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Sample records for pwr loca conditions

  1. ACHILLES: Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    1. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA LIBRARY ACHILLES -Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase. 2. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAMS N/A 3. CONTRIBUTOR AEA Technology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester DT2 8DH United Kingdom through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. 4. DESCRIPTION OF TEST FACILITY The most important features of the Achilles rig were the shroud vessel, which contained the test section, and the downcomer. These may be thought of as representing the core barrel and the annular downcomer in the reactor pressure vessel. The test section comprises a cluster of 69 rods in a square array within a circular shroud vessel. The rod diameter and pitch (9.5 mm and 12.6 mm) were typical of PWR dimensions. The internal diameter of the shroud vessel was 128 mm. Each rod was electrically heated over a length of 3.66 m, which is typical of the nuclear heated length in a PWR fuel rod, and each contained 6 internal thermocouples. These were arranged in one of 8 groupings which concentrated the thermocouples in different axial zones. The spacer grids were at prototypic PWR locations. Each grid had two thermocouples attached to its trailing edge at radial locations. The axial power profile along the rods was an 11 step approximation to a "chopped cosine". The shroud vessel had 5 heating zones whose power could be independently controlled. 5. DESCRIPTION OF TESTS The Achilles experiments investigated the heat transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor during the re-flood phase of a postulated large break loss of coolant accident. The results provided data to validate codes and to improve modeling. Different types of experiments were carried out which included single phase cooling, re-flood under low flow conditions, level swell and re-flood under high flow conditions. Three series of experiments were performed. The first and the third used the same test section but the second used another test section, similar in

  2. ACHILLES: Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase

    2013-11-01

    1. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA LIBRARY ACHILLES -Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase. 2. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAMS N/A 3. CONTRIBUTOR AEA Technology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester DT2 8DH United Kingdom through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. 4. DESCRIPTION OF TEST FACILITY The most important features of the Achilles rig were the shroud vessel, which contained the test section, and the downcomer. These maymore » be thought of as representing the core barrel and the annular downcomer in the reactor pressure vessel. The test section comprises a cluster of 69 rods in a square array within a circular shroud vessel. The rod diameter and pitch (9.5 mm and 12.6 mm) were typical of PWR dimensions. The internal diameter of the shroud vessel was 128 mm. Each rod was electrically heated over a length of 3.66 m, which is typical of the nuclear heated length in a PWR fuel rod, and each contained 6 internal thermocouples. These were arranged in one of 8 groupings which concentrated the thermocouples in different axial zones. The spacer grids were at prototypic PWR locations. Each grid had two thermocouples attached to its trailing edge at radial locations. The axial power profile along the rods was an 11 step approximation to a "chopped cosine". The shroud vessel had 5 heating zones whose power could be independently controlled. 5. DESCRIPTION OF TESTS The Achilles experiments investigated the heat transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor during the re-flood phase of a postulated large break loss of coolant accident. The results provided data to validate codes and to improve modeling. Different types of experiments were carried out which included single phase cooling, re-flood under low flow conditions, level swell and re-flood under high flow conditions. Three series of experiments were performed. The first and the third used the same test section but the second used another test section

  3. TRANSPORT CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED PWR LOCA GENERATED DEBRIS.

    SciTech Connect

    A. K. MAJI; B. MARSHALL; ET AL

    2000-10-01

    In the unlikely event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), break jet impingement would dislodge thermal insulation from nearby piping, as well as other materials within the containment, such as paint chips, concrete dust, and fire barrier materials. Steam/water flows induced by the break and by the containment sprays would transport debris to the containment floor. Subsequently, debris would likely transport to and accumulate on the suction sump screens of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) pumps, thereby potentially degrading ECCS performance and possibly even failing the ECCS. In 1998, the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a generic study (Generic Safety Issue-191) to evaluate the potential for the accumulation of LOCA related debris on the PWR sump screen and the consequent loss of ECCS pump net positive suction head (NPSH). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), supporting the resolution of GSI-191, was tasked with developing a method for estimating debris transport in PWR containments to estimate the quantity of debris that would accumulate on the sump screen for use in plant specific evaluations. The analytical method proposed by LANL, to predict debris transport within the water that would accumulate on the containment floor, is to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combined with experimental debris transport data to predict debris transport and accumulation on the screen. CFD simulations of actual plant containment designs would provide flow data for a postulated accident in that plant, e.g., three-dimensional patterns of flow velocities and flow turbulence. Small-scale experiments would determine parameters defining the debris transport characteristics for each type of debris. The containment floor transport methodology will merge debris transport characteristics with CFD results to provide a reasonable and conservative estimate of debris transport within the containment floor pool and

  4. Effect of bundle size on cladding deformation in LOCA simulation tests. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.H.; Crowley, J.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    Two LOCA simulation tests were conducted to investigate the effects of temperature uniformity and radial restraint boundary conditions on Zircaloy cladding deformation. In one of the tests (B-5), boundary conditions typical of a large array were imposed on an inner 4 x 4 square array by two concentric rings of interacting guard fuel pin simulators. In the other test (B-3), the boundary conditions were imposed on a 4 x 4 square array by a non-interacting heated shroud. Test parameters conducive to large deformation were selected in order to favor rod-to-rod interactions. The tests showed that rod-to-rod interactions play an important role in the deformation process.

  5. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 US/Japanese PWR conservative LOCA prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, G E; Fisher, J E

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of a 200%, double-ended, cold-leg-break, loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) calculation using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 computer code. The reactor system represented a typical United States/Japanese pressurized water reactor with a 15 x 15 fuel bundle arrangement 12-ft long, four loops, and cold-leg Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Systems. Conservation boundary and initial conditions were used. Reactor power was 102% of the 3250 MWt rated power, decay heat was set to 120% of American Nuclear Society Standard 5.1, highest core lifetime values for power peaking and fuel stored energy were used, and the LOCA occurred simultaneously with a loss of offsite power. Best estimate assumptions were used for the break flow model, fuel rod heat transfer and metal-water reaction correlations, and steady-state fuel temperature profiles. A flow blockage model, having the capability to account for the effects of cladding ballooning or rupturing, was not used. Except for these best estimate assumptions, the boundary and initial conditions were consistent with those used in licensing calculations. Maximum fuel rod temperatures were 1380 K (2020/sup 0/F) and 1040 K (1410/sup 0/F) on the hottest evaluation model rod and hottest best estimate rod, respectively. The high reported values or fuel cladding temperature were a direct consequence of the conservative boundary and initial conditions used for the calculation, primarily the 2% overpower condition, the core decay heat assumption, and the degraded ECCS. The calculation demonstrated successful core reflooding before 1478 K (2200/sup 0/F) cladding temperature was exceeded on any fuel rod. 7 refs., 47 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Zircoloy Cladding Oxidation Simulation for LWR under LOCA Conditions

    2003-04-25

    PRECIP-2 simulates zircaloy cladding oxidation under LOCA conditions of LWR’s. The code calculates oxygen concentration distribution across the cladding wall by solving the diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions, taking into account the structure change of the beta— phase, i.e. alpha precipitation during the cooling period. The code also predicts total oxygen uptake, thicknesses of alpha, beta and oxide layers.

  7. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    SciTech Connect

    GrandJean, C.; Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  8. Calculation of fuel pin failure timing under LOCA conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Siefken, L.J.; Straka, M.; Katsma, K.R.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) 4-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) availability, and main coolant pump trip on these items. The analysis was performed using a four-code approach, comprised of FRAPCON-2, SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3, TRAC-PF1/MOD1, and FRAP-T6. In addition to the calculation of timing results, this analysis provided a comparison of the capabilities of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 with TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. This paper discusses the methodology employed and the code development efforts required to implement the methodology. The shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure were 11.4 s and 19.1 for the B W and W plants, respectively. The FRAP-T6 fuel pin failure times calculated using thermal-hydraulic data generated by SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 were more conservative than those calculated using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1. 18 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 1: STEALTH 1D single-phase fluid studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Caraher, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    This report, which is the first in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the first step in the stepwise approach for developing the methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The first step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 1D STEALTH computer code in order that acoustic phenomena in piping and vessel networks may be simulated. The resulting code is termed 1D STEALTH-HYDRO. The 1D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of three control volume models to simulate area changes, orifices, and tees in piping networks. The theory of the control volume models is described.

  10. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 3. Fluid/structure interaction studies using 3-D STEALTH/WHAMSE. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report, the third in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the final step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid-structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The final step in the methodology implements enhancements and special modifications to the STEALTH 3D computer program and the WHAMSE 3D computer program. After describing the enhancements, the individual and the coupled computer programs are assessed by comparing calculational results with either analytical solutions or with experimental data. The coupled 3D STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program is then applied to the simulation of HDR Test V31.1 to further assess the program and to investigate the role that fluid-structure interaction plays in the hydrodynamic loading of reactor internals during subcooled blowdown.

  11. Overview of the M5{sup R} Alloy behavior under RIA and LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mardon, J.P.; Dunn, B.

    2007-07-01

    Experience from irradiation in PWRs has confirmed the M5{sup R} possesses all the properties required for upgraded operation including new fuel management approaches and high duty reactor operation. In this paper accident behavior is demonstrated through a comparison of M5{sup R} and Zircaloy-4 cladding behavior under RIA (Reactivity Insertion Accident) and LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) conditions. AREVA NP supports a significant experimental program of analytical and full -scale tests along with comprehensive analyses on both M5{sup R} and SRA low-tin Zircaloy-4. A key presumption in the conduct of such tests is that, for all Zirconium alloys, the primary effects of high burn-up on cladding thermal-mechanical properties arise from the accumulation of hydrogen within the cladding during operation. This hypothesis is supported through a summarisation of the results of the main RIA and LOCA tests performed on virgin, pre-hydrided, and irradiated M5{sup R} and SRA low-tin Zircaloy-4 cladding. The first part of the paper presents the results of recent Room Temperature (RT) and High Temperature High Pressure (HTHP) integral RIA tests, mainly from the NSRR and CABRI programs, and separate effects mechanical properties tests on high burn-up M5{sup R} and Zircaloy- 4 irradiated claddings. In the second part of this paper, studies of cladding performance under LOCA conditions are presented.. The discussion includes high temperature oxidation kinetics, quench behaviour and post quenched mechanical behaviour of virgin, pre-hydrided and irradiated M5{sup R} and Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes after oxidation at LOCA temperatures and various quenching scenarios. The hydrogen concentrations studied are alloy dependent. Included are mechanical tests and in-depth metallurgical investigations developed to understand the failure mechanisms with the differing alloys and hydrogen concentrations. The result is a confirmation that the effect of hydrogen uptake dominates on the RIA and LOCA

  12. Experimental investigation on the causes for pellet fragmentation under LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, A.; Vitanza, C.; Seidl, M.; Wensauer, A.; Faber, W.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses a separate effect experiment performed with irradiated fuel to study fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The paper presents a qualitative and quantitative investigation of the effects of the removal of the geometrical constraint provided by the cladding and the removal of the constraint given by the rod internal pressure in determining the extent of fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a LOCA for fuel segments with a burnup of approximately 52 MWd/kgU. A review of previous LOCA tests was the starting point for the identification of these constraints and for the selection of the fuel rod burnup, the experiment's procedure and the boundary conditions. An out-of-pile test was considered representative for the scope, and the experiment was performed at the Halden Reactor Project hot cell in Kjeller (Norway) with heat provided by an electric oven. Three fuel rod segments were studied: 1) a fuel segment that experienced only ballooning without burst, 2) a fuel segment that experienced ballooning and burst and 3) a fuel segment that experienced neither ballooning nor burst. The neutron radiography and fuel fragment sifting showed that both cladding constraint and internal pressure play a role in the formation of fuel cracks and fragmentation, and the study of the fission gas release during the transient showed that removing the cladding constraint or the internal pressure increased the amount of fission gas release.

  13. Oxidation of SiC cladding under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Yue, C.; Arnold, R. P.; McKrell, T. J.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    An experimental assessment of Silicon Carbide (SiC) cladding oxidation rate in steam under conditions representative of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in light water reactors (LWRs) was conducted. SiC oxidation tests were performed with monolithic alpha phase tubular samples in a vertical quartz tube at a steam temperature of 1140 deg. C and steam velocity range of 1 to 10 m/sec, at atmospheric pressure. Linear weight loss of SiC samples due to boundary layer controlled reaction of silica scale (SiO{sub 2} volatilization) was experimentally observed. The weight loss rate increased with increasing steam flow rate. Over the range of test conditions, SiC oxidation rates were shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the oxidation rates of zircaloy 4. A SiC volatilization correlation for developing laminar flow in a vertical channel is formulated. (authors)

  14. Modeling of Zr alloy burst cladding internal oxidation and secondary hydriding under LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veshchunov, M. S.; Shestak, V. E.

    2015-06-01

    The recently developed mechanistic model for Zr alloy cladding hydriding has been implemented in the single-rod SVECHA/QUENCH (S/Q) code. The mass transfer in a fuel rod after ballooning and burst opening have been modeled in the modified code that allowed calculating hydrogen and oxygen pickup by the cladding inner-metal surface. The code predicts with a good accuracy the typical distributions of oxygen and hydrogen in the Zr alloy cladding that were observed in the JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) single-rod tests and KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) bundle tests under postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions.

  15. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  16. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 2: STEALTH 2D/WHAMSE 2D single-phse fluid and elastic structure studies. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Silling, S.A.; Belytschko, T.

    1981-03-01

    This report, the second in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the second step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid/structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The second step in the methodology considers enhancements and special modifications to the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program and the 2D WHAMSE computer program. The 2D STEALTH-HYDRO enhancements consist of a fluid-fluid coupling control-volume model and an orifice control-volume model. The enhancements to 2D WHAMSE include elimination of the implicit integration routines, material models, and structural elements not required for the hydroloads application. In addition the logic for coupling the 2D STEALTH-HYDRO computer program to the 2D WHAMSE computer program is discussed.

  17. Assessment of Environmental Qualification Practices and Condition Monitoring Techniques for Low-Voltage Electric Cables: LOCA Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Grove, E.; Villaran, M.; Soo, P.; Hsu, F.

    2001-02-01

    This report documents the results of a research program addressing issues related to the qualification process for low-voltage instrumentation and control (I&C) electric cables used in commercial nuclear power plants. Three commonly used types of I&C cable were tested: Cross-Linked Polyethylene (XLPE) insulation with a Neoprene® jacket, Ethylene Propylene Rubber (EPR) insulation with an unbonded Hypalon® jacket, and EPR with a bonded Hypalon® jacket. Each cable type received accelerated aging to simulate 20, 40, and 60 years of qualified life. In addition, naturally aged cables of the same types were obtained from decommissioned nuclear power plants and tested. The cables were subjected to simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions, which included the sequential application of LOCA radiation followed by exposure to steam at high temperature and pressure, as well as to chemical spray. Periodic condition monitoring (CM) was performed using nine different techniques to obtain data on the condition of the cable, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of those CM techniques for in situ monitoring of cables. Volume 1 of this report presents the results of the LOCA tests, and Volume 2 discusses the results of the condition monitoring tests.

  18. Fuel behavior during a LOCA: LOFT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.L.

    1980-11-01

    The LOFT experiments have provided the following fuel behavior information which appears to be valuable for improving the safety of PWR operation and resolving PWR licensing issues: (1) A generic unassisted core cooling event occurs during large-break LOCAs that dominates the cooling of the core before ECC reflood commences and potentially eliminates the possibility of flow channel blockage from prepressurized fuel rod swelling. (2) The large-break LOCA decompression forces do not disturb the normal control rod gravity drop and may not structually damage the fuel assemblies. (3) Large-break LOCA core cooling may also be enhanced by spacer grid and core counter flow delay of liquid escape from the core boundaries and liquid fallback from the upper plenum into the core region. (4) Lower fuel rod prepressurization may be possible in PWR fuel rods which would reduce flow channel blockage complications during LOCA's. (5) Uniform fuel rod cladding temperature indications during the large break LOCA's do not confirm expectations for the fuel rod cladding temperature variations that would inhibit development of flow channel blockages by ballooning of prepressurized fuel rods.

  19. Post-quench ductility evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and select iron alloys under design basis and extended LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Keiser, J. R.; Terrani, K. A.; Bell, G. L.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 °C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post-quench ductility under postulated and extended LOCA conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 °C was determined to be k = 2.173 × 107 g2/cm4/s, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post-quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 °C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR ≈ 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to 4 h.

  20. The electrochemistry in 316SS crevices exposed to PWR-relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankeerberghen, M.; Weyns, G.; Gavrilov, S.; Henshaw, J.; Deconinck, J.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical and electrochemical conditions within a crevice of Type 316 stainless steel in boric acid-lithium hydroxide solutions under PWR-relevant conditions were modelled with a computational electrochemistry code. The influence of various variables: dissolved hydrogen, boric acid, lithium hydroxide concentration, crevice length, and radiation dose rate was studied. It was found with the model that 25 ccH 2/kg (STP) was sufficient to remain below an electrode potential of -230 mV she, commonly accepted sufficient to prevent stress corrosion cracking under BWR conditions. In a PWR plant various operational B-Li cycles are possible but it was found that the choice of the cycle did not significantly influence the model results. It was also found that a hydrogen level of 50 ccH 2/kg (STP) would be needed to avoid substantial lowering of the pH inside a crevice.

  1. Best-Estimate Analysis PWR LOCA.

    2005-11-11

    Version: 00 TRAC‑PF1 performs best estimate analyses of loss of coolant accidents and other transients in pressurized light water reactors. The program can also be used to model a wide range of thermal hydraulic experiments in reduced scale facilities. Models employed include reflood, multi‑dimensional two‑phase flow, nonequilibrium thermodynamics, generalized heat transfer, and reactor kinetics. Automatic steady‑state and dump/restart capabilities are provided. The changes reported in TRACNEWS issues through Number 7 are incorporated in this release.more » TRAC-PF1 was developed on a CDC computer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The PC version of TRAC‑PF1 was converted at CNEN in 1989 and has not been updated since that time. The NRC no longer supports the TRAC codes. They currently develop and maintain the TRACE code system, which is the TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine. TRACE is a modernized thermal-hydraulics code designed to consolidate the capabilities of NRC's 3 legacy safety codes - TRAC-P, TRAC-B and RELAP. This is NRC's flagship thermal-hydraulics analysis tool. See the website for more information http://www.nrccodes.com/.« less

  2. A comparison of the CHF between tubes and annuli under PWR thermal-hydraulic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herer, C.

    1995-09-01

    Critical Heat Flux (CHF) tests were carried out in three tubes with inside diameters of 8, 13, and 19.2 mm and in two annuli with an inner tube of 9.5 mm and an outer tube of 13 or 19.2 mm. All axial heat flux distributions in the test sections were uniform. The coolant fluid was Refrigerant 12 (Freon-12) under PWR thermal-hydraulic conditions (equivalent water conditions - Pressure: 7 to 20 MPa, Mass Velocity: 1000 to 6000 kg/m2/s, Local Quality: -75% to +45%). The effect of tube diameter is correlated for qualities under 15%. The change from the tube to the annulus configuration is correctly taken into account by the equivalent hydraulic diameter. Useful information is also provided concerning the effect of a cold wall in an annulus.

  3. Code System for PWR & BWR Multicompartment Containment Analysis, Versions MOD5

    1999-06-02

    CONTEMPT4/MOD6 describes the response of multicompartment containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program can accommodate both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) containment systems. Also, both design basis accident (DBA) and degraded core type LOCA conditions can be analyzed. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, and mass and energy inventories due to inter-compartment mass and energy exchange taking into account user-supplied descriptions of compartments,more » inter-compartment junction flow areas, LOCA source terms, and user-selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, heat conducting structures, sump drains, PWR ice condensers, and BWR pressure suppression systems. CONTEMPT4/MOD6 also provides analytical models for hydrogen and carbon monoxide combustion within compartments and energy transfer due to gas radiation to accommodate degraded core type accidents.« less

  4. Fuel performance under normal PWR conditions: A review of relevant experimental results and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, M.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments conducted at Grenoble (CEA/DRN) over the past 20 years in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour are reviewed. Of particular concern is the need to achieve a comprehensive understanding of and subsequently overcome the limitations associated with high burnup and load-following conditions (pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), fission gas release (FGR), water-side corrosion). A general view is given of the organization of research work as well as some experimental details (irradiation, postirradiation examination — PIE). Based on various experimental programmes (Cyrano, Medicis, Anemone, Furet, Tango, Contact, Cansar, Hatac, Flog, Decor), the main contributions of the thermomechanical behaviour of a PWR fuel rod are described: thermal conductivity, in-pile densification, swelling, fission gas release in steady state and moderate transient conditions, gap thermal conductance, formation of primary and secondary ridges under PCI conditions. Specific programmes (Gdgrif, Thermox, Grimox) are devoted to the behaviour of particular fuels (gadolinia-bearing fuel, MOX fuel). Moreover, microstructure-based studies have been undertaken on fission gas release (fine analysis of the bubble population inside irradiated fuel samples), and on cladding behaviour (PCI related studies on stress-corrosion cracking (SCO, irradiation effects on zircaloy microstructure).

  5. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berta, V T

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown.

  6. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  7. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. ); Straka, M. )

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

  8. Large-break LOCA, in-reactor fuel bundle Materials Test MT-6A

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.; Pilger, J.P.; King, L.L.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This is a report on one of a series of experiments to simulates a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) using full-length fuel rods for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The experiments were conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the LOCA simulation Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The major objective of this program was causing the maximum possible expansion of the cladding on the fuel rods from a short-term adiabatic temperature transient to 1200 K (1700 F) leading to the rupture of the cladding; and second, by reflooding the fuel rods to determine the rate at which the fuel bundle is cooled.

  9. Heat transfer to water from a vertical tube bundle under natural-circulation conditions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszczynski, M.J.; Viskanta, R.

    1983-01-01

    The natural circulation heat transfer data for longitudinal flow of water outside a vertical rod bundle are needed for developing correlations which can be used in best estimate computer codes to model thermal-hydraulic behavior of nuclear reactor cores under accident or shutdown conditions. The heat transfer coefficient between the fuel rod surface and the coolant is the key parameter required to predict the fuel temperature. Because of the absence of the required heat transfer coefficient data base under natural circulation conditions, experiments have been performed in a natural circulation loop. A seven-tube bundle having a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 was used as a test heat exchanger. A circulating flow was established in the loop, because of buoyancy differences between its two vertical legs. Steady-state and transient heat transfer measurements have been made over as wide a range of thermal conditions as possible with the system. Steady state heat transfer data were correlated in terms of relevant dimensionless parameters. Empirical correlations for the average Nusselt number, in terms of Reynolds number, Rayleigh number and the ratio of Grashof to Reynolds number are given.

  10. Fog inerting effects on hydrogen combustion in a PWR ice condenser contaminant

    SciTech Connect

    Luangdilok, W.; Bennett, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A mechanistic fog inerting model has been developed to account for the effects of fog on the upward lean flammability limits of a combustible mixture based on the thermal theory of flame propagation. Benchmarking of this model with test data shows reasonably good agreement between the theory and the experiment. Applications of the model and available fog data to determine the upward lean flammability limits of the H{sub 2}-air-steam mixture in the ice condenser upper plenum region of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice condenser contaminant during postulated large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions indicate that combustion may be suppressed beyond the downward flammability limit (8 percent H{sub 2} by volume). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Transient deformation properties of Zircaloy for LOCA simulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hann, C. R.; Mohr, C. L.; Busness, K. M.; Olson, N. J.; Reich, F. R.; Stewart, K. B.

    1980-05-01

    This experimental data report is Volume 4 of a series of 5 volumes describing the oxidation and deformation rate behavior of Zircaloy cladding under simulated LOCA conditions. It contains listings of strain versus stress, time, and temperature evaluated from the numerical constitutive relationships and the original data used to develop them. This volume also contains listings of the ramp load, pressure, and temperature test data from both current and previous phases of the series, as well as material describing applications of the data.

  12. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomechanical behavior: Part 1. Experimental programmes in support of LOCA design methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Waeckel, N.; Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C.

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of Burn-Up extension request, EDF, FRAMATOME, CEA and IPSN have carried out experimental programmes in order to provide the design of fuel rods under LOCA conditions with relevant data. The design methods used in France for LOCA are based on standard Appendix K methodology updated to take into account some penalties related to the actual conditions of the Nuclear Power Plant. Best-Estimate assessments are used as well. Experimental programmes concern plastic deformation and burst behavior of advanced claddings (EDGAR) and thermal shock quenching behavior of highly irradiated claddings (TAGCIR). The former reveals the important role played by the {alpha}/{beta} transformation kinetics related to advanced alloys (Niobium alloys) and the latter the significative impact of hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on oxidation kinetics and failure behavior in terms of cooling rates.

  13. Comparison of computer codes (CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT) with data from the NRU-LOCA thermal hydraulic tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, C.L.; Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.

    1981-07-01

    The LOCA Simulation Program in the NRU reactor is the first set of experiments to provide data on the behavior of full-length, nuclear-heated PWR fuel bundles during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). This paper compares the temperature time histories of 4 experimental test cases with 4 computer codes: CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT. The preliminary comparisons between prediction and experiment show that the state-of-the art fuel codes have large uncertainties and are not necessarily conservative in predicting peak temperatures, turn around times, and bundle quench times.

  14. PWR fuel behavior: lessons learned from LOFT. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the experience with the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) fuel during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), operational and overpower transient tests and steady-state operation is presented. LOFT provides unique capabilities for obtaining pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel behavior information because it features the representative thermal-hydraulic conditions which control fuel behavior during transient conditions and an elaborate measurement system to record the history of the fuel behavior.

  15. Crack initiation testing of thimble tube material under PWR conditions to determine a stress threshold for IASCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, R. W.; Vankeerberghen, M.; Gérard, R.; Somville, F.

    2015-06-01

    IASCC (Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking) crack initiation tests have been carried out on thimble tube material retrieved from a Belgian PWR. The crack initiation tests were carried out by constant load testing of thimble tube specimens at different stress levels. The time-to-failure was determined as a function of the applied stress to find a stress threshold under which no stress corrosion cracking will take place. The thimble tube was made of 316L cold-worked stainless steel and the dose profile along the thimble tube ranges from 45 to 80 dpa. This allows adding crack initiation data for dose values that have not been significantly reported, i.e. in the range of 45-55 dpa and at 80 dpa. The results can be used to determine whether the stress under which no IASCC occurs saturates for a dose larger than 30 dpa or whether a small further threshold decrease with dose can be observed. Over a period of four years, more than 40 specimens have been tested with doses ranging from 45 to 80 dpa at stress levels between 40% and 70% of the irradiated yield stress. Fracture occurred at all stress levels (but not all specimens) although the time-to-failure increased with decreasing stress. The results show that intergranular cracking was the main fracture mode in all failed O-rings. Three of six 80 dpa O-rings subjected to 40% and 45% of the yield stress did not fail after six months of testing. Based on these results and a comparison with literature data, an apparent stress limit for IASCC could be estimated at 40% of the irradiated yield stress.

  16. Contain analysis of hydrogen distribution and combustion in PWR dry containments

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.W.; Nimnual, S.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen transport and combustion in a PWR dry containment are analyzed using the CONTAIN code for a multi-compartment model of the Zion plant. The analysis includes consideration of both degraded core and full core meltdown accidents initiated by a small break LOCA. The importance of intercell flow mixing on distributions of gas composition and temperature in various compartments are evaluated. Thermal stratification and combustion behavior are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. PWR depressurization analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, D.A.; Dobbe, C.A.; Knudson, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    Early containment failure resulting from direct containment heating (DCH) has been identified as a potential contributor to the risk of operating a pressurized water reactor (PWR). One important factor needed to evaluate the contribution of DCH to risk is the conditional probability that, given a core melt, the primary system will be at high pressure when the reactor vessel lower head fails. Two mechanisms that could reduce the pressure during a station blackout core melt accident are discussed. First, natural circulation in the reactor coolant system (RCS) could cause a temperature-induced failure of the RCS pressure boundary, which could result in unintentional (without operator action) depressurization. Second, plant operators could open relief valves in an attempt to intentionally depressurize the RCS prior to. lower head failure. Results from analytical studies of these two depressurization mechanisms for select PWRs are presented.

  18. PWR depressurization analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, D.A.; Dobbe, C.A.; Knudson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Early containment failure resulting from direct containment heating (DCH) has been identified as a potential contributor to the risk of operating a pressurized water reactor (PWR). One important factor needed to evaluate the contribution of DCH to risk is the conditional probability that, given a core melt, the primary system will be at high pressure when the reactor vessel lower head fails. Two mechanisms that could reduce the pressure during a station blackout core melt accident are discussed. First, natural circulation in the reactor coolant system (RCS) could cause a temperature-induced failure of the RCS pressure boundary, which could result in unintentional (without operator action) depressurization. Second, plant operators could open relief valves in an attempt to intentionally depressurize the RCS prior to. lower head failure. Results from analytical studies of these two depressurization mechanisms for select PWRs are presented.

  19. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm

  20. Spatializing Sexuality in Jaime Hernandez's "Locas"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jessica E.

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on Jaime Hernandez's "Locas: The Maggie and Hopey Stories," part of the "Love and Rockets" comic series, I argue that the graphic landscape of this understudied comic offers an illustration of the theories of space in relation to race, gender, and sexuality that have been critical to understandings of Chicana sexuality. Set in a barrio…

  1. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  2. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: fuel temperature measurements under imposed dry storage conditions (I kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Unterzuber, R.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-09-01

    A spent fuel assembly temperature test under imposed dry storage conditions was conducted at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site in support of spent fuel dry storage technology development. This document presents the test data and results obtained from an approximately 1.0 kW decay heat level PWR spent fuel assembly. A spent fuel test apparatus was designed to utilize a representative stainless steel spent fuel canister, a canister lid containing internal temperature instrumentation to measure fuel cladding temperatures, and a carbon steel liner that encloses the canister and lid. Electrical heaters along the liner length, on the lid, and below the canister are used to impose dry storage canister temperature profiles. Temperature instrumentation is provided on the liner and canister. The liner and canister are supported by a test stand in one of the large hot cells (West Process Cell) inside E-MAD. Fuel temperature measurements have been performed using imposed canister temperature profiles from the electrically heated and spent fuel drywell tests being conducted at E-MAD as well as for four constant canister temperature profiles, each with a vacuum, helium and air backfill. Computer models have been utilized in conjunction with the test to predict the thermal response of the fuel cladding. Computer predictions are presented, and they show good agreement with the test data.

  3. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 /times/ 10/sup 8/ rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. LOCA simulation in NRU program: data report for the fourth materials experiment (MT-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.L.; Mohr, C.L.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Russcher, G.E.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This experiment (MT-4) was funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate ballooning and rupture during adiabatic heatup in the temperature range of 1033 to 1200K (1400 to 1700/sup 0/F). The 12 rest rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 4.62 MPa (670 psia) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 test rods ruptured with an average strain of 43.7% at the maximum flow blockage elevation of 2.68 m (105.4 in.). Experimental data for the MT-4 transient experiment and post-test measurements and photographs of the fuel are presented in this report.

  5. Kohonen mapping of the crack growth under fatigue loading conditions of stainless steels in BWR environments and of nickel alloys in PWR environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna

    2008-09-01

    In this study, crack growth rate data under fatigue loading conditions generated by Argonne National Laboratories and published in 2006 were analyzed [O.K. Chopra, B. Alexandreanu, E.E. Gruber, R.S. Daum, W.J. Shack, Argonne National Laboratory, NUREG CR 6891-series ANL 04/20, Crack Growth Rates of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Heat Affected Zone in BWR Environments, January, 2006; B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, H.M. Chung, E.E. Gruber, W.K. Soppet, R.W. Strain, W.J. Shack, Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, vol. 34 in the NUREG/CR-4667 series annual report of Argonne National Laboratory program studies for Calendar (Annual Report 2003). Manuscript Completed: May 2005, Date Published: May 2006], and reported by DoE [B. Alexandreanu, O.K. Chopra, W.J. Shack, S. Crane, H.J. Gonzalez, NRC, Crack Growth Rates and Metallographic Examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from Field Components and Laboratory Materials Tested in PWR Environments, NUREG/CR-6964, May 2008]. The data collected were measured on austenitic stainless steels in BWR (boiling water reactor) environments and on nickel alloys in PWR (pressurized water reactor) environments. The data collected contained information on material composition, temperature, conductivity of the environment, oxygen concentration, irradiated sample information, weld information, electrochemical potential, load ratio, rise time, hydrogen concentration, hold time, down time, maximum stress intensity factor ( Kmax), stress intensity range (Δ Kmax), crack length, and crack growth rates (CGR). Each position on that Kohonen map is called a cell. A Kohonen map clusters vectors of information by 'similarities.' Vectors of information were formed using the metal composition, followed by the environmental conditions used in each experiments, and finally followed by the crack growth rate (CGR) measured when a sample of pre-cracked metal is set in an environment and the sample is cyclically loaded. Accordingly

  6. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus. [PWR; BWR; LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF.

  7. Aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) testing of electrical connections

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental program to determine the aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior of electrical connections in order to obtain an initial scoping of their performance. Ten types of connections commonly used in nuclear power plants were tested. These included 3 types of conduit seals, 2 types of cable-to-device connectors, 3 types of cable-to-cable connectors, and 2 types of in-line splices. The connections were aged for 6 months under simultaneous thermal (99 C) and radiation (46 Gy/hr) conditions. A simulated LOCA consisting of sequential high dose-rate irradiation (3 kGy/hr) and high-temperature steam exposures followed the aging. Connection functionality was monitored using insulation resistance measurements during the aging and LOCA exposures. Because only 5 of the 10 connection types passed a post-LOCA, submerged dielectric withstand test, further detailed investigation of electrical connections and the effects of cable jacket integrity on the cable-connection system is warranted.

  8. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  9. Quantification and local distribution of hydrogen within Zircaloy-4 PWR nuclear fuel cladding tubes at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory from μ-ERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bossis, Ph.; Hamon, D.; Béchade, J. L.; Brachet, J. C.

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen content and its distribution in in-core materials of nuclear plants are known to have a strong influence on their behaviour, especially on their mechanical properties but also on their corrosion resistance. This point has to be largely investigated in the case of the nuclear fuel cladding (Zr based alloys) of pressurized water reactors (PWR). Two situations have been considered here, with regards to the hydrogen content and its spatial distribution within the thickness of the tubes: Irradiated fuel cladding tubes after a nominal period under working conditions in a PWR core. Non-irradiated fuel cladding previously exposed to conditions representative of an hypothetical "loss of coolant accident" scenario (LOCA). As far as micrometric distributions of H were required, μ-ERDA has been performed at the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Süe Laboratory. This facility is fitted with two beam lines. In the first one, used for non-active sample analysis, the μ-ERDA configuration has been improved to reduce the limits of detection and the reliability of the results. The second one offers the unique feature of being dedicated to radioactive samples. We will present the nuclear microprobe and emphasize on the μ-ERDA configuration of the two beam lines. We will illustrate the performance of the setup by describing the results obtained for Zircaloy-4 cladding both on non-irradiated and irradiated samples.

  10. Assessment of CONTAIN and MELCOR for performing LOCA and LOVA analyses in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; Hagrman, D.L.; Gaeta, M.J.; Petti, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the results of an assessment of the CONTAIN and MELCOR computer codes for ITER LOCA and LOVA applications. As part of the assessment, the results of running a test problem that describes an ITER LOCA are presented. It is concluded that the MELCOR code should be the preferred code for ITER severe accident thermal hydraulic analyses. This code will require the least modification to be appropriate for calculating thermal hydraulic behavior in ITER relevant conditions that include vacuum, cryogenics, ITER temperatures, and the presence of a liquid metal test module. The assessment of the aerosol transport models in these codes concludes that several modifications would have to be made to CONTAIN and/or MELCOR to make them applicable to the aerosol transport part of severe accident analysis in ITER.

  11. Long-term aging and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) testing of electrical cables

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.F.; Gauthier, G.; Carlin, F.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the aging degradation and loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior of electrical cables subjected to long-term aging exposures. Four different cable types were tested in both the U.S. and France: (1) U.S. 2 conductor with ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (2) U.S. 3 conductor with cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (3) French 3 conductor with EPR insulation and a Hypalon jacket. (4) French coaxial with polyethylene (PE) insulation and a PE jacket. The data represent up to 5 years of simultaneous aging where the cables were exposed to identical aging radiation doses at either 40{degrees}C or 70{degrees}C; however, the dose rate used for the aging irradiation was varied over a wide range (2-100 Gy/hr). Aging was followed by exposure to simulated French LOCA conditions. Several mechanical, electrical, and physical-chemical condition monitoring techniques were used to investigate the degradation behavior of the cables. All the cables, except for the French PE cable, performed acceptably during the aging and LOCA simulations. In general, cable degradation at a given dose was highest for the lowest dose rate, and the amount of degradation decreased as the dose rate was increased.

  12. System code requirements for SBWR LOCA predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Slovik, G.; Kroeger, P.

    1994-12-31

    The simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) is the latest design in the family of boiling water reactors (BWRs) from General Electric. The concept is based on many innovative, passive, safety systems that rely on naturally occurring phenomena, such as natural circulation, gravity flows, and condensation. Reliability has been improved by eliminating active systems such as pumps and valves. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is connected to heat exchangers submerged in individual water tanks, which are open to atmosphere. These heat exchanger, or isolation condensers (ICs), provide a heat sink to reduce the RPV pressure when isolated. The RPV is also connected to three elevated tanks of water called the gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS). During a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the RPV is depressurized by the automatic depressurization system (ADS), allowing the gravity-driven flow from the GDCS tanks. The containment pressure is controlled by a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) and suppression pool. Similarly, there are new plant protection systems in the SBWR, such as fine-motion control rod drive, passive standby liquid control system, and the automatic feedwater runback system. These safety and plant protection systems respond to phenomena that are different from previous BWR designs. System codes must be upgraded to include models for the phenomena expected during transients for the SBWR.

  13. Code System for Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor LOCA Analysis.

    1999-10-13

    Version 00 The new SCRELA code was developed to analyze the LOCA of the supercritical water cooled reactor. Since the currently available LWR codes for LOCA analysis could not analyze the significant differences in reactor characteristics between the supercritical-water cooled reactor and the current LWR, the first objective of this code development was to analyze the uniqueness of this reactor. The behavior of the supercritical water in the blowdown phase and the reflood phase ismore » modeled.« less

  14. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. ); Straka, M. )

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  15. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  16. Considerations for Probabilistic Analyses to Assess Potential Changes to Large-Break LOCA Definition for ECCS Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Rudland, D.; Wolterman, R.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Scott, P.; Rahman, S.; Fairbanks, C.

    2002-07-01

    The U.S.NRC has undertaken a study to explore changes to the body of Part 50 of the U.S. Federal Code of Regulations, to incorporate risk-informed attributes. One of the regulations selected for this study is 10 CFR 50.46, {sup A}cceptance Criteria for Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Light-Water Nuclear Power Reactors{sup .} These changes will potentially enhance safety and reduce unnecessary burden on utilities. Specific attention is being paid to redefining the maximum pipe break size for LB-LOCA by determining the spectrum of pipe diameter (or equivalent opening area) versus failure probabilities. In this regard, it is necessary to ensure that all contributors to probabilistic failures are accounted for when redefining ECCS requirements. This paper describes initial efforts being conducted for the U.S.NRC on redefining the LB-LOCA requirements. Consideration of the major contributors to probabilistic failure, and deterministic aspects for modeling them, are being addressed. At this time three major contributors to probabilistic failures are being considered. These include: (1) Analyses of the failure probability from cracking mechanisms that could involve rupture or large opening areas from either through-wall or surface flaws, whether the pipe system was approved for leak-before-break (LBB) or not. (2) Future degradation mechanisms, such as recent occurrence of PWSCC in PWR piping need to be included. This degradation mechanism was not recognized as being an issue when LBB was approved for many plants or when the initial risk-informed inspection plans were developed. (3) Other indirect causes of loss of pressure-boundary integrity than from cracks in the pipe system also should be included. The failure probability from probabilistic fracture mechanics will not account for these other indirect causes that could result in a large opening in the pressure boundary: i.e., failure of bolts on a steam generator manway, flanges, and valves; outside force damage from

  17. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    SciTech Connect

    M.Krug, R.Shogan

    2004-09-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR.

  18. Hydrogen motion in Zircaloy-4 cladding during a LOCA transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elodie, T.; Jean, D.; Séverine, G.; M-Christine, B.; Michel, C.; Berger, P.; Martine, B.; Antoine, A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen are key elements influencing the embrittlement of zirconium-based nuclear fuel cladding during the quench phase following a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The understanding of the mechanisms influencing the motion of these two chemical elements in the metal is required to fully describe the material embrittlement. High temperature steam oxidation tests were performed on pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples with hydrogen contents ranging between 11 and 400 wppm prior to LOCA transient. Thanks to the use of both Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA) and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (μ-ERDA), the chemical elements partitioning has been systematically quantified inside the prior-β phase. Image analysis and metallographic examinations were combined to provide an average oxygen profile as well as hydrogen profile within the cladding thickness after LOCA transient. The measured hydrogen profile is far from homogeneous. Experimental distributions are compared to those predicted numerically using calculations derived from a finite difference thermo-diffusion code (DIFFOX) developed at IRSN.

  19. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  20. Case study of the propagation of a small flaw under PWR loading conditions and comparison with the ASME code design life. Comparison of ASME Code Sections III and XI

    SciTech Connect

    Yahr, G.T.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Richardson, A.K.; Server, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cooperative study was performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate the degree of conservatism and consistency in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III fatigue evaluation procedure and Section XI flaw acceptance standards. A single, realistic, sample problem was analyzed to determine the significance of certain points of criticism made of an earlier parametric study by staff members of the Division of Engineering Standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The problem was based on a semielliptical flaw located on the inside surface of the hot-leg piping at the reactor vessel safe-end weld for the Zion 1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR). Two main criteria were used in selecting the problem; first, it should be a straight pipe to minimize the computational expense; second, it should exhibit as high a cumulative usage factor as possible. Although the problem selected has one of the highest cumulative usage factors of any straight pipe in the primary system of PWRs, it is still very low. The Code Section III fatigue usage factor was only 0.00046, assuming it was in the as-welded condition, and fatigue crack-growth analyses predicted negligible crack growth during the 40-year design life. When the analyses were extended past the design life, the usage factor was less than 1.0 when the flaw had propagated to failure. The current study shows that the criticism of the earlier report should not detract from the conclusion that if a component experiences a high level of cyclic stress corresponding to a fatigue usage factor near 1.0, very small cracks can propagate to unacceptable sizes.

  1. Methods and findings of a systems interaction study of a Westinghouse PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, R.; Hanan, N.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Xue, D.; Bozoki, G.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.; Mitra, S.; Macdonald, G.; Chelliah, E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and findings of a systems interaction study of a Westinghouse PWR. BNL conducted the study as a methods application that was performed to support the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-17 on Systems Interactions. The method calls for a fault tree model of the plant to be developed in stages, corresponding to successively increasing levels of scope and detail. A functional model is developed first, resolved only to sufficient detail to reflect support system dependences; this guides the subsequent searches for spatial and induced-human interactions. This process has led to the identification of an active single failure causing loss of low pressure injection following a large or medium LOCA.

  2. Defect formation in aqueous environment: Theoretical assessment of boron incorporation in nickel ferrite under conditions of an operating pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rák, Zs.; Bucholz, E. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    A serious concern in the safety and economy of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is related to the accumulation of boron inside the metal oxide (mostly NiFe2O4 spinel) deposits on the upper regions of the fuel rods. Boron, being a potent neutron absorber, can alter the neutron flux causing anomalous shifts and fluctuations in the power output of the reactor core. This phenomenon reduces the operational flexibility of the plant and may force the down-rating of the reactor. In this work an innovative approach is used to combine first-principles calculations with thermodynamic data to evaluate the possibility of B incorporation into the crystal structure of NiFe2O4 , under conditions typical to operating nuclear pressurized water nuclear reactors. Analyses of temperature and pH dependence of the defect formation energies indicate that B can accumulate in NiFe2O4 as an interstitial impurity and may therefore be a major contributor to the anomalous axial power shift observed in nuclear reactors. This computational approach is quite general and applicable to a large variety of solids in equilibrium with aqueous solutions.

  3. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  4. Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen; Tills, Jack Lee

    2009-05-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

  5. Robotic inspection of PWR coolant pump casing welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, W.R.; Alford, J.W.; Davis, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    As of January 1, 1995, the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate began requiring more thorough inspections of cast stainless-steel components in nuclear power plants, including pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor coolant pump (RCP) casings. The examination requirements are established by fracture mechanics analyses of component weldments and demonstrated test system detection capabilities. This may include full volumetric inspection or some portion thereof. Ringhals station is a four-unit nuclear power plant, owned and operated by the Swedish State Power Board, Vattenfall. Unit 1 is a boiling water reactor. Units 2, 3, and 4 are Westinghouse-designed PWRs, ranging in size from 795 to 925 MW. The RCP casings at the PWR units are made of cast stainless steel and contain four circumferential welds that require inspection. Due to the thickness of the casings at the weld locations and configuration and surface conditions on the outside diameter of the casings, remote inspection from the inside diameter of the pump casing was mandated.

  6. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  7. Radiative transfer during the reflooding step of a LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, J.; Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Boulet, P.

    2013-10-01

    Within the evaluation of the heat transfer downstream a quench front during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a nuclear power plant, a numerical study has been conducted on radiative transfer through a vapor-droplet medium. The non-grey behavior of the medium is obvious since it can be optically thin or thick depending on the wavelength. A six wide bands model has been tested, providing a satisfactory accuracy for the description of the radiative properties. Once the radiative properties of the medium computed, they have been introduced in a model solving the radiative heat transfer based on the Improved Differential Approximation. The fluxes and the flux divergence have been computed on a geometry characteristic of the reactor core showing that radiative transfer plays a relevant role, quite as important as convective heat transfer.

  8. Mixing phenomena of interest to boron dilution during small break LOCAs in PWRs. Revision 7/95

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Cheng, Z.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of mixing phenomena related to boron dilution during small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Boron free condensate can accumulate in the cold leg loop seals when the reactor is operating in a reflux/boiler-condenser mode. A problem may occur when subsequent change in flow conditions such as loop seal clearing or re-establishment of natural circulation flow drive the diluted water in the loop seals into the reactor core without sufficient mixing with the highly borated water in the reactor downcomer and lower plenum. The resulting low boron concentration coolant entering the core may cause a power excursion leading to fuel failure. The mixing processes associated with a slow moving stream of diluted water through the loop seal to the core are examined in this paper. Bounding calculations for boron concentration of coolant entering the core during a small break LOCA in a typical Westinghouse-designed four-loop plant are also presented.

  9. RIA Limits Based On Commercial PWR Core Response To RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Charles L.; Mitchell, David B.; Slagle, William H.

    2006-07-01

    Reactivity insertion accident (RIA) limits have been under intense review by regulators since 1993 with respect to what should be the proper limit as a function of burnup. Some national regulators have imposed new lower limits while in the United States the limits are still under review. The data being evaluated with respect to RIA limits come from specialized test reactors. However, the use of test reactor data needs to be balanced against the response of a commercial PWR core in setting reasonable limits to insure the health and safety of the public without unnecessary restrictions on core design and operation. The energy deposition limits for a RIA were set in the 1970's based on testing in CDC (SPERT), TREAT, PBF and NSRR test reactors. The US limits given in radially averaged enthalpy are 170 cal/gm for fuel cladding failure and 280 cal/gm for coolability. Testing conducted in the 1990's in the CABRI, NSRR and IGR test reactors have demonstrated that the cladding failure threshold is reduced with burnup, with the primary impact due to hydrogen pickup for in-reactor corrosion. Based on a review of this data very low enthalpy limits have been proposed. In reviewing proposed limits from RIL-0401(1) it was observed that much of the data used to anchor the low allowable energy deposition levels was from recent NSRR tests which do not represent commercial PWR reactor conditions. The particular characteristics of the NSRR test compared to commercial PWR reactor characteristics are: - Short pulse width: 4.5 ms vs > 8 ms; - Low temperature conditions: < 100 deg. F vs 532 deg. F. - Low pressure environment: atmospheric vs {approx} 2200 psi. A review of the historical RIA database indicates that some of the key NSRR data used to support the RIL was atypical compared to the overall RIA database. Based on this detailed review of the RIA database and the response of commercial PWR core, the following view points are proposed. - The Failure limit should reflect local fuel

  10. LOCA Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Program Postirradiation Examination Results for the Third Materials Experiment (MT-3) - Second Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Haberman, J. H.

    1985-06-01

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR} fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA} Simulation Program by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The third materials test (MT-3} was the sixth experiment in a series of thermalhydraulic and materials deformation/rupture experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The MT-3 experiment was jointly funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) with the main objective of evaluating ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling at elevated temperatures. All 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle failed with an average peak strain of 55.4%. At the request of the UKAEA, a destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) was performed on 7 of the 12 test rods. The results of this examination were presented in a previous report. Subsequently, and at the request of UKAEA, PIE was performed on three additional rods along with further examination of one of the previously examined rods. Information obtained from the PIE included cladding thickness measurements, cladding metallography, and particle size analysis of the fractured fuel pellets. This report describes the additional PIE work performed and presents the results of the examinations.

  11. Cobalt-60 simulation of LOCA (loss of coolant accident) radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1989-07-01

    The consequences of simulating nuclear reactor loss of coolant accident (LOCA) radiation effects with Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiators have been investigated. Based on radiation induced damage in polymer base materials, it was demonstrated that electron/photon induced radiation damage could be related on the basis of average absorbed radiation dose. This result was used to estimate the relative effectiveness of the mixed beta/gamma LOCA and Cobalt-60 radiation environments to damage both bare and jacketed polymer base electrical insulation materials. From the results obtained, it is concluded that present simulation techniques are a conservative method for simulating LOCA radiation effects and that the practices have probably substantially overstressed both bare and jacketed materials during qualification testing. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. A comprehensive in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Rixin; Zhang, Shucheng; Chen, Dianshan

    1991-02-01

    An in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR at IAE of China. This paper describes the structure of the test bundle (3 × 3-2), fabrication process and quality control of the fuel rod, irradiation conditions and the main Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results. The test fuel bundle was irradiated under the PWR operation and water chemistry conditions with an average linear power of 381 W/cm and reached an average burnup of 25010 MWd/tU of the fuel bundle. After the test, destructive and non-destructive examination of the fuel rods was conducted at hot laboratories. The fission gas release was 10.4-23%. The ridge height of cladding was 3 to 8 μm. The hydrogen content of the cladding was 80 to 140 ppm. The fuel stack height was increased by 2.9 to 3.3 mm. The relative irradiation growth was about 0.11 to 0.17% of the fuel rod length. During the irradiation test, no fuel rod failure or other abnormal phenomena had been found by the on-line fuel failure monitoring system of the test loop and water sampling analysis. The structure of the test fuel assembly was left undamaged without twist and detectable deformation.

  13. Large break LOCA calculations for the AP600 design

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    This paper presents the application of RELAP5 to the calculation of a Large Break (200% doubled-ended rupture) Loss-of-Colant-Accident (LBLOCA) at the reactor vessel inlet for the proposed Westinghouse AP600 design. A parametric calculation was also performed to determine effects of loss of a complete Emergency Core Cooling system (ECCS) train. These calculations were performed over the core blowdown, refill, and reflood phases of the LBLOCA and did not address long term cooling. RELAP5 was shown to be adequate for system response calculation over the period of interest. The passive safety systems were predicted to effectively mitigate the consequences of LBLOCAs; the calculations showed less severe thermal responses than for a current generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. The two primary differences between the AP600 design and a current generation plant that affect LBLOCA response are the lower core thermal power, which results in lower temperatures during the blowdown phase, and the long duration accumulator injection, which provides ample core inventory makeup for final quenching.

  14. Modeling local chemistry in PWR steam generator crevices

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P.J.

    1997-02-01

    Over the past two decades steam generator corrosion damage has been a major cost impact to PWR owners. Crevices and occluded regions create thermal-hydraulic conditions where aggressive impurities can become highly concentrated, promoting localized corrosion of the tubing and support structure materials. The type of corrosion varies depending on the local conditions, with stress corrosion cracking being the phenomenon of most current concern. A major goal of the EPRI research in this area has been to develop models of the concentration process and resulting crevice chemistry conditions. These models may then be used to predict crevice chemistry based on knowledge of bulk chemistry, thereby allowing the operator to control corrosion damage. Rigorous deterministic models have not yet been developed; however, empirical approaches have shown promise and are reflected in current versions of the industry-developed secondary water chemistry guidelines.

  15. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling rates, and

  16. Effect of spray parameter on containment depressurization during LOCA in KAPP 3 and 4, 700 MWE IPHWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S. K.; Bhartia, D. K.; Mohan, N.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    KAPP 3 and 4 is an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) of 700 MWe capacities. It is a pressure tube type reactor with heavy water as moderator and coolant and natural Uranium Dioxide as fuel. It consists of 392 horizontal fuel channel assemblies and surrounded by three separate water systems i.e. primary coolant, moderator and calandria vault water system. Containment of Indian PHWR is an ultimate barrier, which is designed to envelope whole reactor systems, to prevent the spread of active air-borne fission products in accident condition. Containment Spray System has been provided for energy as well as activity removal from the Containment system. This paper discusses about the studies done to assess the effect of spray parameters such as spray flow rate, droplets diameter and height of fall on containment peak pressure and temperature, long term containment depressurization and energy removal from the containment during Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The spray flow rate and droplets diameter play an important role in removing residual energy from containment atmosphere, which influences depressurization of containment. It is obvious that faster depressurization of containment during postulated LOCA helps in limiting radiological consequences. From radiological considerations, droplets diameter is required to be kept to the lowest practically possible value and flow rate of spray should be high. Spray water droplets fall height governs the exposure time of droplets, which is the direct indication of energy removal rate. However, it is observed from the sensitivity studies that for a height of spray droplet fall more than 16.5 m, for the range of spray water flow rate and droplets sizes considered in the analyses, there is no significant change in heat removal. (authors)

  17. Downscaling humidity with Localized Constructed Analogs (LOCA) over the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D. W.; Cayan, D. R.

    2016-07-01

    Humidity is important to climate impacts in hydrology, agriculture, ecology, energy demand, and human health and comfort. Nonetheless humidity is not available in some widely-used archives of statistically downscaled climate projections for the western U.S. In this work the Localized Constructed Analogs (LOCA) statistical downscaling method is used to downscale specific humidity to a 1°/16° grid over the conterminous U.S. and the results compared to observations. LOCA reproduces observed monthly climatological values with a mean error of ~0.5 % and RMS error of ~2 %. Extreme (1-day in 1- and 20-years) maximum values (relevant to human health and energy demand) are within ~5 % of observed, while extreme minimum values (relevant to agriculture and wildfire) are within ~15 %. The asymmetry between extreme maximum and minimum errors is largely due to residual errors in the bias correction of extreme minimum values. The temporal standard deviations of downscaled daily specific humidity values have a mean error of ~1 % and RMS error of ~3 %. LOCA increases spatial coherence in the final downscaled field by ~13 %, but the downscaled coherence depends on the spatial coherence in the data being downscaled, which is not addressed by bias correction. Temporal correlations between daily, monthly, and annual time series of the original and downscaled data typically yield values >0.98. LOCA captures the observed correlations between temperature and specific humidity even when the two are downscaled independently.

  18. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    A.K. Scheider

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  19. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239).

  20. Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-05-31

    In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

  1. Summary on the depressurization from supercritical pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.; Chen, Y.; Ammirable, L.; Yamada, K.

    2012-07-01

    When a fluid discharges from a high pressure and temperature system, a 'choking' or critical condition occurs, and the flow rate becomes independent of the downstream pressure. During a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) of a water reactor the break flow will be subject to this condition. An accurate estimation of the critical flow rate is important for the evaluation of the reactor safety, because this flow rate controls the loss of coolant inventory and energy from the system, and thus has a significant effect on the accident consequences[1]. In the design of safety systems for a super critical water reactor (SCWR), postulated LOCA transients are particularly important due to the lower coolant inventory compared to a typical PWR for the same power output. This lower coolant inventory would result in a faster transient response of the SCWR, and hence accurate prediction of the critical discharge is mandatory. Under potential two-phase conditions critical flow is dominated by the vapor content or quality of the vapor, which is closely related with the onset of vaporization and the interfacial interaction between phases [2]. This presents a major challenge for the estimation of the flow rate due to the lack of the knowledge of those processes, especially under the conditions of interest for the SCWR. According to the limited data of supercritical fluids, the critical flows at conditions above the pseudo-critical point seem to be fairly stable and consistent with the subcritical homogeneous equilibrium model (HEM) model predictions, while having a lower flow rate than those in the two-phase region. Thus the major difficulty in the prediction of the depressurization flow rates remains in the region where two phases co-exist at the top of the vapor dome. In this region, the flow rate is strongly affected by the nozzle geometry and tends to be unstable. Various models for this region have been developed with different assumptions, e.g. the HEM and Moody model [3

  2. Effect of LOCA simulation procedures on cross-linked polyolefin cable's performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1984-04-01

    Electrical and mechanical properties of three commercial cross-linked polyolefin (XLPO) materials, typically used as electrical cable insulation, have been monitored during these simulations of nuclear power plant aging and accident stresses. For one XLPO cable accelerated thermal aging is performed, then the samples are irradiated to the combined aging and LOCA total dose. Finally, a steam exposure is applied. For a second and third set of XLPO cables simultaneous applications of elevated temperature and radiation stresses are used to preaccident age specimens. These aging exposures are followed by simultaneous and steam exposures to simulate a LOCA environment. The measurement parameters during these tests included: dc insulation resistance, ac leakage current, ultimate tensile strength, ultimate tensile elongation, percentage dimensional changes, and percentage moisture absorption. Test results for three XLPO materials are presented.

  3. Effect of LOCA simulation procedures on ethylene propylene rubber's mechanical and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1983-10-01

    Electrical and mechanical properties of several commercial ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) materials, typically used as electrical cable insulation, have been monitored during three simulations of nuclear power plant aging and accident stresses. For one set of cables and separate tensile specimens we did a sequential test. We first performed accelerated thermal aging, then irradiated the samples to the combined aging and LOCA total dose. Finally we applied a steam exposure. For a second and third set of cables and separate tensile specimens we used simultaneous applications of elevated temperature and radiation stresses to preaccident age our specimens. We followed these aging exposures by simultaneous radiation and steam exposures to simulate a LOCA environment. Our measurement parameters during these tests included: dc insulation resistance, ac leakage current, ultimate tensile strength, ultimate tensile elongation, percentage dimensional changes, and percentage moisture absorption. We present test results for nine EPR materials. The implications of our research results for future cable qualification testing efforts is discussed.

  4. Code System for Best-Estimate Analysis of LOCA in BWR.

    2001-07-23

    Version 00 TRAC-BD1 performs best estimate analyses of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and other transients in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The program provides LOCA analysis capability for BWRs and for many BWR-related thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The program features a three-dimensional treatment of the BWR pressure vessel, a detailed model of a BWR fuel bundle including multi-rod, multi-bundle, radiation heat transfer, and leakage path modeling capability; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; reflood tracking capability both for falling filmsmore » and bottom flood quench fronts; and consistent treatment of the entire accident sequence. Dump/restart capabilities are also provided.« less

  5. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  6. Experiment data report for Multirod Burst Test (MRBT) bundle B-6. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R H; Longest, A W; Crowley, J L

    1984-07-01

    A reference source of MRBT bundle B-6 test data is presented with minimum interpretation. The primary objective of this 8 x 8 multirod burst test was to investigate cladding deformation in the alpha-plus-beta-Zircaloy temperature range under simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. B-6 test conditions simulated the adiabatic heatup (reheat) phase of an LOCA and produced very uniform temperature distributions. The fuel pin simulators were electrically heated (average linear power generation of 1.42 kW/m) and were slightly cooled with a very low flow (Re approx. 140) of low-pressure superheated steam. The cladding temperature increased from the initial temperature (330/sup 0/C) to the burst temperature at a rate of 3.5/sup 0/C/s. The simulators burst in a very narrow temperature range, with an average of 930/sup 0/C. Cladding burst strain ranged from 21 to 56%, with an average of 31%. Volumetric expansion over the heated length of the cladding ranged from 16 to 32%, with an average of 23%. 23 references.

  7. Effect of aging on EPR cable electrical performance during LOCA simulations. [Ethylene propylene rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    When exposed to a LOCA environment, some ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cable materials experience substantial moisture absorption and dimensional changes. These phenomena may contribute to mechanical damage of the cable insulation resulting in electrical degradation. Recent experiments illustrate that the extent of moisture absorption and dimensional changes during an accident simulation are dependent on the EPR product, the accelerated age, and the aging technique employed to achieve that age. Results for several commercial EPR materials are summarized.

  8. Probabilistic based design rules for intersystem LOCAS in ABWR piping

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Wesley, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    A methodology has been developed for probability-based standards for low-pressure piping systems that are attached to the reactor coolant loops of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) which could experience reactor coolant loop temperatures and pressures because of multiple isolation valve failures. This accident condition is called an intersystem loss-of-coolant accident (ISLOCA). The methodology was applied to various sizes of carbon and stainless steel piping designed to advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) temperatures and pressures.

  9. Scoping Study Investigating PWR Instrumentation during a Severe Accident Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Lutz, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 nuclear power plants demonstrate the critical importance of accurate, relevant, and timely information on the status of reactor systems during a severe accident. These events also highlight the critical importance of understanding and focusing on the key elements of system status information in an environment where operators may be overwhelmed with superfluous and sometimes conflicting data. While progress in these areas has been made since TMI-2, the events at Fukushima suggests that there may still be a potential need to ensure that critical plant information is available to plant operators. Recognizing the significant technical and economic challenges associated with plant modifications, it is important to focus on instrumentation that can address these information critical needs. As part of a program initiated by the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a scoping effort was initiated to assess critical information needs identified for severe accident management and mitigation in commercial Light Water Reactors (LWRs), to quantify the environment instruments monitoring this data would have to survive, and to identify gaps where predicted environments exceed instrumentation qualification envelop (QE) limits. Results from the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) scoping evaluations are documented in this report. The PWR evaluations were limited in this scoping evaluation to quantifying the environmental conditions for an unmitigated Short-Term Station BlackOut (STSBO) sequence in one unit at the Surry nuclear power station. Results were obtained using the MELCOR models developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored State of the Art Consequence Assessment (SOARCA) program project. Results from this scoping evaluation indicate that some instrumentation identified to provide critical information would be exposed to conditions that

  10. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  11. Proceedings: 2001 PWR/BWR Plant Chemistry Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-05-01

    This report presents proceedings of EPRI's 2001 Plant Chemistry Conference, which brought together approximately 100 industry representatives to discuss experiences and issues regarding nuclear plant chemistry at both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants.

  12. RBMK-LOCA-Analyses with the ATHLET-Code

    SciTech Connect

    Petry, A.; Domoradov, A.; Finjakin, A.

    1995-09-01

    The scientific technical cooperation between Germany and Russia includes the area of adaptation of several German codes for the Russian-designed RBMK-reactor. One point of this cooperation is the adaptation of the Thermal-Hydraulic code ATHLET (Analyses of the Thermal-Hydraulics of LEaks and Transients), for RBMK-specific safety problems. This paper contains a short description of a RBMK-1000 reactor circuit. Furthermore, the main features of the thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET are presented. The main assumptions for the ATHLET-RBMK model are discussed. As an example for the application, the results of test calculations concerning a guillotine type rupture of a distribution group header are presented and discussed, and the general analysis conditions are described. A comparison with corresponding RELAP-calculations is given. This paper gives an overview on some problems posed and experience by application of Western best-estimate codes for RBMK-calculations.

  13. SPACE code simulation of cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS integral test

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. D.

    2012-07-01

    SPACE code is a system analysis code for pressurized water reactors. This code uses a two-fluid and three-field model. For a few years, intensive validations have been performed to secure the prediction accuracy of models and correlations for two-phase flow and heat transfer. Recently, the code version 1.0 was released. This study is to see how well SPACE code predicts thermal hydraulic phenomena of an integral effect test. The target experiment is a cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS facility, which has the same two-loop features as APR1400. Predicted parameters were compared with experimental observations. (authors)

  14. MELCOR code analysis of a severe accident LOCA at Peach Bottom Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A design-basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) concurrent with complete loss of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) has been analyzed for the Peach Bottom atomic station unit 2 using the MELCOR code, version 1.8.1. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate best-estimate times for the important events of this accident sequence and best-estimate source terms. Calculated pressures and temperatures at the beginning of the transient have been compared to results from the Peach Bottom final safety analysis report (FSAR). MELCOR-calculated source terms have been compared to source terms reported in the NUREG-1465 draft.

  15. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J.

    1996-02-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  16. Comparison of TRAC and RELAP5 reactor system calculations for a DEGB LOCA in K-14.1

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.P.; Liebmann, M.L.

    1990-09-01

    A comparison of TRAC and RELAP5 predictions of steady-state and DEGB LOCA results (FI phase) for K-14.1 has been made. Both codes had been previously benchmarked against 1985 L Reactor AC Flow data and were under configuration control. The purpose of the code-to-code comparison is to provide insight on the transient uncertainty in TRAC plenum and tank bottom plenum pressures. The comparisons focus on LOCA results between 0.5 and 2.0 s, which is the primary period of interest for Flow Instability (FI) limits.

  17. Comparison of TRAC and RELAP5 reactor system calculations for a DEGB LOCA in K-14. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.P. ); Liebmann, M.L. )

    1990-09-01

    A comparison of TRAC and RELAP5 predictions of steady-state and DEGB LOCA results (FI phase) for K-14.1 has been made. Both codes had been previously benchmarked against 1985 L Reactor AC Flow data and were under configuration control. The purpose of the code-to-code comparison is to provide insight on the transient uncertainty in TRAC plenum and tank bottom plenum pressures. The comparisons focus on LOCA results between 0.5 and 2.0 s, which is the primary period of interest for Flow Instability (FI) limits.

  18. Continuation and bifurcation analysis of large-scale dynamical systems with LOCA.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Phipps, Eric Todd; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Dynamical systems theory provides a powerful framework for understanding the behavior of complex evolving systems. However applying these ideas to large-scale dynamical systems such as discretizations of multi-dimensional PDEs is challenging. Such systems can easily give rise to problems with billions of dynamical variables, requiring specialized numerical algorithms implemented on high performance computing architectures with thousands of processors. This talk will describe LOCA, the Library of Continuation Algorithms, a suite of scalable continuation and bifurcation tools optimized for these types of systems that is part of the Trilinos software collection. In particular, we will describe continuation and bifurcation analysis techniques designed for large-scale dynamical systems that are based on specialized parallel linear algebra methods for solving augmented linear systems. We will also discuss several other Trilinos tools providing nonlinear solvers (NOX), eigensolvers (Anasazi), iterative linear solvers (AztecOO and Belos), preconditioners (Ifpack, ML, Amesos) and parallel linear algebra data structures (Epetra and Tpetra) that LOCA can leverage for efficient and scalable analysis of large-scale dynamical systems.

  19. Analysis of LOCA Scenarios in the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J. S.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D.

    2015-08-30

    An analysis has been done of hypothetical loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCAs) in the research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The purpose of the analysis is to determine if the peak clad temperature remains below the Safety Limit, which is the blister temperature for the fuel. The configuration of the NBSR considered in the analysis is that projected for the future when changes will be made so that shutdown pumps do not operate when a LOCA signal is detected. The analysis was done for the present core with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and with the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel that would be used when the NBSR is converted from one to the other. The analysis consists of two parts. The first examines how the water would drain from the primary system following a break and the possibility for the loss of coolant from within the fuel element flow channels. This work is performed using the TRACE system thermal-hydraulic code. The second looks at the fuel clad temperature as a function of time given that the water may have drained from many of the flow channels and the water in the vessel is in a quasi-equilibrium state. The temperature behavior is investigated using the three-dimensional heat conduction code HEATING7.3. The results in all scenarios considered for both HEU and LEU fuel show that the peak clad temperature remains below the blister temperature.

  20. Barium silicate glass/Inconel X-750 interaction. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Jr., P. V.; Siegel, W. T.; Miley, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    Water reactor safety programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have required the development of specialized instrumentation. An example is the electrical conductivity-sensitive liquid level transducer developed for use in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) in which the operation of the sensing probe relies upon the passage of current through the water between the center pin of the electrode and its shell such that when water is present the resulting voltage is low, and conversely, when water is absent the voltage is high. The transducer's ceramic seal is a hot-pressed glass ceramic; its metal housing is Inconel X-750. The ceramic material provides an essential dielectric barrier between the center pin and the outer housing. The operation of the probe as well as the integrity of the PWR environment requires a hermetically-bonded seal between the ceramic and the metal. However, during testing, an increasing number of probe assemblies failed owing to poor glass-to-metal seals as well as void formation within the ceramic. Therefore, a program was initiated to characterize the metallic surface with respect to pre-oxidation treatment and determine optimum conditions for wetting and bonding of the metal by the glass to obtain baseline data relevant to production of acceptable transducer seals.

  1. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  2. High Cycle Thermal Fatigue in French PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Blondet, Eric; Faidy, Claude

    2002-07-01

    Different fatigue-related incidents which occurred in the world on the auxiliary lines of the reactor coolant system (SIS, RHR, CVC) have led EDF to search solutions in order to avoid or to limit consequences of thermodynamic phenomenal (Farley-Tihange, free convection loop and stratification, independent thermal cycling). Studies are performed on mock-up and compared with instrumentation on nuclear power stations. At the present time, studies allow EDF to carry out pipe modifications and to prepare specifications and recommendations for next generation of nuclear power plants. In 1998, a new phenomenal appeared on RHR system in Civaux. A crack was discovered in an area where hot and cold fluids (temperature difference of 140 deg. C) were mixed. Metallurgic studies concluded that this crack was caused by high cycle thermal fatigue. Since 1998, EDF is making an inventory of all mixing areas in French PWR on basis of criteria. For all identified areas, a method was developed to improve the first classifying and to keep back only potential damage pipes. Presently, studies are performing on the charging line nozzle connected to the reactor pressure vessel. In order to evaluate the load history, a mock-up has been developed and mechanical calculations are realised on this nozzle. The paper will make an overview of EDF conclusions on these different points: - dead legs and vortex in a no flow connected line; - stratification; - mixing tees with high {delta}T. (authors)

  3. Analysis of a rod withdrawal in a PWR core with the neutronic- thermalhydraulic coupled code RELAP/PARCS and RELAP/VALKIN

    SciTech Connect

    Miro, R.; Maggini, F.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.; Gomez, A.; Ortego, A.; Murillo, J. C.

    2006-07-01

    The Reactor Ejection Accident (REA) belongs to the Reactor Initiated Accidents (RIA) category of accidents and it is part of the licensing basis accident analyses required for pressure water reactors (PWR). The REA at hot zero power (HZP) is characterized by a single rod ejection from a core position with a very low power level. The evolution consists basically of a continuous reactivity insertion. The main feature limiting the consequences of the accident in a PWR is the Doppler Effect. To check the performance of the coupled code RELAP5/PARCS2.5 and RELAP5/VALKIN a REA in Trillo NPP is simulated. These analyses will allow knowing more accurately the PWR real plant phenomenology in the RIA most limiting conditions. (authors)

  4. Three Dimensional Analysis of 3-Loop PWR RCCA Ejection Accident for High Burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Marciulescu, Cristian; Sung, Yixing; Beard, Charles L.

    2006-07-01

    The Rod Control Cluster Assembly (RCCA) ejection accident is a Condition IV design basis reactivity insertion event for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The event is historically analyzed using a one-dimensional (1D) neutron kinetic code to meet the current licensing criteria for fuel rod burnup to 62,000 MWD/MTU. The Westinghouse USNRC-approved three-dimensional (3D) analysis methodology is based on the neutron kinetics version of the ANC code (SPNOVA) coupled with Westinghouse's version of the EPRI core thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The 3D methodology provides a more realistic yet conservative analysis approach to meet anticipated reduction in the licensing fuel enthalpy rise limit for high burnup fuel. A rod ejection analysis using the 3D methodology was recently performed for a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR at an up-rated core power of 3151 MWt with reload cores that allow large flexibility in assembly shuffling and a fuel hot rod burnup to 75,000 MWD/MTU. The analysis considered high enrichment fuel assemblies at the control rod locations as well as bounding rodded depletions in the end of life, zero power and full power conditions. The analysis results demonstrated that the peak fuel enthalpy rise is less than 100 cal/g for the transient initiated at the hot zero power condition. The maximum fuel enthalpy is less than 200 cal/g for the transient initiated from the full power condition. (authors)

  5. Proceedings: PWR Primary Startup/Shutdown Chemistry Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2000-08-01

    This workshop summary outlines the proceedings of the EPRI-sponsored PWR Primary Startup/Shutdown Workshop held in San Antonio, Texas on April 25-27, 2000 to support the next revision of current EPRI PWR Chemistry Guidelines. Information was exchanged to assess the effectiveness of the guidelines. The workshop also helped identify issues needing further study before the next revision. Approximately 50 utility and industry representatives attended the workshop with utility personnel chairing four sessions. The workshop provided an opportunity for utility representatives to express an opinion as to the effectiveness of the existing PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines: Volume 2, Revision 4. Potential improvements and additions to the Guidelines are outlined in this report.

  6. Interfacing systems LOCA (loss-of-coolant accidents): Pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes a study performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Reactor and Plant Safety Issues Branch, Division of Reactor and Plant Systems, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This study was requested by the NRC in order to provide a technical basis for the resolution of Generic Issue 105 ''Interfacing LOCA at LWRs.'' This report deals with pressurized water reactors (PWRs). A parallel report was also accomplished for boiling water reactors. This study focuses on three representative PWRs and extrapolates the plant-specific findings for their generic applicability. In addition, a generic analysis was performed to investigate the cost-benefit aspects of imposing a testing program that would require some minimum level of leak testing of the pressure isolation valves on plants that presently have no such requirements. 28 refs., 31 figs., 64 tabs.

  7. The BWR lower head response during a large-break LOCA with core damage

    SciTech Connect

    Alammar, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Some of the important issues in severe accident management guidelines development deal with estimating the time to lower head vessel failure after core damage and the time window available for water injection that would prevent vessel failure. These issues are obviously scenario dependent, but bounding estimates are needed. The scenario chosen for this purpose was a design-basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) because it was one of the contributors to the Oyster Creek containment failure frequency. Oyster Creek is a 1930-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR)-2. The lower head response models have improved since the Three Mile Island unit 2 (TMI-2) vessel investigation project (VIP) results became known, specifically the addition of rapid- and slow-cooling models. These mechanisms were found to have taken place in the TMI-2 lower head during debris cooldown and were important contributors in preventing vessel failure.

  8. Ethylene propylene cable degradation during LOCA research tests: tensile properties at the completion of accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1982-05-01

    Six ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) insulation materials were aged at elevated temperature and radiation stress exposures common in cable LOCA qualification tests. Material samples were subjected to various simultaneous and sequential aging simulations in preparation for accident environmental exposures. Tensile properties subsequent to the aging exposure sequences are reported. The tensile properties of some, but not all, specimens were sensitive to the order of radiation and elevated temperature stress exposure. Other specimens showed more severe degradation when simultaneously exposed to radiation and elevated temperature as opposed to the sequential exposure to the same stresses. Results illustrate the difficulty in defining a single test procedure for nuclear safety-related qualification of EPR elastomers. A common worst-case sequential aging sequence could not be identified.

  9. PWR full-reactor coolant system decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, R.G.; Pessall, N.; Grand, T.F. )

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the current program is to identify and address all aspects of full system decontamination with the purpose of qualifying at least one process for PWR use. The objective of the current study is to provide baseline data on the performance of materials on the primary side after exposure to one cycle of the LOMI fault testing. This data supplements prior information obtained after exposure to three cycles of LOMI testing. The technical significance of this excursion will be determined in a subsequent task. The general corrosion characteristics of over 39 materials were evaluated for some combinations of material, type of specimen (coupon and creviced coupons), and loop velocity (0, 5, 20 and 150 ft/sec). At velocities of less than or equal to 20 ft/sec, sixteen types of specimens were employed to evaluate localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Specimens were examined after one cycle. Also included in this exposure were specimens added to provide more information on the effect of LOMI fault exposure one: (1) surface roughening of Stellite 156; (2) crevice corrosion of chromium plated 304 stainless steel with the open end gap increased from 3 to {approximately} 9 mils; (3) susceptibility of Inconel X-750 (HTH) to subsequent stress corrosion cracking, (4) loss of chromium plate from threads of 304 stainless steel bolts torqued into stainless steel collars; (5) crack initiation in an Alloy 600 tube known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking; and (6) surface alternation of stressed Inconel X-750 springs with the spring temper.

  10. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    SciTech Connect

    Faidy, C.

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  11. Enriched boric acid for PWR application: Cost evaluation study for a twin-unit PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, J.A.; Waters, R.M.; von Hollen, J.M.; Lamatia, L.A.; Bergmann, C.A.; Ditommaso, S.M. . Nuclear and Advanced Technology Div.)

    1989-09-01

    In the nuclear industry boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant is used as a soluble reactivity control agent. Reactivity control in nuclear plants is also provided by neutron absorbing control rods. This neutron absorbing duty is distributed between the control rods and soluble boric acid in such a way as to provide the most economical split. Typically, the control rods take care of rapid reactivity changes and the boric acid handles the slower long term control of reactivity by varying the boric acid concentrations within the reactor coolant. In PWR reactor plants the dissolved boric acid is referred to as a soluble poison or chemical shim due to the high capacity for thermal neutron capture exhibited by the boron-10 isotope contained in the boric acid molecule. This slow reactivity change or chemical shim control would otherwise have to be performed using control rods, a much more expensive proposition. Reactivity changes are controlled by the B-10 isotope by virtue of its very high cross section (3837 barns) for thermal neutron absorption. However, natural boron contains only 20 atom percent of the B-10 isotope and essentially all the remaining 80 percent as the B-11 isotope. The B-11 isotope of cross section .005 barns is essentially of no use as a neutron absorber. Since B-11 makes up the bulk of the total boron present and contributes little to the nuclear operation it would seem logical to eliminate this isotope of boron from the boric acid molecule. In so doing boric acid concentration in operating PWR plants need only be a fraction of that existing to accomplish identical nuclear operations. However, to achieve the elimination of B-11 from NBA (Natural Boric Acid) an isotope separation must be performed. 4 refs., 25 figs., 17 tabs.

  12. Optimization of burnable poison design for Pu incineration in fully fertile free PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.

    2006-07-01

    The design challenges of the fertile-free based fuel (FFF) can be addressed by careful and elaborate use of burnable poisons (BP). Practical fully FFF core design for PWR reactor has been reported in the past [1]. However, the burnable poison option used in the design resulted in significant end of cycle reactivity penalty due to incomplete BP depletion. Consequently, excessive Pu loading were required to maintain the target fuel cycle length, which in turn decreased the Pu burning efficiency. A systematic evaluation of commercially available BP materials in all configurations currently used in PWRs is the main objective of this work. The BP materials considered are Boron, Gd, Er, and Hf. The BP geometries were based on Wet Annular Burnable Absorber (WABA), Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA), and Homogeneous poison/fuel mixtures. Several most promising combinations of BP designs were selected for the full core 3D simulation. All major core performance parameters for the analyzed cases are very close to those of a standard PWR with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel including possibility of reactivity control, power peaking factors, and cycle length. The MTC of all FFF cores was found at the full power conditions at all times and very close to that of the UO{sub 2} core. The Doppler coefficient of the FFF cores is also negative but somewhat lower in magnitude compared to UO{sub 2} core. The soluble boron worth of the FFF cores was calculated to be lower than that of the UO{sub 2} core by about a factor of two, which still allows the core reactivity control with acceptable soluble boron concentrations. The main conclusion of this work is that judicial application of burnable poisons for fertile free fuel has a potential to produce a core design with performance characteristics close to those of the reference PWR core with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

  13. Effects of Burnable Absorbers on PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    P.M. O'Leary; Dr. M.L. Pitts

    2000-08-21

    Burnup credit is an ongoing issue in designing and licensing transportation and storage casks for spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To address this issue, in July 1999, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Spent Fuel Project Office, issued Interim Staff Guidance-8 (ISG-8), Revision 1 allowing limited burnup credit for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in transport and storage casks. However, one of the key limitations for a licensing basis analysis as stipulated in ISG-8, Revision 1 is that ''burnup credit is restricted to intact fuel assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers''. Because many PWR fuel designs have incorporated burnable-absorber rods for more than twenty years, this restriction places an unnecessary burden on the commercial nuclear power industry. This paper summarizes the effects of in-reactor irradiation on the isotopic inventory of PWR fuels containing different types of integral burnable absorbers (BAs). The work presented is illustrative and intended to represent typical magnitudes of the reactivity effects from depleting PWR fuel with different types of burnable absorbers.

  14. Implementation of non-condensable gases condensation suppression model into the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 LOCA safety evaluation code

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, J.; Cao, L.; Ohkawa, K.; Frepoli, C.

    2012-07-01

    The non-condensable gases condensation suppression model is important for a realistic LOCA safety analysis code. A condensation suppression model for direct contact condensation was previously developed by Westinghouse using first principles. The model is believed to be an accurate description of the direct contact condensation process in the presence of non-condensable gases. The Westinghouse condensation suppression model is further revised by applying a more physical model. The revised condensation suppression model is thus implemented into the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 LOCA safety evaluation code for both 3-D module (COBRA-TF) and 1-D module (TRAC-PF1). Parametric study using the revised Westinghouse condensation suppression model is conducted. Additionally, the performance of non-condensable gases condensation suppression model is examined in the ACHILLES (ISP-25) separate effects test and LOFT L2-5 (ISP-13) integral effects test. (authors)

  15. Parametric study of the potential for BWR ECCS strainer blockage due to LOCA generated debris. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, G.; Brideau, J.; Rao, D.V.; Shaffer, C.; Souto, F.; Thomas, W.

    1995-10-01

    This report documents a plant-specific study for a BWR/4 with a Mark I containment that evaluated the potential for LOCA generated debris and the probability of losing long term recirculation capability due ECCS pump suction strainer blockage. The major elements of this study were: (1) acquisition of detailed piping layouts and installed insulation details for a reference BWR; (2) analysis of plant specific piping weld failure probabilities to estimate the LOCA frequency; (3) development of an insulation and other debris generation and drywell transport models for the reference BWR; (4) modeling of debris transport in the suppression pool; (5) development of strainer blockage head loss models for estimating loss of NPSH margin; (6) estimation of core damage frequency attributable to loss of ECCS recirculation capability following a LOCA. Elements 2 through 5 were combined into a computer code, BLOCKAGE 2.3. A point estimate of overall DEGB pipe break frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.59E-04 was calculated for the reference plant, with a corresponding overall ECCS loss of NPSH frequency (per Rx-year) of 1.58E-04. The calculated point estimate of core damage frequency (per Rx-year) due to blockage related accident sequences for the reference BWR ranged from 4.2E-06 to 2.5E-05. The results of this study show that unacceptable strainer blockage and loss of NPSH margin can occur within the first few minutes after ECCS pumps achieve maximum flows when the ECCS strainers are exposed to LOCA generated fibrous debris in the presence of particulates (sludge, paint chips, concrete dust). Generic or unconditional extrapolation of these reference plant calculated results should not be undertaken.

  16. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking of irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment using heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J.; Hure, J.; Tanguy, B.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.-C.; Andrieu, E.

    2016-08-01

    IASCC has been a major concern regarding the structural and functional integrity of core internals of PWR's, especially baffle-to-former bolts. Despite numerous studies over the past few decades, additional evaluation of the parameters influencing IASCC is still needed for an accurate understanding and modeling of this phenomenon. In this study, Fe irradiation at 450 °C was used to study the cracking susceptibility of 304 L austenitic stainless steel. After 10 MeV Fe irradiation to 5 dpa, irradiation-induced damage in the microstructure was characterized and quantified along with nano-hardness measurements. After 4% plastic strain in a PWR environment, quantitative information on the degree of strain localization, as determined by slip-line spacing, was obtained using SEM. Fe-irradiated material strained to 4% in a PWR environment exhibited crack initiation sites that were similar to those that occur in neutron- and proton-irradiated materials, which suggests that Fe irradiation may be a representative means for studying IASCC susceptibility. Fe-irradiated material subjected to 4% plastic strain in an inert argon environment did not exhibit any cracking, which suggests that localized deformation is not in itself sufficient for initiating cracking for the irradiation conditions used in this study.

  17. The nature and behavior of particulates in PWR primary coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Bridle, D.A.; Butter, K.R.; Cake, P.; Comley, G.C.W.; Mitchell, C.R. )

    1989-12-01

    A study of particle size distributions, nature and behavior of insoluble species carried by PWR coolants has been carried out over a four year period in Belgian reactors. Comparative data was obtained by the use of improved sampling systems designed to overcome the inadequacies of standard facilities. Coolant data is presented from commissioning and early operation of new plant to that in established PWR circuits. Results arising from reactors transients are also included, which refer to shutdown and start-up phases, power changes and scram situations. The information obtained includes chemical and radiochemical characteristics of particulates and their contribution to total activity carried by reactor coolant. The implications for plant operations are discussed. 16 refs., 55 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Improvement of COBRA-TF for modeling of PWR cold- and hot-legs during reactor transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salko, Robert K.

    COBRA-TF is a two-phase, three-field (liquid, vapor, droplets) thermal-hydraulic modeling tool that has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under sponsorship of the NRC. The code was developed for Light Water Reactor analysis starting in the 1980s; however, its development has continued to this current time. COBRA-TF still finds wide-spread use throughout the nuclear engineering field, including nuclear-power vendors, academia, and research institutions. It has been proposed that extension of the COBRA-TF code-modeling region from vessel-only components to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant-line regions can lead to improved Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. Improved modeling is anticipated due to COBRA-TF's capability to independently model the entrained-droplet flow-field behavior, which has been observed to impact delivery to the core region[1]. Because COBRA-TF was originally developed for vertically-dominated, in-vessel, sub-channel flow, extension of the COBRA-TF modeling region to the horizontal-pipe geometries of the coolant-lines required several code modifications, including: • Inclusion of the stratified flow regime into the COBRA-TF flow regime map, along with associated interfacial drag, wall drag and interfacial heat transfer correlations, • Inclusion of a horizontal-stratification force between adjacent mesh cells having unequal levels of stratified flow, and • Generation of a new code-input interface for the modeling of coolant-lines. The sheer number of COBRA-TF modifications that were required to complete this work turned this project into a code-development project as much as it was a study of thermal-hydraulics in reactor coolant-lines. The means for achieving these tasks shifted along the way, ultimately leading the development of a separate, nearly completely independent one-dimensional, two-phase-flow modeling code geared toward reactor coolant-line analysis. This developed code has been named CLAP, for

  19. PWR Cross Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, Carolyn; Ilas, Germina

    2012-01-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% 235U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time.

  20. Design study of long-life PWR using thorium cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Subkhi, Moh. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-06

    Design study of long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle has been performed. Thorium cycle in general has higher conversion ratio in the thermal spectrum domain than uranium cycle. Cell calculation, Burn-up and multigroup diffusion calculation was performed by PIJ-CITATION-SRAC code using libraries based on JENDL 3.2. The neutronic analysis result of infinite cell calculation shows that {sup 231}Pa better than {sup 237}Np as burnable poisons in thorium fuel system. Thorium oxide system with 8%{sup 233}U enrichment and 7.6{approx} 8%{sup 231}Pa is the most suitable fuel for small-long life PWR core because it gives reactivity swing less than 1%{Delta}k/k and longer burn up period (more than 20 year). By using this result, small long-life PWR core can be designed for long time operation with reduced excess reactivity as low as 0.53%{Delta}k/k and reduced power peaking during its operation.

  1. Design study of long-life PWR using thorium cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subkhi, Moh. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul

    2012-06-01

    Design study of long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle has been performed. Thorium cycle in general has higher conversion ratio in the thermal spectrum domain than uranium cycle. Cell calculation, Burn-up and multigroup diffusion calculation was performed by PIJ-CITATION-SRAC code using libraries based on JENDL 3.2. The neutronic analysis result of infinite cell calculation shows that 231Pa better than 237Np as burnable poisons in thorium fuel system. Thorium oxide system with 8% 233U enrichment and 7.6˜ 8% 231Pa is the most suitable fuel for small-long life PWR core because it gives reactivity swing less than 1% Δk/k and longer burn up period (more than 20 year). By using this result, small long-life PWR core can be designed for long time operation with reduced excess reactivity as low as 0.53% Δk/k and reduced power peaking during its operation.

  2. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  3. Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo; Park, Su Ki; Seo, Chul Gyo

    2007-07-01

    A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

  4. The behavior of ANGRA 2 nuclear power plant core for a small break LOCA simulated with RELAP5 code

    SciTech Connect

    Sabundjian, Gaiane; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Belchior, Antonio Jr.; Silva Rocha, Marcelo da; Conti, Thadeu N.; Torres, Walmir M.; Macedo, Luiz A.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Mesquita, Roberto N.; Masotti, Paulo H. F.; Souza Lima, Ana Cecilia de

    2013-05-06

    This work discusses the behavior of Angra 2 nuclear power plant core, for a postulate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the primary circuit for Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA). A pipe break of the hot leg Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) was simulated with RELAP 5 code. The considered rupture area is 380 cm{sup 2}, which represents 100% of the ECCS pipe flow area. Results showed that the cooling is enough to guarantee the integrity of the reactor core.

  5. Technical basis for the initiation and cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking of low-alloy steels in elevated temperature PWR environments

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Section 11 Working Group on Flaw Evaluation of the ASME B and PV Code Committee is considering a Code Case to allow the determination of the conditions under which environmentally-assisted cracking of low-alloy steels could occur in PWR primary environments. This paper provides the technical support basis for such an EAC Initiation and Cessation Criterion by reviewing the theoretical and experimental information in support of the proposed Code Case.

  6. 21-PWR WASTE PACKAGE WITH ABSORBER PLATES LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2004-12-17

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial pressurized water reactor (PWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 21 PWR waste package with absorber plates design as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an example of the application of the methodology presented in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 45 GWd/MTU. Higher burnups were not necessary because 45 GWd/MTU was high enough for the loading curve determination. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing PWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 2004) because it concerns engineered barriers that are included in the ''Q-List'' (BSC 2004k, Appendix A) as items important to safety and waste isolation.

  7. TRU transmutation in thorium-based heterogeneous PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kang-Mok; Lim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2004-07-01

    A thorium-based seed and blanket design concept for a conventional pressurized light water reactor (PWR) was proposed to enhance the proliferation resistance potential and fuel cycle economics. The KTF core was satisfied with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic design limit of conventional PWR, APR-1400. In order to evaluate transmutation capability of a thorium-based KTF core, U/Zr seed fuel mixed with 10% TRU which come from 1,000 MWe power reactor after 10 years decay was proposed and analyzed by transmutation indices such as D{sub j}, TEX and SR. KTF core showed an extended fuel cycle burnup; average burnup of seed was 79.5 MWd/kgHM and blanket was 94.6 MWd/kgHM. It means that residence time of TRU in the core could be long enough for transmutation when TRU is mixed in seed fuel. The amount of TRU production from conventional PWR could be transmuted in the KTF-TRU core, especially Am-241 isotope is remarkably transmuted by capture reaction. Even isotopes of curium were cumulated in the core during the burnup, however, KTF-TRU core could reduce the TRU in spent fuel by using well-thermalized neutron spectrum. Proliferation resistance potential of thorium based transmutation fuel is slightly increased. About 31% reduction of TRU amount was measured from reduced plutonium production from U-238. Total amount of Am-241 was reduced significantly, but total amount of minor actinide (MA) was reduced by 28% of its initial loading mass. (authors)

  8. Estimating probable flaw distributions in PWR steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes methods for estimating the number and size distributions of flaws of various types in PWR steam generator tubes. These estimates are needed when calculating the probable primary to secondary leakage through steam generator tubes under postulated accidents such as severe core accidents and steam line breaks. The paper describes methods for two types of predictions: (1) the numbers of tubes with detectable flaws of various types as a function of time, and (2) the distributions in size of these flaws. Results are provided for hypothetical severely affected, moderately affected and lightly affected units. Discussion is provided regarding uncertainties and assumptions in the data and analyses.

  9. Vertical Drop Of 21-Pwr Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mastilovic; A. Scheider; S.M. Bennett

    2001-01-29

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) Waste Package (WP) subjected to the 2-m vertical drop on an unyielding surface at three different temperatures. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities in two different WP components. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only.

  10. Evaluation of prompt nucleation of bubbles in annular fuel elements during the initial depressurization transient of a DEGB LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.C.

    1997-06-01

    In the first moments following the pipe break, of a DEGB LOCA, the depressurization wave is postulated to propagate rapidly through the system, in the manner of an acoustic or water hammer wave. this is immediately followed by a (reflected) repressurization wave, as the flow of coolant through the break is established. The pressure history is then dictated by the flow from the break and the ability of the pressurizer, pumps and accumulators to supply coolant. The initial sudden drop in pressure may result in the system pressure falling below the saturation pressure of the coolant. This could, in turn, result in bubble formation. Such immediate vapor formation (prompt nucleation of bubbles), in the period before the repressurization wave restores the system pressure to a level above the saturation pressure might initiate flow instability. Such an interruption in flow would allow the fuel tube clad temperature to increase rapidly. Depending on the duration of the flow interruption, the reactor might not be able to survive the initial moments of DEGB LOCA. It has generally been that this phenomenon would not actually occur in an operating reactor. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the possibility of occurrence of bubble formation as a result of initial depressurization. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700/sup 0/F).

  12. Characterization of PWR steam generator deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Varrin, R. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Restoring the thermal performance of the steam generators often requires the utility to remove deposits by expensive chemical means. This work demonstrates that careful characterization of secondary side deposit samples can reveal their chemical and physical properties which in turn contribute to an overall assessment of the need for and extent of steam generator inspection and maintenance. More specifically, knowledge of deposit characteristics can contribute to: (1) determination of the source of corrosion products, (2) assessment of feedwater chemistry control strategies, (3) prediction of rates of tube degradation, and (4) evaluation of degraded heat transfer performance or flow instabilities. Despite the relationships between deposits and steam generator operation and performance, few utilities elect to perform the types of characterizations which are suitable for the determination of the specific chemical and physical nature of their particular deposits. One of the principal goals of this document is to encourage utilities to consider deposit characterization an integral part of an overall effort to assess and maintain the material condition of the steam generators at their plant. This document includes a review of the nature of deposits and relates deposit characteristics to a variety of secondary side phenomena including corrosion and fouling. Candidate techniques for revealing relevant deposit properties are provided so that inferences regarding the role of deposits in promoting or causing these phenomena at their plant can be developed.

  13. VERA Core Simulator Methodology for PWR Cycle Depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, Brendan; Collins, Benjamin S; Jabaay, Daniel; Kim, Kang Seog; Graham, Aaron; Stimpson, Shane; Wieselquist, William A; Clarno, Kevin T; Palmtag, Scott; Downar, Thomas; Gehin, Jess C

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology developed and implemented in MPACT for performing high-fidelity pressurized water reactor (PWR) multi-cycle core physics calculations. MPACT is being developed primarily for application within the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) as one of the main components of the VERA Core Simulator, the others being COBRA-TF and ORIGEN. The methods summarized in this paper include a methodology for performing resonance self-shielding and computing macroscopic cross sections, 2-D/1-D transport, nuclide depletion, thermal-hydraulic feedback, and other supporting methods. These methods represent a minimal set needed to simulate high-fidelity models of a realistic nuclear reactor. Results demonstrating this are presented from the simulation of a realistic model of the first cycle of Watts Bar Unit 1. The simulation, which approximates the cycle operation, is observed to be within 50 ppm boron (ppmB) reactivity for all simulated points in the cycle and approximately 15 ppmB for a consistent statepoint. The verification and validation of the PWR cycle depletion capability in MPACT is the focus of two companion papers.

  14. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    V. Delabrosse

    2003-02-27

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1.

  15. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schmitt

    2005-08-29

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1.

  16. A computer program for assessment of emergency operation procedures under non-loca transient conditions in BWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ohga, Y.

    1983-06-01

    A program analyzing long-term transients after abnormal incidents, excluding loss-of-coolant accidents, has been developed to assess emergency operation procedures for cold shutdown of reactors. The main program features are: The thermal hydraulics in both the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the primary containment vessel (PCV) are treated. Analytical models of the cooling system are included for not only the emergency core cooling system but other cooling systems that are effective for RPV and PCV cooling. The on/off switching of cooling systems by plant interlocks, component failures, and operator actions is simulated. The applicability of this program has been evaluated by simulation of long-term thermal-hydraulic behavior of the boiling water reactor transients initiated by loss of feedwater. From the evaluation results, it has been confirmed that the main program models can assess emergency operation procedures.

  17. Summary report on optimized designs for shipping casks containing 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, or 10-year-old PWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1983-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop new conceptual designs for large Pb, Fe, and U-shielded spent fuel casks which have been optimized for the shipment of 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, or 10-year-old PWR spent fuel assemblies. Design specifications for about 100 cases of potential interest are presented along with a brief 20-page synopsis of the associated analyses. Optimized shielding requirements are presented for each type of cask as a function of the age of the spent fuel and the number of assemblies in the cask. With respect to criticality, a new type of inherently subcritical fuel assembly separator is described which uses hollow, borated stainless-steel tubes in the wall-forming structure between the assemblies. Steady-state and transient heat transfer analyses for casks under nominal and accident conditions were performed using the SCOPE code for Shipping Cask Optimization and Parametric Evaluation. Based on criticality, shielding, and heat transfer considerations, it appears that optimized cask designs could be developed to carry 15 to 18 five-year-old PWR fuel assemblies or as many as 18 to 21 ten-year-old PWR fuel assemblies. 4 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  19. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  20. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Favalli, Andrea; Grogan, Brandon R.; Jansson, Peter; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Mozin, Vladimir; Hu, Jianwei; Schwalbach, P.; Sjoland, A.; et al

    2016-07-17

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detectmore » the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. As a result, to compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.« less

  1. Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

    1981-09-15

    This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

  2. Identification and evaluation of PWR in-vessel severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Dukelow, J S; Harrison, D G; Morgenstern, M

    1992-03-01

    This reports documents work performed the NRC/RES Accident Management Guidance Program to evaluate possible strategies for mitigating the consequences of PWR severe accidents. The selection and evaluation of strategies was limited to the in-vessel phase of the severe accident, i.e., after the initiation of core degradation and prior to RPV failure. A parallel project at BNL has been considering strategies applicable to the ex-vessel phase of PWR severe accidents.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF CABLE AGING USING CONDITION MONITORING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    GROVE,E.; LOFARO,R.; SOO,P.; VILLARAN,M.; HSU,F.

    2000-04-06

    Electric cables in nuclear power plants suffer degradation during service as a result of the thermal and radiation environments in which they are installed. Instrumentation and control cables are one type of cable that provide an important role in reactor safety. Should the polymeric cable insulation material become embrittled and cracked during service, or during a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) and when steam and high radiation conditions are anticipated, failure could occur and prevent the cables from fulfilling their intended safety function(s). A research program is being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to evaluate condition monitoring (CM) techniques for estimating the amount of cable degradation experienced during in-plant service. The objectives of this program are to assess the ability of the cables to perform under a simulated LOCA without losing their ability to function effectively, and to identify CM techniques which may be used to determine the effective lifetime of cables. The cable insulation materials tested include ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE). Accelerated aging (thermal and radiation) to the equivalent of 40 years of service was performed, followed by exposure to simulated LOCA conditions. The effectiveness of chemical, electrical, and mechanical condition monitoring techniques are being evaluated. Results indicate that several of these methods can detect changes in material parameters with increasing age. However, each has its limitations, and a combination of methods may provide an effective means for trending cable degradation in order to assess the remaining life of cables.

  4. Sensitivity Analyses in Small Break LOCA with HPI-Failure: Effect of Break-Size in Secondary-Side Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Ikuo; Torige, Toshihide; Yamada, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    In the case of total failure of the high pressure injection (HPI) system following small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR), the break size is so small that the primary system does not depressurize to the accumulator (ACC) injection pressure before the core is uncovered extensively. Therefore, steam generator (SG) secondary-side depressurization is necessary as an accident management in order to grant accumulator system actuation and core reflood. A thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP5/MOD3 was made on SBLOCA with HPI-failure for Oi Units 3/4 operated by Kansai Electoric Power Co., which are conventional 4 loop PWR plants. The effectiveness of SG secondary-side depressurization procedure was investigated for the real plant design and operational characteristics. The sensitivity analyses using RELAP5/MOD3.2 showed that the accident management was effective for a wide range of break sizes, various orientations and positions. The critical break can be 3 inch cold-leg bottom break.

  5. Integrated Radiation Transport and Thermo-Mechanics Simulation of a PWR Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Clarno, Kevin T; Hamilton, Steven P; Philip, Bobby; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Berrill, Mark A; Barai, Pallab; Banfield, James E

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) Nuclear Fuel Performance code (AMPFuel) is focused on predicting the temperature and strain within a nuclear fuel assembly to evaluate the performance and safety of existing and advanced nuclear fuel bundles within existing and advanced nuclear reactors. AMPFuel was extended to include an integrated nuclear fuel assembly capability for (one-way) coupled radiation transport and nuclear fuel assembly thermo-mechanics. This capability is the initial step towards incorporating an improved predictive nuclear fuel assembly modeling capability to accurately account for source terms, such as the neutron flux distribution, coolant conditions, and assembly mechanical stresses, of traditional (single-pin) nuclear fuel performance simulation. AMPFuel was used to model an entire 17 x 17 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly with many of the features resolved in three dimensions (for thermo-mechanics and/or neutronics), including the fuel, gap, and cladding of each of the 264 fuel pins, the 25 guide tubes, top and bottom structural regions, and the upper and lower (neutron) reflector regions. The final full-assembly calculation was executed on Jaguar (Cray XT5) at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility using 40,000 cores in under 10 hours to model over 162 billion degrees of freedom for 10 loading steps.

  6. Modern Fuel Cladding in Demanding Operation - ZIRLO in Full Life High Lithium PWR Coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kargol, Kenneth; Stevens, Jim; Bosma, John; Iyer, Jayashri; Wikmark, Gunnar

    2007-07-01

    There is an increasing demand to optimize the PWR water chemistry in order to minimize activity build-up in the plants and to avoid CIPS and other fuel related issues. Operation with a constant pH between 7.2 and 7.4 is generally considered an important part in achieving the optimized water chemistry. The extended long cycles currently used in most of the U.S. PWRs implies that the lithium concentration at BOC will be outside the general operating experience with such a coolant chemistry regime. With the purpose to extend the experience of high lithium coolant operation, such water chemistry has been used in a few PWRs, i.e. CPSES Unit 2 and Diablo Canyon Units 1 and 2, all with ZIRLO{sup TM} cladding. Operation with a lithium concentration up to 4.2 ppm does not show any impact of the elevated lithium, while operation with up to 6 ppm possibly produce some limited corrosion acceleration in the region of sub-nucleate boiling but has no detrimental impact under the conditions limited by current operating experience. (authors)

  7. Decay heat removal systems: design criteria and options. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Design criteria and alternate decay heat removal system concepts which have evolved in several different countries throughout the world were compared. The conclusion was reached that the best way to improve the reliability of pressurized water reactor (PWR) decay heat removal is first to focus on improving the reliability of the auxiliary feedwater and high pressure injection systems to cope with certain loss of feedwater transients and small loss of coolant accidents and then to assess how well these systems can handle special emergencies (e.g., sabotage, earthquake, airplane crash). For boiling water reactors (BWRs), it was concluded that emphasis should be placed first on improving the reliability of the residual heat removal and high pressure service water systems to cope with a loss of suppression pool cooling following a loss of feedwater transient and then to assess how well these systems can handle special emergencies. It was found that, for both PWRs and BWRs, a design objective for alternate decay heat removal systems should be at least an order of magnitude reduction in core meltdown probability.

  8. Experience in PWR and BWR mixed-oxide fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, G.J.; Krebs, W.; Urban, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Germany has adopted the strategy of a closed fuel cycle using reprocessing and recycling. The central issue today is plutonium recycling by the use of U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). The design of MOX fuel assemblies and fuel management in MOX-containing cores are strongly influenced by the nuclear properties of the plutonium isotopes. Optimized MOX fuel assembly designs for PWRs currently use up to three types of MOX fuel rods having different plutonium contents with natural uranium or uranium tailings as carrier material but without burnable absorbers. The MOX fuel assembly designs for BWRs use four to six rod types with different plutonium contents and Gd[sub 2]O[sub 3]/UO[sub 2] burnable absorber rods. Both the PWR and the BWR designs attain good burnup equivalence and compatibility with uranium fuel assemblies. High flexibility exists in the loading schemes relative to the position and number of MOX fuel assemblies in the reloads and in the core as a whole. The Siemens experience with MOX fuel assemblies is based on the insertion of 318 MOX fuel assemblies in eight PWRs and 168 in BWRs and pressurized heavy water reactors so far. The primary operating results include information on the cycle length, power distribution, reactivity coefficients, and control rod worth of cores containing MOX fuel assemblies.

  9. Effect of temperature and dissolved hydrogen on oxide films formed on Ni and Alloy 182 in simulated PWR water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, R.; Bosch, R.-W.; Van Renterghem, W.; Vankeerberghen, M.; de Araújo Figueiredo, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alloy 182 is a nickel-based weld metal, which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water. It shows a peak in SCC susceptibility at a certain temperature and hydrogen concentration. This peak is related to the electrochemical condition where the Ni to NiO transition takes place. One hypothesis is that the oxide layer at this condition is not properly developed and so the material is not optimally protected against SCC. Therefore the oxide layer formed on Alloy 182 is investigated as a function of the dissolved hydrogen concentration and temperature around this Ni/NiO transition. Exposure tests were performed with Alloy 182 and Ni coupons in a PWR environment at temperatures between 300 °C and 345 °C and dissolved hydrogen concentration between 5 and 35 cc (STP)H2/kg. Post-test analysis of the formed oxide layers were carried out by SEM, EDS and XPS. The exposure tests with Ni coupons showed that the Ni/NiO transition curve is at a higher temperature than the curve based on thermodynamic calculations. The exposure tests with Alloy 182 showed that oxide layers were present at all temperatures, but that the morphology changed from spinel crystals to needle like oxides when the Ni/NiO transition curve was approached. Oxide layers were present below the Ni/NiO transition curve i.e. when the Ni coupon was still free of oxides. In addition an evolved slip dissolution model was proposed that could explain the observed experimental results and the peak in SCC susceptibility for Ni-based alloys around the Ni/NiO transition.

  10. TRACG prediction of gravity-driven cooling system response in the SBWR/GIST facility LOCA tests

    SciTech Connect

    Alamgir, M.; Andersen, J.G.M.; Yang, A.I.; Shiralkar, B.S. )

    1990-01-01

    General Electric (BE) Nuclear Energy has initiated work on technology programs in support of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) plants under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Work has been performed under the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWT) design verification program and the simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) program. The objective of the SBWR program is to develop the key features of a simplified reactor design. The gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) is an important feature of the SBWR design. The main objectives of the GDCS test program at GE were to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the GDCS concept by performing a section-scaled integrated systems test of the SBWR design and to provide a data base to qualify the TRACG computer code for use in SBWR accident analysis. This paper describes the qualification of TRACG for GDCS applications. The calculational capability and analytical models of TRACG are tested by performing assessment analysis for five loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) tests in the GDCS Integrated Systems Test (GIST) facility. The results of the qualification comparisons are presented and TRACG application ranges are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

  12. Simulating the Effect on Criticality of Simultaneous Matrix Degradation and Assembly Collapse for the 21 PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Alsaed

    1999-09-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the effects of fission products loss on the reactivity of commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in 21 PWR waste packages (WPs) in the event of simultaneous fuel matrix degradation and assembly collapse.

  13. Assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD2. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Putney, J.M.; Preece, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 is presented. The assessment is based on a review of code assessment calculations performed in the UK and elsewhere, detailed calculations against a series of commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR and analytical investigations of the phenomena involved in normal and abnormal SG operation. A number of modelling deficiencies are identified and their implications for PWR safety analysis are discussed -- including methods for compensating for the deficiencies through changes to the input deck. Consideration is also given as to whether the deficiencies will still be present in the successor code RELAP5/MOD3.

  14. Study on Equilibrium Characteristics of Thorium-Plutonium-Minor Actinides Mixed Oxides Fuel in PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Waris, A.; Permana, S.; Kurniadi, R.; Su'ud, Z.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-22

    A study on characteristics of thorium-plutonium-minor actinides utilization in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the equilibrium burnup model has been conducted. For a comprehensive evaluation, several fuel cycles scenario have been included in the present study with the variation of moderator-to-fuel volume ratio (MFR) of PWR core design. The results obviously exhibit that the neutron spectra grow to be harder with decreasing of the MFR. Moreover, the neutron spectra also turn into harder with the rising number of confined heavy nuclides. The required {sup 233}U concentration for criticality of reactor augments with the increasing of MFR for all heavy nuclides confinement and thorium and uranium confinement in PWR.

  15. Cavitation and two-phase flow characteristics of SRPR (Savannah River Plant Reactor) pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The possible head degradation of the SRPR pumps may be attributable to two independent phenomena, one due to the inception of cavitation and the other due to the two-phase flow phenomena. The head degradation due to the appearance of cavitation on the pump blade is hardly likely in the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) since the coolant circulating line is highly pressurized so that the cavitation is difficult to occur even at LOCA (loss of coolant accident) conditions. On the other hand, the suction pressure of SRPR pump is order-of-magnitude smaller than that of PWR so that the cavitation phenomena, may prevail, should LOCA occur, depending on the extent of LOCA condition. In this study, therefore, both cavitation phenomena and two-phase flow phenomena were investigated for the SRPR pump by using various analytical tools and the numerical results are presented herein.

  16. Parametric Study of Control Rod Exposure for PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.E.

    2001-07-20

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends the use of analyses that provide an ''adequate representation of the physics'' and notes particular concern with the ''need to consider the more reactive actinide compositions of fuels burned with fixed absorbers or with control rods fully or partly inserted.'' In the absence of readily available information on the extent of control rod (CR) usage in U.S. PWRs and the subsequent reactivity effect of CR exposure on discharged SNF, NRC staff have indicated a need for greater understanding in these areas. In response, this paper presents results of a parametric study of the effect of CR exposure on the reactivity of discharged SNF for various CR designs (including Axial Power Shaping Rods), fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions (i.e., burnup and axial insertion). The study is performed in two parts. In the first part, two-dimensional calculations are performed, effectively assuming full axial CR insertion. These calculations are intended to bound the effect of CR exposure and facilitate comparisons of the various CR designs. In the second part, three-dimensional calculations are performed to determine the effect of various axial insertion conditions and gain a better understanding of reality. The results from the study demonstrate that the reactivity effect increases with increasing CR exposure (e.g., burnup) and decreasing initial fuel enrichment (for a fixed burnup). Additionally, the results show that even for significant burnup exposures, minor axial CR insertions (e.g., < 20 cm) result in an insignificant effect on the k{sub eff} of a spent fuel cask.

  17. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K; Sung, Yixing; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Xu, Yiban; Cao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  18. WG-MOX Fuel Zr-tube Neutron Spectrum Comparison in ATR and PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2005-02-01

    An experiment containing WG-MOX fuel has been designed and irradiated from 1998 to 2004 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Important neutronics parameters were computed using novel Monte Carlo methods. The purpose of this summary is to compare the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide fuel (WG-MOX) Zr-tube’s neutron spectrum in ATR and PWR. The results indicate that the Zrtube’s neutron spectrum in ATR are softer than in PWR.

  19. WESTINGHOUSE 17X17 MOX PWR ASSEMBLY - WASTE PACKAGE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Davis

    1996-07-15

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to compare the criticality potential of Westinghouse 17 x 17 mixed oxide (MOX) PWR fuel with the Design Basis spent nuclear fuel (SNF) analyzed previously (Ref. 5.1, 5.2). The basis of comparison will be the conceptual design Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) PWR waste package concepts. The objectives of this evaluation are to show that the criticality potential of the MOX fuel is equal to or lower than the DBF or, if necessary, indicate what additional measures are required to make it so.

  20. Categorization of PWR accident sequences and guidelines for fault trees: seismic initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1984-09-01

    This study developed a set of dominant accident sequences that could be applied generically to domestic commercial PWRs as a standardized basis for a probabilistic seismic risk assessment. This was accomplished by ranking the Zion 1 accident sequences. The pertinent PWR safety systems were compared on a plant-by-plant basis to determine the applicability of the dominant accident sequences of Zion 1 to other PWR plants. The functional event trees were developed to describe the system functions that must work or not work in order for a certain accident sequence to happen, one for pipe breaks and one for transients.

  1. Geochemical and Hydrologic Controls of Copper-Rich Surface Waters in the Yerba Loca-Mapocho System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten, P.; Montecinos, M.; Coquery, M.; Pizarro, G. E.; Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Andean watersheds in Northern and Central Chile are naturally enriched with metals, many of them associated to sulfide mineralizations related to copper mining districts. The natural and anthropogenic influx of toxic metals into drinking water sources pose a sustainability challenge for cities that need to provide safe water with the smallest footprint. This work presents our study of the transformations of copper in the Yerba Loca-Mapocho system. Our sampling campaign started from the headwaters at La Paloma Glacier and continues to the inlet of the San Enrique drinking water treatment plant, a system feeding municipalities in the Eastern area of Santiago, Chile. Depending on the season, total copper concentrations go as high as 22 mg/L for the upper sections, which become diluted to <5 mg/L downstream. pH ranged from 3 to 5.6 while suspended solids ranged from <10 to 100 mg/L. We used Geochemist Workbench to assess copper speciation and to evaluate the thermodynamic controls for the formation and dissolution of solid phases. A sediment trap was used to concentrate suspended particulate matter, which was analyzed with ICP-MS, TXRF (total reflection X ray fluorescence) and XRD (X-ray diffraction). Major elements detected in the precipitates were Al (200 g/kg), S (60 g/kg), and Cu (6 g/kg). Likely solid phases include hydrous amorphous phases of aluminum hydroxides and sulfates, and copper hydroxides/carbonates. Efforts are undergoing to find the optimal mixing ratios between the acidic stream and more alkaline streams to maximize attenuation of dissolved copper. The results of this research could be used for enhancing in-stream natural attenuation of copper and reducing treatment needs at the drinking water facility. Acknowledgements to Fondecyt 1130936 and Conicyt Fondap 15110020

  2. Experimental investigation on circumferential and axial temperature gradient over fuel channel under LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ashwini Kumar; kumar, Ravi; Gupta, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, Barun; Mukhopadhyay, Deb; Lele, H. G.

    2014-06-01

    In a nuclear reactor temperature rises drastically in fuel channels under loss of coolant accident due to failure of primary heat transportation system. Present investigation has been carried out to capture circumferential and axial temperature gradients during fully and partially voiding conditions in a fuel channel using 19 pin fuel element simulator. A series of experiments were carried out by supplying power to outer, middle and center rods of 19 pin fuel simulator in ratio of 1.4:1.1:1. The temperature at upper periphery of pressure tube (PT) was slightly higher than at bottom due to increase in local equivalent thermal conductivity from top to bottom of PT. To simulate fully voided conditions PT was pressurized at 2.0 MPa pressure with 17.5 kW power injection. Ballooning initiated from center and then propagates towards the ends and hence axial temperature difference has been observed along the length of PT. For asymmetric heating, upper eight rods of fuel simulator were activated and temperature difference up-to 250 °C has been observed from top to bottom periphery of PT. Such situation creates steep circumferential temperature gradient over PT and could lead to breaching of PT under high pressure.

  3. International experience with a multidisciplinary table top exercise for response to a PWR accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1996-06-01

    Table Top Exercises are used for the training of emergency response personnel from a wide range of disciplines whose duties range from strategic to tactical, from managerial to operational. The exercise reported in this paper simulates the first two or three hours of an imaginary accident on a generic PWR site (named Seaside or Lakeside depending on its location). It is designed to exercise the early response of staff of the utility, government, local authority and the media and some players represent the public. The relatively few scenarios used for this exercise are based on actual events scaled to give off-site consequences which demand early assessment and therefore stress the communication procedures. The exercise is applicable in different cultures and has been used in over 20 short courses held in the USA, UK, Sweden, Prague, and Hong Kong. There are two styles of support for players: a linear program which ensures that all players follow the desired path through the event and an open program which is triggered by umpires (who play the reactor crew from a script) and by requests from other players. In both cases the exercise ends with a Press Conference. Players have an initial briefing and are assigned to roles; those who must speak at interviews and at the Press Conference arc given separate briefing by an expert in Public Affairs. The exercise runs with up to six groups and the communication rate reaches about 30 to 40 messages per hour for each group. The exercise can be applied to test management and communication systems and to study human response to emergencies because the merits of individual players are highlighted in the relatively stressful conditions of the initial stage of an accident. For some players the exercise is the first time that they have been required to carry out their task in front of other people.

  4. Development of the ACP safeguards neutron counter for PWR spent fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Menlove, Howard O.; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2008-04-01

    An advanced neutron multiplicity counter has been developed for measuring spent fuel in the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The counter uses passive neutron multiplicity counting to measure the 244Cm content in spent fuel. The input to the ACP process is spent fuel from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and the high intensity of the gamma-ray exposure from spent fuel requires a careful design of the counter to measure the neutrons without gamma-ray interference. The nuclear safeguards for the ACP facility requires the measurement of the spent fuel input to the process and the Cm/Pu ratio for the plutonium mass accounting. This paper describes the first neutron counter that has been used to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution from spent fuel rods. Using multiple samples of PWR spent fuel rod-cuts, the singles (S), doubles (D), and triples (T) rates of the neutron distribution for the 244Cm nuclide were measured and calibration curves were produced. MCNPX code simulations were also performed to obtain the three counting rates and to compare them with the measurement results. The neutron source term was evaluated by using the ORIGEN-ARP code. The results showed systematic difference of 21-24% in the calibration graphs between the measured and simulation results. A possible source of the difference is that the burnup codes have a 244Cm uncertainty greater than ±15% and it would be systematic for all of the calibration samples. The S/D and D/T ratios are almost constant with an increment of the 244Cm mass, and this indicates that the bias is in the 244Cm neutron source calculation using the ORIGEN-ARP source code. The graphs of S/D and D/T ratios show excellent agreement between measurement and MCNPX simulation results.

  5. Performance evaluation of two-stage fuel cycle from SFR to PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, T.; Hoffman, E.A.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.

    2013-07-01

    One potential fuel cycle option being considered is a two-stage fuel cycle system involving the continuous recycle of transuranics in a fast reactor and the use of bred plutonium in a thermal reactor. The first stage is a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel cycle with metallic U-TRU-Zr fuel. The SFRs need to have a breeding ratio greater than 1.0 in order to produce fissile material for use in the second stage. The second stage is a PWR fuel cycle with uranium and plutonium mixed oxide fuel based on the design and performance of the current state-of-the-art commercial PWRs with an average discharge burnup of 50 MWd/kgHM. This paper evaluates the possibility of this fuel cycle option and discusses its fuel cycle performance characteristics. The study focuses on an equilibrium stage of the fuel cycle. Results indicate that, in order to avoid a positive coolant void reactivity feedback in the stage-2 PWR, the reactor requires high quality of plutonium from the first stage and minor actinides in the discharge fuel of the PWR needs to be separated and sent back to the stage-1 SFR. The electricity-sharing ratio between the 2 stages is 87.0% (SFR) to 13.0% (PWR) for a TRU inventory ratio (the mass of TRU in the discharge fuel divided by the mass of TRU in the fresh fuel) of 1.06. A sensitivity study indicated that by increasing the TRU inventory ratio to 1.13, The electricity generation fraction of stage-2 PWR is increased to 28.9%. The two-stage fuel cycle system considered in this study was found to provide a high uranium utilization (>80%). (authors)

  6. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  7. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria

  8. DOSE RATES FOR WESTINGHOUSE 17X17 MOX PWR SNF IN A WASTE PACKAGE (SCPB: N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    T.L. Lotz

    1997-01-29

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to estimate the dose rate on and near the surface a Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) PWR waste package (WP) which is loaded with Westinghouse 17 x 17 mixed oxide (MOX) PWR fuel. The 21 PWR MPC WP is used to provide an upper bound for waste package designs since the 12 PWR MPC WP will have a smaller source term and an equivalent amount of shielding. the objectives of this evaluation are to calculate the requested dose rate(s) and document the calculation in a fashion to allow comparisons to other waste forms and WP designs at a future time.

  9. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy.

  10. Optimization of small long-life PWR based on thorium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Subkhi, Moh Nurul; Suud, Zaki Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-30

    A conceptual design of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium fuel has been investigated in neutronic aspect. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.2, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in three-dimension X-Y-Z geometry of core by COREBN. The excess reactivity of thorium nitride with ZIRLO cladding is considered during 5 years of burnup without refueling. Optimization of 350 MWe long life PWR based on 5% {sup 233}U & 2.8% {sup 231}Pa, 6% {sup 233}U & 2.8% {sup 231}Pa and 7% {sup 233}U & 6% {sup 231}Pa give low excess reactivity.

  11. Safety analysis of B and W Standard PWR using thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Uotinen, V.O.; Carroll, W.P.; Jones, H.M.; Toops, E.C.

    1980-06-01

    A study was performed to assess the safety and licenseability of the Babcock and Wilcox standard 205-fuel assembly PWR when it is fueled with three types of thoria-based fuels denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, denatured (/sup 235//U/sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, and (Th-Pu)O/sub 2/. Selected transients were analyzed using typical PWR safety analysis calculational methods. The results support the conclusion that it is feasible from a safety standpoint to utilize either of the denatured urania-thoria fuels in the standard B and W plant. In addition, it appears that the use of thoria-plutonia fuels would probably also be feasible. These tentative conclusions depend on a data that is more limited than that available for UO/sub 2/ fuels.

  12. Optimization of small long-life PWR based on thorium fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subkhi, Moh Nurul; Suud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-09-01

    A conceptual design of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium fuel has been investigated in neutronic aspect. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.2, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in three-dimension X-Y-Z geometry of core by COREBN. The excess reactivity of thorium nitride with ZIRLO cladding is considered during 5 years of burnup without refueling. Optimization of 350 MWe long life PWR based on 5% 233U & 2.8% 231Pa, 6% 233U & 2.8% 231Pa and 7% 233U & 6% 231Pa give low excess reactivity.

  13. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subkhi, M. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2014-09-01

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higer conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of 233U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation.

  14. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Subkhi, M. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2014-09-30

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higher conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of {sup 233}U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation.

  15. MC21 analysis of the MIT PWR benchmark: Hot zero power results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly Iii, D. J.; Aviles, B. N.; Herman, B. R.

    2013-07-01

    MC21 Monte Carlo results have been compared with hot zero power measurements from an operating pressurized water reactor (PWR), as specified in a new full core PWR performance benchmark from the MIT Computational Reactor Physics Group. Included in the comparisons are axially integrated full core detector measurements, axial detector profiles, control rod bank worths, and temperature coefficients. Power depressions from grid spacers are seen clearly in the MC21 results. Application of Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration within MC21 has been accomplished, resulting in a significant reduction of inactive batches necessary to converge the fission source. CMFD acceleration has also been shown to work seamlessly with the Uniform Fission Site (UFS) variance reduction method. (authors)

  16. A Critical Review of Practice of Equating the Reactivity of Spent Fuel to Fresh Fuel in Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses for PWR Spent Fuel Pool Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Parks, C.V.

    2000-09-01

    This research examines the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to that of fresh fuel for the purpose of performing burnup credit criticality safety analyses for PWR spent fuel pool (SFP) storage conditions. The investigation consists of comparing k{sub inf} estimates based on reactivity equivalent fresh fuel enrichment (REFFE) to k{sub inf} estimates using the actual spent fuel isotopics. Analyses of selected storage configurations common in PWR SFPs show that this practice yields nonconservative results (on the order of a few tenths of a percent) in configurations in which the spent fuel is adjacent to higher-reactivity assemblies (e.g., fresh or lower-burned assemblies) and yields conservative results in configurations in which spent fuel is adjacent to lower-reactivity assemblies (e.g., higher-burned fuel or empty cells). When the REFFE is determined based on unborated water moderation, analyses for storage conditions with soluble boron present reveal significant nonconservative results associated with the use of the REFFE. This observation is considered to be important, especially considering the recent allowance of credit for soluble boron up to 5% in reactivity. Finally, it is shown that the practice of equating the reactivity of spent fuel to fresh fuel is acceptable, provided the conditions for which the REFFE was determined remain unchanged. Determination of the REFFE for a reference configuration and subsequent use of the REFFE for different configurations violates the basis used for the determination of the REFFE and, thus, may lead to inaccurate, and possibly, nonconservative estimates of reactivity. A significant concentration ({approximately}2000 ppm) of soluble boron is typically (but not necessarily required to be) present in PWR SFPs, of which only a portion ({le} 500 ppm) may be credited in safety analyses. Thus, a large subcritical margin currently exists that more than accounts for errors or uncertainties associated with the use of

  17. Radiation dose rates from commercial PWR and BWR spent fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, C.E.

    1981-10-01

    Data on measurements of gamma dose rates from commercial reactor spent fuel were collected, and documented calculated gamma dose rates were reviewed. As part of this study, the gamma dose rate from spent fuel was estimated, using computational techniques similar to previous investigations into this problem. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates provided a recommended dose rate in air versus distance curve for PWR spent fuel.

  18. Some Aspects of Cost/ Benefit Analysis for In-Service Inspection of PWR Steam Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Zima, G. E.; Lyon, G. H.; Doctor, P. G.; Hoenes, G. R.; Petty, S. E.; Weakley, S. A.

    1981-05-01

    This report discusses a number of aspects of cost/benefit (C/B) analysis for in-service inspection (lSI} of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs) and identifies several problem areas that must be addressed prior to a full C/B analysis capability. Following a brief review of the impact of SG problems on the productivity of PWR units and of the scope and variability of SG problems among U.S. PWRs, various occupational implications of SG lSI are considered, namely manpower, time, and rad exposure. The opportunities provided by refueling outages in respect to lSI frequency and work time windows are reviewed. Indices for characterizing the nondestructive testing {NDT) information, rad exposure, $ impact, and manpower and time attributes of single ISIs and a series of ISIs over an arbitrary evaluation period are presented and calculated for a number of lSI cases using SG parameters for three typical PWR units. A comparison of the $ impact of unscheduled outages attributable to SG problems with the $ cost of ambitious lSI strategies indicates that the $ cost is virtually negligible for well-planned ISis. Considering the ALARA constraint on occupational rad exposure, the skilled manpower pool for NDT work appears to be the principal factor limiting lSI scope and frequency. Analysis of the manpower and time requirements for inspection of a 40-unit PWR population indicates, however, that an lSI strategy embodying two campaigns per year and a total population inspection within a 2-year interval is not far beyond current capabilities.

  19. Calculation of the radionuclides in PWR spent fuel samples for SFR experiment planning.

    SciTech Connect

    Naegeli, Robert Earl

    2004-06-01

    This report documents the calculation of radionuclide content in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel samples planned for use in the Spent Fuel Ratio (SPR) Experiments at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL) to aid in experiment planning. The calculation methods using the ORIGEN2 and ORIGEN-ARP computer codes and the input modeling of the planned PWR spent fuel from the H. B. Robinson and the Surry nuclear power plants are discussed. The safety hazards for the calculated nuclide inventories in the spent fuel samples are characterized by the potential airborne dose and by the portion of the nuclear facility hazard category 2 and 3 thresholds that the experiment samples would present. In addition, the gamma ray photon energy source for the nuclide inventories is tabulated to facilitate subsequent calculation of the direct and shielded dose rates expected from the samples. The relative hazards of the high burnup 72 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU) spent fuel from H. B. Robinson and the medium burnup 36 GWd/MTU spent fuel from Surry are compared against a parametric calculation of various fuel burnups to assess the potential for higher hazard PWR fuel samples.

  20. PWR ENDF/B-VII cross-section libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, C.; Ilas, G.

    2012-07-01

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% {sup 235}U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time. (authors)

  1. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal.

  2. Linking Grain Boundary Microstructure to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cold Rolled Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2012-10-01

    Grain boundary microstructures and microchemistries are examined in cold-rolled alloy 690 tubing and plate materials and comparisons are made to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in PWR primary water. Chromium carbide precipitation is found to be a key aspect for materials in both the mill annealed and thermally treated conditions. Cold rolling to high levels of reduction was discovered to produce small IG voids and cracked carbides in alloys with a high density of grain boundary carbides. The degree of permanent grain boundary damage from cold rolling was found to depend directly on the initial IG carbide distribution. For the same degree of cold rolling, alloys with few IG precipitates exhibited much less permanent damage. Although this difference in grain boundary damage appears to correlate with measured SCC growth rates, crack tip examinations reveal that cracked carbides appeared to blunt propagation of IGSCC cracks in many cases. Preliminary results suggest that the localized grain boundary strains and stresses produced during cold rolling promote IGSCC susceptibility and not the cracked carbides and voids.

  3. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  4. Demonstration of a noise-surveillance system at a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The automated surveillance system has monitored the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant during its first fuel cycle. The system was able to acceptably adapt to different plant operating conditions. While evaluations are still ongoing, results indicate that the system was able to adapt to signals with different statistical character and that the discriminants are useful in detecting spectral changes. The system monitored long-term noise behavior, detected spectra that differ from what is considered normal, and provided concise storage of spectra together with the plant operating condition associated with the stored spectra.

  5. A Study on the Conceptual Design of a 1,500 MWe Passive PWR with Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kwi Lim Lee; Soon Heung Chang

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the preliminary conceptual design of a 1500 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) with annular fuel has been performed. This design is derived from the AP1000 which is a 1000 MWe PWR with two-loop. However, the present design is a 1500 MWe PWR with three-loop, passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications to enhance the construction, operation, and maintenance. The preliminary design parameters of this reactor have been determined through simple relation to those of AP1000 for reactor, reactor coolant system, and passive safety injection system. Using the MATRA code, we analyze the core designs for two alternatives on fuel assembly types: solid fuel and annular fuel. The performance of reactor cooling systems is evaluated through the accident of the cold leg break in the core makeup tank loop by using MARS2.1 code. This study presents the developmental strategy, preliminary design parameters and safety analysis results. (authors)

  6. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

  7. PWR Facility Dose Modeling Using MCNP5 and the CADIS/ADVANTG Variance-Reduction Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward D; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C; Murphy, Brian D; Mueller, Don

    2007-09-01

    The feasibility of modeling a pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) facility and calculating dose rates at all locations within the containment and adjoining structures using MCNP5 with mesh tallies is presented. Calculations of dose rates resulting from neutron and photon sources from the reactor (operating and shut down for various periods) and the spent fuel pool, as well as for the photon source from the primary coolant loop, were all of interest. Identification of the PWR facility, development of the MCNP-based model and automation of the run process, calculation of the various sources, and development of methods for visually examining mesh tally files and extracting dose rates were all a significant part of the project. Advanced variance reduction, which was required because of the size of the model and the large amount of shielding, was performed via the CADIS/ADVANTG approach. This methodology uses an automatically generated three-dimensional discrete ordinates model to calculate adjoint fluxes from which MCNP weight windows and source bias parameters are generated. Investigative calculations were performed using a simple block model and a simplified full-scale model of the PWR containment, in which the adjoint source was placed in various regions. In general, it was shown that placement of the adjoint source on the periphery of the model provided adequate results for regions reasonably close to the source (e.g., within the containment structure for the reactor source). A modification to the CADIS/ADVANTG methodology was also studied in which a global adjoint source is weighted by the reciprocal of the dose response calculated by an earlier forward discrete ordinates calculation. This method showed improved results over those using the standard CADIS/ADVANTG approach, and its further investigation is recommended for future efforts.

  8. SCALE 5.1 Predictions of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Gauld, Ian C; Ilas, Germina

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this calculation report is to document the comparison to measurement of the isotopic concentrations for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel determined with the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 5.1 (Ref. ) epletion calculation method. Specifically, the depletion computer code and the cross-section library being evaluated are the twodimensional (2-D) transport and depletion module, TRITON/NEWT,2, 3 and the 44GROUPNDF5 (Ref. 4) cross-section library, respectively, in the SCALE .1 code system.

  9. Application of LBB to high energy piping systems in operating PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    The amendment to General Design Criterion 4 allows exclusion, from the design basis, of dynamic effects associated with high energy pipe rupture by application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology. This new approach has resulted in substantial financial savings to utilities when applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary loop piping and auxiliary piping systems made of stainless steel material. To date majority of applications pertain to piping systems in operating plants. Various steps of evaluation associated with the LBB application to an operating plant are described in this paper.

  10. Thermal Response of the 21-PWR Waste Package to a Fire Accident

    SciTech Connect

    F.P. Faucher; H. Marr; M.J. Anderson

    2000-10-03

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the thermal response of the 21-PWR WP (pressurized water reactor waste package) to the regulatory fire event. The scope of this calculation is limited to the two-dimensional waste package temperature calculations to support the waste package design. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation (Attachment IV) is that of the potential design of the type of waste package considered in this calculation. The procedure AP-3.12Q.Calculations (Reference 1), and the Development Plan (Reference 24) are used to develop this calculation.

  11. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Don E.; Marshall, William J.; Wagner, John C.; Bowen, Douglas G.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  12. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  13. HSST pressurized-thermal-shock experiment, PTSE-1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.H.; Bass, B.R.; Robinson, G.C.; Merkle, J.G.; Whitman, G.D.; Pugh, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The first pressurized-thermal-shock experiment (PTSE-1) in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is the most recent of a long successtion of fracture-mechanics experiments that are on a scale that allows important aspects of fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessels to be simulated. Such experiments are the means by which theoretical models of fracture behavior can be evaluated for possible aplication to fracture analysis of vessels in nuclear plants. The principal issues of concern in the pressurized-thermal-shock experiments are: (1) warm prestressing phenomena, (2) crack propagation from brittle to ductile regions, (3) transient crack stabilization in ductile regions, and (4) crack shape changes in bimetallic zones of clad vessels. PTSE-1 was designed to investigate the first three issues under conditions relevant to a flawed reactor vessel during an overcooling accident.

  14. End effects on elbows subjected to moment loadings. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    So-called end effects for moment loadings on short-radius and long-radius butt welding elbows of various arc lengths are investigated with a view toward providing more accurate design formulas for critical piping systems. Data developed in this study, along with published information, were used to develop relatively simple design equations for elbows attached at both ends to long sections of straight pipe. These formulas are the basis for an alternate ASME Code procedure for evaluating the bending moment stresses in Class 1 nuclear piping (ASME Code Case N-319). The more complicated problems of elbows with other end conditions, e.g., flanges at one or both ends, are also considered. Comparisons of recently published experimental and theoretical studies with current industrial code design rules for these situations indicate that these rules also need to be improved.

  15. Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

    2008-12-24

    by the operator or any prior knowledge of the spent fuel assembly. The device can also be operated without any movement of the spent fuel from its storage position. Based on parametric studies conducted via computer simulation, the device should be able to detect diversion of as low as ten percent of the missing or replaced fuel from an assembly regardless of the location of the missing fuel within the assembly, of the cooling time, initial fuel enrichment or burnup levels. Conditions in the spent fuel pool such as clarity of the water or boron content are also not issues for this device. The shape of the base signature is principally dependent on the layout of the guide tubes in the various types of PWR fuel assemblies and perturbations in the form of replaced fuel pins will distort this signature. These features of PDET are all unique and overcome limitation and disadvantages presented by currently used devices such as the Fork detector or the Cerenkov Viewing Device. Thus, this device when developed and tested could fill an important need in the safeguards area for partial defect detection, a technology that the IAEA has been seeking for the past few decades.

  16. Relationship of fire protection research to plant safety. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories has been responsible for numerous tests of fire protection systems and concepts. Tests of fire retardant cables, cable coatings, cable tray covers, penetration seals, fire barriers, and spatial separation have been reported and summarized. Other tests involving the effectiveness of suppression systems and the vulnerability of electrical cabinets have been completed with reports in preparation. The following questions constitute the central theme of current fire research by Sandia and the NRC: under what conditions is spatial separation of redundant safety systems adequate; what are the temperature, smoke, humidity, or corrosive vapor damage thresholds of cable and safety equipment exposed to fire or suppression activities; what is the safety significance of fires involving control room cabinets or remote shutdown panels; and what is the relative importance of fire to nuclear power plant safety, as compared to other types of anticipated or postulated accidents. Evidence of why these questions seem important and a description of work being undertaken to address each question are reviewed in the following paragraphs.

  17. PNL technical review of pressurized thermal-shock issues. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, L.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bian, S.H.; Defferding, L.J.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Pelto, P.J.; Simonen, E.P.; Simonen, F.A.; Stevens, D.L.; Taylor, T.T.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked to develop and recommend a regulatory position that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) should adopt regarding the ability of reactor pressure vessels to withstand the effects of pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Licensees of eight pressurized water reactors provided NRC with estimates of remaining effective full power years before corrective actions would be required to prevent an unsafe operating condition. PNL reviewed these responses and the results of supporting research and concluded that none of the eight reactors would undergo vessel failure from a PTS event before several more years of operation. Operator actions, however, were often required to terminate a PTS event before it deteriorated to the point where failure could occur. Therefore, the near-term (less than one year) recommendation is to upgrade, on a site-specific basis, operational procedures, training, and control room instrumentation. Also, uniform criteria should be developed by NRC for use during future licensee analyses. Finally, it was recommended that NRC upgrade nondestructive inspection techniques used during vessel examinations and become more involved in the evaluation of annealing requirements.

  18. Phenomenon analysis of stress corrosion cracking in the vessel head penetrations of French PWR`s

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Buisine, D.; Faidy, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1995-12-31

    During a hydrotest in 1991, a leak was detected on,a reactor vessel head (RVH) penetration of a French PWR. This leak was due to a phenomenon of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) affecting these penetrations in Alloy 600. The destructive and non-destructive examinations undertaken during the following months highlighted the generic nature of the degradations. In order to well understand this phenomenon and implement the most suitable maintenance policy, a large scale scientific program was decided and performed jointly by Electricite de France and FRAMATOME. The paper will present all the results obtained in this program concerning the parameters governing the PWSCC. In particular the following fields will be developed: (1) the material, its microstructure in line with the manufacturing and its susceptibility to PWSCC; (2) the stresses and their evaluations by measurements, mock up corrosion tests and Finite Element Analysis (FEA); (3) the effect of surface finish on crack initiation; and (4) the crack growth rate. This phenomenon analysis will be useful for evaluating the risk of PWSCC on other Alloy 600 areas in PWR`s primary system.

  19. Regeneratively Cooled Liquid Oxygen/Methane Technology Development Between NASA MSFC and PWR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Joel W.; Greene, Christopher B.; Stout, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) has identified Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/Liquid Methane (LCH4) as a potential propellant combination for future space vehicles based upon exploration studies. The technology is estimated to have higher performance and lower overall systems mass compared to existing hypergolic propulsion systems. NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in concert with industry partner Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) utilized a Space Act Agreement to test an oxygen/methane engine system in the Summer of 2010. PWR provided a 5,500 lbf (24,465 N) LOX/LCH4 regenerative cycle engine to demonstrate advanced thrust chamber assembly hardware and to evaluate the performance characteristics of the system. The chamber designs offered alternatives to traditional regenerative engine designs with improvements in cost and/or performance. MSFC provided the test stand, consumables and test personnel. The hot fire testing explored the effective cooling of one of the thrust chamber designs along with determining the combustion efficiency with variations of pressure and mixture ratio. The paper will summarize the status of these efforts.

  20. Validation of the new code package APOLLO2.8 for accurate PWR neutronics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Blaise, P.; Leconte, P.; Palau, J. M.; Roque, B.; Vaglio, C.; Vidal, J. F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes the Qualification work performed to demonstrate the accuracy of the new APOLLO2.S/SHEM-MOC package based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file for the prediction of PWR neutronics parameters. This experimental validation is based on PWR mock-up critical experiments performed in the EOLE/MINERVE zero-power reactors and on P.I. Es on spent fuel assemblies from the French PWRs. The Calculation-Experiment comparison for the main design parameters is presented: reactivity of UOX and MOX lattices, depletion calculation and fuel inventory, reactivity loss with burnup, pin-by-pin power maps, Doppler coefficient, Moderator Temperature Coefficient, Void coefficient, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} poisoning worth, Efficiency of Ag-In-Cd and B4C control rods, Reflector Saving for both standard 2-cm baffle and GEN3 advanced thick SS reflector. From this qualification process, calculation biases and associated uncertainties are derived. This code package APOLLO2.8 is already implemented in the ARCADIA new AREVA calculation chain for core physics and is currently under implementation in the future neutronics package of the French utility Electricite de France. (authors)

  1. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  2. Bi-content Gadolinia as Burnable Absorber in PWR to Improve the Reactor Core Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, S.

    2007-07-01

    The gadolinia product is one of the standard burnable absorbers used in the PWR long and low leakage fuel cycle in order to control the radial power distribution and to hold down the initial core reactivity. This product presents a large number of advantages such as the high efficiency with only a small number of gadolinia-bearing rods, the easy adjustment between the number and the content of the gadolinia-bearing rods according to the cycle length need and the initial reactivity hold-down, no increasing of boron concentration versus cycle depletion, no additional increasing of internal pressure in poisoned rods, very low additional manufacture cost. On the other hand, some unfavourable phenomena are also observed during the utilization of the gadolinia: amplification of the asymmetrical power distribution and more negative axial offset. Based on the correlation between the gadolinia burnout and its content, the use of gadolinia bi-content will improve the parameters indicated here above. The gadolinia bi-content have been used in BWR for more than 20 years. In this paper, the comparison of the main reactor core physical parameters in PWR, calculated with the AREVA NP standard neutronic code package SCIENCE, is made by using the mono- and bi-content of the gadolinia products in the same fuel assembly. The results show that the asymmetrical axial and azimuthal power distribution can be improved in the case of the bi-content gadolinia product. (authors)

  3. Development of a new lattice physics code robin for PWR application

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Chen, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a description of methodologies and preliminary verification results of a new lattice physics code ROBIN, being developed for PWR application at Shanghai NuStar Nuclear Power Technology Co., Ltd. The methods used in ROBIN to fulfill various tasks of lattice physics analysis are an integration of historical methods and new methods that came into being very recently. Not only these methods like equivalence theory for resonance treatment and method of characteristics for neutron transport calculation are adopted, as they are applied in many of today's production-level LWR lattice codes, but also very useful new methods like the enhanced neutron current method for Dancoff correction in large and complicated geometry and the log linear rate constant power depletion method for Gd-bearing fuel are implemented in the code. A small sample of verification results are provided to illustrate the type of accuracy achievable using ROBIN. It is demonstrated that ROBIN is capable of satisfying most of the needs for PWR lattice analysis and has the potential to become a production quality code in the future. (authors)

  4. Maximim Accelerations On The Fuel Assemblies Of a 21-PWR Waste Package During End Impacts 

    SciTech Connect

    T. Schmitt

    2005-08-17

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the acceleration of the fuel assemblies contained in a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities of the waste package is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the acceleration of the fuel assemblies during the impact.

  5. Maximim Accelerations On The Fuel Assemblies Of a 21-PWR Waste Package During End Impacts 

    SciTech Connect

    V. DeLa Brosse

    2003-03-27

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the acceleration of the fuel assemblies contained in a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities of the waste package is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the acceleration of the fuel assemblies during the impact.

  6. Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1985-04-01

    This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

  7. A Study on Structured Simulation Framework for Design and Evaluation of Human-Machine Interface System -Application for On-line Risk Monitoring for PWR Nuclear Power Plant-

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, J.; Yang, M.; Li, S.C.; Peng, M.J.; Yan, S.Y.; Zhang, Z.J.

    2006-07-01

    The operators in the main control room of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) need to monitor plant condition through operation panels and understand the system problems by their experiences and skills. It is a very hard work because even a single fault will cause a large number of plant parameters abnormal and operators are required to perform trouble-shooting actions in a short time interval. It will bring potential risks if operators misunderstand the system problems or make a commission error to manipulate an irrelevant switch with their current operation. This study aims at developing an on-line risk monitoring technique based on Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) for monitoring and predicting potential risks in current plant condition by calculating plant reliability. The proposed technique can be also used for navigating operators by estimating the influence of their operations on plant condition before they take an action that will be necessary in plant operation, and therefore, can reduce human errors. This paper describes the risk monitoring technique and illustrates its application by a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident in a 2-loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Marine Nuclear Power Plant (MNPP). (authors)

  8. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  9. Risk analysis of highly combustible gas storage, supply, and distribution systems in PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Simion, G.P.; VanHorn, R.L.; Smith, C.L.; Bickel, J.H.; Sattison, M.B.; Bulmahn, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the potential safety concerns for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) identified in Generic Safety Issue 106, Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas. A Westinghouse four-loop PWR plant was analyzed for the risk due to the use of combustible gases (predominantly hydrogen) within the plant. The analysis evaluated an actual hydrogen distribution configuration and conducted several sensitivity studies to determine the potential variability among PWRs. The sensitivity studies were based on hydrogen and safety-related equipment configurations observed at other PWRs within the United States. Several options for improving the hydrogen distribution system design were identified and evaluated for their effect on risk and core damage frequency. A cost/benefit analysis was performed to determine whether alternatives considered were justifiable based on the safety improvement and economics of each possible improvement.

  10. Monte Carlo characterization of PWR spent fuel assemblies to determine the detectability of pin diversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdo, James S.

    This research is based on the concept that the diversion of nuclear fuel pins from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel assemblies is feasible by a careful comparison of spontaneous fission neutron and gamma levels in the guide tube locations of the fuel assemblies. The goal is to be able to determine whether some of the assembly fuel pins are either missing or have been replaced with dummy or fresh fuel pins. It is known that for typical commercial power spent fuel assemblies, the dominant spontaneous neutron emissions come from Cm-242 and Cm-244. Because of the shorter half-life of Cm-242 (0.45 yr) relative to that of Cm-244 (18.1 yr), Cm-244 is practically the only neutron source contributing to the neutron source term after the spent fuel assemblies are more than two years old. Initially, this research focused upon developing MCNP5 models of PWR fuel assemblies, modeling their depletion using the MONTEBURNS code, and by carrying out a preliminary depletion of a ¼ model 17x17 assembly from the TAKAHAMA-3 PWR. Later, the depletion and more accurate isotopic distribution in the pins at discharge was modeled using the TRITON depletion module of the SCALE computer code. Benchmarking comparisons were performed with the MONTEBURNS and TRITON results. Subsequently, the neutron flux in each of the guide tubes of the TAKAHAMA-3 PWR assembly at two years after discharge as calculated by the MCNP5 computer code was determined for various scenarios. Cases were considered for all spent fuel pins present and for replacement of a single pin at a position near the center of the assembly (10,9) and at the corner (17,1). Some scenarios were duplicated with a gamma flux calculation for high energies associated with Cm-244. For each case, the difference between the flux (neutron or gamma) for all spent fuel pins and with a pin removed or replaced is calculated for each guide tube. Different detection criteria were established. The first was whether the relative error of the

  11. Three Dimensional Radiation Transport Analyses in Pwr with Tort and Mcnp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nakata, Hayato; Kimura, Itsuro; Kitagawa, Hideo; Ohmura, Masaki; Ito, Taku; Shin, Kazuo

    2003-06-01

    Three dimensional (3D) neutron and gamma calculations for structural materials inside the reactor vessel in a commercial PWR were performed using the 3D transport code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MCNP to assess the accuracy of calculations using these codes and libraries. Comparisons with two dimensional DORT calculations with various libraries and surveillance dosimetry measurements indicated that TORT and MCNP calculations give similar agreements with surveillance measurements to DORT calculations. Influences of the cross section data, ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-VI and JENDL3.2 on attenuation of the fast flux and dpa rate in the reactor vessel, relative contributions of gamma-rays and thermal neutrons to dpa were discussed.

  12. Grid-to-rod flow-induced impact study for PWR fuel in reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Hao; Qu, Jun; Lu, Roger Y.; Wang, Jy-An John

    2016-06-10

    The source for grid-to-rod fretting in a pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) is the dynamic contact impact from hydraulic flow-induced fuel assembly vibration. In order to support grid-to-rod fretting wear mitigation research, finite element analysis (FEA) was used to evaluate the hydraulic flow-induced impact intensity between the fuel rods and the spacer grids. Three-dimensional FEA models, with detailed geometries of the dimple and spring of the actual spacer grids along with fuel rods, were developed for flow impact simulation. The grid-to-rod dynamic impact simulation provided insights of the contact phenomena at grid-rod interface. Finally, it is an essential and effectivemore » way to evaluate contact forces and provide guidance for simulative bench fretting-impact tests.« less

  13. IMPACT OF FISSION PRODUCTS IMPURITY ON THE PLUTONIUM CONTENT IN PWR MOX FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles Youinou; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-03-01

    This report presents the results of a neutronics analysis done in response to the charter IFCA-SAT-2 entitled 'Fuel impurity physics calculations'. This charter specifies that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies (UOX SNF) is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate PWR MOX fuel assemblies. Only non-gaseous FP have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1). This mixture of Pu and FP is called PuFP. Note that, in this preliminary analysis, the FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

  14. Metal cation inhibitors for controlling denting corrosion in steam generators. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Leidheiser, H. Jr.; Granata, R.D.; Simmons, G.W.; Music, S.; Vedage, H.L.

    1982-12-01

    Metal cations of arsenic, antimony, tin, manganese, zinc, cadmium, indium, and thallium have been evaluated in a preliminary way as possible3 inhibitors for controlling denting corrision observed in steam generators used with pressurized water reactors (PWR). The rationale for this approach was based upon the well-known inhibition effects of metal cations on corrosion rates in electrolyte/metal systems. A review of corrosion inhibition by metal cations (H. Leidheiser, Jr., Corrosion 36, 339 (1982)) has identified eleven inhibition mechanisms. The major test methods used for this evaluation were: (1) Isothermal capsule tests of carbon/steel/Inconel 600 tube bulging rates at temperatures up to 288/sup 0/C in seawater/copper-nickel chloride bulge-accelerating solutions. (2) Immersion weight-loss tests of steel coupled to Inconel 600 in boiling (102/sup 0/C) 3% sodium chloride solutions. In addition, electrochemical measuremens and surface analyses were performed. The major findings of this investigation are presented.

  15. Common cause evaluations in applied risk analysis of nuclear power plants. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T.; Ligon, D.; Stamatelatos, M.

    1983-04-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches were developed for the evaluation of common cause failures (CCFs) in nuclear power plants and were applied to the analysis of the auxiliary feedwater systems of several pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Key CCF variables were identified through a survey of experts in the field and a review of failure experience in operating PWRs. These variables were classified into categories of high, medium, and low defense against a CCF. Based on the results, a checklist was developed for analyzing CCFs of systems. Several known techniques for quantifying CCFs were also reviewed. The information provided valuable insights in the development of a new model for estimating CCF probabilities, which is an extension of and improvement over the Beta Factor method. As applied to the analysis of the PWR auxiliary feedwater systems, the method yielded much more realistic values than the original Beta Factor method for a one-out-of-three system.

  16. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed.

  17. VISA: a computer code for predicting the probability of reactor pressure-vessel failure. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Strosnider, J. Jr.; Klecker, R.W.; Engel, D.W.; Johnson, K.I.

    1983-09-01

    The VISA (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) code was developed as part of the NRC staff evaluation of pressurized thermal shock. VISA uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the failure probability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to a pressure and thermal transient specified by the user. Linear elastic fracture mechanics are used to model crack initiation and propagation. parameters for initial crack size, copper content, initial RT/sub NDT/, fluence, crack-initiation fracture toughness, and arrest fracture toughness are treated as random variables. This report documents the version of VISA used in the NRC staff report (Policy Issue from J.W. Dircks to NRC Commissioners, Enclosure A: NRC Staff Evaluation of Pressurized Thermal Shock, November 1982, SECY-82-465) and includes a user's guide for the code.

  18. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping. [Double-ended guillotine break

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria.

  19. Feasibility of recycling thorium in a fusion-fission hybrid/PWR symbiotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Josephs, J. M.

    1980-12-31

    A study was made of the economic impact of high levels of radioactivity in the thorium fuel cycle. The sources of this radioactivity and means of calculating the radioactive levels at various stages in the fuel cycle are discussed and estimates of expected levels are given. The feasibility of various methods of recycling thorium is discussed. These methods include direct recycle, recycle after storage for 14 years to allow radioactivity to decrease, shortening irradiation times to limit radioactivity build up, and the use of the window in time immediately after reprocessing where radioactivity levels are diminished. An economic comparison is made for the first two methods together with the throwaway option where thorium is not recycled using a mass energy flow model developed for a CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor), a fusion-fission hybrid reactor which serves as fuel producer for several PWR reactors.

  20. Cable condition monitoring research activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.; Zigler, G.L.; Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant cables. The objectives of the program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond 40 year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring techniques for predicting remaining cable life. The cables are being aged for long times at relatively mild exposure conditions with various condition monitoring techniques to be employed during the aging process. Following the aging process, the cables will be exposed to a sequential accident profile consisting of high dose rate irradiation followed by a simulated design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) steam exposure. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Analysis of MERCI decay heat measurement for PWR UO{sub 2} fuel rod

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboulay, J.C.; Bourganel, S.

    2012-01-15

    Decay heat measurements, called the MERCI experiment, were conducted at Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA)/Saclay to characterize accurately residual power at short cooling time and verify its prediction by decay code and nuclear data. The MOSAIC calorimeter, developed and patented by CEA/Grenoble (DTN/SE2T), enables measurement of the decay heat released by a pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod sample between 200 and 4 W within a precision of 1%. The MERCI experiment included three phases. At first, a UO{sub 2} fuel rod sample was irradiated in the CEA/Saclay experimental reactor OSIRIS. The burnup achieved at the end of irradiation was similar to 3.5 GWd/tonne. The second phase was the transfer of the fuel rod sample from its irradiation location to a hot cell, to be inserted inside the MOSAIC calorimeter. It took 26 min to carry out the transfer. Finally, decay heat released by the PWR sample was measured from 27 min to 42 days after shutdown. Post irradiation examinations were performed to measure concentrations of some heavy nuclei (U, Pu) and fission products (Cs, Nd). The decay heat was predicted using a calculation scheme based on the PEPIN2 depletion code, the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code, and the JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data file. The MERCI experiment analysis shows that the discrepancy between the calculated and the experimental decay heat values is included between -10% at 27 min and +6% at 12 h, 30 min otter shutdown. From 4 up to 42 days of cooling time, the difference between calculation and measurement is about ± 1%, i.e., experimental uncertainty. The MERCI experiment represents a significant contribution for code validation; the time range above 10{sup 5} s has not been validated previously. (authors)

  2. An Extension of the Validation of SCALE (SAS2H) Isotopic Predictions for PWR Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic characterization of spent fuel via depletion and decay calculations is necessary for determination of source terms for subsequent system analyses involving heat transfer, radiation shielding, isotopic migration, etc. Unlike fresh fuel assumptions typically employed in the criticality safety analysis of spent fuel configurations, burnup credit applications also rely on depletion and decay calculations to predict the isotopic composition of spent fuel. These isotopics are used in subsequent criticality calculations to assess the reduced worth of spent fuel. To validate the codes and data used in depletion approaches, experimental measurements are compared with numerical predictions for relevant spent fuel samples. Such comparisons have been performed in earlier work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes additional independent measurements and corresponding calculations, which supplement the results of the earlier work. The current work includes measured isotopic data from 19 spent fuel samples obtained from the Italian Trino Vercelles pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and the U.S. Turkey Point Unit 3 PWR. In addition, an approach to determine biases and uncertainties between calculated and measured isotopic concentrations is discussed, together with a method to statistically combine these terms to obtain a conservative estimate of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results are presented based on the combination of measured-to-calculated ratios for earlier work and the current analyses. The results described herein represent an extension to a new reactor design not included in the earlier work, and spent fuel samples with enrichment as high as 3.9 wt % {sup 235}U. Results for the current work are found to be, for the most part, consistent with the findings of the earlier work. This consistency was observed for results obtained from each of two different cross-section libraries and suggests that the estimated biases determined for

  3. Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-12-17

    This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

  4. Effect of aging on the PWR Chemical and Volume Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, E.J.; Travis, R.J.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    The PWR Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS) is designed to provide both safety and non-safety related functions. During normal plant operation it is used to control reactor coolant chemistry, and letdown and charging flow. In many plants, the charging pumps also provide high pressure injection, emergency boration, and RCP seal injection in emergency situations. This study examines the design, materials, maintenance, operation and actual degradation experiences of the system and main sub-components to assess the potential for age degradation. A detailed review of the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) and Licensee Event Report (LER) databases for the 1988--1991 time period, together with a review of industry and NRC experience and research, indicate that age-related degradations and failures have occurred. These failures had significant effects on plant operation, including reactivity excursions, and pressurizer level transients. The majority of these component failures resulted in leakage of reactor coolant outside the containment. A representative plant of each PWR design (W, CE, and B and W) was visited to obtain specific information on system inspection, surveillance, monitoring, and inspection practices. The results of these visits indicate that adequate system maintenance and inspection is being performed. In some instances, the frequencies of inspection were increase in response to repeated failure events. A parametric study was performed to assess the effect of system aging on Core Damage Frequency (CDF). This study showed that as motor-operated valve (MOV) operating failures increased, the contribution of the High Pressure Injection to CDF also increased.

  5. Calculation of total effective dose equivalent and collective dose in the event of a LOCA in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Raisali, G; Davilu, H; Haghighishad, A; Khodadadi, R; Sabet, M

    2006-01-01

    In this research, total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) and collective dose (CD) are calculated for the most adverse potential accident in Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant from the viewpoint of radionuclides release to the environment. Calculations are performed using a Gaussian diffusion model and a slightly modified version of AIREM computer code to adopt for conditions in Bushehr. The results are comparable with the final safety analysis report which used DOZAM code. Results of our calculations show no excessive dose in populated regions. Maximum TEDE is determined to be in the WSW direction. CD in the area around the nuclear power plant by a distance of 30 km (138 man Sv) is far below the accepted limits. Thyroid equivalent dose is also calculated for the WSW direction (maximum 25.6 mSv) and is below the limits at various distances from the reactor stack.

  6. SAS2H Generated Isotopic Concentrations For B&W 15X15 PWR Assembly (SCPB:N/A)

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Davis

    1996-08-29

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide pressurized water reactor (PWR) isotopic composition data as a function of time for use in criticality analyses. The objectives of this evaluation are to generate burnup and decay dependant isotopic inventories and to provide these inventories in a form which can easily be utilized in subsequent criticality calculations.

  7. Constraints on silicates formation in the Si-Al-Fe system: Application to hard deposits in steam generators of PWR nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Gilles; Million-Picallion, Lisa; Lefevre, Grégory; Delaunay, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Introduction: The hydrothermal crystallization of silicates phases in the Si-Al-Fe system may lead to industrial constraints that can be encountered in the nuclear industry in at least two contexts: the geological repository for nuclear wastes and the formation of hard sludges in the steam generator of the PWR nuclear plants. In the first situation, the chemical reactions between the Fe-canister and the surrounding clays have been extensively studied in laboratory [1-7] and pilot experiments [8]. These studies demonstrated that the high reactivity of metallic iron leads to the formation of Fe-silicates, berthierine like, in a wide range of temperature. By contrast, the formation of deposits in the steam generators of PWR plants, called hard sludges, is a newer and less studied issue which can affect the reactor performance. Experiments: We present here a preliminary set of experiments reproducing the formation of hard sludges under conditions representative of the steam generator of PWR power plant: 275°C, diluted solutions maintained at low potential by hydrazine addition and at alkaline pH by low concentrations of amines and ammoniac. Magnetite, a corrosion by-product of the secondary circuit, is the source of iron while aqueous Si and Al, the major impurities in this system, are supplied either as trace elements in the circulating solution or by addition of amorphous silica and alumina when considering confined zones. The fluid chemistry is monitored by sampling aliquots of the solution. Eh and pH are continuously measured by hydrothermal Cormet© electrodes implanted in a titanium hydrothermal reactor. The transformation, or not, of the solid fraction was examined post-mortem. These experiments evidenced the role of Al colloids as precursor of cements composed of kaolinite and boehmite, and the passivation of amorphous silica (becoming unreactive) likely by sorption of aqueous iron. But no Fe-bearing was formed by contrast to many published studies on the Fe

  8. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  9. PwrSoC (integration of micro-magnetic inductors/transformers with active semiconductors) for more than Moore technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathuna, Cian Ó.; Wang, Ningning; Kulkarni, Santosh; Roy, Saibal

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of power supply on chip (PwrSoC) which will enable the development of next-generation, functionally integrated, power management platforms with applications in dc-dc conversion, gate drives, isolated power transmission and ultimately, high granularity, on-chip, power management for mixed-signal, SOC chips. PwrSoC will integrate power passives with the power management IC, in a 3D stacked or monolithic form factor, thereby delivering the performance of a highefficiency dc-dc converter within the footprint of a low-efficiency linear regulator. A central element of the PwrSoC concept is the fabrication of power micro-magnetics on silicon to deliver micro-inductors and micro-transformers. The paper details the magnetics on silicon process which combines thin film magnetic core technology with electroplated copper conductors. Measured data for micro-inductors show inductance operation up to 20 MHz, footprints down to 0.5 mm2, efficiencies up to 93% and dc current carrying capability up to 600 mA. Measurements on micro-transformers show voltage gain of approximately - 1 dB at between 10 MHz and 30 MHz. Contribution to the Topical Issue “International Semiconductor Conference Dresden-Grenoble - ISCDG 2012”, Edited by Gérard Ghibaudo, Francis Balestra and Simon Deleonibus.

  10. Summary of MELCOR 1.8.2 calculations for three LOCA sequences (AG, S2D, and S3D) at the Surry Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.; Smith, L.

    1994-03-01

    Activities involving regulatory implementation of updated source term information were pursued. These activities include the identification of the source term, the identification of the chemical form of iodine in the source term, and the timing of the source term`s entrance into containment. These activities are intended to support a more realistic source term for licensing nuclear power plants than the current TID-14844 source term and current licensing assumptions. MELCOR calculations were performed to support the technical basis for the updated source term. This report presents the results from three MELCOR calculations of nuclear power plant accident sequences and presents comparisons with Source Term code Package (STCP) calculations for the same sequences. The three low-pressure sequences were analyzed to identify the materials which enter containment (source terms) and are available for release to the environment, and to obtain timing of sequence events. The source terms include fission products and other materials such as those generated by core-concrete interactions. All three calculations, for both MELCOR and STCP, analyzed the Surry plant, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) with a subatmospheric containment design.

  11. Performance degradation of a large production reactor recirculation pump during off-design conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    In order to accurately predict reactor hydraulic behavior during a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) the performance of reactor coolant pumps under off-design conditions must be understood. The LOCA of primary interest for the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors involves the aspiration of air into the recirculated heavy water flow as reactor tank inventory is lost, (system temperatures are too low to result in significant flashing of water coolant into steam). Entrained air causes degradation in the performance of the large recirculation pumps. The amount of degradation is a parameter used in computer codes which predict the course of the accident. This paper describes the analysis of data obtained during in-reactor simulated LOCA tests, and presents the head degradation curve for the SRS reactor recirculation pumps. The greatest challenge of the analysis was to determine a reasonable estimate of mixture density at the pump suction. Specially designed three-beam densitometers were used to determine mixture density. Since it was not feasible to place them in the most advantageous location, measured pump motor power along with other techniques, were used to calculate the average mixture density at the pump impeller. This technique provides a good estimate of pump suction mixture density. Measurements from more conventional instruments were used to arrive at the value of pump two-component head over a wide range of flows. The results were significantly different from previous work with commercial reactor recirculation pumps. Further experimental work using a 1/4 scale model of the SRS pump should provide an opportunity to confirm these results, and is currently in progress.

  12. Impact of makeup water system performance on PWR steam generator corrosion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.J.; Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Smith, L.A.

    1985-06-01

    The objectives of this project were to review makeup system design and performance and assess the possible relation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator corrosion to makeup water impurity ingress at fresh water sites. Project results indicated that makeup water transport of most ionic impurities can be expected to have a significant impact on secondary cycle chemistry only if condenser inleakage and other sources of impurities are maintained at very low levels. Since makeup water oxygen control techniques at most study plants were not consistent with state-of-the-art technology, oxygen input to the cycle via makeup can be significant. Leakage of colloidal silica and organics through makeup water systems can be expected to control blowdown silica levels and organic levels throughout the cycle at many plants. Attempts to correlate makeup water quality to steam generator corrosion observations were unsuccessful since (1) other impurity sources were significant compared to makeup at most study plants, (2) many variables are involved in the corrosion process, and (3) in the case of IGA, the variables have not been clearly established. However, in some situations makeup water can be a significant source of contaminants suspected to lead to both IGA and denting.

  13. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Surry PWR TMLB` (with a DCH study)

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Summers, R.M.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-02-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC. This code models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRs. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze a station blackout transient in Surry, a three-loop Westinghouse PWR. Basecase results obtained with MELCOR 1.8.2 are presented, and compared to earlier results for the same transient calculated using MELCOR 1.8.1. The effects of new models added in MELCOR 1.8.2 (in particular, hydrodynamic interfacial momentum exchange, core debris radial relocation and core material eutectics, CORSOR-Booth fission product release, high-pressure melt ejection and direct containment heating) are investigated individually in sensitivity studies. The progress in reducing numeric effects in MELCOR 1.8.2, compared to MELCOR 1.8.1, is evaluated in both machine-dependency and time-step studies; some remaining sources of numeric dependencies (valve cycling, material relocation and hydrogen burn) are identified.

  14. Validation of the scale system for PWR spent fuel isotopic composition analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, O.W.; Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1995-03-01

    The validity of the computation of pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel isotopic composition by the SCALE system depletion analysis was assessed using data presented in the report. Radiochemical measurements and SCALE/SAS2H computations of depleted fuel isotopics were compared with 19 benchmark-problem samples from Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, H. B. Robinson Unit 2, and Obrigheim PWRs. Even though not exhaustive in scope, the validation included comparison of predicted and measured concentrations for 14 actinides and 37 fission and activation products. The basic method by which the SAS2H control module applies the neutron transport treatment and point-depletion methods of SCALE functional modules (XSDRNPM-S, NITAWL-II, BONAMI, and ORIGEN-S) is described in the report. Also, the reactor fuel design data, the operating histories, and the isotopic measurements for all cases are included in detail. The underlying radiochemical assays were conducted by the Materials Characterization. Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Approved Testing Material program and by four different laboratories in Europe on samples processed at the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant.

  15. Development of a coupling code for PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Z.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, H.; Wang, M.

    2012-07-01

    PWR reactor cavity radiation streaming is important for the safe of the personnel and equipment, thus calculation has to be performed to evaluate the neutron flux distribution around the reactor. For this calculation, the deterministic codes have difficulties in fine geometrical modeling and need huge computer resource; and the Monte Carlo codes require very long sampling time to obtain results with acceptable precision. Therefore, a coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this study, we develop a coupling code named DORT2MCNP to link the Sn code DORT and Monte Carlo code MCNP. DORT2MCNP is used to produce a combined surface source containing top, bottom and side surface simultaneously. Because SDEF card is unsuitable for the combined surface source, we modify the SOURCE subroutine of MCNP and compile MCNP for this application. Numerical results demonstrate the correctness of the coupling code DORT2MCNP and show reasonable agreement between the coupling method and the other two codes (DORT and MCNP). (authors)

  16. LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop by using the US NRC approved methods

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory requirements for postulated pipe ruptures have changed significantly since the first nuclear plants were designed. The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology is now accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of double-ended guillotine breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. The previous pipe rupture design requirements for nuclear power plant applications are responsible for all the numerous and massive pipe whip restraints and jet shields installed for each plant. This results in significant plant congestion, increased labor costs and radiation dosage for normal maintenance and inspection. Also the restraints increase the probability of interference between the piping and supporting structures during plant heatup, thereby potentially impacting overall plant reliability. The LBB approach to eliminate postulating ruptures in high energy piping systems is a significant improvement to former regulatory methodologies, and therefore, the LBB approach to design is gaining worldwide acceptance. However, the methods and criteria for LBB evaluation depend upon the policy of individual country and significant effort continues towards accomplishing uniformity on a global basis. In this paper the historical development of the U.S. LBB criteria will be traced and the results of an LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop applying U.S. NRC approved methods will be presented. In addition, another approach using the Japanese LBB criteria will be shown and compared with the U.S. criteria. The comparison will be highlighted in this paper with detailed discussion.

  17. Feasibility of recycling thorium in a fusion-fission hybrid/PWR symbiotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Josephs, J.M.

    1980-12-31

    A study was made of the economic impact of high levels of radioactivity in the thorium fuel cycle. The sources of this radioactivity and means of calculating the radioactive levels at various stages in the fuel cycle are discussed and estimates of expected levels are given. The feasibility of various methods of recycling thorium is discussed. These methods include direct recycle, recycle after storage for 14 years to allow radioactivity to decrease, shortening irradiation times to limit radioactivity build up, and the use of the window in time immediately after reprocessing where radioactivity levels are diminished. An economic comparison is made for the first two methods together with the throwaway option where thorium is not recycled using a mass energy flow model developed for a CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor), a fusion fission hybrid reactor which serves as fuel producer for several PWR reactors. The storage option is found to be most favorable; however, even this option represents a significant economic impact due to radioactivity of 0.074 mills/kW-h which amounts to $4 x 10/sup 9/ over a 30 year period assuming a 200 gigawatt supply of electrical power.

  18. Demonstration of optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio in a PWR unit fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Feltus, M.A.; Pozsgai, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear engineering students at The Pennsylvania State University develop scaled-down [[approx]350 MW(thermal)] pressurized water reactors (PWRs) using actual plants as references. The design criteria include maintaining the clad temperature below 2200[degree]F, fuel temperature below melting point, sufficient departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) margin, a beginning-of-life boron concentration that yields a negative moderator temperature coefficient, an adequate cycle power production (330 effective full-power days), and a batch loading scheme that is economical. The design project allows for many degrees of freedom (e.g., assembly number, pitch and height and batch enrichments) so that each student's result is unique. The iterative nature of the design process is stressed in the course. The LEOPARD code is used for the unit cell depletion, critical boron, and equilibrium xenon calculations. Radial two-group diffusion equations are solved with the TWIDDLE-DEE code. The steady-state ZEBRA thermal-hydraulics program is used for calculating DNBR. The unit fuel cell pin radius and pitch (fuel-to-moerator ratio) for the scaled-down design, however, was set equal to the already optimized ratio for the reference PWR. This paper describes an honors project that shows how the optimum fuel-to-moderator ratio is found for a unit fuel cell shown in terms of neutron economics. This exercise illustrates the impact of fuel-to-moderator variations on fuel utilization factor and the effect of assuming space and energy separability.

  19. Brief account of the effect of overcooling accidents on the integrity of PWR pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The occurrence in recent years of several (PWR) accident initiating events that could lead to severe thermal shock to the reactor pressure vessel, and the growing awareness that copper and nickel in the vessel material significantly enhance radiation damage in the vessel, have resulted in a reevaluation of pressure-vessel integrity during postulated overcooling accidents. Analyses indicate that the accidents of concern are those involving both thermal shock and pressure loadings, and that an accident similar to that at Rancho Seco in 1978 could, under some circumstances and at a time late in the normal life of the vessel, result in propagation of preexistent flaws in the vessel wall to the extent that they might completely penetrate the wall. More severe accidents have been postulated that would result in even shorter permissible lifetimes. However, the state-of-the-art fracture-mechanics analysis may contain excessive conservatism, and this possibility is being investigated. Furthermore, there are several remedial measures, such as fuel shuffling, to reduce the damage rate, and vessel annealing, to restore favorable material properties, that may be practical and used if necessary. 5 figures.

  20. Modeling and design of a reload PWR core for a 48-month fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, M.V.; Driscoll, M.J.; Todreas, N.E.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this research was to use state-of-the-art nuclear and fuel performance packages to evaluate the feasibility and costs of a 48 calendar month core in existing pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, considering the full range of practical design and economic considerations. The driving force behind this research is the desire to make nuclear power more economically competitive with fossil fuel options by expanding the scope for achievement of higher capacity factors. Using CASMO/SIMULATE, a core design with fuel enriched to 7{sup w}/{sub o} U{sup 235} for a single batch loaded, 48-month fuel cycle has been developed. This core achieves an ultra-long cycle length without exceeding current fuel burnup limits. The design uses two different types of burnable poisons. Gadolinium in the form of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) mixed with the UO{sub 2} of selected pins is sued to hold down initial reactivity and to control flux peaking throughout the life of the core. A zirconium di-boride (ZrB{sub 2}) integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) coating on the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-UO{sub 2} fuel pellets is added to reduce the critical soluble boron concentration in the reactor coolant to within acceptable limits. Fuel performance issues of concern to this design are also outlined and areas which will require further research are highlighted.

  1. Code System to Calculate Cross Sections for PWR Fuel Assembly Calculations.

    1994-11-15

    Version 00 The MARIA System calculates cross sections for PWR fuel assembly calculations. It generates the cross sections library for the diffusion calculations with burnup and feedback effects (CARMEN System, NEA 0649 and RSIC CCC-487) and the k(infinite) and M**2 parameters for the nodal calculations (SIMULA, NEA 0768). MARIA includes three modules. PRELIM generates the input data for the fuel assembly calculation module, for all fuel assembly types in the core and at any conditionmore » of power rate and temperature. WIMS-TRACA is a modified version of the fuel assembly calculation program WIMS-D/4 (NEA 0329 and RSIC CCC-576), which generates the collapsed cross sections versus burn up needed by the CARMEN code (reference cell, boron, xenon, samarium, and light water). POSWIM calculates the transport corrections to the diffusion constant of the absorber materials generated by WIMS-TRACA, to be used directly in the diffusion code when rods or burnable absorber rods are present.« less

  2. Remote Gamma Scanning System for Characterization of BWR and PWR Fuel Rod Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Shannon L.; Alzheimer, James M.

    2011-08-08

    Sometimes challenges with the design and deployment of automated equipment in remote environments deals more with the constraints imposed by the remote environment than it does with the details of the automation. This paper discusses the development of a scanning system used to provide gamma radiation profiles of irradiated fuel rod segments. The system needed the capability to provide axial scans of cut segments of BWR and PWR fuel rods. The scanning location is A-Cell at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Hanford site in Washington State. The criteria for the scanning equipment included axial scanning increments of a tenth of an inch or less, ability to scan fuel rods with diameters ranging from 3/8 inch to 5/8 inch in diameter, and fuel rod segments up to seven feet in length. Constraints imposed by the environment included having the gamma detector and operator controls on the outside of the hot cell and the scanning hardware on the inside of the hot cell. This entailed getting a narrow, collimated beam of radiation from the fuel rod to the detector on the outside of the hot cell while minimizing the radiation exposure caused by openings for the wires and cables traversing the hot cell walls. Setup and operation of all of the in-cell hardware needed to accommodate limited access ports and use of hot cell manipulators. The radiation levels inside the cell also imposed constraints on the materials used.

  3. Conceptual Core Analysis of Long Life PWR Utilizing Thorium-Uranium Fuel Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouf; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-08-01

    Conceptual core analysis of long life PWR utilizing thorium-uranium based fuel has conducted. The purpose of this study is to evaluate neutronic behavior of reactor core using combined thorium and enriched uranium fuel. Based on this fuel composition, reactor core have higher conversion ratio rather than conventional fuel which could give longer operation length. This simulation performed using SRAC Code System based on library SRACLIB-JDL32. The calculation carried out for (Th-U)O2 and (Th-U)C fuel with uranium composition 30 - 40% and gadolinium (Gd2O3) as burnable poison 0,0125%. The fuel composition adjusted to obtain burn up length 10 - 15 years under thermal power 600 - 1000 MWt. The key properties such as uranium enrichment, fuel volume fraction, percentage of uranium are evaluated. Core calculation on this study adopted R-Z geometry divided by 3 region, each region have different uranium enrichment. The result show multiplication factor every burn up step for 15 years operation length, power distribution behavior, power peaking factor, and conversion ratio. The optimum core design achieved when thermal power 600 MWt, percentage of uranium 35%, U-235 enrichment 11 - 13%, with 14 years operation length, axial and radial power peaking factor about 1.5 and 1.2 respectively.

  4. Whole-core comet solutions to a 3-dimensional PWR benchmark problem with gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2012-07-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with gadolinium was used to determine the accuracy and computational efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport method COMET. The benchmark problem contains 193 square fuel assemblies. The COMET solution (eigenvalue, assembly averaged and fuel pin averaged fission density distributions) was compared with those obtained from the corresponding Monte Carlo reference solution using the same 2-group material cross section library. The comparison showed that both the core eigenvalue and fission density distribution averaged over each assembly and fuel pin predicated by COMET agree very well with the corresponding MCNP reference solution if the incident flux response expansion used in COMET is truncated at 2nd order in the two spatial and the two angular variables. The benchmark calculations indicate that COMET has Monte Carlo accuracy. In, particular, the eigenvalue difference between the codes ranged from 17 pcm to 35 pcm, being within 2 standard deviations of the calculational uncertainty. The mean flux weighted relative differences in the assembly and fuel pin fission densities were 0.47% and 0.65%, respectively. It was also found that COMET's full (whole) core computational speed is 30,000 times faster than MCNP in which only 1/8 of the core is modeled. It is estimated that COMET would have been about over 6 orders of magnitude faster than MCNP if the full core were also modeled in MCNP. (authors)

  5. UO 2/Zry-4 chemical interaction layers for intact and leak PWR fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the UO 2 pellet-Zry-4 cladding interfaces of intact and leak PWR fuel rods were examined with the help of an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to investigate typical chemical interaction layers formed at the pellet-cladding interface during the normal reactor operations. The two intact and two leak fuel rods with the burnup of between 35,000 and 53,000 MWD/MTU were selected to evaluate the effects of gap-gas compositions and fuel burnup on the chemical interaction layer formation. Based on the optical and scanning electron micrographs, it is found that the intact fuel rod generates apparently one interaction layer of (U,Zr)O 2-x at the interface, whereas the leak fuel rod generates apparently two interaction layers of ZrO 2-x and (U,Zr)O 2-x. These interaction layers for the intact and leak fuel rods were predicted by several diffusion paths drawn on a U-Zr-O ternary phase diagram. The variations of chemical element compositions around the interface of one intact rod were generated by an electron probe micro-analyzer to confirm the interaction layers at the pellet-cladding interface. The interaction layer growth rates of the ZrO 2-x and (U,Zr)O 2-x phases were estimated, using the layer thicknesses and the reaction times.

  6. Aging mechanisms in the Westinghouse PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) Control Rod Drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An aging assessment of the Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Control Rod System (CRD) has been completed as part of the US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research, (NPAR) Program. This study examined the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the system to determine its potential for degradation as the plant ages. Selected results from this study are presented in this paper. The operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. From our evaluation of the data, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and the operating environment, we conclude that the Westinghouse CRD system is subject to degradation which, if unchecked, could affect its safety function as a plant ages. Ways to detect and mitigate the effects of aging are included in this paper. The current maintenance for the control rod drive system at fifteen Westinghouse PWRs was obtained through a survey conducted in cooperation with EPRI and NUMARC. The results of the survey indicate that some plants have modified the system, replaced components, or expanded preventive maintenance. Several of these activities have effectively addressed the aging issue. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  8. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I.; St Clair, R.; Orr, D.

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  9. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  10. A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

  11. On-line PWR RHR pump performance testing following motor and impeller replacement

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarzo, J.T.

    1996-12-01

    On-line maintenance and replacement of safety-related pumps requires the performance of an inservice test to determine and confirm the operational readiness of the pumps. In 1995, major maintenance was performed on two Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Residual Heat Removal (RHR) Pumps. A refurbished spare motor was overhauled with a new mechanical seal, new motor bearings and equipped with pump`s `B` impeller. The spare was installed into the `B` train. The motor had never been run in the system before. A pump performance test was developed to verify it`s operational readiness and determine the in-situ pump performance curve. Since the unit was operating, emphasis was placed on conducting a highly accurate pump performance test that would ensure that it satisfied the NSSS vendors accident analysis minimum acceptance curve. The design of the RHR System allowed testing of one train while the other was aligned for normal operation. A test flow path was established from the Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) through the pump (under test) and back to the RWST. This allowed staff to conduct a full flow range pump performance test. Each train was analyzed and an expression developed that included an error vector term for the TDH (ft), pressure (psig), and flow rate (gpm) using the variance error vector methodology. This method allowed the engineers to select a test instrumentation system that would yield accurate readings and minimal measurement errors, for data taken in the measurement of TDH (P,Q) versus Pump Flow Rate (Q). Test results for the `B` Train showed performance well in excess of the minimum required. The motor that was originally in the `B` train was similarly overhauled and equipped with `A` pump`s original impeller, re-installed in the `A` train, and tested. Analysis of the `A` train results indicate that the RHR pump`s performance was also well in excess of the vendors requirements.

  12. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  13. Investigation of the Effect of Fixed Absorbers on the Reactivity of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel for Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C.; Sanders, Charlotta E.

    2002-08-15

    The effect of fixed absorbers on the reactivity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of burnup-credit criticality safety analyses is examined. A fuel assembly burned in conjunction with fixed absorbers may have a higher reactivity for a given burnup than an assembly that has not used fixed absorbers. As a result, guidance on burnup credit, issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommendation eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged SNF from loading in burnup credit casks and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. Therefore, data are needed to support the extension of burnup credit to additional SNF. This research investigates the effect of various fixed absorbers, including integral burnable absorbers, burnable poison rods, control rods, and axial power shaping rods, on the reactivity of PWR SNF. Trends in reactivity with relevant parameters (e.g., initial fuel enrichment, burnup and absorber type, exposure, and design) are established, and anticipated reactivity effects are quantified. Where appropriate, recommendations are offered for addressing the reactivity effects of the fixed absorbers in burnup-credit safety analyses.

  14. Testing and analyses of the TN-24P PWR spent-fuel dry storage cask loaded with consolidated fuel

    SciTech Connect

    McKinnon, M A; Michener, T E; Jensen, M F; Rodman, G R

    1989-02-01

    A performance test of a Transnuclear, Inc. TN-24P storage cask configured for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel was performed. The work was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and the Electric Power Research Institute. The performance test consisted of loading the TN-24P cask with 24 canisters of consolidated PWR spent fuel from Virginia Power's Surry and Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point reactors. Cask surface and fuel canister guide tube temperatures were measured, as were cask surface gamma and neutron dose rates. Testing was performed with vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfill environments in both vertical and horizontal cask orientations. Transnuclear, Inc., arranged to have a partially insulated run added to the end of the test to simulate impact limiters. Limited spent fuel integrity data were also obtained. From both heat transfer and shielding perspectives, the TN-24P cask with minor refinements can be effectively implemented at reactor sites and central storage facilities for safe storage of unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. 35 refs., 93 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Analysis of a Defected Dissimilar Metal Weld in a PWR Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Efsing, P.; Lagerstrom, J.

    2002-07-01

    During the refueling outage 2000, inspections of the RC-loops of one of the Ringhals PWR-units, Ringhals 4, indicated surface breaking defects in the axial direction of the piping in a dissimilar weld between the Low alloy steel nozzle and the stainless safe end in the hot leg. In addition some indications were found that there were embedded defects in the weld material. These defects were judged as being insignificant to the structural integrity. The welds were inspected in 1993 with the result that no significant indications were found. The weld it self is a double U weld, where the thickness of the material is ideally 79,5 mm. Its is constructed by Inconel 182 weld material. At the nozzle a buttering was applied, also by Inconel 182. The In-service inspection, ISI, of the object indicated four axial defects, 9-16 mm deep. During fabrication, the areas where the defects are found were repaired at least three times, onto a maximum depth of 32 mm. To evaluate the defects, 6 boat samples from the four axial defects were cut from the perimeter and shipped to the hot-cell laboratory for further examination. This examination revealed that the two deep defects had been under sized by the ISI outside the requirement set by the inspection tolerances, while the two shallow defects were over sized, but within the tolerances of the detection system. When studying the safety case it became evident that there were several missing elements in the way this problems is handled with respect to the Swedish safety evaluation code. Among these the most notable at the beginning was the absence of reliable fracture mechanical data such as crack growth laws and fracture toughness at elevated temperature. Both these questions were handled by the project. The fracture mechanical evaluation has focused on a fit for service principal. Thus defects both in the unaffected zones and the disturbed zones, boat sample cutouts, of the weld have been analyzed. With reference to the Swedish safety

  16. The effects of cold rolling orientation and water chemistry on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated PWR water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junjie; Lu, Zhanpeng; Xiao, Qian; Ru, Xiangkun; Han, Guangdong; Chen, Zhen; Zhou, Bangxin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking behaviors of one-directionally cold rolled 316L stainless steel specimens in T-L and L-T orientations were investigated in hydrogenated and deaerated PWR primary water environments at 310 °C. Transgranular cracking was observed during the in situ pre-cracking procedure and the crack growth rate was almost not affected by the specimen orientation. Locally intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in the hydrogenated PWR water. Extensive intergranular stress corrosion cracks were found on the fracture surfaces of specimens in deaerated PWR water. More extensive cracks were found in specimen T-L orientation with a higher crack growth rate than that in the specimen L-T orientation with a lower crack growth rate. Crack branching phenomenon found in specimen L-T orientation in deaerated PWR water was synergistically affected by the applied stress direction as well as the preferential oxidation path along the elongated grain boundaries, and the latter was dominant.

  17. Multi level optimization of burnable poison utilization for advanced PWR fuel management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Serkan

    The objective of this study was to develop an unique methodology and a practical tool for designing burnable poison (BP) pattern for a given PWR core. Two techniques were studied in developing this tool. First, the deterministic technique called Modified Power Shape Forced Diffusion (MPSFD) method followed by a fine tuning algorithm, based on some heuristic rules, was developed to achieve this goal. Second, an efficient and a practical genetic algorithm (GA) tool was developed and applied successfully to Burnable Poisons (BPs) placement optimization problem for a reference Three Mile Island-1 (TMI-1) core. This thesis presents the step by step progress in developing such a tool. The developed deterministic method appeared to perform as expected. The GA technique produced excellent BP designs. It was discovered that the Beginning of Cycle (BOC) Kinf of a BP fuel assembly (FA) design is a good filter to eliminate invalid BP designs created during the optimization process. By eliminating all BP designs having BOC Kinf above a set limit, the computational time was greatly reduced since the evaluation process with reactor physics calculations for an invalid solution is canceled. Moreover, the GA was applied to develop the BP loading pattern to minimize the total Gadolinium (Gd) amount in the core together with the residual binding at End-of-Cycle (EOC) and to keep the maximum peak pin power during core depletion and Soluble boron concentration at BOC both less than their limit values. The number of UO2/Gd2O3 pins and Gd 2O3 concentrations for each fresh fuel location in the core are the decision variables and the total amount of the Gd in the core and maximum peak pin power during core depletion are in the fitness functions. The use of different fitness function definition and forcing the solution movement towards to desired region in the solution space accelerated the GA runs. Special emphasize is given to minimizing the residual binding to increase core lifetime as

  18. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no

  19. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    SciTech Connect

    Hartini, Entin Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan

    2014-09-30

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  20. Effects of PbO on the oxide films of incoloy 800HT in simulated primary circuit of PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu; Yang, Junhan; Wang, Wanwan; Shi, Rongxue; Liang, Kexin; Zhang, Shenghan

    2016-05-01

    Effects of trace PbO on oxide films of Incoloy 800HT were investigated in simulated primary circuit water chemistry of PWR, also with proper Co addition. The trace PbO addition in high temperature water blocked the protective spinel oxides formation of the oxide films of Incoloy 800HT. XPS results indicated that the lead, added as PbO into the high temperature water, shows not only +2 valance but also +4 and 0 valances in the oxide film of 800HT co-operated with Fe, Cr and Ni to form oxides films. Potentiodynamic polarization results indicated that as PbO concentration increased, the current densities of the less protective oxide films of Incoloy 800HT decreased in a buffer solution tested at room temperature. The capacitance results indicated that the donor densities of oxidation film of Incoloy 800HT decreased as trace PbO addition into the high temperature water.

  1. FLECHT SEASET program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hochreiter, L E

    1985-11-01

    This report presents the highlights and main findings of the USNRC, EPRI, and Westinghouse cooperative FLECHT SEASET program. The report indicates areas in which the results of the program can contribute to revising the current licensing requirements for Loss of Coolant (LOCA) safety analysis for PWRs. Also identified are several technical areas in which the new FLECHT SEASET data and analysis can lead to improved safety analysis modeling, and thereby to predicted PWR response for postulated accident scenarios. Significant progress has been made in the modeling areas of nonequilibrium dispersed two-phase flow during reflood. Improved models and understanding of this rod bundle cooling regime are summarized in this report. Another important result of the FLECHT SEASET program arises from the natural circulation test series, which investigated single-phase, two-phase, and reflux condensation cooling modes of a scaled PWR under small-break LOCA conditions. The tests and subsequent analysis constitute one of few complete sets of data for these cooling modes in which full-height, multitube steam generators with sufficient instrumentation were used to examine primary-to-secondary heat transfer in the generators. It is believed that the natural circulation test data will be extremely useful to benchmark the improved post-TMI small-break LOCA computer codes. 170 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Combined numerical and experimental investigations of local hydrodynamics and coolant flow mass transfer in Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies of PWR reactors with mixing grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. M.; Samoilov, O. B.; Khrobostov, A. E.; Varentsov, A. V.; Dobrov, A. A.; Doronkov, D. V.; Sorokin, V. D.

    2014-08-01

    Results of research works on studying local hydrodynamics and mass transfer for coolant flow in the characteristic zones of PWR reactor fuel assemblies in case of using belts of mixing spacer grids are presented. The investigations were carried out on an aerodynamic rig using the admixture diffusion method (the tracer-gas method). Certain specific features pertinent to coolant flow in the fuel rod bundles of Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies were revealed during the experiments. The obtained study results were included in the database for verifying computation fluid dynamics computer codes and detailed cell-wise calculations of reactor cores with Kvadrat-type fuel assemblies. The obtained results can also be used for more exact determination of local coolant flow hydrodynamic and mass transfer characteristics in assessing thermal reliability of PWR reactor cores.

  3. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 1: External HR Break Near Inlet Header

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    The APT blanket system has about 57 MW of thermal energy deposited within the blanket region under normal operating conditions from the release of neutrons and the interaction of the High energy particles with the blanket materials. This corresponds to about 48 percent of total thermal energy deposited in the APT target/blanket system. The deposited thermal energy under normal operation conditions is an important input parameter used in the thermal-hydraulic design and accident analysis.

  4. Chemical System Decontamination at PWR Power Stations Biblis A and B by Advanced System Decontamination by Oxidizing Chemistry (ASDOC-D) Process Technology - 13081

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Andreas; Runge, Hartmut; Stanke, Dieter; Bertholdt, Horst-Otto; Adams, Andreas; Impertro, Michael; Roesch, Josef

    2013-07-01

    For chemical decontamination of PWR primary systems the so called ASDOC-D process has been developed and qualified at the German PWR power station Biblis. In comparison to other chemical decontamination processes ASDOC-D offers a number of advantages: - ASDOC-D does not require separate process equipment but is completely operated and controlled by the nuclear site installations. Feeding of chemical concentrates into the primary system is done by means of the site's dosing systems. Process control is performed by standard site instrumentation and analytics. - ASDOC-D safely prevents any formation and precipitation of insoluble constituents - Since ASDOC-D is operated without external equipment there is no need for installation of such equipment in high radioactive radiation surrounding. The radioactive exposure rate during process implementation and process performance may therefore be neglected in comparison to other chemical decontamination processes. - ASDOC-D does not require auxiliary hose connections which usually bear high leakage risk. The above mentioned technical advantages of ASDOC-D together with its cost-effectiveness gave rise to Biblis Power station to agree on testing ASDOC-D at the volume control system of PWR Biblis unit A. By involving the licensing authorities as well as expert examiners into this test ASDOC-D received the official qualification for primary system decontamination in German PWR. As a main outcome of the achieved results NIS received contracts for full primary system decontamination of both units Biblis A and B (each 1.200 MW) by end of 2012. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D.; Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C.

    1994-10-01

    PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

  6. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  7. Standard- and extended-burnup PWR (pressurized-water reactor) and BWR (boiling-water reactor) reactor models for the ORIGEN2 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, S.B.; Renier, J.P.

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe an updated set of reactor models for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) operating on uranium fuel cycles and the methods used to generate the information for these models. Since new fuel cycle schemes and reactor core designs are introduced from time to time by reactor manufacturers and fuel vendors, an effort has been made to update these reactor models periodically and to expand the data bases used by the ORIGEN2 computer code. In addition, more sophisticated computational techniques than previously available were used to calculate the resulting reactor model cross-section libraries. The PWR models were based on a Westinghouse design, while the BWR models were based on a General Electric BWR/6 design. The specific reactor types considered in this report are as follows (see Glossary for the definition of these and other terms): (1) PWR-US, (2) PWR-UE, (3) BWR-US, (4) BWR-USO, and (5) BWR-UE. Each reactor model includes a unique data library that may be used to simulate the buildup and deletion of isotopes in nuclear materials using the ORIGEN2 computer code. 33 refs., 44 tabs.

  8. Scoping design analyses for optimized shipping casks containing 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, or 10-year-old PWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report details many of the interrelated considerations involved in optimizing large Pb, Fe, or U-metal spent fuel shipping casks containing 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, or 10-year-old PWR fuel assemblies. Scoping analyses based on criticality, shielding, and heat transfer considerations indicate that some casks may be able to hold as many as 18 to 21 ten-year-old PWR fuel assemblies. In the criticality section, a new type of inherently subcritical fuel assembly separator is described which uses hollow, borated stainless-steel tubes in the wall-forming structure between the assemblies. In another section, details of many n/..gamma.. shielding optimization studies are presented, including the optimal n/..gamma.. design points and the actual shielding requirements for each type of cask as a function of the age of the spent fuel and the number of assemblies in the cask. Multigroup source terms based on ORIGEN2 calculations at these and other decay times are also included. Lastly, the numerical methods and experimental correlations used in the steady-state and transient heat transfer analyses are fully documented, as are pertinent aspects of the SCOPE code for Shipping Cask Optimization and Parametric Evaluation. (While only casks for square, intact PWR fuel assemblies were considered in this study, the SCOPE code may also be used to design and analyze casks containing canistered spent fuel or other waste material. An abbreviated input data guide is included as an appendix).

  9. Evaluation of the effects of initial conditions on transients in PUMA

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-07-01

    Major differences between the SBWR and the currently operating BWRs include the use of passive gravity-driven systems in the SBWR for emergency cooling of the vessel and containment. In order to investigate the phenomena expected during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), NRC has sponsored an integral scaled-test facility, called Purdue, University Multidimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). The facility models all the major safety-related components of SBWR. Two PUMA initialization calculations were performed to assist the Purdue University in establishing test initialization procedures. Both calculations were based on the initial conditions obtained from SBWR LOCA simulation. In the base case, a complete separation between vapor and liquid was assumed, with all the water in the lower part of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and all the vapor above it. In the sensitivity case, the water inventory was distributed in the vessel in the same way as in the SBWR at 1.034 MPa, which is the initial pressure for PUMA facility. Purdue University plans to initialize the PUMA tests as in the base case. The sensitivity calculation is performed to provide assurance that this mode of initialization is adequate. It also provides information on possible differences in the progress of transients. The conditions outside of the vessel were identical for both cases prior to initiation of the accident. The paper will discuss the differences in the early part of the transient. The conclusion from this study will also apply to many integral facilities which simulate the reactor transients from the middle of the transient.

  10. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  11. Comparison of PWR - Burnup calculations with SCALE 5.0/TRITON other burnup codes and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Oberle, P.; Broeders, C. H. M.; Dagan, R.

    2006-07-01

    The increasing tendency towards fuel lifetime extension in thermal nuclear reactors motivated validation work for available evaluation tools for nuclear fuel burnup calculations. In this study two deterministic codes with different transport solvers and one Monte Carlo method are investigated. The code system KAPROS/KARBUS uses the classical deterministic First Collision Probability method utilizing a cylinderized Wigner-Seitz cell. In the SCALES.0/TRITON/NEWT code the Extended Step Characteristic method is applied. In a first step the two deterministic codes are compared with experimental results from the KWO-Isotope Correlation Experiment up to 30 MWD/kg HM burnup, published in 1981. Two pin cell calculations are analyzed by comparison of calculated and experimental results for important heavy isotope vectors. The results are very satisfactory. Subsequently, further validation at higher burnup (< 80 MWD/kg HM) is provided by comparison of the two deterministic codes and the Monte Carlo based burnup code MONTEBURNS for PWR UO{sub 2} fuel assembly calculations. Possible reasons for differences in the results are analyzed and discussed. Especially the influence of cross section data and processing is presented. (authors)

  12. Benchmark of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions of depletion analyses for San Onofre PWR MOX fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-02-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, fabricated with both uranium and plutonium, after discharge from reactors is of significant interest to the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The validation of the SCALE (SAS2H) depletion code for use in the prediction of isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to previous validation studies on uranium-only fueled reactors, has corresponding significance. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program examined the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit 1, during cycles 2 and 3. Isotopic analyses of the MOX spent fuel were conducted on 13 actinides and {sup 148}Nd by either mass or alpha spectrometry. Six fuel pellet samples were taken from four different fuel pins of an irradiated MOX assembly. The measured actinide inventories from those samples has been used to benchmark SAS2H for MOX fuel applications. The average percentage differences in the code results compared with the measurement were {minus}0.9% for {sup 235}U and 5.2% for {sup 239}Pu. The differences for most of the isotopes were significantly larger than in the cases for uranium-only fueled reactors. In general, comparisons of code results with alpha spectrometer data had extreme differences, although the differences in the calculations compared with mass spectrometer analyses were not extremely larger than that of uranium-only fueled reactors. This benchmark study should be useful in estimating uncertainties of inventory, criticality and dose calculations of MOX spent fuel.

  13. Presentation of the MERC work-flow for the computation of a 2D radial reflector in a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, T.; Hebert, A.; Leroyer, H.; Argaud, J. P.; Poncot, A.; Bouriquet, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a work-flow for computing an equivalent 2D radial reflector in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core, in adequacy with a reference power distribution, computed with the method of characteristics (MOC) of the lattice code APOLLO2. The Multi-modelling Equivalent Reflector Computation (MERC) work-flow is a coherent association of the lattice code APOLLO2 and the core code COCAGNE, structured around the ADAO (Assimilation de Donnees et Aide a l'Optimisation) module of the SALOME platform, based on the data assimilation theory. This study leads to the computation of equivalent few-groups reflectors, that can be spatially heterogeneous, which have been compared to those obtained with the OPTEX similar methodology developed with the core code DONJON, as a first validation step. Subsequently, the MERC work-flow is used to compute the most accurate reflector in consistency with all the R and D choices made at Electricite de France (EDF) for the core modelling, in terms of number of energy groups and simplified transport solvers. We observe important reductions of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using equivalent reflectors obtained with the MERC work-flow. (authors)

  14. In-plant test and evaluation of the neutron collar for verification of PWR fuel assemblies at Resende, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Marzo, M.A.S.; de Almeida, S.G.; de Almeida, M.C.; Moitta, L.P.M.; Conti, L.F.; de Paiva, J.R.T.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar has been evaluated for the measurement of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies at the Fabrica de Elementos Combustiveis plant in Resende, Brazil. This evaluation was part of the cooperative-bilateral-safeguards technical-exchange program between the United States and Brazil. The neutron collar measures the STVU content per unit length of full fuel assemblies using neutron interrogation and coincidence counting. The STYU content is measured in the passive mode without the AmLi neutron-interrogation source. The extended evaluation took place over a period of 6 months with both scanning and single-zone measurements. The results of the tests gave a coincidence-response standard deviation of 0.7% (sigma = 1.49% for mass) for the active case and 2.5% for the passive case in 1000-s measurement times. The length measurement in the scanning mode was accurate to 0.77%. The accuracies of different calibration methods were evaluated and compared.

  15. Development of modified MDA (M-MDA), PWR fuel cladding tube for high duty operation in future

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Seiichi; Kido, Toshiya; Arakawa, Yasushi

    2007-07-01

    A new cladding material of M-MDA has been developed in order to prepare for a strong growing demand for advanced fuel which can maintain its integrity even under high duties due to more efficient operation such as higher burnup, higher LHR, and longer operation cycle which will contribute the suppression of environmental burdens like CO{sub 2} emission. The main aim of M-MDA is to have excellent corrosion resistance while the other properties are inherited from MDA, which has been adopted to the step 2 fuel, instead of Zry-4, of Japanese PWR plant whose upper limit of assembly discharged burnup is 55 MWd/kgU. And we could confirm that the main aim of M-MDA was achieved by means of out-of-pile tests. In order to confirm improvement of corrosion resistance of M-MDA in the actual operation, irradiation test of M-MDA in the commercial reactor of Vandellos II is ongoing. The latest results of on-site examination after every end of cycle showed that oxide thickness of M-MDA-SR was much smaller than that of MDA at rod discharged burnup of approximately 60 MWd/kgU. The final irradiation cycle was completed on April 2007 and then we will obtain corrosion data of M-MDA over 70 MWd/kgU. M-MDA is a candidate alloy for advanced fuel under higher duty usage. (authors)

  16. Improvement of the thermal margins in the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR by introducing new fuel assemblies with thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, C. W.; Demaziere, C.; Nylen, H.; Sandberg, U.

    2012-07-01

    Thorium is a fertile material and most of the past research has focused on breeding thorium to fissile material. In this paper, the focus is on using thorium to improve the thermal margins by homogeneously distributing thorium in the fuel pellets. A proposed uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly is simulated for the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR core in a realistic demonstration. All the key safety parameters, such as isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, Doppler temperature of reactivity, boron worth, shutdown margins and fraction of delayed neutrons are studied in this paper, and are within safety limits for the new core design using the uranium-thorium-based fuel assemblies. The calculations were performed by the two-dimensional transport code CASMO-4E and the two group steady-state three dimensional nodal code SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik Scandpower. The results showed that the uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly improves the thermal margins, both in the pin peak power and the local power (Fq). The improved thermal margins would allow more flexible core designs with less neutron leakage or could be used in power uprates to offer efficient safety margins. (authors)

  17. Non-Invasive Characterization of Burnup for PWR Spent Fuel Rods with Burnups > 80 GWd/t

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, S.; Murphy, M.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R.

    2006-07-01

    High-resolution gamma spectroscopy has been employed for the measurement of {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs/{sup 154}Eu gamma intensity ratios from spent fuel with the purpose of deriving pin-averaged single-ratio burnup indicators for high and ultra-high burnups. Two UO{sub 2} pressurised water reactor (PWR) fuel rod segments with record burnup levels >80 GWd/t have been experimentally characterised. Additionally, pin cell depletion calculations have been performed for each sample with the deterministic code CASMO-4, using both its JEF2.2- and its ENDF/B-IV-based libraries, for three different descriptions of the fuel rod irradiation histories, in order to test the sensitivity of the results to neutron cross sections and to the depletion model employed. Measured and calculated ratios have then been compared. It is shown that the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio, frequently used as burnup monitor, is considerably less accurate for values exceeding 50 GWd/t; discrepancies of up to {approx}25% are found between measured and calculated values. The ratios built with the {sup 154}Eu concentration show much larger discrepancies, essentially because this isotope is rather poorly predicted as revealed by the use of different basic cross section data. (authors)

  18. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.

    2015-05-01

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  19. Evaluation of the effects of initial conditions on transients in PUMA

    SciTech Connect

    Parlatan, Y.; Jo, J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1996-06-01

    A Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is the latest Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) designed by the General Electric (GE). Major differences between the SBWR and the currently operating BWRs include the use of passive gravity-driven systems in the SBWR for emergency cooling of the vessel and containment. In order to investigate the phenomena expected during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored an integral scaled-test facility, called Purdue University Multidimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA). The facility models all the major safety-related components of SBWR. Two PUMA initialization calculations were performed to assist the Purdue University in establishing test initialization procedures. Both calculations were based on the initial conditions obtained from SBWR LOCA simulation. In the base case, a complete separation between vapor and liquid was assumed, with all the water in the lower part of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and all the vapor above it. In the sensitivity case, the water inventory was distributed in the vessel in the same way as in the SBWR at 1.034 MPa, which is the initial pressure for PUMA facility. Purdue University plans to initialize the PUMA tests as in the base case. The sensitivity calculation is performed to provide assurance that this mode of initialization is adequate. It also provides information on possible differences in the progress of transients. The paper will discuss the differences in the early part of the transient. The conclusion from this study will also apply to many integral facilities which simulate the reactor transients form the middle of the transient.

  20. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2014-05-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation

  1. TMI-2 - A Case Study for PWR Instrumentation Performance during a Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson

    2013-03-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor provided a unique opportunity to evaluate sensors exposed to severe accident conditions. Conditions associated with the release of coolant and the hydrogen burn that occurred during this accident exposed instrumentation to harsh conditions, including direct radiation, radioactive contamination, and high humidity with elevated temperatures and pressures. As part of a program initiated in 2012 by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a review was completed to gain insights from prior TMI-2 sensor survivability and data qualification efforts. This new effort focussed upon a set of sensors that provided critical data to TMI-2 operators for assessing the condition of the plant and the effects of mitigating actions taken by these operators. In addition, the effort considered sensors providing data required for subsequent accident simulations. Over 100 references related to instrumentation performance and post-accident evaluations of TMI-2 sensors and measurements were reviewed. Insights gained from this review are summarized within this report. For each sensor, a description is provided with the measured data and conclusions related to the sensor’s survivability, and the basis for conclusions about its survivability. As noted within this document, several techniques were invoked in the TMI-2 post-accident evaluation program to assess sensor status, including comparisons with data from other sensors, analytical calculations, laboratory testing, and comparisons with sensors subjected to similar conditions in large-scale integral tests and with sensors that were similar in design but more easily removed from the TMI-2 plant for evaluations. Conclusions from this review provide important insights related to sensor survivability and enhancement options for improving sensor performance. In addition, this document provides recommendations related to the sensor survivability and data evaluation

  2. Dosimetry Evaluation of In-Core and Above-Core Zirconium Alloy Samples in a PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Foster, John P.; Greenwood, Larry R.

    2016-02-01

    A description of the neutron fluence analysis of activated zirconium alloys samples at a Westinghouse 3-loop reactor is presented. These samples were irradiated in the core and in the fuel plenum region, where dosimetry measurements are relatively rare compared with regions radially outward of the core. Dosimetry measurements performed by Batelle/PNNL are compared to the calculational models. Good agreement is shown with the in-core measurements when using analysis conditions expected to best represent this region, such as an assembly-specific axial power distribution. However, the use of these conditions to evaluate dosimetry in the fuel plenum region can lead to significant underestimation of the fluence. The use of a flat axial power distribution, however, does not underestimate the fluence in the fuel plenum region.

  3. Application of the TEMPEST computer code for simulating hydrogen distribution in model containment structures. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.

    1982-09-01

    In this study several aspects of simulating hydrogen distribution in geometric configurations relevant to reactor containment structures were investigated using the TEMPEST computer code. Of particular interest was the performance of the TEMPEST turbulence model in a density-stratified environment. Computed results illustrated that the TEMPEST numerical procedures predicted the measured phenomena with good accuracy under a variety of conditions and that the turbulence model used is a viable approach in complex turbulent flow simulation.

  4. RELAP-7 Level 2 Milestone Report: Demonstration of a Steady State Single Phase PWR Simulation with RELAP-7

    SciTech Connect

    David Andrs; Ray Berry; Derek Gaston; Richard Martineau; John Peterson; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou

    2012-05-01

    The document contains the simulation results of a steady state model PWR problem with the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on INL's modern scientific software development framework - MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). This report summarizes the initial results of simulating a model steady-state single phase PWR problem using the current version of the RELAP-7 code. The major purpose of this demonstration simulation is to show that RELAP-7 code can be rapidly developed to simulate single-phase reactor problems. RELAP-7 is a new project started on October 1st, 2011. It will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series (the replacement for RELAP5). The key to the success of RELAP-7 is the simultaneous advancement of physical models, numerical methods, and software design while maintaining a solid user perspective. Physical models include both PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations) and experimental based closure models. RELAP-7 will eventually utilize well posed governing equations for multiphase flow, which can be strictly verified. Closure models used in RELAP5 and newly developed models will be reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past three decades. RELAP-7 uses modern numerical methods, which allow implicit time integration, higher order schemes in both time and space, and strongly coupled multi-physics simulations. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. Its development follows modern software design paradigms. The code is easy to read, develop, maintain, and couple with other codes. Most importantly, the modern software design allows the RELAP-7 code to

  5. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  6. Advanced Fabrication Technique and Thermal Performance Prediction of U-Mo/Zr-alloy Dispersion Fuel Pin for High Burnup PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardi

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, a novel class of zirconium alloys having the melting temperature of 990-1160 K has been developed. Based on novel zirconium matrix alloys, high uranium content fuel pin with U-9Mo has been developed according to capillary impregnation technique. The pin shows it is thermal conductivity ranging from 18 to 22 w/m/K that is comparably higher than UO2 pellet pin. The paper presents the met-met fabrication and thermal performance analysis of the fuel in typical PWR. The fabrication consists of mixing UO2 powder or granules and a novel Zr-alloy powder having low melting point, filling the mixture in a cladding tube that one of its end has been plugged, heating the pin to above melting temperature of Zr-alloy for an hour, natural cooling and heat treating at 300 K for 1/2 hr. The thermal analysis takes into account the pore and temperature distribution and high burn up effect to pellet conductivity. The thermal diffusivity ratio of novel to conventional fuel has been used as correction factor for the novel fuel conductivity. The results show a significant lowering pellet temperature along the radius until 1000 K at the hottest position. The analysis underestimates since the gap conductivity has been treated as decreased by 2% fission gas released that is not real since the use of lower temperature, and also decreasing thermal conductivity by porosity formation will much lower. The analysis shows that the novel fuel has very good thermal properties which able to pass the barrier of 65 MWD/kg-U, the limit to day commercial fuel. The burn-up extension means fewer fresh fuel is needed to produce electricity, preserve natural uranium resource, easier fuel handling operational per energy produced

  7. Rod consolidation of RG and E's (Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation) spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-05-01

    The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling the fuel rods from five fuel assemblies from Unit 1 of RG and E's R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant. Slow and careful rod pulling efforts were used for the first and second fuel assemblies. Rod pulling then proceeded smoothly and rapidly after some minor modifications were made to the UST and D consolidation equipment. The compaction ratios attained ranged from 1.85 to 2.00 (rods with collapsed cladding were replaced by dummy rods in one fuel assembly to demonstrate the 2:1 compaction ratio capability). This demonstration involved 895 PWR fuel rods, among which there were some known defective rods (over 50 had collapsed cladding); no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. However, one of the rods with collapsed cladding unexplainably broke during handling operations (i.e., reconfiguration in the failed fuel canister), subsequent to the rod consolidation demonstration. The broken rod created no facility problems; the pieces were encapsulated for subsequent storage. Another broken rod was found during postdemonstration cutting operations on the nonfuel-bearing structural components from the five assemblies; evidence indicates it was broken prior to any rod consolidation operations. During the demonstration, burnish-type lines or scratches were visible on the rods that were pulled; however, experience indicates that such lines are generally produced when rods are pulled (or pushed) through the spacer grids. Rods with collapsed cladding would not enter the funnel (the transition device between the fuel assembly and the canister that aids in obtaining high compaction ratios). Reforming of the flattened areas of the cladding on those rods was attempted to make the rod cross sections more nearly circular; some of the reformed rods passed through the funnel and into the canister.

  8. Modeling of local steam condensation on walls in presence of non-condensable gases. Application to a loca calculation in reactor containment using the multidimensional geyser/tonus code

    SciTech Connect

    Benet, L.V.; Caroli, C.; Cornet, P.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports part of a study of possible severe pressurized water reactor (PWR) accidents. The need for containment modeling, and in particular for a hydrogen risk study, was reinforced in France after 1990, with the requirement that severe accidents must be taken into account in the design of future plants. This new need of assessing the transient local hydrogen concentration led to the development, in the Mechanical Engineering and Technology Department of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA/DMT), of the multidimensional code GEYSER/TONUS for containment analysis. A detailed example of the use of this code is presented. The mixture consisted of noncondensable gases (air or air plus hydrogen) and water vapor and liquid water. This is described by a compressible homogeneous two-phase flow model and wall condensation is based on the Chilton-Colburn formula and the analogy between heat and mass transfer. Results are given for a transient two-dimensional axially-symmetric computation for the first hour of a simplified accident sequence. In this there was an initial injection of a large amount of water vapor followed by a smaller amount and by hydrogen injection.

  9. PWR FLECHT SEASET 163-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task data report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 13, August-October 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M J; Hochreiter, L E; McGuire, M F; Valkovic, M M

    1983-10-01

    This report presents data from the 163-Rod Bundle Blow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Systems Effects and Separate Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The task consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. These tests were designed to determine effects of flow blockage and flow bypass on reflooding behavior and to aid in the assessment of computational models in predicting the reflooding behavior of flow blockage in rod bundle arrays.

  10. Development of a coupled PARCS/RELAPS model of the Ringhals-3 PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Banati, J.; Demaziere, C.; Staalek, M.

    2006-07-01

    This paper deals with the development of a coupled PARCS/RELAPS model of the Swedish Ringhals-3 pressurized water reactor. The stand-alone PARCS and RELAP5 models are first presented. On the neutronic side, the dependence of the material constants on history effects, burnup, and instantaneous conditions is accounted for, and the full heterogeneity of the core is thus taken into account. The reflectors are also explicitly represented. On the thermal-hydraulic side, each of the 157 fuel assemblies is modeled. The model is furthermore able to handle possible asymmetrical conditions of the flow field between the loops. The coupling between the two codes is then reported, with emphasis on the mapping between the hydrodynamic/heat structures and the neutronic nodes. Preliminary coupling tests for steady-state calculations were successfully performed and comparisons against plant measured data demonstrate a very good agreement of the model with the measurements. The coupled model will be later on used for analyzing the consequences of the power up-rate planned for this reactor, via the simulation of a few limiting transients. (authors)

  11. A High Fidelity Multiphysics Framework for Modeling CRUD Deposition on PWR Fuel Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Daniel John

    Corrosion products on the fuel cladding surfaces within pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies have had a significant impact on reactor operation. These types of deposits are referred to as CRUD and can lead to power shifts, as a consequence of the accumulation of solid boron phases on the fuel rod surfaces. Corrosion deposits can also lead to fuel failure resulting from localized corrosion, where the increased thermal resistance of the deposit leads to higher cladding temperatures. The prediction of these occurrences requires a comprehensive model of local thermal hydraulic and chemical processes occurring in close proximity to the cladding surface, as well as their driving factors. Such factors include the rod power distribution, coolant corrosion product concentration, as well as the feedbacks between heat transfer, fluid dynamics, chemistry, and neutronics. To correctly capture the coupled physics and corresponding feedbacks, a high fidelity framework is developed that predicts three-dimensional CRUD deposition on a rod-by-rod basis. Multiphysics boundary conditions resulting from the coupling of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, coolant chemistry, CRUD deposition, neutron transport, and nuclide transmutation inform the CRUD deposition solver. Through systematic parametric sensitivity studies of the CRUD property inputs, coupled boundary conditions, and multiphysics feedback mechanisms, the most important variables of multiphysics CRUD modeling are identified. Moreover, the modeling framework is challenged with a blind comparison of plant data to predictions by a simulation of a sub-assembly within the Seabrook nuclear plant that experienced CRUD induced fuel failures. The physics within the computational framework are loosely coupled via an operator-splitting technique. A control theory approach is adopted to determine the temporal discretization at which to execute a data transfer from one physics to another. The coupled stepsize selection is viewed as a

  12. RELAP5 assessment: LOFT small-break L3-6/L8-1. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L N

    1983-03-01

    The RELAP5 independent assessment project at Sandia National Laboratories is part of an overall effort funded by the NRC to determine the ability of various systems codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of LWR's during accident and off-normal conditions. The RELAP5 code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, a small break transient and subsequent partial core uncovery transient performed at the LOFT facility have been analyzed. The results show that RELAP5/MOD1 does very well on predicting the qualitative behavior for this small break experiment, although there are a number of quantitative disagreements.

  13. RELAP5 assessment: LOFT intermediate breaks L5-1 and L8-2. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Orman, J.L.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1983-08-01

    The RELAP5 independent assessment project at Sandia National Laboratories is part of an overall effort funded by the NRC to determine the ability of various systems codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of LWRs during accident and off-normal conditions. The RELAP5 code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, an intermediate break transient (L5-1) and a core uncovery transient (L8-2) performed at the LOFT facility have been analyzed. Transient calculations were done with both cycle 14 and cycle 18 of RELAP5/MOD1 and a comparison of the predictions was made. The results show that RELAP5/MOD1 did very well calculating the overall behavior for these intermediate break experiments, although there were a few quantitative disagreements.

  14. Evaluation of integral continuing experimental capability (CEC) concepts for light water reactor research: PWR scaling concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Condie, K G; Larson, T K; Davis, C B; McCreery, G E

    1987-02-01

    In this report reactor transients and thermal-hydraulic phenomena of importance (based on probabilistic risk assessment and the International Code Assessment Program) to reactor safety were examined and identified. Established scaling methodologies were used to develop potential concepts for integral thermal-hydraulic testing facilities. Advantages and disadvantages of each concept are evaluated. Analysis is conducted to examine the scaling of various phenomena in each of the selected concepts. Results generally suggest that a facility capable of operating at typical reactor operating conditions will scale most phenomena reasonably well. Although many phenomena in facilities using Freon or water at nontypical pressure will scale reasonably well, those phenomena that are heavily dependent on quality (heat transfer or critical flow for example) can be distorted. Furthermore, relation of data produced in facilities operating with nontypical fluids or at nontypical pressures to large plants will be a difficult and time consuming process.

  15. PWR hybrid computer model for assessing the safety implications of control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, O L; Renier, J P; Difilippo, F C; Clapp, N E; Sozer, A; Booth, R S; Craddick, W G; Morris, D G

    1986-03-01

    The ORNL study of safety-related aspects of nuclear power plant control systems consists of two interrelated tasks: (1) failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) that identified single and multiple component failures that might lead to significant plant upsets and (2) computer models that used these failures as initial conditions and traced the dynamic impact on the control system and remainder of the plant. This report describes the simulation of Oconee Unit 1, the first plant analyzed. A first-principles, best-estimate model was developed and implemented on a hybrid computer consisting of AD-4 analog and PDP-10 digital machines. Controls were placed primarily on the analog to use its interactive capability to simulate operator action. 48 refs., 138 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Overview of the use of prestressed concrete in US nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ashar, H.; Naus, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    In the United States it is required that the condition and functional capability of the ungrouted post-tensioning systems of prestressed-concrete nuclear-power-plant containments be periodically assessed. This is accomplished, in part, systematically through an inservice tendon inspection program which must be developed and implemented for each containment. An overview of the essential elements of the inservice inspection requirements is presented, and the effectiveness of these requirements is demonstrated through presentation of some of the potential problem areas which have been identified through the periodic assessments of the structural integrity of containments. Also, a summary of general problems which have been encountered with prestressed-concrete construction at nuclear-power-plant containments in the United States is presented: that is, dome delamination, cracking of anchorheads, settlement of bearing plates, etc. The paper will conclude with an assessment of the overall effectiveness of the prestressed-concrete containments.

  17. Developmental techniques for ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization in stainless steel. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1983-04-01

    Flaw detection and characterization by ultrasonic methods is particularly difficult for stainless steel. This paper focuses on two specific problem areas: (a) the inspection of centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) and (b) the differentiation of intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) from geometrical reflectors such as the weld root. To help identify optimal conditions for the ultrasonic inspection of CCSS, the effect of frequency on propagation of longitudinal and shear waves was examined in both isotropic and anisotropic samples. Good results were obtained with isotropic CCSS and 0.5-MHz angle beam shear waves. The use of beam-scattering patterns (i.e. signal amplitude vs skew angle) as a tool for discriminating IGSCC from geometrical reflectors is also discussed.

  18. Full-scale turbine-missile-casing tests. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Schamaun, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of two full-scale tests simulating the impact of turbine disk fragments on simple ring and shell structures that represent the internal stator blade ring and the outer housing of an 1800-rpm steam turbine casing. The objective was to provide benchmark data on both the energy-absorbing mechanisms of the impact process and, if breakthrough occured, the exit conditions of the turbine missile. A rocket sled was used to accelerate a 1527-kg (3366-lb) segment of a turbine disk, which impacted a steel ring 12.7 cm (5 in.) thick and a steel shell 3.2 cm (1.25 in.) thick. The impact velocity of about 150 m/s (492 ft/s) gave a missile kinetic energy corresponding to the energy of a fragment from a postulated failure at the design overspeed (120% of operating speed). Depending on the orientation of the missile at impact, the steel test structure either slowed the missile to 60% of its initial translational velocity or brought it almost to rest (an energy reduction of 65 and 100%, respectively). The report includes structural and finite element analysis and data interpretation, estimates of energy during impact, missile displacement and velocity histories, and selected strain gage data.

  19. TRAC analyses of severe overcooling transients for the Oconee-1 PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, J R

    1985-05-01

    This report describes the results of several Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-PF1 calculations of overcooling transients in a Babcock and Wilcox lowered-loop, pressurized water reactor (Oconee-1). The purpose of this study is to provide detailed input on thermal-hydraulic data to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for pressurized thermal-shock analyses. The transient calculations performed were plant specific in that details of the primary system, the secondary system, and the plant-integrated control system of Oconee-1 were included in the TRAC input model. The results of the calculations indicate that the turbine-bypass valve failure transient was the most severe in terms of resulting in relatively cold liquid temperatures in the downcomer region of the vessel. The power-operated relief valve loss-of-coolant accident transient was the least severe in terms of downcomer liquid temperatures because of vent-valve fluid mixing and near-saturated conditions in the primary system. It is recommended that future calculations consider a wider range of operator actions to cover the spectra of overcooling transient sequences more completely. 6 refs., 287 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Hydrogen combustion and control studies in intermediate scale. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, R.; Siefert, K.; Wachtler, W.; Gay, R.R.; Gloski, D.M.; Wanless, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the combustion behavior of hydrogen under containment conditions which might occur in a postulated degraded-core accident. Parameters included hydrogen concentration, hydrogen and steam flow rates, water-vapor concentration, igniter location, and water-spray characteristics. Both quiescent (premixed) and dynamic (continuous injection) tests were conducted in a vessel of 213 cm (7 ft) internal diameter by 518 cm (17 ft) high, having a volume of 17,800 liters (630 ft/sup 3/). Measurements were made of temperatures, pressure, flamefront propagation, and gas-constituent concentration. The maximum overepressure increase in the 17 dynamic injection tests was 193 kPa (28 psi) for a case without steam addition to the hydrogen flow and without water sprays or fog. The presence of steam injected with hydrogen generally lowered the maximum pressure observed. Equipment response scoping tests were performed on a representative sample of safety-related Class 1E equipment and cable typically used in nuclear-reactor containments.

  1. Performance Spec. for Fuel Drying and Canister Inerting System for PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies Stored within Shipping Port Spent Fuel Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-03-14

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and basic design requirements imposed on the fuel drying and canister inerting system for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies (BFAs) stored within Shippingport spent fuel (SSFCs) canisters (fuel drying and canister inerting system). This fuel drying and canister inerting system is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Spent Nuclear Fuels Project at the Hanford Site. The fuel drying and canister inerting system provides for removing water and establishing an inert environment for Shippingport PWR Core 2 BFAs stored within SSFCs. A policy established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) states that new SNF facilities (this is interpreted to include structures, systems and components) shall achieve nuclear safety equivalence to comparable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. This will be accomplished in part by applying appropriate NRC requirements for comparable NRC-licensed facilities to the fuel drying and canister inerting system, in addition to applicable DOE regulations and orders.

  2. Effects of future climate conditions on terrestrial export from coastal southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Zhao, Y.; Raoufi, R.; Beighley, E.; Melack, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Santa Barbara Coastal - Long Term Ecological Research Project (SBC-LTER) is focused on investigating the relative importance of land and ocean processes in structuring giant kelp forest ecosystems. Understanding how current and future climate conditions influence terrestrial export is a central theme for the project. Here we combine the Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model and daily precipitation and temperature downscaled using statistical downscaling based on localized constructed Analogs (LOCA) to estimate recent streamflow dynamics (2000 to 2014) and future conditions (2015 to 2100). The HRR model covers the SBC-LTER watersheds from just west of the Ventura River to Point Conception; a land area of roughly 800 km2 with 179 watersheds ranging from 0.1 to 123 km2. The downscaled climate conditions have a spatial resolution of 6 km by 6 km. Here, we use the Penman-Monteith method with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) limited climate data approximations and land surface conditions (albedo, leaf area index, land cover) measured from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites to estimate potential evapotranspiration (PET). The HRR model is calibrated for the period 2000 to 2014 using USGS and LTER streamflow. An automated calibration technique is used. For future climate scenarios, we use mean 8-day land cover conditions. Future streamflow, ET and soil moisture statistics are presented and based on downscaled P and T from ten climate model projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5).

  3. Criticality Analysis of Assembly Misload in a PWR Burnup Credit Cask

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J. C.

    2008-01-31

    The Interim Staff Guidance on bumup credit (ISG-8) for spent fuel in storage and transportation casks, issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends a bumup measurement for each assembly to confirm the reactor record and compliance with the assembly bumup value used for loading acceptance. This recommendation is intended to prevent unauthorized loading (misloading) of assemblies due to inaccuracies in reactor burnup records and/or improper assembly identification, thereby ensuring that the appropriate subcritical margin is maintained. This report presents a computational criticality safety analysis of the consequences of misloading fuel assemblies in a highcapacity cask that relies on burnup credit for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to provide a quantitative understanding of the effects of fuel misloading events on safety margins. A wide variety of fuel-misloading configurations are investigated and results are provided for informational purposes. This report does not address the likelihood of occurrence for any of the misload configurations considered. For representative, qualified bumup-enrichment combinations, with and without fission products included, misloading two assemblies that are underburned by 75% results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045, while misloading four assemblies that are underburned by 50% also results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045. For the cask and conditions considered, a reduction in bumup of 20% in all assemblies results in an increase in kff of less than 0.035. Misloading a single fresh assembly with 3, 4, or 5 wt% 235U enrichment results in an increase in keffof--0.02, 0.04, or 0.06, respectively. The report concludes with a summary of these and other important findings, as well as a discussion of relevant issues that should be considered when assessing the appropriate role of burnup measurements.

  4. Post-Service Examination of PWR Baffle Bolts, Part I. Examination and Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Keith J.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Gussev, Maxim N.

    2015-04-30

    In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor plants, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating with Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, The Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and ATI Consulting, the selective procurement of baffle bolts that were withdrawn from service in 2011 and currently stored on site at Ginna. The goal of this program is to perform detailed microstructural and mechanical property characterization of baffle former bolts following in-service exposures. This report outlines the selection criteria of the bolts and the techniques to be used in this study. The bolts available are the original alloy 347 steel fasteners used in holding the baffle plates to the baffle former structures within the lower portion of the pressurized water reactor vessel. Of the eleven possible bolts made available for this work, none were identified to have specific damage. The bolts, however, did show varying levels of breakaway torque required in their removal. The bolts available for this study varied in peak fluence (highest dose within the head of the bolt) between 9.9 and 27.8x1021 n/cm2 (E>1MeV). As no evidence for crack initiation was determined for the available bolts from preliminary visual examination, two bolts with the higher fluence values were selected for further post-irradiation examination. The two bolts showed different breakaway torque levels necessary in their removal. The information from these bolts will be integral to the LWRS program initiatives in evaluating end of life microstructure and properties. Furthermore, valuable data will be obtained that can be incorporated into model predictions of long-term irradiation behavior and compared to results obtained in high flux experimental reactor conditions. The two bolts selected for the ORNL study will be shipped to Westinghouse with bolts of

  5. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-09-28

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (U.S. NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% {Delta}k. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs

  6. Church ladies, good girls, and locas

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Pamela Y; von Unger, Hella; Armbrister, Adria

    2008-01-01

    Inner city women with severe mental illness may carry multiple stigmatized statuses. In some contexts these include having a mental illness, being a member of an ethnic minority group, being an immigrant, being poor, and being a woman who does not live up to gendered expectations. These potentially stigmatizing identities influence both the way women’s sexuality is viewed and their risk for HIV infection. This qualitative study applies the concept of intersectionality to facilitate understanding of how these multiple identities intersect to influence women’s sexuality and HIV risk. We report the firsthand accounts of 24 Latina women living with severe mental illness in New York City. In examining the interlocking domains of these women’s sexual lives, we find that the women seek identities that define them in opposition to the stigmatizing label of “loca” (Spanish for crazy) and bestow respect and dignity. These identities have unfolded through the additional themes of “good girls” and “church ladies”. Therefore, inspite of their association with the “loca”, the women also identify with faith and religion (“church ladies”) and uphold more traditional gender norms (“good girls”) that are often undermined by the realities of life with a severe mental illness and the stigma attached to it. However, the participants fall short of their gender ideals and engage in sexual relationships that they experience as disempowering and unsatisfying. The effects of their multiple identities as poor Latina women living with severe mental illness in an urban ethnic minority community are not always additive, but the interlocking effects can facilitate increased HIV risks. Interventions should acknowledge women’s multiple layers of vulnerability, both individual and structural, and stress women’s empowerment in and beyond the sexual realm. PMID:18423828

  7. Reactor coolant seal testing under station blackout conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Failures of reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals that could result in a significant loss-of-coolant inventory are of current concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Particular attention is being focused on seal behavior during station blackout conditions, when failure of on-site emergency diesel generators occurs simultaneously with loss of all off-site alternating current power. Under these conditions, both seal injection flow and component cooling water flow are lost, and the RCP seals are exposed to full reactor coolant temperature. Overheating of elastomeric components and flashing of coolant across the sealing faces can cause unacceptably high leakage rates, with potential catastrophic consequences. A test program has been conducted that subjects full-scale seal cartridges to typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant system steady-state and transient operation conditions including associated dynamic shaft motions. A special test segment was developed to evaluate seal operation under station blackout conditions. The test program successfully mirrored the severity of an actual loss-of-seal cooling water event under station blackout conditions, and the Byron Jackson{reg sign} N-9000 seal cartridge maintained its integrity.

  8. Winning Conditions?

    PubMed

    Green, Esther; Moody, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    The authors of the paper, "The Patient Experience in Ontario 2020: What is Possible?", framed both the current state as well as the future of what patient experience might look like in five years. To ensure intention is catalyzed into meaningful change to improve experience and outcomes, we suggest four winning conditions. The first is to change the language; patients are people too, irrespective of their disease or illness; person-centred is inclusive language and ought to be the focus. The second condition is focused on leaders who play a critical role to establish, build and embed person-centred within the organization. The third and fourth winning conditions are building the evidence base and using effective and meaningful engagement, moving beyond advice, to partnership, respectively. Person-centred care is not the flavour of the month, it is here to stay. Ontarians are important actors in the system not only as users of the system but owners as well. To those who might argue that it is costly to do this work, what are the costs to not engage? Are we satisfied not only as administrators, and clinicians, but as patients at some point, to maintain the status quo? PMID:26888319

  9. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 9. PRAISE computer code user's manual. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, E.Y.

    1981-06-01

    The PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) computer code estimates the influence of earthquakes on the probability of failure at a weld joint in the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor. Failure, either a through-wall defect (leak) or a complete pipe severance (a large-LOCA), is assumed to be caused by fatigue crack growth of an as-fabricated interior surface circumferential defect. These defects are assumed to be two-dimensional and semi-elliptical in shape. The distribution of initial crack sizes is a function of crack depth and aspect ratio. PRAISE treats the inter-arrival times of operating transients either as a constant or exponentially distributed according to observed or postulated rates. Leak rate and leak detection models are also included. The criterion for complete pipe severance is exceedance of a net section critical stress. Earthquakes of various intensity and arbitrary occurrence times can be modeled. PRAISE presently assumes that exactly one initial defect exists in the weld and that the earthquake of interest is the first earthquake experienced at the reactor. PRAISE has a very modular structure and can be tailored to a variety of crack growth and piping reliability problems. Although PRAISE was developed on a CDC-7600 computer, it was, however, coded in standard FORTRAN IV and is readily transportable to other machines.

  10. Iodine volatility. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this program is to couple experimental aqueous iodine volatilities to a fission product release model. Iodine partition coefficients, for inorganic iodine, have been measured during hydrolysis and radiolysis. The hydrolysis experiments have illustrated the importance of reaction time on iodine volatility. However, radiolysis effects can override hydrolysis in determining iodine volatility. In addition, silver metal in radiolysis samples can react to form silver iodide accompanied by a decrease in iodine volatility. Experimental data are now being coupled to an iodine transport and release model that was developed in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  11. Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    Operant behavior is behavior “controlled” by its consequences. In practice, operant conditioning is the study of reversible behavior maintained by reinforcement schedules. We review empirical studies and theoretical approaches to two large classes of operant behavior: interval timing and choice. We discuss cognitive versus behavioral approaches to timing, the “gap” experiment and its implications, proportional timing and Weber's law, temporal dynamics and linear waiting, and the problem of simple chain-interval schedules. We review the long history of research on operant choice: the matching law, its extensions and problems, concurrent chain schedules, and self-control. We point out how linear waiting may be involved in timing, choice, and reinforcement schedules generally. There are prospects for a unified approach to all these areas. PMID:12415075

  12. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Brian J; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-10-01

    in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

  13. Estimating pressurized water reactor decommissioning costs: A user`s manual for the PWR Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software. Draft report for comment

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschbach, M.C.; Mencinsky, G.J.

    1993-10-01

    With the issuance of the Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), nuclear power plant licensees are required to submit to the US Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. This user`s manual and the accompanying Cost Estimating Computer Program (CECP) software provide a cost-calculating methodology to the NRC staff that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals. The CECP, designed to be used on a personnel computer, provides estimates for the cost of decommissioning PWR plant stations to the point of license termination. Such cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial costs; and manpower costs. In addition to costs, the CECP also calculates burial volumes, person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning.

  14. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shilei; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Hui; Xin, Changsheng; Wang, Xitao

    2016-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels of unaged and thermally aged at 400 °C for as long as 20,000 h were studied by using a slow strain rate testing (SSRT) system. Spinodal decomposition in ferrite during thermal aging leads to hardening in ferrite and embrittlement of the SSRT specimen. Plastic deformation and thermal aging degree have a great influence on the oxidation rate of the studied material in simulated PWR primary water environments. In the SCC regions of the aged SSRT specimen, the surface cracks, formed by the brittle fracture of ferrite phases, are the possible locations for SCC. In the non-SCC regions, brittle fracture of ferrite phases also occurs because of the effect of thermal aging embrittlement.

  15. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    SciTech Connect

    Cerne, S.P.; Hermann, O.W.; Westfall, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub infinity/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub infinity/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub infinity/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Quantification of Uncertainties due to 235,238U, 239,240,241Pu and Fission Products Nuclear Data Uncertainties for a PWR Fuel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cruz, D. F.; Rochman, D.; Koning, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    Uncertainty analysis on reactivity and discharged inventory for a typical PWR fuel element as a result of uncertainties in 235,238U, 239,240,241Pu, and fission products nuclear data was performed. The Total Monte-Carlo (TMC) method was applied using the deterministic transport code DRAGON. The nuclear data used in this study is from the JEFF-3.1 evaluations, with the exception of the nuclear data files for U, Pu and fission products isotopes, which are taken from the nuclear data library TENDL-2012. Results show that the calculated total uncertainty in keff (as result of uncertainties in nuclear data of the considered isotopes) is virtually independent on fuel burnp and amounts to 700 pcm. The uncertainties in inventory of the discharged fuel is dependent on the element considered and lies in the range 1-15% for most fission products, and is below 5% for the most important actinides.

  17. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of isolated drywells containing spent fuel (1 kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect

    Unterzuber, R; Wright, J B

    1980-09-01

    A spent fuel Isolated Drywell Test was conducted at the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site. Two PWR spent fuel assemblies having a decay heat level of approximately 1.1 kW were encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in instrumented near-surface drywell storage cells. Temperatures from the two isolated drywells and the adjacent soil have been recorded throughout the 19 month Isolated Drywell Test. Canister and drywell liner temperatures reached their peak values (254{sup 0}F and 203{sup 0}F, respectively) during August 1979. Thereafter, all temperatures decreased and showed a cycling pattern which responded to seasonal atmospheric temperature changes. A computer model was utilized to predict the thermal response of the drywell. Computer predictions of the drywell temperatures and the temperatures of the surrounding soil are presented and show good agreement with the test data.

  18. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod bundle flow blockage task data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse Report No. 11. Appendices K-P

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  19. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  20. Experimental investigation on the chemical precipitation generation under the loss of coolant accident of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. H.; Sung, J. J.; Chung, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    The PWR containment buildings are designed to facilitate core cooling in the event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The cooling process requires water discharged from the break and containment spray to be collected in a sump for recirculation. The containment sump contains screens to protect the components of the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and Containment Spray System (CSS) from debris. Since the containment materials may dissolve or corrode when exposed to the reactor coolant and spray solutions, various chemical precipitations can be generated in a post-LOCA environment. These chemical precipitations may become another source of debris loading to be considered in sump screen performance and downstream effects. In this study, new experimental methodology to predict the type and quantity of chemical precipitations has been developed. To generate the plant-specific chemical precipitation in a post-LOCA environment, the plant specific chemical condition of the recirculation sump during post-LOCA is simulated with the experimental reactor for the chemical effect. The plant-specific containment materials are used in the present experiment such as glass fibers, concrete blocks, aluminum specimens, and chemical reagent - boric acid, spray additives or buffering chemicals (sodium hydroxide, Tri-Sodium Phosphate (TSP), or others). The inside temperature of the reactor is controlled to simulate the plant-specific temperature profile of the recirculation sump. The total amount of aluminum released from aluminum specimens is evaluated by ICP-AES analysis to determine the amount of AlOOH and NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8} which induce very adverse effect on the head loss across the sump screens. The amount of these precipitations generated in the present experimental study is compared with the results of WCAP-16530-NP-A. (authors)

  1. PKL experiments on loss of residual heat removal under shutdown conditions in PWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Umminger, Klaus; Schoen, Bernhard; Mull, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    When a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is shutdown for refueling, the main coolant inventory is reduced so that the level is at mid-loop elevation. Removal of the decay heat from the core is maintained by the residual heat removal system (RHRS), which under these conditions represents the only heat sink. Loss of RHRS under shutdown conditions has occurred several times worldwide and still plays an important role in risk studies for PWRs. The experimental investigation on loss of RHRS is one mayor topic in the current PKL test program which is included in an international project set up by the OECD. PKL is an integral test facility simulating a typical western-type 1300 MW PWR and is used to investigate the thermal-hydraulic system behavior of PWRs under accident situations. The PKL test facility is operated in the Technical Center of Framatome ANP in Erlangen, Germany. The tests on loss of RHRS have been performed with borated water and special measurement techniques for the determination of the boron concentration (online measurements). The PKL tests demonstrate that, as long as the primary circuit is closed, a failure of the residual heat removal system can be compensated by one or more steam generators, which remain filled with water on the secondary side and stay ready for use during refueling and other outages. However, the tests showed also that accumulations of large condensate inventories (with low boron concentration) can occur in the cold leg piping during mid-loop operation after loss of the RHRS. This paper summarizes the most important results of a PKL experiment dealing with loss of RHRS during mid-loop operation with closed primary circuit. Issues still open and needs for further investigations are also discussed. (authors)

  2. Application of Advanced Thermal Hydraulic TRACG Model to Preserve Operating Margins in BWRs at Extended Power Up-rate Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens G. M.; Casillas, Jose L.; Shiralkar, Bharat S.

    2006-07-01

    GE has developed TRACG, a customized BWR version of the TRAC model, for application to BWR analyses. This model was initially applied to special BWR challenges and for benchmarking the official simplified thermal-hydraulic design models. However, in past years extensive additional model development, qualification and application studies have been completed. This development has followed the CSAU methodology, where extensive model evaluation and qualification have been performed to demonstrate the applicability of the model and to quantify the uncertainty in the model parameters as well as in plant parameters and initial conditions. This has then been combined with a statistically based application methodology following the CSAU approach to generate tolerance limits for the critical safety and design parameters. This effort has resulted in application processes that have been reviewed and approved by the US NRC to enable routine application of the TRACG model to the design and licensing analyses and utilize the improved operating margin to optimize the fuel cycle design. These applications have been supported by development of programs that construct specific plant and problem base-decks that utilize BWR plant characteristics and system databases to standardize and streamline the application to several plants. The application of the TRACG model in Transient and LOCA analyses has assisted in allowing similar power peaking at higher power density conditions for BWRs. Also, the application of the TRACG model in Stability analyses has assisted in preserving the setpoints of stability monitoring systems to avoid margin loss for high power density applications. TRACG is being used for analysis of ATWS events. It has been used to support the development of emergency procedure guidelines, and it is currently being used to demonstrate that the suppression pool temperature limits can be met for up-rated conditions. Finally, the application of the TRACG model in Faulted Load

  3. Simulation of PWR plant by a new version of TRAC-PF1 code including a three-dimensional neutronic model and a transport boron model

    SciTech Connect

    Alloggio, G.; Brega, E.; Basile, D.; Guandalini, R.; Pollachini, L.

    1996-08-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting a solution method for time-dependent problems coupling thermal-hydraulic behavior and neutronic changes during selected transients in Pressurized Water Reactors. A two-group three-dimensional reactor kinetics model, based on the Analytical Nodal Method with a detailed feedback model, has been implemented in TRAC-PF1 code replacing the original point-kinetics approximation. A geometry conversion was done to match, in the core discretization, the cylindrical geometry of the TRAC-PF1 with the Cartesian geometry of the three-dimensional neutronic model. In this version of TRAC-PFI, named TRAC-EN for IBM computers, a Boron transport model has been implemented. The transient Boron concentration is computed from a Boron mass balance after the coolant mass, energy and momentum balances have been completed. In order to evaluate the new code capabilities, a model of the two-loops 600 MW Westinghouse reactor was implemented. Some specific PWR transients that exhibit interesting nuclear and thermal-hydraulic responses, e.g., control rod ejection and pressurization transients, are presented. To check the Boron transport model, a local Boron dilution transient was analyzed. The results obtained by using the space and time dependent neutronic model can not be predicted by point kinetics approximation. Furthermore, some events that apparently concern only the core, are also involving the primary circuit the responses of which can not be neglected because they affect the neutronic behavior.

  4. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) to measure U-235 and Pu-239 content in a PWR spent fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, Adrienne M; Charlton, William S; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2009-01-01

    The use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu content in a PWR spent fuel assembly was investigated via Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n, f) reaction peaks in fission chamber. These simulations utilize the {sup 244}Cm spontaneous fission neutrons to self-interrogate the fuel pins. The amount of resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fuel can be measured using {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the sensitivity of the measurements to extraneous material present in fuel. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is of great importance to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in FBR spent fuel and heavy metal product from reprocessing methods.

  5. On the Application of CFD Modeling for the Prediction of the Degree of Mixing in a PWR During a Boron Dilution Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Lycklama, Jan-Aiso; Hoehne, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    In a Pressurized Water Reactor, negative reactivity is present in the core by means of Boric acid as a soluble neutron absorber in the coolant water. During a so-called Boron Dilution Transient (BDT), a de-borated slug of coolant water is transported from the cold leg into the reactor vessel, and the borated coolant water is diluted by mixing with this un-borated water. The resulting decrease in the boron concentration leads to an insertion of positive reactivity in the core, which may lead to a reactivity excursion. The associated power peak may damage the fuel rods. The mixing of borated and un-borated water in downcomer and lower plenum is an important process, because it mitigates the degree of reactivity insertion. In the present study the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for the prediction of this mixing of un-borated with borated water in the RPV has been assessed. The analyses have been compared with the measurement data from the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) experiment. The ROCOM test facility represents the primary cooling system of a KONVOI type of PWR (1300 MW{sub el}). In spite of the complicated spatial, temporal, and geometrical aspects of the flow in the RPV, the agreement between the calculated and the experimental data is good. The CFD model tends to slightly under predict the degree of mixing in the RPV resulting in a slight under-prediction of the boron concentration at the core. (authors)

  6. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  7. Experimental evidence of oxygen thermo-migration in PWR UO2 fuels during power ramps using in-situ oxido-reduction indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Sercombe, J.; Lamontagne, J.; Noirot, J.; Roure, I.; Blay, T.; Desgranges, L.

    2016-11-01

    The present study describes the in-situ electrochemical modifications which affect irradiated PWR UO2 fuels in the course of a power ramp, by means of in-situ oxido-reduction indicators such as chromium or neo-formed chemical phases. It is shown that irradiated fuels (of nominal stoichiometry close to 2.000) under temperature gradient such as that occurring during high power transients are submitted to strong oxido-reduction perturbations, owing to radial migration of oxygen from the hot center to the cold periphery of the pellet. The oxygen redistribution, similar to that encountered in Sodium Fast Reactors fuels, induces a massive reduction/precipitation of the fission products Mo, Ru, Tc and Cr (if present) in the high temperature pellet section and the formation of highly oxidized neo-formed grey phases of U4O9 type in its cold section, of lower temperature. The parameters governing the oxidation states of UO2 fuels under power ramps are finally debated from a cross-analysis of our results and other published information. The potential chemical benefits brought by oxido-reductive additives in UO2 fuel such as chromium oxide, in connection with their oxygen buffering properties, are discussed.

  8. Allergic Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  9. VIPRE-01. a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 1. Mathematical modeling. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Kelly, J.M.; Basehore, K.L.; George, T.L.; Rowe, D.S.

    1983-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 1: Mathematical Modeling) explains the major thermal hydraulic models and supporting correlations in detail.

  10. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 3. Programmer's manual. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Koontz, A.S.; Cuta, J.M.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1983-05-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear-reactor-core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This is Volume 3, the Programmer's Manual. It explains the codes' structures and the computer interfaces.

  11. PWR full-reactor coolant system decontamination. Materials evaluation after off-normal exposure to the LOMI decontamination process, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, R.G.; Pessall, N.; Grand, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the current program is to identify and address all aspects of full system decontamination with the purpose of qualifying at least one process for PWR use. The objective of the current study is to provide baseline data on the performance of materials on the primary side after exposure to one cycle of the LOMI fault testing. This data supplements prior information obtained after exposure to three cycles of LOMI testing. The technical significance of this excursion will be determined in a subsequent task. The general corrosion characteristics of over 39 materials were evaluated for some combinations of material, type of specimen (coupon and creviced coupons), and loop velocity (0, 5, 20 and 150 ft/sec). At velocities of less than or equal to 20 ft/sec, sixteen types of specimens were employed to evaluate localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Specimens were examined after one cycle. Also included in this exposure were specimens added to provide more information on the effect of LOMI fault exposure one: (1) surface roughening of Stellite 156; (2) crevice corrosion of chromium plated 304 stainless steel with the open end gap increased from 3 to {approximately} 9 mils; (3) susceptibility of Inconel X-750 (HTH) to subsequent stress corrosion cracking, (4) loss of chromium plate from threads of 304 stainless steel bolts torqued into stainless steel collars; (5) crack initiation in an Alloy 600 tube known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking; and (6) surface alternation of stressed Inconel X-750 springs with the spring temper.

  12. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for reactor cores. Volume 2. User's manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Stewart, C.W.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1983-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear energy reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 2: User's Manual) describes the input requirements of VIPRE and its auxiliary programs, SPECSET, ASP and DECCON, and lists the input instructions for each code.

  13. Simultaneous backward conditioned inhibition and mediated conditioning.

    PubMed

    Graham, Steven; Jie, Hans Lee; Chan, Hui-Minn; McLaren, I P L; Wills, Andy J

    2011-04-01

    Demonstrations of retrospective revaluation suggest that remembered stimuli undergo a reduction in association with the unconditioned stimulus (US) present during learning. Conversely, demonstrations of mediated conditioning in flavor-conditioning experiments with rats suggest that remembered stimuli undergo an increase in association with the US present during learning. In a food allergy prediction task with 23 undergraduates, we demonstrated simultaneous backward conditioned inhibition and mediated conditioning effects. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that the direction of change (decrease or increase) in associative strength depends on whether the remembered stimulus was of a different category (conditioned stimulus/antecedent) or the same category (US/outcome) as the presented US. PMID:21319913

  14. Life Estimation of PWR Steam Generator U-Tubes Subjected to Foreign Object-Induced Fretting Wear

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-10-15

    This paper presents an approach to the remaining life prediction of steam generator (SG) U-tubes, which are intact initially, subjected to fretting-wear degradation due to the interaction between a vibrating tube and a foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. The operating SG shell-side flow field conditions are obtained from a three-dimensional SG flow calculation using the ATHOS3 code. Modal analyses are performed for the finite element models of U-tubes to get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and participation factor. The wear rate of a U-tube caused by a foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula, and the remaining life of the tube is predicted. Also discussed in this study are the effects of the tube modal characteristics, external flow velocity, and tube internal pressure on the estimated results of the remaining life of the tube.

  15. A Statistical Approach to Predict the Failure Enthalpy and Reliability of Irradiated PWR Fuel Rods During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Cheol; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Jung, Youn-Ho

    2001-11-15

    During the last decade, the failure behavior of high-burnup fuel rods under a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) condition has been a serious concern since fuel rod failures at low enthalpy have been observed. This has resulted in the reassessment of existing licensing criteria and failure-mode study. To address the issue, a statistics-based methodology is suggested to predict failure probability of irradiated fuel rods under an RIA. Based on RIA simulation results in the literature, a failure enthalpy correlation for an irradiated fuel rod is constructed as a function of oxide thickness, fuel burnup, and pulse width. Using the failure enthalpy correlation, a new concept of ''equivalent enthalpy'' is introduced to reflect the effects of the three primary factors as well as peak fuel enthalpy into a single damage parameter. Moreover, the failure distribution function with equivalent enthalpy is derived, applying a two-parameter Weibull statistical model. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is carried out to estimate the effects of burnup, corrosion, peak fuel enthalpy, pulse width, and cladding materials used.

  16. Early Pavlovian conditioning impairs later Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Lariviere, N A; Spear, N E

    1996-11-01

    Four experiments tested the effects in the rat of very early experience with stimuli to be used later for Pavlovian conditioning. Beginning on postnatal Day 12, prior to the development of substantial detection and effective perception of visual and auditory stimuli, rats were given five daily experiences with either lights or tones and a footshock known to be an effective unconditioned stimulus at these ages. Twenty-four hours after the last of these experiences, pairings of either the light or tone and the unconditioned stimulus were given with parameters established to yield a moderate degree of conditioning in untreated preweanlings (Experiment 1). Experiment 2 determined that early experience with paired or unpaired presentations of either the light or tone and the unconditioned stimulus resulted in a failure to condition to these same lights or tones on postnatal Day 17, although nontreated pups from the same litters conditioned quite effectively. Experiment 3 determined that this early conditioning experience with either paired or unpaired presentations of the lights or tones and the unconditioned stimulus yielded impaired conditioning on postnatal Day 17 in the alternative sensory modality as well, although again nontreated siblings conditioned quite effectively. Experiment 4 replicated the results of each of Experiments 2 and 3 and determined in addition that despite the impairment in conditioning that resulted from early paired or unpaired experience with the stimuli of conditioning, early experience with the individual stimuli of conditioning-with only the CS, the US, or the context-did not result in a similar impairment in conditioning. Although the results were unexpected, they may be understood in part in terms of intersensory competition during development, and there is precedent in the literature for similar interfering effects of early learning on later learning in a variety of species.

  17. Chinese Conditionals and the Theory of Conditionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chierchia, Gennaro

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes the main features of discourse representation theory, situation-based approaches, and dynamic semantics, and discusses the role the novelty condition plays in each of them, providing the main theoretical coordinates against which to try an assessment of the role of the Chinese conditional and a proposal put forth by Chang and Huang…

  18. Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

  19. Determination of the Lower Temperature Limit of Void Swelling of Stainless Steels at PWR-Relevant Displacement Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yury V.; Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Krigan, V. M.; Garner, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies associated with light water reactors (LWR) in both the USA and Russia have raised the question of void swelling in austenitic components of core internals. One question of particular interest is the range of temperatures over which voids can develop, especially the lowest temperature. To address this question a flow restrictor component manufactured from annealed X18H9T was removed from the reflector region of the BN-350 fast reactor, located in Kazakhstan. During operation this component spanned temperatures and dpa rates of direct interest to pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in the West and VVERs in Russia. This steel is analogous to AISI 321 and is used in Russian reactors for applications where AISI 304 would be used in the West and in Japan. This component was sectioned on a very fine scale to determine in what range of conditions voids existed. Microstructural data were obtained for 157 separate locations, with 111 specimens showing voids over the relevant range of temperatures and displacement rates, allowing construction of a parametric map of swelling with temperature, dpa and dpa rate. These data show that swelling at doses as high as ~50 dpa persists down to ~306°C for dose rates in the range 0.11 x 10-7 to 1.6 x 10-7dpa/sec. Finally, since the helium generation rate is rather low in the spectral environment of the flow restrictor, the early onset of swelling is attributed primarily to the lower displacement rate, a conclusion supported by a number of other experimental studies.

  20. WREM--TOODEE2--MOD3. 2d Time-Dependent Fuel Element Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lauben, G.N.

    1992-03-05

    WREM-TOODEE2 is a two dimensional, time-dependent, fuel-element thermal analysis program. Its primary purpose is to evaluate fuel-element thermal response during post-LOCA refill and reflood in a pressurized water reactor (PWR).

  1. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  2. Uncertainty analysis of minimum vessel liquid inventory during a small-break LOCA in a B W Plant: An application of the CSAU methodology using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, M G; Ghan, L S

    1992-12-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) revised the emergency core cooling system licensing rule to allow the use of best estimate computer codes, provided the uncertainty of the calculations are quantified and used in the licensing and regulation process. The NRC developed a generic methodology called Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) to evaluate best estimate code uncertainties. The objective of this work was to adapt and demonstrate the CSAU methodology for a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor of Babcock Wilcox Company lowered loop design using RELAP5/MOD3 as the simulation tool. The CSAU methodology was successfully demonstrated for the new set of variants defined in this project (scenario, plant design, code). However, the robustness of the reactor design to this SBLOCA scenario limits the applicability of the specific results to other plants or scenarios. Several aspects of the code were not exercised because the conditions of the transient never reached enough severity. The plant operator proved to be a determining factor in the course of the transient scenario, and steps were taken to include the operator in the model, simulation, and analyses.

  3. Investigation of Minimum Film boiling Phenomena on Fuel Rods Under Blowdown Cooling Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M. Bajorek; Michael Gawron; Timothy Etzel; Lucas Peterson

    2003-06-30

    Blowdon cooling heat transfer is an important process that occurs early in a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor. During blowdown, the flow through the hot assembly is a post-critical heat flux dispersed droplet flow. The heat transfer mechanisms that occur in blowdown cooling are complex and depend on droplet and heated surface interaction. In a safety analysis, it is of considerable importance to determine the thermal-hydraulic conditions leading to the minimum film boiling temperature, Tmin. A flow boiling rig for measurement of blowdown cooling heat transfer and quench phenomena on a nuclear fuel rod simulator was designed and constructed for operation at up to 12.4 MPa. The test section consisted of a concentric annulus, with a 9.5 mm OD nuclear fuel rod simulator at the center. The rod was contained within a 0.85 mm thick, 19 mm OD 316 stainless steel tube, forming the flow channel. Two types of rods were tested; one type was sheathed with Inconel 600 while the other was clad with Zircaloy-2. Water was injected into the test section at the top of the heated length through an injection header. This header was an annular sign that fit around the fuel rod simulator and within the stainless steel tube. Small spacers aligned the injection header and prevented contract with either the heater rod or the tube. A series of small diameter holes at the bottom of the header caused the formation of droplets that became entrained with the steam flow. The test section design was such that quench would take place on the rod, and not along the channel outer annulus.

  4. Baseball-specific conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Matthew R; Bunker, Derek

    2009-09-01

    Baseball demands speed, power, and quickness. To perform at a high level, and avoid injuries that are common among baseball players, an evaluation of current trends in strength and conditioning practices is helpful. Based on the demands of the sport and the injury risks, qualified strength and conditioning professionals can develop effective baseball-specific conditioning programs. This commentary briefly covers historical aspects of baseball conditioning, recent injury trends, current practices among elite baseball professionals, and provides suggestions for future improvements in training.

  5. A comparison of the effect of the first and second upwind schemes on the predictions of the modified RELAP5/MOD3

    SciTech Connect

    Analytis, G.Th.

    1995-09-01

    As is well-known, both TRAC-BF1 and TRAC-PF are using the first upwind scheme when finite-differencing the phasic momentum equations. In contrast, RELAP5 uses the second upwind which is less diffusive. In this work, we shall assess the differences between the two schemes with our modified version of RELAP5/MOD3 by analyzing some transients of interest. These will include the LOFT LP-LB-1 and LOBI small break LOCA (SB-LOCA) BL34 tests, and a commercial PWR 200% hypothetical large break LOCA (LB-LOCA). In particular, we shall show that for some of these transients, the employment of the first upwind scheme results in significantly different code predictions than the ones obtained when the second upwind scheme is used.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Characteristic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffenberger, Werner; Stein, R.

    2009-05-01

    We implemented MHD characteristic boundary conditions for a non-ideal plasma in the "stagger-code" (Gudiksen and Nordlund, 2005, ApJ 618, 1020). The aim of these boundary conditions is to reduce reflection at the boundaries which is important for the simulation of wave propagation. We present some test simulations of propagating waves demonstrating the capability of these boundary conditions.

  7. Inflation of Conditional Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koriat, Asher; Fiedler, Klaus; Bjork, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report 7 experiments indicating that conditional predictions--the assessed probability that a certain outcome will occur given a certain condition--tend to be markedly inflated. The results suggest that this inflation derives in part from backward activation in which the target outcome highlights aspects of the condition that are…

  8. PWR FLECHT SEASET 21-rod-bundle flow-blockage task: data and analysis report. NRC/EPRI/Westinghouse report No. 11, main report and appendices A-J

    SciTech Connect

    Loftus, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Lee, N.; McGuire, M.F.; Wenzel, A.H.; Valkovic, M.M.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents data and limited analysis from the 21-Rod Bundle Flow Blockage Task of the Full-Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Separate Effects and Systems Effects Test Program (FLECHT SEASET). The tests consisted of forced and gravity reflooding tests utilizing electrical heater rods with a cosine axial power profile to simulate PWR nuclear core fuel rod arrays. Steam cooling and hydraulic characteristics tests were also conducted. These tests were utilized to determine effects of various flow blockage configurations (shapes and distributions) on reflooding behavior, to aid in development/assessment of computational models in predicting reflooding behavior of flow blockage configurations, and to screen flow blockage configurations for future 163-rod flow blockage bundle tests.

  9. [Conditioning mechanisms and psychoneuroimmunology].

    PubMed

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle

    2005-01-01

    This chapter deals with the role of conditioning principles in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI). We will first describe the paradigms of classical and instrumental conditioning and classify immune parameters that are subject to conditioning (chapter 1). So far, PNI research mainly uses classical (or Pavlovian) conditioning. We will summarize some of the paradigmatic studies, mainly animal studies (chapter 2) and also describe studies that support the clinical relevance of classical conditioning, i. e., in the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and tumor chemotherapy (chapter 3). A study of our group on anticipatory immunomodulation in pediatric cancer patients is reported. Mechanisms mediating conditioned immunomodulation are summarized (chapter 4). We also describe studies that analyze the impact of instrumental conditioning contingencies on immune functioning (chapter 5). Finally, research perspectives are summarized (chapter 6).

  10. Context and Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Landeira-Fernandez, J

    1996-02-01

    Procedurally, learning has to occur in a context. Several lines of evidence suggest that contextual stimuli actively affect learning and expression of the conditional response. The experimental context can become associated with the unconditional stimulus (US), especially when the US is presented in a context in the absence of a discrete conditional stimulus (CS). Moreover, context can modulate CS-US associations. Finally, it appears that context can become associated with the CS when it is presented before the CS-US training. The purpose of the present paper is to review some of the relevant literature that considers the context as an important feature of Pavlovian conditioning and to discuss some of the main learning theories that incorporate the context into their theoretical framework. The paper starts by mentioning historical positions that considered context an important variable in conditioning and then describes how the approach to contextual conditioning changed with the modern study of Pavlovian conditioning. Various forms of measurement of context conditioning are presented and the associative strength attached to context in several experimental paradigms is examined. The possible functions that context may acquire during conditioning are pointed out and related to major learning theories. Moreover, the effect of certain neurological manipulations on context conditioning is presented and these results are discussed in terms of possible functions that the context might acquire during Pavlovian conditioning. It is concluded that contextual stimuli acquire different functions during normal conditioning. A procedure in which animals are exposed to an aversive US immediately after they are placed in the experimental context is suggested as a useful control for the study of context conditioning.

  11. Common skin conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, M.; Safranek, M.

    1992-01-01

    Four common conditions: acne, psoriasis, eczema and urticaria are considered. Guidance is given on appropriate topical and systematic treatment for the different types and degrees of these conditions, with notes on management in general and criteria for referral to hospital outpatient departments. Where there are different types of the condition, with varying aetiology, for example in urticaria and eczema, management of the common types is outlined. PMID:1345156

  12. Nonbirefringence conditions for spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, Yakov

    2005-10-15

    Within the axiomatic premetric approach to classical electrodynamics, we derive under which covariant conditions the quartic Fresnel surface represents a unique light cone without birefringence in vacuum.

  13. Condition Assessment Information System

    2002-09-16

    CAIS2000 records, tracks and cost maintenance deficiencies associated with condition assessments of real property assets. Cost information is available for 39,000 items in the currenht RS Means, Facilities Construction Manual. These costs can, in turn, be rolled by by asset to produce the summary condition of an asset or site.

  14. Air-Conditioning Mechanic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by air conditioning mechanics. Addressed in the four chapters, or lessons, of the manual are the following topics: principles of air conditioning, refrigeration components as…

  15. CONDITIONAL DISTANCE CORRELATION

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqin; Pan, Wenliang; Hu, Wenhao; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference on conditional dependence is essential in many fields including genetic association studies and graphical models. The classic measures focus on linear conditional correlations, and are incapable of characterizing non-linear conditional relationship including non-monotonic relationship. To overcome this limitation, we introduces a nonparametric measure of conditional dependence for multivariate random variables with arbitrary dimensions. Our measure possesses the necessary and intuitive properties as a correlation index. Briefly, it is zero almost surely if and only if two multivariate random variables are conditionally independent given a third random variable. More importantly, the sample version of this measure can be expressed elegantly as the root of a V or U-process with random kernels and has desirable theoretical properties. Based on the sample version, we propose a test for conditional independence, which is proven to be more powerful than some recently developed tests through our numerical simulations. The advantage of our test is even greater when the relationship between the multivariate random variables given the third random variable cannot be expressed in a linear or monotonic function of one random variable versus the other. We also show that the sample measure is consistent and weakly convergent, and the test statistic is asymptotically normal. By applying our test in a real data analysis, we are able to identify two conditionally associated gene expressions, which otherwise cannot be revealed. Thus, our measure of conditional dependence is not only an ideal concept, but also has important practical utility. PMID:26877569

  16. Sheltered Living Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherland's Central Society for Rehabilitation, The Hague.

    Resulting from a study conducted by the Advisory Housing Committee of the Dutch Society for Rehabilitation, the report describes housing conditions and possibilities for the physically handicapped in the Netherlands. Four categories of sheltered living conditions are described and analyzed: residential centers, supervised residential centers,…

  17. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition report compiles several available data sets from different agencies and areas of the country and summarizes them to present a broad baseline picture of the condition of coastal waters. Although data sets presented in this report do not cover all coa...

  18. Early results from an experimental program to determine the behavior of containment piping penetration bellows subjected to severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Containment piping penetration bellows are an integral part of the pressure boundary in steel containments in the United States (US). Their purpose is to minimize loading on the containment shell caused by differential movement between the piping and the containment. This differential movement is typically caused by thermal gradients generated during startup and shutdown of the reactor, but can be caused by earthquake, a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or ``severe`` accidents. In the event of a severe accident, the bellows would be subjected to pressure, temperature, and deflection well beyond the design basis. Most bellows are installed such that they would be subjected to elevated internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression, and lateral deflection during a severe accident. A few bellows would be subjected to external pressure and axial elongation, as well as elevated temperature and lateral deflection. The purpose of this experimental program is to examine the potential for leakage of containment bellows during a severe accident. The test series subjects bellows to various levels and combinations of internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression or elongation, and lateral deformation. The experiments are being conducted in two parts. For Part 1, all bellows specimens are tested in ``like-new`` condition, without regard for the possible degrading effect of corrosion that has been observed in some containment piping bellows in the US Part I testing, which included 13 bellows tests, has been completed. The second part of the experimental program, in which bellows are subjected to simulated corrosive environments prior to testing, has just just begun. The Part I experiments have shown that bellows in ``like-new`` condition can withstand elevated temperatures and pressures along with large deformations before leaking. In most cases, the like-new bellows were fully compressed without developing any leakage.

  19. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  20. Systematizing semishortening conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, C.-Y.; Siegel, W.

    2014-12-01

    We rederive semishortening conditions for four-dimensional superconformal field theory with a different approach. These conditions have similar patterns that can be generalized to weaker constraints, including all those of Dolan and Osborn [Ann. Phys. (Amsterdam) 307, 41 (2003)]. In particular, for the case of N =4 super-Yang-Mills theory formulated in projective superspace, we find constraints for all Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield operators. We also give an example how constraints can be found from known ones. These constraints are a subset of our maximal set of semishortening conditions.

  1. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. Themore » most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.« less

  2. LOCA simulation in the NRU reactor: materials test-1

    SciTech Connect

    Russcher, G.E.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Wildung, N.J.; Rausch, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This second experiment of the program produced peak fuel cladding temperatures of 1148K (1607/sup 0/F) and resulted in six ruptured fuel rods. Test data and initial results from the experiment are presented here in the form of photographs and graphical summaries. These results are also compared with the preceding prototypic thermal-hydraulic test results and with computer model test predictions.

  3. Materials Test-2 LOCA Simulation in the NRU Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; King, I. L.; Marshall, R. K.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Russcher, G. E.; Webb, B. J.; Wildung, N. J.; Wilson, C. L.; Wismer, M. D.; Mohr, C. L.

    1982-03-01

    A simulated loss-of-coolant accident was performed with a full-length test bundle of pressurized water reactor fuel rods. This third experiment of the program produced fuel cladding temperatures exceeding 1033 K (1400°F) for 155 s and resulted in eight ruptured fuel rods. Experiment data and initial results are presented in the form of photographs and graphical summaries.

  4. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. The most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.

  5. Etiquette of Verbal Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denner, Bruce

    1970-01-01

    Explores role of ambiguity in producing verbal conditioning by using two E types and two S types. Six college students were assigned to "crafty Es. Results revealed that certain types of ambiguity increase verbal compliance. (Author)

  6. Operant Conditioning and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Noronha, Mario

    A case study of a learning disabled 8-year-old with behavior disturbancs is presented to highlight the use of operant conditioning in cutting down educational costs and easing the teacher's class management problems. (CL)

  7. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy? • What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? • What is prurigo of pregnancy? • ... itchy skin. What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? In this condition, small, red ...

  8. Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... might be linked to other conditions, such as cerebral palsy, muscle weakness disorders, autism, or other nervous system ...

  9. Aerobic Conditioning Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Neil R.

    1980-01-01

    An aerobic exercise class that focuses on the conditioning of the cardiovascular and muscular systems is presented. Students complete data cards on heart rate, pulse, and exercises to be completed during the forty minute course. (CJ)

  10. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. ... your bronchial tubes ( bronchitis ) or deep in your lungs ( pneumonia ). These infections cause a buildup of mucus ...

  11. Pavement condition data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniewski, J.P.; Hudson, S.W.; Hudson, W.R.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes a computer methodology for analyzing pavement condition data to define inputs for pavement management systems. This system of programs was developed during a Federal Highway Administration research project. In the project, eight state highway departments were studied to determine the types of pavement condition data collected, procedures used for collecting data, the inputs to the states' pavement management systems, and computer programs used by the states to analyze raw pavement condition data. Several of the programs were assembled into the Method for Analyzing Pavement Condition, MAPCON, during a project performed at Pennsylvania State University. These and other existing or new programs (a total of 18) were identified, tested, modified, and incorporated onto a MS/DOS microcomputer system. MAPCON guides the user through selection of analysis method, raw data entry, and data analysis.

  12. Climatic Conditions in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Simon M.; Howes, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of research on the ways in which classroom thermal environment, lighting conditions, ion state, and electromagnetic and air pollution affect learning and the performance of students and teachers. (SJL)

  13. Conditional data watchpoint management

    DOEpatents

    Burdick, Dean Joseph; Vaidyanathan, Basu

    2010-08-24

    A method, system and computer program product for managing a conditional data watchpoint in a set of instructions being traced is shown in accordance with illustrative embodiments. In one particular embodiment, the method comprises initializing a conditional data watchpoint and determining the watchpoint has been encountered. Upon that determination, examining a current instruction context associated with the encountered watchpoint prior to completion of the current instruction execution, further determining a first action responsive to a positive context examination; otherwise, determining a second action.

  14. Power supply conditioning circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Loveland, Rohan C. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A conditioning circuit is provided with a constant current diode in series with a zener diode, the former having a high dynamic impedance and the latter a low dynamic impedance. The constant current diode can receive an input voltage with PARD. In conjunction with the zener diode fixed to a ground, a voltage divider is provided which can give an output voltage whose PARD was significantly reduced. The conditioning circuit is effective down to dc.

  15. Chemical conditioning of sludge.

    PubMed

    Novak, J T; Park, C

    2004-01-01

    With all the advances made in understanding the structure and composition of sewage sludges, chemical conditioning remains a trial and error process, both with regard to the type and dose of conditioner needed. Recent studies at Virginia Tech have found that biological floc consists of two types of biopolymer, material associated with iron and aluminium and material associated with calcium and magnesium. These materials behave differently when sludges undergo digestion. This results in very different material being released into solution during digestion and very different conditioning requirements. This study shows that the primary materials released during anaerobic digestion are proteins and coagulation of the colloidal protein fraction in solution is the primary mechanism for conditioning. For aerobically digested sludges, both proteins and polysaccharides make up the colloid fraction, which interferes with dewatering. This research also shows that the effectiveness of the digestion process as characterized by volatile solids destruction is directly related to the chemical dose required for conditioning. That is, as the solids destruction increases, the conditioning chemical requirement also increases. Well digested sludges dewater more poorly and require more conditioning chemical than those with less volatile solids destruction. PMID:15259940

  16. Causal conditionals and counterfactuals

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, Caren A.; Byrne, Ruth M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Causal counterfactuals e.g., ‘if the ignition key had been turned then the car would have started’ and causal conditionals e.g., ‘if the ignition key was turned then the car started’ are understood by thinking about multiple possibilities of different sorts, as shown in six experiments using converging evidence from three different types of measures. Experiments 1a and 1b showed that conditionals that comprise enabling causes, e.g., ‘if the ignition key was turned then the car started’ primed people to read quickly conjunctions referring to the possibility of the enabler occurring without the outcome, e.g., ‘the ignition key was turned and the car did not start’. Experiments 2a and 2b showed that people paraphrased causal conditionals by using causal or temporal connectives (because, when), whereas they paraphrased causal counterfactuals by using subjunctive constructions (had…would have). Experiments 3a and 3b showed that people made different inferences from counterfactuals presented with enabling conditions compared to none. The implications of the results for alternative theories of conditionals are discussed. PMID:22858874

  17. Choice and conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fantino, E; Freed, D; Preston, R A; Williams, W A

    1991-03-01

    A potential weakness of one formulation of delay-reduction theory is its failure to include a term for rate of conditioned reinforcement, that is, the rate at which the terminal-link stimuli occur in concurrent-chains schedules. The present studies assessed whether or not rate of conditioned reinforcement has an independent effect upon choice. Pigeons responded on either modified concurrent-chains schedules or on comparable concurrent-tandem schedules. The initial link was shortened on only one of two concurrent-chains schedules and on only one of two corresponding concurrent-tandem schedules. This manipulation increased rate of conditioned reinforcement sharply in the chain but not in the tandem schedule. According to a formulation of delay-reduction theory, when the outcomes chosen (the terminal links) are equal, as in Experiment 1, choice should depend only on rate of primary reinforcement; thus, choice should be equivalent for the tandem and chain schedules despite a large difference in rate of conditioned reinforcement. When the outcomes chosen are unequal, however, as in Experiment 2, choice should depend upon both rate of primary reinforcement and relative signaled delay reduction; thus, larger preferences should occur in the chain than in the tandem schedules. These predictions were confirmed, suggesting that increasing the rate of conditioned reinforcement on concurrent-chains schedules may have no independent effect on choice.

  18. Conditional E-Cash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Larry; Carbunar, Bogdan; Sion, Radu

    We introduce a novel conditional e-cash protocol allowing future anonymous cashing of bank-issued e-money only upon the satisfaction of an agreed-upon public condition. Payers are able to remunerate payees for services that depend on future, yet to be determined outcomes of events. Once payment complete, any double-spending attempt by the payer will reveal its identity; no double-spending by the payee is possible. Payers can not be linked to payees or to ongoing or past transactions. The flow of cash within the system is thus both correct and anonymous. We discuss several applications of conditional e-cash including online trading of financial securities, prediction markets, and betting systems.

  19. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  20. Mineralogy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Jinfu

    2012-02-07

    We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

  1. Operant Conditioning - Token Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Jacqueline; McBurney, Raymond D.

    Described is an Operant Conditioning-Token Economy Program, teaching patients to be responsible for their own behavior, to make choices, and to be motivated to change. The program was instigated with mentally ill patients in a state hospital and was later used with institutionalized mentally handicapped groups. After two years, only four of the…

  2. Teachers and Operant Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Sherman

    A survey was conducted of 406 elementary, middle, and secondary school teachers to determine their understanding, acceptance, and use of the principle of operant conditioning. The treatment of data was by percent and chi square analysis primarily according to sex, experience, degree, and position. Subjects reported that a) they believed that the…

  3. Workplace Conditions. Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association Research Department, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This brief describes workplace conditions in "learning centered" schools, where practices are consistent with recent research knowledge about learning and its contexts. Its purpose is to support fundamental, long-term change by offering a vision of best practice for educators to consider, discuss, and adapt to their circumstances. It summarizes…

  4. Expectation and conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coster, Adelle C. F.; Alstrøm, Preben

    2001-02-01

    We present a dynamical model that embodies both classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms in the same framework. The model is based on the formation of expectations of stimuli and of rewards. The expectations of stimuli are formed in a recurrent process called expectation learning in which one activity pattern evokes another. The expectation of rewards or punishments (motivation) is modelled using reinforcement learning.

  5. Impacts of sociopolitical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finney, Ben R.

    1992-01-01

    Space development scenarios and the choice of technologies to carry them out depend upon the future social, economic, and political factors. A brief discussion concerning the impact of sociopolitical conditions on space exploration is presented. Some of the topics mentioned include: space weapons/warfare, international cooperation, NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Program, and superpower rivelry.

  6. Effective Conditions for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Barbara; Ball, Derek

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors respond to four 2006 "Mathematics Teaching" articles by Paul Andrews and Judy Sayers comparing conditions for learning mathematics in England and in four other European countries. They reflect on what might be done with English education, and with English mathematics education in particular. They challenge Andrews' and…

  7. Preventing Secondary Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the Institute of Medicine model of the dynamic nature of the disabling process of both primary disabilities and secondary conditions, and the interaction of that process with risk factors and quality of life. The components of a comprehensive disability prevention program are discussed. (Author/JDD)

  8. Progress in the studies of passive heat removal in the next European torus under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, A. ); Renda, V.; Papa, L. . Joint Research Centre); Fenoglio, F. )

    1989-12-01

    Within the framework of safety analysis for the next European torus, a decay heat hazards assessment is under way in Ispra. Undercooling accidents (loss-of-coolant and loss-of-flow accidents (LOCAs and LOFAs)) due to pump failure have been investigated assuming an automatic plasma shutdown in both cases. The passive heat removal mechanisms considered include radiation between components and residual cooling by the thermosyphon effect in the main cooling circuits. Conservative thermohydraulic calculations have been made to determine coolant velocity and temperature transients to avoid water boiling int he circuits. Results show that during a LOFA, water boiling can be avoided provided that the water inertia is large enough, and material melting temperatures are not reached during a LOCA.

  9. Power supply conditioning circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, L. E.; Loveland, R.

    1987-01-01

    A power supply conditioning circuit that can reduce Periodic and Random Deviations (PARD) on the output voltages of dc power supplies to -150 dBV from dc to several KHz with no measurable periodic deviations is described. The PARD for a typical commercial low noise power supply is -74 dBV for frequencies above 20 Hz and is often much worse at frequencies below 20 Hz. The power supply conditioning circuit described here relies on the large differences in the dynamic impedances of a constant current diode and a zener diode to establish a dc voltage with low PARD. Power supplies with low PARD are especially important in circuitry involving ultrastable frequencies for the Deep Space Network.

  10. Quantum conditional operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, Alessandro; Dall'Arno, Michele; Perinotti, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    An essential element of classical computation is the "if-then" construct, that accepts a control bit and an arbitrary gate, and provides conditional execution of the gate depending on the value of the controlling bit. On the other hand, quantum theory prevents the existence of an analogous universal construct accepting a control qubit and an arbitrary quantum gate as its input. Nevertheless, there are controllable sets of quantum gates for which such a construct exists. Here we provide a necessary and sufficient condition for a set of unitary transformations to be controllable, and we give a complete characterization of controllable sets in the two-dimensional case. This result reveals an interesting connection between the problem of controllability and the problem of extracting information from an unknown quantum gate while using it.

  11. Conditional statistical model building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Hansen, Michael Sass; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-03-01

    We present a new statistical deformation model suited for parameterized grids with different resolutions. Our method models the covariances between multiple grid levels explicitly, and allows for very efficient fitting of the model to data on multiple scales. The model is validated on a data set consisting of 62 annotated MR images of Corpus Callosum. One fifth of the data set was used as a training set, which was non-rigidly registered to each other without a shape prior. From the non-rigidly registered training set a shape prior was constructed by performing principal component analysis on each grid level and using the results to construct a conditional shape model, conditioning the finer parameters with the coarser grid levels. The remaining shapes were registered with the constructed shape prior. The dice measures for the registration without prior and the registration with a prior were 0.875 +/- 0.042 and 0.8615 +/- 0.051, respectively.

  12. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Springfield, Ray M.; Wheat, Jr., Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  13. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  14. The problem of optimizing the water chemistry used in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear power station equipped with VVER reactors under the conditions of longer fuel cycle campaigns and increased capacity of power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafutdinov, R. B.; Kharitonova, N. L.

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that the optimal water chemistry of the primary coolant circuit must be substantiated while introducing measures aimed at increasing the power output in operating power units and for the project called AES-2006/AES TOI (a typical optimized project of a nuclear power station with enhanced information support). The experience gained from operation of PWR reactors with an elongated fuel cycle at an increased level of power is analyzed. Conditions under which boron compounds are locally concentrated on the fuel rod surfaces (the hideout phenomenon) and axial offset anomaly occurs are enlisted, and the influence of lithium on the hideout in the pores of deposits on the surfaces of fuel assemblies is shown.

  15. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  16. Childhood Eye Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Conditions Nov. 01, 2013 The importance of vision screening There are many eye conditions and diseases ... child’s vision. Focus and alignment disorders that affect vision If any of the following conditions is suspected, ...

  17. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  18. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  19. Explaining Verification Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    The Hoare approach to program verification relies on the construction and discharge of verification conditions (VCs) but offers no support to trace, analyze, and understand the VCs themselves. We describe a systematic extension of the Hoare rules by labels so that the calculus itself can be used to build up explanations of the VCs. The labels are maintained through the different processing steps and rendered as natural language explanations. The explanations can easily be customized and can capture different aspects of the VCs; here, we focus on their structure and purpose. The approach is fully declarative and the generated explanations are based only on an analysis of the labels rather than directly on the logical meaning of the underlying VCs or their proofs. Keywords: program verification, Hoare calculus, traceability.

  20. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; McKinney, Elizabeth; Kim, Tehryung

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  1. Signal conditioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahzah, Mohamad (Inventor); Korkosz, Gregory J. (Inventor); Bohr, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A current-driven signal conditioning system comprising a first terminal, a second terminal, a strain gauge, and an instrumentation amplifier is disclosed. The strain gauge is adapted to measure a deformation of a structure and to generate a resistance which corresponds to the measured deformation. The instrumentation amplifier is adapted to be connected between the first terminal and the second terminal. The instrumentation amplifier is further adapted to be connected to the strain gauge and to place an output current on the second terminal. The output current is proportional to the resistance generated by the strain gauge. An output resister is coupled between the strain gauge and the second terminal, and a capacitor is coupled between the resister and the first terminal. A zenor diode is coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge, and a diode is also coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge.

  2. Magnetic conditioning in superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.

    1988-08-01

    Improvements in superconducting magnet technology have reduced to a handful the number of training quenches typical of dipole magnets. The number of training quenches in long (17 m) and short (1--2 m) SSC magnets are now about the same (operating at 6.6 tesla and 4.4 K). Yet the steps necessary to totally eliminate training are in the future RandD plans for magnet construction and conductor motion prevention. The accepted hypothesis is that Lorentz forces and poor mechanical properties of superconducting cables are the cause of conductor motion. Conductor motion reduces the stored energy in the cable by converting it into heat. The small amount of heat generated (millijoules) during motion is usually enough to quench the magnet when it is close to short sample. During training, the magnet performance normally improves with the number of quenches. It is not the quench itself that improves magnet performance but rather the fact that once conductor motion has occurred it will probably not repeat itself unless subjected to higher forces. Conditioning is a process that enables the magnet to reduce its stored energy without causing a premature quench. During the conditioning process the magnet is further cooled from its operating temperature of 4.4 K to 1.8 K by converting He I into He II. As a result the magnet is placed in a state where it has excess stability as well as excellent heat transfer capabilities. Although this does not eliminate motion, if the magnet is now cycled to /approximately/10% above its operating field at 4.4 K (which is above short sample) the excess stability should be enough to prevent quenching and reduce the probability of conductor motion and training once the magnet has been warmed back up to its operating temperature of 4.4 K. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Verbal Conditioning and Therapeutic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapuc, Paul S.; Harmatz, Morton G.

    1970-01-01

    Investigates the generalization of verbal conditioning effects to postconditioning personality and behavioral measures. Results demonstrated conditioning and generalization to some of the personality measures. (Author)

  4. Flue gas conditioning today

    SciTech Connect

    Southam, B.J.; Coe, E.L. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Many relatively small electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s) exist which collect fly ash at remarkably high efficiencies and have been tested consistently at correspondingly high migration velocities. But the majority of the world`s coal supplies produce ashes which are collected at much lower migration velocities for a given efficiency and therefore require correspondingly large specific collection areas to achieve acceptable results. Early trials of flue gas conditioning (FGC) showed benefits in maximizing ESP performance and minimizing expense which justified continued experimentation. Trials of several dozen ways of doing it wrong eventually developed a set of reliable rules for doing it right. One result is that the use of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) for adjustment of the resistivity of fly ash from low sulfur coal has been widely applied and has become an automatically accepted part of the option of burning low sulfur coal for compliance with the Clean Air Act of l990 in the U.S.A. Currently, over 100,000 MW of generating capacity is using FGC, and it is estimated that approximately 45,800 MW will utilize coal-switching with FGC for Clean Air Act emission compliance. Guarantees that this equipment will be available to operate at least 98 percent of the time it is called upon are routinely fulfilled.

  5. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. This summary report comprises performance evaluations, TRDA partnership tasks, a project summary, project milestones and results.

  6. Thermal condition of Surtsey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, V.; Axelsson, G.; Sigurdsson, O.; Gudmundsson, G.; Steingrimsson, B.

    1985-12-01

    The island Surtsey was created by a submarine volcanic eruption which started on the 14th of November 1963, 21 km southwest of the Westman Islands. Volcanic activity continued in this area for nearly 4 years. During the summer of 1979 a 181 m deep continuously cored borehole was drilled on the Surtsey island. Several temperature profiles have been measured in the hole since 1979. The results of these temperature measurements are used as the basis for a discussion of the thermal condition of Surtsey. The hypothesis that intrusions rather than pillow lavas are responsible for the excess heat content of Surtsey is favored. It is found that the 13 m thick discontinuous dike complex, observed in the drill core, is sufficient to explain the excess heat content in the vicinity of the borehole and the shape of the temperature profiles recorded. It is demonstrated that the heat transfer in Surtsey has been dominated by hydrothermal convection and that the system is vapor dominated above sea level. It is estimated that the permeability of a 40 m thick section of altered tuff below sea level is 4.1 × 10 -13 m 2, while the permeability of the unaltered tuff above sea level is estimated as 1.2 × 10 -10 m 2.

  7. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  8. The Probabilities of Conditionals Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douven, Igor; Verbrugge, Sara

    2013-01-01

    According to what is now commonly referred to as "the Equation" in the literature on indicative conditionals, the probability of any indicative conditional equals the probability of its consequent of the conditional given the antecedent of the conditional. Philosophers widely agree in their assessment that the triviality arguments of…

  9. The Probability of Causal Conditionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Over, David E.; Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Evans, Jonathan St. B. T.; Handley, Simon J.; Sloman, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Conditionals in natural language are central to reasoning and decision making. A theoretical proposal called the Ramsey test implies the conditional probability hypothesis: that the subjective probability of a natural language conditional, P(if p then q), is the conditional subjective probability, P(q [such that] p). We report three experiments on…

  10. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g.

  11. Measurement of two-phase flow momentum with force transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.; Smith, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Two strain-gage-based drag transducers were developed to measure two-phase flow in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) test facilities. One transducer, a drag body (DB), was designed to measure the bidirectional average momentum flux passing through an end box. The second drag sensor, a break through detector (BTD), was designed to sense liquid downflow from the upper plenum to the core region. After prototype sensors passed numerous acceptance tests, transducers were fabricated and installed in two experimental test facilities, one in Japan and one in West Germany. High-quality data were extracted from both the DBs and BTDs for a variety of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. The information collected from these sensors has added to the understanding of the thermohydraulic phenomena that occur during the refill/reflood stage of a LOCA in a PWR. 9 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Assessing the planet's condition.

    PubMed

    Brown, L R

    1990-01-01

    The destruction of the environment has accelerated since the Earth Day of 1970, the world's population has increased by another 1.6 billion, and over 500 million acres of forest have been lost. Carbon dioxide levels, greenhouse gases, and chlorofluorocarbons have increased in the atmosphere with evidence that global warming has started. The ozone hole has appeared, acid rain has destroyed forests, air pollution in major northern hemisphere cities has worsened, and species are disappearing, while toxic chemicals have been dumped indiscriminately. World grain production has fallen while population has increased. In Europe 14 countries have stabilized their population, and Japan, France, and Finland are on the way to zero growth. Reduction of high fertility in 1/2 could halt the deterioration of living conditions. Japan and China achieved this within a decade. Energy efficiency has to be attained; US cars still consume too much gas. Solar energy with photovoltaic cells to provide power, fuel alcohol from plants, and solar thermal power plants have potential. Semiarid regions, such as northern Africa, could become major producers of solar energy. Various measures are mandatory to cut down on waste: to recycle paper bags, to use standardized glasses for beverages, and to utilize scrap metal in electric arc steel furnaces. Reforestation is also on the agenda, as major deforestation has occurred in the Brazilian Amazon region, in India, and in Europe because of acid rain. Australia's national plan envisions planting 1 billion trees, and the US project is of similar magnitude during the 1990s. Only the US has succeeded in erosion control and topsoil stabilization when it converted erodible cropland into grassland or woodland during 1986-90.

  13. Assessing the planet's condition.

    PubMed

    Brown, L R

    1990-01-01

    The destruction of the environment has accelerated since the Earth Day of 1970, the world's population has increased by another 1.6 billion, and over 500 million acres of forest have been lost. Carbon dioxide levels, greenhouse gases, and chlorofluorocarbons have increased in the atmosphere with evidence that global warming has started. The ozone hole has appeared, acid rain has destroyed forests, air pollution in major northern hemisphere cities has worsened, and species are disappearing, while toxic chemicals have been dumped indiscriminately. World grain production has fallen while population has increased. In Europe 14 countries have stabilized their population, and Japan, France, and Finland are on the way to zero growth. Reduction of high fertility in 1/2 could halt the deterioration of living conditions. Japan and China achieved this within a decade. Energy efficiency has to be attained; US cars still consume too much gas. Solar energy with photovoltaic cells to provide power, fuel alcohol from plants, and solar thermal power plants have potential. Semiarid regions, such as northern Africa, could become major producers of solar energy. Various measures are mandatory to cut down on waste: to recycle paper bags, to use standardized glasses for beverages, and to utilize scrap metal in electric arc steel furnaces. Reforestation is also on the agenda, as major deforestation has occurred in the Brazilian Amazon region, in India, and in Europe because of acid rain. Australia's national plan envisions planting 1 billion trees, and the US project is of similar magnitude during the 1990s. Only the US has succeeded in erosion control and topsoil stabilization when it converted erodible cropland into grassland or woodland during 1986-90. PMID:12285798

  14. Conditioned stimulus determinants of conditioned response form in Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Rivers, S; Bevins, R A; Ayres, J J

    1996-01-01

    Four experiments using barpress conditioned suppression in rats found that tone evoked more freezing (immobility) than did light. Still, tone and light appeared to have similar conditioned value as assessed by suppression in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, and by blocking, second-order conditioning, and overconditioning assays in Experiments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Experiment 4 arranged for tone to evoke less suppression than light but more freezing. Results suggest that in fear conditioning, the nature of the conditioned stimulus affects the form of conditioned responding (strong vs. weak freezing). This conclusion extends one drawn by P. C. Holland (1977) on the basis of his work in appetitive conditioning.

  15. Results of vortex-suppressor tests, single-outlet sump tests and miscellaneous sensitivity tests. Containment sump reliability studies generic task A-43. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, M.

    1982-09-01

    Full scale tests of flow conditions in Containment Recirculation Sumps for nuclear power stations were conducted at the Alden Research Laboratory (ARL) of Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) to provide sump hydraulic design and performance data for use in resolving the Unresolved Safety Issue, A-43, Containment Sump Performance. This document is a report of the results of investigations conducted as a part of Phase II of the test program, including: (a) vortex suppressor tests to study in detail the hydraulic behavior of two commonly used suppressors; namely, cubic cage and horizontal floor grating; (b) single outlet sump tests to ascertain the hydraulic performance of single outlet sumps compared to double outlet sumps; and (c) tests to study the effects on the hydraulic performance of a solid partition wall in a double outlet sump, pump overspeed (i.e., higher flow), outlet pipe diameter, and bellmouth entrances.

  16. RELAP/MOD2 post-test calculation of the OECD LOFT experiment LP-SB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R. )

    1992-04-01

    This document presents the analysis of the OECD LOFT LP-SB-1 Experiment performed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear of Spain working group making use of RELAP5/MOD2 in the frame of the Spanish LOFT Project. LP-SB-1 experiment studies the effect of an early pump trip in a small break LOCA scenario with a 3-inch equivalent diameter break in the hot leg of a commercial PWR.

  17. RELAP5/MOD2 post-test calculation of the OECD LOFT experiment LP-SB-2

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1992-04-01

    This document presents the analysis of the OECD LOFT LP-SB-2 Experiment performed by the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear of Spain working group making use of RELAP5/MOD2 in the frame of the Spanish LOFT Project. LB-SB-2 experiment studies the effect of a delayed pump trip in a small break LOCA scenario with a 3-inch equivalent diameter break in the hot leg of a commercial PWR.

  18. Organizational Conditions of Teacher Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassler, Otto; Hoover-Dempsey, Kathy

    1986-01-01

    This research examined 1,213 elementary school teachers' perceptions of the school organizational conditions that provide the greatest opportunities for professional development. Ten workplace conditions were analyzed. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  19. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  20. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  1. Operant Conditioning for Special Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, Bonnie C.; Pedrini, D. T.

    The paper briefly explains operant conditioning as it pertains to special educators. Operant conditioning is thought to be an efficient method for modifying student behavior. Using the B. F. Skinner frame of reference, operant conditioning is said to include behavior modification and therapy, programed instruction, and computer assisted and…

  2. Teacher Working Conditions that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Ken; McAdie, Pat

    2007-01-01

    To advance understanding of the issues concerning teachers' working conditions, the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario commissioned one of the authors to do an analytical review of literature on teachers' working conditions. This resulted in the publication, "Teacher Working Conditions That Matter: Evidence for Change." The framework for…

  3. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  4. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G.

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  5. Serotonin and conditioning: focus on Pavlovian psychostimulant drug conditioning.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; Damianopoulos, Ernest N

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin containing neurons are located in nuclei deep in the brainstem and send axons throughout the central nervous system from the spinal cord to the cerebral cortex. The vast scope of these connections and interactions enable serotonin and serotonin analogs to have profound effects upon sensory/motor processes. In that conditioning represents a neuroplastic process that leads to new sensory/motor connections, it is apparent that the serotonin system has the potential for a critical role in conditioning. In this article we review the basics of conditioning as well as the serotonergic system and point up the number of non-associative ways in which manipulations of serotonin neurotransmission have an impact upon conditioning. We focus upon psychostimulant drug conditioning and review the contribution of drug stimuli in the use of serotonin drugs to investigate drug conditioning and the important impact drug stimuli can have on conditioning by introducing new sensory stimuli that can create or mask a CS. We also review the ways in which experimental manipulations of serotonin can disrupt conditioned behavioral effects but not the associative processes in conditioning. In addition, we propose the use of the recently developed memory re-consolidation model of conditioning as an approach to assess the possible role of serotonin in associative processes without the complexities of performance effects related to serotonin treatment induced alterations in sensory/motor systems.

  6. In-vessel flow characterization under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Kim, S.B.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a parametric framework for characterization of flow and heat transfer regimes and their associated phenomenological uncertainties following severe accidents using a two dimensional, heterogenous, porous media formulation. This approach extends the understanding of buoyancy-induced flow characteristics in the uncovered region of the reactor core and the upper plenum of a PWR vessel. The results of this study can be used to augment the boil-off steam flow in integrated one-dimensional severe accident codes such as the Source Team Code Package (STCP).

  7. Extended slow-roll conditions and rapid-roll conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We derive slow-roll conditions for a scalar field which is non-minimally coupled with gravity in a consistent manner and express spectral indices of scalar/tensor perturbations in terms of the slow-roll parameters. The conformal invariance of the curvature perturbation is proved without linear approximations. Rapid-roll conditions are also derived, and the relation with the slow-roll conditions is discussed.

  8. Sensitivity to masked conditioned stimuli predicts conditioned response magnitude under masked conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Echiverri, Aileen M.; Grillon, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Expression of conditioned fear has been reported to be independent of perceptual awareness of conditioned stimuli (CSs). Previous studies have been criticized, however, for not adequately assessing perceptual awareness. We fear-conditioned participants to one of two symbols and measured skin conductance responses to dichoptically masked and unmasked CSs. Participants also performed a target detection task and sensitivity (d′) to the masked conditioned stimuli (CS+, CS−) was measured. Results showed that sensitivity under masking conditions was related to conditioned responses to masked CSs but not unmasked CSs. Thus, a strong relationship between expression of conditioned fear and awareness of the CS+ emerges when the latter is assessed by signal detection methods. Without consensus on how awareness should be defined, these findings bring balance to previous studies that have typically used less sensitive assessments of awareness. PMID:17433097

  9. Extinction in human fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Dirk; Craske, Michelle G; Mineka, Susan; Lovibond, Peter F

    2006-08-15

    Although most extinction research is conducted in animal laboratories, the study of extinction learning in human fear conditioning has gained increasing attention over the last decade. The most important findings from human fear extinction are reviewed in this article. Specifically, we review experimental investigations of the impact of conditioned inhibitors, conditioned exciters, context renewal, and reinstatement on fear extinction in human samples. We discuss data from laboratory studies of the extinction of aversively conditioned stimuli, as well as results from experimental clinical work with fearful or anxious individuals. We present directions for future research, in particular the need for further investigation of differences between animal and human conditioning outcomes, and research examining the role of both automatic and higher-order cognitive processes in human conditioning and extinction.

  10. How People Interpret Conditionals: Shifts toward the Conditional Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fugard, Andrew J. B.; Pfeifer, Niki; Mayerhofer, Bastian; Kleiter, Gernot D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how people interpret conditionals and how stable their interpretation is over a long series of trials. Participants were shown the colored patterns on each side of a 6-sided die and were asked how sure they were that a conditional holds of the side landing upward when the die is randomly thrown. Participants were presented with 71…

  11. Polarity in Conditionals and Conditional-Like Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, I-Ta Chris

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the distribution of negative polarity items (henceforth, NPIs) in conditionals and conditional-like constructions. NPIs include words such as any and ever and idioms such as "give a damn" and "lift a finger"; these expressions have only a limited distribution. In this dissertation, the distribution of…

  12. Demand Characteristics in Classical Verbal Conditioning and Attitude Conditioning Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Hugh

    This paper is a draft for the American Psychological Association Symposium on the conditioning of verbal behavior and attitudes. The author presents the results of several studies he conducted in the classical conditioning of meaning and attitude. These studies attempt to control the measurement effects created by extraneous variables operating on…

  13. Conditional entropy of ordinal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unakafov, Anton M.; Keller, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we investigate a quantity called conditional entropy of ordinal patterns, akin to the permutation entropy. The conditional entropy of ordinal patterns describes the average diversity of the ordinal patterns succeeding a given ordinal pattern. We observe that this quantity provides a good estimation of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy in many cases. In particular, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns of a finite order coincides with the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for periodic dynamics and for Markov shifts over a binary alphabet. Finally, the conditional entropy of ordinal patterns is computationally simple and thus can be well applied to real-world data.

  14. FPC conditioning cart at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Belomestnykh, S.; Burrill, A.; Cole, M.; Deonarine, J.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Laloudakis, N.; Masi Jr, L.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Philips, D.; Seda, T.; Steszyn, A.; Tallerico, T.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.; White, G.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    The 703 MHz superconducting gun for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) prototype has two fundamental power couplers (FPCs), and each of them will deliver up to 500 kW of CW RF power. In order to prepare the couplers for high power RF service and process multipacting, the FPCs should be conditioned prior to installation into the gun cryomodule. A conditioning cart based test stand, which includes a vacuum pumping system, controllable bake-out system, diagnostics, interlocks and data log system has been designed, constructed and commissioned by collaboration of BNL and AES. This paper presents FPC conditioning cart systems and the conditioning process.

  15. Radioactive Spent Ion-Exchange Resins Conditioning by the Hot Supercompaction Process at Tihange NPP - Early Experience - 12200

    SciTech Connect

    Braet, Johan; Charpentier, David; Centner, Baudouin; Vanderperre, Serge

    2012-07-01

    Spent ion-exchange resins are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during their conditioning to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. In Belgium, for economical reasons, the Volume Reduction Factor is a key criterion. After Tractebel Engineering performed a technical and economical comparison of the industrially available systems, Tihange NPP decided to install a spent ion-exchange resins hot supercompaction unit with Tractebel Engineering in the role of architect-engineer. The treatment and conditioning unit processes the spent ion-exchange resins through the following steps: dewatering of the resins, drying the resins under deep vacuum, discharging the dried resins into compactable drums, super-compacting the drums to generate pellets, grouting the pellets into standard 400 litres waste drums (overpacks) licensed for final disposal in the near-surface repository in Belgium. Several developments were required to adapt the reference process and equipment to PWR spent ion-exchange bead resins and Belgian radioactive waste acceptance criteria. In order to avoid cracks on the compacted drum, and external surface contamination from resin leaks, some improvements were achieved to minimize spring-back as well as the risk of cracking the drum wall. Placing the compactable drum inside a second, slightly larger drum, guarantees clean and reproducible pellets. Currently the commissioning phase is on-going. Numerous process validation tests have been completed. An acceptance file was transmitted to the Belgian Waste Management Authority recently. This will be followed by demonstration tests necessary to obtain their final acceptance of the installation. More than 3 800 drums of mixed powdered and bead resins have been processed by the reference Hot Compaction process, achieving a Volume Reduction Factor (VRF) of 2.5. The equipment has been proven to be a reliable technology with low operation and maintenance

  16. Entanglement conditions and polynomial identities

    SciTech Connect

    Shchukin, E.

    2011-11-15

    We develop a rather general approach to entanglement characterization based on convexity properties and polynomial identities. This approach is applied to obtain simple and efficient entanglement conditions that work equally well in both discrete as well as continuous-variable environments. Examples of violations of our conditions are presented.

  17. Matching and Conditioned Reinforcement Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to examine the effects of variations in relative conditioned reinforcement rate on choice have been confounded by changes in rates of primary reinforcement or changes in the value of the conditioned reinforcer. To avoid these problems, this experiment used concurrent observing responses to examine sensitivity of choice to relative…

  18. Operant conditioning in redwinged blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Bastian, C W; Hothersall, D

    1970-09-01

    An operant conditioning technique for use with passerine birds is described. Two redwinged blackbirds were successfully conditioned to perch-hop for food reinforcement. Continuous reinforcement and fixed-ratio schedules involving substantial ratio requirements were used to maintain this response. The behavior of the two redwinged blackbirds was comparable to that of more conventional organisms working on similar schedules of reinforcement.

  19. The National Wetland Condition Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA) was conducted in 2011 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Vegetation, algae, soil, water chemistry,and hydrologic data were collected at each of 1138 sites across the contiguous US. Ecological condition was ass...

  20. Trace fear conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Holley, Andrew J

    2014-03-20

    In this experiment we present a technique to measure learning and memory. In the trace fear conditioning protocol presented here there are five pairings between a neutral stimulus and an unconditioned stimulus. There is a 20 sec trace period that separates each conditioning trial. On the following day freezing is measured during presentation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and trace period. On the third day there is an 8 min test to measure contextual memory. The representative results are from mice that were presented with the aversive unconditioned stimulus (shock) compared to mice that received the tone presentations without the unconditioned stimulus. Trace fear conditioning has been successfully used to detect subtle learning and memory deficits and enhancements in mice that are not found with other fear conditioning methods. This type of fear conditioning is believed to be dependent upon connections between the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. One current controversy is whether this method is believed to be amygdala-independent. Therefore, other fear conditioning testing is needed to examine amygdala-dependent learning and memory effects, such as through the delay fear conditioning.

  1. Conditional Logic and Primary Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robert H.

    Conditional logic, as interpreted in this paper, means deductive logic characterized by "if-then" statements. This study sought to investigate the knowledge of conditional logic possessed by primary children and to test their readiness to learn such concepts. Ninety students were designated the experimental group and participated in a 15-week…

  2. Study of the cofactor conditions: Conditions of supercompatibility between phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Srivastava, Vijay; Dabade, Vivekanand; James, Richard D.

    2013-12-01

    The cofactor conditions, introduced in James and Zhang(2005), are conditions of compatibility between phases in martensitic materials. They consist of three subconditions: (i) the condition that the middle principal stretch of the transformation stretch tensor U is unity (λ2=1), (ii) the condition a·Ucof(U2-I)n=0, where the vectors a and n are certain vectors arising in the specification of the twin system, and (iii) the inequality trU2+det U2-(1/4)|a|2|n|2≥2. Together, these conditions are necessary and sufficient for the equations of the crystallographic theory of martensite to be satisfied for the given twin system but for any volume fraction f of the twins, 0≤f≤1. This contrasts sharply with the generic solutions of the crystallographic theory which have at most two such volume fractions for a given twin system of the form f* and 1-f*. In this paper we simplify the form of the cofactor conditions, we give their specific forms for various symmetries and twin types, we clarify the extent to which the satisfaction of the cofactor conditions for one twin system implies its satisfaction for other twin systems. In particular, we prove that the satisfaction of the cofactor conditions for either Type I or Type II twins implies that there are solutions of the crystallographic theory using these twins that have no elastic transition layer. We show that the latter further implies macroscopically curved, transition-layer-free austenite/martensite interfaces for Type I twins, and planar transition-layer-free interfaces for Type II twins which nevertheless permit significant flexibility (many deformations) of the martensite. We identify some real material systems nearly satisfying the cofactor conditions. Overall, the cofactor conditions are shown to dramatically increase the number of deformations possible in austenite/martensite mixtures without the presence of elastic energy needed for coexistence. In the context of earlier work that links the special case λ2

  3. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders.

  4. Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O.

    1997-04-01

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

  5. Conceptual Conditioning: Mechanisms Mediating Conditioning Effects on Pain.

    PubMed

    Jepma, Marieke; Wager, Tor D

    2015-11-01

    Classical conditioning can profoundly modify subsequent pain responses, but the mechanisms that drive this effect are unresolved. In pain-conditioning studies, cues are typically conditioned to primary aversive reinforcers; hence, subsequent pain modulation could reflect learned precognitive associations (i.e., those involving neural plasticity independent of expectations and other forms of conceptual thought) or conceptual expectancies. We isolated conceptual contributions using a thermal pain-conditioning procedure in which different conditioned stimulus (CS) cues were repeatedly paired with symbolic representations of high and low noxious heat. In a subsequent test phase, identical noxious stimuli evoked larger skin conductance responses (SCRs) and pain ratings when preceded by CS cues associated with high temperature than by those associated with low temperature. These effects were mediated by participants' self-reported expectancies. CS cues associated with high temperature also evoked larger anticipatory SCRs than did CS cues associated with low temperature, but larger anticipatory SCRs predicted smaller subsequent heat-evoked SCRs. These results provide novel evidence that conditioned modulation of pain physiology can be acquired through purely conceptual processes, and that self-reported expectancies and physiological threat responses have opposing effects on pain.

  6. Defeasible reasoning with legal conditionals.

    PubMed

    Gazzo Castañeda, Lupita Estefania; Knauff, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Valid conclusions can be defeated if people can think of conditions that prevent the consequent to occur although the antecedent is given. The goal of the present research was to investigate how people consider these conditions when reasoning with legal conditionals such as "If a person kills another human, then this person should be punished for manslaughter." In Experiments 1 and 2 legal conditionals were presented to participants together with exculpatory circumstances, i.e., counterexamples. The participants' task was to decide whether they would adhere to the legal conditional rule and punish the offender. Participants were either lawyers (i.e., advanced law students and graduate lawyers) or legal laypeople. We found that laypeople often ignore exculpatory circumstances and adhere to the conditional rule when offences evoked high levels of moral outrage. Lawyers did not show this effect. In Experiment 3 laypeople showed difficulties even when asked to simply imagine exculpatory circumstances for highly morally outrageous offences. Results provide new evidence for the role of emotions--like moral outrage--in the consideration of counterexamples to legal conditionals. PMID:26689704

  7. Compatibility Conditions of Structural Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The theory of elasticity has camouflaged a deficiency in the compatibility formulation since 1860. In structures the ad hoc compatibility conditions through virtual "cuts" and closing "gaps" are not parallel to the strain formulation in elasticity. This deficiency in the compatibility conditions has prevented the development of a direct stress determination method in structures and in elasticity. We have addressed this deficiency and attempted to unify the theory of compatibility. This work has led to the development of the integrated force method for structures and the completed Beltrami-Michell formulation for elasticity. The improved accuracy observed in the solution of numerical examples by the integrated force method can be attributed to the compliance of the compatibility conditions. Using the compatibility conditions allows mapping of variables and facile movement among different structural analysis formulations. This paper reviews and illustrates the requirement of compatibility in structures and in elasticity. It also describes the generation of the conditions and quantifies the benefits of their use. The traditional analysis methods and available solutions (which have been obtained bypassing the missed conditions) should be verified for compliance of the compatibility conditions.

  8. GALIC: Galaxy initial conditions construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurin, Denis; Springel, Volker

    2014-08-01

    GalIC (GALaxy Initial Conditions) is an implementation of an iterative method to construct steady state composite halo-disk-bulge galaxy models with prescribed density distribution and velocity anisotropy that can be used as initial conditions for N-body simulations. The code is parallelized for distributed memory based on MPI. While running, GalIC produces "snapshot files" that can be used as initial conditions files. GalIC supports the three file formats ('type1' format, the slightly improved 'type2' format, and an HDF5 format) of the GADGET (ascl:0003.001) code for its output snapshot files.

  9. Mass-based condition measures and their relationship with fitness: in what condition is condition?

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Craig A.; Suzuki, Toshitaka N.; Sakaluk, Scott K.; Thompson, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Mass or body-size measures of ‘condition’ are of central importance to the study of ecology and evolution, and it is often assumed that differences in condition measures are positively and linearly related to fitness. Using examples drawn from ecological studies, we show that indices of condition frequently are unlikely to be related to fitness in a linear fashion. Researchers need to be more explicit in acknowledging the limitations of mass-based condition measures and accept that, under some circumstances, they may not relate to fitness as traditionally assumed. Any relationship between a particular condition measure and fitness should first be empirically validated before condition is used as a proxy for fitness. In the absence of such evidence, researchers should explicitly acknowledge that assuming such a relationship may be unrealistic. PMID:26019406

  10. Plant Condition Remote Monitoring Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Krishen, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a radiation transfer study conducted on houseplants using controlled environmental conditions. These conditions included: (1) air and soil temperature; (2) incident and reflected radiation; and (3) soil moisture. The reflectance, transmittance, and emittance measurements were conducted in six spectral bands: microwave, red, yellow, green, violet and infrared, over a period of three years. Measurements were taken on both healthy and diseased plants. The data was collected on plants under various conditions which included: variation in plant bio-mass, diurnal variation, changes in plant pathological conditions (including changes in water content), different plant types, various disease types, and incident light wavelength or color. Analysis of this data was performed to yield an algorithm for plant disease from the remotely sensed data.

  11. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    DOEpatents

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  12. 8 Conditions for Motivated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The author interviewed hundreds of adolescents about what makes them interested in learning, in and out of school. The result is a formula hinging on creating eight conditions that spur kids to take active, motivated roles in their own learning.

  13. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... examination to be needed, and Application for treatment is received within 180 days of discharge, and A VA... treatment of periodontal disease or calculus, unless the condition meets regulatory eligibility criteria....

  14. Matching and conditioned reinforcement rate.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina

    2006-03-01

    Attempts to examine the effects of variations in relative conditioned reinforcement rate on choice have been confounded by changes in rates of primary reinforcement or changes in the value of the conditioned reinforcer. To avoid these problems, this experiment used concurrent observing responses to examine sensitivity of choice to relative conditioned reinforcement rate. In the absence of observing responses, unsignaled periods of food delivery on a variable-interval 90-s schedule alternated with extinction on a center key (i.e., a mixed schedule was in effect). Two concurrently available observing responses produced 15-s access to a stimulus differentially associated with the schedule of food delivery (S+). The relative rate of S+ deliveries arranged by independent variable-interval schedules for the two observing responses varied across conditions. The relation between the ratio of observing responses and the ratio of S+ deliveries was well described by the generalized matching law, despite the absence of changes in the rate of food delivery. In addition, the value of the S+ deliveries likely remained constant across conditions because the ratio of S+ to mixed schedule food deliveries remained constant. Assuming that S+ deliveries serve as conditioned reinforcers, these findings are consistent with the functional similarity between primary and conditioned reinforcers suggested by general choice theories based on the concatenated matching law (e.g., contextual choice and hyperbolic value-added models). These findings are inconsistent with delay reduction theory, which has no terms for the effects of rate of conditioned reinforcement in the absence of changes in rate of primary reinforcement.

  15. [Early Development under Microgravity Conditions].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to various aspects of early development under the space flight conditions. The different possible cell mechanosensors are considered. Structural and functional changes in the cells, predominantly, in non-muscle ones, were discussed. The results of the different experiments with the embryos of fish, amphibians, birds and mammals under microgravity conditions are shown discussing possible reasons for the development of morphological changes. PMID:26591615

  16. Blood circulation under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Kopanev, V. I.; Yazdovskiy, V. I.

    1975-01-01

    Biomedical data obtained on men and animals during weightlessness conditions establish instabilities in pulse rate and blood circulation that smooth out in proportion to adaptation to the weightless condition. The unusual slowness of recovery of pulse rate to initial values after space flight stress is attributed to biological simulation of hormonal shifts and discharge of humoral substances into the blood that prevent a rapid recovery of some biological indicators to initial values.

  17. US PWR steam generator management: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Welty, C.S. Jr.

    1997-02-01

    This paper provides an overview on the status of steam generator management activities in US PWRs, and includes: (1) an overview of the impact of steam generator problems; (2) a brief discussion of historical damage trends and the current damage mechanism of most concern; (3) a discussion of the elements of {open_quotes}steam generator management{close_quotes}; and (4) a description of the approach being followed to implement a degradation-specific protocol for tubing inspection and repair. This paper was prepared in conjunction with another paper presented during the Plenary Session of this Conference, {open_quotes}Steam Generator Degradation: Current Mitigation Strategies for Controlling Corrosion{close_quotes}, and is provided as a supplement to that material.

  18. Systems interaction study of a Westinghouse PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, R.; Hanan, N.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Xue, D.; Bozoki, G.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents methods and findings of a systems interaction study of Indian Point 3. The study was carried out in support of the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-17 on Systems Interactions. Fault tree methods were employed. Among the study's findings is a single active failure in the low pressure injection function; this discovery led to a plant modification. In addition to providing support to the staff in resolving USI A-17, the project discovered an important new class of failure modes which led the utility to implement a hardware modification. The scope of the project is indicated, key features of the method are highlighted findings are discussed, and comments are offered on the usefulness of this type of, principal study. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Master information data acquisition system. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.C.

    1981-06-01

    MIDAS provides real-time work and component status as a function of the Work Control Log (WCL). Status is maintained and tracked with regard to Tag-Out status, Out-of-Service status, and document status. Component integration and technical and safety information is provided by the MIDAS Component Index (MCI). This information is provided directly to the user upon request. This information is also provided directly to the WCL as a function of component input to the WCL document prior to the documents release for execution.

  20. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  1. Impact analyses after pipe rupture. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, R.C.; Chuang, T.Y.

    1983-12-13

    Two of the French pipe whip experiments are reproduced with the computer code WIPS. The WIPS results are in good agreement with the experimental data and the French computer code TEDEL. This justifies the use of its pipe element in conjunction with its U-bar element in a simplified method of impact analyses.

  2. Air conditioning and refrigeration engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.

    1999-12-01

    This book supplies the basics of design, from selecting the optimum system and equipment to preparing the drawings and specifications. It discusses the four phases of preparing a project: gathering information, developing alternatives, evaluating alternatives, and selling the best solution. In addition, the author breaks down the responsibilities of the engineer design documents, computer aided design, and government codes and standards. It provides you with an easy reference to all aspects of the topic. This resource addresses the most current areas of interest, such as computer aided design and drafting, desiccant air conditioning and energy conservation. It is a thorough and convenient guide to air conditioning and refrigeration engineering. Contents include: introduction; psychrometrics; air-conditioning processes and cycles; refrigerants and refrigeration cycles; outdoor design conditions and indoor design criteria; load calculations; air handling units and packaged units; refrigeration components and evaporative coolers; water systems; heating systems; refrigeration systems; thermal storage system; air system basics; absorption systems; air-conditioning systems and selection; and desiccant dehumidification and air-conditioning.

  3. Initial conditions for bubble universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2008-06-01

    The “bubble universes” of Coleman and De Luccia play a crucial role in string cosmology. Since our own Universe is supposed to be of this kind, bubble cosmology should supply definite answers to the long-standing questions regarding cosmological initial conditions. In particular, it must explain how an initial singularity is avoided, and also how the initial conditions for inflation were established. I argue that the simplest nonanthropic approach to these problems involves a requirement that the spatial sections defined by distinguished bubble observers should not be allowed to have arbitrarily small volumes. Casimir energy is a popular candidate for a quantum effect which can ensure this, but (because it violates energy conditions) there is a danger that it could lead to nonperturbative instabilities in string theory. I make a simple proposal for the initial conditions of a bubble universe, and show that my proposal ensures that the system is nonperturbatively stable. Thus, low-entropy conditions can be established at the beginning of a bubble universe without violating the second law of thermodynamics and without leading to instability in string theory. These conditions are inherited from the ambient spacetime.

  4. Monetary effects on fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chen; Zhang, Aiyi; Chen, Qishan

    2013-04-01

    Previous research has found that the loss of money as a negative secondary reinforcer was as effective as a primary reinforcer during fear conditioning. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of monetary gain as a positive secondary reinforcer in fear conditioning. Participants were assigned to a high-reward group or low-reward group. Three kinds of squares prompting non-compensation shock, compensation shock, and no shock were presented. Skin conductance responses (SCRs) and self-ratings were recorded. The results revealed that (a) both SCRs and self-ratings in the compensation shock condition were lower than in the non-compensation shock condition, suggesting that money might block the learning stage of fear conditioning; and (b) a higher ratio of fear reduction was present in self-rating when compared to SCRs, suggesting that people might overstate the utility of money, subjectively. Monetary effects, the effects of different amounts of money, and the differences between subjective and physiological levels are discussed.

  5. Conditioned sounds enhance visual processing.

    PubMed

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, -50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception.

  6. Enhanced flue gas conditioning study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.J.; Laudal, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    Many electrostatic precipitators (ESPS) do not achieve acceptable particulate removal efficiencies because of high-resistivity ash. One method to improve ESP performance is to employ chemical conditioning agents to reduce fly ash resistivity. Widely used agents include sulfur trioxide (SO[sub 3]) and ammonia, which are sometimes used simultaneously. For some fly ashes, that have a low affinity for SO[sub 3], conditioning with SO[sub 3] alone is not adequate to reduce resistivity without excessive amounts of SO[sub 3] exiting the stack. In such cases, the use of ammonia in addition to SO[sub 3] may reduce the amount of required SO[sub 3] and prevent the emission of excess SO[sub 3] out of the stack. The general objective of the work was to test enhanced flue gas conditioning methods to improve the performance of ESPS. Specific objectives were to (1) verify the relationship between the required SO[sub 3] injection rates to maintain the desired fly ash resistivity and temperature for four coals, (2) verify that dual conditioning with both ammonia and SO[sub 3] promotes SO[sub 3] utilization and allows for resistivity modification with moderate SO[sub 3] injection rates, and (3) verify the effectiveness and practicality of an enhanced flue gas conditioning (EFGC) method. The EFGC method is a proprietary development of Wahlco, Inc.

  7. Conditioned Sounds Enhance Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Fabrizio; Noppeney, Uta

    2014-01-01

    This psychophysics study investigated whether prior auditory conditioning influences how a sound interacts with visual perception. In the conditioning phase, subjects were presented with three pure tones ( =  conditioned stimuli, CS) that were paired with positive, negative or neutral unconditioned stimuli. As unconditioned reinforcers we employed pictures (highly pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) or monetary outcomes (+50 euro cents, −50 cents, 0 cents). In the subsequent visual selective attention paradigm, subjects were presented with near-threshold Gabors displayed in their left or right hemifield. Critically, the Gabors were presented in synchrony with one of the conditioned sounds. Subjects discriminated whether the Gabors were presented in their left or right hemifields. Participants determined the location more accurately when the Gabors were presented in synchrony with positive relative to neutral sounds irrespective of reinforcer type. Thus, previously rewarded relative to neutral sounds increased the bottom-up salience of the visual Gabors. Our results are the first demonstration that prior auditory conditioning is a potent mechanism to modulate the effect of sounds on visual perception. PMID:25192387

  8. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  9. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  10. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-03-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  11. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April- June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-09-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL} from April1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory {INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  12. Evolution of the design methodologies for the next generation of RPV Extensive role of the thermal-hydraulics numerical tools

    SciTech Connect

    Goreaud, Nicolas; Nicaise, Norbert; Stoudt, Roger

    2004-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the first PWR's was mainly based on an experimental approach, with a large series of test on the main equipment (control rod guide tubes, RPV plenums..), to check its performances. Development of CFD-codes and computers now allows for complex simulations of hydraulic phenomena. Provided adequate qualification, these numerical tools are efficient means to determine hydraulics in given design, and to perform sensitivities for optimization of new designs. Experiments always play their role, first for qualification, and for validation at the last stage of the design. The design of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), is based on both hydraulic calculations and experiments, handled in a complementary approach. This paper describes the effort launched by Framatome-ANP on hydraulic calculations for the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of the EPR reactor. It concerns 3D-calculations of RPV-inlet including cold legs, RPV-downcomer and lower plenum, RPV-upper plenum up to and including hot legs. It covers normal operating conditions, but also accidental conditions as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock) in small break loss of coolant accident (SB-LOCA). Those hydraulic studies have provided numerous useful information for the mechanical design of RPV-internals. (authors)

  13. Conditioning across the duration of a backward conditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, C B; Williams, D A

    2000-10-01

    Five conditioned suppression experiments examined the extent to which an appetitively motivated lever-press response can be punished by different components of a backward conditioned stimulus (CS). Using a 0-s unconditioned stimulus (US)-CS interval, Experiments 1 and 2 showed that the initial 3 s of a normally 30-s backward CS served as a more effective punisher than the CS as a whole. Experiment 3 found no such effect if the US-CS interval were 3 s rather than 0 s. Experiments 4A and 4B found that if the US-CS interval were 0 s, the initial part of the backward CS acquired excitatory properties although the CS as a whole passed a summation test for conditioned inhibition. By contrast, the 3-s US-CS interval supported inhibitory conditioning across the whole duration of the backward CS. Taken together, these findings support a modified version of Wagner's sometimes opponent process model, which suggests that different components of a backward CS become either excitatory or inhibitory depending on the components' temporal proximity to the US. PMID:11056885

  14. Condition with Caution: Think Thrice Before Conditioning. (Rough Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Lilian G.

    1971-01-01

    Innovative models for education are often quickly adopted. Behavior modification, or operant conditioning, is an example of a technique which has been widely used because, when properly applied in the classroom, it "works." However, the application of a technique should be carefully thought through in terms of the meaning of the behavior in…

  15. Oil Analysis and Condition Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, A.; Toms, L.

    Lubricants are essential and expensive components of machine systems needing sampling, analysis and monitoring. Monitoring can be either performance testing or oil condition monitoring. Knowledge of the system's critical failure modes is essential for cost-effective oil and machinery monitoring. Contamination occurs by water, fuel, glycol, dirt, wrong oil, metal particulate, soot, oil degradation and additive depletion. Oil test methods include in situ or laboratory FT-IR, electronic particle counting, elemental metal measurement, X-ray fluorescence, viscosity, gas chromatography, water determination and RULER®. Condition monitoring data must be managed by storage, analysis and interpretation. Status levels must be established from the database and reported upon for individual and sequential runs of samples as condition indicators.

  16. Conditioned Reinforcement and Response Strength

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  17. Diffusions conditioned on occupation measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeletti, Florian; Touchette, Hugo

    2016-02-01

    A Markov process fluctuating away from its typical behavior can be represented in the long-time limit by another Markov process, called the effective or driven process, having the same stationary states as the original process conditioned on the fluctuation observed. We construct here this driven process for diffusions spending an atypical fraction of their evolution in some region of state space, corresponding mathematically to stochastic differential equations conditioned on occupation measures. As an illustration, we consider the Langevin equation conditioned on staying for a fraction of time in different intervals of the real line, including the positive half-line which leads to a generalization of the Brownian meander problem. Other applications related to quasi-stationary distributions, metastable states, noisy chemical reactions, queues, and random walks are discussed.

  18. Quantum Measurement and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Ovidiu Cristinel

    2016-03-01

    Quantum measurement finds the observed system in a collapsed state, rather than in the state predicted by the Schrödinger equation. Yet there is a relatively spread opinion that the wavefunction collapse can be explained by unitary evolution (for instance in the decoherence approach, if we take into account the environment). In this article it is proven a mathematical result which severely restricts the initial conditions for which measurements have definite outcomes, if pure unitary evolution is assumed. This no-go theorem remains true even if we take the environment into account. The result does not forbid a unitary description of the measurement process, it only shows that such a description is possible only for very restricted initial conditions. The existence of such restrictions of the initial conditions can be understood in the four-dimensional block universe perspective, as a requirement of global self-consistency of the solutions of the Schrödinger equation.

  19. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration.

  20. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  1. Eckart−Sayvetz conditions revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Szalay, Viktor

    2014-06-21

    It is shown that vibrational displacements satisfying the Eckart−Sayvetz conditions can be constructed by projection of unconstrained displacements. This result has a number of interesting direct and indirect ramifications: (i) The normal coordinates corresponding to an electronic state or an isotopologue of a molecule are transformed to those of another state or isotopologue by a linear and, in general, non-orthogonal transformation. (ii) Novel interpretation of axis switching. (iii) One may enhance the separation of rotational-large-amplitude internal motions and the vibrational motions beyond that offered by the standard use of the Eckart−Sayvetz conditions. (iv) The rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian given in terms of curvilinear internal coordinates may be derived with elementary mathematical tools while taking into account the Eckart conditions with or without enhancement.

  2. Motor activity under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Kopanev, V. I.; Cherepakhin, M. A.; Yuganov, Y. M.

    1975-01-01

    The material presented on the motor activity under weightless conditions (brief and long) leads to the conclusion that it is not significantly disrupted, if those being examined are secured at the workplaces. Some discoordination of movement, moderately expressed disruption of the precision of reproduction of assigned muscular forces, etc., were observed. Motor disorders decrease significantly in proportion to the length of stay under weightless conditions. This apparently takes place, as a consequence of formation of a new functional system, adequate to the conditions of weightlessness. Tests on intact and labyrinthectomized animals have demonstrated that signaling from the inner ear receptors is superfluous in weightlessness, since it promotes the onset of disruptions in the combined work of the position analyzers.

  3. Conditioned reinforcement and response strength.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-03-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in parameters of conditioned reinforcement appear not to affect response strength as measured by resistance to change, long-standing assertions that conditioned reinforcers do not strengthen behavior in a reinforcement-like fashion are considered. A signposts or means-to-an-end account is explored and appears to provide a plausible alternative interpretation of the effects of stimuli associated with primary reinforcers. Related suggestions that primary reinforcers also might not have their effects via a strengthening process are explored and found to be worthy of serious consideration. PMID:20885815

  4. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  5. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000-130,000 nm(2)) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  6. Core cooling under accident conditions at the high flux beam reactor (HFBR)

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, P.; Cheng, L. ); Fauske, H. )

    1991-01-01

    In certain accident scenarios, e.g. loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) all forced flow cooling is lost. Decay heating causes a temperature increase in the core coolant and the resulting thermal buoyancy causes a reversal of the flow direction to a natural circulation mode. Although there was experimental evidence during the reactor design period (1958--1963) that the heat removal capacity in the fully developed natural circulation cooling mode was relatively high, it was not possible to make a confident prediction of the heat removal capacity during the transition from downflow to natural circulation. In a LOCA scenario where even limited fuel damage occurs and natural circulation is established, fission product gases could be carried from the damaged fuel by steam into areas where operator access is required to maintain the core in a coolable configuration. This would force evacuation of the building and lead to extensive core damage. As a result the HFBR was shut down by the Department of Energy (DOE) and an extensive review of the HFBR was initiated. In an effort to address this issue BNL developed a model designed to predict the heat removal limit during flow reversal that was found to be in good agreement with the test results. Currently a thermal-hydraulic test program is being developed to provide a more realistic and defensible estimate of the flow reversal heat removal limit so that the reactor power level can be increased.

  7. Initial conditions and quantum cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, James B.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of initial conditions is necessary for a complete explanation of the presently observed large scale structural features of the universe, and a quantum theory of cosmology is probably needed for its formulation. The kinematics of quantum cosmology are reviewed, and some candidates for a law of initial conditions are discussed. The proposal that the quantum state of a closed universe is the natural analog of the ground state for closed cosmologies and is specified by a Euclidean sum over histories is sketched. When implemented in simple models, this proposal is consistent with the most important large-scale observations.

  8. Real-time streamflow conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, David J.; Gebert, Warren A.

    1996-01-01

    Would you like to know streamflow conditions before you go fishing in Wisconsin or in more distant locations? Real-time streamflow data throughout Wisconsin and the United States are available on the Internet from the U.S. Geological Survey. You can see if the stream you are interested in fishing is high due to recent rain or low because of an extended dry spell. Flow conditions at more than 100 stream-gaging stations located throughout Wisconsin can be viewed by accessing the Wisconsin District Home Page at: http://wwwdwimdn.er.usgs.gov

  9. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  10. Heat pipe thermal conditioning panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Loose, J. D.; Mccoy, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal control of electronic hardware and experiments on future space vehicles is critical to proper functioning and long life. Thermal conditioning panels (cold plates) are a baseline control technique in current conceptual studies. Heat generating components mounted on the panels are typically cooled by fluid flowing through integral channels within the panel. However, replacing the pumped fluid coolant loop within the panel with heat pipes offers attractive advantages in weight, reliability, and installation. This report describes the development and fabrication of two large 0.76 x 0.76 m heat pipe thermal conditioning panels to verify performance and establish the design concept.

  11. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  12. Associations in Human Instrumental Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, A. Matias; Rosas, Juan M.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to study the contents of human instrumental conditioning. Experiment 1 found positive transfer between a discriminative stimulus (S[superscript D] and an instrumental response (R) that shared the outcome (O) with the response that was originally trained with the S[superscript D], showing the formation of an…

  13. How Cells Endure Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    One of natures most gripping feats of survival is now better understood. For the first time, Berkeley Lab scientists observed the chemical changes in individual cells that enable them to survive in conditions that should kill them. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/07/07/cells-endure-extremes/

  14. Auditory Temporal Conditioning in Neonates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, W. K.; And Others

    Twenty normal newborns, approximately 36 hours old, were tested using an auditory temporal conditioning paradigm which consisted of a slow rise, 75 db tone played for five seconds every 25 seconds, ten times. Responses to the tones were measured by instantaneous, beat-to-beat heartrate; and the test trial was designated as the 2 1/2-second period…

  15. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197

  16. Conditions for Developing Communicative Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Individuals need communicative competence for personal fulfillment and development, active citizenship, social inclusion and employment. Materials and Methods. The meaning of the key concepts of "communicative competence" and "opportunities" is studied within the search for conditions to develop. Conclusion. The theoretical findings…

  17. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of EPA's National Coastal Assessment (NCA) program is to estimate the status and trends of the condition of the nation's coastal resources on state, regional and national scales. During 1999-2003, 100% of the nation's estuarine waters were representatively sampled at ...

  18. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  19. Lightning injuries during snowy conditions.

    PubMed

    Cherington, M; Breed, D W; Yarnell, P R; Smith, W E

    1998-12-01

    Skiers and other snow sports enthusiasts can become lightning casualties. Two such accidents are reported, one being fatal. There are fewer warning signals of impending lightning strikes in winter-like conditions. However, outdoor activists should be aware of at least two suspicious clues: the appearance of convective clouds, and the presence of graupel (snow pellets) during precipitation.

  20. Conditioned Reinforcement and Response Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Stimuli associated with primary reinforcers appear themselves to acquire the capacity to strengthen behavior. This paper reviews research on the strengthening effects of conditioned reinforcers within the context of contemporary quantitative choice theories and behavioral momentum theory. Based partially on the finding that variations in…