloned major urinary protein genes. These show that the 45-kb unit is a gigantic imperfect palindrome. Each arm of the palindrome contains two regions of inverted symmetry of 9.5 and 4.5 kb separated by a 3-kb nonsymmetrical region. We argue that the nonsymmetrical regions arose by a series of deletion events in the two arms of the palindrome. The center of the 45-kb unit is an 8-kb sequence without inverted symmetry flanked by the 9.5-kb regions, which contain the 4-kb genes and their immediate 5' and 3' flanking regions. The junction between adjacent 45-kb units is a 2- to 4-kb sequence without inverted symmetry flanked by the 4.5-kb regions. Some of the 45-kb units are arranged as direct tandem repeats. Others appear to be in inverted orientation with respect to a neighboring unit. Cloned major urinary protein genes show few incidences of the repetitive elements B1, B2, R, and MIF. Two elements, a B1 and an R, may be a constant feature of the 45-kb units. If so, in those cases in which the units are in tandem array, both of these elements will occur with a 45-kb periodicity. A comparison of corresponding parts of different 45-kb units shows that they differ because of a number of deletion or insertion events, particularly in the regions 3' to the genes.

  19. Eta Carinae: A Box of Puzzles...Some Solved, Others Await

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the l840's, Eta Carinae brightened to rival Sirius, then faded. Today we see a marginally naked-eye binary with an expanding, very dusty bipolar Homunculus. The energetics of the ejected mass (>l2 to 40 solar masses at 500-700 km/s plus outer bullets/strings up to 3000 km/s} approach that of a supernova. Extragalactic SN surveys detect near-supernovae thought to be like the Great Eruption of the 1840's. Eta Carinae presents an abundance of puzzles: rich in N, but 1/100th the solar C and O abundances; Ti, V, Sr, Sc persist in atomic states.... yet an abundance of molecules and dust exists in the Homunculus. How did molecules and dust form with low C and O? A near supernova occurred in the l840m, yet both binary companions, with total mass > 120 solar masses, survive in a very eccentric orbit. What is the near future of this system: a GRB? a SN? or just two WR stars that ultimately become two SNs? These and other puzzles will be presented

  20. Heavy flavor puzzle at LHC: a serendipitous interplay of jet suppression and fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2014-01-31

    Both charged hadrons and D mesons are considered to be excellent probes of QCD matter created in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Surprisingly, recent experimental observations at LHC show the same jet suppression for these two probes, which--contrary to pQCD expectations--may suggest similar energy losses for light quarks and gluons in the QCD medium. We here use our recently developed energy loss formalism in a finite-size dynamical QCD medium to analyze this phenomenon that we denote as the "heavy flavor puzzle at LHC." We show that this puzzle is a consequence of an unusual combination of the suppression and fragmentation patterns and, in fact, does not require invoking the same energy loss for light partons. Furthermore, we show that this combination leads to a simple relationship between the suppressions of charged hadrons and D mesons and the corresponding bare quark suppressions. Consequently, a coincidental matching of jet suppression and fragmentation allows considerably simplifying the interpretation of the corresponding experimental data.

  1. A Hybrid alldifferent-Tabu Search Algorithm for Solving Sudoku Puzzles.

    PubMed

    Soto, Ricardo; Crawford, Broderick; Galleguillos, Cristian; Paredes, Fernando; Norero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The Sudoku problem is a well-known logic-based puzzle of combinatorial number-placement. It consists in filling a n(2) × n(2) grid, composed of n columns, n rows, and n subgrids, each one containing distinct integers from 1 to n(2). Such a puzzle belongs to the NP-complete collection of problems, to which there exist diverse exact and approximate methods able to solve it. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid algorithm that smartly combines a classic tabu search procedure with the alldifferent global constraint from the constraint programming world. The alldifferent constraint is known to be efficient for domain filtering in the presence of constraints that must be pairwise different, which are exactly the kind of constraints that Sudokus own. This ability clearly alleviates the work of the tabu search, resulting in a faster and more robust approach for solving Sudokus. We illustrate interesting experimental results where our proposed algorithm outperforms the best results previously reported by hybrids and approximate methods.

  2. A Hybrid alldifferent-Tabu Search Algorithm for Solving Sudoku Puzzles

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Broderick; Paredes, Fernando; Norero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The Sudoku problem is a well-known logic-based puzzle of combinatorial number-placement. It consists in filling a n2 × n2 grid, composed of n columns, n rows, and n subgrids, each one containing distinct integers from 1 to n2. Such a puzzle belongs to the NP-complete collection of problems, to which there exist diverse exact and approximate methods able to solve it. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid algorithm that smartly combines a classic tabu search procedure with the alldifferent global constraint from the constraint programming world. The alldifferent constraint is known to be efficient for domain filtering in the presence of constraints that must be pairwise different, which are exactly the kind of constraints that Sudokus own. This ability clearly alleviates the work of the tabu search, resulting in a faster and more robust approach for solving Sudokus. We illustrate interesting experimental results where our proposed algorithm outperforms the best results previously reported by hybrids and approximate methods. PMID:26078751

  3. A Hybrid alldifferent-Tabu Search Algorithm for Solving Sudoku Puzzles.

    PubMed

    Soto, Ricardo; Crawford, Broderick; Galleguillos, Cristian; Paredes, Fernando; Norero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The Sudoku problem is a well-known logic-based puzzle of combinatorial number-placement. It consists in filling a n(2) × n(2) grid, composed of n columns, n rows, and n subgrids, each one containing distinct integers from 1 to n(2). Such a puzzle belongs to the NP-complete collection of problems, to which there exist diverse exact and approximate methods able to solve it. In this paper, we propose a new hybrid algorithm that smartly combines a classic tabu search procedure with the alldifferent global constraint from the constraint programming world. The alldifferent constraint is known to be efficient for domain filtering in the presence of constraints that must be pairwise different, which are exactly the kind of constraints that Sudokus own. This ability clearly alleviates the work of the tabu search, resulting in a faster and more robust approach for solving Sudokus. We illustrate interesting experimental results where our proposed algorithm outperforms the best results previously reported by hybrids and approximate methods. PMID:26078751

  4. Occupancy models for monitoring marine fish: a bayesian hierarchical approach to model imperfect detection with a novel gear combination.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Lewis G; Bacheler, Nathan M; Gwinn, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy models using incidence data collected repeatedly at sites across the range of a population are increasingly employed to infer patterns and processes influencing population distribution and dynamics. While such work is common in terrestrial systems, fewer examples exist in marine applications. This disparity likely exists because the replicate samples required by these models to account for imperfect detection are often impractical to obtain when surveying aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. We employ simultaneous sampling using fish traps and novel underwater camera observations to generate the requisite replicate samples for occupancy models of red snapper, a reef fish species. Since the replicate samples are collected simultaneously by multiple sampling devices, many typical problems encountered when obtaining replicate observations are avoided. Our results suggest that augmenting traditional fish trap sampling with camera observations not only doubled the probability of detecting red snapper in reef habitats off the Southeast coast of the United States, but supplied the necessary observations to infer factors influencing population distribution and abundance while accounting for imperfect detection. We found that detection probabilities tended to be higher for camera traps than traditional fish traps. Furthermore, camera trap detections were influenced by the current direction and turbidity of the water, indicating that collecting data on these variables is important for future monitoring. These models indicate that the distribution and abundance of this species is more heavily influenced by latitude and depth than by micro-scale reef characteristics lending credence to previous characterizations of red snapper as a reef habitat generalist. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneous sampling devices, including camera traps, in aquatic environments to inform occupancy models and account for imperfect detection when describing factors

  5. Occupancy models for monitoring marine fish: a bayesian hierarchical approach to model imperfect detection with a novel gear combination.

    PubMed

    Coggins, Lewis G; Bacheler, Nathan M; Gwinn, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy models using incidence data collected repeatedly at sites across the range of a population are increasingly employed to infer patterns and processes influencing population distribution and dynamics. While such work is common in terrestrial systems, fewer examples exist in marine applications. This disparity likely exists because the replicate samples required by these models to account for imperfect detection are often impractical to obtain when surveying aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. We employ simultaneous sampling using fish traps and novel underwater camera observations to generate the requisite replicate samples for occupancy models of red snapper, a reef fish species. Since the replicate samples are collected simultaneously by multiple sampling devices, many typical problems encountered when obtaining replicate observations are avoided. Our results suggest that augmenting traditional fish trap sampling with camera observations not only doubled the probability of detecting red snapper in reef habitats off the Southeast coast of the United States, but supplied the necessary observations to infer factors influencing population distribution and abundance while accounting for imperfect detection. We found that detection probabilities tended to be higher for camera traps than traditional fish traps. Furthermore, camera trap detections were influenced by the current direction and turbidity of the water, indicating that collecting data on these variables is important for future monitoring. These models indicate that the distribution and abundance of this species is more heavily influenced by latitude and depth than by micro-scale reef characteristics lending credence to previous characterizations of red snapper as a reef habitat generalist. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneous sampling devices, including camera traps, in aquatic environments to inform occupancy models and account for imperfect detection when describing factors

  6. Occupancy Models for Monitoring Marine Fish: A Bayesian Hierarchical Approach to Model Imperfect Detection with a Novel Gear Combination

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Lewis G.; Bacheler, Nathan M.; Gwinn, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy models using incidence data collected repeatedly at sites across the range of a population are increasingly employed to infer patterns and processes influencing population distribution and dynamics. While such work is common in terrestrial systems, fewer examples exist in marine applications. This disparity likely exists because the replicate samples required by these models to account for imperfect detection are often impractical to obtain when surveying aquatic organisms, particularly fishes. We employ simultaneous sampling using fish traps and novel underwater camera observations to generate the requisite replicate samples for occupancy models of red snapper, a reef fish species. Since the replicate samples are collected simultaneously by multiple sampling devices, many typical problems encountered when obtaining replicate observations are avoided. Our results suggest that augmenting traditional fish trap sampling with camera observations not only doubled the probability of detecting red snapper in reef habitats off the Southeast coast of the United States, but supplied the necessary observations to infer factors influencing population distribution and abundance while accounting for imperfect detection. We found that detection probabilities tended to be higher for camera traps than traditional fish traps. Furthermore, camera trap detections were influenced by the current direction and turbidity of the water, indicating that collecting data on these variables is important for future monitoring. These models indicate that the distribution and abundance of this species is more heavily influenced by latitude and depth than by micro-scale reef characteristics lending credence to previous characterizations of red snapper as a reef habitat generalist. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneous sampling devices, including camera traps, in aquatic environments to inform occupancy models and account for imperfect detection when describing factors

  7. Constructing Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2003-02-01

    Schools are expected to lay the foundation upon which knowledge can be built and equip students with the tools necessary to accomplish the construction. The role of the teacher in this building process is crucial to the type of structure the student can build. Whether you call it constructivism, discussion teaching, project-based learning, inquiry learning, or any of the other names given to the instructional strategies being suggested by education researchers, the key is getting students to become active participants in the process. While some students may be able to learn from eloquently delivered lectures and dynamic demonstrations, the majority of students cannot effectively retain and apply ideas communicated in this manner.

  8. A puzzle form of a non-verbal intelligence test gives significantly higher performance measures in children with severe intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Katrina D; Goharpey, Nahal; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of 'potential intellectual ability' of children with severe intellectual disability (ID) is limited, as current tests designed for normal children do not maintain their interest. Thus a manual puzzle version of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) was devised to appeal to the attentional and sensory preferences and language limitations of children with ID. It was hypothesized that performance on the book and manual puzzle forms would not differ for typically developing children but that children with ID would perform better on the puzzle form. Methods The first study assessed the validity of this puzzle form of the RCPM for 76 typically developing children in a test-retest crossover design, with a 3 week interval between tests. A second study tested performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in a sample of 164 children with ID. Results In the first study, no significant difference was found between performance on the puzzle and book forms in typically developing children, irrespective of the order of completion. The second study demonstrated a significantly higher performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in the ID population. Conclusion Similar performance on book and puzzle forms of the RCPM by typically developing children suggests that both forms measure the same construct. These findings suggest that the puzzle form does not require greater cognitive ability but demands sensory-motor attention and limits distraction in children with severe ID. Thus, we suggest the puzzle form of the RCPM is a more reliable measure of the non-verbal mentation of children with severe ID than the book form. PMID:18671882

  9. ChloroSSRdb: a repository of perfect and imperfect chloroplastic simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) of green plants.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Aditi; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions in DNA sequence that contain repeating motifs of length 1-6 nucleotides. These repeats are ubiquitously present and are found in both coding and non-coding regions of genome. A total of 534 complete chloroplast genome sequences (as on 18 September 2014) of Viridiplantae are available at NCBI organelle genome resource. It provides opportunity to mine these genomes for the detection of SSRs and store them in the form of a database. In an attempt to properly manage and retrieve chloroplastic SSRs, we designed ChloroSSRdb which is a relational database developed using SQL server 2008 and accessed through ASP.NET. It provides information of all the three types (perfect, imperfect and compound) of SSRs. At present, ChloroSSRdb contains 124 430 mined SSRs, with majority lying in non-coding region. Out of these, PCR primers were designed for 118 249 SSRs. Tetranucleotide repeats (47 079) were found to be the most frequent repeat type, whereas hexanucleotide repeats (6414) being the least abundant. Additionally, in each species statistical analyses were performed to calculate relative frequency, correlation coefficient and chi-square statistics of perfect and imperfect SSRs. In accordance with the growing interest in SSR studies, ChloroSSRdb will prove to be a useful resource in developing genetic markers, phylogenetic analysis, genetic mapping, etc. Moreover, it will serve as a ready reference for mined SSRs in available chloroplast genomes of green plants. Database URL: www.compubio.in/chlorossrdb/

  10. Frequency Split Elimination Method for a Solid-State Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro with an Imperfect Axisymmetric-Shell Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Fu, Mengyin; Deng, Zhihong; Liu, Ning; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The resonator of a solid-state vibratory gyro is responsible for sensing angular motion. Frequency splitting of an axisymmetric-shell resonator is a common problem caused by manufacturing defects. The defect causes a frequency difference between two working modes which consist of two nodes and two antinodes. The difference leads to the loss of gyroscopic effect, and thus the resonator cannot sense angular motion. In this paper, the resonator based on an axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell structure is investigated and an approach to eliminate frequency splits is proposed. Since axisymmetric multi-curved surface shell resonators are too complex to be modeled, this paper proposes a simplified model by focusing on a common property of the axisymmetric shell. The resonator with stochastic imperfections is made equivalent to a perfect shell with an imperfect mass point. Rayleigh's energy method is used in the theoretical analysis. Finite element modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the elimination approach. In real cases, a resonator's frequency split is eliminated by the proposed approach. In this paper, errors in the theoretical analysis are discussed and steps to be taken when the deviation between assumptions and the real situation is large are figured out. The resonator has good performance after processing. The elimination approach can be applied to any kind of solid-state vibratory gyro resonators with an axisymmetric shell structure. PMID:25648707

  11. CardioKnowledge: A Knowledge Management Environment

    PubMed Central

    Montoni, Mariella A.; Galotta, Catia; Rocha, Ana Regina; Rabelo, Álvaro; Rabelo, Lisia

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge management supports decision-making by capturing and analyzing key performance indicators, providing visibility into the effectiveness of the business model, and by concentrating collaborative work and employee knowledge reviews on critical business problems. CardioKnowledge is a knowledge management environment based on the business and process requirements of a health care organization in Cardiology. CardioKnowledge supports organizational processes in order to facilitate the communication and exchange of knowledge among the cardiologists, medical students and other employees. PMID:14728445

  12. Tracking the Footprints Puzzle: The Problematic Persistence of Science-as-Process in Teaching the Nature and Culture of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Charles R., Jr.; Dodick, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    For many decades, science educators have asked, "In what ways should learning the content of traditional subjects serve as the means to more general ends, such as understanding the nature of science or the processes of scientific inquiry?" Acceptance of these ends reduces the role of disciplinary context; the "Footprints Puzzle" and Oregon's…

  13. An Effective Method of Introducing the Periodic Table as a Crossword Puzzle at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joag, Sushama D.

    2014-01-01

    A simple method to introduce the modern periodic table of elements at the high school level as a game of solving a crossword puzzle is presented here. A survey to test the effectiveness of this new method relative to the conventional method, involving use of a wall-mounted chart of the periodic table, was conducted on a convenience sample. This…

  14. {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Japanese site gears up to sole neutrino puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Normile, D.

    1995-11-03

    Ever since Wolfgang Pauli proposed the existence of neutrinos in 1930 to explain some puzzling features of the radioactive decay of certain atoms, expermentalists have labored hard to detect enough of the elusive particles to determine their properties. It took 26 years to prove that Pauli`s particle even exits-a feat for which Frederick Reines of the University of California (UC), Irvine, won the Nobel Prize last month. Soon, however, physicists will be capturing neutrinos in unprecedented numbers in a 50,000-metric-ton tank that will fill with water starting next month. Researchers hope that this colossal waterbath will yield an answer to one of the most pressing questions is cosmology and high-energy physics: Do neutrinos have mass?The $100 million experiment, called Super-Kamiokande, in located in a lead mine west of Tokyo. This article describes the work to be conducted.

  15. The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro; Kashimura, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the midlatitudes at cloud-top levels (∼65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ∼60° latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. Here we perform numerical simulations of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model, and succeed in reproducing these puzzling features in close agreement with the observations. The cold collar and warm polar region are attributed to the residual mean meridional circulation enhanced by the thermal tide. The present results strongly suggest that the thermal tide is crucial for the structure of the Venus upper polar atmosphere at and above cloud levels. PMID:26832195

  16. The puzzling Venusian polar atmospheric structure reproduced by a general circulation model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro; Kashimura, Hiroki; Imamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the midlatitudes at cloud-top levels (∼65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ∼60° latitude, which is a unique feature called ‘cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. Here we perform numerical simulations of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model, and succeed in reproducing these puzzling features in close agreement with the observations. The cold collar and warm polar region are attributed to the residual mean meridional circulation enhanced by the thermal tide. The present results strongly suggest that the thermal tide is crucial for the structure of the Venus upper polar atmosphere at and above cloud levels. PMID:26832195

  17. Height of female Americans in the 19th century and the antebellum puzzle.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2011-03-01

    Using 19th century state prison records, this study contrasts the biological standard of living of comparable US African-American and white females during a period of relatively rapid economic development. White females were consistently taller than black females by about 1.5 cm (0.6 in.). Whites from Great Lakes and Plains states and black Southwestern females were the tallest. US females were tall compared to their European counterparts. The height of females began to decline in the antebellum period, possibly before that of males. The recovery of physical stature was also earlier among females than among males. This implies that the biological standard of lower-class men and women did not move in parallel during the onset of modern economic growth. It also implies that the antebellum puzzle was most likely rooted in the endogenous forces of socio-economic change rather than the exogenous changes in the disease environment.

  18. Completing the nuclear reaction puzzle of the nucleosynthesis of 92Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, G. M.; Spyrou, A.; Schwengner, R.; Naqvi, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Eriksen, T. K.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Crespo Campo, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Klintefjord, M.; Meyer, B. S.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.

    2016-08-01

    One of the greatest questions for modern physics to address is how elements heavier than iron are created in extreme astrophysical environments. A particularly challenging part of that question is the creation of the so-called p -nuclei, which are believed to be mainly produced in some types of supernovae. The lack of needed nuclear data presents an obstacle in nailing down the precise site and astrophysical conditions. In this work, we present for the first time measurements on the nuclear level density and average γ strength function of 92Mo. State-of-the-art p -process calculations systematically underestimate the observed solar abundance of this isotope. Our data provide stringent constraints on the 91Nb(p ,γ )92Mo reaction rate, which is the last unmeasured reaction in the nucleosynthesis puzzle of 92Mo. Based on our results, we conclude that the 92Mo abundance anomaly is not due to the nuclear physics input to astrophysical model calculations.

  19. A possible hadronic excess in psi(2S) decay and the rho pi puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2000-11-09

    We study the so-called {rho}{pi} puzzle of the {psi}(2S) decay by incorporating two inputs; the relative phase between the one-photon and the gluonic decay amplitude, and a possible hadronic excess in the inclusive nonelectromagnetic decay rate of {psi}(2S). We look into the possibility that the hadronic excess in {psi}(2S) originates from a decay process of long-distance origin which is absent from the J/{upsilon} decay. We propose that the amplitude of this additional process happens to nearly cancel the short-distance gluonic amplitude in the exclusive decay {psi}(2S) {yields} 1{sup -}0{sup -} and turn the sum dominantly real in contrast to the J/{psi} decay. We present general consequences of this mechanism and survey two models which might possibly explain the source of this additional amplitude.

  20. A Theoretical Model of Jigsaw-Puzzle Pattern Formation by Plant Leaf Epidermal Cells.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Akita, Kae; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Yoshimura, Kenji; Miura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Plant leaf epidermal cells exhibit a jigsaw puzzle-like pattern that is generated by interdigitation of the cell wall during leaf development. The contribution of two ROP GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, to the cytoskeletal dynamics that regulate epidermal cell wall interdigitation has already been examined; however, how interactions between these molecules result in pattern formation remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a simple interface equation model that incorporates both the cell wall remodeling activity of ROP GTPases and the diffusible signaling molecules by which they are regulated. This model successfully reproduces pattern formation observed in vivo, and explains the counterintuitive experimental results of decreased cellulose production and increased thickness. Our model also reproduces the dynamics of three-way cell wall junctions. Therefore, this model provides a possible mechanism for cell wall interdigitation formation in vivo.

  1. Height of female Americans in the 19th century and the antebellum puzzle.

    PubMed

    Carson, Scott Alan

    2011-03-01

    Using 19th century state prison records, this study contrasts the biological standard of living of comparable US African-American and white females during a period of relatively rapid economic development. White females were consistently taller than black females by about 1.5 cm (0.6 in.). Whites from Great Lakes and Plains states and black Southwestern females were the tallest. US females were tall compared to their European counterparts. The height of females began to decline in the antebellum period, possibly before that of males. The recovery of physical stature was also earlier among females than among males. This implies that the biological standard of lower-class men and women did not move in parallel during the onset of modern economic growth. It also implies that the antebellum puzzle was most likely rooted in the endogenous forces of socio-economic change rather than the exogenous changes in the disease environment. PMID:21276759

  2. The solar neutrino puzzle and the vL --> vR conversion hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, R.; Fiorentini, G.

    As a possible explanation of the solar neutrino puzzle, several authors have invoked a neutrino helicity rotation (vL --> vR) in the solar magnetic field, coupled to a neutrino magnetic moment. We discuss: (i) the effect on the vL --> vR conversion probability of the different coherent interaction with matter of the two neutrino helicity states; (ii) the azimuthal asymmetry in the elastic v-e scattering of solar neutrinos, due to the interference between the weak and the electromagnetic amplitude. We also briefly comment on the theoretical problem posed by a neutrino magnetic moment as large as 10-10μB. Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Italy.

  3. Using High-Fidelity Analysis Methods and Experimental Results to Account for the Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The analytical results include the effects of traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections and uncertainties in the values of selected shell parameters on the buckling loads of the shells. The nonlinear structural analysis results correlate very well with the experimental results. The high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure used to generate the analytical results can also be used to form the basis of a new shell design procedure that could reduce the traditional dependence on empirical results in the shell design process. KEYWORDS: high-fidelity nonlinear structural analysis, composite shells, shell stability, initial imperfections

  4. Gathering Knowledge for Your Knowledge Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley-Durst, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Discusses knowledge management that seeks to minimize information overload in order to enhance performance. Highlights include the differences between data, information, and knowledge; the relationship between learning, knowledge, and performance; the use of focus groups; documenting results; and knowledge classification. (LRW)

  5. On the Buckling of Imperfect Anisotropic Shells with Elastic Edge Supports Under Combined Loading Part I:. Pt. 1; Theory and Numerical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, Johann; deVries, J.; Hol, J. M. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    A rigorous solution is presented for the case of stiffened anisotropic cylindrical shells with general imperfections under combined loading, where the edge supports are provided by symmetrical or unsymmetrical elastic rings. The circumferential dependence is eliminated by a truncated Fourier series. The resulting nonlinear 2-point boundary value problem is solved numerically via the "Parallel Shooting Method". The changing deformation patterns resulting from the different degrees of interaction between the given initial imperfections and the specified end rings are displayed. Recommendations are made as to the minimum ring stiffnesses required for optimal load carrying configurations.

  6. Effect of the thickness variation and initial imperfection on buckling of composite cylindrical shells: Asymptotic analysis and numerical results by BOSOR4 and PANDA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Wei; Elishakoff, Isaac; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Bushnell, David

    1998-01-01

    This study is an extension of a previous investigation of the combined effect of axisymmetric thickness variation and axisymmetric initial geometric imperfection on buckling of isotropic shells under uniform axial compression. Here the anisotropic cylindrical shells are investigated by means of Koiter's energy criterion. An asymptotic formula is derived which can be used to determine the critical buckling load for composite shells with combined initial geometric imperfection and thickness variation. Results are compared with those obtained by the software packages BOSOR4 and PANDA2.

  7. Differentiation of the functional in an optimization problem for diffusion and convective transfer coefficients of elliptic imperfect contact interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manapova, Aigul

    2016-08-01

    We consider optimal control problems for second order elliptic equations with non-self-adjoint operators-convection-diffusion problems. Control processes are described by semi-linear convection-diffusion equation with discontinuous data and solutions (states) subject to the boundary interface conditions of imperfect type (i.e., problems with a jump of the coefficients and the solution on the interface; the jump of the solution is proportional to the normal component of the flux). Controls are involved in the coefficients of diffusion and convective transfer. We prove differentiability and Lipshitz continuity of the cost functional, depending on a state of the system and a control. The calculation of the gradients uses the numerical solutions of direct problems for the state and adjoint problems.

  8. Comparison of various methods for mathematical analysis of the Foucault knife edge test pattern to determine optical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, B. E.

    1971-01-01

    The linearized integral equation for the Foucault test of a solid mirror was solved by various methods: power series, Fourier series, collocation, iteration, and inversion integral. The case of the Cassegrain mirror was solved by a particular power series method, collocation, and inversion integral. The inversion integral method appears to be the best overall method for both the solid and Cassegrain mirrors. Certain particular types of power series and Fourier series are satisfactory for the Cassegrain mirror. Numerical integration of the nonlinear equation for selected surface imperfections showed that results start to deviate from those given by the linearized equation at a surface deviation of about 3 percent of the wavelength of light. Several possible procedures for calibrating and scaling the input data for the integral equation are described.

  9. Insurance and imperfect financial markets in Grossman's demand for health model--a reply to Tabata and Ohkusa.

    PubMed

    Liljas, B

    2000-09-01

    In the article by Tabata and Ohkusa, they show that the insurance system set out in Liljas [Liljas, B., 1998a. The demand for health with uncertainty and insurance. Journal of Health Economics 17, 153-170.] does not have an optimal solution, and propose a new formulation. It is argued here that even though the new model works mathematically, it has a less realistic economic foundation. Furthermore, generalizing the Grossman model by making the marginal utility of income variable over time is suggested to be more relevant in the case where there are imperfect financial markets, and a simple example is provided. Overall, there seems to be room for further theoretical extensions in the demand for health literature.

  10. Optimum random and age replacement policies for customer-demand multi-state system reliability under imperfect maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Luan; Chang, Chin-Chih; Sheu, Dwan-Fang

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes the generalised random and age replacement policies for a multi-state system composed of multi-state elements. The degradation of the multi-state element is assumed to follow the non-homogeneous continuous time Markov process which is a continuous time and discrete state process. A recursive approach is presented to efficiently compute the time-dependent state probability distribution of the multi-state element. The state and performance distribution of the entire multi-state system is evaluated via the combination of the stochastic process and the Lz-transform method. The concept of customer-centred reliability measure is developed based on the system performance and the customer demand. We develop the random and age replacement policies for an aging multi-state system subject to imperfect maintenance in a failure (or unacceptable) state. For each policy, the optimum replacement schedule which minimises the mean cost rate is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  11. Imperfect magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and discrete auroras. Final report 1 Jan 79-31 Dec 80

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, J.R.

    1981-04-01

    Recent theoretical developments on the formation of discrete auroras are reviewed to assess the progress of our understanding of discrete auroral phenomenon. In spite of the great complexity involved, a unified physical picture begins to emerge in which the roles of various auroral acceleration processes can be identified in the context of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Potential drops for the formation of inverted V precipitations are supported predominantly by a combination of double layer and pitch angle anisotropy processes. Additional electron energizations for the formation of thin auroral arcs are most likely due to filamentations of electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence along the inverted V field lines. the discrete auroras can be understood as a manifestation of the imperfect coupling state of the magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction due to enhanced magnetospheric convection.

  12. Post-buckling of geometrically imperfect shear-deformable flat panels under combined thermal and compressive edge loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Souza, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The static post-buckling of simply-supported flat panels exposed to a stationary nonuniform temperature field and subjected to a system of subcritical in-plane compressive edge loads is investigated. The study is performed within a refined theory of composite laminated plates incorporating the effect of transverse shear and the geometric nonlinearities. The influence played by a number of effects, among them transverse shear deformation, initial geometric imperfections, the character of the in-plane boundary conditions and thickness ratio are studied and a series of conclusions are outlined. The influence played by the complete temperature field (i.e., the uniform through thickness and thickness-wise gradient) as compared to the one induced by only the uniform one, is discussed and the peculiarities of the resulting post-buckling behaviors are enlightened.

  13. A flexible Bayesian hierarchical approach for analyzing spatial and temporal variation in the fecal corticosterone levels in birds when there is imperfect knowledge of individual identity.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Guthrie S; Millspaugh, Joshua J; Link, William A; Woods, Rami J; Gutiérrez, R J

    2013-12-01

    Population cycles have long interested biologists. The ruffed grouse, Bonasa umbellus, is one such species whose populations cycle over most of their range. Thus, much effort has been expended to understand the mechanisms that might control cycles in this and other species. Corticosterone metabolites are widely used in studies of animals to measure physiological stress. We evaluated corticosterone metabolites in feces of territorial male grouse as a potential tool to study mechanisms governing grouse cycles. However, like most studies of corticosterone in wild animals, we did not know the identity of all individuals for which we had fecal samples. This presented an analytical problem that resulted in either pseudoreplication or confounding. Therefore, we derived an analytical approach that accommodated for uncertainty in individual identification. Because we had relatively low success capturing birds, we estimated turnover probabilities of birds on territorial display sites based on capture histories of a limited number of birds we captured. Hence, we developed a study design and modeling approach to quantify variation in corticosterone levels among individuals and through time that would be applicable to any field study of corticosterone in wild animals. Specifically, we wanted a sampling design and model that was flexible enough to partition variation among individuals, spatial units, and years, while incorporating environmental covariates that would represent potential mechanisms. We conducted our study during the decline phase of the grouse cycle and found high variation among corticosterone samples (11.33-443.92 ng/g [x=113.99 ng/g, SD=69.08, median=99.03 ng/g]). However, there were relatively small differences in corticosterone levels among years, but levels declined throughout each breeding season, which was opposite our predictions for stress hormones correlating with a declining population. We partitioned the residual variation into site, bird, and repetition (i.e., multiple samples collected from the same bird on the same day). After accounting for years and three general periods within breeding seasons, 42% of the residual variation among observations was attributable to differences among individual birds. Thus, we attribute little influence of site on stress level of birds in our study, but disentangling individual from site effects is difficult because site and bird are confounded. Our model structures provided analytical approaches for studying species having different ecologies. Our approach also demonstrates that even incomplete information on individual identity of birds within samples is useful for analyzing these types of data.

  14. ChloroSSRdb: a repository of perfect and imperfect chloroplastic simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) of green plants

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Aditi; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions in DNA sequence that contain repeating motifs of length 1–6 nucleotides. These repeats are ubiquitously present and are found in both coding and non-coding regions of genome. A total of 534 complete chloroplast genome sequences (as on 18 September 2014) of Viridiplantae are available at NCBI organelle genome resource. It provides opportunity to mine these genomes for the detection of SSRs and store them in the form of a database. In an attempt to properly manage and retrieve chloroplastic SSRs, we designed ChloroSSRdb which is a relational database developed using SQL server 2008 and accessed through ASP.NET. It provides information of all the three types (perfect, imperfect and compound) of SSRs. At present, ChloroSSRdb contains 124 430 mined SSRs, with majority lying in non-coding region. Out of these, PCR primers were designed for 118 249 SSRs. Tetranucleotide repeats (47 079) were found to be the most frequent repeat type, whereas hexanucleotide repeats (6414) being the least abundant. Additionally, in each species statistical analyses were performed to calculate relative frequency, correlation coefficient and chi-square statistics of perfect and imperfect SSRs. In accordance with the growing interest in SSR studies, ChloroSSRdb will prove to be a useful resource in developing genetic markers, phylogenetic analysis, genetic mapping, etc. Moreover, it will serve as a ready reference for mined SSRs in available chloroplast genomes of green plants. Database URL: www.compubio.in/chlorossrdb/ PMID:25380781

  15. Characterization for imperfect polarizers under imperfect conditions.

    PubMed

    Nee, S M; Yoo, C; Cole, T; Burge, D

    1998-01-01

    The principles for measuring the extinction ratio and transmittance of a polarizer are formulated by use of the principal Mueller matrix, which includes both polarization and depolarization. The extinction ratio is about half of the depolarization, and the contrast is the inverse of the extinction ratio. Errors in the extinction ratio caused by partially polarized incident light and the misalignment of polarizers can be corrected by the devised zone average method and the null method. Used with a laser source, the null method can measure contrasts for very good polarizers. Correct algorithms are established to deduce the depolarization for three comparable polarizers calibrated mutually. These methods are tested with wire-grid polarizers used in the 3-5-microm wavelength region with a laser source and also a lamp source. The contrasts obtained from both methods agree. PMID:18268560

  16. The effect of initial imperfections on shell stability: An updated review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the Delft Interactive Shell Design Code (DISDECO) is described. The purpose is to make the accumulated theoretical, numerical, and practical knowledge of the last years readily accessible to users interested in the analysis of buckling sensitive structures. With this open ended, hierarchical, interactive computer code, the user can access workstation programs of increasing complexity. As a first update of DISDECO, the computational modules of the initial level were modified so as to handle combined loads consisting of axial compression, internal and external pressure, and clockwise or counter clockwise torque. The applied load is assumed to have a uniform spatial distribution and is divided into a fixed and a variable part. The magnitude of the variable part is allowed to vary in proportion to a load parameter Lambda. This leads to an eigenvalue problem for the critical lambda sub C.

  17. Effect of structural imperfections on lasing characteristics of diode-pumped YVO{sub 4}, GdVO{sub 4} and mixed rare-earth vanadate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, G Yu; Vlasov, V I; Zavartsev, Yu D; Zagumennyi, A I; Kalashnikova, I I; Kutovoi, S A; Naumov, V S; Sirotkin, A A

    2012-03-31

    The efficiency of diode-pumped lasers with gain elements made from yttrium, gadolinium, yttrium - gadolinium and yttrium - scandium orthovanadate crystals has been shown for the first time to be influenced by structural imperfections (quality) of the crystals. This allows one to predict lasing parameters of such crystals in a preliminary step, without fabricating gain elements.

  18. The Effects of Instruction Enhanced by Video/Photo Blogs and Wikis on Learning the Distinctions of the Spanish Preterite and Imperfect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaneda, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in levels of achievement when learning the preterite and imperfect aspects in Spanish, at the recognition and production levels, between students who used instruction with video/photo blogs and wikis, compared to those who used instruction with traditional text-based technologies. Results revealed that there…

  19. Knowledge management: organizing nursing care knowledge.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jane A; Willson, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Almost everything we do in nursing is based on our knowledge. In 1984, Benner (From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley; 1984) described nursing knowledge as the culmination of practical experience and evidence from research, which over time becomes the "know-how" of clinical experience. This "know-how" knowledge asset is dynamic and initially develops in the novice critical care nurse, expands within competent and proficient nurses, and is actualized in the expert intensive care nurse. Collectively, practical "know-how" and investigational (evidence-based) knowledge culminate into the "knowledge of caring" that defines the profession of nursing. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of knowledge management as a framework for identifying, organizing, analyzing, and translating nursing knowledge into daily practice. Knowledge management is described in a model case and implemented in a nursing research project.

  20. Biophysical Puzzles Concerning Magnetite-Based Magnetoreception in the Common Nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    A recent report demonstrating magnetotactic behavior in the nematode worm, C. elegans, presents two intriguing biophysical puzzles. Vidal-Gadea et al. (2015, DOI: 10.7554/eLife.07493) show that wild-type, well-fed populations from both Hemispheres migrate upwards when their soil environment is moist and wet, and downward when starved. Their data show that inverting the vertical component of the magnetic field reverses the migration direction, indicating that it is a magnetically polar (not axial) response. Also, the angle of magnetic migration varies with the inclination angle of the local geomagnetic field at the native site, minimizing travel time. This ancestral magnetic migration direction persists even when strains are taken to different areas. We note that only a single-domain ferromagnetic magnetoreceptor (e.g, magnetite) is capable of producing a polar magnetotactic response, and in support there is one report of magnetosomes in C. elegans (Cranfield et al., 2004;DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2004.0209). However, the polarity of a magnetosome is determined at the time it grows across the SPM/SD threshold, and the magnetic orientation will lock-in randomly unless biased by the strong field of adjacent magnetosomes. Hence, the persistence of a North or South seeking direction preference within these populations demands that stable magnetosome chains of fixed polarity must be transmitted from parents, to the eggs, to the larvae, and then to the new adults. This is similar to the non-genetic inheritance process by which populations of magnetotactic bacteria can maintain North- or South-seeking swimming preference. Furthermore, for a magnetotactic organism to maintain a consistent angle from the magnetic axis is not enough to make it go vertical; it would go in a cone. For them to go vertical as reported (or to deviate at their natal magnetic inclination) demands that they must have a separate gravity sensor with which to measure the inclination angle relative to the