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Sample records for pylori isolates obtained

  1. Levofloxacin resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in southern Poland, between 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    Karczewska, Elzbieta; Klesiewicz, Karolina; Wojtas-Bonior, Izabela; Skiba, Iwona; Sito, Edward; Czajecki, Krzysztof; Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Budak, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    An increasing resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to antimicrobial agents leads to the need of regional monitoring of the prevalence resistant strains (according to the Maastricht/Florence consensus report, 2012). The aim of the study was to assess the resistance to levofloxacin of H. pylori strains isolated from adult patients of Małopolska region in Poland. Bioptates taken from gastric mucosa during gastroscopy constituted the material for the study. Two hundred ten H. pylori strains were isolated from 811 patients. A majority of strains (171) came from patients before the treatment of H. pylori infections while the remaining 39 strains were isolated from patients after the failed therapy. Susceptibility of H. pylori to levofloxacin was determined by strips impregnated with antibiotic gradient (E-test, bioMerieux). The obtained minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 0.002 mg/L to 32 mg/L. The percentage of strains resistant to levofloxacin amounted to 8.10% (17/210). Among the group of strains isolated from patients before the treatment, 5.85% (10/171) of H. pylori strains were resistant to levofloxacin. In the group of strains isolated from patients after the treatment 17.95% (7/39) of strains were resistant. The difference in the frequency of H. pylori strains resistant to levofloxacin in patients before and after the treatment of the infection due to H. pylori was statistically significant (p = 0.0297). The low percentage of H. pylori strains resistant to levofloxacin justify that the introduction of a triple therapy with levofloxacin is a good alternative in the treatment of H. pylori infections, especially in regions with high prevalence of H. pylori strains resistant to clarithromycin (> 20%).

  2. New urea biosensor based on urease enzyme obtained from Helycobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Dindar, Bahar; Karakuş, Emine; Abasıyanık, Fatih

    2011-11-01

    The urease enzyme of Helicobacter pylori was isolated from biopsy sample obtained from antrum big curvature cell extracts. A new urea biosensor was prepared by immobilizing urease enzyme isolated from Helicobacter pylori on poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) ammonium membrane electrode by using nonactine as an ammonium ionophore. The effect of pH, buffer concentration, and temperature for the biosensor prepared with urease from H. pylori were obtained as 6.0, 5 mM, and 25 °C, respectively. We also investigated urease concentration, stirring rate, and enzyme immobilization procedures in response to urea of the enzyme electrode. The linear working range of the biosensor extends from 1 × 10(-5) to 1 × 10(-2) M and they showed an apparent Nernstian response within this range. Urea enzyme electrodes prepared with urease enzymes obtained from H. pylori and Jack bean based on PVC membrane ammonium-selective electrode showed very good analytical parameters: high sensitivity, dynamic stability over 2 months with less decrease of sensitivity, response time 1-2 min. The analytical characteristics were investigated and were compared those of the urea biosensor prepared with urease enzyme isolated from Jack bean prepared at the same conditions. It was observed that rapid determinations of human serum urea amounts were also made possible with both biosensors.

  3. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associate Urease by Labdane Diterpenoids Isolated from Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rafik U; Dawane, Ashwini A; Pawar, Rajendra P; Gond, Dhananjay S; Meshram, Rohan J; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-Helicobacter pylori and its associated urease activity of labdane diterpenoids isolated from Andrographis paniculata. A molecular docking analysis was performed by using ArgusLab 4.0.1 software. The results obtained indicate that compound A possesses strong inhibition to H. pylori, 28 ± 2.98 (minimum inhibitory concentration, 9 µg/mL), and its urease, 85.54 ± 2.62% (IC50 , 20.2 µg/mL). Compounds B, C, and D also showed moderate inhibition to H. pylori and its urease. The obtained results were in agreement with the molecular docking analysis of compounds. The phytochemicals under investigation were found to be promising antibacterial agents. Moreover, the isolated compounds can be considered as a resource for searching novel anti-H. pylori agents possessing urease inhibition.

  4. Antibiotic resistance among Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Boehnke, Kevin F; Valdivieso, Manuel; Bussalleu, Alejandro; Sexton, Rachael; Thompson, Kathryn C; Osorio, Soledad; Reyes, Italo Novoa; Crowley, John J; Baker, Laurence H; Xi, Chuanwu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Gastric carcinoma is the most common cancer and cause of cancer mortality in Peru. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach, is a Group 1 carcinogen due to its causal relationship to gastric carcinoma. While eradication of H. pylori can help prevent gastric cancer, characterizing regional antibiotic resistance patterns is necessary to determine targeted treatment for each region. Thus, we examined primary antibiotic resistance in clinical isolates of H. pylori in Lima, Peru. Materials and methods H. pylori strains were isolated from gastric biopsies of patients with histologically proven H. pylori infection. Primary antibiotic resistance among isolates was examined using E-test strips. Isolates were examined for the presence of the cagA pathogenicity island and the vacA m1/m2 alleles via polymerase chain reaction. Results Seventy-six isolates were recovered from gastric biopsies. Clinical isolates showed evidence of antibiotic resistance to 1 (27.6%, n=21/76), 2 (28.9%, n=22/76), or ≥3 antibiotics (40.8%). Of 76 isolates, eight (10.5%) were resistant to amoxicillin and clarithromycin, which are part of the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection. No trends were seen between the presence of cagA, vacA m1, or vacA m2 and antibiotic resistance. Conclusion The rate of antibiotic resistance among H. pylori isolates in Lima, Peru, is higher than expected and presents cause for concern. To develop more targeted eradication therapies for H. pylori in Peru, more research is needed to better characterize antibiotic resistance among a larger number of clinical isolates prospectively. PMID:28331349

  5. Prevalence of resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates in Bulgarian children.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Koumanova, Radka; Gergova, Galina; Popova, Maria; Mitov, Ivan; Kovacheva, Youlia; Derejian, Sirigan; Katsarov, Nikolai; Nikolov, Rossen; Krastev, Zacharii

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the primary and combined resistances of Helicobacter pylori isolates obtained from paediatric patients in 2000-2001 to seven antimicrobial agents. Resistance rates of pre-treatment isolates from 115 children were investigated by the limited agar dilution method alone and by the E-test. The cut-off concentrations for resistance were: metronidazole >8 mg/L, clarithromycin and azithromycin >1 mg/L, clindamycin >4 mg/L, amoxicillin >0.5 mg/L, tetracycline >4 mg/L and ciprofloxacin >1 mg/L. Primary resistance rates were: metronidazole 15.8%, clarithromycin 12.4%, azithromycin 14.6%, clindamycin 20.0%, amoxicillin 0%, metronidazole + clarithromycin 4.5%, ciprofloxacin 6.0%, metronidazole + clarithromycin + ciprofloxacin 1.2%, tetracycline 3.1% and metronidazole + ciprofloxacin 1.2%. There were no significant age (1-9 years versus 10-18 years) or gender differences. Prevalence of both macrolide-resistant and intermediately susceptible strains was 21.9% for azithromycin and 15.9% for clarithromycin. Of 18 metronidazole-resistant isolates, 77.8% exhibited a metronidazole MIC > or = 32 mg/L. H. pylori resistance rates to metronidazole, clarithromycin and both agents were relatively low in Bulgarian children. However, resistance was found to all drugs tested except for amoxicillin. The consumption of newer macrolides and tetracyclines could be related to the prevalence of resistance to the corresponding agents. There were no significant differences in primary resistance rates of H. pylori to antimicrobial agents between children and adults except for metronidazole. Multi-drug resistance to newer macrolides, metronidazole and ciprofloxacin in association with a slightly elevated amoxicillin MIC (0.38 mg/L) was detected in one strain.

  6. Characterization and presumptive identification of Helicobacter pylori isolates from rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Drazek, E S; Dubois, A; Holmes, R K

    1994-01-01

    We characterized 38 Helicobacter isolates, including 22 from gastric biopsy samples obtained from 14 rhesus monkeys and single isolates from 16 monkeys in a different colony. Biochemical profiles of these isolates were nearly identical to that of Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis indicated that each infected monkey harbored one to four strains. The 17 RFLP types found among these 22 isolates differed from all seven RFLPs found among the other 16 isolates. Thus, monkeys within a given colony are more likely to be infected by Helicobacter isolates with the same or a similar RFLP than are monkeys from different colonies. A 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and cloned from the Helicobacter isolate from rhesus monkey 85D08. Ribotyping with this probe demonstrated less diversity among isolates from rhesus monkeys than was reported among isolates of H. pylori from humans, as did RFLP analysis of a PCR fragment of the ureA-ureB gene cluster. The DNA sequence of the cloned 16S rRNA gene was determined and compared with sequences reported for H. pylori and other Helicobacter species. Our analysis of 127 nucleotides (corresponding with residues 1240 to 1366 of the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene) indicated that the Helicobacter isolate from monkey 85D08 was 99.2 to 100% homologous to isolates of H. pylori from humans but only 83.5 to 96.9% homologous with other Helicobacter species in this region of the 16S rRNA gene. These data provide strong support for the presumptive identification of these isolates as H. pylori. Images PMID:7523441

  7. Isolation and diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori by a new method: Microcapillary culture

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Caliskan, Reyhan; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; Aliyeva, Hayat; Unal, Gokce; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Toptas, Hilal; Yuksel, Pelin; Kalayci, Fatma; Aslan, Mustafa; Erzin, Yusuf; Bal, Kadir; Kocazeybek, Bekir S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the performance of the microcapillary culture method (MCM) in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolation and diagnosis. METHODS: Microcapillary culture (MC), classical culture (CC), rapid urease (CLO) test, and histopathologic examination (HE) were performed with biopsy samples. Homogenized biopsy samples were loaded into capillary tubes and incubated for 48 h at 37 °C without providing a microaerophilic environment. Additionally, three or four loops of the homogenized sample were inoculated in a ready-to-use selective medium (Becton Dickinson, Helicobacter Agar, Modified) specific for the isolation of H. pylori and incubated at 37 °C in a microaerophilic atmosphere provided by CampyGen (Becton Dickinson, GasPack). Bacteria reproducing in microcapillary tubes were evaluated in an inverted microscope and also were evaluated after performing a CC with the content. Results obtained by CC, CLO test, and HE were compared with those of MC. The diagnostic performances of the methods used in this study were evaluated for specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and CI. RESULTS: H. pylori was found positive by CLO test + HE and/or CC culture in 26 patient antrum and corpus biopsy samples. In 25 (25/26) patient biopsy samples, H. pylori was isolated by MCM, whereas in only 14 (14/26) patient biopsy samples, H. pylori was isolated by CC. CLO test and HE were found positive in 17 (17/26) patient biopsy samples. Comparing the results of the isolation of H. pylori by MCM, CC, CLO test, and HE, the sensitivity of the MCM was found as 96%, the specificity as 80%, the PPV as 83%, the NPV as 95%, and the 95%CI as 0.76 (χ2 = 31.51, P < 0.01) whereas the sensitivity of the CC was found as 54% (χ2 = 19.15, P < 0.01), and the sensitivity of the CLO test and HE were found as 65% (χ2 = 25.26, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: This new microcapillary cultivation method for H. pylori has high diagnostic sensitivity compared

  8. Primary Antibiotic Resistance to Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated From Children in Northern Iran: A Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Maleknejad, Shohreh; Mojtahedi, Ali; Safaei-Asl, Afshin; Taghavi, Zeinab; Kazemnejad, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Initial resistance to antibiotics is the main reason for the failure of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication in children. Objectives: As we commonly face high antibiotic resistance rates in children, we aimed to determine the susceptibility of H. pylori to common antibiotics. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional in vitro study, 169 children younger than 14 years with clinical diagnosis of peptic ulcer underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Biopsy specimens from stomach and duodenum were cultured. In isolated colonies, tests of catalase, urease, and oxidase as well as gram staining were performed. After confirming the colonies as H. pylori, the antibiogram was obtained using disk diffusion method. Results: Culture for H. pylori was positive in 12.3% of the specimens, urease test in 21.3%, serological test in 18.9% and stool antigen test was positive in 21.9%. We could show high specificity but moderate sensitivity of both histological and H. pylori stool antigen tests to detect H. pylori. The overall susceptibility to metronidazole was 42.9%, amoxicillin 95.2%, clarithromycin 85.7%, furazolidone 61.9%, azithromycin 81.0%, and tetracycline 76.2% with the highest resistance to metronidazole and the lowest to clarithromycin. Conclusions: In our region, there is high resistance of H. pylori to some antibiotics including metronidazole and furazolidone among affected children. To reduce the prevalence of this antibiotic resistance, more controlled use of antibiotics should be considered in children. PMID:26635938

  9. Isolation and characterisation of putative adhesins from Helicobacter pylori with affinity for heparan sulphate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ochoa, J L; Wadström, T; Ascencio, F

    2001-03-01

    A pool of heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) from Helicobacter pylori culture supernates was obtained by sequential ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. The chromatographic procedure yielded one major fraction that contained proteins with heparan sulphate affinity as revealed by inhibition studies of heparan sulphate binding to H. pylori cells. Preparative iso-electric focusing, SDS-PAGE and blotting experiments, with peroxidase(POD)-labelled heparan sulphate as a probe, indicated the presence of two major extracellular proteins with POD-heparan sulphate affinity. One protein had a molecular mass of 66.2 kDa and a pI of 5.4, whilst the second protein had a molecular mass of 71.5 kDa and a pI of 5.0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 71.5-kDa HSBP did not show homology to any other heparin-binding protein, nor to known proteins of H. pylori, whereas the 66.2-kDa HSBP showed a high homology to an Escherichia coli chaperon protein and equine haemoglobin. A third HSBP was isolated from an outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction of H. pylori cells with a molecular mass of 47.2 kDa. The amino acid sequence of an internal peptide of the OMP-HSBP did not show homology to the extracellular HSBP of H. pylori, or to another microbial HSBP.

  10. Optimal combination of media for primary isolation of Helicobacter pylori from gastric biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Piccolomini, R; Di Bonaventura, G; Festi, D; Catamo, G; Laterza, F; Neri, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare eight media, four nonselective and four selective media, to determine the best combination of media for the primary isolation of Helicobacter pylori. Over a period of 5 months, mucosal antral biopsy specimens were obtained from 222 consecutive dyspeptic patients undergoing endoscopy. Biopsy samples were plated in parallel on all eight media. Egg yolk emulsion agar (EYE), Skirrow's medium, Dent's medium, and modified Thayer-Martin medium were used as selective media; modified chocolate agar (MCHOC), Triptycase soy agar (TSA), brucella agar, and brain heart infusion agar were used as nonselective media. Overall, by using these eight media, H. pylori was recovered from biopsy specimens from 114 of 222 patients, yielding an isolation rate of 51%. Comparison of all possible combinations of the eight media showed that the highest rate of isolation of H. pylori was 100% (114 of 114) with EYE-MCHOC, followed by 96.5% (110 of 114) when EYE-TSA was used. Conversely, it was found that none of the media used alone yielded a 100% rate of recovery (the maximum recovery rate was 95%, which was achieved with EYE). These results indicate that the association of EYE and MCHOC yielded the maximum recovery of H. pylori from gastric biopsy specimens. Therefore, the use of selective and nonselective media in parallel offers optimal recovery rates with only a slight increase in costs. PMID:9163478

  11. [Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa, dental plaque and saliva in a population from the Venezuelan Andes].

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Lilibeth; Vásquez, Libia; Velasco, Judith; Parlapiano, Donatella

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is common in people. However, the existence of extra gastric reservoirs and transmission routes remain controversial in the field. Because the oral cavity has been proposed as a reservoir for H. pylori, a study was carried out to determine the presence of H. pylori in dental plaque and saliva. The results were asociated with those obtained in the gastric biopsy. Ninety-seven dyspeptic and fifty asymptomatic patients were studied and samples taken for biopsy, dental plaque and saliva. The gastric biopsies were evaluated using microbiology and histology methods. Cultures and urease tests were carried out on the oral cavity samples and included pretreatment methods using urea and HCl. The frequency of H. pylori for all the patients evaluated was 75.5%. H. pylori was not isolated in saliva or dental plaque in any of the two groups studied with or without sample pretreatment. The urease test in dental plaque was positive in 99.3% of the patients and 89.8% in saliva. There was no statistically significant difference between the infection prevalence by H. pylori in dyspeptic or not dyspeptic patients. The obtained results suggest that the methodology used for the detection of H. pylori is not sufficiently sensitive for the determination of the microorganism in the oral cavity.

  12. Analysis of Genomic Diversity among Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Iranian Children by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Sotoudeh, Nazli; Feizabadi, Mohammad-Mehdi; Mahjoub, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Presence of genomic diversity among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains have been suggested by numerous investigators. Little is known about diversity of H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian children and their association with virulence of the strains. Our purpose was to assess the degree of genomic diversity among H. pylori strains isolated from Iranian-children, on the basis of vacA genotype, cagA status of the strains, sex, age as well as the pathological status of the patients. Methods: Genomic DNA from 44 unrelated H. pylori strains isolated during 1997–2009, was examined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Pathological status of the patients was performed according to the modified Sydney-system and genotype/status of vacA/cagA genes was determined by PCR. PFGE was performed using XbaI restriction-endonuclease and the field inversion-gel electrophoresis system. Findings: No significant relationship was observed between the patterns of PFGE and the cagA/vacA status/genotype. Also no relationship was observed between age, sex, and pathological status of the children and the PFGE patterns of their isolates. Similar conclusion was obtained by Total Lab software. However, more relationship was observed between the strains isolated in the close period (1997–2009, 2001–2003, 2005–2007, and 2007–2009) and more difference was observed among those obtained in the distant periods (1997 and 2009). Conclusion: H. pylori strains isolated from children in Iran are extremely diverse and this diversity is not related to their virulence characteristics. Occurrence of this extreme diversity may be related to adaptation of H. pylori strains to variable living conditions during transmission between various host individuals. PMID:26019775

  13. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern chile

    PubMed Central

    Otth, Laura; Wilson, Myra; Fernández, Heriberto; Otth, Carola; Toledo, Claudio; Cárcamo, Victoria; Rivera, Paula; Ruiz, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement). Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3%) with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures) than male (40.2% positive cultures). With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21–30 (55%) and 41–50 (52.6%) years old, and patients with secondary (43.9%) and university (46.2%) educational levels. Nineteen (21.6%) strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3%) showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously. PMID:24031652

  14. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori in gastric mucosa and susceptibility to five antimicrobial drugs in Southern chile.

    PubMed

    Otth, Laura; Wilson, Myra; Fernández, Heriberto; Otth, Carola; Toledo, Claudio; Cárcamo, Victoria; Rivera, Paula; Ruiz, Luis

    2011-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes more than 50% of the world population thus, it is considered an important cause of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation frequency of H. pylori in Southern Chile from patients with symptomatology compatible with gastritis or gastric ulcer and to correlate these findings with demographic parameters of infected patients and the susceptibility profiles of the isolated strains to the antimicrobial drugs used in the eradication treatments. A total of 240 patients were enrolled in the study. Each gastric biopsy was homogenized and seeded onto blood agar plates containing a selective antibiotics mixture (DENT supplement). Plates were incubated at 37° C in a microaerophilic environment for five days. The susceptibility profiles to amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, tetracycline and metronidazole were determined using the E-test method. H. pylori was isolated from 99 patients (41.3%) with slightly higher frequency in female (42% positive cultures) than male (40.2% positive cultures). With regard to age and educational level, the highest isolation frequencies were obtained in patients between 21-30 (55%) and 41-50 (52.6%) years old, and patients with secondary (43.9%) and university (46.2%) educational levels. Nineteen (21.6%) strains showed resistance to at least one antimicrobial drug. Tetracycline was the most active antimicrobial in vitro, whereas metronidazole was the less active. One strain (5.3%) showed resistance to amoxicillin, clarithomycin and metronidazole, simultaneously.

  15. Study of Biofilm Formation in C57Bl/6J Mice by Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Attaran, Bahareh; Falsafi, Tahereh; Moghaddam, Ali N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Despite the significant number of studies on H. pylori pathogenesis, not much data has been published concerning its ability to form biofilm in the host stomach. This study aims to evaluate the potential of clinical isolates of H. pylori to form biofilm in C57BL/6J mice model. Materials and Methods: Two strains of H. pylori were selected from a collection of clinical isolates; one (19B), an efficient biofilm producer and the other (4B), with weak biofilm-forming ability. Mice infected through gastric avages were examined after one and two weeks. Colonization was determined by CFU and urease activity; the anti-H. pylori IgA was measured by ELISA, and chronic infections were evaluated by histopathology. Bacterial communities within mucosal sections were studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Successful infection was obtained by both test strains. Strain 19B with higher ability to form biofilm in vitro also showed a higher colonization rate in the mice stomach one week after infection. Difference (P < 0.05) in IgA titers was observed between the infected mice and the controls as well as between 19B and 4B infected mice, two weeks after the last challenge. Immunofluorescence and SEM results showed tightly colonizing H. pylori in stomach mucosal sections and in squamous and glandular epithelium. Conclusion: H. pylori is able to form biofilm in the mouse stomach and induce IgA production, reflecting the same potential as in humans. Firm attachment of coccoid form bacteria to host cells suggests the importance of this state in biofilm formation by H. pylori. Occurrence of biofilm in squamous and glandular epithelium of the mouse stomach proposes that H. pylori can all parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26997224

  16. Universal high-level primary metronidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori isolated from children in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sherif, May; Mohran, Zaynab; Fathy, Hanan; Rockabrand, David M; Rozmajzl, Patrick J; Frenck, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 48 isolates of Helicobacter pylori recovered from Egyptian children undergoing routine endoscopies. The isolates were universally highly resistant to metronidazole, but resistance to other tested antimicrobial agents was rare (4% for clarithromycin, erythromycin, and azithromycin resistance versus 2% for ciprofloxacin and ampicillin resistance). Use of metronidazole for the treatment of H. pylori in Egypt should be avoided.

  17. Primary antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Beijing: A prospective serial study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue-Xi; Zhou, Li-Ya; Song, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; He, Li-Hua; Ding, Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the resistance patterns of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains isolated from patients in Beijing and monitor the change of antibiotic resistance over time. METHODS: In this prospective, serial and cross-sectional study, H. pylori cultures were successfully obtained from 371 and 950 patients (never receiving eradication) during 2009-2010 and 2013-2014, respectively. Resistance to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, tetracycline, and rifampicin was determined by Epsilometer test. RESULTS: The resistance rates of isolates obtained during 2009-2010 were 66.8%, 39.9%, 34.5%, 15.4%, 6.7%, and 4.9% to metronidazole, clarithromycin, levofloxacin, rifampicin, amoxicillin and tetracycline, respectively; and the corresponding rates for isolates during 2013-2014 were 63.4%, 52.6%, 54.8%, 18.2%, 4.4% and 7.3%, respectively. The resistance rates to clarithromycin and levofloxacin were significantly increased after four years. In 2009-2010, 14.6% of H. pylori isolates were susceptible to all tested antibiotics, with mono (33.7%), double (28.3%), triple (16.7%), quadruple (6.2%), quintuple (0.3%) and sextuple resistance (0.3%) also being detected. In 2013-2014, 9.4% were susceptible to all tested antibiotics, and mono (27.6%), double (28.4%), triple (24.9%), quadruple (7.3%), quintuple (2.3%) and sextuple resistance (0.1%) was also observed. More multiple resistant H. pylori isolates were found during 2013-2014. Gender (to levofloxacin and metronidazole), age (to levofloxacin) and endoscopic findings (to clarithromycin) were independent factors influencing antibiotic resistance. CONCLUSION: H. pylori resistance to commonly used antibiotics in Beijing is high with increased multiple antibiotic resistance. PMID:25759550

  18. Enzyme biotypes of Helicobacter pylori isolated from Penang, Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Uyub, A M; Azlan, A A

    2000-12-01

    A total of 52 clinical strains of Helicobacter pylori were characterized on the basis of preformed enzyme production with API ZYM kits. Using the biotyping schemes as defined by Reina and Alomar (1989), Kung et al (1989) and Matsumoto et al (1996), 15.3% (8/52), 13.5% (7/52) and 11.5% (6/52) of the isolates were not biotypable, respectively. Two enzymes, valine arylamidase and cystine arylamidase could be additionally used to differentiate between isolates. Our isolates were either negative or positive for both the enzymes or positive only for cystine arylamidase. We propose the incorporation of these two enzymes into the Matsumoto et al (1996) biotyping scheme to biotype strains into additional enzyme biotypes.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 29CaP Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. pylori strain 29CaP, isolated from a Mexican patient with gastric cancer. The genomic data analysis revealed a cag-negative H. pylori strain that contains a prophage sequence. PMID:26769924

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 29CaP Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel; López-Vidal, Yolanda

    2016-01-14

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. pylori strain 29CaP, isolated from a Mexican patient with gastric cancer. The genomic data analysis revealed a cag-negative H. pylori strain that contains a prophage sequence.

  1. Genotypic and phenotypic variation of Lewis antigen expression in geographically diverse Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Mary Ann; Zhang, William; Shah, Sunny; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo L.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a persistent colonizer of the human gastric mucosa, which can lead to the development peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, H. pylori can asymptomatically colonize a host for years. One factor that has been hypothesized to contribute to such persistence is the production of Lewis (Le) antigens in the lipopolysaccharide layer of the bacterial outer membrane as a form of molecular mimicry, since humans also express these antigens on their gastric mucosa. Humans and H. pylori both are polymorphic for Le expression, which is driven in H. pylori by variation at the Le synthesis loci. In this report we sought to characterize Le genotypic and phenotypic variation in geographically diverse H. pylori isolates. Materials and Methods From patients undergoing endoscopy in 29 countries, we determined Le phenotypes of 78 H. pylori strains, and performed genotyping of the galT and β-(1,3)galT loci in 113 H. pylori strains. Results Le antigen phenotyping revealed a significant (p <0.0001) association between type 1 (Lea and Leb) expression and strains of East-Asian origin. Genotyping revealed a significant correlation between strain origin and the size of the promoter region upstream of the Le synthesis gene, galT (p <0.0001). Conclusion These results indicate that the heterogeneity of human Le phenotypes are reflected in their H. pylori colonizing strains, and suggest new loci that can be studied to assess variation of Le expression. PMID:22059399

  2. Genomic variability of Helicobacter pylori isolates of gastric regions from two Colombian populations

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Andrés Jenuer; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the genomic variability and the multiple colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic gastritis from two Colombian populations with contrast in the risk of developing gastric cancer (GC): Túquerres-Nariño (High risk) and Tumaco-Nariño (Low risk). METHODS Four hundred and nine patients from both genders with dyspeptic symptoms were studied. Seventy-two patients were included in whom H. pylori was isolated from three anatomic regions of the gastric mucosa, (31/206) of the high risk population of GC (Túquerres) and (41/203) of the low risk population of GC (Tumaco). The isolates were genotyped by PCR-RAPD. Genetic diversity between the isolates was evaluated by conglomerates analysis and multiple correspondence analyses. RESULTS The proportion of virulent genotypes of H. pylori was 99% in Túquerres and 94% in Tumaco. The coefficient of similarity of Nei-Li showed greater genetic diversity among isolates of Túquerres (0.13) than those of Tumaco (0.07). After adjusting by age, gender and type of gastritis, the multiple colonization was 1.7 times more frequent in Túquerres than in Tumaco (P = 0.05). CONCLUSION In Túquerres, high risk of GC there was a greater probability of multiple colonization by H. pylori. From the analysis of the results of the PCR-RAPD, it was found higher genetic variability in the isolates of H. pylori in the population of high risk for the development of GC. PMID:28223724

  3. Mixed Infections of Helicobacter pylori Isolated from Patients with Gastrointestinal Diseases in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju-Chun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Li, Ju-Pi; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Wu, Hua-Shan; Sun, Yu-Chen; Lin, Mei-Ling; Lee, Ju-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Persistent Helicobacter pylori infection may induce several upper gastrointestinal diseases. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), are thought to be associated with the severity of disease progression. The distribution of vacA and cag-pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) alleles varies in H. pylori isolated from patients in different geographic regions. Aim. To assess the association between mixed infection of H. pylori clinical isolates from Taiwanese patients and the severity of gastrointestinal diseases. Methods. A total of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. Six distinct and well-separated colonies were isolated from each patient and 420 colonies were analyzed to determine the genotypes of virulence genes. Results. The prevalence of mixed infections of all H. pylori-infected patients was 28.6% (20/70). The rate of mixed infections in patients with duodenal ulcer (47.6%) was much higher than that with other gastrointestinal diseases (P < 0.05). Conclusions. H. pylori mixed infections show high genetic diversity that may enhance bacterial adaptation to the hostile environment of the stomach and contribute to disease development. PMID:27738429

  4. A highly specific and sensitive DNA probe derived from chromosomal DNA of Helicobacter pylori is useful for typing H. pylori isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Ferguson, D A; Ha, T; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1993-01-01

    HindIII-digested DNA fragments derived from an EcoRI-digested 6.5-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA prepared from Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629 (type strain) were cloned into the pUC19 vector. A 0.86-kb insert was identified as a potential chromosomal DNA probe. The specificity of the probe was evaluated by testing 166 non-H. pylori bacterial strains representing 38 genera and 91 species which included aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic flora of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. None of the 166 non-H. pylori strains hybridized with this probe (100% specificity), and the sensitivity of this probe was also 100% when H. pylori isolates from 72 patients with gastritis and with the homologous ATCC type strain were tested by dot blot hybridization. The capability of this probe for differentiating between strains of H. pylori was evaluated by Southern blot hybridization of HaeIII-digested chromosomal DNA from 68 clinical isolates and the homologous ATCC type strain of H. pylori. Fifty-one unique hybridization patterns were seen among the 69 strains tested, demonstrating considerable genotypic variation among H. pylori clinical isolates. We propose that this probe would be of significant value for conducting epidemiologic studies. Images PMID:8370744

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility and integron carriage in Helicobacter pylori isolates from patients

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Heidary, Mohsen; Azad, Mehdi; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and distribution of integron in H. pylori isolates collected from patients referred to private health care centers in Tehran, Iran. Background: Antibiotic resistance is the main reason for failure of Helicobacter pylori therapy. Integrons as genetic reservoirs play main roles in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance gene. Methods: During a 12-month cross-sectional study period, 65 H. pylori isolates were recovered from 124 biopsy specimens. Isolates were subjected to susceptibility testing using by Epsilometer test according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guideline. PCR was used to detect different types of integrons. Results: Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that 73.8% of isolates were resistant to metronidazole, 43.1% to clarithromycin, 29.2% to tetracycline, 27.7% to amoxicillin, 23.1% to rifampicin and 13.4% to levofloxacin. Frequency of multidrug resistance among H. pylori isolates was 26.1%. The most predominant resistance profiles among our isolates were included resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole (20%). Class 1 and 2 integrons were detected in 8 (12.3%) and 15 (23.1%) of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions: The high prevalence of multidrug resistance and frequency of class 2 integron in this survey can be a warning for clinicians. Continuous surveillance is necessary for the development of new treatment protocols to prevent the treatment failures and also further spread of resistant isolates. PMID:28224028

  6. Identification of new enzyme biotypes of Helicobacter pylori isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Yamada, M; Fujii, Y; Kawai, T; Nishizato, Y; Uchida, Y; Hamashima, H; Sasatsu, M; Arai, T

    1996-01-01

    The enzyme biotype of 86.5% of strains of Helicobacter pylori isolated in Japan could not be determined by the method used for the identification of the biotypes defined by Reina and Alomar (1989). A modified system for naming of biotypes is proposed.

  7. [Antibiotic resistance rates of Helicobacter pylori isolates and the comparison of E-test and fluorescent in situ hybridization methods for the detection of clarithromycin resistant strains].

    PubMed

    Bakir Ozbey, Saliha; Ozakin, Cüneyt; Keskin, Murat

    2009-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori which is one of the commonly seen chronic bacterial infections in the world, has been demonstrated to have a relationship with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Current management of H. pylori infection involves the use of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) and any two of amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole in combination. Antibiotic resistance which is in an increasing trend in H. pylori since the recent years, is the main cause of treatment failure. This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility of 31 H. pylori strains to several antibiotics by using E-test method (AB Biodisk, Sweden) and also to detect clarithromycin resistance by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH; SeaFAST, Hungary). The strains were isolated from the gastric biopsy specimens of patients who were admitted to Uludağ University Hospital, Bursa, Turkey with dyspeptic complaints. Clarithromycin, amoxycillin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin resistance rates were as 41.9%, 3.2%, 41.9%, 3.2% and 45.2%, respectively. Resistance to single antibiotic was detected in 32.2% of the isolates whereas multiresistance was seen in 45.2%. For the hybridization process one probe specific for 16S rRNA and labeled with a fluorescein dye and the other probe specific for the mutations in 23S rRNA and labeled with Cy3 stain were used. Green signalling denoted presence of H. pylori in the specimen and red signalling was associated with clarithromycin resistance. All of the isolates yielded green signalling and the 13 isolates found to be resistant to clarithromycin by E-test, gave red signalling. No difference was detected between the two methods in terms of clarithromycin resistance determination. This was a preliminary study reporting the H. pylori resistance rates in our region, however, further larger scale studies are required for obtaining countrywide data.

  8. RESISTANCE TO AMOXICILLIN, CLARITHROMYCIN AND CIPROFLOXACIN OF Helicobacter pylori ISOLATED FROM SOUTHERN BRAZIL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Picoli, Simone Ulrich; Mazzoleni, Luiz Edmundo; Fernández, Heriberto; De Bona, Laura Renata; Neuhauss, Erli; Longo, Larisse; Prolla, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori is a bacteria which infects half the world population and is an important cause of gastric cancer. The eradication therapy is not always effective because resistance to antimicrobials may occur. The aim of this study was to determine the susceptibility profile of H. pylori to amoxicillin, clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin in the population of Southern Brazil. Material and methods: Fifty four samples of H. pylori were evaluated. The antibiotics susceptibility was determined according to the guidelines of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy and the Comité de l'Antibiogramme de la Société Française de Microbiologie. Results: Six (11.1%) H. pylori isolates were resistant to clarithromycin, one (1.9%) to amoxicillin and three (5.5%) to ciprofloxacin. These indices of resistance are considered satisfactory and show that all of these antibiotics can be used in the empirical therapy. Conclusion: The antibiotics amoxicillin and clarithromycin are still a good option for first line anti-H. pylori treatment in the population of Southern Brazil. PMID:24878996

  9. Cytotoxic isolates of Helicobacter pylori from Peptic Ulcer Diseases decrease K+-dependent ATPase Activity in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Shanjana, Awasthi; Archana, Ayyagari

    2003-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a Gram negative bacterium that plays a central role in the etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. However, not all H. pylori positive cases develop advanced disease. This discriminatory behavior has been attributed to the difference in virulence of the bacteria. Among all virulence factors, cytotoxin released by H. pylori is the most important factor. In this work, we studied variation in H. pylori isolates from Indian dyspeptic patients on the basis of cytotoxin production and associated changes in K+-dependent ATPase (one of its targets) enzyme activity in HeLa cells. Methods The patients were retrospectively grouped on the basis of endoscopic and histopathological observation as having gastritis or peptic ulcer. The HeLa cells were incubated with the broth culture filtrates (BCFs) of H. pylori isolates from patients of both groups and observed for the cytopathic effects: morphological changes and viability. In addition, the K+-dependent ATPase activity was measured in HeLa cells extracts. Results The cytotoxin production was observed in 3/7 (gastritis) and 4/4 (peptic ulcer) H. pylori isolates. The BCFs of cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains reduced the ATPase activity of HeLa cells to 40% of that measured with non-cytotoxin producing H. pylori strains (1.33 μmole Pi/mg protein and 3.36 μmole Pi/mg protein, respectively, p < 0.05). The decreased activity of ATPase enzyme or the release of cytotoxin also correlated with the increased pathogenicity indices of the patients. Conclusions Our results suggest that the isolation of cytotoxic H. pylori is more common in severe form of acid peptic diseases (peptic ulcer) than in gastritis patients from India. Also the cytotoxin released by H. pylori impairs the ion-transporting ATPase and is a measure of cytotoxicity. PMID:14604441

  10. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  11. Detection of Helicobacter pylori and the genotypes of resistance to clarithromycin and the heterogeneous genotype to this antibiotic in biopsies obtained from symptomatic children.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Correa, John Jairo; Urruzuno, Pedro; Barrio, Josefa; Martinez, María José; Agudo, Sonia; Somodevilla, Angela; Llorca, Laura; Alarcón, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use a commercially available kit (GenoType® HelicoDR; Hain Life Science, Germany) to detect Helicobacter pylori infection and clarithromycin resistance genotype in biopsies obtained from symptomatic children.

  12. High rate of A2142G point mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance among Iranian Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Reza; Dara, Mahintaj; Bazargani, Abdollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Taghavi, Alireza; Moeini, Maryam; Dehghani, Behzad; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clarithromycin resistance and its associated molecular mechanisms among Helicobacter pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Shiraz, Iran. From January to May 2014, 100 H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The resistance to clarithromycin was quantitatively evaluated, using Epsilometer (E-test) method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed on all the isolates to detect A2143G and A2142G mutations in 23S rRNA gene. The H. pylori isolation rate was found to be 31.4%. E-test showed that 20% of isolates were resistant to clarithromycin (MIC ≥ 1 mg/L). MIC of clarithromycin ranged between 0.016 and 24 mg/L. Findings of PCR-RFLP showed that the A2142G was the most (90%) frequently point mutation, followed by the A2143G (10%). No statistically significant difference was found between H. pylori clarithromycin resistance point mutations and patients' gender or age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high frequency of A2142G point mutation in Iran and probably in other regions of the world. Considering the increasing trend of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin due to these mutations, it is crucial to investigate the new therapeutic approaches against H. pylori infection.

  13. Detection of the glmM Gene in Helicobacter pylori Isolates with a Novel Primer by PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Córdova Espinoza, Maria Guadalupe; González Vazquez, Rosa; Morales Mendez, Iyari; Ruelas Vargas, Consuelo; Giono Cerezo, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    A novel reverse primer (GLM MR1) was designed for detection of the glmM gene in Helicobacter pylori by PCR. The percentage of amplification in clinical isolates using GLM MR1 was 100% for detection of the glmM gene and 86.36% for the ureA gene. The primer designed is useful for the identification of H. pylori. PMID:21289140

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 7C Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Chronic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis is a risk factor for developing gastric pathologies. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant H. pylori strain isolated from a chronic gastritis patient in Mexico City, Mexico. Nonvirulent VacA and cag-pathogenicity island (PAI) genotypes were found, but the presence of a potential mobilizable plasmid carrying an IS605 element is of outstanding interest. PMID:26744372

  15. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of crude N-acetylneuraminic acid isolated from glycomacropeptide of whey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Min-Jung; Choi, Jin-A; Na, Dae-Seung; Kim, Jin-Beom; Na, Chun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. An increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori arouses demand on alternative non-antibiotic-based therapies. In this study, we freshly prepared crude N-acetylneuraminic acid obtained from glycomacropeptide (G-NANA) of whey through a neuraminidase-mediated reaction and evaluated its antibacterial ability against H. pylori and H. felis. Overnight cultures of the H. pylori were diluted with fresh media and different concentrations (1-150 mg/mL) of crude G-NANA were added directly to the culture tube. Bacterial growth was evaluated by measuring the optical density of the culture medium and the number of viable bacteria was determined by a direct count of the colony forming units (CFU) on agar plates. For the in vivo study, mice were orally infected with 100 µL (5×108 cfu/mL) of H. felis four times at a day's interval, accompanied by a daily administration of crude G-NANA or vehicle. A day after the last infection, the mice were daily administered the crude G-NANA (0, 75, and 300 mg/mL) for 10 days and euthanized. Their stomachs were collected and bacterial colonization was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Crude G-NANA inhibited H. pylori's growth and reduced the number of viable bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, crude G-NANA inhibited bacterial colonization in the mice. These results showed that crude G-NANA has antibacterial activity against Helicobacter and demonstrated its therapeutic potential for the prevention of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis induced by Helicobacter infection in humans. PMID:27382378

  16. Helicobacter pylori bab Paralog Distribution and Association with cagA, vacA, and homA/B Genotypes in American and South Korean Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aeryun; Servetas, Stephanie L; Kang, Jieun; Kim, Jinmoon; Jang, Sungil; Cha, Ho Jin; Lee, Wan Jin; Kim, June; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Merrell, D Scott; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori genetic variation is a crucial component of colonization and persistence within the inhospitable niche of the gastric mucosa. As such, numerous H. pylori genes have been shown to vary in terms of presence and genomic location within this pathogen. Among the variable factors, the Bab family of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been shown to differ within subsets of strains. To better understand genetic variation among the bab genes and to determine whether this variation differed among isolates obtained from different geographic locations, we characterized the distribution of the Bab family members in 80 American H. pylori clinical isolates (AH) and 80 South Korean H. pylori clinical isolates (KH). Overall, we identified 23 different bab genotypes (19 in AH and 11 in KH), but only 5 occurred in greater than 5 isolates. Regardless of strain origin, a strain in which locus A and locus B were both occupied by a bab gene was the most common (85%); locus C was only occupied in those isolates that carried bab paralog at locus A and B. While the babA/babB/- genotype predominated in the KH (78.8%), no single genotype could account for greater than 40% in the AH collection. In addition to basic genotyping, we also identified associations between bab genotype and well known virulence factors cagA and vacA. Specifically, significant associations between babA at locus A and the cagA EPIYA-ABD motif (P<0.0001) and the vacA s1/i1/m1 allele (P<0.0001) were identified. Log-linear modeling further revealed a three-way association between bab carried at locus A, vacA, and number of OMPs from the HOM family (P<0.002). En masse this study provides a detailed characterization of the bab genotypes from two distinct populations. Our analysis suggests greater variability in the AH, perhaps due to adaptation to a more diverse host population. Furthermore, when considering the presence or absence of both the bab and homA/B paralogs at their given loci and the vac

  17. Surveillance of Levofloxacin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Isolates in Bogotá-Colombia (2009-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Trespalacios-Rangél, Alba A.; Otero, William; Arévalo-Galvis, Azucena; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A.; Rimbara, Emiko; Graham, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    Increased resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin and metronidazole has resulted in recommendation to substitute fluoroquinolones for eradication therapy. The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and changes in primary levofloxacin resistance related to H. pylori gyrA sequences. The study utilized H. pylori strains isolated from patients undergoing gastroscopy in Bogotá, Colombia from 2009 to 2014. Levofloxacin susceptibility was assessed by agar dilution. Mutations in gyrA sequences affecting the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) were evaluated by direct sequencing. Overall, the mean prevalence of primary levofloxacin resistance was 18.2% (80 of 439 samples). Resistance increased from 11.8% (12/102) in 2009 to 27.3% (21/77) in 2014 (p = 0.001). gyrA mutations in levofloxacin resistant strains were present in QRDR positions 87 and 91. The most common mutation was N87I (43.8%, 35/80) followed by D91N (28.8%, 23/80) and N87K (11.3%, 9/80). Levofloxacin resistance increased markedly in Colombia during the six-year study period. Primary levofloxacin resistance was most often mediated by point mutations in gyrA, with N87I being the most common QRDR mutation related to levofloxacin resistance. PMID:27454429

  18. Surveillance of Levofloxacin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Isolates in Bogotá-Colombia (2009-2014).

    PubMed

    Trespalacios-Rangél, Alba A; Otero, William; Arévalo-Galvis, Azucena; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Rimbara, Emiko; Graham, David Y

    2016-01-01

    Increased resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin and metronidazole has resulted in recommendation to substitute fluoroquinolones for eradication therapy. The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence and changes in primary levofloxacin resistance related to H. pylori gyrA sequences. The study utilized H. pylori strains isolated from patients undergoing gastroscopy in Bogotá, Colombia from 2009 to 2014. Levofloxacin susceptibility was assessed by agar dilution. Mutations in gyrA sequences affecting the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) were evaluated by direct sequencing. Overall, the mean prevalence of primary levofloxacin resistance was 18.2% (80 of 439 samples). Resistance increased from 11.8% (12/102) in 2009 to 27.3% (21/77) in 2014 (p = 0.001). gyrA mutations in levofloxacin resistant strains were present in QRDR positions 87 and 91. The most common mutation was N87I (43.8%, 35/80) followed by D91N (28.8%, 23/80) and N87K (11.3%, 9/80). Levofloxacin resistance increased markedly in Colombia during the six-year study period. Primary levofloxacin resistance was most often mediated by point mutations in gyrA, with N87I being the most common QRDR mutation related to levofloxacin resistance.

  19. Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B E; Cohen, H; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium which causes chronic gastritis and plays important roles in peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. H. pylori has been found in the stomachs of humans in all parts of the world. In developing countries, 70 to 90% of the population carries H. pylori. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is lower. There appears to be no substantial reservoir of H. pylori aside from the human stomach. Transmission can occur by iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes. H. pylori is able to colonize and persist in a unique biological niche within the gastric lumen. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which appears essential to the survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A variety of tests to diagnose H. pylori infection are now available. Histological examination of gastric tissue, culture, rapid urease testing, DNA probes, and PCR analysis, when used to test gastric tissue, all require endoscopy. In contrast, breath tests, serology, gastric juice PCR, and urinary excretion of [15N]ammonia are noninvasive tests that do not require endoscopy. In this review, we highlight advances in the detection of the presence of the organism and methods of differentiating among types of H. pylori, and we provide a background for appropriate chemotherapy of the infection. PMID:9336670

  20. Identification of markers for Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children with peptic ulcer disease by suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Oleastro, Mónica; Monteiro, Lurdes; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2006-07-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurs after a long-term Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the disease can develop earlier, and rare cases have been observed in children, suggesting that these H. pylori strains may be more virulent. We used suppressive subtractive hybridization for comparative genomics between H. pylori strains isolated from a 5-year-old child with duodenal ulcer and from a sex- and age-matched child with gastritis only. The prevalence of the 30 tester-specific subtracted sequences was determined on a collection of H. pylori strains from children (15 ulcers and 30 gastritis) and from adults (46 ulcers and 44 gastritis). Two of these sequences, jhp0562 (80.0% versus 33.3%, P = 0.008) and jhp0870 (80.0% versus 36.7%, P = 0.015), were highly associated with PUD in children and a third sequence, jhp0828, was less associated (40.0% versus 10.0%, P = 0.048). Among adult strains, none of the 30 sequences was associated with PUD. However, both jhp0562 and jhp0870 were less prevalent in adenocarcinoma strains than in PUD strains from children and adults, the difference being statistically significant for jhp0870. In conclusion, two H. pylori genes were identified as being strongly associated with PUD in children, and their putative roles as an outer membrane protein for jhp0870 and in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis for jhp0562, suggest that they may be novel virulence factors of H. pylori.

  1. Susceptibility of clinical isolates of Campylobacter pylori to 24 antimicrobial and anti-ulcer agents.

    PubMed

    Glupczynski, Y; Delmee, M; Bruck, C; Labbe, M; Avesani, V; Burette, A

    1988-06-01

    Forty-nine isolates of Campylobacter pylori were tested for their susceptibility to twenty antibiotics and four anti-ulcer agents by an agar dilution technique. Penicillin and amoxycillin were the most active drugs (MIC90, 0.06 microgram/ml); erythromycin, cefazolin, minocycline, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and gentamicin were slightly less active (MIC90, less than or equal to 1 microgram/ml). Moderate activity was found for doxycyclin, rifampin, nitrofurantoin, norfloxacin, pefloxacin, enoxacin, paromomycin, metronidazole and tinidazole. All strains were resistant to trimethoprim (MIC greater than 512 micrograms/ml). Nalidixic acid (MIC90, greater than 256 micrograms/ml) and colistin (MIC90, greater than 64 micrograms/ml) had little to no activity. Of four anti-ulcer drugs, only bismuth subcitrate showed activity (MIC90, 64 micrograms/ml). Strains resistant to all 4-quinolones were found in patients who had previously received ofloxacin as part of a clinical trial aimed at eradication of C. pylori. These isolates remained susceptible to amoxycillin, tetracyclines and to other classes of antibiotics.

  2. Effect of biofilm formation by clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori on the efflux-mediated resistance to commonly used antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Attaran, Bahareh; Falsafi, Tahereh; Ghorbanmehr, Nassim

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of biofilm formation on the resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to commonly prescribed antibiotics, the expression rates of resistance genes in biofilm-forming and planktonic cells were compared. METHODS A collection of 33 H. pylori isolates from children and adult patients with chronic infection were taken for the present study. The isolates were screened for biofilm formation ability, as well as for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reaction with HP1165 and hp1165 efflux pump genes. Susceptibilities of the selected strains to antibiotic and differences between susceptibilities of planktonic and biofilm-forming cell populations were determined. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis was performed using 16S rRNA gene as a H. pylori-specific primer, and two efflux pumps-specific primers, hp1165 and hefA. RESULTS The strains were resistant to amoxicillin, metronidazole, and erythromycin, except for one strain, but they were all susceptible to tetracycline. Minimum bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics in the biofilm-forming cells were significantly higher than those of planktonic cells. qPCR demonstrated that the expression of efflux pump genes was significantly higher in the biofilm-forming cells as compared to the planktonic ones. CONCLUSION The present work demonstrated an association between H. pylori biofilm formation and decreased susceptibility to all the antibiotics tested. This decreased susceptibility to antibiotics was associated with enhanced functional activity of two efflux pumps: hp1165 and hefA. PMID:28275296

  3. Isolation and characterization of a family of porin proteins from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Exner, M M; Doig, P; Trust, T J; Hancock, R E

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to identify heat-modifiable outer membrane proteins, which were candidates for porins, from Helicobacter pylori membrane preparations. Four such proteins with apparent molecular masses of 48, 49, 50, and 67 kDa were isolated. The four proteins copurified together after selective detergent solubilizations followed by anion-exchange chromatography, and each protein was ultimately purified to homogeneity by gel purification. These proteins were then tested for pore-forming ability with a planar lipid bilayer model membrane system. All four proteins appeared to be present as monomers, and they formed pores with low single-channel conductances in 1.0 M KCl of 0.36, 0.36, 0.30, and 0.25 nS, respectively, for the 48-, 49-, 50-, and 67-kDa proteins which we propose to designate HopA, HopB, HopC, and HopD. N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses showed a high degree of homology among all four proteins, and it appears that these proteins constitute a family of related porins in H. pylori. PMID:7534278

  4. Determination of Helicobacter pylori virulence by analysis of the cag pathogenicity island isolated from Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Kaveh; Shokrzadeh, Leila; Jafari, Fereshteh; Dabiri, Hossein; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Bolfion, Mehdi; Zojaji, Homayon; Aslani, Mehdi; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    Background The cag pathogenicity island (PAI), which can divide into two parts: cagI and cagII, is the most well-known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori. Aims We investigated the association between genetic variations within the cag PAI (cagA and cagE in the cagI and cagT in the cagII) and clinical outcomes in Iranian population. Subjects A total of 231 patients including 182 patients with gastritis, 41 with peptic ulcer and 8 with gastric cancer. Methods The presences of the cagA, cagE and cagT genes were measured by polymerase chain reaction and the results were compared with clinical outcomes and gastric histology. Results The cagA, cagE and cagT genes were found in 154 (66.7%), 90 (39.0%) and 70 (30.3%) of clinical isolates. At least 144 (62.3%) strains possessed partially deleted cag PAI (e.g., 69 [29.9%] strains were cagA-positive, but cagE and cagT-negative). Conclusion The simple gene as well as the combination of the genes in the cag PAI appeared not to be useful markers to predict H. pylori-related diseases in Iranian population. The genomic sequences of the cag PAI in Iranian strains might be considerably different from those in other geographic locations. PMID:19261552

  5. [Susceptibility of 36 Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates to four first-line antibiotics and virulence factors].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Reganon, J; Alarcón, T; Domingo, D; López-Brea, M

    2006-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori possess various virulence factors, including cagA and vacA genes, that are associated with more aggressive symptoms such as bleed-ing ulcer and gastric cancer. Although there are different treatment regimens, there is still a failure rate of up to 20% due to antibiotic resistance, among other causes. In our country resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin is increasing, especially in children, although they are still susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline. In order to determine the susceptibility pattern to these antibiotics 36 H. pylori clinical isolates were studied. MIC was determined by agar diffusion and agar dilution, and vacA and cagA genes were detected by conventional PCR. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline. Resistance to metronidazole by diffusion or dilution tests was 35.7% and 36.1%, respectively, and to clarithromycin, 21.4% and 22.3%, respectively. There was one strain that showed intermediate resistance to clarithromycin (MIC 0.38 mg/l), using agar diffusion, and that was included among the resistant strains. Three discrepancies were observed between the diffusion and dilution methods. The vacA s1 allele was detected in 17.2% of the strains, and vacA s2 in 82.8%; 51.7% of the total were cagA+. In conclusion, all strains tested in our study were susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline, allowing them to be considered as first-line antibiotics, while clarithromycin and metronidazole maintain a slight increase in their resistance level. The cagA+ strains were detected in expected quantities, while the s1 allele of the vacA gene was detected in lower quantities.

  6. The Bioinformatics Report of Mutation Outcome on NADPH Flavin Oxidoreductase Protein Sequence in Clinical Isolates of H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Nasrin; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghaempanah, Abdol Majid; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2016-05-01

    frxA gene has been implicated in the metronidazole nitro reduction by H. pylori. Alternatively, frxA is expected to contribute to the protection of urease and to the in vivo survival of H. pylori. The aim of present study is to report the mutation effects on the frxA protein sequence in clinical isolates of H. pylori in our community. Metronidazole resistance was proven in 27 of 48 isolates. glmM and frxA genes were used for molecular confirmation of H. pylori isolates. The primer set for detection of whole sequence of frxA gene for the effect of mutation on protein sequence was used. DNA and protein sequence evaluation and analysis were done by blast, Clustal Omega, and T COFFEE programs. Then, FrxA protein sequences from six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates were analyzed by web-based bioinformatics tools. The result of six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates in comparison with strain 26695 showed ten missense mutations. The result with the STRING program revealed that no change was seen after alterations in these sequences. According to consensus data involving four methods, residue substitutions at 40, 13, and 141 increase the stability of protein sequence after mutation, while other alterations decrease. Residue substitutions at 40, 43, 141, 138, 169, and 179 are deleterious, while, V7I, Q10R, V34I, and V96I alterations are neutral. As FrxA contribute to survival of bacterium and in regard to the effect of mutations on protein function, it might affect the survival and bacterium phenotype and it need to be studied more. Also, none of the stability prediction tool is perfect; iStable is the best predictor method among all methods.

  7. Identification of a Latin American-specific BabA adhesin variant through whole genome sequencing of Helicobacter pylori patient isolates from Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Thorell, Kaisa; Hosseini, Shaghayegh; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria Palacios; Chaotham, Chatchai; Graham, David Y.; Paszat, Lawrence; Rabeneck, Linda; Lundin, Samuel B.; Nookaew, Intawat; Sjoling, Asa

    2016-02-29

    In this study, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans and this infection can lead to gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori is one of the most genetically variable human pathogens and the ability of the bacterium to bind to the host epithelium as well as the presence of different virulence factors and genetic variants within these genes have been associated with disease severity. Nicaragua has particularly high gastric cancer incidence and we therefore studied Nicaraguan clinical H. pylori isolates for factors that could contribute to cancer risk. The complete genomes of fifty-two Nicaraguan H. pylorii isolates were sequenced and assembled de novo, and phylogenetic and virulence factor analyses were performed. The Nicaraguan isolates showed phylogenetic relationship with West African isolates in whole-genome sequence comparisons and with Western and urban South-and Central American isolates using MLSA (Multi-locus sequence analysis). A majority, 77 % of the isolates carried the cancer-associated virulence gene cagA and also the s1/i1/m1 vacuolating cytotoxin, vacA allele combination, which is linked to increased severity of disease. Specifically, we also found that Nicaraguan isolates have a blood group-binding adhesin (BabA) variant highly similar to previously reported BabA sequences from Latin America, including from isolates belonging to other phylogenetic groups. These BabA sequences were found to be under positive selection at several amino acid positions that differed from the global collection of isolates. In conclusion, the discovery of a Latin American BabA variant, independent of overall phylogenetic background, suggests hitherto unknown host or environmental factors within the Latin American population giving H. pylori isolates carrying this adhesin variant a selective advantage, which could affect pathogenesis and risk for sequelae through specific adherence

  8. Bactericidal activity of Pistacia lentiscus mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Leone, E; Bona, S; Carretto, E; Perversi, L

    2001-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of mastic gum, a resin obtained from the Pistacia lentiscus tree, against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were obtained by a microdilution assay. Mastic gum killed 50% of the strains tested at a concentration of 125 microg/ml and 90% at a concentration of 500 microg/ml. The influence of sub-MBCs of mastic gum on the morphologies of H. pylori was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The lentiscus resin induced blebbing, morphological abnormalities and cellular fragmentation in H. pylori cells.

  9. Genetic Manipulation of a Naturally Competent Bacterium, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of Helicobacter pylori facilitates characterization and functional analysis of individual H. pylori genes. This chapter discusses the methods involved in H. pylori chromosomal DNA isolation, mutagenesis of individual genes, and natural transformation. PMID:23015491

  10. High Frequency of vacA s1m2 Genotypes Among Helicobacter pylori Isolates From Patients With Gastroduodenal Disorders in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pajavand, Hamid; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Mohajeri, Parviz; Bakhtyari, Somaye; Bashiri, Homayoon; Kalali, Behnam; Gerhard, Markus; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases outcome are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial, host and environmental factors. Several distinct virulence factors of H. pylori have been shown to be associated with different clinical outcomes. Here we focused on vacA and cagA genotypes of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric disorder. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of two toxins and genotypes of VacA toxin in patients referred to a central hospital in the west of Iran (Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah) during 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: Samples were collected from patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and corpus were cultured. PCR analysis was performed for genotyping H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Results: Helicobacter pylori was isolated from 48% (96/200) of patients with gastroduodenal disorders. In 81/96 (84%) cases, the cagA gene was present. Among different genotypes of vacA, two s1m2 and s2m2 genotypes were dominant with frequency of 39.5% and 50%, respectively. The frequency of the s1m1 genotype was 7.2% (7/96), which is much lower than elsewhere. H. pylori isolates with positive results for cagA gene and vacA s1m2 genotypes showed statistically significant correlation with peptic ulcer (s1m2 13/34 [38.2%] P = 0.003). However, isolates of H. pylori infection with cagA gene and vacA s2m2 genotypes were significantly associated with development of gastritis (s2m2 41/42 [97.6%] P = 0.000). Conclusions: About 90% of H. pylori strains potentially contained vacA s2m2 and s1m2 genotypes. Infection with H. pylori strain containing the cagA gene or the vacA s1m1 and s1m2 genotypes was associated with increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). PMID:26862378

  11. Identification of a Latin American-specific BabA adhesin variant through whole genome sequencing of Helicobacter pylori patient isolates from Nicaragua

    DOE PAGES

    Thorell, Kaisa; Hosseini, Shaghayegh; Palacios Gonzales, Reyna Victoria Palacios; ...

    2016-02-29

    In this study, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans and this infection can lead to gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori is one of the most genetically variable human pathogens and the ability of the bacterium to bind to the host epithelium as well as the presence of different virulence factors and genetic variants within these genes have been associated with disease severity. Nicaragua has particularly high gastric cancer incidence and we therefore studied Nicaraguan clinical H. pylori isolates for factors that could contribute to cancer risk. The complete genomes ofmore » fifty-two Nicaraguan H. pylorii isolates were sequenced and assembled de novo, and phylogenetic and virulence factor analyses were performed. The Nicaraguan isolates showed phylogenetic relationship with West African isolates in whole-genome sequence comparisons and with Western and urban South-and Central American isolates using MLSA (Multi-locus sequence analysis). A majority, 77 % of the isolates carried the cancer-associated virulence gene cagA and also the s1/i1/m1 vacuolating cytotoxin, vacA allele combination, which is linked to increased severity of disease. Specifically, we also found that Nicaraguan isolates have a blood group-binding adhesin (BabA) variant highly similar to previously reported BabA sequences from Latin America, including from isolates belonging to other phylogenetic groups. These BabA sequences were found to be under positive selection at several amino acid positions that differed from the global collection of isolates. In conclusion, the discovery of a Latin American BabA variant, independent of overall phylogenetic background, suggests hitherto unknown host or environmental factors within the Latin American population giving H. pylori isolates carrying this adhesin variant a selective advantage, which could affect pathogenesis and risk for sequelae through specific adherence properties.« less

  12. Composition and Gene Expression of the cag Pathogenicity Island in Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Gastric Carcinoma and Gastritis Patients in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Occhialini, Alessandra; Marais, Armelle; Urdaci, Maria; Sierra, Rafaela; Muñoz, Nubia; Covacci, Antonello; Mégraud, Francis

    2001-01-01

    The composition and in vitro expression of the cag pathogenicity island genes in a group of Helicobacter pylori strains obtained from patients suffering from chronic gastritis-associated dyspepsia (n = 26) or gastric carcinoma (n = 17) were analyzed. No significant difference in the distribution of the 10 studied regions was found between the cases and the controls. Nine strains did not harbor any of the selected regions: eight (30.8%) isolated from patients with gastritis only and one (5.9%) from a patient with gastric carcinoma. No association was found between the number of repeated sequences at the 3′ end of the cagA gene or the presence of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and the clinical origin of the strains. The virB10 homolog gene was the sole gene studied to be significantly expressed more often in cancer strains than in gastritis strains (P = 0.03). PMID:11179371

  13. Composition and gene expression of the cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from gastric carcinoma and gastritis patients in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, A; Marais, A; Urdaci, M; Sierra, R; Muñoz, N; Covacci, A; Mégraud, F

    2001-03-01

    The composition and in vitro expression of the cag pathogenicity island genes in a group of Helicobacter pylori strains obtained from patients suffering from chronic gastritis-associated dyspepsia (n = 26) or gastric carcinoma (n = 17) were analyzed. No significant difference in the distribution of the 10 studied regions was found between the cases and the controls. Nine strains did not harbor any of the selected regions: eight (30.8%) isolated from patients with gastritis only and one (5.9%) from a patient with gastric carcinoma. No association was found between the number of repeated sequences at the 3' end of the cagA gene or the presence of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and the clinical origin of the strains. The virB10 homolog gene was the sole gene studied to be significantly expressed more often in cancer strains than in gastritis strains (P = 0.03).

  14. Helicobacter pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses. H. pylori , which used to be called Campylobacter pylori , also can cause peptic ulcers (commonly known ... H. Pylori Antigen Food Safety for Your Family Campylobacter Infections Pyloric Stenosis Peptic Ulcers Digestive System Vomiting ...

  15. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti- Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl) blume

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose β-Mangostin (BM) from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. Materials and methods BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. Results BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound showed intense periodic acid–Schiff staining to the gastric mucus layer and marked amount of alcian blue binding to free gastric mucus. BM significantly increased the gastric homogenate content of prostaglandin E2 glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds. The compound inhibited the lipid peroxidation revealed by the reduced gastric content of malondialdehyde. Moreover, BM upregulate HSP70 expression and downregulate Bax expression. Furthermore, the compound showed interesting anti-H. pylori activity. Conclusion Thus, it could be concluded that BM possesses gastroprotective activity, which could be attributed to the antisecretory, mucus production, antioxidant, HSP70, antiapoptotic, and anti-H. pylori mechanisms. PMID:26834460

  16. Isolation and characterization of a conserved porin protein from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, P; Exner, M M; Hancock, R E; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis in humans and is correlated with gastric ulcer formation. Infections with this bacterium have proven difficult to treat with antimicrobial agents. To better understand how this bacterium transports compounds such as antimicrobial agents across its outer membrane, identification of porin proteins is important. We have recently identified a family of H. pylori porins (HopA to HopD) (M. M. Exner, P. Doig, T. J. Trust, and R. E. W. Hancock, Infect. Immun. 63:1567-1572, 1995). Here, we report on an unrelated porin species (HopE) from this bacterium. This protein had a apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa and was seen to form 50- and 90-kDa aggregates that were designated putative dimeric and trimeric forms, respectively. The protein was purified to homogeneity and, with a model planar lipid membrane system, was shown to act as a nonselective pore with a single channel conductance in 1.0 M KCl of 1.5 nS, similarly to other bacterial nonspecific porins. An internal peptide sequence of HopE shared homology with the P2 porin of Haemophilus influenzae. HopE was also shown to be antigenic in vivo as assessed by sera taken from H. pylori-infected individuals and was immunologically conserved with both patient sera and specific monoclonal antibodies. From these data, it appears that HopE is a major nonselective porin of H. pylori. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7559328

  17. Differences in Genome Content among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Patients with Gastritis, Duodenal Ulcer, or Gastric Cancer Reveal Novel Disease-Associated Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R.; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:19237517

  18. Comparative Genomics of a Helicobacter pylori Isolate from a Chinese Yunnan Naxi Ethnic Aborigine Suggests High Genetic Divergence and Phage Insertion

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuanhai; He, Lihua; Zhang, Maojun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common pathogen correlated with several severe digestive diseases. It has been reported that isolates associated with different geographic areas, different diseases and different individuals might have variable genomic features. Here, we describe draft genomic sequences of H. pylori strains YN4-84 and YN1-91 isolated from patients with gastritis from the Naxi and Han populations of Yunnan, China, respectively. The draft sequences were compared to 45 other publically available genomes, and a total of 1059 core genes were identified. Genes involved in restriction modification systems, type four secretion system three (TFS3) and type four secretion system four (TFS4), were identified as highly divergent. Both YN4-84 and YN1-91 harbor intact cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) and have EPIYA-A/B/D type at the carboxyl terminal of cagA. The vacA gene type is s1m2i1. Another major finding was a 32.5-kb prophage integrated in the YN4-84 genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (30/33) with Helicobacter pylori prophage KHP30. Moreover, a 1,886 bp transposable sequence (IS605) was found in the prophage. Our results imply that the Naxi ethnic minority isolate YN4-84 and Han isolate YN1-91 belong to the hspEAsia subgroup and have diverse genome structure. The genome has been extensively modified in several regions involved in horizontal DNA transfer. The important roles played by phages in the ecology and microevolution of H. pylori were further emphasized. The current data will provide valuable information regarding the H. pylori genome based on historic human migrations and population structure. PMID:25799515

  19. Consensus and Variable Region PCR Analysis of Helicobacter pylori 3′ Region of cagA Gene in Isolates from Individuals with or without Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Pereira-Lima, Júlio C.; Blaya, Carolina; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2001-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori-infected patients and the relationship between cagA and peptic ulcer disease, gastric biopsy specimens from 103 Caucasian patients in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Since allelic variation in cagA exists and distinct H. pylori subgenotypes may circulate in different regions, PCR using primers for a variable 3′ region of the cagA gene according to a Japanese methodology and for a consensus cagA 3′ region used in Western methods was used for cagA detection. cagA was present in 53 (71%) of 75 H. pylori-positive cases when analyzed by the consensus region method and was associated with duodenal ulcer disease (P = 0.02), but not with gastric ulcer (P = 0.26), when compared to patients with duodenitis or gastritis. The variable region PCR method was able to detect 43 (57%) cagA-positive cases within the same group of H. pylori-positive patients and showed three subtypes of cagA (A, B/D, and C) that were not associated with clinical outcome. However, in 8 (18%) of the cases, more than one subtype was present, and an association between patients with multiple subtypes and disease outcome was observed when compared to patients with isolated subtypes (P = 0.048). cagA was a marker of H. pylori strains for duodenal ulcer disease in our population, and in spite of the differences in the 3′ region of the cagA gene, the Japanese methodology was able to detect the cagA status in most cases. The presence of multiple subgenotypes of cagA was associated with gastric ulcer. PMID:11158115

  20. Free recombination within Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suerbaum, Sebastian; Smith, John Maynard; Bapumia, Khairun; Morelli, Giovanna; Smith, Noel H.; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Dyrek, Isabelle; Achtman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Sequences of three gene fragments (flaA, flaB, and vacA) from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in Germany, Canada, and South Africa were analyzed for diversity and for linkage equilibrium by using the Homoplasy Test and compatibility matrices. Horizontal genetic exchange in H. pylori is so frequent that different loci and polymorphisms within each locus are all at linkage equilibrium. These results indicate that H. pylori is panmictic. Comparisons with sequences from Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Drosophila melanogaster showed that recombination in H. pylori was much more frequent than in other species. In contrast, when multiple family members infected with H. pylori were investigated, some strains were indistinguishable at all three loci. Thus, H. pylori is clonal over short time periods after natural transmission. PMID:9770535

  1. Multiple in vivo passages enhance the ability of a clinical Helicobacter pylori isolate to colonize the stomach of Mongolian gerbils and to induce gastritis.

    PubMed

    Bleich, A; Köhn, I; Glage, S; Beil, W; Wagner, S; Mähler, M

    2005-04-01

    The Mongolian gerbil is an excellent animal model for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in humans. In this study, initially low colonization rates of the H. pylori strains ATCC 43504, SS1, or HP87 inoculated into gerbils caused difficulties in establishing this model. In order to increase the colonization ability and pathogenicity, the clinical HP87 isolate was selected for adaptation to the gerbil stomach by multiple in vivo passages through gerbils. Development of gastritis was examined histologically at 4-52 weeks after infection. The proportion of gerbils which tested positive for H. pylori by culture at four weeks after inoculation gradually increased from 11.1% of gerbils inoculated with HP87 without prior in vivo passage (P0) to 100% of gerbils inoculated with HP87 with seven in vivo passages (P7). In addition, adaptation of HP87 resulted in more severe histopathological changes. Gerbils infected with adapted HP87 (P7) exhibited severe infiltration by monomorphonuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the mucosa, submucosa, and subserosa of the gastric antrum, as well as epithelial changes consisting of hyperplasia, erosion, and ulceration. Histopathological changes increased in severity from four to 52 weeks after infection. Adaptation of HP87 during its passages through gerbils could be due to genetic changes in bacterial colonization factors. Identification of these changes might be useful to understand the underlying mechanism of gastric adaptation and pathogenesis of H. pylori.

  2. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Tang, Fu-Ai; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep’s blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present study included periods before and after the advent of the EPIs, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), reserpine and pantoprazole), and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined accordingly. In the same way, the effects of 5 proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), used in treatment of H. pylori infection, on MICs of antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: Four strains of MDR H. pylori were induced successfully, and the antibiotic susceptibilities of MDR strains were partly restored by CCCP and pantoprazole, but there was little effect of reserpine. Rabeprazole was the most effective of the 5 PPIs which could decrease the MICs of antibiotics for MDR H. pylori significantly. CONCLUSION: In vitro, some EPIs can strengthen the activities of different antibiotics which are the putative substrates of the efflux pump system in H. pylori. PMID:20222174

  3. Recent Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori by Baka Pygmies

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Valeria; Maady, Ayas; Nkwescheu, Armand; Siri, Jose; Elamin, Wael F.; Falush, Daniel; Linz, Bodo; Achtman, Mark; Moodley, Yoshan; Suerbaum, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Both anatomically modern humans and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori originated in Africa, and both species have been associated for at least 100,000 years. Seven geographically distinct H. pylori populations exist, three of which are indigenous to Africa: hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, and hpNEAfrica. The oldest and most divergent population, hpAfrica2, evolved within San hunter-gatherers, who represent one of the deepest branches of the human population tree. Anticipating the presence of ancient H. pylori lineages within all hunter-gatherer populations, we investigated the prevalence and population structure of H. pylori within Baka Pygmies in Cameroon. Gastric biopsies were obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy from 77 Baka from two geographically separated populations, and from 101 non-Baka individuals from neighboring agriculturalist populations, and subsequently cultured for H. pylori. Unexpectedly, Baka Pygmies showed a significantly lower H. pylori infection rate (20.8%) than non-Baka (80.2%). We generated multilocus haplotypes for each H. pylori isolate by DNA sequencing, but were not able to identify Baka-specific lineages, and most isolates in our sample were assigned to hpNEAfrica or hpAfrica1. The population hpNEAfrica, a marker for the expansion of the Nilo-Saharan language family, was divided into East African and Central West African subpopulations. Similarly, a new hpAfrica1 subpopulation, identified mainly among Cameroonians, supports eastern and western expansions of Bantu languages. An age-structured transmission model shows that the low H. pylori prevalence among Baka Pygmies is achievable within the timeframe of a few hundred years and suggests that demographic factors such as small population size and unusually low life expectancy can lead to the eradication of H. pylori from individual human populations. The Baka were thus either H. pylori-free or lost their ancient lineages during past demographic fluctuations. Using coalescent simulations

  4. In vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the 3’ region of cagA gene in Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andrés; Matta, Andrés Januer; Pazos, Alvaro; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro effect of amoxicillin and clarithromycin on the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI). METHODS: One hundred and forty-nine clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cultured from gastric biopsies from 206 Colombian patients with dyspeptic symptoms from a high-risk area for gastric cancer were included as study material. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method. Resistant isolates at baseline and in amoxicillin and clarithromycin serial dilutions were subjected to genotyping (cagA, vacA alleles s and m), Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) polymerase chain reaction and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Images of the RAPD amplicons were analyzed by Gel-Pro Analyzer 4.5 program. Cluster analyses was done using SPSS 15.0 statistical package, where each of the fingerprint bands were denoted as variables. Dendrograms were designed by following Ward’s clustering method and the estimation of distances between each pair of H. pylori isolates was calculated with the squared Euclidean distance. RESULTS: Resistance rates were 4% for amoxicillin and 2.7% for clarithromycin with 2% double resistances. Genotyping evidenced a high prevalence of the genotype cagA-positive/vacA s1m1. The 3’ region of cagA gene was successfully amplified in 92.3% (12/13) of the baseline resistant isolates and in 60% (36/60) of the resistant isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. Upon observing the distribution of the number of EPIYA repetitions in each dilution with respect to baseline isolates, it was found that in 61.5% (8/13) of the baseline isolates, a change in the number of EPIYA repetitions lowered antibiotic pressure. The gain and loss of EPIYA motifs resulted in a diversity of H. pylori subclones after bacterial adjustment to changing conditions product of antibiotic pressure. RAPD PCR evidenced the close clonal relationship between baseline isolates and isolates growing in antibiotic dilutions. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic

  5. Antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter isolates obtained from retail chicken meat and offal products in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hidano, Arata; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hayama, Yoko; Muroga, Norihiko; Kobayashi, Sota; Nishida, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    A rapid increase in antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter has been posing a serious concern for human health. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the overall trend in antimicrobial resistance among Campylobacter isolates obtained from chicken meat and offal products collected from a wide geographic area throughout Japan. Resistance to Enrofloxacin was most frequently observed, with significantly higher rate of resistance among isolates obtained from offal (55.6%) than from meat (27.3%) samples (p = 0.05). These results highlight need for a better understanding of the characteristics of Campylobacter isolates obtained from chicken meat and offal products.

  6. Helicobacter pylori outer membrane protein Q allele distribution is associated with distinct pathologies in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Javed; Abbas, Zaigham; Khan, Rustam; Salim, Saima Azhar; Awan, Safia; Abrar, Ambar; Jafri, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) strains expressing outer membrane protein Q (HopQ) promote adherence to the gastric epithelial cell. We characterized HopQ alleles in relation to H. pylori-related disease, histology and virulence markers. Gastric biopsies were obtained at esophagogastroduodenoscopy from patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. H. pylori culture, histology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HopQ types, cagA, cagA-promoter and vacA alleles were performed. DNA extracted was used for PCR. Sequencing of PCR products of HopQ types 1 and 2 was followed by BLAST query. We examined 241 H. pylori isolates. HopQ type 1 was positive in 70 (29%) isolates, type 2 in 60 (25%) isolates, while both type 1 and type 2 in 111 (46%) H. pylori isolates, respectively. Nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was associated with HopQ type 2 in 48 (41%) isolates, while gastric carcinoma (GC) in 37 (53%) (P<0.001) with type 1 isolates. Gastric ulcers (GU) were 39 (46%) (P<0.001) in H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles compared to 6 (23%) in HopQ type 1. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that multiple HopQ alleles were associated with GU OR 2.9 (1.07-7.8) (P=0.03). HopQ type 1 was associated with cagA 58 (84%) (P<0.001) and cagA-promoter 58 (83%) (P<0.001) compared to 14 (23%) and 17 (28%) respectively, in type 2. VacAs1a was associated with HopQ type 1 in 59 (84%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 35 (58%) (P=0.002) isolates. VacAm1 was associated with HopQ type 1 in 53 (76%) isolates compared to HopQ type 2 in 32 (53%) (P=0.004) isolates. H. pylori infection with multiple HopQ alleles was predominant. H. pylori infection with single HopQ type 1 was associated with GC in the presence of other H. pylori virulence markers.

  7. In vitro synergistic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa aqueous extract in combination with standard antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Berchová, Kateřina; Majerová, Michaela; Pokorná, Marie; Švajdlenka, Emil

    2016-09-01

    Context The increasing problem of drug-resistant strains has led to the failure of current treatment regimens of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Recently, a new treatment strategy has been developed to overcome the problem by using natural products in combination with antibiotics to enhance the treatment efficacy. Objective The antimicrobial combinatory effect of the aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) (AEHS) with antibiotics (clarithromycin, CLA; amoxicillin, AMX; metronidazole, MTZ) has been evaluated in vitro against HP strains. Materials and methods Hibiscus calyces (35 g) were brewed in 250 mL of boiled water for 30 min, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution method. The checkerboard assay was used to evaluate the antimicrobial combinatory effect according to the sum of fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) indices. Results In this study, AEHS exerted remarkable bacteriostatic effect against all HP strains tested with MICs values ranging from 9.18 to 16.68 μg/mL. Synergy effect of AEHS with CLA or MTZ was obtained against four of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.21 to 0.39. The additive effect of AEHS with AMX was obtained against five of seven HP strains tested with ∑FIC ranging from 0.61 to 0.91. Conclusion This study presents AEHS as a potent therapeutic candidate alone, or in combination with antibiotics for the treatment of HP infection.

  8. Helicobacter pylori isolated from Iranian drinking water: vacA, cagA, iceA, oipA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Khamesipour, Faham; Jonaidi-Jafari, Nematollah; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Despite the clinical importance of Helicobacter pylori in human gastric disorders, its exact route of transmission is still uncertain. Based on the contentious hypothesis and findings of previous investigations, water may play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. This study was carried out to investigate the vacA, cagA, oipA, iceA and babA2 genotype status and antimicrobial resistance properties of H. pylori strains isolated from the drinking water samples of four major provinces in Iran. A total of 400 drinking water samples were cultured and tested. H. pylori-positive strains were analyzed for the presence of various genotypes and antimicrobial resistance. Twelve of 400 (3%) water samples were positive for H. pylori. Samples from Isfahan province had the highest, while those from Shiraz had the lowest prevalence of H. pylori. The seasonal distribution was also determined, with the highest prevalence of bacteria in the summer season (7.36%). H. pylori strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (100%), erythromycin (75%), clarithromycin (75%), and trimethoprim (58.3%). The most commonly detected genotypes were vacAs1a (83.3%), vacAm1a (66.6%), vacAs2 (50%) and cagA (50%). The presence of similar genotypes in the H. pylori strains of drinking water and those of human clinical samples suggest that contaminated water maybe the sources of bacteria. Spiramycin and furazolidone are suggested for the treatment of cases of H. pylori infection.

  9. Evaluation of two monkey species (Macaca mulatta and Macaca fascicularis) as possible models for human Helicobacter pylori disease.

    PubMed Central

    Euler, A R; Zurenko, G E; Moe, J B; Ulrich, R G; Yagi, Y

    1990-01-01

    Endoscopic, histologic, and microbiologic evaluations of 21 cynomolgus and 34 rhesus monkeys for naturally occurring Helicobacter pylori infection were done. H. pylori was never isolated from any cynomolgus monkey, but was found in 12 rhesus monkeys. A general correlation existed between a positive culture and a gastric inflammatory response. Inoculation challenges were then undertaken. Four cynomolgus and five rhesus monkeys received two different H. pylori strains isolated from humans. Five rhesus monkeys received an isolate obtained from rhesus monkeys. Evaluation of the cynomolgus monkeys 7 and 14 days later revealed no H. pylori. Endoscopies of the rhesus monkeys were done 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56 days later. One rhesus monkey, which received the isolate from humans, became H. pylori positive at day 21 and remained positive through day 56. Restriction enzyme analysis of genomic DNA at day 56 revealed that the isolate was not identical to the challenge strain isolated from humans. All five rhesus monkeys that received the strain isolated from rhesus monkeys became H. pylori positive by day 14 and remained positive through day 56 Antral inflammation developed in all monkeys. Restriction enzyme analysis of genomic DNA on day 56 confirmed that four of five isolates were identical to the challenge strain isolated from rhesus monkeys. DNA hybridization documented homology between the challenge strains isolated from humans and rhesus monkeys plus those isolated at day 56. In this study, we showed that the rhesus monkey, if given a strain of H. pylori isolated from rhesus monkeys, develops a gastric infection with accompanying histological changes, making this model suitable for further development. Images PMID:2229353

  10. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2010-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication has been shown to have a prophylactic effect against gastric cancer. According to several international guidelines, the first-line therapy for treating H. pylori infection consists of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or ranitidine bismuth citrate, with any two antibiotics among amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole, given for 7-14 days. However, even with these recommended regimens, H. pylori eradication failure is still seen in more than 20% of patients. The failure rate for first-line therapy may be higher in actual clinical practice, owing to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. The recommended second-line therapy is a quadruple regimen composed of tetracycline, metronidazole, a bismuth salt and a PPI. The combination of PPI-amoxicillin-levofloxacin is a good option as second-line therapy. In the case of failure of second-line therapy, the patients should be evaluated using a case-by-case approach. European guidelines recommend culture before the selection of a third-line treatment based on the microbial antibiotic sensitivity. H. pylori isolates after two eradication failures are often resistant to both metronidazole and clarithromycin. The alternative candidates for third-line therapy are quinolones, tetracycline, rifabutin and furazolidone; high-dose PPI/amoxicillin therapy might also be promising.

  11. Bacteriology of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Owen, R J

    1995-09-01

    The discovery and first isolation of H. pylori in pure culture from gastric biopsies in 1982 provided the basis for a completely new area of microbiology. Since then, H. pylori has been an intensively pursued topic world-wide, and extensive data have been acquired on all aspects of its basic microbiology, both at the conventional phenotypic level and at the molecular level. H. pylori is a remarkable microorganism because of its ability to readily colonize a major proportion of human population worldwide and to persist successfully for long periods (probably decades) in a hostile environment. At the same time it interacts with the host immune system in such a way as to permit long-term survival. Blaser (1993) proposed a model in which both host and parasite adapt to down regulate inflammatory phenomena to promote survival. Urease production by H. pylori (an important factor in that process) is one of its most distinct features with a key role in its success as an infective agent. Another less obvious yet highly significant feature of H. pylori is the ability to achieve a high degree of interstrain diversity in genomic DNA nucleotide sequences, while maintaining overall genetic homology and phenotypic homogeneity amongst strains. The selective advantage this diversity provides the bacterium is not understood. A key objective of future microbiological studies should be to understand the population genetic structure of H. pylori. Most species of bacteria are clonal in natural population structure, yet all genomic data suggest the contrary is true for H. pylori. Furthermore, it is not clear if all strains of H. pylori are equally pathogenic, and that some subsets may possess additional pathogenicity factors that are responsible for the development of different disease pathologies. A phylogenetic framework of the genetic relationships of the clones within H. pylori would enable an examination of the total genetic diversity, with respect to ethnic or geographical

  12. Polyphasic characterization of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus isolates obtained from different sugarcane varieties

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Helma V.; dos Santos, Samuel T.; Perin, Liamara; Teixeira, Kátia R. dos S.; Reis, Veronica M.; Baldani, José I.

    2008-01-01

    A polyphasic approach was applied to characterize 35 G. diazotrophicus isolates obtained from sugarcane varieties cultivated in Brazil. The isolates were analyzed by phenotypic (use of different carbon sources) and genotypic tests (ARDRA and RISA–RFLP techniques). Variability among the isolates was observed in relation to the carbon source use preference. Glucose and sucrose were used by all isolates in contrast to myo-inositol, galactose and ribose that were not metabolized. The results of the analysis showed the presence of two groups clustered at 68% of similarity. The genetic distance was higher when RISA-RFLP analysis was used. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences from isolates showed that all of them belonged to the G. diazotrophicus species. Neither effect of the plant part nor sugarcane variety was observed during the cluster analysis. The observed metabolic and genetic variability will be helpful during the strain selection studies for sugarcane inoculation in association with sugarcane breeding programs. PMID:24031296

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE: Characteristics of a magneto-rheological fluid isolator obtained by permanent magnet arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Ung

    2004-06-01

    This note focuses on the characteristics of a magneto-rheological (MR) fluid isolator obtained by five permanent magnet arrangements. The basic characteristics of the isolator with various magnetic arrangements were measured from quasi-static tests, and their equivalent models were proposed. The appropriate magnet arrangement for implementing a device that can be used to prevent damage and alignment shift of on-board satellite equipment due to the shock and vibration during lift-off and, at the same time, to isolate disturbances generated by on-orbit momentum- or reaction-wheel operation was investigated.

  14. Antifungal activity of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates obtained from animals with mycoses.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Ken; Imaji, Mashio; Osumi, Takafumi; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Watanabe, Toshi

    2009-01-01

    Animal mycosis, particularly deep mycosis, is one of the most challenging conditions encountered by veterinarians. Pathogens causing mycotic infections in animals include fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida spp., and Aspergillus spp. The antifungal drugs used for the treatment of deep mycoses in animals as well as humans are polyenes and azoles. However, the sensitivity of clinical isolates obtained from animals toward these drugs has rarely been assayed. In this study, the antifungal activities of itraconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates of C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolated from animals with mycoses were examined using the broth microdilution method performed according to the guidelines provided by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of itraconazole toward the C. neoformans, Candida spp., and A. fumigatus isolates were 0.125 - 1, 0.125 - 2, and 0.25 - 2 microg/ml, respectively, and those of voriconazole were 0.0625 - 0.5, < or =0.0313 - 0.0625, and 0.0625 - 1 microg/ml, respectively. The results of the MIC analyses implied that the fungal isolates obtained from infected animals exhibit an equivalent degree of susceptibility to itraconazole and voriconazole, as is observed in the case of isolates obtained from humans. The appropriate antifungal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of mycoses in animals must be selected taking into consideration the host immune status and organ function as well as the in vitro sensitivity of the pathogens to antifungal drugs.

  15. Triazole Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus Clinical Isolates Obtained in Nanjing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Feng, Chun-Lai; Chen, Fei; He, Qian; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the past decades, the incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) caused by Aspergillus fumigatus has increased dramatically. The aims of this study were to investigate the susceptibility of clinical isolates of A. fumigatus to triazole and the underlying cyp51A mutations in triazole-resistant A. fumigatus. Methods: A total of 126 A. fumigatus clinical isolates from 126 patients with proven or probable IA were obtained from four large tertiary hospitals in Nanjing, China, between August 2012 and July 2015. The determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole was performed by broth microdilution according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing reference method. Results: A total of 4 A. fumigatus isolates (3.17%) were confirmed to be itraconazole resistant, with MICs of ≥8 mg/L, and one isolate (0.8%) was confirmed to be voriconazole resistant and posaconazole resistant, with MICs of 4 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. We found that two of the 4 isolates of triazole-resistant A. fumigatus had the L98H amino acid substitution in combination with a 34-base pair tandem repeat in the promoter region, one isolate had an M220I mutation, and another itraconazole-resistant isolate did not have a substitution in the cyp51A gene. Conclusions: This study shows that triazole-resistant A. fumigatus clinical isolates are present in Nanjing, China, which is a new challenge to the clinical management of IA. PMID:28303848

  16. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  17. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-06-07

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated.

  18. Occurrence of Mutations in the Antimicrobial Target Genes Related to Levofloxacin, Clarithromycin, and Amoxicillin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Buenos Aires City.

    PubMed

    Zerbetto De Palma, Gerardo; Mendiondo, Nicolas; Wonaga, Andrés; Viola, Luis; Ibarra, Daniela; Campitelli, Esteban; Salim, Nicolas; Corti, Rodolfo; Goldman, Cinthia; Catalano, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Domain V of 23S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB Quinolones Resistance-Determining Region (QRDR), and pbp-1A gene point mutations were investigated in Helicobacter pylori-resistant isolates from three centres of Buenos Aires. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were performed in 197 isolates from 52 H. pylori-positive naive patients by agar dilution method. Point mutations were achieved by amplification and sequencing of the target genes, and their association with resistance was determined by natural transformation assays. Resistance rates were as follows: metronidazole 28.8%, clarithromycin (CLA) 26.9%, levofloxacin (LEV) 32.7%, and amoxicillin (AMX) 7.6%. Nearly one-third of patients carried multidrug-resistant isolates. A2143G or A2142G in domain V of 23S-rRNA was found in all isolates showing high level of resistance to CLA (MIC >2 mg/L), accounting for 76.0% (38/50) of those with the resistant phenotype. The mutations A2267G or T1861C carried by 8/12 isolates with MIC 1-2 mg/L (low level) did not confer resistance by transformation. Substitutions at GyrA position 87 or 91, mainly N87K and D91G, were found in 92.8% (52/56) of the LEV-resistant isolates: 48 isolates with MIC 4-64 mg/L and 4/8 isolates with MIC 2 mg/L. The remaining four harboured K133N, also present in susceptible isolates. None of the substitutions in GyrB demonstrated to confer resistance. Transformation proved that PBP-1A N562Y and/or T556S substitutions confer the AMX resistance in our isolates, showing an additive effect. In conclusion, the usually reported mutations related to CLA, LEV, and AMX resistance were found in our isolates. However, low-level CLA resistance seems not to be due to mutations in Domain V of 23S rRNA gene.

  19. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  20. Pathogenicity and phenotypic sulfadiazine resistance of Toxoplasma gondii isolates obtained from livestock in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Claudio Bs; Meurer, Ywlliane Sr; Andrade, Joelma Ma; Costa, Maria Esm; Andrade, Milena Mc; Silva, Letícia A; Lanza, Daniel Cf; Vítor, Ricardo Wa; Andrade-Neto, Valter F

    2016-06-03

    Toxoplasma gondii is the causative protozoan agent of toxoplasmosis, which is a common infection that is widely distributed worldwide. Studies revealed stronger clonal strains in North America and Europe and genetic diversity in South American strains. Our study aimed to differentiate the pathogenicity and sulfadiazine resistance of three T. gondii isolates obtained from livestock intended for human consumption. The cytopathic effects of the T. gondii isolates were evaluated. The pathogenicity was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using a CS3 marker and in a rodent model in vivo. Phenotypic sulfadiazine resistance was measured using a kinetic curve of drug activity in Swiss mice. IgM and IgG were measured by ELISA, and the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene sequence was analysed. The cytopathic effects and the PCR-RFLP profiles from chickens indicated a different infection source. The Ck3 isolate displayed more cytopathic effects in vitro than the Ck2 and ME49 strains. Additionally, the Ck2 isolate induced a differential humoral immune response compared to ME49. The Ck3 and Pg1 isolates, but not the Ck2 isolate, showed sulfadiazine resistance in the sensitivity assay. We did not find any DHPS gene polymorphisms in the mouse samples. These atypical pathogenicity and sulfadiazine resistance profiles were not previously reported and served as a warning to local health authorities.

  1. Identification of virulence genes carried by bacteriophages obtained from clinically isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Karasartova, Djursun; Cavusoglu, Zeynep Burcin; Turegun, Buse; Ozsan, Murat T; Şahin, Fikret

    2016-12-01

    Bacteriophages play an important role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) either by carrying accessory virulence factors or several superantigens. Despite their importance, there are not many studies showing the actual distribution of the virulence genes carried by the prophages obtained from the clinically isolated Staphylococcus. In this study, we investigated prophages obtained from methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from hospital- and community-associated (HA-CA) infections for the virulence factors. In the study, 43 phages isolated from 48 MRSA were investigated for carrying toxin genes including the sak, eta, lukF-PV, sea, selp, sek, seg, seq chp, and scn virulence genes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot. Restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to analyze phage genomes to investigate the relationship between the phage profiles and the toxin genes' presence. MRSA strains isolated from HA infections tended to have higher prophage presence than the MRSA strains obtained from the CA infections (97% and 67%, respectively). The study showed that all the phages with the exception of one phage contained one or more virulence genes in their genomes with different combinations. The most common toxin genes found were sea (83%) followed by sek (77%) and seq (64%). The study indicates that prophages encode a significant proportion of MRSA virulence factors.

  2. Characterization of rhizobia isolates obtained from nodules of wild genotypes of common bean.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Aline Assis; Andraus, Michel de Paula; Borba, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Martin-Didonet, Claudia Cristina Garcia; Ferreira, Enderson Petrônio de Brito

    This study aimed to evaluate the tolerance to salinity and temperature, the genetic diversity and the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia isolates obtained from wild genotypes of common bean cultivated in soil samples from the States of Goiás, Minas Gerais and Paraná. The isolates were subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) at different temperatures (28°C, 33°C, 38°C, 43°C and 48°C). Genotypic characterization was performed based on BOX-PCR, REP-PCR markers and 16S rRNA sequencing. An evaluation of symbiotic efficiency was carried out under greenhouse conditions in autoclaved Leonard jars. Among 98 isolates about 45% of them and Rhizobium freirei PRF81 showed a high tolerance to temperature, while 24 isolates and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 were able to use all of the carbon sources studied. Clustering analysis based on the ability to use carbon sources and on the tolerance to salinity and temperature grouped 49 isolates, R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12 with a similarity level of 76%. Based on genotypic characterization, 65% of the isolates showed an approximately 66% similarity with R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12. About 20% of the isolates showed symbiotic efficiency similar to or better than the best Rhizobium reference strain (R. tropici CIAT899). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed that two efficient isolates (ALSG5A1 and JPrG6A8) belong to the group of strains used as commercial inoculant for common bean in Brazil and must be assayed in field experiments.

  3. Nucleotide substitutions in vanC-2 gene of Enterococcus casseliflavus isolates obtained from chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Murase, T.; Mito, Y.; Otsuki, K.; Suzuki, R.; Yamai, S.

    2002-01-01

    DNA sequencing of the vanC-2 gene was partially carried out on 10 isolates of Enterococcus casseliflavus obtained from 8 samples of imported chickens in Japan between July 1999 and June 2001 to evaluate the variation in the gene. Forty nucleotide substitutions in 36 codons were identified within 345 base pairs when compared with the vanC-2 sequence of the reference strain E. casseliflavus ATCC25788. Identical nucleotide substitutions were commonly found in the isolates recovered from chickens imported from both Brazil and China. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of NotI-digested chromosomal DNA of these strains were distinguished by two, or more than six, band differences. These observations suggest that sequencing of the vanC-2 gene may be helpful for epidemiological investigation in combination with the PFGE analyses of the isolates, although particular genotypes are unlikely to be restricted to each of the countries that exported chickens. PMID:12403118

  4. Pathogenicity and phenotypic sulfadiazine resistance ofToxoplasma gondii isolates obtained from livestock in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Claudio BS; Meurer, Ywlliane SR; Andrade, Joelma MA; Costa, Maria ESM; Andrade, Milena MC; Silva, Letícia A; Lanza, Daniel CF; Vítor, Ricardo WA; Andrade-Neto, Valter F

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the causative protozoan agent of toxoplasmosis, which is a common infection that is widely distributed worldwide. Studies revealed stronger clonal strains in North America and Europe and genetic diversity in South American strains. Our study aimed to differentiate the pathogenicity and sulfadiazine resistance of three T. gondiiisolates obtained from livestock intended for human consumption. The cytopathic effects of the T. gondii isolates were evaluated. The pathogenicity was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using a CS3 marker and in a rodent model in vivo. Phenotypic sulfadiazine resistance was measured using a kinetic curve of drug activity in Swiss mice. IgM and IgG were measured by ELISA, and the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene sequence was analysed. The cytopathic effects and the PCR-RFLP profiles from chickens indicated a different infection source. The Ck3 isolate displayed more cytopathic effects in vitro than the Ck2 and ME49 strains. Additionally, the Ck2 isolate induced a differential humoral immune response compared to ME49. The Ck3 and Pg1 isolates, but not the Ck2 isolate, showed sulfadiazine resistance in the sensitivity assay. We did not find any DHPS gene polymorphisms in the mouse samples. These atypical pathogenicity and sulfadiazine resistance profiles were not previously reported and served as a warning to local health authorities. PMID:27276184

  5. Construction of a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector for gene transfer in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W K; An, Y S; Kim, K H; Kim, S H; Song, J Y; Ryu, B D; Choi, Y J; Yoon, Y H; Baik, S C; Rhee, K H; Cho, M J

    1997-01-01

    In this study, a Helicobacter pylori-Escherichia coli shuttle vector was constructed for transferring DNA into H. pylori. The smallest cryptic plasmid (1.2 kb), pHP489, among those harbored by 77 H. pylori isolates was selected as a base replicon for constructing vectors. HindIII-digested pHP489 was ligated with a kanamycin resistance gene [aph(3')-III], which originated from Campylobacter jejuni, to produce the recombinant plasmid pHP489K. pHP489K was efficiently transformed into and stably maintained in H. pylori strains. The shuttle vector pBHP489K (3.6 kb) was constructed by the recombination of pHP489, ColE1, and aph(3')-III sequences. pBHP489K was reciprocally transformed into and maintained in both H. pylori and E. coli. Introduction of the shuttle vector clone DNA (pBHP489K/AB; 6.7 kb), containing the ureA and ureB genes of H. pylori, into urease-negative mutants of H. pylori led to the restoration of their urease activity. The transformants were confirmed to contain the incoming plasmid DNA. pBHP489K satisfied the requirements for an H. pylori-E. coli shuttle vector, implying that it might be a useful vector for investigating pathogenicity and restriction-modification systems of H. pylori. PMID:9406406

  6. Genotypic Profile of the Outer Membrane Proteins BabA and BabB in Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Colbeck, Jeffrey C.; Hansen, Lori M.; Fong, Julie M.; Solnick, Jay V.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori BabA is the ABO blood group antigen binding adhesin, which has a closely related paralogue (BabB) whose function is unknown. PCR and DNA sequence analysis showed extensive genotypic diversity in babA and babB across different strains, as well as within a strain colonizing an individual patient. We hypothesize that diverse profiles of babA and babB reflect selective pressures for adhesion, which may differ across different hosts and within an individual over time. PMID:16790815

  7. Involvement of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) receptor and ligand system in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric epithelial apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, J; Kuck, D; Strand, S; von Herbay, A; Mariani, S M; Krammer, P H; Galle, P R; Stremmel, W

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinoma. The potential role of CD95-mediated apoptosis was investigated in a panel of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis (n = 29) and with noninfected normal mucosa (n = 10). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased CD95 receptor expression in epithelial and lamina propria cells in chronic gastritis. By in situ hybridization, CD95 ligand mRNA was absent or low in normal mucosa but expressed at high levels in lamina propria lymphocytes and, unexpectedly, in epithelial cells in chronic gastritis. Apoptotic cells were rare in normal mucosa but were observed regularly in chronic gastritis in close proximity to CD95 ligand mRNA expression throughout the epithelial and lamina propria cells. In a functional analysis gastric epithelial cell lines were incubated with supernatants of H. pylori. Treatment with the cytotoxic isolate H. pylori 60190 but not with the noncytotoxic isolate Tx30a upregulated CD95 in up to 50% of gastric epithelial cells and induced apoptosis in these cells. H. pylori-induced apoptosis was partially prevented by blocking CD95, demonstrating the functional role of the CD95 system. These findings suggest that H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis involves apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells by activation of the CD95 receptor and ligand system. PMID:9788963

  8. Assessment of Risk and Sero-Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization among Remote Orang Asli Tribes in Peninsula Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes.

  9. Assessment of Risk and Sero-Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization among Remote Orang Asli Tribes in Peninsula Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Thevakumar, Kavitha; Chandren, Josephine Rebecca; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio; Chua, Eng Guan; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Tan, Jin Ai Mary Anne; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Goh, Khean Lee; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Marshall, Barry J.; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai; Wong, Li Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is related to human poverty with marked differences between developing and developed countries. Socioeconomic factors and living standards are the main determinants of the age-dependent acquisition rate of H. pylori, and consequently its prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the risk and sero-prevalence of H. pylori colonization among Orang Asli in Peninsula Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Orang Asli subjects in seven isolated settlements spanning across all three major tribes (Negrito, Proto Malay and Senoi) in Malaysia. Socio-demographic characteristics of the subjects were obtained through interview. Subjects were tested for H. pylori colonization based on CagA and whole cell (WC) antigen serological assays. A total of 275 subjects participated in this study. Among these subjects, 115 (44.7%) were H. pylori sero-positive with highest sero-prevalence among Negrito (65.7%). Among subjects who were H. pylori sero-positive, CagA sero positivity was also significantly higher among Negrito. The highest proportion of respondents reported to be H. pylori sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (57.9%), males (56.2%), Negrito (48.6%) and live in bamboo house (92.3%). The highest proportion of respondents reported to be CagA sero-positive was from age group 30 years old and below (41.4%), males (35.6%) and Negrito (48.6%). The results of this study demonstrate that H. pylori colonization can be related to age, gender, tribes and house materials and CagA sero-positive stain closely associated with age, gender and tribes. PMID:27441568

  10. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  11. Optimization of the isoelectric precipitation method to obtain protein isolates from amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) seeds.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Chávez, Beatriz; Osuna-Castro, Juan A; Guevara-Lara, Fidel; Domínguez-Domínguez, Jorge; Paredes-López, Octavio

    2002-10-23

    This research was conducted to evaluate the effect of extraction pH (7.8-9.2) and precipitation pH (4.3-5.7) on four selected quality attributes of protein isolates from amaranth seeds (Amaranthus cruentus) such as protein content (PC), whiteness index (WI), enthalpy of transition (EN), and denaturation temperature (DT). Ten different treatments involving extraction and precipitation pH combinations were analyzed by a central composite design; the experimental data were fitted by a second-order model using a least-squares method for each one of the four dependent variables. Response surface methodology was used for the optimization process; in addition, a common optimum value for the four dependent variables was obtained utilizing the desirability method. A confirmatory test showed that the generated regression equations could adequately predict performance of this isoelectric precipitation method. The results indicate that extraction pH and precipitation pH showed an important effect on PC, WI, and EN. However, the different combinations did not significantly affect the DT. Values of 9.2 and 8.0 for extraction pH and 5.7 for precipitation pH produced the best overall result for all responses. Finally, the results have shown that it is possible to obtain protein isolates from A. cruentus seeds at optimized values of extraction pH and precipitation pH, which presented a high protein content and good physicochemical properties.

  12. Characterization of bovine viral diarrhea virus isolates resistant to a novel antiviral compound obtained from persistently infected calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to characterize isolates resistant to a novel antiviral compound (DB772) isolated from persistently infected (PI) calves treated with the compound. Viral isolates were obtained from four Angus-cross beef calves (A,B,C,D) persistently infected with BVDV type 1 or 2 ...

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in United States Navy submarine crews.

    PubMed

    Jackman, R P; Schlichting, C; Carr, W; Dubois, A

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is elevated in German submarine crews and in United States Navy (USN) surface fleet personnel, but H. pylori prevalence in USN submariners was unknown. The goal of the study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in the crews of USN nuclear submarines compared to other military personnel and to the general US population. The presence of H. pylori IgG antibodies was determined in serum samples using a commercial ELISA. Only 47 out of 451 submariners (9.4%) were H. pylori positive, which is similar to that of the US general population with a similar level of education. In contrast, H. pylori prevalence is significantly higher in US Army recruits (26%), USN surface fleet personnel (25%), and German diesel submariners (38%). These data demonstrate that submarine service (and by inference activity requiring isolation and close contact, per se) is not a risk factor for H. pylori infection.

  14. Demonstration of an Optical Isolator with a Semiconductor Guiding Layer that was Obtained by Use of a Nonreciprocal Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, H; Mizumoto, T; Shinjo, N; Futakuchi, N; Nakano, Y

    2000-11-20

    We present the experimental study of an optical isolator with a semiconductor guiding layer that was obtained by use of a nonreciprocal phase shift. The isolator is equipped with an optical interferometer composed of tapered couplers, nonreciprocal phase shifters, and a reciprocal phase shifter. The nonreciprocal phase shifter was constructed by wafer direct bonding between the semiconductor guiding layer and the magneto-optic cladding layer. The isolator, designed for the 1.55-mum wavelength, was fabricated to investigate the characteristics of each component. By applying an external magnetic field to the nonreciprocal phase shifter, we achieved an isolation ratio of approximately 4.9 dB in the interferometric isolator.

  15. Nationwide survey of Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Gumnarai, Pornpen; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Mahachai, Varocha

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to survey the antibiotic-resistant pattern of Helicobacter pylori infection in different geographical locations in Thailand and to determine factors associated with antibiotic resistance. Dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from the Northern, Northeastern, Central, and Southern regions of Thailand between January 2004 and December 2012 were enrolled in this study. Two antral gastric biopsies were obtained for culture; susceptibility tests were performed using E-test. A total of 3964 were enrolled, and 1350 patients (34.1%) were infected with H. pylori as identified by rapid urease test. Cultures were positive in 619 isolates. E-test for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were successful in 400 isolates and for levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in 208 isolates. Antibiotic resistance was present in 50.3% including amoxicillin 5.2%, tetracycline 1.7%, clarithromycin 3.7%, metronidazole 36%, ciprofloxacin 7.7%, levofloxacin 7.2%, and multi-drugs in 4.2%. Clarithromycin resistance was significantly more common in those older than 40 years (i.e., 100% versus 0%; P = 0.04). The prevalence of metronidazole resistant in Southern Thailand was significantly higher than in the Northeastern region (66.7% versus 33.3% P = 0.04). Metronidazole resistance remains the most common antibiotic resistant type of H. pylori in Thailand. The pattern of H. pylori antibiotic resistance over 9 years demonstrated a fall in clarithromycin resistance such that currently age >40 years is a predictor for clarithromycin resistance in Thailand. Quinolone resistance is a growing problem.

  16. Genetic characterisation of Helicobacter pylori isolates from an Argentinean adult population based on cag pathogenicity island right-end motifs, lspA-glmM polymorphism and iceA and vacA genotypes.

    PubMed

    Leanza, A G; Matteo, M J; Crespo, O; Antelo, P; Olmos, J; Catalano, M

    2004-09-01

    Isolates of Helicobacter pylori from 88 patients were characterised by cagA status, cagA pathogenicity island (PAI) right-end motifs, iceA, vacA and lspA-glmM genotypes, primarily by PCR-based analysis, to investigate whether Argentinean isolates differed from those recovered in southern Europe or other Latin American countries. PCR-based analysis of vacA alleles was confirmed by reverse hybridisation in 56 cases, while sequence analysis was performed either when iceA and vacA genotypes could not be determined by PCR, or to investigate PCR and reverse hybridisation vacA genotyping discordance. Typing by lspA-glmM restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed with HhaI and AluI. The pattern of cag PAI right-end motifs and the prevalence of type Ia were similar to those in isolates from southern European countries, with cagA(+)/iceA1/vacA-s1 m1 being the commonest genotype. Reverse hybridisation identified a vacA-s1a/s1b recombinant allele, confirmed by sequencing analysis. Analysis of lspA-glmM genotypes identified at least 73 unrelated strains. Few mixed infections were identified, but in one case, isolates from a single biopsy exhibiting two vacA alleles were shown by lspA-glmM fingerprints to be two unrelated strains. No associated effect on ulcer disease risk was demonstrated by analysis of cagA, vacA and iceA status. Overall, the isolates of H. pylori from Argentina were similar to isolates from southern Europe or Latin American countries, and infections were associated mainly with single H. pylori strains.

  17. Rapid Ovary Mass-Isolation (ROMi) to Obtain Large Quantities of Drosophila Egg Chambers for Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Mejstrik, Pavel; Tomancak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of large quantities of tissue from organisms is essential for many techniques such as genome-wide screens and biochemistry. However, obtaining large quantities of tissues or cells is often the rate-limiting step when working in vivo. Here, we present a rapid method that allows the isolation of intact, single egg chambers at various developmental stages from ovaries of adult female Drosophila flies. The isolated egg chambers are amenable for a variety of procedures such as fluorescent in situ hybridization, RNA isolation, extract preparation, or immunostaining. Isolation of egg chambers from adult flies can be completed in 5 min and results, depending on the input amount of flies, in several milliliters of material. The isolated egg chambers are then further processed depending on the exact requirements of the subsequent application. We describe high-throughput in situ hybridization in 96-well plates as example application for the mass-isolated egg chambers.

  18. Helicobacter pylori: treatment with combinations of pivampicillin and tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate.

    PubMed

    Weil, J; Bell, G D; Powell, K; Morden, A; Harrison, G; Gant, P W; Trowell, J E; Burridge, S

    1991-10-01

    Fifty Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori) positive patients entered an open study and were assigned to one of four treatment regimens comprising: pivampicillin (500 mg b.d.) for 2 weeks +/- tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate (tablet or liquid form) for one month. The 14C-urea breath test was used to evaluate clearance (negative at the end of treatment) and eradication (negative at 1 month post-treatment) of H. pylori. Clearance rates were 20% (2/10) after pivampicillin alone, 86% (12/14) after tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate tablets (240 mg b.d.) plus pivampicillin, 67% (6/9) after tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate tablets (120 mg q.d.s.) plus pivampicillin, and 100% (13/13) after tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate liquid (120 mg in 5 ml q.d.s) plus pivampicillin. The eradication rates were 0% (0/10), 13% (2/15), 0% (0/11) and 54% (7/13), respectively. Combination of the results from the 2 tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate tablet/pivampicillin groups gave an eradication rate of 7.7% (2/26) which was significantly lower than the 53.9% (7/13) obtained with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate liquid/pivampicillin (P less than 0.02). In conclusion, a liquid tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate pivampicillin combination may be of special use in the treatment of H. pylori-positive patients when triple therapy is contraindicated (e.g. patient sensitivity/allergy to metronidazole) or when the H. pylori isolate is resistant to metronidazole.

  19. Role of Helicobacter pylori plasticity region genes in development of gastroduodenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Watada, Masahide; Jung, Sung Woo; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2012-02-01

    The plasticity region of Helicobacter pylori is a large chromosomal segment including isolate-specific open reading frames with characteristics of pathogenicity islands. It remains unclear whether genes in the plasticity region play a role in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal inflammation and gastroduodenal disease. Our aim was to assess the role of selected genes in the plasticity region in relation to risk of H. pylori-related disease and the severity of gastric mucosal damage. We used PCR to study the relation of disease outcome and mucosal damage with four genes in the H. pylori plasticity region (jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949) from isolates obtained from both Western (n = 296) and East Asian (n = 217) patients. The prevalence of jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 differed significantly between Western and East Asian isolates. In Western isolates, the presence of jhp0945 was significantly associated with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer (odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 2.27 [1.04 to 4.98], 1.86 [1.03 to 3.34], and 1.92 [1.03 to 3.56], respectively). jhp0940-positive Western isolates were significantly associated with absence of gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer (0.21 [0.05 to 0.94] and 0.31 [0.12 to 0.78], respectively). No significant difference was observed between inflammatory cell infiltration or atrophy and the presence or absence of plasticity region genes. The outcome of H. pylori infections varies widely geographically. These data suggest a possible role for difference in the prevalence of plasticity region genes in the geographic variation in H. pylori-related diseases.

  20. Evaluation of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori in the last 15 years in West Poland.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Tomasz M; Andrzejewska, Ewa; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof; Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Increasing resistance to drugs represents a serious problem in treatment of infections with Helicobacter pylori, providing cause of frequent therapeutic failures. Present study aimed at analysis of changes in resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics in West Poland within the recent 15 years. 108 strains of H. pylori were analysed, isolated from gastric mucosa of adult patients. Group 1 involved 66 strains isolated in years of 1998/1999. Group 2 comprised 42 isolates obtained in years of 2013/2014. Susceptibility to amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CL), tetracycline (TC) and metronidazole (MTZ) was determined by E-test (AB Biodisc). All strains on both studied groups were susceptible to AMX. In group 1 all strains proved to be susceptible to TC, while 9% and 36% of tested strains were resistant to CL and MTZ, respectively. By contrast, in group 2, 31% and 83% of strains were resistant to CL and MTZ, respectively. In parallel, 14% strains were found to be resistant to TC (according to EUCAST interpretations). In West Poland, within recent 15 years a dramatic increase was noted in H. pylori strains resistant to metronidazole. In parallel, a significant increase was noted in proportion of strains resistant to clarithromycin.

  1. Genetic diversity of Japanese encephalitis virus isolates obtained from the Indonesian archipelago between 1974 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-07-01

    Five genotypes (GI-V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI-III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the tropical climate

  2. Genetic Diversity of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolates Obtained from the Indonesian Archipelago Between 1974 and 1987

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Five genotypes (GI–V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI–III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the

  3. The diversity of oomycetes on crayfish: morphological vs. molecular identification of cultures obtained while isolating the crayfish plague pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kozubíková-Balcarová, Eva; Koukol, Ondřej; Martín, María P; Svoboda, Jiří; Petrusek, Adam; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Numerous oomycetes colonise the crayfish cuticle, the best known being the crayfish plague pathogen Aphanomyces astaci. Although other oomycetes associated with crayfish complicate the isolation and molecular detection of A. astaci, their diversity is little known. To improve this knowledge, we analysed 95 oomycete isolates obtained during attempts to isolate A. astaci from crayfish presumably infected by this pathogen. We characterized the isolates morphologically and by sequencing of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. We identified 13 taxa by molecular analysis. Ten of them were assigned to five genera; the remaining three were affiliated with the order Saprolegniales but could not be reliably assigned to any genus. Morphological identification to species level was only possible for 15 % of isolates; all corresponded to Saprolegnia ferax, which was confirmed by ITS sequencing. The most frequently isolated species were S. ferax and Saprolegnia australis. Only seven isolates of A. astaci were obtained, all from one disease outbreak. We show that oomycete cultures obtained as by-products of parasite isolation are valuable for oomycete diversity studies, but morphological identification may uncover only a fraction of their diversity. Further, we show that crayfish may be frequently associated with potentially serious parasites of other organisms.

  4. Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases among Enterobacter Isolates Obtained in Tel Aviv, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Jacob; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Chmelnitsky, Inna; Hammer-Münz, Orly; Leavitt, Azita; Gold, Howard S.; Schwaber, Mitchell J.; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    The extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing phenotype is frequent among Enterobacter isolates at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel. We examined the clonal relatedness and characterized the ESBLs of a collection of these strains. Clonal relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and transconjugation experiments were performed. ESBL gene families were screened by colony hybridization and PCR for blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, blaIBC, blaPER, blaOXA, blaVEB, and blaSFO; and the PCR products were sequenced. The 17 Enterobacter isolates studied comprised 15 distinct genotypes. All isolates showed at least one IEF band (range, one to five bands) whose appearance was suppressed by addition of clavulanate; pIs ranged from 5.4 to ≥8.2. Colony hybridization identified at least one family of beta-lactamase genes in 11 isolates: 10 harbored blaTEM and 9 harbored blaSHV. PCR screening and sequence analysis of the PCR products for blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M identified TEM-1 in 11 isolates, SHV-12 in 7 isolates, SHV-1 in 1 isolate, a CTX-M-2-like gene in 2 isolates, and CTX-M-26 in 1 isolate. In transconjugation experiments with four isolates harboring blaTEM-1 and blaSHV-12, both genes were simultaneously transferred to the recipient strain Escherichia coli HB101. Plasmid mapping, PCR, and Southern analysis with TEM- and SHV-specific probes demonstrated that a single transferred plasmid carried both the TEM-1 and the SHV-12 genes. The widespread presence of ESBLs among Enterobacter isolates in Tel Aviv is likely due not to clonal spread but, rather, to plasmid-mediated transfer, at times simultaneously, of genes encoding several types of enzymes. The dominant ESBL identified was SHV-12. PMID:15728917

  5. Molecular characterization of Pasteurella multocida isolates obtained from poultry, ruminant, cats and dogs using RAPD and REP-PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shirzad-Aski, Hesamaddin; Tabatabaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic sequence-based Polymerase Chain Reaction (REP- PCR) were used to characterize 131 isolates of Pasteurella multocida, originating from different healthy and diseased animal species obtained from several geographical regions of Iran. The RAPD and REP-PCR generated amplified products in the range of 300 to 3400 bp and 200 to 2850 bp, respectively. Among all of the P. multocida isolates, cluster analysis revealed that 63 clusters and nine untypable isolates and 81 clusters and six untypable isolates were produced with RAPD and REP-PCR methods, respectively. The results indicated that the REP-PCR method showed a slightly higher level of discrimination power in differentiating of P. multocida isolates as compared with RAPD. The results showed that a considerable level of genetic diversity exists among P. multocida isolates even in the isolates with the same animal or geographical origins. There was no host- and region-specific pattern. In addition, the isolates obtained from the healthy and diseased animal did not reveal any correlation genotypic profiles, which could be supported by the hypothesis that P. multocida is a strictly opportunistic pathogen. In conclusion, because of a large amount of genetic heterogeneity in the P. multocida isolates, Pasteurellosis may be caused by different clones in the same herd or animal. PMID:28097166

  6. Assignment of serotype to Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from poultry and their environment in Southern Brazil.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To assess diversity of Salmonella enterica serotypes present in poultry and their environment from Southern Brazil, the Kauffman-White-LeMinor (KWL) scheme was used to serotype a total of 155 isolates. Isolates were then re-examined with nested PCR and sequencing of the dkgB-linked Intergenic Sequ...

  7. Identification, characterization and antibiotic resistance of bacterial isolates obtained from waterpipe device hoses.

    PubMed

    Masadeh, Majed M; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H; Khabour, Omar; Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Gharaibeh, Mahmoud

    2015-05-13

    The general lack of knowledge about the health effects of waterpipe smoking is among the reasons for its global spread. In this study, bacterial contamination of waterpipe hoses was investigated. Twenty hoses were collected from waterpipe cafés and screened for bacterial pathogens using standard culture and isolation techniques. Additionally, resistance of isolated bacteria to common antibiotics was determined by identifying the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each isolate. Forty eight bacterial isolates were detected. Isolates included both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from species that included Micrococcus (12), Corynebacterium (13) and Bacillus (9). In addition, some of the detected pathogens were found to be resistant to aztreonam (79%), cefixime (79%), norfloxacin, amoxicillin (47%), clarithromycin (46%) and enrofloxacin (38%). In conclusion, the hose of the waterpipe device is a good environment for the growth of bacterial pathogens, which can then be transmitted to users.

  8. Role of dupA in virulence of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin; Perez-Perez, Guillermo

    2016-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gastric human pathogen associated with acute and chronic gastritis, 70% of all gastric ulcers, 85% of all duodenal ulcers, and both forms of stomach cancer, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Recently, attention has focused on possible relationship between presence of certain virulence factor and H. pylori-associated diseases. Some contradictory data between this bacterium and related disorders has been observed since not all the colonized individuals develop to severe disease. The reported diseases plausibility related to H. pylori specific virulence factors became an interesting story about this organism. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been identified including cytotoxin-associated gene a (cagA) and vacA, there are conflicting data about their actual participation as specific risk factor for H. pylori-related diseases. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene a (dupA) is a virulence factor of H. pylori that is highly associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk of gastric cancer. The prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains isolated from western countries is relatively higher than in H. pylori strains from Asian countries. Current confusing epidemiological reports will continue unless future sophisticated and molecular studies provide data on functional and complete dupA cluster in H. pylori infected individuals. This paper elucidates available knowledge concerning role of dupA in virulence of H. pylori after a decade of its discovery.

  9. Role of dupA in virulence of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin; Perez-Perez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gastric human pathogen associated with acute and chronic gastritis, 70% of all gastric ulcers, 85% of all duodenal ulcers, and both forms of stomach cancer, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Recently, attention has focused on possible relationship between presence of certain virulence factor and H. pylori-associated diseases. Some contradictory data between this bacterium and related disorders has been observed since not all the colonized individuals develop to severe disease. The reported diseases plausibility related to H. pylori specific virulence factors became an interesting story about this organism. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been identified including cytotoxin-associated gene a (cagA) and vacA, there are conflicting data about their actual participation as specific risk factor for H. pylori-related diseases. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene a (dupA) is a virulence factor of H. pylori that is highly associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk of gastric cancer. The prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains isolated from western countries is relatively higher than in H. pylori strains from Asian countries. Current confusing epidemiological reports will continue unless future sophisticated and molecular studies provide data on functional and complete dupA cluster in H. pylori infected individuals. This paper elucidates available knowledge concerning role of dupA in virulence of H. pylori after a decade of its discovery. PMID:28028359

  10. Prevalence of multiple drug-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains among patients with different gastric disorders in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shokrzadeh, Leila; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Mirzaei, Tabassom; Farzi, Nastaran; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-02-01

    Emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Helicobacter pylori is a global health concern. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of MDR H. pylori strains in Iran. H. pylori isolates were obtained from cultured gastric biopsy samples on selective culture media after their characterization by PCR and conventional biochemical methods. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, ampicillin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline were determined for 111 strains that were isolated from 197 dyspeptic patients by the agar dilution method. The primary resistance rates were 61.3% (68/111) for metronidazole, 15.3% (17/111) for ampicillin, and 14.4% (16/111) for rifampicin. Resistance rates for other antimicrobials were as follows: macrolides (erythromycin or clarithromycin) 32.4% (36/111) and quinolones (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin) 30.6% (34/111). Among the resistant strains, the rates of double and multiple drug resistance phenotypes were 22.6% (19/84) and 34.5% (29/84), respectively. The quadruple drug resistance phenotype encompasses 37.9% of the MDR strains, of which 90% of them was resistant to metronidazole. In conclusion, these results showed a high frequency of MDR phenotypes among the studied H. pylori strains in Iran. The eradication of the H. pylori strains presenting high resistance rates to macrolides, fluoroquinolones, or metronidazole could be achieved by approved tetracycline- or amoxicillin-containing regimens as alternative regimens to standard triple therapy.

  11. Morphological and molecular characterization of Calothrix isolates obtained from diverse environments in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Dhar, D W; Gupta, R K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract-Thirty cyanobacterial strains of Calothrix (family Rivulariaceae) isolated from diverse geographical regions of India were analyzed using morphological and molecular approaches. Most of the isolates were planktonic while some grew benthically. Significant differences were observed with regard to the shape and size of the vegetative cells, heterocysts, and akinetes. Analyses of molecular polymorphisms using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes with the reference strain led to unambiguous differentiation of the isolates as well as understanding of their genetic relationships.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance trends among Salmonella isolates obtained from horses in the northeastern United States (2001-2013).

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kevin J; Perkins, Gillian A; Khatibzadeh, Sarah M; Warnick, Lorin D; Aprea, Victor A; Altier, Craig

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the antimicrobial resistance patterns of Salmonella isolates obtained from horses in the northeastern United States and to identify trends in resistance to select antimicrobials over time. SAMPLE 462 Salmonella isolates from horses. PROCEDURES Retrospective data were collected for all Salmonella isolates obtained from equine specimens that were submitted to the Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2013. Temporal trends in the prevalence of resistant Salmonella isolates were investigated for each of 13 antimicrobials by use of the Cochran-Armitage trend test. RESULTS The prevalence of resistant isolates varied among antimicrobials and ranged from 0% (imipenem) to 51.5% (chloramphenicol). During the observation period, the prevalence of resistant isolates decreased significantly for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefazolin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline and remained negligible for amikacin and enrofloxacin. Of the 337 isolates for which the susceptibility to all 13 antimicrobials was determined, 138 (40.9%) were pansusceptible and 192 (57.0%) were multidrug resistant (resistant to ≥ 3 antimicrobial classes). The most common serovar isolated was Salmonella Newport, and although the annual prevalence of that serovar decreased significantly over time, that decrease had only a minimal effect on the observed antimicrobial resistance trends. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that current antimicrobial use in horses is not promoting the emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella strains in the region served by the laboratory.

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  14. Identification of xanthans isolated from sugarcane juices obtained from scalded plants infected by Xanthomonas albilineans.

    PubMed

    Fontaniella, Blanca; Rodríguez, C W; Piñón, Dolores; Vicente, C; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2002-04-25

    The exudate gum produced by Xanthomonas albilineans, a specific sugarcane pathogen, has been isolated from juices of diseased sugarcane stalks, hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid, and the hydrolysate analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Sucrose. cellobiose, mannose, glucose, glucose-1-P and glucuronic acid were identified as the major components of the polysaccharide isolated from diseased stalks. Juices from healthy stalks contained maltose instead of cellobiose. The chemical nature of this polysaccharide is discussed.

  15. Apoptotic depletion of infiltrating mucosal lymphocytes associated with Fas ligand expression by Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosal epithelium: human glandular stomach as a site of immune privilege.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S

    2000-04-01

    H. pylori infection almost invariably results in chronic gastritis, but only a proportion of patients develops severe destruction of epithelial glandular structure or peptic ulcer. To confirm the recent data obtained in testis and eye, showing that Fas ligand is involved in the phenomenon of "immune privilege," expression of Fas receptor and its ligand of the stomach was investigated in a panel of gastric biopsies obtained from patients H. pylori-positive (N = 42) and with H. pylori-negative (N = 18) by two-color flow cytometry. The results show that membrane-bound Fas ligand protein is constitutively expressed on freshly isolated human gastric mucosal epithelium coupled with infiltrating lymphocytes. There was significant overexpression of Fas receptor and its ligand, and a higher frequency of apoptotic cell death detected by TUNEL in epithelium and infiltrating lymphocytes in H. pylori-infected patients. These findings suggest that involvement of Fas receptor and its ligand system contributes to some extent to mucosal damage in H. pylori-associated gastritis. However, the more specific findings are apoptotic depletion of invading mucosal lymphocytes associated with Fas ligand expression by gastric epithelium. These provide the first direct quantitative evidence to support Fas receptor counterattack and/or paracrine fratricide as a mechanism of immune privilege in vivo in the H. pylori-infected glandular stomach.

  16. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  17. Susceptibilities to antimicrobials and disinfectants in Salmonella isolates obtained from poultry and swine in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Pathanasophon, Pornpen; Khemtong, Sirintip; Wannaprasat, Wechsiri; Padungtod, Pawin

    2008-06-01

    Salmonella enterica isolates from poultry (n=125) and swine (n=132) in Thailand were investigated for antibiotic resistance, susceptibility to disinfectants (benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), zinc chloride and copper sulfate) and cyclohexane tolerance. Forty-two percent were of multiple resistance to antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of all antibiotics against isolates from swine were higher than that against the isolates from poultry. There were generally few variations in MICs to all disinfectants, indicating that the isolates had either no or only a limited degree of developed resistance to the disinfectants tested. Only 5 isolates (1.9%) were tolerant to cyclohexane. The proton-dependent efflux systems did not play a major role in the reduced susceptibility to BKC and CHX, since susceptibility was not restored when an efflux inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was present. Successive exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of BKC and CHX generated mutants resistant to BKC and CHX. A spontaneous BKC-resistant derivative expressed cross-resistance to antibiotics, chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The mechanism responsible for cross-resistance between BKC and antibiotics was not driven by the proton motif force (PMF).

  18. Virulence characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from broiler breeders with salpingitis.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Maria A R; Knöbl, Terezinha; Bottino, José A; Ferreira, Claudete S Astolfi; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2005-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Escherichia coli from broiler breeders with salpingitis were studied. Using the slide agglutination test, the isolates were found to belong to serogroups O1, O2, O5, O36, O45, O53 and O78. Pathogenicity for day-old chicks was determined by air sac inoculation and isolates were categorized as having high, intermediate or low virulence. Growth on iron starvation medium was observed together with aerobactin production. Based on the results of in vitro adherence tests, attachment to oviduct epithelium from old birds was found to be superior to that observed using corresponding material from young birds. DNA hybridization testing for type 1, P, and S fimbriae revealed predominant expression of type 1, correlating with mannose-sensitive hemagglutination using guinea-pig erythrocytes. In this study, P and S fimbriae were not considered to be important adherence factors. Study findings would suggest that, as far as salpingitis is concerned, type 1 fimbriae can play an important role in E. coli infection in breeders. An interesting result to emerge from the study was the observation that E. coli isolates were completely resistant to serum from young breeders, whereas they were completely sensitive using serum from older breeders. Based on serogroups involved, pathogenicity for day-old chicks and virulence indicators, the salpingitis isolates were similar to those from cases of chronic respiratory disease.

  19. Extreme spore UV resistance of Bacillus pumilus isolates obtained from an ultraclean Spacecraft Assembly Facility.

    PubMed

    Link, L; Sawyer, J; Venkateswaran, K; Nicholson, W

    2004-02-01

    Recent environmental microbial sampling of the ultraclean Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL-SAF) identified spores of Bacillus pumilus as major culturable bacterial contaminants found on and around spacecraft. As part of an effort to assess the efficacy of various spacecraft sterilants, purified spores of 10 JPL-SAF B. pumilus isolates were subjected to 254-nm UV and their UV resistance was compared to spores of standard B. subtilis biodosimetry strains. Spores of six of the 10 JPL-SAF isolates were significantly more resistant to UV than the B. subtilis biodosimetry strain, and one of the JPL-SAF isolates, B. pumilus SAFR-032, exhibited the highest degree of spore UV resistance observed by any Bacillus spp. encountered to date.

  20. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  1. Biofilm Formation by Drug Resistant Enterococci Isolates Obtained from Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Manjula; Sood, Shaveta; Sharma, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Enterococci are an important cause of opportunistic nosocomial infections and several multidrug resistant strains have emerged. The severity of periodontal diseases is managed by reduction in the pathogenic bacteria. There is a need to assess the prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of enterococci colonizing the periodontal pocket and correlate its biofilm formation ability because oral biofilms provide a protective environment and are a reservoir of bacterial colonization of the gingival crevice. Aim To investigate possible association between antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm formation in enterococci isolates from chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Dr. Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Punjab University, Chandigarh from January 2015 to October 2015. Sterile paper points were inserted in the periodontal pocket of 100 subjects and put in a transport media. Forty -six isolates were identified as enterococci. The isolates were further examined for their ability to form biofilm by microtitre plate assay and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion method for clinically relevant antibiotics. Results Significant relationship (p<0.001) was found between biofilm production with antibiotic resistance to Vancomycin, Erythromycin, Ciprofloxacin, Tiecoplanin, Amoxycillin and Gentamycin. Conclusion The study demonstrates a high propensity among the isolates of Enterococci to form biofilm and a significant association of biofilm with multiple drug resistance. PMID:28273964

  2. Genome Sequences of 12 Bacterial Isolates Obtained from the Urine of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Cory M.; Deitzler, Grace E.; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Park, SoEun; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The presence of bacteria in urine can pose significant risks during pregnancy. However, there are few reference genome strains for many common urinary bacteria. We isolated 12 urinary strains of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Citrobacter, Gardnerella, and Lactobacillus. These strains and their genomes are now available to the research community. PMID:27688327

  3. Low Helicobacter pylori primary resistance to clarithromycin in gastric biopsy specimens from dyspeptic patients of a city in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and a pump proton inhibitor are the most common drugs recommended as first-line triple therapy for H.pylori treatment, which results in eradication rates close to 80%, varying regionally, principally due to emergency cases and increases of clarithromycin resistant strains. Nucleotide substitutions at the H. pylori domain V of the 23S rRNA fraction are involved in the macrolide resistance and the A2142G and A2143G mutations are predominant in clinical isolates worldwide including in Brazil. As H. pylori culture is fastidious, we investigated the primary occurrence of H. pylori A2142G and A2143G rDNA 23S mutations using a molecular approach directly on gastric biopsies of dyspeptic patients consecutively attended at Hospital das Clinicas of Marilia, São Paulo, Brazil. Methods Biopsy specimens obtained from 1137 dyspeptic patients, were subjected to histopathology and H. pylori diagnosis by histology and PCR. PCR/RFLP assay was used to detect A2142G and A2143G point mutations at domain V of the H. pylori 23S rDNA associated with clarithromycin resistance. Through the developed assay, a 768 bp PCR amplicon corresponding to1728 to 2495 bp of the 23S H. pylori rDNA is restricted with MboII for A2142G mutation detection and with BsaI for A2143G mutation detection. Occurrence of 23S rDNA A2142G results in two DNA fragments (418 and 350 bp) and of 23S rDNA A2143G results in three DNA fragments (108, 310 and 350pb), due to a conserved BsaI restriction site. Results The PCR method used to diagnose H. pylori presented sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 77,6%, 79,3% and 78,6%, respectively, compared to histology, the gold standard method for H. pylori diagnosis used in our routine. Prevalence of H.pylori with clarithromycin resistant genotypes was 2,46%, with predominance of A2143G 23S rDNA point mutation. Conclusions The PCR/RFLP assay was a rapid and accurate H.pylori diagnostic and clarithromycin resistance determination

  4. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  5. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes and Clinical Outcomes in Saudi Patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Two major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA) and the vacuolating toxin (vacA). Since considerable geographic diversity in the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors has been reported, the aim of this work was to determine if there is a significant correlation between different H. pylori virulence genes (cagA and vacA) in 68 patients, from Saudi Arabia, and gastric clinical outcomes. H. pylor was recognized in cultures of gastric biopsies. vacA and cagA genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cagA gene was obtained with 42 isolates (61.8%). The vacA s- and m- region genotypes were determined in all strains studied. Three genotypes were found: s1/m1 (28%), s1/m2 (40%) and s2/m2 (26%). The s2/m1 genotype was not found in this study. The relation of the presence of cagA and the development of cases to gastritis and ulcer was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The study showed a significant correlation between the vacA s1/m2 genotype and gastritis cases, and a significant correlation between vacA s1/m1 genotype and peptic ulcer cases. The results of this study might be used for the identification of high-risk patients who are infected by vacA s1/m1 genotype of H. pylori strains. In conclusion, H. pylori strains of vacA type s1 and the combination of s1/m1 were associated with peptic ulceration and the presence of cagA gene. PMID:22323867

  6. Biocide and antibiotic susceptibility of Salmonella isolates obtained before and after cleaning at six Danish pig slaughterhouses.

    PubMed

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Pedersen, Karl; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2014-07-02

    Salmonella sp. continues to be one of the most important foodborne pathogens. Control measures in terms of cleaning and disinfection on food production plants are very important for limiting the risk of contaminated food products to reach the consumer. In the last decade concern has arisen that bacteria exposed to disinfectants can develop resistance toward disinfectants and can have a higher risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of biocide resistant Salmonella sp. in Danish pig slaughterhouses, to evaluate if there was a correlation between susceptibilities to biocides and antibiotics, and to examine if cleaning and disinfection select isolates with changed susceptibility toward biocides or antibiotics. Salmonella sp. was isolated from the environment in Danish pig slaughterhouses before and after cleaning and disinfection. The susceptibility toward three different biocides, triclosan and two commercial disinfection products: Desinfect Maxi, a quaternary ammonium compound, and Incimaxx DES, an acetic compound, was determined. We found no resistance toward the biocides tested, but we did find that isolates obtained after cleaning had higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values toward one of the disinfectants (Incimaxx DES) compared to isolates obtained before cleaning and disinfection. This could indicate selection of strains that are more tolerant, due to the cleaning and disinfection. Furthermore, we found that there was a weak statistical correlation between MICs toward the biocides and some antibiotics, but no difference in log(MIC)s toward antibiotics between isolates obtained before and after cleaning, nor did we find any difference in the number of resistances of isolates obtained before and after cleaning and disinfection.

  7. Assignment of serotype to Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from poultry and their environment in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pulido-Landínez, M; Sánchez-Ingunza, R; Guard, J; do Nascimento, V Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    To assess diversity of Salmonella enterica serotypes present in poultry and their environment from southern Brazil, the Kauffmann–White–Le Minor (KWL) scheme was used to serotype a total of 155 isolates. Isolates were then re-examined with nested PCR and sequencing of the dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR) region that assesses single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring around a 5S ribosomal gene. Serotypes identified were Heidelberg (40·6%), Enteritidis (34·2%), Hadar (8·4%), Typhimurium (3·9%), Gallinarum (3·2%), Agona (1·3%), Cerro (1·3%), Livingstone (1·3%), Infantis (0·6%), Isangi (0·6%), Mbandaka (0·6%), Montevideo (0·6%) and Senftenberg (0·6%). Three unique ISRs were detected from four strains. Day old chicks yielded only S. Enteritidis, whereas S. Heidelberg was most often associated with poultry carcasses. Overall agreement between KWL and ISR was 85·2%, with disagreement possibly due to the ability of ISR to detect mixtures of serotypes in culture. Overall, ISR provided more information than did KWL about the ecology of Salm. enterica on-farm. The O-antigen group D Salm. enterica serovars such as Pullorum, Gallinarum and Enteritidis appear susceptible to overgrowth by other serotypes. Significance and Impact of the Study Single nucleotide polymorphisms found in a group of poultry-associated Salmonella isolates from southern Brazil provided evidence of mixtures of serovar group D serotypes on-farm and in single samples from birds. This finding suggests that co-infection and interserotype competition of Salmonella enterica in poultry could impact the incidence of disease in animals or humans. In addition, unique serotypes were identified on-farm that escaped characterization by antibody typing. Application of cost-efficient and highly discriminatory genomic methods for assigning serotype may alter concepts about the epidemiology of Salm. enterica on-farm and in foods. PMID:23734786

  8. Study of Helicobacter pylori genotype status in saliva, dental plaques, stool and gastric biopsy samples

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hassan; Souod, Negar; Dabiri, Hossein; Sarshar, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare genotype of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolated from saliva, dental plaques, gastric biopsy, and stool of each patient in order to evaluate the mode of transmission of H. pylori infection. METHODS: This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 300 antral gastric biopsy, saliva, dental plaque and stool samples which were obtained from patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy referred to endoscopy centre of Hajar hospital of Shahrekord, Iran from March 2010 to February 2011. Initially, H. pylori strains were identified by rapid urease test (RUT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied to determine the presence of H. pylori (ureC) and for genotyping of voculating cytotoxin gene A (vacA) and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes in each specimen. Finally the data were analyzed by using statistical formulas such as Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests to find any significant relationship between these genes and patient’s diseases. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of 300 gastric biopsy samples, 77.66% were confirmed to be H. pylori positive by PCR assay while this bacterium were detected in 10.72% of saliva, 71.67% of stool samples. We were not able to find it in dental plaque specimens. The prevalence of H. pylori was 90.47% among patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 80% among patients with gastric cancer, and 74.13% among patients with none ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) by PCR assay. The evaluation of vacA and cagA genes showed 6 differences between gastric biopsy and saliva specimens and 11 differences between gastric and stool specimens. 94.42% of H. pylori positive specimens were cagA positive and all samples had amplified band both for vacA s and m regions. There was significant relationship between vacA s1a/m1a and PUD diseases (P = 0.04), s2/m2 genotype and NUD diseases (P = 0.05). No statically significant relationship was found between cagA status with clinical outcomes and

  9. Isolation and Partial Characterization of an Immunogenic Moiety Obtained from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Venneman, Martin R.; Bigley, Nancy J.

    1969-01-01

    Ribosomal preparations obtained from Salmonella typhimurium by differential centrifugation and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatment of the bacillary lysate were found to be immunogenic in F1 hybrid (C3H/HeJ × DBA/2J) and albino Swiss mice, as determined by progressive host survival. The immunity obtained was independent of the need for adjuvant and dependent on the dosage of immunogen given. Immunizations with the ribosomal preparations induced an immune response comparable to that obtained by vaccination with living organisms and significantly greater than that obtained by immunization with heat-killed salmonellae, purified lipopolysaccharide, or crude and SDS-treated endotoxin preparations. No effect on the immunogenicity of the ribosomal fraction was observed by enzymatic treatment with trypsin, Pronase, deoxyribonuclease, and pancreatic ribonuclease. Linear sucrose density gradient resolution of the preparations showed that the immunogenicity of the ribosomal fraction was not unique to any one of its subcomponents. Ethyl alcohol-precipitated, crude ribonucleic acid preparations obtained from the ribosomal and sucrose density-resolved ribosomal preparations were found to induce an immune response comparable to that obtained by immunization with the entire ribosomal fraction. Dialysis in doubly distilled demineralized water slightly reduced the immunogenicity of the preparation; however, comparable dialysis in 10−4m MgCl2-phosphate buffer did not. Chemical assays of the preparations found to be immunogenic were performed. PMID:4898982

  10. Different distribution of Helicobacter pylori EPIYA- cagA motifs and dupA genes in the upper gastrointestinal diseases and correlation with clinical outcomes in iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Haddadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bazargani, Abdollah; Khashei, Reza; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Moini, Maryam; Rokni Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to determine the EPIYA-cagA Phosphorylation sites and dupA gene in H. pylori isolates among patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases. Background: Pathogenicity of the cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is associated with EPIYA motifs and higher number of EPIYA-C segments is a risk factor of gastric cancer, while duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) is determined as a protective factor against gastric cancer. Patients and methods: A total of 280 non-repeated gastric biopsies obtained from patients undergoing endoscopy from January 2013 till July 2013. Samples were cultured on selective horse blood agar and incubated in microaerophilic atmosphere. The isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori by Gram staining and positive oxidase, catalase, and urease tests. Various motif types of cagA and the prevalence of dupA were determined by PCR method. Results: Out of 280 specimens, 128 (54.7%) isolated organisms were identified as H. pylori. Of 120 H. pylori isolates, 35.9% were dupA positive and 56.26% were cagA positive, while cagA with ABC and ABCC motifs were 55.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Fifty six percent of the isolates with the ABCC motif have had dupA genes. We also found a significant association between strains with genotypes of dupA-ABC and duodenal ulcer disease (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of cagA-positive H. pylori in Shiraz was as high as in western countries and higher numbers of EPIYA-C segments were seen in gastric cancer patients. We may also use dupA as a prognostic and pathogenic marker for duodenal ulcer disease and cagA with the segment C for gastric cancer and gastric ulcer disease in this region. PMID:26171136

  11. [Isolation, identification and serotyping of yeasts obtained from the vaginal fluid in patients with clinical vaginitis].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; González, I; Bellorin, E J; Salazar, W; Mendoza, L; Zambrano, E A; de Albornoz, M C

    1999-03-01

    A study was carried out to determine the presence of Candida in 105 patients with clinical vaginitis who consulted in the Infectious Disease Unit of the Vargas Hospital after referral from Gynecology Service. Yeasts were detected in 23 cases (24%), and identified as C. albicans (12), C. tropicalis (5), C. guilliermondii (3), C. glabrata (2) and C. parapsilosis (1). The presence of hyphae was observed in 50% of the direct examinations, in which the isolated species was C. albicans. These structures were not observed in infections with other species of Candida. In this study, there was relatively little difference between the percentages of serotypes A and B, 58 % and 42, respectively. This is in contrast with previous studies reported in clinical material from Venezuela and other countries, in which serotype A presented a greater incidence than serotype B. Our observations suggest an increase in serotype B C. albicans in vaginal candidiasis.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Imipenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Susceptible Klebsiella variicola Isolates Obtained from the Same Patient.

    PubMed

    Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Moreno-Dominguez, Stephania; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Silva-Sanchez, Jesús; Barrios, Humberto; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Sanchez-Perez, Alejandro; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Sanchez-León, María Carmen; Moncada-Barron, David

    2016-04-01

    Klebsiella variicola, a bacterium closely genetically related to Klebsiella pneumoniae, is commonly misidentified as K. pneumoniae by biochemical tests. To distinguish between the two bacteria, phylogenetic analysis of the rpoB gene and the identification of unique genes in both bacterial species by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provide the means to reliably identify and genotype K. variicola. In recent years, K. variicola has been described both as the cause of an intrahospital outbreak in a pediatric hospital, which resulted in sepsis in inpatients, and as a frequent cause of bloodstream infections. In the present study, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola were isolated from a unique patient displaying different antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes and different genotypes of virulence determinants. Eight clinical isolates were obtained at different time intervals; all during a 5-month period. The isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae by an automated identification system. The clinical (biochemical test) and molecular (multiplex-PCR and rpoB gene) characterization identified imipenem resistance in the first six K. pneumoniae ST258 isolates, which encode the SHV-12 cephalosporinase and KPC-3 carbapenemase genes. The two last remaining isolates corresponded to susceptible K. variicola. The bacterial species showed a specific profile of virulence-associated determinants, specifically the fimA, fimH, and ecpRAB fimbrial-encoding genes identified only in K. pneumoniae isolates. However, the entb (enterobactin), mrkD (fimbrial adhesin), uge (epimerase), ureA (urease), and wabG (transferase) genes were shared between both bacterial species. Recent studies attribute a higher mortality rate to K. variicola than to K. pneumonia. This work highlights the identification of K. pneumoniae and the closely related K. variicola isolated from the same patient. The value of distinguishing between these two bacterial species is in their clinical significance, their

  13. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of Acinetobacter Clinical Isolates Obtained from Inmates of California Correctional Facilities▿†

    PubMed Central

    Golanbar, Galarah D.; Lam, Christopher K.; Chu, Yi-Ming; Cueva, Carla; Tan, Stephanie W.; Silva, Isba; Xu, H. Howard

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. increasingly have been wreaking havoc in hospitals and communities worldwide. Although much has been reported regarding Acinetobacter isolates responsible for nosocomial infections, little is known about these organisms in correctional facilities. In this study, we performed species identification, examined the antibiotic resistance profiles, and determined the mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships of 123 Acinetobacter isolates obtained from inmates of 20 California correctional facilities (CCFs). We found that 57.7% of the isolates belong to A. baumannii, followed by isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 3 (gen. sp. 3; 23.6%) and of Acinetobacter gen. sp. 13TU (10.6%). Multidrug-resistant (MDR) CCF isolates were found in only six CCFs. Additionally, DNA sequences of gyrA and parC genes were consistent with fluoroquinolone (FQ) susceptibility phenotypes. Furthermore, the presence of class 1 integrons was detected in 15 CCF isolates, all of which are MDR. Integron-associated gene cassettes encode several aminoglycoside modification enzymes, which correlate with most of the aminoglycoside-resistant phenotypes. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the presence of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine indicated the involvement of efflux pumps in the FQ resistance of only a few CCF isolates. Finally, genetic profiling showed that there was no evidence of A. baumannii outbreaks in CCFs. Instead, our analyses revealed only limited clonal dissemination of mostly non-MDR A. baumannii strains in a few facilities. This study represents the first report to characterize phenotypic and molecular features of Acinetobacter isolates in correctional facilities, which provides a baseline for monitoring the antimicrobial resistance changes and dissemination patterns of these organisms in such specialized institutions. PMID:21450955

  14. Heliobactor pylori Virulence Factors and Their Role in Pathogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-25

    pylori infection in children living in communal apartments as compared to children with traditional families (212). Transmission is also thought...isolated from the stomach and dental plaque (56, 99, 318). However, the rate of isolation of H. pylori from dental plaque is extremely low (39, 54, 56...99, 318), and PCR detection rates in dental plaque vary (224). Interestingly, dental workers do not have an increased rate of infection (194, 207

  15. CAMP-reaction among skin isolates obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema.

    PubMed

    Brückler, J; Wibawan, I W; Lämmler, C

    1990-12-01

    The primary culture of a clinical specimen obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema revealed 3 different bacterial cultures. Two of these cultures, a beta-hemolytic Staphylococcus aureus and a group B streptococcal culture, demonstrated synergistic hemolytic activities on this primary culture plate. The group B streptococcus had the serotype surface antigens Ib/c, protein antigen c in its c beta component.

  16. Metronidazole susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori: comparison of disk, broth, and agar dilution methods and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    DeCross, A J; Marshall, B J; McCallum, R W; Hoffman, S R; Barrett, L J; Guerrant, R L

    1993-01-01

    Since the methods for metronidazole susceptibility testing of Helicobacter pylori have not been standardized or validated, we compared three methods that are used to test the metronidazole susceptibilities of 25 isolates of H. pylori. Specifically, we examined the methods of Steer's replicator agar dilution, tube broth microdilution, and modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion. The metronidazole disk zone sizes obtained by the disk diffusion method correlated well (r = 0.74) with the MICs obtained by the agar dilution method. Afterward, the disk diffusion method was used to characterize the metronidazole susceptibilities of 44 isolates of H. pylori. Dual therapy (bismuth and metronidazole) proved to be highly effective against metronidazole-susceptible strains (81.6% eradication rate) but fared poorly against resistant strains (16.7% eradication rate; P < 0.01). Using agar dilution testing, we validated the modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method for metronidazole susceptibility testing of H. pylori and conclude that it is practical, accurate, and clinically applicable. PMID:8370723

  17. Isolation and characterization of starch obtained from Brosimum alicastrum Swarts seeds.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pacheco, E; Moo-Huchin, V M; Estrada-León, R J; Ortiz-Fernández, A; May-Hernández, L H; Ríos-Soberanis, C R; Betancur-Ancona, D

    2014-01-30

    In this paper, the Ramon starch was isolated and its chemical composition and physical and microscopic characteristics were determined. Corn starch was used as reference. In general, the proximal composition was similar between starches studied. Ramon starch granules were oval-spherical and rounded with sizes between 6.5 and 15 μm. Starch purity was high (92.57%) with amylose content of 25.36%. The gelatinization temperature was 83.05°C and transition enthalpy was 21.423 J/g. At 90°C, solubility was 20.42%, swelling power 17.64 g water/gstarch and water absorption capacity was 13 gwater/gstarch. The pH, clarity and color (Hue angle) of Ramon starch were higher to those reported for corn starch. The results achieved suggest that Ramon starch has potential for application in food systems requiring high processing temperatures and it is also a promising option for use in the manufacture of biodegradable materials.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Diversity Evolving in Helicobacter pylori Communities through Genetic Modifications in Fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Skoglund, Anna; Moran, Anthony P.; Annuk, Heidi; Engstrand, Lars; Normark, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the gastric mucosa of half the human population. It is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial organisms and subvariants are continuously emerging within an H. pylori population. In this study we characterized a number of single-colony isolates from H. pylori communities in various environmental settings, namely persistent human gastric infection, in vitro bacterial subcultures on agar medium, and experimental in vivo infection in mice. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen chain revealed considerable phenotypic diversity between individual cells in the studied bacterial communities, as demonstrated by size variable O-antigen chains and different levels of Lewis glycosylation. Absence of high-molecular-weight O-antigen chains was notable in a number of experimentally passaged isolates in vitro and in vivo. This phenotype was not evident in bacteria obtained from a human gastric biopsy, where all cells expressed high-molecular-weight O-antigen chains, which thus may be the preferred phenotype for H. pylori colonizing human gastric mucosa. Genotypic variability was monitored in the two genes encoding α1,3-fucosyltransferases, futA and futB, that are involved in Lewis antigen expression. Genetic modifications that could be attributable to recombination events within and between the two genes were commonly detected and created a diversity, which together with phase variation, contributed to divergent LPS expression. Our data suggest that the surrounding environment imposes a selective pressure on H. pylori to express certain LPS phenotypes. Thus, the milieu in a host will select for bacterial variants with particular characteristics that facilitate adaptation and survival in the gastric mucosa of that individual, and will shape the bacterial community structure. PMID:19043574

  19. Characterization and molecular analysis of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae clinical isolates obtained in Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Mayumi; Narita, Mitsuo; Okazaki, Norio; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Suzuki, Isao; Andoh, Tomoaki; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Yuko; Horino, Atsuko; Shintani, Miharu; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Sasaki, Tsuguo

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains that are clinically resistant to macrolide antibiotics have occasionally been encountered in Japan. Of 76 strains of M. pneumoniae isolated in three different areas in Japan during 2000 to 2003, 13 strains were erythromycin (ERY) resistant. Of these 13 strains, 12 were highly ERY resistant (MIC, > or =256 microg/ml) and 1 was weakly resistant (MIC, 8 microg/ml). Nucleotide sequencing of domains II and V of 23S rRNA and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22, which are associated with ERY resistance, showed that 10 strains had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (corresponding to 2058 in Escherichia coli numbering), 1 strain showed A-to-C transversion at position 2063, 1 strain showed an A-to-G transition at position 2064, and the weakly ERY-resistant strain showed C-to-G transversion at position 2617 (corresponding to 2611 in E. coli numbering) of domain V. Domain II and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 were not involved in the ERY resistance of these clinical M. pneumoniae strains. In addition, by using our established restriction fragment length polymorphism technique to detect point mutations of PCR products for domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of M. pneumoniae, we found that 23 (24%) of 94 PCR-positive oral samples taken from children with respiratory infections showed A2063G mutation. These results suggest that ERY-resistant M. pneumoniae infection is not unusual in Japan.

  20. Isolation and characterization of nicotiflorin obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of two precursors in tea seed extract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang-Bok; Kim, Eun-Ki; Park, Sang-Jae; Bang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Tae Gil; Chung, Dae-Won

    2010-04-28

    Two flavonol triglycosides, camelliaside A (CamA) and camelliaside B (CamB), of tea seed extract (TSE) were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis. Among five kinds of glycosidases investigated, beta-galactosidase (Gal) induced selective hydrolysis of CamA. On the other hand, pectinase (Pec) and cellulase (Cel) induced hydrolysis of CamB. For Gal and Pec, only kaempferol diglycoside (nicotiflorin, NF) was produced; on the other hand, significant amounts of kaempferol monoglycoside (astragalin, AS) and kaempferol (KR) were also detected for Cel. The combination of the use of Gal and Pec in the enzymatic hydrolysis of TSE afforded NF with high specificity. Crude NF with 22% purity was recovered from the enzymatic reaction mixture by extraction with organic solvent, and pure NF with >95% purity was obtained by crystallized in water. The chemical structure of NF was confirmed by (1)H and (13)C NMR analyses.

  1. Bacteriology and taxonomy of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Windsor, H M; O'Rourke, J

    2000-09-01

    As the scientific community approaches the twentieth anniversary of the first isolation of H. pylori, it appears that despite the wealth of articles published in journals throughout the world every month, there are still many unanswered questions about the microbiology of this bacterium and others in the genus Helicobacter.

  2. Structural characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Štefanić, Zoran; Mikleušević, Goran; Luić, Marija; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Ašler, Ivana Leščić

    2017-03-20

    Microaerophilic bacterium Helicobacer pylori is a well known human pathogen involved in the development of many diseases. Due to the evergrowing infection rate and increase of H. pylori antibiotic resistence, it is of utmost importance to find a new way to attack and eradicate H. pylori. The purine metabolism in H. pylori is solely dependant on the salvage pathway and one of the key enzymes in this pathway is purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). In this timely context, we report here the basic biochemical and structural characterization of recombinant PNP from the H. pylori clinical isolate expressed in Escherichia coli. Structure of H. pylori PNP is typical for high molecular mass PNPs. However, its activity towards adenosine is very low, thus resembling more that of low molecular mass PNPs. Understanding the molecular mechanism of this key enzyme may lead to the development of new drug strategies and help in the eradication of H. pylori.

  3. Binding of isolated plant lectin by rhizobia during episodes of reduced gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. L.; Green, P. D.; Wong, P. P.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Development of a legume root nodule is a complex process culminating in a plant/bacterial symbiosis possessing the capacity for biological dinitrogen fixation. Formation of root nodules is initiated by the binding and stabilization of rhizobia to plant root hairs, mediated in part by a receptor/ligand recognition system composed of lectins on the plant root surface and lectin-binding sites on the rhizobial cell surface. The dinitrogen fixation activity of these root nodules may be an important feature of enclosed, space-based life support systems, and may provide an ecological method to recycle nitrogen for amino acid production. However, the effects on nodule development of varied gravitational fields, or of root nutrient delivery hardware, remain unknown. We have investigated the effects of microgravity on root nodule formation, with preliminary experiments focused upon the receptor/ligand component. Microgravity, obtained during parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, has no apparent effect on the binding of purified lectin to rhizobia, a result that will facilitate forthcoming experiments using intact root tissues.

  4. Natural maternal transmission of H pylori in Mongolian gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Uk; Kim, Okjin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate maternal H pylori infection status to determine the potential of maternal transmission. METHODS: In the present study, we examined these issues in an experimental murine model, which is a Mongolian gerbil model that has been reported as an optimal laboratory animal model to study H pylori. Pregnant Mongolian gerbils, infected experimentally with H pylori, were divided into as four groups. Following the experimental design, the stomachs of the mother and litters were isolated and assessed for transmission of H pylori at the prenatal period, parturition day, 1-wk old and 3-wk old respectively. Bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to examine the presence of transmitted H pylori. RESULTS: All litters showed no transmission of H pylori during pregnancy and at parturition day. However, they revealed 33.3% and 69.6% at 1-wk and 3-wk of age respectively by PCR. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that vertical infection during the prenatal period or delivery procedure is unlikely as a route of mother-to-child H pylori infection. It may be that H pylori is acquired through breast-feeding, contaminated saliva and fecal-oral transmission during co-habitation. PMID:17007019

  5. Standardization of disk diffusion test and its clinical significance for susceptibility testing of metronidazole against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, H; Keane, C T; Beattie, S; O'Morain, C A

    1994-01-01

    Susceptibilities of 121 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains to metronidazole were determined by both a 5-micrograms metronidazole disk diffusion test and a plate dilution method in duplicate and after different periods of incubation. The distribution of MICs of metronidazole against H. pylori among the strains was found to be bimodal. The diameters of inhibitory zones obtained by the disk diffusion test and the MICs obtained by the plate dilution method correlated well, especially after 4 days of incubation (r = 0.77). An inhibitory zone diameter of 20 mm was found to correspond to a MIC of 8 micrograms/ml and is recommended as a suitable zone for differentiating susceptibility and resistance with a 5-micrograms metronidazole disk. Three interpretive categories of susceptibility results were defined; strains with inhibitory zone diameters of more than 26 mm were defined as susceptible (MIC, < 4 micrograms/ml), strains with zone diameters of 20 to 26 mm were deemed intermediate (MIC, 4 to 8 micrograms/ml), and those with zone diameters of less than 20 mm were deemed resistant (MIC, > 8 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, 76 H. pylori-positive patients with duodenal ulcers or nonulcer dyspepsia were treated with a 1 week of triple therapy (colloidal bismuth subcitrate, metronidazole, and tetracycline). H. pylori strains were isolated before treatment from antral biopsies from those patients, and the metronidazole susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the disk diffusion test. H. pylori status was evaluated again 4 weeks after completion of treatment. The eradication rates for susceptible, intermediate, and resistant strains were 95.9% (47 of 49), 62.5% (5 of 8), and 52.6% (10 of 19), respectively. It is included that the 5-micrograms disk diffusion test is easy to perform and gives final results similar to those of the plate dilution method. The three interpretive categories of susceptibility may be of benefit for clinical choice of chemotherapy in eradicating

  6. Identification of cagA tyrosine phosphorylation DNA motifs in Helicobacter pylori isolates from peptic ulcer patients by novel PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and real-time fluorescence PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robert J; Sharp, Sally I; Chisholm, Stephanie A; Rijpkema, Sjoerd

    2003-07-01

    Cag pathogenicity island-containing Helicobacter pylori (type I) induces signal transduction pathways resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins adjacent to the site of bacterial adhesion on host gastric epithelial cells. Conventional block PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and real-time LightCycler (LC) PCR hybridization assays, validated by direct sequencing, were designed to test for the presence of three nucleotide sequences corresponding to tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) A, B, and C in 84 isolates of H. pylori type I from patients in England. Overall, the PCR assays demonstrated that one or more TPMs were present in 62 strains (75%). Motif A was common (71% of strains), whereas motifs B and C were rarer (8% of strains). Strains lacking a TPM were typically vacuolating cytotoxin genotype vacA m2. Motif A was widely distributed in relation to disease severity and was more commonly (but not significantly [P = 0.071]) associated with gastric ulcer than with duodenal ulcer (86 versus 56%). The LC hybridization assay provided a rapid means of detecting all three motifs, but RFLP analysis was more specific for TPM-A. TPMs provide novel additional strain markers for defining cagA variation, including identification of RFLP types within TPM-A. The presence of a particular TPM was not of direct diagnostic value, either singly or in combination, but the higher proportion of TPM-A strains in gastric ulcer patients merits further investigation.

  7. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health.

  8. High Efficacy of Finafloxacin on Helicobacter pylori Isolates at pH 5.0 Compared with That of Other Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Won; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Kim, Jung Mogg; Park, Jong Youn; Lee, Sun Min; Kim, Joo Sung; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-01-01

    Finafloxacin is a novel fluoroquinolone with improved antimicrobial efficacy, especially in an acidic environment. The efficacy of finafloxacin for the inhibition of Helicobacter pylori infection was compared with the efficacies of levofloxacin and moxifloxacin at neutral and acidic pH. The impacts of gyrA point mutation on the efficacy of those three fluoroquinolones were also investigated. A total of 128 clinical H. pylori strains were utilized. MICs of levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and finafloxacin were determined at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0 by the agar dilution method. The impact of gyrA point mutations that are responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance was analyzed; the results showed 50 strains with an Asn-87 point mutation, 48 strains with an Asp-91 point mutation, and the remaining 30 strains with no gyrA mutations. The use of finafloxacin led to MIC values at pH 5.0 that were lower than the values seen at pH 7.0 for 112 strains (112/128, 87.5%), and this proportion was higher than that seen with moxifloxacin (21/128, 16.4%, P < 0.001). Finafloxacin also demonstrated a rate of susceptibility (MIC, <1 μg/ml) (37.5%, 48/128) at pH 5.0 that was higher than that seen with moxifloxacin (2.3%, 3/128) (P < 0.001). The trends were similar regardless of which of the Asn-87, Asp-91, and A2143 point mutations were present. In conclusion, the superior antimicrobial efficacy of finafloxacin against H. pylori in an acidic environment suggests the possible use of finafloxacin for treatment of H. pylori infection, as has been proposed by its developer, Merlion Pharma. PMID:26416863

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori isolates from Brazilian children and adolescents: comparing agar dilution, E-test, and disk diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Silvio Kazuo; Gales, Ana Cristina; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Helicobacter pylori is increasingly important due to resistance to the most used antimicrobials agents. Only agar dilution method is approved by CLSI, but it is difficult to perform routinely. We evaluated the reliability of E-test and disk diffusion comparing to agar dilution method on Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Susceptibility testing was performed for amoxicillin, clarithromycin, furazolidone, metronidazole and tetracycline using E-test, disk-diffusion and agar dilution method in 77 consecutive Helicobacter pylori strains from dyspeptic children and adolescents. Resistance rates were: amoxicillin - 10.4%, 9% and 68.8%; clarithromycin - 19.5%, 20.8%, 36.3%; metronidazole - 40.2%33.7%, 38.9%, respectively by agar dilution, E-test and disk diffusion method. Furazolidone and tetracycline showed no resistance rates. Metronidazole presented strong correlation to E-test (r = 0.7992, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.6962, p < 0.0001). Clarithromycin presented moderate correlation to E-test (r = 0.6369, p < 0.0001) and disk diffusion method (r=-0.5656, p < 0.0001). Amoxicillin presented weak correlation to E-test (r = 0.3565, p = 0.0015) and disk diffusion (r=-0.3565, p = 0.0015). Tetracycline presented weak correlation with E-test (r = 0.2346, p = 0.04) and furazolidone to disk diffusion (r=-0.0288, p = 0.8038). E-test presented better agreement with gold standard. It is an easy and reliable method for Helicobacter pylori susceptibility testing. Disk diffusion method presented high disagreement and high rates of major errors.

  10. In vitro antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus casei against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Enany, Shymaa; Abdalla, Salah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic infections in humans. Curing H. pylori infection is difficult because of the habitat of the organism below the mucus adherent layer of gastric mucosa. Lactobacilli are known as acid-resistant bacteria and can remain in stomach for a long time than any other organism, we aimed in this study to examine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei as a probiotic against H. pylori in humans. Particularly, L. casei was opted as it is considered to be one of the widely used probiotics in dairy products. One hundred and seven strains of H. pylori were isolated from dyspeptic patients and were tested for their antibiotic susceptibility to metronidazole (MTZ), clarithromycin (CLR), tetracycline (TET), and amoxicillin (AMX) by the disc diffusion method. The strains were examined for their susceptibility toward L. casei - present in fermented milk products - by well diffusion method. It was found that 74.7% strains were resistant to MTZ; 1.8% to MTZ, TET, and CLR; 3.7% to MTZ and CLR; 4.6% to MTZ and TET; and 0.9% were resistant to MTZ, TET, and AMX. The antibacterial activity of L. casei against H. pylori was determined on all the tested H. pylori isolates including antibiotic resistant strains with different patterns. Our study proposed the use of probiotics for the treatment of H. pylori infection as an effective approach. PMID:26691482

  11. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  12. Helicobacter pylori: A Possible Risk Factor for Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yun Hee; Gwak, Jong Seop; Hong, Sung Woo; Hyeon, Jung Hyeon; Lee, Cheol Min; Oh, Seung Won

    2015-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection may cause systemic inflammation and increase the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6. Unfortunately, bone mineral density also may be affected by these cytokines. This study aimed to evaluate the association between bone mineral density and H. pylori infection. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluated 1,126 men undergoing a comprehensive health screening in a private Korean screening center. Subjects' sera were tested for H. pylori antibodies (immunoglobulin G) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and bone mineral densities (g/cm2) of the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur were obtained using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. To evaluate the difference in bone mineral density according to H. pylori infection status, the adjusted mean bone mineral densities at each site were compared after adjusting for potential confounders, including age, sex, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, and exercise. Results H. pylori infection was associated with a significant decrease in mean lumbar bone mineral density (H. pylori-positive, 1.190 g/cm2; H. pylori-negative, 1.219 g/cm2; P=0.006), which was greatest among men who were ≥50 years old (H. pylori-positive, 1.193 g/cm2; H. pylori-negative, 1.233 g/cm2; P=0.006). However, no significant association was observed in the bone mineral densities of the total femur and femoral neck. Conclusion In men, H. pylori infection was negatively associated with lumbar bone mineral density. This association may be useful in the early detection, prevention, and management of male osteoporosis. PMID:26435815

  13. Classification of Austrian rhizobia and the Mexican isolate FL27 obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris L. as Rhizobium gallicum.

    PubMed

    Sessitsch, A; Ramírez-Saad, H; Hardarson, G; Akkermans, A D; de Vos, W M

    1997-10-01

    The phylogenetic positions of four rhizobial strains obtained from nodules of common bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in an Austrian soil and of the Mexican bean isolate FL27 are described. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes revealed sequences almost identical to that of the Rhizobium gallicum type strain, R602sp, with a maximum of two nucleotide substitutions. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences with those from other bacteria indicated highest similarity to Rhizobium sp. strain OK-50, Rhizobium leguminosarum IAM 12609, and Rhizobium etli. DNA homology determined by DNA-DNA hybridization was high among the Austrian isolates and R602spT (45 to 90%) and ranged from 21 to 65% with FL27, but hybridization analysis revealed very low homology to the recognized common bean-nodulating species, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli, R. etli, and Rhizobium tropici. Ribosomal gene organization was studied by Southern hybridization with the 16S rRNA gene and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, indicating identical organizations and the presence of three identical 16S rRNA copies in the genome of this species. The six strains investigated showed different plasmid profiles based on their geographical origins. We propose that the Austrian isolates and the Mexican strain FL27 are members of the species R. gallicum.

  14. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  15. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of plant extracts traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Laura Lúcia; Monteiro, Cristina Leise Bastos; Miguel, Marilis Dallarmi; Miguel, Obdulio Gomes; Cunico, Miriam Machado; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; de Camargo, Eloá Ramalho; Kussen, Gislene Maria Botão; Nogueira, Keite da Silva; Costa, Libera Maria Dalla

    2010-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of plant extracts obtained from Bixa orellana L., Chamomilla recutita L., Ilex paraguariensis A. St.-Hil., Malva sylvestris L., Plantago major L. and Rheum rhaponticum L. has been evaluated against two reference strains and eleven clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. All the plant species chosen are used in popular Brazilian cuisine and folk medicine in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Initial screening was made by the disk diffusion test and then minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the agar dilution method. The results presented in this work demonstrated that among the plant preparations analyzed, B. orellana L., C. recutita L., I. paraguariensis A. St.-Hil. and M. sylvestris L. were capable of inhibiting the in vitro growth of H. pylori. PMID:24031496

  16. Helicobacter pylori invades the gastric mucosa and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Uchida, Keisuke; Takemura, Tamiko; Nagaoka, Sakae; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Ishige, Ikuo; Ishige, Yuki; Ishida, Noriko; Furukawa, Asuka; Muraoka, Hiroe; Ikeda, Satoshi; Sekine, Masaki; Ando, Noboru; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Takashige; Eishi, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been considered to be non-invasive and to rarely infiltrate the gastric mucosa, even though there is an active Th1 immune response in the lamina propria of the H. pylori-infected stomach. To elucidate whether H. pylori invades the lamina propria and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes, we examined H. pylori in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of stomach and gastric lymph nodes obtained from 51 cancer patients using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with a novel anti-H. pylori monoclonal antibody that recognizes lipopolysaccharides. Fresh gastric lymph nodes were used to culture for H. pylori. In 46 patients with H. pylori in the stomach, the bacterium was found in the lymph nodes from 21 patients by culture, 37 patients by PCR, and 29 patients by IHC. H. pylori captured by macrophages was found in the lamina propria of 39 patients. In the lymph nodes, the bacterium was found in many macrophages and a few interdigitating dendritic cells at the paracortical areas. H. pylori was also found in the intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells in 21 patients, but intracytoplasmic invasion into gastric epithelial cells was not identified. When compared to the commercially available anti-H. pylori antibodies, the novel antibody showed the highest sensitivity to detect H. pylori-positive macrophages, whereas no difference was found for H. pylori in the mucous layer. The H. pylori-positive macrophages in the lamina propria correlated with chronic gastritis as well as translocation of such cells to the lymph nodes. These results suggest that H. pylori-induced gastric epithelial damage allows the bacteria to invade the lamina propria and translocate to the gastric lymph nodes, which may chronically stimulate the immune system. The bacteria captured by macrophages, whether remaining alive or not, may contribute to the induction and development of H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis.

  17. Using Macro-Arrays to Study Routes of Infection of Helicobacter pylori in Three Families

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Josette; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Kalach, Nicolas; Bergeret, Michel; Dupont, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Background Analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of Helicobacter pylori allowed tracing the spread of infection through populations on different continents but transmission pathways between individual humans have not been clearly described. Materials and Methods To investigate person-to-person transmission, we studied three families each including one child with persistence of symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Ten isolates from the antrum and corpus of stomach of each family member were analyzed both by sequencing of two housekeeping genes and macroarray tests. Results A total of 134 (8.4%) out of the 1590 coding sequences (CDSs) tested, including cag PAI and insertion sequences, were present in some but not all isolates (and are therefore defined as variable CDSs). Most of the variable CDSs encoded proteins of unknown function (76/134) or were selfish DNA including that encoding restriction/modification enzymes (13/134). Isolates colonizing the stomach of one individual can vary by point mutations, as seen in hspA, or by the gain or loss of one to five CDSs. They were considered as (genetic) variants. The phylogenetic clustering of gene profiles obtained on macro-arrays allowed identifying the different strains infecting families. Two to five strains circulated within a family. Identical strains were present in at least two members of all three families supporting the accepted model of intrafamilial transmission. Surprisingly, the mother was not implicated in the transmission of H. pylori in the two French families. Sibling-to-sibling transmission and acquisition of H. pylori from outside the family appeared to be probable in the transmission pathways. Conclusion Macroarray analysis based on previously selected CDSs gives a comprehensive view of the genome diversity of a pathogen. This approach combined with information on the origin of the hspA and glmM alleles revealed that Helicobacter pylori infection may be acquired by more diverse routes than previously

  18. Genotyping of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma in Iranian Patients with Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Hossein; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Fazeli, Maryam; Azad, Mehdi; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection as a serious problem in both adults and children can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and possibly gastric cancer. The aim of the current study was to survey antibiotic resistance and also to determine influence of PPARγ polymorphism in patients with H. pylori infection. During an 11-month-period, 98 H. pylori isolates were collected from 104 biopsy specimens. In vitro susceptibility of H. pylori isolates to 4 antimicrobial agents metronidazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline were assessed by quantitative method according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) guideline. PPARγ polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. The frequency of H. pylori infection in our study was 94.2%. In vitro susceptibility data showed that highest level of resistance was related to metronidazole (66.3%), and the majority of H. pylori isolates were highly susceptible to amoxicillin and tetracycline (94.9% and 96.9%, respectively). Genotypic frequencies were 25.5% for CC (Pro12Pro), 40.8% for GC (Pro12Ala) and 33.7% for GG (Ala12Ala). In our study, CG genotype had highest distributions among infected patients with H. pylori. The study suggests that the PPAR-γ Pro12Ala polymorphism could be evaluated as a potential genetic marker for susceptibility to gastric cancer in the presence of H. pylori infection.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  20. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 biopsies diagnosed as oral ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral primary lymphoma were selected from the archives of the Pathology Department. Thirty-two samples that were diagnosed as being without any pathological changes were selected as the control group. All the paraffin blocks were cut for hematoxylin and eosin staining to confirm the diagnoses and then the samples were prepared for immunohistochemistry staining. Data were collected and analyzed. Results. Chi-squared test showed significant differences between the frequency of H. pylori positivity in normal tissue and the lesions were examined (P=0.000). In addition, there was a statistically significant difference between the lesions examined (P=0.042). Chi-squared test showed significant differences between H. pylori positivity and different tissue types except inside the muscle layer as follows: in epithelium and in lamina propria (P=0.000), inside the blood vessels (P=0.003), inside the salivary gland duct (P=0.036), and muscle layer (P=0.122). Conclusion. There might be a relation between the presence of H. pylori and oral lesions. Therefore, early detection and eradication of H. pylori in high-risk patients are suggested. PMID:24578822

  1. Structure, function and localization of Helicobacter pylori urease.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B. E.; Phadnis, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of most cases of gastritis. Once acquired, H. pylori establishes chronic persistent infection; it is this long-term infection that, is a subset of patients, leads to gastric or duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer or gastric MALT lymphoma. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which is essential to survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A significant fraction of urease is associated with the surface of H. pylori both in vivo and in vitro. Surface-associated urease is essential for H. pylori to resist exposure to acid in the presence of urea. The mechanism whereby urease becomes associated with the surface of H. pylori is unique. This process, which we term "altruistic autolysis," involves release of urease (and other cytoplasmic proteins) by genetically programmed autolysis with subsequent adsorption of the released urease onto the surface of neighboring intact bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of essential communal behavior in pathogenic bacteria; such behavior is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:10378351

  2. Persistence of Helicobacter pylori in heterotrophic drinking-water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Azevedo, N F; Wilks, S A; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2008-10-01

    Although the route of transmission of Helicobacter pylori remains unknown, drinking water has been considered a possible transmission vector. It has been shown previously that, in water, biofilms are a protective niche for several pathogens, protecting them from stressful conditions, such as low carbon concentration, shear stress, and less-than-optimal temperatures. In this work, the influence of these three parameters on the persistence and cultivability of H. pylori in drinking-water biofilms was studied. Autochthonous biofilm consortia were formed in a two-stage chemostat system and then inoculated with the pathogen. Total numbers of H. pylori cells were determined by microscopy using a specific H. pylori 16S rRNA peptide nucleic acid probe, whereas cultivable cells were assessed by standard plating onto selective H. pylori medium. Cultivable H. pylori could not be detected at any time point, but the ability of H. pylori cells to incorporate, undergo morphological transformations, persist, and even agglomerate in biofilms for at least 31 days without a noticeable decrease in the total cell number (on average, the concentration was between 1.54 x 10(6) and 2.25 x 10(6) cells cm(-2)) or in the intracellular rRNA content may indicate that the loss of cultivability was due to entry into a viable but noncultivable state. Unlike previous results obtained for pure-culture H. pylori biofilms, shear stress did not negatively influence the numbers of H. pylori cells attached, suggesting that the autochthonous aquatic bacteria have an important role in retaining this pathogen in the sessile state, possibly by providing suitable microaerophilic environments or linking biomolecules to which the pathogen adheres. Therefore, biofilms appear to provide not only a safe haven for H. pylori but also a concentration mechanism so that subsequent sloughing releases a concentrated bolus of cells that might be infectious and that could escape routine grab sample microbiological

  3. Effect of replacement of corn starch by whey protein isolate in biodegradable film blends obtained by extrusion.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Viviane Machado; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Marconcini, José Manoel; Yoshida, Maria Irene; Neto, Alfredo Rodrigues Sena; Pereira, Tamara Coelho; Pereira, Camila Ferreira Gonçalves

    2017-02-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing corn starch by whey protein isolated (WPI) in biodegradable polymer blends developed by extrusion. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of a Vh-type crystalline arrangement. The films were homogeneous, indicating strong interfacial adhesion between the protein and the thermoplastic starch matrix (TPS) as observed in scanning electron microscopy. The addition of WPI on TPS matrix promoted an increase in the thermal stability of the materials. It was observed 58.5% decrease in the water vapor permeability. The effect of corn starch substitution by WPI on mechanical properties resulted in a more resistant and less flexible film when compared the TPS film. The addition of WPI caused greenish yellow color and less transparent films. The substitution of corn starch by WPI made it possible to obtain polymer blends with improved properties and represents an innovation for application as a packaging material.

  4. Development of a Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection that Mimics Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Marta; Arico, Beatrice; Burroni, Daniela; Figura, Natale; Rappuoli, Rino; Ghiara, Paolo

    1995-03-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in vivo was studied by adapting fresh clinical isolates of bacteria to colonize the stomachs of mice. A gastric pathology resembling human disease was observed in infections with cytotoxin-producing strains but not with noncytotoxic strains. Oral immunization with purified H. pylori antigens protected mice from bacterial infection. This mouse model will allow the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against H. pylori infection in humans.

  5. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... special substance that has urea. Urea is a waste product the body produces as it breaks down protein. The urea used in the test has been made harmlessly radioactive. If H. pylori are present, the bacteria convert ...

  6. Optimizing enrichment culture conditions for detecting Helicobacter pylori in foods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiuping; Doyle, Michael P

    2002-12-01

    The survival and growth of Helicobacter pylori under enrichment conditions in fresh, autoclaved and irradiated ground beef were determined. H. pylori grew in autoclaved ground beef at 37 degrees C under microaerobic conditions in brain heart infusion broth with 7% horse serum at pH 7.3 after 3 to 7 days of lag time but did not grow within 7 days in irradiated (10 kGy) ground beef under the same enrichment conditions. Adjustment of the enrichment broth to pH 5.5 enabled the growth (ca. 2 log10 CFU/ml) of H. pylori within 7 days in the presence of irradiated ground beef and the prolific growth (ca. 3 to 4 log10 CFU/ml) of H. pylori within 3 days in the presence of autoclaved beef. H. pylori in fresh ground beef could not be isolated from enrichment media with antibiotics; however. H. pylori ureA could be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in such enrichment media after 1 to 3 days of incubation at 37 degrees C. The addition of supplements, i.e., 0.3% mucin, 0.05% ferrous sulfate, and 0.05% sodium pyruvate or 0.008 M urea, or the adjustment of the enrichment broth pH to 5.5 or 4.5 enabled the detection of H. pylori ureA in enrichment media incubated for 1, 2, 3, and/or 7 days at 37 degrees C. H. pylori in sterile milk refrigerated at 4 degrees C at an initial level of 10(6) CFU/ml was inactivated to an undetectable level within 6 days; however, H. pylori was not detected either by a PCR assay or by the plating of enrichment cultures of 120 raw bovine milk samples.

  7. The antimicrobial effects and metabolomic footprinting of carboxyl-capped bismuth nanoparticles against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Nazari, P; Dowlatabadi-Bazaz, R; Mofid, M R; Pourmand, M R; Daryani, N E; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Shahverdi, A R

    2014-01-01

    Organic salts of bismuth are currently used as antimicrobial agents against Helicobacter pylori. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of elemental bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) using a serial agar dilution method for the first time against different clinical isolates and a standard strain of H. pylori. The Bi NPs were biologically prepared and purified by a recently described method and subjected to further characterization by infrared spectroscopy and anti-H. pylori evaluation. Infrared spectroscopy results showed the presence of carboxyl functional groups on the surface of biogenic Bi NPs. These biogenic nanoparticles showed good antibacterial activity against all tested H. pylori strains. The resulting MICs varied between 60 and 100 μg/ml for clinical isolates of H. pylori and H. pylori (ATCC 26695). The antibacterial effect of bismuth ions was also tested against all test strains. The antimicrobial effect of Bi ions was lower than antimicrobial effect of bismuth in the form of elemental NPs. The effect of Bi NPs on metabolomic footprinting of H. pylori was further evaluated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Exposure of H. pylori to an inhibitory concentration of Bi NPs (100 μg/ml) led to release of some metabolites such as acetate, formic acid, glutamate, valine, glycine, and uracil from bacteria into their supernatant. These findings confirm that these nanoparticles interfere with Krebs cycle, nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism and shows anti-H. pylori activity.

  8. Characterization of feline Helicobacter pylori strains and associated gastritis in a colony of domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Handt, L K; Fox, J G; Stalis, I H; Rufo, R; Lee, G; Linn, J; Li, X; Kleanthous, H

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four young adult domestic cats from a commercial vendor were found to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histopathologic analyses, selected electron microscopy, and urease mapping were performed on mucosal samples collected from the cardias and fundi, bodies, and antra of these cats' stomachs. H. pylori organisms were abundant in all areas of the stomach on the basis of histologic evaluation and urease mapping. H. pylori infection was associated with a moderate to severe lymphofollicular gastritis in 21 of 24 cats (88%). The gastritis was most pronounced in the antral region and consisted mainly of multifocal lymphoplasmacytic follicular infiltrates in the deep mucosa. The severity of gastritis in the antrum corresponded to high numbers of H. pylori there on the basis of the use of the urease assay as an indicator of H. pylori colonization. Ten of 24 cats (42%) also had small to moderate numbers of eosinophils in the gastric mucosa. All 24 cats had gastric lymphoid follicles, with follicles being most prevalent in the antrum. Electron microscopy of gastric tissue revealed numerous H. pylori organisms, some of which were closely adhered to the mucosal epithelium. Human H. pylori gene-specific primers to ureA and ureB amplified products of similar sizes from H. pylori cat isolates. Digestion of the products with restriction enzymes resulted in fragments characteristic of the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of H. pylori isolates from humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7494015

  9. Efflux pump gene hefA of Helicobacter pylori plays an important role in multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether efflux systems contribute to multidrug resistance of H pylori. METHODS: A chloramphenicol-induced multidrug resistance model of six susceptible H pylori strains (5 isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) was developed. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were selected and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of erythromycin, metronidazole, penicillin G, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin in multidrug resistant strains and their parent strains was determined by agar dilution tests. The level of mRNA expression of hefA was assessed by fluorescence real-time quantitative PCR. A H pylori LZ1026 knockout mutant (ΔH pylori LZ1026) for (putative) efflux protein was constructed by inserting the kanamycin resistance cassette from pEGFP-N2 into hefA, and its susceptibility profiles to 10 antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: The MIC of six multidrug-resistant strains (including 5 clinical isolates and H pylori NCTC11637) increased significantly (≥ 4-fold) compared with their parent strains. The expression level of hefA gene was significantly higher in the MDR strains than in their parent strains (P = 0.033). A H pylori LZ1026 mutant was successfully constructed and the ΔH pylori LZ1026 was more susceptible to four of the 10 antibiotics. All the 20 strains displayed transcripts for hefA that confirmed the in vitro expression of these genes. CONCLUSION: The efflux pump gene hefA plays an important role in multidrug resistance of H pylori. PMID:18777600

  10. Isolation, amplification, and sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA obtained from human crab louse, Pthirus pubis (L.), blood meals.

    PubMed

    Lord, W D; DiZinno, J A; Wilson, M R; Budowle, B; Taplin, D; Meinking, T L

    1998-09-01

    The ability to identify individual human hosts based on analyses of blood recovered from the digestive tract of hematophagous arthropods has been a long-term pursuit in both medical and forensic entomology. Blood meal individualization techniques can bring important advancements to studies of vector-borne disease epidemiology. Forensically, these analyses may aid in assailant identification in violent crime cases where blood-feeding insects or their excreta are recovered from victims or at crime scenes. Successful isolation, amplification, and sequencing of human mitochondrial DNA obtained from adult human crab lice fed on human volunteers are reported. Adult lice were removed from recruited volunteers frequenting inner city health clinics. Live lice were killed by freezing and subsequently air dried at ambient temperature. A saliva sample was obtained from each volunteer and served as a DNA reference sample. Volunteers were afforded free, approved pediculosis treatment. Individual lice were subsequently processed using procedures developed for the extraction of mitochondrial DNA from human hair, teeth, and bone. The resulting DNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Our results point to valuable avenues for future entomological research.

  11. Structure and Antioxidant Activity of Soy Protein Isolate-Dextran Conjugates Obtained by TiO2 Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Bing; Chen, Caiyan; Zhang, Xiaosa; Chen, Siqiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics and antioxidant activities of soy protein isolate- (SPI-) dextran conjugates obtained by TiO2 photocatalysis treatment. Results revealed that the UV-vis absorption and the fluorescence intensity increased as the photocatalytic power increased (P < 0.05). Higher photocatalytic power could promote the extent of glycation and the formation of high molecular weight SPI-dextran conjugates, which were evidenced by free amino group content and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra suggested that the amide I, II, and III bands of SPI were altered by the glycation induced by TiO2 photocatalysis. Moreover, significant changes of secondary structure occurred in SPI-dextran conjugates. The α-helix, β-sheet, β-turns, and random coil were changed from approximately 10.6%, 37.9%, 12.9%, and 38.6% to 3.8%, 10.4%, 17.7%, and 68.8%, respectively, after treatment at photocatalytic power of 1000 W. In addition, SPI-dextran conjugates obtained by TiO2 photocatalysis treatment exhibited high hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and possessed increased reducing power. All data indicated that TiO2 photocatalysis was an efficient method for promoting protein-polysaccharide copolymerisation. PMID:26495283

  12. Structure and antioxidant activity of soy protein isolate-dextran conjugates obtained by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Bing; Chen, Caiyan; Zhang, Xiaosa; Chen, Siqiao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics and antioxidant activities of soy protein isolate- (SPI-) dextran conjugates obtained by TiO2 photocatalysis treatment. Results revealed that the UV-vis absorption and the fluorescence intensity increased as the photocatalytic power increased (P < 0.05). Higher photocatalytic power could promote the extent of glycation and the formation of high molecular weight SPI-dextran conjugates, which were evidenced by free amino group content and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra suggested that the amide I, II, and III bands of SPI were altered by the glycation induced by TiO2 photocatalysis. Moreover, significant changes of secondary structure occurred in SPI-dextran conjugates. The α-helix, β-sheet, β-turns, and random coil were changed from approximately 10.6%, 37.9%, 12.9%, and 38.6% to 3.8%, 10.4%, 17.7%, and 68.8%, respectively, after treatment at photocatalytic power of 1000 W. In addition, SPI-dextran conjugates obtained by TiO2 photocatalysis treatment exhibited high hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and possessed increased reducing power. All data indicated that TiO2 photocatalysis was an efficient method for promoting protein-polysaccharide copolymerisation.

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates obtained in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from 2002 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Gaudreau, Christiane; Boucher, France; Gilbert, Huguette; Bekal, Sadjia

    2014-07-01

    From 2002 to 2013 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 38 Campylobacter coli isolates were more frequently erythromycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin resistant than 440 Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni isolates (18.4% versus 1.8%; P = 0.00005), of which the 148 isolates acquired abroad were more frequently erythromycin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin resistant than the 292 isolates acquired locally (5.4% versus 0%; P = 0.0001).

  14. New transport medium for cultural recovery of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Luigina; Di Campli, Emanuela; Di Bartolomeo, Soraya; Bessa, Lucinda Janete; Baffoni, Marina; Di Giulio, Mara

    2014-12-01

    We developed a new transport medium (GESA--Helicobacter pylori transport medium [publication no. WO/2014/019696, patent pending no. PCT/EP2013/002292; Liofilchem s.r.l., Roseto degli Abruzzi, Teramo, Italy]) for recovery of Helicobacter pylori from gastric biopsy samples. GESA transport medium, in a semisolid state, provides the optimal conditions for maintaining the viability of the microorganism over time. The efficacy of the transport medium was assessed through in vitro and ex vivo experiments. We were able to recover different suspensions of H. pylori ATCC 43629 and H. pylori 13 A in GESA transport medium stored at 4 °C for up to 10 days. In particular, with a starting inoculum of ∼ 10(5) CFU, after 7 days of storage, 150 ± 25 CFU and 40 ± 7 CFU of the reference and clinical strains were detected, respectively. H. pylori colonies were isolated from gastric specimens taken from both the antrum and the fundus in 68 (90.66%) of 75 urea breath test (UBT)-positive patients. Moreover, GESA transport medium allowed the recovery and isolation of H. pylori colonies from additional biopsy samples from 13 of the 75 detected subjects at up to 10 days of biopsy sample storage at 4 °C. Finally, GESA transport medium preserved its characteristics when stored at 4°C for 1 year from its preparation, thus allowing good recovery of H. pylori. GESA transport medium can be considered a standardized transport medium with high performance that optimizes the recovery rate of H. pylori grown by culture.

  15. Phenotypic and Molecular Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Derrick; Cunningham, Scott A; Cole, Nicolynn C; Kohner, Peggy C; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Failure to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection is often a result of antimicrobial resistance, which for clarithromycin is typically mediated by specific point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. The purpose of this study was to define current patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in H. pylori isolates derived primarily from the United States and to survey them for the presence of point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene and assess the ability of these mutations to predict phenotypic clarithromycin susceptibility. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using agar dilution on 413 H. pylori isolates submitted to Mayo Medical Laboratories for susceptibility testing. For a subset of these isolates, a 150-bp segment of the 23S rRNA gene was sequenced. A total of 1,970 MICs were reported over the 4-year study period. The rate of clarithromycin resistance was high (70.4%), and elevated MICs were frequently observed for metronidazole (82.4% of isolates had an MIC of >8 μg/ml) and ciprofloxacin (53.5% of isolates had an MIC of >1 μg/ml). A total of 111 archived H. pylori isolates underwent 23S rRNA gene sequencing; we found 95% concordance between genotypes and phenotypes (P = 0.9802). Resistance to clarithromycin was most commonly due to an A2143G mutation (82%), followed by A2142G (14%) and A2142C (4%) mutations. Clinical H. pylori isolates derived primarily from the United States demonstrated a high rate of clarithromycin resistance and elevated metronidazole and ciprofloxacin MICs. The relative distribution of point mutations at positions 2143 and 2142 in the 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori was similar to that reported from other parts of the world; these mutations predict phenotypic resistance to clarithromycin.

  16. Anti-Helicobacter pylori xanthones of Garcinia fusca.

    PubMed

    Nontakham, Jannarin; Charoenram, Napaporn; Upamai, Wanchalerm; Taweechotipatr, Malai; Suksamrarn, Sunit

    2014-08-01

    A new geranylated xanthone derivative, fuscaxanthone I (1), along with nine xanthones (2-9 and 11), a biphenyl (10) and three biflavonoids (12-14) were isolated from the roots of Garcinia fusca Pierre. Compounds 8, 10 and 11-14 were reported from this plant species for the first time. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS. The isolated compounds were evaluated for antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori. Cowaxanthone (5) and fukugiside (14) exhibited stronger inhibitory activity against H. pylori DMST reference strain at MICs 4.6 and 10.8 μM, respectively, than that of the control metronidazole. Isojacareubin (8) displayed the most potent activity against H. pylori HP40 clinical isolate with MIC 23.9 μM, which was approximately two times greater than that of the standard drug amoxicillin.

  17. Effect of protease EPg222 obtained from Penicillium chrysogenum isolated from dry-cured ham in pieces of pork loins.

    PubMed

    Benito, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Sosa, María J; Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J

    2003-01-01

    The fungal protease EPg222 obtained from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 isolated from dry-cured ham, was assayed for proteolytic activity in a meat model system based on sterile pieces of pork loins for 32 days. Treated samples showed a significative reduction of total high ionic strength-soluble proteins during the incubation period, as compared with a control incubated without enzyme, both on the surface and in the depth. SDS-PAGE analysis of this protein fraction showed higher hydrolysis of the main myofibrillar proteins H-meromyosin, actin, and tropomyosin in treated samples. Non-protein and amino acidic nitrogen were detected in higher amounts in enzyme-added than in control pieces of loins, both on the surface and in the depth. Thus, addition of enzyme EPg222 to whole pieces of meat results in an increase of protein hydrolysis. The effect of this enzyme could be of great interest for stimulating proteolysis in whole dry-cured meat pieces.

  18. Composition of the essential oil of two Nepeta species and in vitro evaluation of their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Kalpoutzakis, E; Aligiannis, N; Mentis, A; Mitaku, S; Charvala, C

    2001-12-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained from the aerial parts of Nepeta camphorata and Nepeta argolica ssp. dirphya were analysed by GC-MS. A total of 52 components were identified and significant differences (qualitative and quantitative) were observed between the two samples. 1,8-Cineol and two nepetalactones were found to be the major components of the oil of N. camphorata and N. argolica ssp. dirphya respectively. The in vitro activity, of the two oils and the three above mentioned isolated compounds, against 25 clinically isolated and commercial strains of Helicobacter pylori was investigated and some activity was found.

  19. Molecular characterization and phylogeny of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates obtained from two Dutch regions using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, M; Friedrich, A W; Grundmann, H; de Boer, R F; Croughs, P D; Islam, M A; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, M F Q; Kooistra-Smid, A M D; Rossen, J W A

    2016-07-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is one of the major causes of human gastrointestinal disease and has been implicated in sporadic cases and outbreaks of diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uremic syndrome worldwide. In this study, we determined the molecular characteristics and phylogenetic relationship of STEC isolates, and their genetic diversity was compared to that of other E. coli populations. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 132 clinical STEC isolates obtained from the faeces of 129 Dutch patients with gastrointestinal complaints. STEC isolates of this study belonged to 44 different sequence types (STs), 42 serogenotypes and 14 stx subtype combinations. Antibiotic resistance genes were more frequently present in stx1-positive isolates compared to stx2 and stx1 + stx2-positive isolates. The iha, mchB, mchC, mchF, subA, ireA, senB, saa and sigA genes were significantly more frequently present in eae-negative than in eae-positive STEC isolates. Presence of virulence genes encoding type III secretion proteins and adhesins was associated with isolates obtained from patients with bloody diarrhoea. Core genome phylogenetic analysis showed that isolates clustered according to their ST or serogenotypes irrespective of stx subtypes. Isolates obtained from patients with bloody diarrhoea were from diverse phylogenetic backgrounds. Some STEC isolates shared common ancestors with non-STEC isolates. Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool for clinical microbiology, allowing high-resolution molecular typing, population structure analysis and detailed molecular characterization of strains. STEC isolates of a substantial genetic diversity and of distinct phylogenetic groups were observed in this study.

  20. A study of recombinant protective H. pylori antigens

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zheng; Tao, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Ai-Long; Wang, Pi-Long

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express Mr26000 outer membrane protein (OMP) from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and to obtain the vaccine protecting against H. pylori infection and a diagnostic reagent kit quickly detecting H. pylori infection. METHODS: The gene encoding the structural Mr26000 outer membrane protein of H. pylori was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA by PCR, and inserted in the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+), which was transformed into the Top10 E. coli strain. Recombinant vector was selected, identified and transformed into BL-21(DE3) E. coli strain. The recombinant fusion proteins were expressed. The antigenicity of recombinant protein was studied by ELISA or immunoblotting and immunized Balb/c mice. RESULTS: The gene of Mr26000 OMP was amplified to be 594 base pairs, 1.1% of the cloned genes was mutated and 1.51% of amino acid residues was changed, but there was homogeneity between them. The recombinant fusion protein encoded objective polypeptides of 198 amino acid residues, corresponding to calculated molecular masses of Mr26000. The level of soluble expression products was about 38.96% of the total cell protein. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose resin columniation, the purity of objective protein became about 90%. The ELISA results showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by patient serum infected with H. pylori and rabbit serum immunized with the recombinant protein. Furthermore, Balb/c mice immunized with the recombinant protein were protected against H. pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Mr26000 OMP may be a candidate vaccine preventing H. pylori infection. PMID:11925614

  1. High Diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori Genotypes in Patients with and without Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Vidal, Yolanda; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Barreto-Zúñiga, Rafael; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008), and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003). A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036). A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003). Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. Conclusion/Significance High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work. PMID:19050763

  2. Effect of treatment failure on the CagA EPIYA motif in Helicobacter pylori strains from Colombian subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Rengifo, Javier Andres; Matta, Andres Jenuer; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate effect of treatment failure on cagA and vacA genotypes in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolates from Colombia. METHODS One hundred and seventy-six participants infected with H. pylori from Colombia were treated during 14 d with the triple-standard therapy. Six weeks later, eradication was evaluated by 13C-Urea breath test. Patients with treatment failure were subjected to endoscopy control; biopsies obtained were used for histopathology and culture. DNA from H. pylori isolates was amplified using primers specific for cagA and vacA genes. The phylogenetic relationships among isolates obtained before and after treatment were established by conglomerate analysis based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting. RESULTS Treatment effectiveness was at 74.6%. Of the participants with treatment failure, 25 accepted subjected to a second endoscopy. Prevalence of post-treatment infection was 64% (16/25) and 40% (10/25) by histology and culture, respectively. Upon comparing the cagA and vacA genotypes found before and after therapy, multiple cagA genotypes (cagA-positive and cagA-negative) were found before treatment; in contrast, cagA-negative genotypes decreased after treatment. vacA s1m1 genotype was highly prevalent in patients before and after therapy. The 3’cagA region was successfully amplified in 95.5% (21/22) of the isolates obtained before and in 81.8% (18/22) of the isolates obtained after treatment. In the isolates obtained from patients with treatment failure, it was found that 72.7% (16/22) presented alterations in the number of EPIYA motifs, compared to isolates found before treatment. CONCLUSION Unsuccessful treatment limits colonization by low-virulence strains resulting in partial and selective eradication in mixed infections, and acts on the cagA-positive strains inducing genetic rearrangements in cagA variable region that produces a loss or gain of EPIYA repetitions. PMID:28373764

  3. Involvement of Aquaporin 3 in Helicobacter pylori-Related Gastric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shen, Lizong

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is one of the most common and lethal malignant cancers worldwide, and numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays a key role in the development of gastric carcinomas. Our previous studies showed that aquaporin 3 (AQP3) is overexpressed in gastric carcinoma and promotes the migration and proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells, suggesting that AQP3 may be a potentially important determinant of gastric carcinoma. However, the role of AQP3 in H. pylori carcinogenesis is unknown. Methods The AQP3 protein and H. pylori were detected in human gastric tissues by immunohistochemistry and modified Giemsa staining respectively. AQP3 knockdown was obtained by small interfering (si) RNA. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were used to evaluate the change of AQP3 in the human gastric cancer AGS and SGC7901 cell lines after co-culture with H. pylori. Sprague Dawley rats were orally inoculated with H. pylori to establish a rat model colonized by H. pylori. Results The present study found that AQP3 expression correlated with H. pylori infection status in gastric cancer tissues and corresponding normal mucosa, and H. pylori co-culture upregulated AQP3 expression in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. H. pylori infection also increased AQP3 expression in gastric mucosa colonized by H. pylori in a Sprague Dawley rat model. Conclusions These findings provide further information to understand the mechanism of H. pylori carcinogenesis and a potential strategy for the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinoma. PMID:23152856

  4. Reprint of: The diversity of oomycetes on crayfish: Morphological vs. molecular identification of cultures obtained while isolating the crayfish plague pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kozubíková-Balcarová, Eva; Koukol, Ondřej; Martín, María P; Svoboda, Jiří; Petrusek, Adam; DiÉguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    Numerous oomycetes colonise the crayfish cuticle, the best known being the crayfish plague pathogen Aphanomyces astaci. Although other oomycetes associated with crayfish complicate the isolation and molecular detection of A. astaci, their diversity is little known. To improve this knowledge, we analysed 95 oomycete isolates obtained during attempts to isolate A. astaci from crayfish presumably infected by this pathogen. We characterized the isolates morphologically and by sequencing of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. We identified 13 taxa by molecular analysis. Ten of them were assigned to five genera; the remaining three were affiliated with the order Saprolegniales but could not be reliably assigned to any genus. Morphological identification to species level was only possible for 15 % of isolates; all corresponded to Saprolegnia ferax, which was confirmed by ITS sequencing. The most frequently isolated species were S. ferax and Saprolegnia australis. Only seven isolates of A. astaci were obtained, all from one disease outbreak. We show that oomycete cultures obtained as by-products of parasite isolation are valuable for oomycete diversity studies, but morphological identification may uncover only a fraction of their diversity. Further, we show that crayfish may be frequently associated with potentially serious parasites of other organisms.

  5. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in saliva demonstrated by a novel PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Musich, P R; Ha, T; Ferguson, D A; Patel, N R; Chi, D S; Thomas, E

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in the saliva of patients infected with this bacterium. METHODS--A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect H pylori in saliva and gastric biopsy specimens from patients undergoing endoscopy. RESULTS--Our PCR assay amplified a 417 base pair fragment of DNA from all 21 DNAs derived from H pylori clinical isolates but did not amplify DNA from 23 non-H pylori strains. Sixty three frozen gastric biopsy and 56 saliva specimens were tested. H pylori specific DNA was detected by PCR in all 39 culture positive biopsy specimens and was also identified from another seven biopsy specimens which were negative by culture but positive by histology. H pylori specific DNA was identified by PCR in saliva specimens from 30 (75%) of 40 patients with H pylori infection demonstrated by culture or histological examination, or both, and in three patients without H pylori infection in the stomach. CONCLUSION--The results indicate that the oral cavity harbours H pylori and may be the source of infection and transmission. Images PMID:7560176

  6. Genome Sequencing Reveals a Phage in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lehours, Philippe; Vale, Filipa F.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Melefors, Ojar; Advani, Reza; Glavas, Steve; Guegueniat, Julia; Gontier, Etienne; Lacomme, Sabrina; Alves Matos, António; Menard, Armelle; Mégraud, Francis; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Anders F.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa in more than half of the human population; in a subset of this population, its presence is associated with development of severe disease, such as gastric cancer. Genomic analysis of several strains has revealed an extensive H. pylori pan-genome, likely to grow as more genomes are sampled. Here we describe the draft genome sequence (63 contigs; 26× mean coverage) of H. pylori strain B45, isolated from a patient with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The major finding was a 24.6-kb prophage integrated in the bacterial genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (22/27) with prophage region II of Helicobacter acinonychis strain Sheeba. After UV treatment of liquid cultures, circular DNA carrying the prophage integrase gene could be detected, and intracellular tailed phage-like particles were observed in H. pylori cells by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that phage production can be induced from the prophage. PCR amplification and sequencing of the integrase gene from 341 H. pylori strains from different geographic regions revealed a high prevalence of the prophage (21.4%). Phylogenetic reconstruction showed four distinct clusters in the integrase gene, three of which tended to be specific for geographic regions. Our study implies that phages may play important roles in the ecology and evolution of H. pylori. PMID:22086490

  7. In vitro susceptibility of equine-obtained isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to gallium maltolate and 20 other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Norman, T E; Batista, M; Lawhon, S D; Zhang, S; Kuskie, K R; Swinford, A K; Bernstein, L R; Cohen, N D

    2014-07-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials.

  8. In Vitro Susceptibility of Equine-Obtained Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis to Gallium Maltolate and 20 Other Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Batista, M.; Lawhon, S. D.; Zhang, S.; Kuskie, K. R.; Swinford, A. K.; Bernstein, L. R.; Cohen, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activities of gallium maltolate (GaM) and 20 other antimicrobial agents against clinical equine isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The growth of cultured isolates was not inhibited by any concentration of GaM. MIC data revealed susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials. PMID:24829243

  9. Genetic diversity demonstrated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis of Salmonella enterica isolates obtained from diverse sources in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the genetic diversity of Salmonella isolates recovered from a variety of sources using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to assess their possible relatedness. Salmonella was isolated from ca. 52% of samples from a pepper var. Bell production system. A to...

  10. Identification of Helicobacter pylori by immunological dot blot method based on reaction of a species-specific monoclonal antibody with a surface-exposed protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bölin, I; Lönroth, H; Svennerholm, A M

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against membrane preparations of Helicobacter pylori were produced. One MAb was found to be specific for H. pylori, because it did not react with a number of other bacterial species, including Helicobacter felis and Campylobacter jejuni. This MAb reacted with a 30-kDa protein found in outer membrane preparations of H. pylori. The protein was also detected on the cell surface on intact bacteria when analyzed by immunoelectron microscopy. To facilitate the identification of H. pylori isolates after culturing of biopsies, an immunodot blot assay based on the reaction of this MAb was developed. This assay was found to be highly specific for H. pylori. Sixty-six clinical isolates typed as H. pylori by conventional biochemical tests were found to be positive, whereas no other bacterial species tested gave a positive result. By this method, reliable and rapid identification of H. pylori could be accomplished. PMID:7714196

  11. Characterization of reticuloendotheliosis virus isolates obtained from broiler breeders, turkeys, and prairie chickens located in various geographical regions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mays, Jody K; Silva, Robert F; Lee, Lucy F; Fadly, Aly M

    2010-10-01

    Nine reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) isolates obtained from broiler breeders, turkeys, and prairie chickens located in three different geographical regions in the USA, and three isolates obtained from known contaminated live-virus vaccines were characterized using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) assays. All isolates were propagated in chicken embryo fibroblasts obtained from a specific pathogen free breeder flock. PCR analysis of all 12 isolates resulted in the amplification of the 291-bp REV long-terminal repeat region (LTR); none of the isolates exhibited a different pattern or shift from the expected PCR product of REV LTR. The subtype of the REV isolates was determined by IFA using REV-specific monoclonal antibodies, 11B118.22, 11C237.8, and 11D182. Results from sub-typing indicated that all nine isolates from broiler breeders, turkeys, and prairie chickens belonged to subtype 3, and are antigenically related to the chick syncytial virus (CSV) strain of REV, the prototype of subtype 3 REV. In contrast, the three isolates from contaminated vaccines were classified as subtype 2, and were antigenically related to spleen necrosis virus (SNV) strain of REV, the prototype of subtype 2 REV. Three isolates representing REV isolated from broiler breeders, turkeys, and prairie chickens were cloned and further evaluated by DNA sequence analysis of the envelope gene. Results from DNA sequence analysis confirmed those from sub-typing and indicated that the three REV isolates representing those from broiler breeders, turkeys, and prairie chickens are closely related to CSV of REV, with an amino acid homology of 98% or greater as compared with SNV with an amino acid homology of 95% or less. Data from this study clearly indicate that subtype 3 is the most common subtype of REV circulating in three different avian species, namely broiler breeders, turkeys and prairie chickens, located in three different geographical regions in the United

  12. Association of Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer in Saudi Patients.

    PubMed

    Saber, Taisir; Ghonaim, Mabrouk M; Yousef, Amany R; Khalifa, Amany; Al Qurashi, Hesham; Shaqhan, Mohammad; Samaha, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship between occurrence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer, and the presence of H. pylori cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG, and to estimate the value of these antibodies in detecting infection by cagA gene-positive H. pylori strains in Saudi patients. The study included 180 patients who were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in Taif province and Western region of Saudi Arabia (60 gastric cancer, 60 peptic ulcer, and 60 with non-ulcer dyspepsia). Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained and tested for H. pylori infection by rapid urease test and culture. PCR was performed on the isolated strains and biopsy specimens for detection of the cagA gene. Blood samples were collected and tested for CagA IgG by ELISA. H. pylori infection was detected among 72.8% of patients. The cagA gene and anti-CagA IgG were found in 63.4% and 61.8% of H. pylori-infected patients, respectively. They were significantly (p < 0.01) higher in patients with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer compared with those with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Detection of the CagA IgG was 91.6% sensitive, 89.6% specific, and 90.8% accurate compared with detection of the cagA gene. Its positive and negative predictive values were 93.8% and 86%, respectively. The study showed a significant association between the presence of the cagA gene and gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease, and between anti-CagA IgG and the cagA gene in Saudi patients. However, a further larger study is required to confirm this finding.

  13. Biofilm and Helicobacter pylori: from environment to human host.

    PubMed

    García, Apolinaria; Salas-Jara, María José; Herrera, Carolina; González, Carlos

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative pathogen that selectively colonizes the human gastric epithelium. Over 50% of the world population is infected with H. pylori reaching up to 90% of infected individuals in developing countries. Nonetheless the increased impact upon public health care, its reservoir and the transmission pathway of the species has not been clearly established yet. Molecular studies allowed the detection of H. pylori in various aquatic environments, even forming biofilm in tap water distribution systems in several countries, suggesting a role of water as a possible reservoir of the pathogen. The persistence of human infection with H. pylori and the resistance of clinical isolates to commonly used antibiotics in eradication therapy have been related to the genetic variability of the species and its ability to develop biofilm, demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Thus, during the last years, experimental work with this pathogen has been focused in the search for biofilm inhibitors and biofilm destabilizing agents. However, only two anti- H. pylori biofilm disrupting agents have been successfully used: Curcumin - a natural dye - and N-acetyl cysteine - a mucolytic agent used in respiratory diseases. The main goal of this review was to discuss the evidences available in the literature supporting the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm upon various surfaces in aquatic environments, both in vivo and in vitro. The results published and our own observations suggest that the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm may be important for surviving under stress conditions or in the spread of the infection among humans, mainly through natural water sources and water distribution systems.

  14. Biofilm and Helicobacter pylori: From environment to human host

    PubMed Central

    García, Apolinaria; Salas-Jara, María José; Herrera, Carolina; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative pathogen that selectively colonizes the human gastric epithelium. Over 50% of the world population is infected with H. pylori reaching up to 90% of infected individuals in developing countries. Nonetheless the increased impact upon public health care, its reservoir and the transmission pathway of the species has not been clearly established yet. Molecular studies allowed the detection of H. pylori in various aquatic environments, even forming biofilm in tap water distribution systems in several countries, suggesting a role of water as a possible reservoir of the pathogen. The persistence of human infection with H. pylori and the resistance of clinical isolates to commonly used antibiotics in eradication therapy have been related to the genetic variability of the species and its ability to develop biofilm, demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro experiments. Thus, during the last years, experimental work with this pathogen has been focused in the search for biofilm inhibitors and biofilm destabilizing agents. However, only two anti- H. pylori biofilm disrupting agents have been successfully used: Curcumin - a natural dye - and N-acetyl cysteine - a mucolytic agent used in respiratory diseases. The main goal of this review was to discuss the evidences available in the literature supporting the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm upon various surfaces in aquatic environments, both in vivo and in vitro. The results published and our own observations suggest that the ability of H. pylori to form biofilm may be important for surviving under stress conditions or in the spread of the infection among humans, mainly through natural water sources and water distribution systems. PMID:24914322

  15. Population attributable burden of Helicobacter pylori-related gastric cancer, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Chen, Y; Shi, J; Song, C; Zhang, J; Wang, K

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor of cancer and chronic diseases, remains highly prevalent in China. This review aims to systematically evaluate the H. pylori-attributable burden for gastric cancer (GC), coronary heart disease (CHD), and ischemic stroke (IS) in the Chinese population. Helicobacter pylori prevalence was updated by pooling the results reported in studies across China. The population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated based on the H. pylori prevalence 10 years ago and relative risks of specific disease by reviewing the prospective studies published from 2000 through 2015. In China, the nationwide average prevalence of H. pylori was estimated to be 42.06 % in the general population during 2009-2013. The fixed effects pooled relative risk (RR) of 1.89 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.57-2.26] was obtained for gastric cancer and H. pylori infection. Helicobacter pylori infection was responsible for around 37.38 % of noncardia GC, corresponding to about 105,536 cases in 2012. As for extra-gastric disorders, H. pylori infections had higher risk of CHD (RR = 1.55, 95 % CI: 1.37-1.76) and IS (RR = 1.54, 95 % CI: 1.42-1.66). About 23.15 % of CHD and 22.29 % of IS were attributable to H. pylori infection. The estimates of H. pylori-attributable burden reveal a great potential of reducing H. pylori-related chronic disease burden by H. pylori eradication. Large prospective studies are warranted to identify which H. pylori strains, which subtypes of the disease, and which subgroups of the population have the greatest risk of relevant diseases and the effect of H. pylori eradication on the prevention of H. pylori-related diseases.

  16. [Gastrointestinal giardiasis associated with Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Isaeva, G Sh; Efimova, N G

    2010-01-01

    The study involved 160 patients with chronic cholecystitis associated with chronic gastroduodenitis. Obtaining biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa and bile samples allowed to compare the microbial picture and the morphological structure of gastric mucosa in the same patient, to identify patterns of colonization of the stomach, 12 duodenal ulcer and gall bladder various microorganisms. At cytological examination was detected in the gall bladder G. lamblia in 47.5 +/- 3.95% of cases in the stomach--in 29.09 +/- 6.12% of cases. The frequency of H. pylori detection in biopsy of gastric mucosa amounted to 98.18 +/- 1.8% of cases, in 12-duodenum--93.75 +/- 1.9%, in the gall bladder--to 54.38 +/- 3.94%, in the bile duct--in 54.38 +/- 3.94%. It was found strict association between the detection of H. pylori and G. lamblia in the stomach--100% of H. pylori-infection combined with giardiasis. Morphological changes of gastric mucosa in the form of lymphoid infiltration detected mainly in the mixed-infection H. pylori and G. lamblia.

  17. Helicobacter pylori reinfection with identical organisms: transmission by the patients' spouses.

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, K; Hentschel, E; Dragosics, B; Hirschl, A M

    1995-01-01

    Reinfection with Helicobacter pylori after eradication is responsible for the recurrence of duodenal ulcer disease. The mode of transmission has not yet been established. In this study, 18 patients with chronic duodenal ulcers in whom H pylori had been eradicated with amoxicillin and metronidazole were entered into a prospective follow up study. Control endoscopies were performed 4, 8, 14, 27, and 43 months after starting treatment and the results of direct tests were compared with the kinetics of H pylori specific IgG titres. After eradication there was a noticeable and consistent fall in anti-H pylori IgG, while reinfections were characterised by a significant increase in specific titres. Reinfection was detected in two patients after 14 and 43 months, respectively. The H pylori strains responsible for these reinfections, the corresponding pretreatment isolates, and the strains isolated from the spouses of these patients were examined by polymerase chain reaction based DNA fingerprinting. Analysis showed that reinfection had been caused by the same H pylori strain and identified the spouses of these patients as carriers of the identical strain. Considering the genomic diversity and the interpatient heterogeneity of H pylori these results suggest a person to person transmission of H pylori reinfection. By the end of the observation period reflux oesophagitis had developed in 10 of the 16 patients who had not been reinfected. This surprising finding may be explained by the changed eating habits of patients after healing of duodenal ulcer disease. Images p832-a PMID:7615268

  18. Fragmentation of CagA Reduces Hummingbird Phenotype Induction by Helicobactor pylori.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chi; Kuo, Wein-Shung; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been linked to various gastro-intestinal diseases; nevertheless it remains to be clarified why only a minority of infected individuals develop illness. Studies from the West have indicated that the cagA gene and the associated EPIYA genotype of H. pylori is closely linked to the development of severe gastritis and gastric carcinoma; however, as yet no consistent correlation has been found among the bacteria from East Asia. In addition to genotype variation, the CagA protein undergoes fragmentation; however, the functional significance of fragmentation with respect to H. pylori infection remains unknown. In this study, we isolated 594 H. pylori colonies from 99 patients and examined the fragmentation patterns of CagA protein using immunoblotting. By analyzing the ability of the isolates to induce the host cell morphological transition to the highly invasive hummingbird phenotype, we demonstrated that H. pylori colonies with substantial CagA fragmentation are less potent in terms of causing this morphological transition. Our results uncovered a functional role for CagA fragmentation with respect to H. pylori-induced hummingbird phenotype formation and these findings suggest the possibility that the post-translational processing of CagA may be involved in H. pylori infection pathogenesis.

  19. Genetic Relatedness of Salmonella Serovars Isolated from Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and Tilapia (Tilapia mossambica) Obtained from Wet Markets and Ponds in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Budiati, Titik; Rusul, Gulam; Wan-Abdullah, Wan Nadiah; Chuah, Li-Oon; Ahmad, Rosma; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2016-04-01

    A total of 43 Salmonella enterica isolates belonging to different serovars (Salmonella Albany, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Corvallis, Salmonella Stanley, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Mikawasima, and Salmonella Bovismorbificans) were isolated from catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and tilapia (Tilapia mossambica) obtained from nine wet markets and eight ponds in Penang, Malaysia. Thirteen, 19, and 11 isolates were isolated from 9 of 32 catfish, 14 of 32 tilapia, and 11 of 44 water samples, respectively. Fish reared in ponds were fed chicken offal, spoiled eggs, and commercial fish feed. The genetic relatedness of these Salmonella isolates was determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR) using primer OPC2, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Composite analysis of the RAPD-PCR, REP-PCR, and PFGE results showed that the Salmonella serovars could be differentiated into six clusters and 15 singletons. RAPD-PCR differentiated the Salmonella isolates into 11 clusters and 10 singletons, while REP-PCR differentiated them into 4 clusters and 1 singleton. PFGE differentiated the Salmonella isolates into seven clusters and seven singletons. The close genetic relationship of Salmonella isolates from catfish or tilapia obtained from different ponds, irrespective of the type of feed given, may be caused by several factors, such as the quality of the water, density of fish, and size of ponds.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Mobile Genetic Elements from Microbial Assemblages Obtained from the Field Research Center Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Sobecky; Cassie Hodges; Kerri Lafferty; Mike Humphreys; Melanie Raimondo; Kristin Tuttle; Tamar Barkay

    2004-03-17

    Considerable knowledge has been gained from the intensive study of a relatively limited group of bacterial plasmids. Recent efforts have begun to focus on the characterization of, at the molecular level, plasmid populations and associated mobile genetic elements (e.g., transposons, integrons) occurring in a wider range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Surprisingly, however, little information is available regarding the incidence and distribution of mobile genetic elements extant in contaminated subsurface environments. Such studies will provide greater knowledge on the ecology of plasmids and their contributions to the genetic plasticity (and adaptation) of naturally occurring subsurface microbial communities. We requested soil cores from the DOE NABIR Field Research Center (FRC) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The cores, received in February 2003, were sampled from four areas on the Oak Ridge Site: Area 1, Area 2, Area 3 (representing contaminated subsurface locales) and the background reference sites. The average core length (24 in) was subdivided into three profiles and soil pH and moisture content were determined. Uranium concentration was also determined in bulk samples. Replicate aliquots were fixed for total cell counts and for bacterial isolation. Four different isolation media were used to culture aerobic and facultative microbes from these four study areas. Colony forming units ranged from a minimum of 100 per gram soil to a maximum of 10,000 irrespective of media composition used. The vast majority of cultured subsurface isolates were gram-positive isolates and plasmid characterization was conducted per methods routinely used in the Sobecky laboratory. The percentage of plasmid incidence ranged from 10% to 60% of all isolates tested. This frequency appears to be somewhat higher than the incidence of plasmids we have observed in other habitats and we are increasing the number of isolates screened to confirm this observation. We are also

  1. Helicobacter pylori and food products: a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen causing gastritis and chronic superficial infection (CSG). It colonizes the stomach of more than 50% of humans and causes disease. This microorganism is associated with the gastric antral epithelium in patients with active chronic gastritis, peptic (gastric) or duodenal ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma H. pylori is present in feces, sewage, and water but is killed by routine chlorination. Therefore, in developing countries, consumption of sewage-contaminated drinking water and vegetables may pose a risk; properly cooking foods and chlorinating water reduces the risk of transmitting H. pylori to humans. In South America the consumption of raw vegetables fertilized with human feces has been found to be a risk factor for infection, and consumption of water from a municipal supply has been suggested as a risk factor for children. Epidemiological studies have found that H. pylori organisms colonize the stomach and duodenum of humans and many animal species and family clusters; it is believed to be orally transmitted person to person. This transmission is the major, if not exclusive, source of infection.H. pylori has been detected in the mouth from dental plaque. Recent observations in persons infected with H. pylori caused to vomit or have diarrhea showed that an actively unwell person with these symptoms could spread H. pylori in the immediate vicinity by aerosol, splashing of vomitus, infected vomitus, and infected diarrhea. In summary, H. pylori is usually spread by the fecal-oral route but possibly also by the oral-oral route and the spread of contaminated secretions. Thus, in developing countries, individuals catch H. pylori at a very young age from other persons (children) in their environment. In developed countries, H. pylori is more difficult to acquire and is usually transmitted from one family member to another, possibly by the fecal-oral route, or by the oral-oral route, e.g., kissing, vomitus. On occasion

  2. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis Results Obtained in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, J.E.; Berglund, J.W.; Davis, F.J.; Economy, K.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Miller, J.; O'Brien, D.G.; Ramsey, J.L.; Schreiber, J.D.; Shinta, A.; Smith, L.N.; Stockman, C.; Stoelzel, D.M.; Vaughn, P.

    1998-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) is located in southeastern New Mexico and is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic (deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. A detailed performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP was carried out in 1996 and supports an application by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the certification of the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste. The 1996 WIPP PA uses a computational structure that maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 yr regulatory period that applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from the imprecision with which many of the quantities required in the PA are known. Important parts of this structure are (1) the use of Latin hypercube sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncertainty, (2) the use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncertainty, and (3) the efficient use of the necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to support the analysis. The use of Latin hypercube sampling generates a mapping from imprecisely known analysis inputs to analysis outcomes of interest that provides both a display of the uncertainty in analysis outcomes (i.e., uncertainty analysis) and a basis for investigating the effects of individual inputs on these outcomes (i.e., sensitivity analysis). The sensitivity analysis procedures used in the PA include examination of scatterplots, stepwise regression analysis, and partial correlation analysis. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results obtained as part of the 1996 WIPP PA are presented and discussed. Specific topics considered include two phase flow in the vicinity of the repository, radionuclide release from the repository, fluid flow and radionuclide

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  4. Presence of superantigen genes and antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus isolates obtained from the uteri of dairy cows with clinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J-L; Ding, Y-X; Zhao, H-X; He, X-L; Li, P-F; Li, Z-F; Guan, H; Guo, X

    2014-10-11

    Clinical endometritis is an important disease of dairy cattle and results in decreased reproductive performance. This disease is caused by contamination of the uterus with a broad spectrum of microorganisms after calving. In this study, staphylococcal isolates from the uterus of dairy cows with clinical endometritis were tested for their distribution of superantigen (SAg) genes and antimicrobial resistance. Between the 127 staphylococcal isolates collected in this study, 10 species were identified. The predominant strain identified was Staphylococcus aureus (n=53), followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (n=38) and Staphylococcus chromogenes (n=22). PCR analysis demonstrated that most isolates (63.0 per cent) harboured at least one SAg gene. The most commonly observed SAg gene and genotype was selj (38.6 per cent) and sec-selj-seln (24.0 per cent), respectively. Most isolates were resistant to penicillin (79.5 per cent), ampicillin (71.7 per cent), erythromycin (56.7 per cent), and tetracycline (52.0 per cent). PCR analysis demonstrated that the antimicrobial resistance determinants ermA, ermB, ermC, tetK, tetM and blaZ were detected in 0 per cent, 44.4 per cent, 51.4 per cent, 68.2 per cent, 13.6 per cent and 86.1 per cent of the erythromycin, tetracycline and β-lactam resistant isolates, respectively. There were 22 (17.3 per cent of all isolates) coagulase-negative staphylococci shown to be methicillin resistant. In the methicillin-resistant isolates, significant resistances to ampicillin, erythromycin and penicillin were observed (P<0.01). The results of this study demonstrate that staphylococci recovered from dairy cows with clinical endometritis contain an extensive and complex prevalence of SAg genes. Significant resistances to antibiotics were also seen, highlighting the need for the rational appliance of antibiotics in veterinary medicine.

  5. Sequence of Reston Virus Isolate AZ-1435, an Ebolavirus Isolate Obtained during the 1989–1990 Reston Virus Epizootic in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Joseph P.; Diaz, Larissa; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Sword, Jennifer; Porcella, Stephen F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reston virus (RESTV) was discovered in 1989–1990 during three connected epizootics of highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever among captive macaques in primate housing facilities in the United States and Philippines. Currently, only one RESTV isolate from that outbreak (named Pennsylvania) has been sequenced. Here, we report the sequence of a second isolate, Reston virus/M.fascicularis-tc/USA/1990/Philippines89-AZ1435. PMID:28082493

  6. Sequence of Reston Virus Isolate AZ-1435, an Ebolavirus Isolate Obtained during the 1989-1990 Reston Virus Epizootic in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Joseph P; Diaz, Larissa; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Sword, Jennifer; Jahrling, Peter B; Kuhn, Jens H; Porcella, Stephen F; Johnson, Reed F

    2017-01-12

    Reston virus (RESTV) was discovered in 1989-1990 during three connected epizootics of highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever among captive macaques in primate housing facilities in the United States and Philippines. Currently, only one RESTV isolate from that outbreak (named Pennsylvania) has been sequenced. Here, we report the sequence of a second isolate, Reston virus/M.fascicularis-tc/USA/1990/Philippines89-AZ1435.

  7. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates obtained from 2010 to 2012 from chickens with necrotic enteritis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Kim, Sara; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Jang, Il; Lee, Hee Soo; Kwon, Yong Kuk

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces diverse virulent toxins that cause necrotic enteritis in poultry, resulting in a great negative impact on the poultry industry. To study the characteristics of C. perfringens in chickens, we isolated 88 strains from chickens (1 strain per flock) with necrotic enteritis. The isolated bacterial strains were screened for toxin type and antimicrobial susceptibility. Necropsy of 17 chickens that died from necrotic enteritis revealed that their intestines were dilated with inflammatory exudates and characterized by mucosal necrosis. All the isolated strains were identified as toxin type A using multiplex PCR for toxin typing. We found that the rate of netB-positive strains isolated from dead chickens was significantly higher (8 of 17) than the rate among healthy chickens (2 of 50). We performed antimicrobial susceptibility test with 20 selected antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion test and found that 30 tested strains were completely resistant to 5 antibiotics and partially resistant to 6 antibiotics whereas all the strains were susceptible to 9 antimicrobial agents. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, the 17 strains were divided into 13 genetic clusters showing high genetic diversity. In conclusion, C. perfringens strains isolated from Korean poultry showed a high resistance to antimicrobial drugs and high genetic diversity, suggesting that continuous monitoring is essential to prevent outbreaks of necrotic enteritis in chickens.

  8. Immunobiological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins.

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, M A; Rossano, F; Catalanotti, P; Liguori, G; Capasso, C; Ceccarelli, M T; Marinelli, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out on some biological activities of Helicobacter pylori porins in vitro. We extracted and purified a porin with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes preincubated with H. pylori porins showed a decrease of chemotaxis, of adherence to nylon wool, and of chemiluminescence. Used as chemotaxins in place of zymosan-activated serum or as chemotaxinogens in place of zymosan, the porins induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration. Human monocytes and lymphocytes cultivated in the presence of H. pylori porins released cytokines. Release of the various cytokines studied was obtained with differentiated kinetics and at various porin concentrations. Starting only 3 h after culture, tumor necrosis factor alpha is released quickly, reaching a peak at 18 h, at a porin concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears later, with a peak at 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells, while IL-8 is released after 6 h of culture, with a peak at 24 h, at a porin concentration of 10 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells. Lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori porins release gamma interferon after 18 h of culture at higher concentrations of porins (20 micrograms/ml/10(6) cells). Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor is released from 6 to 48 h at a concentration of 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, while both IL-3 and IL-4 are released after 18 h of culture at different porin concentrations (0.1 and 1 microgram/ml/10(6) cells, respectively). Our results lead us to think that during H. pylori infection, surface components, porins in particular, are able to induce a series of chain reactions ranging from the inflammatory to the immunological responses. Images PMID:8132346

  9. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R.; Reddy, N. Rukma; Skinner, Guy E.; Larkin, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. PMID:26519392

  10. Antifungal susceptibility and molecular typing of 115 Candida albicans isolates obtained from vulvovaginal candidiasis patients in 3 Shanghai maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chunmei; Zhang, Hongju; Tang, Zhenhua; Chen, Huifen; Gao, Jing; Yue, Chaoyan

    2016-05-01

    In our multicenter study, we studied the distribution of Candida species in vulvovaginal candidiasis patients and investigated antifungal susceptibility profile and genotype of Candida albicans in vaginal swab. A total of 115 Candida albicans strains were detected in 135 clinical isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration determinations showed that 83% and 81% of the 115 Candida albicans strains were susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD) was applied to identify clonally related isolates from different patients at the local level. All tested strains were classified into genotype A (77.4%), genotype B (18.3%), and genotype C (4.3%). Genotype A was further classified into five subtypes and genotype B into two subtypes.Candida albicans was the dominant pathogen of vulvovaginal candidiasis, the majority belonging to genotype A in this study. Exposure to azoles is a risk factor for the emergence of azole resistance among Candida albicans isolated from VVC patients.

  11. Potent and selective inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori glutamate racemase (MurI): pyridodiazepine amines.

    PubMed

    Geng, Bolin; Basarab, Gregory; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Hill, Pamela; Kiely, Andrew; Loch, James; MacPherson, Lawrence; Morningstar, Marshall; Mullen, George; Osimboni, Ekundayo; Satz, Alexander; Eyermann, Charles; Lundqvist, Tomas

    2009-02-01

    An SAR study of an HTS screening hit generated a series of pyridodiazepine amines as potent inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori glutamate racemase (MurI) showing highly selective anti-H. pylori activity, marked improved solubility, and reduced plasma protein binding. X-ray co-crystal E-I structures were obtained. These uncompetitive inhibitors bind at the MurI dimer interface.

  12. Halitosis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Wenhuan; Li, Juan; Xu, Liming; Zhu, Jianhong; Hu, Kewei; Sui, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianzong; Xu, Lingling; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Halitosis is used to describe any disagreeable odor of expired air regardless of its origin. Numerous trials published have investigated the relation between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and halitosis, and even some regimes of H pylori eradication have been prescribed to those patients with halitosis in the clinic. We conducted a meta-analysis to define the correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis. Objectives: To evaluate whether there is a real correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis, and whether H pylori eradication therapy will help relieve halitosis. Methods: We searched several electronic databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Wanfangdata) up to December 2015. Studies published in English and Chinese were considered in this review. After a final set of studies was identified, the list of references reported in the included reports was reviewed to identify additional studies. Screening of titles and abstracts, data extraction and quality assessment was undertaken independently and in duplicate. All analyses were done using Review Manager 5.2 software. Results: A total of 115 articles were identified, 21 of which met the inclusion criteria and presented data that could be used in the analysis. The results showed that the OR of H pylori infection in the stomach between halitosis-positive patients and halitosis-negative patients was 4.03 (95% CI: 1.41–11.50; P = 0.009). The OR of halitosis between H pylori-positive patients and H pylori-negative patients was 2.85 (95% CI: 1.40–5.83; P = 0.004); The RR of halitosis after successful H pylori eradication in those H pylori-infected halitosis-positive patients was 0.17 (95% CI: 0.08–0.39; P <0.0001), compared with those patients without successful H pylori eradication. And the RR of halitosis before successful H pylori eradication therapy was 4.78 (95% CI: 1.45–15.80; P = 0.01), compared with after successful H

  13. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  14. Helicobacter pylori: the balance between a role as colonizer and pathogen.

    PubMed

    Otero, Laura Llorca; Ruiz, Victoria E; Perez Perez, Guillermo I

    2014-12-01

    The isolation of Helicobacter pylori from the human stomach produced significant changes in how gastroenterologists, immunologists, epidemiologists, pathologists and microbiologists have approached gastro-duodenal diseases in the last half of the XX century. However, research of this organism has progressed greatly in the first decade of this century, evidence suggest that H. pylori is associated with disease only in humans older than 40 years, while, the lack of H. pylori colonization is associated with the emergence of new diseases, particularly in younger individuals. These differing effects of H. pylori colonization have created two contrasting concepts: the 'bad' and the 'good' Helicobacter. Following from renewed interest in the normal human microbiome, we need to reconsider our definitions and perhaps recognize that H. pylori might be a normal member of the human gastric microbiome in ancient humans that gradually, as results of the improvement in our environment, is disappearing.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolate Obtained from a Mexican Hospital (Sequence Type 422)

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Jaimes, Semiramis; Salgado-Camargo, Abraham David; Graña-Miraglia, Lucía; Lozano, Luis; Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Volkow-Fernández, Patricia; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a dangerous nosocomial pathogen, particularly for severely ill patients in intensive care units and patients with hematologic malignancies. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate, recovered from a Mexican hospital and classified as sequence type 422 according to the multilocus sequence typing Pasteur scheme. PMID:27340065

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clinical Isolates of Burkholderia mallei Obtained from Nasal Swabs of Glanderous Equines in India

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Praveen; Saini, Sheetal; Khurana, Sandip K.; Elschner, Mandy C.; Mertens, Katja; Barth, Stefanie A.; Tripathi, Bhupendra N.; Singh, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative coccobacillus which causes glanders—a fatal disease of equines that may occasionally be transmitted to humans. Several cases of outbreaks have been reported from India since 2006. This paper presents draft genome sequences of two B. mallei strains isolated from equines affected by glanders in India. PMID:28385832

  17. Frequency of MCR-1-mediated colistin resistance among Escherichia coli clinical isolates obtained from patients in Canadian hospitals (CANWARD 2008-2015)

    PubMed Central

    Walkty, Andrew; Karlowsky, James A.; Adam, Heather J.; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Baxter, Melanie; Mulvey, Michael R.; McCracken, Melissa; Poutanen, Susan M.; Roscoe, Diane; Zhanel, George G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colistin is often used as an antimicrobial of last resort for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli. In 2015, plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Escherichia coli due to MCR-1 was described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of colistin resistance among E. coli clinical isolates obtained from patients in Canadian hospitals as part of the Canadian Ward Surveillance Study (CANWARD) and to determine how often the mcr-1 gene is detected among the colistin-resistant subset. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2015 (excluding 2011), 10 to 15 sentinel hospitals submitted consecutive clinical isolates (1 per patient per infection site) from blood (100-240), respiratory (100-150), urine (25-100) and wound (25-100) infections. We performed susceptibility testing using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methods. Isolates that showed resistance to colistin as defined by European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing breakpoints (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥ 4 µg/mL) were evaluated for the mcr-1 gene by polymerase chain reaction. Results: In total, 5571 E. coli clinical isolates were obtained over the study years. Twelve isolates (0.2%) were resistant to colistin. The proportion of colistin-resistant isolates varied from 0.0% to 0.5% depending on the study year, and there was no clear trend toward increasing resistance over time. Typically the colistin-resistant isolates remained susceptible to antimicrobials from several other classes. Two colistin-resistant isolates (0.04%) were found to harbour the mcr-1 gene. Interpretation: The results suggest that colistin resistance among E. coli human clinical isolates, including resistance mediated by the mcr-1 gene, remains rare in Canada. PMID:28018876

  18. Characterization of feline Helicobacter pylori strains and associated gastritis in a colony of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Handt, L K; Fox, J G; Stalis, I H; Rufo, R; Lee, G; Linn, J; Li, X; Kleanthous, H

    1995-09-01

    Twenty-four young adult domestic cats from a commercial vendor were found to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histopathologic analyses, selected electron microscopy, and urease mapping were performed on mucosal samples collected from the cardias and fundi, bodies, and antra of these cats' stomachs. H. pylori organisms were abundant in all areas of the stomach on the basis of histologic evaluation and urease mapping. H. pylori infection was associated with a moderate to severe lymphofollicular gastritis in 21 of 24 cats (88%). The gastritis was most pronounced in the antral region and consisted mainly of multifocal lymphoplasmacytic follicular infiltrates in the deep mucosa. The severity of gastritis in the antrum corresponded to high numbers of H. pylori there on the basis of the use of the urease assay as an indicator of H. pylori colonization. Ten of 24 cats (42%) also had small to moderate numbers of eosinophils in the gastric mucosa. All 24 cats had gastric lymphoid follicles, with follicles being most prevalent in the antrum. Electron microscopy of gastric tissue revealed numerous H. pylori organisms, some of which were closely adhered to the mucosal epithelium. Human H. pylori gene-specific primers to ureA and ureB amplified products of similar sizes from H. pylori cat isolates. Digestion of the products with restriction enzymes resulted in fragments characteristic of the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of H. pylori isolates from humans. In the domestic cat, H. pylori infection is associated with a lymphofollicular gastritis, consisting of lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration into the lamina propria, and the organism appears to provide chronic antigenic stimulation resulting in the formation of gastric lymphoid follicles.

  19. Characterization of Nivalenol-Producing Fusarium culmorum Isolates Obtained from the Air at a Rice Paddy Field in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da-Woon; Kim, Gi-Yong; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Jueun; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Lee, Chul Won; Lee, Hyang Burm; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Together with the Fusarium graminearum species complex, F. culmorum is a major member of the causal agents of Fusarium head blight on cereals such as wheat, barley and corn. It causes significant yield and quality losses and results in the contamination of grain with mycotoxins that are harmful to humans and animals. In Korea, F. culmorum is listed as a quarantine fungal species since it has yet to be found in the country. In this paper, we report that two isolates (J1 and J2) of F. culmorum were collected from the air at a rice paddy field in Korea. Species identification was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis using multi-locus sequence data derived from five genes encoding translation elongation factor, histone H3, phosphate permease, a reductase, and an ammonia ligase and by morphological comparison with reference strains. Both diagnostic PCR and chemical analysis confirmed that these F. culmorum isolates had the capacity to produce nivalenol, the trichothecene mycotoxin, in rice substrate. In addition, both isolates were pathogenic on wheat heads and corn stalks. This is the first report on the occurrence of F. culmorum in Korea. PMID:27298593

  20. An African origin for the intimate association between humans and Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Linz, Bodo; Balloux, François; Moodley, Yoshan; Manica, Andrea; Liu, Hua; Roumagnac, Philippe; Falush, Daniel; Stamer, Christiana; Prugnolle, Franck; van der Merwe, Schalk W; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y; Perez-Trallero, Emilio; Wadstrom, Torkel; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Achtman, Mark

    2007-02-22

    Infection of the stomach by Helicobacter pylori is ubiquitous among humans. However, although H. pylori strains from different geographic areas are associated with clear phylogeographic differentiation, the age of an association between these bacteria with humans remains highly controversial. Here we show, using sequences from a large data set of bacterial strains that, as in humans, genetic diversity in H. pylori decreases with geographic distance from east Africa, the cradle of modern humans. We also observe similar clines of genetic isolation by distance (IBD) for both H. pylori and its human host at a worldwide scale. Like humans, simulations indicate that H. pylori seems to have spread from east Africa around 58,000 yr ago. Even at more restricted geographic scales, where IBD tends to become blurred, principal component clines in H. pylori from Europe strongly resemble the classical clines for Europeans described by Cavalli-Sforza and colleagues. Taken together, our results establish that anatomically modern humans were already infected by H. pylori before their migrations from Africa and demonstrate that H. pylori has remained intimately associated with their human host populations ever since.

  1. In vitro and In vivo Anti-Helicobacter pylori Activities of Centella asiatica Leaf Extract

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong-Mei; Choi, Myung-Joo; Kim, Jae Min; Lee, Kye Wan; Park, Yu Hwa; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an increased risk of developing upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. However, treatment failure is a major cause of concern mainly due to possible recurrence of infection, the side effects, and resistance to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the activities of Centella asiatica leaf extract (CAE) against H. pylori both in vitro and in vivo. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against 55 clinically isolated strains of H. pylori were tested using an agar dilution method. The MICs of CAE ranged from 0.125 mg/mL to 8 mg/mL, effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth was 2 mg/mL. The anti-H. pylori effects of CAE in vivo were also examined in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice. CAE was orally administrated once daily for 3 weeks at doses of 50 mg/kg and 250 mg/kg. CAE at the 50 mg/kg dose significantly reduced H. pylori colonization in mice gastric mucosa. Our study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effects of CAE against H. pylori infection, and it suggests that CAE may be useful as an alternative therapy. PMID:27752495

  2. The Antibacterial Activity of Honey on Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Nzeako, Basil C; Al-Namaani, Faiza

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This project aimed to assess the antibacterial potential of various brands of honey sold in Muscat area on some isolates of H. pylori and to determine if there is any synergy between honey and amoxycillin or clarithromycin used in the treatment of H. pylori gastritis and duodenal ulcer. Methods: Eight samples of commercial honey were used in the experiment after they were checked for purity by sub-culturing on blood agar and incubating for 48 hours at 37°c. Honey samples showing gross contamination were discarded. Purified culture isolates of H. pylori from our laboratory stock cultures were swabbed on chocolate plate using 1x 104 cfu/ml. One hundred microlitres (100μl) of various honey samples were placed on each plate which was subsequently incubated microaerophilically at 37ºc for 3 days. The presence or absence of growth inhibition zones on each plate was noted and an average zone size of each honey was taken. Honey samples with high zone sizes were further diluted from 1:2–1:8 to find the end-points of their growth inhibition concentrations and the experiment was repeated in triplicates. The synergistic effect between honey, amoxycillin and clarithromycin was done in triplicates by placing honey at various distances between each antibiotic after swabbing chocolate agar with 1x 104 cfu/ml of H. pylori. The plates were incubated as before. Results: All honey samples produced growth inhibition zones with H. pylori no at dilution of honey but had different zone sizes at 1:2–1:8 dilutions. Black Forest honey had the highest antibacterial activity followed by Langnese honey. None of the honeys had a synergistic effect with either clarithromycin or amoxycillin. Conclusion: We conclude that, in vitro, some honey brands possess antibacterial activity against H. pylori and that no synergy or antagonism was observed between honey and clarithromycin or honey and amoxicillin using H. pylori as a test organism. Though no synergy or antagonism was observed

  3. IS1311 and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses, Serotypes, and Drug Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium avium Complex Isolates Obtained from a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dvorska, Lenka; Bartos, Milan; Ostadal, Oldrich; Kaustova, Jarmila; Matlova, Ludmila; Pavlik, Ivo

    2002-01-01

    Six isolates of Mycobacterium avium of genotype dnaJ+ IS901− IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotypes 6 (n = 1), 6/9, (n = 2), and 9 (n = 3) were obtained within a 5-month period from a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient treated for tuberculosis. The isolates were identified with PvuII restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis as a single IS1311 RFLP type and six different IS1245 RFLP types. Six separate colonies/clones obtained by subculture from each of the six isolates were tested for MICs of a set of 10 drugs. This report documents the appearance of isolates that are resistant to antimycobacterial drugs as the duration of therapy increases. Because isolates recovered from the patient following longer duration of treatment were more likely to be resistant to more antimycobacterial drugs, we would conclude that there was selection for antimycobacterial drug-resistant isolates. Analyses of all 36 clones identified three IS1311 and 22 IS1245 types forming three clusters. Tests of 105 environmental samples collected in the home and the work place of the patient yielded 16 mycobacterial isolates, of which one M. avium from soil was of genotype dnaJ+ IS901+ IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotype 2, and the second M. avium from a vacuum cleaner was of genotype dnaJ+ IS901− IS1311+ IS1245+ and serotype 9. Overall analyses of the results did not reveal any relation between serotype, RFLP type, and drug susceptibility. Based on the course of the disease in the patient and different serotypes, IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP types of isolates of M. avium we suppose represent polyclonal infection. PMID:12354870

  4. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  5. Helicobacter pylori Stores Nickel To Aid Its Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Stéphane L.; Miller, Erica F.

    2013-01-01

    The transition metal nickel (Ni) is critical for the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. Indeed the element is a required component of two enzymes, hydrogenase and urease, that have been shown to be important for in vivo colonization of the host gastric mucosa. Urease accounts for up to 10% of the total cellular H. pylori protein content, and therefore the bacterial Ni demand is very high. H. pylori possess two small and abundant histidine-rich, Ni-binding proteins, Hpn and Hpn-like, whose physiological role in the host have not been investigated. In this study, special husbandry conditions were used to control Ni levels in the host (mouse), including the use of Ni-free versus Ni-supplemented food. The efficacy of each diet was confirmed by measuring the Ni concentrations in sera of mice fed with either diet. Colonization levels (based on rank tests) of the Δhpn Δhpn-like double mutants isolated from the mice provided Ni-deficient chow were statistically lower than those for mice given Ni in their diet. In contrast, H. pylori wild-type colonization levels were similar in both host groups (e.g., regardless of Ni levels). Our results indicate that the gastric pathogen H. pylori can utilize stored Ni via defined histidine-rich proteins to aid colonization of the host. PMID:23230291

  6. Isolation of murine intrahepatic immune cells employing a modified procedure for mechanical disruption and functional characterization of the B, T and natural killer T cells obtained.

    PubMed

    Blom, K G; Qazi, M Rahman; Matos, J B Noronha; Nelson, B D; DePierre, J W; Abedi-Valugerdi, M

    2009-02-01

    Intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC) are known to play central roles in immunological responses mediated by the liver, and isolation and phenotypic characterization of these cells is therefore of considerable importance. In the present investigation, we developed a simple procedure for the mechanical disruption of mouse liver that allows efficient isolation and phenotypic characterization of IHIC. These cells are compared with the corresponding cells purified from the liver after enzymatic digestion with different concentrations of collagenase and DNase. The mechanical disruption yielded viable IHIC in considerably greater numbers than those obtained following enzymatic digestion. The IHIC isolated employing the mechanical disruption were heterogeneous in composition, consisting of both innate and adaptive immune cells, of which B, T, natural killer (NK), NK T cells, granulocytes and macrophages were the major populations (constituting 37.5%, 16.5%, 12.1%, 7.9%, 7.9% and 7.5% of the total number of cells recovered respectively). The IHIC obtained following enzymatic digestion contained markedly lower numbers of NK T cells (1.8%). The B, T and NK T cells among IHIC isolated employing mechanical disruption were found to be immunocompetent, i.e. they proliferated in vitro in response to their specific stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, concanavalin A and alpha-galactosylceramide respectively) and produced immunoglobulin M and interferon-gamma. Thus, the simple procedure for the mechanical disruption of mouse liver described here results in more efficient isolation of functionally competent IHIC for various types of investigation.

  7. Comparative Genome Sequencing of an Isogenic Pair of USA800 Clinical Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Obtained before and after Daptomycin Treatment Failure▿†

    PubMed Central

    Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Jones, Marcus; Gourley, Brett L.; Holmes, Michael; Ruf, Rebecca; Balsam, Ashley R.; Boulware, David R.; Kline, Susan; Jawahir, Selina; DeVries, Aaron; Peterson, Scott N.; Daum, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a clinical daptomycin treatment failure in a patient with recurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia in whom daptomycin was administered after a failed empirical treatment course with vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. We had the opportunity to compare the genome sequences of an isogenic pair of daptomycin-susceptible and -resistant MRSA isolates obtained before and after initiation of daptomycin therapy, respectively. The genotype of both isolates was USA800, ST5, SCCmec type IV, agr type II. There was no increase in cell wall thickness in the daptomycin-resistant strain despite having decreased susceptibility to both vancomycin and daptomycin. By comparing the genome sequences by pyrosequencing, we identified a polymorphism (S337L) in the tenth transmembrane segment of the multiple peptide resistance factor, MprF, encoding lysyl phosphatidylglycerol transferase. This enzyme has been shown previously to promote repulsion of daptomycin at the cell surface by addition of positively charged lysine to phosphatidylglycerol. Also, the hlb open reading frame (ORF) encoding the β-toxin was interrupted by a prophage in the daptomycin-susceptible strain; this phage was missing in the daptomycin-resistant isolate and the hlb ORF was restored. Loss of the phage in the resistant isolate also resulted in loss of the virulence factor genes clpP, scn, and sak. This is the first study to use pyrosequencing to compare the genomes of a daptomycin-susceptible/resistant MRSA isolate pair obtained during failed daptomycin therapy in humans. PMID:21343446

  8. Isolation and identification of zoonotic species of genus arcobacter from chicken viscera obtained from retail distributors of the metropolitan area of San José, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Edgar García; Jaramillo, Heriberto Fernández; Ulate, Carolina Chaves; Echandi, María Laura Arias

    2013-05-01

    Arcobacter is a genus of growing importance worldwide; some of its species are considered emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents. In Costa Rica, as well as in other countries, its isolation has been reported, so the objective of this project was to evaluate and identify the presence of Arcobacter in chicken viscera sold in the metropolitan area of San José, Costa Rica, as well as to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns associated with it. One hundred fifty samples of chicken viscera including heart, liver, and other gastrointestinal organs were purchased from 15 supermarkets and 15 local retailers. De Boer and Houf broths were used as enrichment media; isolation was done with Arcobacter-selective medium and with membrane filtration with blood agar. Typical colonies were identified with genus-specific PCR, and species identification was made with multiplex PCR. Susceptibility to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, and tetracycline was done with the Epsilometer test. The isolation frequency of Arcobacter genus obtained in this study was of 17.3%. A total of 33 isolates were obtained from the poultry samples, and according to the multiplex PCR methodology, 22 (66.7%) isolates were identified as Arcobacter butzleri, 8 (24.2%) as Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and 1 (3.1%) as Arcobacter skirrowii. Two strains were not identified. No statistical significant difference was found when the source of samples was compared. Resistance toward chloramphenicol was 68.75%, followed by ampicillin (43.75%) and ciprofloxacin (18.75%); all strains were susceptible to tetracycline.

  9. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Kaisa; Yahara, Koji; Berthenet, Elvire; Lawson, Daniel J; Mikhail, Jane; Kato, Ikuko; Mendez, Alfonso; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Bravo, María Mercedes; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Torres, Javier; Sheppard, Samuel K; Falush, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind) bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations.

  10. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Mikhail, Jane; Kato, Ikuko; Suzuki, Rumiko; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Falush, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind) bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations. PMID:28231283

  11. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  12. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  13. Screening of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus intermedius, and Staphylococcus schleiferi isolates obtained from small companion animals for antimicrobial resistance: a retrospective review of 749 isolates (2003-04).

    PubMed

    Morris, Daniel O; Rook, Kathryn A; Shofer, Frances S; Rankin, Shelley C

    2006-10-01

    Companion animal staphylococcal isolate antibiograms were screened retrospectively to determine the frequency of methicillin-resistant (MR) infection by Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus intermedius, and Staphylococcus schleiferi. Rates of MR were: S. aureus 35%, S. intermedius 17%, and S. schleiferi 40%. Frequency of isolation of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) from dogs and cats was similar, whereas methicillin-resistant S. intermedius (MRSI) and methicillin-resistant S. schleiferi (MRSS) were significantly more common in dogs. MRSS was more commonly associated with superficial (skin and ear canal) infections, whereas MRSA was more commonly associated with deep infections. The MR strain resistance pattern to other classes of antibiotics was also investigated. MRSA was resistant to the most classes of antibiotics, followed by MRSI, while MRSS maintained the most favourable susceptibility profile. MR staphylococci may pose a significant risk to animal and public health. Therefore, to avoid selecting for resistant strains in cases of suspected staphylococcal infection, clinicians should consider culture and susceptibility testing early in the course of treatment.

  14. Analysis of Helicobacter pylori genotypes in clinical gastric wash samples.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Ono, Shoko; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Kudo, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a key factor in the development of gastric cancer; indeed, clearance of H. pylori helps prevent gastric cancer. However, the relationship between gastric cancer and the abundance and diversity of H. pylori genotypes in the stomach remains unknown. Here, we present, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of H. pylori genotypes in gastric washes. A method was first developed to assess diversity and abundance by pyrosequencing and analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a gene associated with clarithromycin resistance. This method was then validated using arbitrarily mixed plasmids carrying 23S rRNA with single nucleotide polymorphisms. Multiple strains were detected in many of 34 clinical samples, with frequency 24.3 ± 24.2 and 26.3 ± 33.8 % for the A2143G and A2144G strains, respectively. Importantly, results obtained from gastric washes were similar to those obtained from biopsy samples. The method provides opportunities to investigate drug resistance in H. pylori and assess potential biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, and should thus be validated in large-scale clinical trials.

  15. Prevalence of the Helicobacter pylori babA2 gene and correlation with the degree of gastritis in infected Slovenian children.

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaž; Šterbenc, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Luzar, Boštjan; Zidar, Nina; Orel, Rok; Poljak, Mario

    2014-10-01

    The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of the babA2 gene within Helicobacter pylori strains circulating in the Slovenian pediatric population, to further clarify its significance in causing inflammation of gastric mucosa in children and to verify whether cagA, vacA, iceA and babA genes work independently or synergistically in causing gastritis. A total of 163 H. pylori isolates obtained from the same number of children were tested for the presence of cagA, vacA and iceA genes using previously established methods, while the babA2 gene was determined using novel polymerase chain reaction assay targeting a 139-bp fragment of the central region of babA2. The babA2 gene was detected in 47.9% of H. pylori samples. The presence of the babA2 gene was strongly associated with cagA, vacA s1 and vacA m1 genotype. The babA2 status correlated positively with bacterial density score, activity of inflammation and chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa. No significant correlation was found between the babA2 status and the presence of atrophy or intestinal metaplasia. In addition, the activity of gastric inflammation and density score were significantly associated with the coexpression of the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1 and babA2 genes. The study, which included the largest number of pediatric H. pylori samples to date, confirmed that babA2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis in children. Furthermore, our results suggest that babA2, cagA and vacA s1 and m1 gene products may work synergistically in worsening the inflammation of gastric mucosa.

  16. Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypic Profiles of Sulfadiazine-Resistant and Sensitive Toxoplasma gondii Isolates Obtained from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Letícia Azevedo; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Vítor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous Toxoplasma gondii studies revealed that mutations in the dhps (dihydropteroate synthase) gene are associated with resistance to sulfonamides. Although Brazilian strains are genotypically different, very limited data are available regarding the susceptibility of strains obtained from human to sulfonamides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulfadiazine (SDZ) against Brazilian isolates of T. gondii and verify whether isolates present polymorphisms in the dhps gene. We also investigated whether the virulence-phenotype and/or genotype were associated with the profile of susceptibility to SDZ. Methods Five T. gondii isolates obtained from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis were used to verify susceptibility. Mice were infected with 104 tachyzoites and orally treated with different doses of SDZ. The mortality curve was evaluated by the Log-rank test. The presence of polymorphisms in the dhps gene was verified using sequencing. A descriptive analysis for 11 Brazilian isolates was used to assess the association between susceptibility, genotype, and virulence-phenotype. Results Statistical analysis showed that TgCTBr03, 07, 08, and 16 isolates were susceptible to SDZ, whereas TgCTBr11 isolate presented a profile of resistance to SDZ. Nineteen polymorphisms were identified in dhps exons. Seven polymorphisms corresponded to non-synonymous mutations, with four being new mutations, described for the first time in this study. No association was found between the profile of susceptibility and the virulence-phenotype or genotype of the parasite. Conclusions There is a high variability in the susceptibilities of Brazilian T. gondii strains to SDZ, with evidence of drug resistance. Despite the large number of polymorphisms identified, the profile of susceptibility to SDZ was not associated with any of the dhps variants identified in this study. Other genetic factors, not yet determined, may be associated with the resistance to SDZ; thus

  17. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Maghbool, Maryam; Maghbool, Masood; Shahriari, Mehdi; Karimi, Mehran

    2009-06-08

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10-15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years). A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150×10(9)/L) or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150×10(9)/L). We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients.

  18. An Additive Effect of Oral N-Acetyl Cysteine on Eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hamidian, Seyed Mohammad-Taghi; Aletaha, Najmeh-sadat; Taslimi, Reza; Montazeri, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori is highly adapted to the gastric environment where it lives within or beneath the gastric mucous layer. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of N-acetyl cysteine to the treatment regimen of H. pylori infection would affect eradication rates of the disease. Methods. A total of 79 H. pylori positive patients were randomized to two therapeutic groups. Both groups received a 14-day course of three-drug regimen including amoxicillin/clarithromycin/omeprazole. Experimental group (38 subjects) received NAC, and control group (41 subjects) received placebo, besides three-drug regimen. H. pylori eradication was evaluated by urea breath test at least 4 weeks after the cessation of therapy. Results. The rate of H. pylori eradication was 72.9% and 60.9% in experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.005). By logistic regression modeling, female gender (OR 3.68, 95% CI: 1.06–5.79; P = 0.040) and treatment including NAC (OR 1.88, 95% CI: 0.68–3.15; P = 0.021) were independent factors associated with H. pylori eradication. Conclusion. The results of the present study show that NAC has an additive effect on the eradication rates of H. pylori obtained with three-drug regimen and appears to be a promising means of eradicating H. pylori infection. PMID:26421191

  19. Sequencing of two sunflower chlorotic mottle virus isolates obtained from different natural hosts shed light on its evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Bejerman, N; Giolitti, F; de Breuil, S; Lenardon, S

    2013-02-01

    Sunflower chlorotic mottle virus (SuCMoV), the most prevalent virus of sunflower in Argentina, was reported naturally infecting not only sunflower but also weeds. To understand SuCMoV evolution and improve the knowledge on its variability, the complete genomic sequences of two SuCMoV isolates collected from Dipsacus fullonum (-dip) and Ibicella lutea (-ibi) were determined from three overlapping cDNA clones and subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analyses. SuCMoV-dip and -ibi genomes were 9,953-nucleotides (nt) long; their sequences contained an open reading frame of 9,561 nucleotides, which encoded a polyprotein of 3,187 amino acids flanked by a 5'-noncoding region (NCR) of 135 nt and a 3'-NCR of 257 nt. SuCMoV-dip and -ibi genome nucleotide sequences were 90.9 identical and displayed 90 and 94.6 % identity to that of SuCMoV-C, and 90.8 and 91.4 % identity to that of SuCMoV-CRS, respectively. P1 of SuCMoV-dip and -ibi was 3-nt longer than that of SuCMoV-CRS, but 12-nt shorter than that of SuCMoV-C. Two recombination events were detected in SuCMoV genome and the analysis of d(N)/d(S) ratio among SuCMoV complete sequences showed that the genomic regions are under different evolutionary constraints, suggesting that SuCMoV evolution would be conservative. Our findings provide evidence that mutation and recombination would have played important roles in the evolutionary history of SuCMoV.

  20. Different visible colors and green fluorescence were obtained from the mutated purple chromoprotein isolated from sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yi-Lin; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2014-08-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like proteins have been studied with the aim of developing fluorescent proteins. Since the property of color variation is understudied, we isolated a novel GFP-like chromoprotein from the carpet anemone Stichodactyla haddoni, termed shCP. Its maximum absorption wavelength peak (λ(max)) is located at 574 nm, resulting in a purple color. The shCP protein consists of 227 amino acids (aa), sharing 96 % identity with the GFP-like chromoprotein of Heteractis crispa. We mutated aa residues to examine any alteration in color. When E63, the first aa of the chromophore, was replaced by serine (E63S), the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-E63S was shifted to 560 nm and exhibited a pink color. When Q39, T194, and I196, which reside in the surrounding 5 Å of the chromophore's microenvironment, were mutated, we found that (1) the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-Q39S was shifted to 518 nm and exhibited a red color, (2) shCP-T194I exhibited a purple-blue color, and (3) an additional mutation at I196H of the mutated protein shCP-E63L exhibited green fluorescence. In contrast, when the aa located neither at the chromophore nor within its microenvironment were mutated, the resultant proteins shCP-L122H, -E138G, -S137D, -T95I, -D129N, -T194V, -E138Q, -G75E, -I183V, and -I70V never altered their purple color, suggesting that mutations at the shCP chromophore and the surrounding 5 Å microenvironment mostly control changes in color expression or cause fluorescence to develop. Additionally, we found that the cDNAs of shCP and its mutated varieties are faithfully and stably expressed both in Escherichia coli and zebrafish embryos.

  1. [Clinical analysis of unsuccessful Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    PubMed

    Szadkowski, Aleksander; Chojnacki, Jan; Klupińska, Grazyna; Wojtuń, Stanisław

    2004-01-01

    Numerous medical reports claim that the effectiveness of H. pylori therapy decreases. The aim of the study was the analysis of the reasons of this phenomenon on own material. The study included 437 subjects, aged 19-64 years with chronic gastritis with H. pylori infection. All patients were subjected to: endoscopy, fast urease test, breath test (UBT-13C) and antibody titer in IgG class was determined. In the case of ineffective therapy bacteriological examination was performed. In the first stage of the therapy pantoprazol (2 x 40 mg) and amoxicillin (2 x 1000 mg) with metronidazol (2 x 500 mg) were applied in 282 subjects for 7 days (group I), amoxicillin with clarithromycin (2 x 500 mg) in 182 subjects (group II) and clarithromycin with metronidazol in 43 subjects (group III). After 6 weeks negative breath test was observed on average in 65.68% without significant differences between the groups. Ineffective therapy was more frequent in subjects over 45 years of age with high intensity of H. pylori colonization and earlier treated with antibiotics due to other reasons; such differences were not observed dependently on the antibody titer. In the second stage of the therapy pantoprazol was still administered but antibacterial drugs were changed among the groups. From among 150 subjects eradication was obtained in 117 (78.0%). In 33 subjects with ineffective therapy bacteriological examination of gastric bioptates confirmed antibiotic resistance in 75.76%. It results from the study that the applied therapy, consistent with current recommendations of the experts, does not ensure H. pylori eradication in part of the patients, what points to the necessity of searching for other effective antibiotics.

  2. Vasorelaxant activity of extracts obtained from Apium graveolens: Possible source for vasorelaxant molecules isolation with potential antihypertensive effect

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Vergara-Galicia; Ángel, Jimenez-Ramirez Luis; Adrián, Tun-Suarez; Francisco, Aguirre-Crespo; Anuar, Salazar-Gómez; Samuel, Estrada-Soto; Ángel, Sierra-Ovando; Emmanuel, Hernandez-Nuñez

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate vasorelaxant effect of organic extracts from Apium graveolens (A. graveolens) which is a part of a group of plants subjected to pharmacological and phytochemical study with the purpose of offering it as an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. Methods An ex vivo method was employed to assess the vasorelaxant activity. This consisted of using rat aortic rings with and without endothelium precontracted with norepinephrine. Results All extracts caused concentration-dependent relaxation in precontracted aortic rings with and without endothelium; the most active extracts were Dichloromethane and Ethyl Acetate extracts from A. graveolens. These results suggested that secondary metabolites responsible for the vasorelaxant activity belong to a group of compounds of medium polarity. Also, our evidence showed that effect induced by dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts from A. graveolens is mediated probably by calcium antagonism. Conclusions A. graveolens represents an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. PMID:24075341

  3. Tupuseleiamides and basiliskamides, new acyldipeptides and antifungal polyketides produced in culture by a Bacillus laterosporus isolate obtained from a tropical marine habitat.

    PubMed

    Barsby, Todd; Kelly, Michael T; Andersen, Raymond J

    2002-10-01

    Laboratory cultures of PNG 276, a Bacillus laterosporus isolate obtained from coastal waters off Papua New Guinea, have been shown to produce the novel metabolites basiliskamide A (1), basiliskamide B (2), tupuseleiamide A (3), and tupusleiamide B (4). The structures of 1 to 4 were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data and chemical degradation. Basiliskamides A (1) and B (2) show potent in vitro anti-Candida activity.

  4. Genome Sequencing of 10 Helicobacter pylori Pediatric Strains from Patients with Nonulcer Dyspepsia and Peptic Ulcer Disease.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alexandra; Rocha, Raquel; Vale, Filipa F; Vieira, Luís; Sampaio, Daniel A; Dias, Ricardo; Gomes, João P; Oleastro, Mónica

    2015-02-05

    We present draft genome sequences of 10 Helicobacter pylori clinical strains isolated from children. This will be important for future studies of comparative genomics in order to better understand the virulence determinants underlying peptic ulcer disease.

  5. A Novel Reduction Strategy of Clarithromycin Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Tadjrobehkar, Omid; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance is a major therapeutic problem in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori clarithromycin resistant mutants have been evolved during antibiotic therapy, this is mainly due to 23s rRNA point mutations. Objectives: In the present study, we investigated anti-mutational features of four traditionally Iranian medicinal plants on three local isolated H. pylori strains. Materials and Methods: In this study clarithromycin resistance was used as a mutation indicator. Frequencies of such mutations in the presence and absence of plant extracts were evaluated. Mutation incidence was evaluated by Luria Delbruck fluctuation assay. Results: The mean mutation frequency in H. pylori isolates was 27 × 10-9 which decreased at the presence of Mirtus communis, Teucrium polium, Achillea millefolium and Thymus vulgaris of plant extract, this amount was 97.4%, 95.2%, 63.7% and 19.6% respectively. Moreover, A-to-G transition at 2143 position (A2143G) was detected by PCR-sequencing as major point mutation causing clarithromycin resistant mutants. Conclusions: The efficacy of these plant extracts in prohibiting resistance showed considerable results. This finding should be considered to use plant extracts with antibiotics to develop more effective eradication regimens. PMID:25741431

  6. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated.

  7. Compositional analysis of Helicobacter pylori rough-form lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Moran, A P; Helander, I M; Kosunen, T U

    1992-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the macromolecular heterogeneity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from seven fresh clinical isolates and three culture collection strains of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori. All the clinical isolates produced smooth-form LPS with O side chains of relatively homogeneous chain length, whereas the culture collection strains yielded rough-form LPS. A better yield of the latter LPS was obtained when combined protease pretreatment and hot phenol-water extraction were used than when the conventional phenol-water technique alone was used for extraction. The LPS of the three culture collection strains (S-24, C-5437, and NCTC 11637) were chemically characterized. Constituents common to all the LPS were fucose, D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-glycero-D-manno-heptose, L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, and 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid. The molar ratios of the hexoses differed between different strains, thereby reflecting structural differences. Phosphate, phosphorylethanolamine, and pyrophosphorylethanolamine were present also. Free lipid A contained D-glucosamine and fatty acids, with phosphate and a minor amount of ethanolamine. The major fatty acids were ester- and amide-bound 3-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid and ester-bound octadecanioc and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, with minor amounts of ester-bound tetradecanoic and hexadecanoic acids. In addition to the uncommonly long 3-hydroxy fatty acids, an unusual phosphorylation pattern was deduced to be present in the lipid A. Images PMID:1735724

  8. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    PubMed

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  9. Identification of Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic patients in Surabaya, Indonesia, using five diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, M; Shiota, S; Suzuki, R; Matsuda, M; Uchida, T; Kido, Y; Kawamoto, F; Maimunah, U; Adi, P; Rezkitha, Y; Nasronudin; Nusi, I; Yamaoka, Y

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia is controversial. We examined the H. pylori infection rate in 78 patients in a hospital in Surabaya using five different tests, including culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urease test, and urine antibody test. Furthermore, we analysed virulence factors in H. pylori strains from Indonesia. The H. pylori infection rate was only 11.5% in all patients studied, and 2.3% of Javanese patients and 18.0% of Chinese patients were infected (P = 0.01). Although severe gastritis was not observed, activity and inflammation were significantly higher in patients positive for H. pylori than in patients negative for H. pylori. Among genotypes identified from five isolated strains, cagA was found in four; two were vacA s1m1. All cagA-positive strains were oipA 'on' and iceA1 positive. We confirmed both a low H. pylori infection rate and a low prevalence of precancerous lesions in dyspeptic patients in a Surabaya hospital, which may contribute to the low incidence of gastric cancer in Indonesia.

  10. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D.; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori. In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA. Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity. PMID:26930708

  11. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: from molecular pathogenesis to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Wen

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) was originally identified as a virulence factor of H. pylori for its ability to activate neutrophils to generate respiratory burst by releasing reactive oxygen species. Later on, HP-NAP was also found to be involved in the protection of H. pylori from DNA damage, supporting the survival of H. pylori under oxidative stress. This protein is highly conserved and expressed by virtually all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The majority of patients infected with H. pylori produced antibodies specific for HP-NAP, suggesting its important role in immunity. In addition to acting as a pathogenic factor by activating the innate immunity through a wide range of human leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, HP-NAP also mediates adaptive immunity through the induction of T helper cell type I responses. The pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP not only make it play an important role in disease pathogenesis but also make it a potential candidate for clinical use. Even though there is no convincing evidence to link HP-NAP to a disease outcome, recent findings supporting the pathogenic role of HP-NAP will be reviewed. In addition, the potential clinical applications of HP-NAP in vaccine development, clinical diagnosis, and drug development will be discussed.

  12. Lactobacilli Reduce Helicobacter pylori Attachment to Host Gastric Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting Adhesion Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, Nele; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Gebreegziabher, Hanna; Saroj, Sunil D; Eriksson, Beatrice; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Roos, Stefan; Lindén, Sara; Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-05-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, including the harsh environment of the stomach, harbors a large variety of bacteria, of which Lactobacillus species are prominent members. The molecular mechanisms by which species of lactobacilli interfere with pathogen colonization are not fully characterized. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of lactobacillus strains upon the initial attachment of Helicobacter pylori to host cells. Here we report a novel mechanism by which lactobacilli inhibit adherence of the gastric pathogen H. pylori In a screen with Lactobacillus isolates, we found that only a few could reduce adherence of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. Decreased attachment was not due to competition for space or to lactobacillus-mediated killing of the pathogen. Instead, we show that lactobacilli act on H. pylori directly by an effector molecule that is released into the medium. This effector molecule acts on H. pylori by inhibiting expression of the adhesin-encoding gene sabA Finally, we verified that inhibitory lactobacilli reduced H. pylori colonization in an in vivo model. In conclusion, certain Lactobacillus strains affect pathogen adherence by inhibiting sabA expression and thereby reducing H. pylori binding capacity.

  13. Comparative proteome analysis of untreated and Helicobacter pylori-treated HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Fan, Xue-Gong; Chen, Ren; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Xue-Ping; Tian, Xue-Fei; Chen, Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathological effect of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) on human hepatic cells, proteomic methods were used to find and to identify proteins that were overexpressed in HepG2 cells treated by H pylori. METHODS: H pylori was co-cultured with HepG2 for 6 h. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to gain the protein expression pattern of untreated and H pylori-treated HepG2. After staining and image analysis, spots of interest were isolated and subjected to mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Seven proteins, which were up-regulated in H pylori-treated HepG2 cells, were identified. These proteins included integrin beta-1, protein kinase C alpha, LIM/homeobox protein Lhx1, eIF-2-beta, MAP kinase kinase 3, PINCH protein and Ras-related protein Rab-37, which involved in transcription regulation, signal transduction, metabolism and so on. CONCLUSION: H pylori may exert the pathological effect on HepG2 cells by up-regulating the expression of some proteins. PMID:15948260

  14. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  15. Is There a Role for Probiotics in Helicobacter pylori Therapy?

    PubMed

    Dore, Maria P; Goni, Elisabetta; Di Mario, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The role of probiotics in Helicobacter pylori therapy remains unclear. Lactobacilli can be shown to inhibit H pylori in vitro. Some strains of Lactobacilli may exert specific antimicrobial effects. There is no strong evidence of a benefit on eradication rate when probiotics are added to a regimen. Despite promising results obtained using compounds of L reuteri and S boulardii, high-quality trials are needed to define the role of probiotics as adjuvant therapy. Variables that remain to be studied with L reuteri, currently the most promising strain, include dosage, frequency of administration, administration in relation to meals, and duration of therapy.

  16. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori urease activity by sucralfate and sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1997-06-01

    The effect of gastroprotective agents, sucralfate and sulglycotide, on the in vitro activity of H. pylori urease was investigated. The bacterium was subjected to sonication, centrifuged, and the supernatant used as an enzyme source. The assays revealed that the rate of urea degradation was proportional to enzyme protein up to 100 micrograms and remained constant with time for 10 min. Introduction of sucralfate or sulglycotide to the assay system led to the reduction in the rate of ammonia production. With both drugs the optimal inhibition was attained at 10 micrograms/ml, at which dose a 63.1% decrease in urease activity occurred with sucralfate and a 70.2% inhibition was obtained with sulglycotide. The findings demonstrate that the inhibitory action of sucralfate and sulglycotide on H. pylori urease activity may be of value in the treatment of gastric disease associated with H. pylori infection.

  17. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Samples of Gastric Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Leda Maria Delmondes Freitas; Menezes, Lania Barreto de Oliveira; de Souza Neta, Adozina Marques; Leite Rolemberg, Paulo Candido; Souza, Lais Dantas; Barreto, Ikaro Daniel de Carvalho; Meurer, Luise

    2017-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection affects about 50% of the world population and its association with environmental factors and host properties is involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The study aimed to estimate the prevalence of H. pylori in samples of gastric mucosa biopsies, correlate the presence of the bacteria in the sample with the variables age, sex and origin, to identify the types of lesions found in patients with H. pylori, and to evaluate the association of the lesions with the region of the gastric mucosa. Methods A cross-sectional, retrospective study was carried out in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil, from January 2013 to December 2015. A total of 45,206 gastric mucosal biopsies were obtained from patients submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Of the reports evaluated, 12,909 met the inclusion criteria since they presented the patient’s demographic data as well as the histopathological characteristics of gastric mucosal regions and positivity for H. pylori. Data were analyzed by IBM SPSS Statistic 20 and subjected to descriptive analyses (categorical variables) and inferential (Pearson’s Qui-square and linear association tests) and multiple correspondence analyses. Significance level adopted 5%. Results Of the total of 12,909 (28.6%) reports evaluated, 67% (8,647) came from urban areas and 64.5% (8,320) were female. The mean age (standard deviation (SD)) was 43 years, ranging from 8 to 100 years, prevailing between 21 and 60 years. Among the types of gastric mucosa analyzed, 95.5% (12,322) were of the antral mucosa. The absence of glandular atrophy, the mild infection intensity for H. pylori, the absence of metaplasia, the presence of foveolar hyperplasia and lymphoid follicles were statistically significant (P < 0.001) in this region. In the fundic region, the evidence of fibrinoleucocytic crust and lymphoid follicles was significant (P < 0.001). There was no evidence of associated ulcerated lesions or significant relationship

  18. Phenotypic and genotypic characters of isolates of Pasteurella multocida obtained from back-yard poultry and from two outbreaks of avian cholera in avifauna in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Christensen, J P; Dietz, H H; Bisgaard, M

    1998-01-01

    Two outbreaks of fowl cholera in the avifauna in Denmark, affecting primarily eiders but also cormorants, gulls and oyster-catchers were shown to be caused by the same clone of Pasteurella multocida ssp. multocida by restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and ribotyping, using the enzymes HpaII and HhaI and phenotypic characterization. This observation indicated spread by migratory birds. It was shown that the outbreak clone was closely related to isolates of Pasteurella multocida ssp. multocida obtained from back-yard poultry in Denmark, including chickens, pheasants, turkeys and ducks. The only detectable difference between the outbreak clone and some of these strains concerned the size of one fragment. These results indicate a possible exchange of P. multocida ssp. multocida between populations of wild birds and back-yard poultry. Among the DNA fingerprinting methods used, restriction enzyme analysis offered the highest discrimination among thirty strains obtained from back-yard poultry. The restriction enzymes HpaII and HhaI generated almost the same number of profile types, 17 and 15 respectively, but only HpaII differentiated the outbreak clone from the group of closely related strains isolated from back-yard poultry. Ribotyping, using the same enzymes, resulted in 12 and 10 different profile types, respectively. The outbreak isolates did not harbour any plasmids, while six out of the 30 strains originating from back-yard poultry (20%) carried a cryptic plasmid of approximately 3.4 kb.

  19. Comparison of drug sensitivity and genotypes of clinically isolated strains of levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from Okinawa Island, the Japanese main island and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Satoko; Fujita, Jiro; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Haranaga, Shusaku; Nakasone, Isamu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Uno, Tsukasa

    2011-08-01

    The prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. In the present study, a comparison of drug sensitivity and genotypes of clinically isolated strains of levofloxacin (LVFX)-resistant S. pneumoniae obtained from Hong Kong, Okinawa Island and the Japanese main island (Honshu) was performed. MICs of quinolones (LVFX, tosufloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin and sitafloxacin (STFX)) and other antibiotics (penicillin G, cefcapene, cefditoren, clarithromycin and azithromycin) were determined by a microdilution broth method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Standards. The quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE of these strains were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. All 40 strains tested had more than one amino-acid substitution in the QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC or parE. Although there seemed to be some clonality in strains obtained from Hong Kong, there was no clonality in strains obtained from Okinawa and Japan. Strains obtained from Hong Kong, Okinawa Island and the Japanese main island were genetically different by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The range of MIC values of STFX against isolates resistant to LVFX (MIC 4-32 mg l(-1)) was 0.12-0.5 mg l(-1), and MIC(80) values of STFX against LVFX-resistant isolates were 0.25 mg l(-1). This study suggests that LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae is similar in all three locations and STFX is potent against LVFX-resistant S. pneumoniae with multiple mutations in QRDRs of gyrase A and topoisomerase IV.

  20. Comparative analysis of gastric bacterial microbiota in Mongolian gerbils after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takako; Matsuki, Takahiro; Asahara, Takashi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Kurata, Satoshi; Woo, Timothy Derg-hoong; Nomoto, Koji; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative (qt) real time PCR using 16SrDNA primers is useful for determination of the bacterial composition of the gastric microbiota in Mongolian gerbils. The aim of this study was to determine the change in the gastric microbiota after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori. One year after inoculation with H. pylori, five gerbils were determined as H. pylori-positive and 6 gerbils H. pylori-negative by culture and real time qt PCR methods. The gastric microbiota of each group of gerbils was also compared with that of 6 gerbils uninfected with H. pylori. DNA from the Atopobium cluster, Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were detected in the gastric mucus of both infected and uninfected gerbils. In contrast, Eubacterium cylindroides group and Prevotella spp. were detected only in H. pylori-negative gerbils. The numbers of C. leptum subgroup, C. coccoides group and Bifidobacterium spp. in gastric mucus of H. pylori-negative Mongolian gerbils were significantly lower than those in non-infected gerbils. The results obtained suggest that the composition of gastric indigenous microbiota in Mongolian gerbils may be disturbed by long-term infection with H. pylori, and that these changes may in fact inhibit H. pylori infection.

  1. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M; Baker, Sandy T; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L; Wolfson, Marla R

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation-6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung.

  2. A Novel Approach for Ovine Primary Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Isolation and Culture from Fresh and Cryopreserved Tissue Obtained from Premature and Juvenile Animals

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewicz, Mariola M.; Baker, Sandy T.; Wu, Jichuan; Hubert, Terrence L.; Wolfson, Marla R.

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo ovine model provides a clinically relevant platform to study cardiopulmonary mechanisms and treatments of disease; however, a robust ovine primary alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell culture model is lacking. The objective of this study was to develop and optimize ovine lung tissue cryopreservation and primary ATII cell culture methodologies for the purposes of dissecting mechanisms at the cellular level to elucidate responses observed in vivo. To address this, we established in vitro submerged and air-liquid interface cultures of primary ovine ATII cells isolated from fresh or cryopreserved lung tissues obtained from mechanically ventilated sheep (128 days gestation—6 months of age). Presence, abundance, and mRNA expression of surfactant proteins was assessed by immunocytochemistry, Western Blot, and quantitative PCR respectively on the day of isolation, and throughout the 7 day cell culture study period. All biomarkers were significantly greater from cells isolated from fresh than cryopreserved tissue, and those cultured in air-liquid interface as compared to submerged culture conditions at all time points. Surfactant protein expression remained in the air-liquid interface culture system while that of cells cultured in the submerged system dissipated over time. Despite differences in biomarker magnitude between cells isolated from fresh and cryopreserved tissue, cells isolated from cryopreserved tissue remained metabolically active and demonstrated a similar response as cells from fresh tissue through 72 hr period of hyperoxia. These data demonstrate a cell culture methodology using fresh or cryopreserved tissue to support study of ovine primary ATII cell function and responses, to support expanded use of biobanked tissues, and to further understanding of mechanisms that contribute to in vivo function of the lung. PMID:26999050

  3. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  4. Validation of a High-Throughput Multiplex Genetic Detection System for Helicobacter pylori Identification, Quantification, Virulence, and Resistance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanmei; Zhao, Fuju; Kong, Mimi; Wang, Shiwen; Nan, Li; Hu, Binjie; Olszewski, Michal A.; Miao, Yingxin; Ji, Danian; Jiang, Wenrong; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Jinghao; Chen, Fei; Xiang, Ping; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is closely related to various gastroduodenal diseases. Virulence factors and bacterial load of H. pylori are associated with clinical outcomes, and drug-resistance severely impacts the clinical efficacy of eradication treatment. Existing detection methods are low-throughput, time-consuming and labor intensive. Therefore, a rapid and high-throughput method is needed for clinical diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring for H. pylori. High-throughput Multiplex Genetic Detection System (HMGS) assay was established to simultaneously detect and analyze a set of genes for H. pylori identification, quantification, virulence, and drug resistance by optimizing the singlet-PCR and multiple primers assay. Twenty-one pairs of chimeric primers consisted of conserved and specific gene sequences of H. pylori tagged with universal sequence at the 5′ end were designed. Singlet-PCR assay and multiple primers assay were developed to optimize the HMGS. The specificity of HMGS assay was evaluated using standard H. pylori strains and bacterial controls. Six clinical isolates with known genetic background of target genes were detected to assess the accuracy of HMGS assay. Artificial mixed pathogen DNA templates were used to evaluate the ability to distinguish mixed infections using HMGS assay. Furthermore, gastric biopsy specimens with corresponding isolated strains were used to assess the capability of HMGS assay in detecting biopsy specimens directly. HMGS assay was specific for H. pylori identification. HMGS assay for H. pylori target genes detection were completely consistent with the corresponding genetic background. Mixed infection with different drug-resistant isolates of H. pylori could be distinguished by HMGS assay. HMGS assay could efficiently diagnose H. pylori infection in gastric biopsy specimens directly. HMGS assay is a rapid and high throughput method for the simultaneous identification and quantification of H. pylori, analysis of

  5. Regulation of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Within the Context of Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Noto, Jennifer M; Lee, Josephine Y; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Cover, Timothy L; Amieva, Manuel R; Peek, Richard M

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains that harbor the oncoprotein CagA increase gastric cancer risk, and this risk is augmented under iron-deficient conditions. We demonstrate here that iron depletion induces coccoid morphology in strains lacking cagA. To evaluate the stability of augmented H. pylori virulence phenotypes stimulated by low-iron conditions, H. pylori isolated from iron-depleted conditions in vivo were serially passaged in vitro. Long-term passage decreased the ability of hypervirulent strains to translocate CagA or induce interleukin 8, indicating that hypervirulent phenotypes stimulated by low-level iron conditions are reversible. Therefore, rectifying iron deficiency may attenuate disease among H. pylori-infected persons with no response to antibiotics.

  6. Chemical composition and anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of Satureja bachtiarica Bunge essential oil.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Tahereh; Moradi, Parisa; Mahboubi, Mohaddese; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Momtaz, Hassan; Hamedi, Behzhad

    2015-01-15

    Resistance of H. pylori strains to common antibiotics has been developed in different parts of the world and continues to increase. It is important to investigate the novel and efficient anti-H. pylori drugs, among which the plants would be suitable sources. Satureja bachtiarica Bunge is traditionally used as antimicrobial agent. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of S. bachtiarica Bunge essential oil against 10 clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods. The chemical composition of essential oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Carvacrol (45.5%) and thymol (27.9%) were the primary constituents of oil, followed by p-cymene (4.4%), and γ-terpinene (4.0%). S. bachtiarica essential oil showed strong antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of H. pylori (17.6 ± 1.1 mm and 0.035 ± 0.13 μl/ml). Carvacrol, as the first main component, had a significant role in this effect, whereas in the presence of thymol, the antibacterial effect of carvacrol was reduced. Therefore, S. bachtiarica essential oil can be applied as an alternative agent for treatment of H. pylori infections. More studies would be required to better clarify its mechanism of action on H. pylori.

  7. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Himaya, S.W.A.; Dewapriya, Pradeep; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation.

  8. Usefulness of antimicrobial susceptibility in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Cosme, A; Montes, M; Martos, M; Gil, I; Mendarte, U; Salicio, Y; Piñeiro, L; Recasens, M T; Ibarra, B; Sarasqueta, C; Bujanda, L

    2013-04-01

    The rate of eradication of Helicobacter pylori with standard triple therapy using omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin (OAC) is unacceptable in populations with high rates of clarithromycin resistance (15-20%). The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 10-day OAC therapy as the first-line treatment in patients diagnosed by culture with antimicrobial susceptibility or diagnosed by a (13) C-labelled urea breath test (UBT) without antimicrobial susceptibility in an area where the clarithromycin resistance rate was 15-20%. This was a retrospective cohort study of 266 patients, recruited consecutively throughout 2008. A total of 247 H. pylori-infected patients received antibiotic therapy (221 received the 10-day OAC therapy and 26 received other regimens) of which 134 patients were diagnosed by culture of gastric samples followed by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and 113 were diagnosed by UBT. In all patients, the eradication of H. pylori was checked by UBT. The cost of eradication by 10-day OAC treatment was assessed in each patient. The success rate of 10-day OAC therapy in patients diagnosed by culture and by UBT was 88% (103/117) and 49% (51/104), respectively (p <0.0005). The treatment was also more cost-effective in the former of these two groups (€571 versus €666). To perform culture and antimicrobial susceptibility of the H. pylori isolates was a more successful and cost effective strategy than empirical 10-day OAC treatment in populations with high rates of resistance to clarithromycin.

  9. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication

    PubMed Central

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiologic link between the H. pylori infection and metabolic changes is inconstant and controversial. Growth delay was described mainly in low-income regions with high prevalence of the infection, where probably other nutritional and social factors contribute to it. The timely eradication of the infection will lead to a more healthy development of the young population, along with preventing peptic ulcers and gastric cancer An increase of total, low density lipoprotein and high density liporotein cholesterol levels in some infected people creates an atherogenic lipid profile which could promote atherosclerosis with its complications, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Well designed and adequately powered long-term studies are required to see whether eradication of the infection will prevent these conditions. In case of glucose metabolism, the most consistent association was found between H. pylori and insulin resistance: again, proof that eradication prevents this common metabolic disturbance is expected. The results of eradication with standard regimens in diabetics are significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients, thus, more active regimens must be found to obtain better results. Successful eradication itself led to an increase of body mass index and cholesterol levels in some populations, while in others no such changes were encountered. Uncertainities of the metabolic consequences of H. pylori infection must be clarified in the future. PMID:24833852

  10. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  11. Prevalence and Phylogenetic Characterization of Escherichia coli and Hygiene Indicator Bacteria Isolated from Leafy Green Produce, Beef, and Pork Obtained from Farmers' Markets in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Scheinberg, Joshua A; Dudley, Edward G; Campbell, Jonathan; Roberts, Beth; DiMarzio, Michael; DebRoy, Chitrita; Cutter, Catherine N

    2017-02-01

    The popularity of farmers' markets in the United States has led to over 8,400 farmers' markets being in operation in 2015. As farmers' markets have increased in size and complexity in the kinds of foods sold at these venues, so have the potential food safety risks. Since 2008, seven major foodborne illness outbreaks and two recalls associated with food products from farmers' markets have occurred, causing 80 known reported illnesses and one death. Various researchers also have observed vendors performing high-risk food safety retail behaviors, and others have identified microbiological hazards in foods sold at farmers' markets. In this study, the presence of hygiene indicators (coliforms, fecal coliforms, Listeria spp., and Escherichia coli ) was assessed in select samples of leafy green produce and meat obtained from farmers' markets in Pennsylvania. E. coli isolates were further characterized by phylogenetic profile and virulence potential. E. coli was present in 40% (20 of 50) and 18% (9 of 50) of beef and pork samples, respectively, and in 28% (15 of 54), 29% (15 of 52), and 17% (8 of 46) of kale, lettuce, and spinach samples, respectively. Listeria spp. was found in 8% (4 of 50) of beef samples, 2% (1 of 54) of kale samples, 4% (2 of 52) of lettuce samples, and 7% (3 of 46) of spinach samples. Among the 10 Listeria spp. isolates, 3 were identified as L. monocytogenes . E. coli isolated from meat samples mainly clustered into phylogroup B1 (66%; 19 of 29), whereas produce isolates clustered into phylogroups B2 (36%; 14 of 39) and B1 (33%; 13 of 39). These E. coli isolates possessed the fimH, iroN, hlyD, and eae genes associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli . The high prevalence but low levels of E. coli and Listeria spp. found on both produce and meat products obtained from farmers' markets in this study strongly indicate that farmers' market vendors would benefit greatly from food safety training and increased

  12. Genetically different clonal isolates of Trichomonas gallinae, obtained from the same bird, can vary in their drug susceptibility, an in vitro evidence.

    PubMed

    Zimre-Grabensteiner, Elvira; Arshad, Najma; Amin, Aziza; Hess, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a flagellated protozoon which parasitizes in the upper digestive tract of different birds, especially columbiformes (doves and pigeons) and falconiformes. The parasite is also a common inhabitant of the crop of psittacine birds and is frequently detected in budgerigars. The lesions associated with T. gallinae infection of the upper digestive tract range from mild inflammation of the mucosa to large caseous lesions that block the lumen of the oesophagus. Nitroimidazoles are considered to be the drugs of choice for the treatment of trichomonosis. However, only a few studies report the existence of resistant strains of T. gallinae to these drugs. Thus, in the present investigation cloned cultures of T. gallinae obtained from budgerigars and pigeons were analysed for the first time for their in vitro susceptibilities against four 5´-nitroimidazole derivates, including metronidazole, dimetridazole, ronidazole and ornidazole. Significantly different minimal lethal concentrations (MLCs) were observed for them against all four drugs. The lowest MLCs revealed the Trichomonas isolates obtained from two budgerigars, ranging from 2.0 ± 0.3 to 3.0 ± 0.7 μg/ml for metronidazole and dimetridazole, and from 2.0 ± 0.6 to 6.7 ± 1.7 μg/ml for ornidazole and ronidazole. Contrary to this, the highest MLCs were recorded for one Trichomonas isolate obtained from a pigeon, ranging from 83.3 ± 6.7 (for dimetridazole and ronidazole) to 103.3 ± 3.3 μg/ml (for metronidazole and ornidazole). The data obtained for the resistance testing were further compared with already available genetic data of the small subunit rRNA gene sequences and ITS-1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS-2 sequences, indicating a certain correlation between in vitro results and strain relationships.

  13. An optimised protocol to isolate high-quality genomic DNA from seed tissues streamlines the workflow to obtain direct estimates of seed dispersal distances in gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    García, C; Escribano-Ávila, G

    2016-05-01

    Genotyping of maternally derived seed tissues from georefered seeds that moved away from their source tree yield direct estimates of seed dispersal distances when the location and the genotype of the fruiting tree are available. These estimates are instrumental in forecasting the response of plant communities to drivers of global change, such as fragmentation or the expansion of invasive species. Obtaining robust assessments of seed dispersal distances requires comparing reliable multilocus genotypes of maternally derived seed tissues and fruiting trees, as previously shown for angiosperm species. However, robust estimates of seed dispersal distances based on direct methods are rare in non-model gymnosperms due to the difficulty in isolating high quality DNA from inconspicuous maternally derived seed tissues. These tissues tend to yield low DNA quantities that increase the frequency of genotyping errors. Here, we deliver a step-by-step visual protocol used to identify and isolate different seed tissues of interest for dispersal studies: embryos (2n, bi-parentally derived), seed coats (2n, maternally derived), and megagametophytes (n, maternally derived). We also provide an optimised lab protocol used to obtain multilocus genotypes from the target seed tissue. These broadly applicable protocols proved successful both in avoiding contamination among different seed tissues and providing reliable multilocus genotypes.

  14. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and related factors among university students in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Tayfun; Aygin, Dilek; Sen, Selen; Yucel, Oya

    2008-05-01

    The frequency and risk factors for contamination of Helicobacter pylori infection was investigated among Sakarya University students. Two-hundred students randomly chosen from among those who volunteered for the study and met its criteria were included. Data were obtained by a questionnaire. H. pylori positivity was checked with the monoclonal H. pylori stool antigen test. Statistical analysis was done with chi-square test. The average age of the subjects was 21.14 +/- 2.06, and 76% of them were female. Monthly family income was below 575 Euros in 69.5% of them, and 56% were living in state dormitories. H. pylori positivity was found to be as high as 63% in our group. According to the qustionnaire (age, gender, blood groups, family income, crowded family living conditions, smoking, alcohol and caffeine consumption, the presence of gastric symptoms, family history, and hygienic behaviors), no statistical differences were found between the H. pylori positive and negative students. These data support the finding that personal and environmental conditions in adults did not affect H. pylori infectivity, and that H. pylori might be acquired in childhood.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection with intestinal metaplasia: An independent risk factor for colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ye; Chen, Yi-Na; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Chun-Jing; Jin, Yin; Pan, Shuang; Wu, Jian-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To explore the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection status, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and colorectal adenomas. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed 1641 individuals aged ≥ 40 years who underwent physical examination, laboratory testing, 13C-urea breath testing, gastroscopy, colonoscopy, and an interview to ascertain baseline characteristics and general state of health. Histopathological results were obtained by gastric and colorectal biopsies. RESULTS The prevalence of H. pylori infection and adenomas was 51.5% (845/1641) and 18.1% (297/1641), respectively. H. pylori infection was significantly correlated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.535, 95%CI: 1.044-1.753, P = 0.022; adjusted OR = 1.359, 95%CI: 1.035-1.785, P = 0.028). Individuals with IM had an elevated risk of colorectal adenomas (crude OR = 1.664, 95%CI: 1.216-2.277, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.381, 95%CI: 0.998-1.929, P = 0.059). Stratification based on H. pylori infection stage and IM revealed that IM accompanied by H. pylori infection was significantly associated with an increased risk of adenomas (crude OR = 2.109, 95%CI: 1.383-3.216, P = 0.001; adjusted OR = 1.765, 95%CI: 1.130-2.757, P = 0.012). CONCLUSION H. pylori-related IM is associated with a high risk of colorectal adenomas in Chinese individuals. PMID:28293091

  16. Evidence for ethnic tropism of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S; Fraser, A; Holliss, B; Schmid, J; O'Toole, P W

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is linked to gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. Peptic ulcer disease, as distinct from chronic asymptomatic infection, is strongly associated with expression of bacterial virulence markers, including a major antigen, CagA, and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. We have previously described significant differences in colonization rates, independent of socioeconomic status, among ethnic groups in New Zealand. To evaluate relative risks for peptic ulcer disease, we examined the frequency of two virulence markers in H. pylori strains infecting these ethnic groups. Although these markers occurred significantly more frequently in strains isolated from Polynesians than in strains from Europeans, this frequency was not reflected in the incidence of peptic ulcer disease in the two groups. DNA fingerprinting of the urease gene showed that Polynesians are more frequently infected by a group of strains which are genetically distinct from those affecting European New Zealanders. Our data suggest that separate bacterial lineages may have evolved in parallel with race-specific specialization. PMID:9284141

  17. PCR detection of colonization by Helicobacter pylori in conventional, euthymic mice based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J G; Kong, L; Abruzzo, G K; Gill, C J; Flattery, A M; Scott, P M; Bramhill, D; Cioffe, C; Thompson, C M; Bartizal, K

    1996-01-01

    Many animal models of Helicobacter infection have been described, including infection in rhesus monkeys, ferrets, gnotobiotic piglets, and mice. These animal models utilize a combination of detection methods, including culture, urease testing, and histopathology, all of which may be unreliable, insensitive, or labor-intensive. Development of new animal models of Helicobacter pylori requires new methods of detection with increased sensitivity and specificity. We have developed sensitive and specific PCR primers based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence of H. pylori. The primers detected single-copy 16S DNA representing 0.2 cell of pure H. pylori (2 cells in the presence of mouse stomach mucosal DNA) and did not cross-react with closely related bacteria. We were able to detect colonization by H. pylori in conventional, euthymic, outbred mice up to 4 weeks postinoculation with a high percentage of isolates tested. One isolate of H. pylori was detected by PCR in 100% of the mice at 6 months and 60% of the mice 1 year after inoculation. Approximately 10(3) to 10(4) H. pylori cells per stomach were detected by utilizing this PCR methodology semiquantitatively. These primers and PCR methodology have facilitated detection of H. pylori colonization in conventional, euthymic mice, colonization which may not have been detectable by other methods. PMID:8770506

  18. Promising in vitro and in vivo inhibition of multidrug-resistant Helicobacter pylori by linezolid and novel oxazolidinone analogues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingdong; Jiang, Ying; Zhao, Yanfang

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of drug-resistant Helicobacter pylori in Beijing Tian Tan Hospital (Beijing, China) and to determine the susceptibility of H. pylori to linezolid and novel oxazolidinone analogues. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and levofloxacin against H. pylori were determined by Etest. The in vitro antibacterial activities of linezolid and novel oxazolidinone analogues were assessed by the disk diffusion method. In vivo antibacterial activities were determined by intragastric administration and stomach CFU counting. Drug resistance patterns were serious among clinical H. pylori isolates, with a rate of multidrug-resistant H. pylori of 10.1%. Linezolid was observed to exhibit in vitro activity, with MICs ranging from ≤0.25mg/L to 32mg/L against clinical H. pylori isolates (MIC50, 2mg/L; MIC90, 8mg/L). The oxazolidinone analogue sy142 demonstrated better antimicrobial activity than linezolid in vitro. These results indicate that oxazolidinones may be appropriate agents to treat drug-resistant H. pylori. Further clinical trials should be performed to confirm this.

  19. Effect of chlorine on incorporation of Helicobacter pylori into drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Gião, M S; Azevedo, N F; Wilks, S A; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2010-03-01

    The use of a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori persisted inside biofilms exposed to low concentrations of chlorine (0.2 and 1.2 mg liter(-1)) for at least 26 days, although no culturable cells were recovered. Coupled with data obtained using viability stains in pure culture, this result suggests that H. pylori can survive chlorination but remain undetectable by culture methods, which can be effectively replaced by PNA hybridization.

  20. Diversification of the AlpB Outer Membrane Protein of Helicobacter pylori Affects Biofilm Formation and Cellular Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Takako; Fukutomi, Toshiyuki; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hojo, Fuhito; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in humans, and it forms biofilms on human gastric mucosal epithelium as well as on in vitro abiotic surfaces. Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. We previously demonstrated that strain TK1402, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with duodenal and gastric ulcers, has high biofilm-forming ability in vitro relative to other strains. In addition, we showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMV) play an important role in biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to analyze which protein(s) in the OMV contributes to biofilm formation in TK1402. We obtained a spontaneous mutant strain derived from TK1402 lacking biofilm-forming ability. The protein profiles of the OMV were compared between this mutant strain and the wild type, and it was found that AlpB, an outer membrane protein in the OMV of the mutant strain, was markedly decreased compared to that of the wild type. Restoration of TK1402 alpB to the mutant strain fully recovered the ability to form biofilm. However, restoration with alpB from other strains demonstrated incomplete recovery of biofilm-forming ability. We therefore inferred that the variable region of AlpB (amino acid positions 121 to 146) was involved in TK1402 biofilm formation. In addition, diversification of the AlpB sequence was shown to affect the ability to adhere to AGS cells. These results demonstrate a new insight into the molecular mechanisms of host colonization by H. pylori. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. The mechanism of Helicobacter pylori adherence to host cells mediated by cell surface adhesins has been the focus of many studies, but little is known regarding factors involved in H. pylori biofilm formation. Our study demonstrated that AlpB plays an important role in biofilm formation and that this property

  1. Association among H. pylori virulence markers dupA, cagA and vacA in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Only a few Helicobacter pylori-infected individuals develop severe gastric diseases and virulence factors of H. pylori appear to be involved in such clinical outcomes. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene A (dupA) is a novel virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that is associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk for gastric carcinoma in some populations. The aims of the present study were to determine the presence of dupA gene and evaluate the association among dupA and other virulence factors including cagA and vacA in Brazilian patients. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 205 dyspeptic patients (100 children and 105 adults). DNA was extracted and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori and its virulence factors using the polymerase chain reaction method. Results Patients with gastritis tested positive for H. pylori more frequently. The dupA gene was detected in 41.5% of them (85/205); cagA gene was found in 98 isolates (47.8%) and vacA genotype s1/m1 in 50.2%, s1/m2 in 8.3%, s2/m2 in 36.6%, s2/m1 in 0.5% and s1/s2/m1/m2 in 4.4%. We also verified a significant association between cagA and dupA genes [p = 0.0003, relative risk (RR) 1.73 and confidence interval [CI] = 1.3–2.3]. The genotypes s1/m1 were also associated with dupA gene (p = 0.0001, RR: 1.72 and CI: 1.3–2.2). The same associations were found when analyzing pediatric and adult groups of patients individually. Conclusion Ours results suggest that dupA is highly frequent in Brazilian patients and is associated with cagA gene and vacA s1/m1 genotype, and it may be considered an important virulence factor in the development of gastric diseases in adults or children. PMID:24456629

  2. Diversification of the AlpB Outer Membrane Protein of Helicobacter pylori Affects Biofilm Formation and Cellular Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Fukutomi, Toshiyuki; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kurata, Satoshi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hojo, Fuhito; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2017-03-15

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in humans, and it forms biofilms on human gastric mucosal epithelium as well as on in vitro abiotic surfaces. Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. We previously demonstrated that strain TK1402, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with duodenal and gastric ulcers, has high biofilm-forming ability in vitro relative to other strains. In addition, we showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMV) play an important role in biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to analyze which protein(s) in the OMV contributes to biofilm formation in TK1402. We obtained a spontaneous mutant strain derived from TK1402 lacking biofilm-forming ability. The protein profiles of the OMV were compared between this mutant strain and the wild type, and it was found that AlpB, an outer membrane protein in the OMV of the mutant strain, was markedly decreased compared to that of the wild type. Restoration of TK1402 alpB to the mutant strain fully recovered the ability to form biofilm. However, restoration with alpB from other strains demonstrated incomplete recovery of biofilm-forming ability. We therefore inferred that the variable region of AlpB (amino acid positions 121 to 146) was involved in TK1402 biofilm formation. In addition, diversification of the AlpB sequence was shown to affect the ability to adhere to AGS cells. These results demonstrate a new insight into the molecular mechanisms of host colonization by H. pyloriIMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilm is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. The mechanism of Helicobacter pylori adherence to host cells mediated by cell surface adhesins has been the focus of many studies, but little is known regarding factors involved in H. pylori biofilm formation. Our study demonstrated that AlpB plays an important role in biofilm formation and that this property depends

  3. Furazolidone- and Nitrofurantoin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori: Prevalence and Role of Genes Involved in Metronidazole Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dong H.; Lee, Miae; Kim, J. J.; Kim, J. G.; El-Zaatari, F. A. K.; Osato, M. S.; Graham, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, and metronidazole resistance among Helicobacter pylori strains was assessed with 431 clinical isolates. Fifty-two percent were metronidazole resistant, compared to 2% (7 of 431) with resistance to furazolidone and nitrofurantoin. All seven furazolidone- and nitrofurantoin-resistant isolates were also metronidazole resistant. rdxA, frxA, and fdxB knockouts did not result in furazolidone or nitrofurantoin resistance. These data suggest that furazolidone and nitrofurantoin may be good alternatives to metronidazole for treating H. pylori infection. PMID:11120984

  4. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is synthesized via a novel pathway with an evolutionary connection to protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hug, Isabelle; Couturier, Marc R; Rooker, Michelle M; Taylor, Diane E; Stein, Markus; Feldman, Mario F

    2010-03-19

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component on the surface of Gram negative bacteria and is composed of lipid A-core and the O antigen polysaccharide. O polysaccharides of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori contain Lewis antigens, mimicking glycan structures produced by human cells. The interaction of Lewis antigens with human dendritic cells induces a modulation of the immune response, contributing to the H. pylori virulence. The amount and position of Lewis antigens in the LPS varies among H. pylori isolates, indicating an adaptation to the host. In contrast to most bacteria, the genes for H. pylori O antigen biosynthesis are spread throughout the chromosome, which likely contributed to the fact that the LPS assembly pathway remained uncharacterized. In this study, two enzymes typically involved in LPS biosynthesis were found encoded in the H. pylori genome; the initiating glycosyltransferase WecA, and the O antigen ligase WaaL. Fluorescence microscopy and analysis of LPS from H. pylori mutants revealed that WecA and WaaL are involved in LPS production. Activity of WecA was additionally demonstrated with complementation experiments in Escherichia coli. WaaL ligase activity was shown in vitro. Analysis of the H. pylori genome failed to detect a flippase typically involved in O antigen synthesis. Instead, we identified a homolog of a flippase involved in protein N-glycosylation in other bacteria, although this pathway is not present in H. pylori. This flippase named Wzk was essential for O antigen display in H. pylori and was able to transport various glycans in E. coli. Whereas the O antigen mutants showed normal swimming motility and injection of the toxin CagA into host cells, the uptake of DNA seemed to be affected. We conclude that H. pylori uses a novel LPS biosynthetic pathway, evolutionarily connected to bacterial protein N-glycosylation.

  5. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection.

  6. Role of integrons, plasmids and SXT elements in multidrug resistance of Vibrio cholerae and Providencia vermicola obtained from a clinical isolate of diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rajpara, Neha; Kutar, Braj M. R. N. S.; Sinha, Ritam; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Bhardwaj, Ashima K.

    2015-01-01

    The isolates of Vibrio cholerae and Providencia vermicola obtained from a diarrheal patient were investigated for genetic elements governing their drug resistance phenotypes. Out of 14 antibiotics tested, V. cholerae Vc IDH02365 isolate showed resistance to nine antibiotics, while P. vermicola Pv NBA2365 was found to be resistant to all the antibiotics except polymyxin B. Though SXT integrase was depicted in both the bacteria, class 1 integron was found to be associated only with Pv NBA2365. Integrons in Pv NBA2365 conferred resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and trimethoprim. Pv NBA2365 carried two transformable plasmids imparting distinct antibiotic resistance traits to their Escherichia coli transformants. In rabbit ileal loop assays, Pv NBA2365 did not show any fluid accumulation (FA) in contrast with Vc IDH02365 that showed high FA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a highly drug resistant P. vermicola and additionally co-existence of multidrug resistant V. cholerae and P. vermicola. Both the microbes appeared to possess a wide array of mobile genetic elements for a large spectrum of antimicrobial agents, some of which are being used in the treatment of acute diarrhea. PMID:25741322

  7. Genomic structure and insertion sites of Helicobacter pylori prophages from various geographical origins

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Filipa F.; Nunes, Alexandra; Oleastro, Mónica; Gomes, João P.; Sampaio, Daniel A.; Rocha, Raquel; Vítor, Jorge M. B.; Engstrand, Lars; Pascoe, Ben; Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Hitchings, Matthew D.; Mégraud, Francis; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Lehours, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori genetic diversity is known to be influenced by mobile genomic elements. Here we focused on prophages, the least characterized mobile elements of H. pylori. We present the full genomic sequences, insertion sites and phylogenetic analysis of 28 prophages found in H. pylori isolates from patients of distinct disease types, ranging from gastritis to gastric cancer, and geographic origins, covering most continents. The genome sizes of these prophages range from 22.6–33.0 Kbp, consisting of 27–39 open reading frames. A 36.6% GC was found in prophages in contrast to 39% in H. pylori genome. Remarkably a conserved integration site was found in over 50% of the cases. Nearly 40% of the prophages harbored insertion sequences (IS) previously described in H. pylori. Tandem repeats were frequently found in the intergenic region between the prophage at the 3′ end and the bacterial gene. Furthermore, prophage genomes present a robust phylogeographic pattern, revealing four distinct clusters: one African, one Asian and two European prophage populations. Evidence of recombination was detected within the genome of some prophages, resulting in genome mosaics composed by different populations, which may yield additional H. pylori phenotypes. PMID:28205536

  8. High-level genetic diversity in the vapD chromosomal region of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, P; Cover, T L

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori isolates from different patients are characterized by diversity in the nucleotide sequences of individual genes, variation in genome size, and variation in gene order. Genetic diversity is particularly striking in vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) alleles. In this study, five open reading frames (ORFs) were identified within a 4.2-kb region downstream from vacA in H. pylori 60190. One of these ORFs was closely related to the virulence-associated protein D (vapD) gene of Dichelobacter nodosus (64.9% nucleotide identity). A probe derived from vapD of H. pylori 60190 hybridized with only 19 (61.3%) of 31 H. pylori strains tested. Sequence analysis of the vapD region in vapD-negative H. pylori strains revealed that there were two different families of approximately 0.5-kb DNA segments, which were both unrelated to vapD. The presence of vapD was not associated with any specific family of vacA alleles. These findings are consistent with a recombinational population structure for H. pylori. PMID:9139899

  9. Helicobacter pylori Adaptation In Vivo in Response to a High-Salt Diet

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John T.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Gaudieri, Silvana; Mallal, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated whether the diversification of H. pylori is influenced by the composition of the diet. Specifically, we investigated the effect of a high-salt diet (a known risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma) on H. pylori diversification within a host. We analyzed H. pylori strains isolated from Mongolian gerbils fed either a high-salt diet or a regular diet for 4 months by proteomic and whole-genome sequencing methods. Compared to the input strain and output strains from animals fed a regular diet, the output strains from animals fed a high-salt diet produced higher levels of proteins involved in iron acquisition and oxidative-stress resistance. Several of these changes were attributable to a nonsynonymous mutation in fur (fur-R88H). Further experiments indicated that this mutation conferred increased resistance to high-salt conditions and oxidative stress. We propose a model in which a high-salt diet leads to high levels of gastric inflammation and associated oxidative stress in H. pylori-infected animals and that these conditions, along with the high intraluminal concentrations of sodium chloride, lead to selection of H. pylori strains that are most fit for growth in this environment. PMID:26438795

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA: analysis of sequence diversity in relation to phosphorylation motifs and implications for the role of CagA as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Evans, D J; Evans, D G

    2001-09-01

    CagA is transported into host target cells and subsequently phosphorylated. Clearly this is a mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori could take control of one or more host cell signal transduction pathways. Presumably the end result of this interaction favors survival of H. pylori, irrespective of eventual damage to the host cell. CagA is noted for its amino acid (AA) sequence diversity, both within and outside the variable region of the molecule. The primary purpose of this review is to examine how variation in the type and number of CagA phosphorylation sites might determine the outcome of infection by different strains of H. pylori. The answer to this question could help to explain the widely disparate results obtained when H. pylori CagA status has been compared to type and severity of disease outcome in different populations, that is in different countries. Analysis of all available CagA sequences revealed that CagA contains both tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) and cyclic-AMP-dependent phosphorylation motifs (CPMs). There are two potential CPMs near the N-terminus of CagA and at least two in the repeat region; these are not all equally well conserved. We also defined a 48-residue AA sequence, which includes the N-terminal TPM at tyrosine (Y)-122, which distinguishes between Eastern (Hong Kong-Taiwan-Japan-Thailand) H. pylori isolates and those from the West (Europe-Africa-the Americas-Australia). All 28 of the Eastern type CagA proteins have a functional N-terminal TPM whereas 11 of 47 (23.4%) of the Western type contain an inactive motif, with threonine (T) replacing the critical aspartic acid (D) residue. Only 13 of 24 (54%) known CagA sequences have an active TPM in the repeat region and only one has two TPMs in this region. The potential TPM near the C-terminus of CagA is not likely to be important since only 3 of 24 (12.5%) sequences were found to be intact. Protein database searches revealed that the AA sequence immediately following the TPM at Y

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  12. Common Coinfections of Giardia intestinalis and Helicobacter pylori in Non-Symptomatic Ugandan Children

    PubMed Central

    Ankarklev, Johan; Hestvik, Elin; Lebbad, Marianne; Lindh, Johan; Kaddu-Mulindwa, Deogratias H.; Andersson, Jan O.; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Tumwine, James K.; Svärd, Staffan G.

    2012-01-01

    Background The protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis and the pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori are well known for their high prevalences in human hosts worldwide. The prevalence of both organisms is known to peak in densely populated, low resource settings and children are infected early in life. Different Giardia genotypes/assemblages have been associated with different symptoms and H. pylori with induction of cancer. Despite this, not much data are available from sub-Saharan Africa with regards to the prevalence of different G. intestinalis assemblages and their potential association with H. pylori infections. Methodology/Principal Findings Fecal samples from 427 apparently healthy children, 0–12 years of age, living in urban Kampala, Uganda were analyzed for the presence of H. pylori and G. intestinalis. G. intestinalis was found in 86 (20.1%) out of the children and children age 1<5 years had the highest rates of colonization. H. pylori was found in 189 (44.3%) out of the 427 children and there was a 3-fold higher risk of concomitant G. intestinalis and H. pylori infections compared to non-concomitant G. intestinalis infection, OR = 2.9 (1.7–4.8). No significant association was found in the studied population with regard to the presence of Giardia and gender, type of toilet, source of drinking water or type of housing. A panel of 45 G. intestinalis positive samples was further analyzed using multi-locus genotyping (MLG) on three loci, combined with assemblage-specific analyses. Giardia MLG analysis yielded a total of five assemblage AII, 25 assemblage B, and four mixed assemblage infections. The assemblage B isolates were highly genetically variable but no significant association was found between Giardia assemblage type and H. pylori infection. Conclusions/Significance This study shows that Giardia assemblage B dominates in children in Kampala, Uganda and that the presence of H. pylori is an associated risk factor for G. intestinalis infection

  13. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine milk in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Kheirabadi, Elahe Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is one of the most common infections worldwide. However, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly explained. One of the suggested theories is transmission via raw milk from animals to human beings. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of H. pylori in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds in Iran. In the present study, 447 bulk milk samples from 230 dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds were collected in four provinces and tested for H. pylori by cultural method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of the ureC (glmM) gene. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Using the cultural method, three of 447 milk samples (0.67%), including two sheep (2.2%) and one buffalo (1.6%) milk samples, were found to be contaminated with H. pylori. H. pylori ureC gene was detected in 56 (12.5%) of milk samples, including 19 cow (14.1%), 11 sheep (12.2%), nine goat (8.7%), two camel (3.6%), and 15 buffalo (23.4%) milk samples. Using PCR method, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in the level of contamination with H. pylori between milk samples collected from different species. The present study is the first report of the isolation of H. pylori from raw sheep and buffalo milk in Iran and the first demonstration of H. pylori DNA in camel and buffalo milk.

  14. Current consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Nomura, Sachiko; Hoshino, Yoshinori; Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Minegishi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ishii, Hiromasa

    2003-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shaped bacterium that resides in the stomach mucosa. Isolation of H. pylori from the stomach mucosa changed the erstwhile widely held belief that the stomach contains no bacteria and is actually sterile. Once H. pylori is safely ensconced in the mucus, it is able to neutralize the acid in the stomach by elaborating an enzyme called urease. Urease converts urea, of which there is an abundant supply in the stomach (derived from saliva and the gastric juice), into bicarbonate and ammonia, which are strong bases. These bases form a cloud of acid-neutralizing chemicals in the vicinity of the organisms, protecting them from the acid in the stomach. This urea hydrolysis reaction is utilized for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in the urea breath test (UBT) and the rapid urease test (RUT). In Japan, both invasive tests, such as bacterial culture, histopathology and RUT, and non-invasive tests such as UBT and serology are conducted for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. For confirming the results of eradication therapy, UBT is considered to be the most sensitive and specific. In order to treat H. pylori infection, a new one-week triple therapy regimen (lansoprazole or omeprazole + amoxicillin + clarithromycin) has been approved for use in patients with peptic ulcer disease in Japan. As for H. pylori eradication in the case of other diseases in which the bacterium has been implicated (e.g., chronic atrophic gastritis, gastric MALT lymphoma, gastric cancer, non-ulcer dyspepsia, chronic urticaria, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)), further basic and clinical investigation is required.

  15. Serum IL-10, MMP-7, MMP-9 Levels in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Correlation with Degree of Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Gontar; Halim, Sahat; Sitepu, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori causes gastric mucosal inflammation and immune reaction. However, the increase of IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-7 levels in the serum is still controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-10, MMP-7 & MMP-9 in gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was done on seventy gastritis patients that consecutive admitted to endoscopy units. The diagnosis of gastritis was made based on histopathology and diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on rapid urease test. Serum samples were obtained to determine to circulate IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-9 level. Univariate and bivariate analysis were done by SPSS version 22. RESULTS: Forthy percentages of the patients were infected with H. pylori. The IL-10 level was significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. However, there were no differences between serum levels of MMP-7 and MMP-9 in infected and non-infected H. pylori patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected by the increased levels of serum IL-10. However, there were no significant differences in MMP-7 and MMP-9 serum levels between positive and negative infected H. pylori patients. PMID:27703556

  16. Interaction between Helicobacter pylori and latent toxoplasmosis and demographic variables on cognitive function in young to middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Gale, Shawn D; Erickson, Lance D; Brown, Bruce L; Hedges, Dawson W

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and latent toxoplasmosis are widespread diseases that have been associated with cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. We sought to determine whether interactions between Helicobacter pylori and latent toxoplasmosis, age, race-ethnicity, educational attainment, economic status, and general health predict cognitive function in young and middle-aged adults. To do so, we used multivariable regression and multivariate models to analyze data obtained from the United States' National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which can be weighted to represent the US population. In this sample, we found that 31.6 percent of women and 36.2 percent of men of the overall sample had IgG Antibodies against Helicobacter pylori, although the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori varied with sociodemographic variables. There were no main effects for Helicobacter pylori or latent toxoplasmosis for any of the cognitive measures in models adjusting for age, sex, race-ethnicity, educational attainment, economic standing, and self-rated health predicting cognitive function. However, interactions between Helicobacter pylori and race-ethnicity, educational attainment, latent toxoplasmosis in the fully adjusted models predicted cognitive function. People seropositive for both Helicobacter pylori and latent toxoplasmosis - both of which appear to be common in the general population - appear to be more susceptible to cognitive deficits than are people seropositive for either Helicobacter pylori and or latent toxoplasmosis alone, suggesting a synergistic effect between these two infectious diseases on cognition in young to middle-aged adults.

  17. Vigilance for Salmonella in Feedstuffs Available in Costa Rica: Prevalence, Serotyping and Tetracycline Resistance of Isolates Obtained from 2009 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Molina, Andrea; Granados-Chinchilla, Fabio; Jiménez, Marisol; Acuña-Calvo, María Teresa; Alfaro, Margarita; Chavarría, Guadalupe

    2016-03-01

    Relevant epidemiological information is provided in this report for Salmonella based on data obtained from a Costa Rican surveillance program for animal feeds. In addition to prevalence, a description in terms of serotypes and tetracycline (TET) resistance of the isolates is included. A total of 1725 feed and feed ingredients samples were analyzed during 2009 and 2014, from which 110 Salmonella strains were recovered (76 from poultry, 23 from meat and bone meal [MBM], 3 from pet foods, and 8 from other feed). Retrieved isolates were serotyped and tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against TET. Salmonella strains were found mainly from poultry feed (different growth stages, n = 76/110; 69.1%) and MBM (n = 23/109; 21.1%). The rest of the isolates were recovered from feather meal, pet food, fish meal (n = 3/110; 2.3% each) and swine feed (n = 1/110; 0.9%). From the different serotypes recovered (n = 21), the most common were Salmonella Give (n = 18; 13.8%) and Salmonella Rissen (n = 6; 4.6%) for MBM and Salmonella Havana (n = 14; 10.8%), Salmonella Rissen, Salmonella Soerenga, and Salmonella Schwarzengrund (n = 8; 6.2% each) in poultry feed. Recovered strains were regarded to be sensitive or have an intermediate resistance to TET as evidenced by their MIC50 and MIC90 concentrations of 4 and 8 μg/mL for MBM and poultry feed, respectively. Compound feed and MBM samples exhibited strains characterized by 86.8 and 88.9% of the isolates classified (according to CLSI, 2015 ) as sensitive, 7.7 and 3.7% as intermediate, and 5.5% (with >256 μg/mL as the highest concentration) and 7.4% (with 64 μg/mL as the highest concentration) as resistant to TET, respectively. Salmonella serovars Anatum and Havana exhibited the highest resistance profile >256 and 128 μg/mL, respectively. Hence, MBM and poultry feed seem to be a target of interest if Salmonella incidence is to be controlled. Serotypes recovered have in the past

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis for H. pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Flores, Juan L; Fernandez-Rivero, Justo A; Marroquín-Fabian, Erika; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I; Sánchez-Jiménez, Beatriz A; Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C

    2017-01-01

    Background The term nodular is not included in the Sydney classification and there is no widely accepted histopathological definition. It has been proposed that the presence of antral nodularity could predict Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis (NG) for H. pylori infection after a rigorous standardization process, and to describe the associated histopathological characteristics. Materials and methods Endoscopic images of patients submitted to endoscopy with biopsy sampling were included. Endoscopic images were distributed among six endoscopists. The analysis was performed sequentially in three rounds: the first round assessed the interobserver variability, the second evaluated the intraobserver variability, and the third calculated the interobserver variability after training. A correlation analysis between endoscopic and histopathological findings was performed. Results A total of 917 studies were included. In the first analysis of interobserver variability, a poor kappa value (0.078) was obtained. The second evaluation yielded good intraobserver variability, with kappa values of 0.62–0.86. The evaluation of interobserver variability after training revealed an improvement in the kappa value of 0.42. A correlation was found between endoscopic images and histopathological reports. Conclusion There was a strong correlation between NG and H. pylori, but only after rigorous evaluation. The use of the term NG requires extensive standardization before it can be used clinically. PMID:28031716

  19. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development. PMID:27713775

  20. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: What should be the gold standard?

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Jain, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Anil Kumar; Nath, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in 1983, numerous detection methods for the presence of the bacterium have been developed. Each one of them has been associated with advantages and disadvantages. Noninvasive tests such as serology, 13C urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen tests are usually preferred by the clinicians. Serology has its own limitation especially in endemic areas while 13C UBT is technically very demanding. The stool antigen detection method, although specific, is usually associated with poor sensitivity. The 13C UBT is believed to be specific, but with present revelation of the fact that stomach is colonized by many other urease producing bacteria makes it questionable. Histology, culture, rapid urease test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the tests which are carried out on antral biopsies collected by invasive means. Histology has been proposed to be very sensitive and specific but the question is how by simply looking the morphology of the bacteria in the microscope, one can claim that the curved bacterium is exclusively H. pylori. Rapid urease test (RUT), the doctor’s test, is also challenged because the presence of other urease producing bacteria in the stomach cannot be denied. Moreover, RUT has been reported with poor sensitivity specially, when density of the bacterium is low. Isolation of H. pylori is essential to investigate its growth requirements, antibiotic susceptibility testing, studying virulence factor to develop vaccine and many more explorations. It has also got several disadvantages i.e., special condition for transporting, media, incubation and few days waiting for the colonies to appear, apart from the speed essentially needed to process the specimens. Till date, majority of the microbiological laboratories in the world are not equipped and trained to isolate such fastidious bacterium. The option left is PCR methods to detect H. pylori’s DNA in gastric mucosa, gastric juice, saliva, dental

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection does not reduce the viscosity of human gastric mucus gel.

    PubMed Central

    Markesich, D C; Anand, B S; Lew, G M; Graham, D Y

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori undermines host defence mechanisms is unclear. Several in vitro studies using soluble mucins have suggested that H pylori may compromise mucus function. Gastric mucus gel was obtained from 13 H pylori infected patients; six untreated subjects and seven after eradication of the infection. Gastric mucus is a non-Newtonian substance in that its viscosity changes with changing rates of shear, requiring mucus viscosity to be measured in a rotational cone-plate microviscometer. Viscosity was measured at shear rates varying from 1.15 s-1 to 46 s-1. The gastric mucus viscosity was significantly higher in patients infected with H pylori compared with mucus gel obtained after eradication of the infection. The results of our study suggest that the previous studies using in vitro methods involving soluble mucins or its components may have lead to erroneous conclusions about the in vivo interactions of H pylori and gastric mucus gel. The present findings argue against the hypothesis that degradation of gastric mucus by H pylori is important in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. PMID:7698685

  2. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori protease activity towards growth factors by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-09-01

    Infection with H. pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Here, we examined the susceptibility of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) to degradation by H. pylori protease, and assessed the effect of a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, on this process. The 125I-labeled EGF, bFGF, TGF beta and PDGF were incubatet with H. pylori protease, obtained from the filtrates of saline washes of the bacterium culture, in the presence of 0-100 micrograms sulglycotide. The results showed that, under the assay conditions, H. pylori protease caused only 5% degradation of EGF and 7% degradation of bFGF. However, the protease evoked a 61.7% degradation of PDGF and a 62.3% degradation of TGF beta. Introduction of sulglycotide to the reaction assay system caused a dose-dependent inhibition in PDGF and TGF beta proteolysis by the H. pylori enzyme. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with sulglycotide at 100 micrograms/ml, at which dose an 84.4% decrease in PDGF and 88.3% decrease in TGF beta degradation was achieved. The results provide a strong evidence for the effectiveness of sulglycotide in the protection of gastric mucosal growth factors against degradation by H. pylori.

  3. Characteristics of clinical Helicobacter pylori strains from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Debets-Ossenkopp, Yvette J; Reyes, Germán; Mulder, Janet; aan de Stegge, Birgit M; Peters, José T A M; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Tanca, J; Peña, Amado S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E

    2003-01-01

    In Ecuador, Helicobacter pylori infections are highly prevalent. A total of 42 H. pylori clinical isolates from 86 patients attending the outpatient clinic of the gastroenterology department of the university hospital of Guayaquil in Ecuador were characterized. Their susceptibility, and cagA and vacA status were determined. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin was found in 80.9% and 9.5% of strains, respectively. Neither amoxicillin- nor tetracycline-resistant strains were found. The most prevalent genotype was the cagA(+), vacA s1b,m1 type. This genotype was associated with gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA showed no genetic relationship among the strains.

  4. Evaluation of Nitrofurantoin Combination Therapy of Metronidazole-Sensitive and -Resistant Helicobacter pylori Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, Peter J.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Tankovic, Jacques; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Labigne, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine whether the nitroreductase enzyme encoded by the rdxA gene of Helicobacter pylori was responsible for reductive activation of nitrofurantoin and whether a triple-therapy regimen with nitrofurantoin was able to eradicate metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. The susceptibilities to nitrofurantoin of parent and isogenic rdxA mutant strains (three pairs), as well as a series of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains isolated from mice (30) and patients (20), were assessed by agar dilution determination of the MIC. Groups of mice colonized with the metronidazole-sensitive H. pylori SS1 strain or a metronidazole-resistant rdxA SS1 mutant were treated with either metronidazole or nitrofurantoin as part of a triple-therapy regimen. One month after the completion of treatment the mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were cultured for H. pylori. The nitrofurantoin MICs for all strains tested were between 0.5 and 4.0 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between the susceptibility to nitrofurantoin of the parental strains and those of respective rdxA mutants or between those of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori isolates. The regimen with metronidazole eradicated infection from all eight SS1-infected mice and from one of eight mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant (P ≤ 0.001). The regimen with nitrofurantoin failed to eradicate infection from any of the six SS1-infected mice (P ≤ 0.001) and cleared infection from one of seven mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant. These results demonstrate that, despite the good in vitro activity of nitrofurantoin against H. pylori and the lack of cross-resistance between metronidazole and nitrofurantoin, eradication regimens involving nitrofurantoin are unable to eradicate either metronidazole-sensitive or -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. PMID:10991835

  5. Antibiotics resistance of Helicobacter pylori and treatment modalities in children with H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric infection with Helicobacter pylori may occur early in childhood and persist lifelong. Global pediatric clinical studies have reported a decreasing tendency in the overall rate of H. pylori eradication. In pediatric patients with H. pylori infection, pediatric patients with peptic ulcer, and the first-degree relatives of patients with a history of gastric cancer, it is commonly recommended that H. pylori strains be eradicated. Antibiotic drug resistance to H. pylori, which has been reported to vary widely between geographic regions, is mainly associated with treatment failure in these patients. It is therefore imperative that the antibiotic resistance rates of H. pylori in children and adolescents be meticulously monitored across countries and throughout geographic regions. This paper particularly focuses on the antibiotic drug resistance of H. pylori and the thearpy of pediatric H. pylori infection cases.

  6. Genetic profiles of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolates obtained from patients with cystitis: phylogeny, virulence factors, PAIusp subtypes, and mutation patterns.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Muratani, Tetsuro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Satoshi; Monden, Koichi; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Soichi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Shima, Hiroki; Kurazono, Hisao; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2009-03-01

    The low virulence of quinolone- and fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains is known, although the reasons for this remain unclear. We surveyed the mutation patterns of quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs), phylogenetic distribution, prevalence of 18 urovirulence genes, and PAIusp subtypes in 89 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli (FQREC) isolates obtained from patients with cystitis and compared them with those of their fluoroquinolone-susceptible counterparts (FQSEC). Phylogenetic group B2 was significantly less prevalent in FQREC than in FQSEC (49% versus 78%; P=0.0138), but it still dominated, followed by phylogroup D (35%), in FQREC. When the prevalences of virulence factor (VF) genes were compared between FQREC and FQSEC, sfa/foc, cnf1, hly, kpsMT, ompT, ibeA, usp, and iroN showed significantly lower prevalences in FQREC than in FQSEC (1.1% versus 24% [P<0.0001], 0% versus 29% [P<0.0001], 7.9% versus 33% [P<0.0001], 74% versus 90% [P=0.01], 71% versus 87% [P=0.017], 5.6% versus 37% [P<0.0001], 54% versus 82% [P<0.0001], and 7.9% versus 32% [P=0.0001], respectively), whereas aer, iha, and ETTT showed significantly higher prevalences in FQREC (85% versus 36% [P<0.0001], 66% versus 29% [P<0.0001], and 53% versus 16% [P<0.0001], respectively). Furthermore, a similar difference in prevalences of uropathogenic VF genes was seen between FQREC and FQSEC in phylogroup B2. This indicated that the low virulence in FQREC was intimately correlated with a lesser distribution of VFs in phylogroup B2, which dominated in FQREC and FQSEC. It was interesting that the mutation pattern of Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn encoded in gyrA and Ser80Ile and Glu84Val encoded in parC was frequently found in FQREC isolates that belonged to phylogroup B2 and that most of these isolates showed PAIusp subtype 2a. PAIusp subtypes 1a, 1b, and 2b, which were frequently seen in FQSEC, were rarely found in FQREC. These results suggested that the acquisition of fluoroquinolone

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection treated with a tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate and metronidazole combination.

    PubMed

    Weil, J; Bell, G D; Powell, K; Morden, A; Harrison, G; Gant, P W; Jones, P H; Trowell, J E

    1990-12-01

    Seventy-two patients with H. pylori infection in their antral mucosa took part in the study. Forty-three received metronidazole 400 mg t.d.s. for two weeks, plus De-Nol tabs 2 b.d. for four weeks, and the remaining 29 patients received metronidazole 400 mg t.d.s. for two weeks plus De-Nol liquid 5 ml q.d.s. for four weeks. Seven of 57 H. pylori isolates were found to have pre-treatment metronidazole resistance. Success, in terms of eradication of H. pylori, was assessed using a one-month post-treatment 14C urea breath test. Successful eradication of H. pylori was achieved in 72% and 79%, respectively, of the metronidazole/De-Nol tablet and metronidazole/De-Nol liquid groups. These figures increased to 87% and 84%, respectively, if the patients whose organisms were known to be metronidazole-sensitive were considered in isolation. H. pylori was successfully eradicated in only one of seven patients with a metronidazole-resistant organism.

  8. Helicobacter pylori: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Malnick, Stephen David Howard; Melzer, Ehud; Attali, Malka; Duek, Gabriel; Yahav, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative spiral bacterium that is present in nearly half the world’s population. It is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and a recognized cause of gastric carcinoma. In addition, it is linked to non-ulcer dyspepsia, vitamin B12 deficiency, iron-deficient anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. These conditions are indications for testing and treatment according to current guidelines. An additional indication according to the guidelines is “anyone with a fear of gastric cancer” which results in nearly every infected person being eligible for eradication treatment. There may be beneficial effects of H. pylori in humans, including protection from gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, universal treatment will be extremely expensive (more than $32 billion in the United States), may expose the patients to adverse effects such as anaphylaxis and Clostridium difficile infection, as well as contributing to antibiotic resistance. There may also be an as yet uncertain effect on the fecal microbiome. There is a need for robust clinical data to assist in decision-making regarding treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:25083071

  9. Helicobacter pylori: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Malnick, Stephen David Howard; Melzer, Ehud; Attali, Malka; Duek, Gabriel; Yahav, Jacob

    2014-07-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative spiral bacterium that is present in nearly half the world's population. It is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and a recognized cause of gastric carcinoma. In addition, it is linked to non-ulcer dyspepsia, vitamin B12 deficiency, iron-deficient anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. These conditions are indications for testing and treatment according to current guidelines. An additional indication according to the guidelines is "anyone with a fear of gastric cancer" which results in nearly every infected person being eligible for eradication treatment. There may be beneficial effects of H. pylori in humans, including protection from gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, universal treatment will be extremely expensive (more than $32 billion in the United States), may expose the patients to adverse effects such as anaphylaxis and Clostridium difficile infection, as well as contributing to antibiotic resistance. There may also be an as yet uncertain effect on the fecal microbiome. There is a need for robust clinical data to assist in decision-making regarding treatment of H. pylori infection.

  10. Medication Adherence Pattern and Factors affecting Adherence in Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shakya Shrestha, S; Bhandari, M; Thapa, S R; Shrestha, R; Poudyal, R; Purbey, B; Gurung, R B

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic bacterial infection worldwide affecting approximately half of the world's population. A number of screening tests as well as complex multi-drug therapies are available for the detection and treatment of H. pylori infection. However, the optimum eradication rates of H. pylori infection can only be achieved if adherence to drug therapy is higher. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to determine the factors leading to poor adherence to obtain successful treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the medication adherence pattern in patients with H. pylori infection and assess the factors associated with non-adherence to the prescribed drug therapy. Method Patients meeting the inclusion criteria who were confirmed as H. pylori positive by rapid urease test (histopathology) and/ or stool antigen test and those under H. pylori eradication therapy were considered. Informed consent was taken from the patients or from the patient party in incapacitated patients. They were then interviewed using structured questionnaire. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and a p-value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Result Among the 70 participants included in this study, 57.10% (n=40) of them were males. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 42.36 years (±17.93). Higher number (85.70% (n=60)) of the patients were adherent to the recommended medication. Forgetfulness was the reason for missing dose in a majority (80% (n=8)) of the nonadherent patients. A highly significant association (p<0.05) was observed between adherence and absence of symptomatic relief. However, there was no statistically significant association (p>0.05) between patients' adherence to gender, age, literacy, and the prescribed treatment regimen. Conclusion Majority of the patients with H. pylori infection were adherent to medication. Forgetfulness was the major reason for missing dose in the non

  11. Comparison of PCR and other diagnostic techniques for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J; Mecca, J; da Silva, E; Gassner, D

    1994-01-01

    A sensitive and specific PCR-based assay to detect the Helicobacter pylori 16S rRNA gene present in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens has been developed. A total of 95 patients with dyspepsia were evaluated for the presence of chronic active gastritis and an infection with H. pylori through the use of diagnostic assays based on biopsy specimens and serology. The "gold standard" for the presence of the bacteria was direct detection in histological sections of biopsy specimens by Giemsa stain. The results obtained with the PCR assay performed on the biopsy specimens (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity) were equivalent to the detection of H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibodies by the commercially available second-generation Cobas Core anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G enzyme immunoassay (94% sensitivity and 98% specificity) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Urease testing and bacterial culture of the biopsy specimens were inferior (88 and 70% sensitivity and 96% and 98% specificity, respectively). A Western blot (immunoblot) analysis had slightly greater sensitivity (96%), although specificity was reduced to 93%. This research prototype PCR assay was shown to be highly reliable for the detection of infection with H. pylori and the presence of chronic active gastritis in the population studied. PMID:7929755

  12. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a country with a high occurrence of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Serhat; Kitapcioglu, Gul; Kasap, Elmas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with additional symptoms, relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) of this country-wide study. METHODS Data from 3214 adults were obtained with validated questionnaire. Eight hundred and forty-one subjects were randomized to be tested for H. pylori via the urea breath test. "Frequent symptoms" were defined heartburn and/or regurgitation occurring at least weekly. RESULTS The prevalence of GERD was 22.8%, frequent and occasional heartburn were 9.3%-12.7%, regurgitation were 16.6%-18.7%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18.5 showed a prevalence of 15%, BMI > 30 was 28.5%. The GERD prevalence was higher in women (26.2%) than men (18.9%) (P < 0001). Overall prevalence of H. pylori was 75.7%. The prevalence was 77.1% in subjects without symptoms vs 71.4% in subjects with GERD (χ2 = 2.6, P = 0.27). Underprivileged with the lowest income people exhibit a higher risk. CONCLUSION GERD is common in Turkey which reflects both Western and Eastern lifestyles with high rate of H. pylori. The presence of H. pylori had no effect on either the prevalence or the symptom profile of GERD. Subjects showing classical symptoms occasionally exhibit more additional symptoms compared with those without classical symptoms. PMID:28210089

  13. Isolation and partial characterization of infectious molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus obtained directly from bone marrow DNA of a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed Central

    Siebelink, K H; Chu, I H; Rimmelzwaan, G F; Weijer, K; Osterhaus, A D; Bosch, M L

    1992-01-01

    Replication-competent molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were isolated directly from the DNA of bone marrow cells of a naturally FIV-infected cat. After transfection in a feline kidney cell line (CrFK) and subsequent cocultivation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the viral progeny of the clones was infectious for PBMC but not for CrFK cells. PBMC infected with these clones showed syncytium formation, a decrease in cell viability, and gradual loss of CD4+ cells. The restriction maps of these clones differed from those obtained for previously described molecular clones of FIV derived from cats in the United States. The predicted amino acid sequence similarity of the envelope genes of the two clones was 99.3%, whereas the similarities of the sequences of the clones to those of two molecular clones from the United States, Petaluma and PPR, were 86 and 88%, respectively. Most of the differences between the amino acid sequences of the two clones and those of the clones from the United States were found in five different hypervariable (HV) regions, HV-1 through HV-5. The viral progeny of one of these clones was inoculated into two specific-pathogen-free cats. The animals seroconverted, and the virus could be reisolated from their PBMC. Images PMID:1309891

  14. Influence of pH on viscoelastic properties of heat-induced gels obtained with a β-Lactoglobulin fraction isolated from bovine milk whey hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Natalia; Fuciños, Pablo; Bargiela, Verónica; Picó, Guillermo; Valetti, Nadia Woitovich; Tovar, Clara Asunción; Rúa, M Luisa

    2017-03-15

    A β-Lactoglobulin fraction (r-βLg) was isolated from whey hydrolysates produced with cardosins from Cynara cardunculus. The impact of the hydrolysis process on the r-βLg structure and the rheological properties of heat-induced gels obtained thereafter were studied at different pH values. Differences were observed between r-βLg and commercial β-Lg used as control. Higher values for the fluorescence emission intensity and red shifts of the emission wavelength of r-βLg suggested changes in its tertiary structure and more solvent-exposed tryptophan residues. Circular dichroism spectra also supported these evidences indicating that hydrolysis yielded an intermediate (non-native) β-Lg state. The thermal history of r-βLg through the new adopted conformation improved the microstructure of the gels at acidic pH. So, a new microstructure with better rheological characteristics (higher conformational flexibility and lower rigidity) and greater water holding ability was founded for r-βLg gel. These results were reflected in the microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Toxicosis in Helicobacter Pylori infection - a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    BELASCU, MIHAI

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim We present a new clinical entity in relation to the Helicobacter pylori infection characterized by complex and varied clinical extra-digestive manifestations. Clinical findings such as asthenia, adynamia, sleep disorders, hair and nails modifications, digestive symptoms and heart rhythm disorders describe the clinical aspect of toxicosis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods The clinical presentation and therapy of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection were analyzed. Results Combined drug therapy: antibiotics + proton pump inhibitors + colloidal bismuth compound determinate remission of the symptoms in the first 3 to 5 days. The characteristic of the relation between Helicobacter pylori and the mucus-epithelial cell complex, the properties of the bacterial cell components, and the inflammatory and immunological response targeting other organs describe the immuno-pathological outbreak of Helicobacter pylori. Conclusion We support the term of toxicosis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in selected cases. PMID:26527950

  16. Rapid identification of Helicobacter pylori and assessment of clarithromycin susceptibility from clinical specimens using FISH.

    PubMed

    Demiray-Gürbüz, Ebru; Yılmaz, Özlem; Olivares, Asalia Z; Gönen, Can; Sarıoğlu, Sülen; Soytürk, Müjde; Tümer, Sait; Altungöz, Oğuz; Şimşek, İlkay; Perez Perez, Guillermo I

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori remains one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Clarithromycin resistance is the most important cause of H. pylori eradication failures. Effective antibiotic therapies in H. pylori infection must be rapidly adapted to local resistance patterns. We investigated the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance due to mutations in positions 2142 and 2143 of 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and compared with culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 234 adult patients with dyspepsia who were enrolled. Antrum and corpus biopsy specimens were obtained for rapid urease test, histopathology and culture. Epsilometer test was used to assess clarithromycin susceptibility. H. pylori presence and clarithromycin susceptibility were determined by FISH in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. We found that 164 (70.1%) patients were positive for H. pylori based on clinical criteria, 114 (69.5% CI 62.5-76.6%) were culture positive, and 137 (83.5% CI 77.8-89.2%) were FISH positive. Thus the sensitivity of FISH was significantly superior to that of culture. However specificity was not significantly different (91.4 versus 100.0%, respectively). The resistance rate to clarithromycin for both antrum and corpus was detected in H. pylori-positive patients; 20.2% by FISH and 28.0% by E-test.The concordance between E-test and FISH was only 89.5% due to the presence of point mutations different from A2143G, A2142G or A2142C. We conclude that FISH is significantly more sensitive than culture and the E-test for the detection of H. pylori and for rapid determinination of claritromycin susceptibility. The superior hybridisation efficiency of FISH is becoming an emerging molecular tool as a reliable, rapid and sensitive method for the detection and visualisation of H. pylori, especially when the management of H. pylori eradication therapy is necessary. This is particularly important for the treatment of patients with H

  17. Comparison of PCR-based restriction length polymorphism analysis of urease genes with rRNA gene profiling for monitoring Helicobacter pylori infections in patients on triple therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R J; Bickley, J; Hurtado, A; Fraser, A; Pounder, R E

    1994-01-01

    Multiple isolates of Helicobacter pylori from antral biopsies of nine patients were examined by DNA fingerprinting. Analysis of rRNA gene patterns and HaeIII restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified urease genes were compared and used to study colonization before and after failed triple therapy. H. pylori isolates from a single biopsy shared the same HaeIII DNA fingerprint regardless of the isolation method (plate or broth). DNA pattern types of paired strains of H. pylori were distinct between patients and were not grossly affected by treatment except for one patient with an altered strain type. H. pylori infections were generally associated with several subpopulations of strains, evident from the subtypic variation before and after treatment, detectable by both DNA fingerprinting methods. The urease gene patterns also provided evidence that some cultures of H. pylori probably contained a mixture of genomic subtypes. The study suggests that triple therapy has the effect either of inducing minor genomic variations or of changing the proportions of different subtypes of H. pylori. It was concluded that urease gene profiling provides a simple yet reliable method of establishing whether treatment failures are attributable to incomplete eradication of H. pylori. Images PMID:7914204

  18. Purification and characterization of urease from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B E; Campbell, G P; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1990-06-05

    Urease was purified 112-fold to homogeneity from the microaerophilic human gastric bacterium, Helicobacter pylori. The urease isolation procedure included a water extraction step, size exclusion chromatography, and anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme exhibited a Km of 0.3 +/- 0.1 mM and a Vmax of 1,100 +/- 200 mumols of urea hydrolyzed/min/mg of protein at 22 degrees C in 31 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0. The isoelectric point was 5.99 +/- 0.03. Molecular mass estimated for the native enzyme was 380,000 +/- 30,000 daltons, whereas subunit values of 62,000 +/- 2,000 and 30,000 +/- 1,000 were determined. The partial amino-terminal sequence (17 residues) of the large subunit of H. pylori urease (Mr = 62,000) was 76% homologous with an internal sequence of the homohexameric jack bean urease subunit (Mr = 90,770; Takashima, K., Suga, T., and Mamiya, G. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 175, 151-165) and was 65% homologous with amino-terminal sequences of the large subunits of heteropolymeric ureases from Proteus mirabilis (Mr = 73,000) and from Klebsiella aerogenes (Mr = 72,000; Mobley, H. L. T., and Hausinger, R. P. (1989) Microbiol. Rev. 53, 85-108). The amino-terminal sequence (20 residues) of the small subunit of H. pylori urease (Mr = 30,000) was 65 and 60% homologous with the amino-terminal sequences of the subunit of jack bean urease and with the Mr = 11,000 subunit of P. mirabilis urease (Jones, B. D., and Mobley, H. L. T. (1989) J. Bacteriol. 171, 6414-6422), respectively. Thus, the urease of H. pylori shows similarities to ureases found in plants and other bacteria. When used as antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, neither purified urease nor an Mr = 54,000 protein that co-purified with urease by size exclusion chromatography was as effective as crude preparations of H. pylori proteins at distinguishing sera from persons known either to be infected with H. pylori or not.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis, based on EPIYA repeats in the cagA gene of Indian Helicobacter pylori, and the implications of sequence variation in tyrosine phosphorylation motifs on determining the clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Santosh K; Sharma, Vishwas; Sharma, Varun Kumar; Gopi, Manoj; Saikant, R; Nandan, Amrita; Bardia, Avinash; Gunisetty, Sivaram; Katikala, Prasanth; Habeeb, Md Aejaz; Khan, Aleem A; Habibullah, C M

    2011-04-01

    The population of India harbors one of the world's most highly diverse gene pools, owing to the influx of successive waves of immigrants over regular periods in time. Several phylogenetic studies involving mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomal variation have demonstrated Europeans to have been the first settlers in India. Nevertheless, certain controversy exists, due to the support given to the thesis that colonization was by the Austro-Asiatic group, prior to the Europeans. Thus, the aim was to investigate pre-historic colonization of India by anatomically modern humans, using conserved stretches of five amino acid (EPIYA) sequences in the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori. Simultaneously, the existence of a pathogenic relationship of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs), in 32 H. pylori strains isolated from subjects with several forms of gastric diseases, was also explored. High resolution sequence analysis of the above described genes was performed. The nucleotide sequences obtained were translated into amino acids using MEGA (version 4.0) software for EPIYA. An MJ-Network was constructed for obtaining TPM haplotypes by using NETWORK (version 4.5) software. The findings of the study suggest that Indian H. pylori strains share a common ancestry with Europeans. No specific association of haplotypes with the outcome of disease was revealed through additional network analysis of TPMs.

  20. High prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains and risk factors associated with resistance in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Sonia; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo; Alarcón, Teresa; López-Brea, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Clarithromycin is one of the antibiotics used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections, and clarithromycin resistance is the most important factor when it comes to predicting eradication failure. The present study analyzed H. pylori isolates for the presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations and determined the risk factors associated with resistance among H. pylori isolates collected in Madrid, Spain, in 2008. We studied 118 H. pylori strains isolated from the same number of patients. A total of 76.3% of the patients were born in Spain, 52.7% were children, 20.3% had previously been treated, and 66.1% were female. Clarithromycin resistance was determined by Etest. H. pylori strains were considered resistant if the MIC was ≥1 mg/liter. DNA extraction was carried out by use of the NucliSens easyMAG platform with NucliSens magnetic extraction reagents (bioMérieux). The DNA sequences of the 23S rRNA genes of clarithromycin-resistant and -sensitive strains were determined to identify specific point mutations. The vacA genotype and cagA status were determined by PCR. We found that 42 (35.6%) strains were resistant to clarithromycin by Etest. Etest results were confirmed by detection of the presence of point mutations in 34 (88.1%) of these strains. Eight H. pylori strains were resistant to clarithromycin by Etest but did not have a point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. Mutation at A2143G was found in 85.3% of the strains, mutation at A2142G in 8.8%, and mutation at T2182C in 5.9%. Dual mutations were found in 8.8% of the strains. H. pylori clarithromycin-resistant strains were strongly associated with pediatric patients, with patients born in Spain, and with patients who had previously been treated (P ≤ 0.02). In addition, H. pylori strains resistant to clarithromycin more frequently presented the vacA s2/m2 genotype and were more likely to be cagA negative than susceptible strains (39.1% and 11.2%, respectively; P value < 0.001). We concluded that, in the

  1. Evolution of amoxicillin resistance of Helicobacter pylori in vitro: characterization of resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nadia N; Gallaher, Brandon; Schiller, Neal L

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer in humans. Treatment involves a two or three drug cocktail, typically including amoxicillin. Increasing levels of resistance to amoxicillin contribute to treatment failures, and higher levels of resistance are believed to be due to multiple genetic mutations. In this study, we examined the progression of spontaneous genetic mutations that contribute to amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori when exposed to increasing concentrations of amoxicillin in vitro. During the selection process, we isolated five strains each of which had progressively higher levels of resistance. Using a whole genome sequencing approach, we identified mutations in a number of genes, notably pbp1, pbp2, hefC, hopC, and hofH, and by sequencing these genes in each isolate we were able to map the order and gradual accumulation of mutations in these isolates. These five isolates, each expressing multiple mutated genes and four transformed strains expressing individually mutated pbp1, hefC, or hofH, were characterized using minimum inhibitory concentrations, amoxicillin uptake, and efflux studies. Our results indicate that mutations in pbp1, hefC, hopC, hofH, and possibly pbp2 contribute to H. pylori high-level amoxicillin resistance. The data also provide evidence for the complexity of the evolution of amoxicillin resistance in H. pylori and indicate that certain families of genes might be more susceptible to amoxicillin resistance mutations than others.

  2. Lewis Antigen Expression by Helicobacter pylori Strains Colonizing Different Regions of the Stomach of Individual Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Valencia, Gerardo; Muñoz-Perez, Leopoldo; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier

    2008-01-01

    The diversity in the expression of Lewis antigens (Le) of 226 single colonies of Helicobacter pylori isolated from four regions of the stomach of eight adults is shown. Ley was expressed more in strains colonizing antrum than in strains colonizing fundus, whereas Lex was more common in fundus strains. cagA+ strains were more associated with Le-negative strains. PMID:18550746

  3. QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI BY THE TAQMAN FLUOROGENIC PROBE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culturing of H. pylori from environmental sources continues to be an obstacle in detecting and enumerating this organism. Successful methods of isolation and growth from water samples have not yet been developed. In this study a method involving real tme PCR product detection wit...

  4. Multiple and mixed Helicobacter pylori infections: Comparison of two epidemiological situations in Tunisia and France.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Khansa; Fendri, Chedlia; Battikh, Hajer; Garnier, Martine; Zribi, Meriem; Jlizi, Asma; Burucoa, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Individuals can be infected by either a single or multiple strains of Helicobacter pylori. Multiple infection with genetically different isolates and particularly mixed infection with both antibiotic-susceptible and resistant isolates are difficult to detect and should impact the effectiveness of eradication treatment. It is largely assumed that multiple infections are more frequent in developing countries but an actual comparison developing/developed using a single methodology has never been reported. To compare the prevalence of multiple and mixed H. pylori infection in Tunisia and France, we conducted a prospective study including 42 H. pylori-culture positive infected patients (21 Tunisian and 21 French) never previously treated for H. pylori infection. One gastric biopsy was collected from antrum. Three to eleven (mean = 9) colonies were isolated from each biopsy. A total of 375 different isolates were genotyped using RAPD fingerprinting and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on amoxicillin, clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, tetracycline and metronidazole with E-tests. Multiple infection was defined by different RAPD fingerprintings among the different isolates from a single patient. Mixed infection was defined by different resistance profiles among the different isolates from a single patient. Multiple H. pylori infection is more prevalent in Tunisia than in France. It occurred in ten (48%) Tunisian patients and in one (5%) French patient (p < 0.001). Mixed infection is common (24%), it occurred in 4 (19%) Tunisian patients and in 6 (29%) French patients (p = 0.46) and was mainly (8/10) due to genetically related clones in single infection.

  5. Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyat, Mati; Velin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common infections in human beings worldwide. H. pylori express lipopolysaccharides and flagellin that do not activate efficiently Toll-like receptors and express dedicated effectors, such as γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), arginase, that actively induce tolerogenic signals. In this perspective, H. pylori can be considered as a commensal bacteria belonging to the stomach microbiota. However, when present in the stomach, H. pylori reduce the overall diversity of the gastric microbiota and promote gastric inflammation by inducing Nod1-dependent pro-inflammatory program and by activating neutrophils through the production of a neutrophil activating protein. The maintenance of a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa and the direct action of virulence factors (vacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A) confer pro-carcinogenic activities to H. pylori. Hence, H. pylori cannot be considered as symbiotic bacteria but rather as part of the pathobiont. The development of a H. pylori vaccine will bring health benefits for individuals infected with antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains and population of underdeveloped countries. PMID:24914318

  6. Relation between periodontitis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Pei; Zhou, Weiying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between periodontitis and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the mouth was analyzed. Method: 70 elderly patients with periodontitis treated at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were recruited. Dental plaques and gargle were collected for H. pylori detection using PCR technique. Periodontal health status of the patients was recorded. 70 control cases with healthy periodontium were also included. The symptoms of H. pylori infection in the mouth were compared between the two groups, and the results were analyzed statistically. Results: The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the periodontitis group was 71.4%; the positive rate of cagA gene was 35.7%. The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the control group was 34.3% and that of cagA gene was 12.9%. The two groups did not show significant differences in these two indicators (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in subgingival plaques was higher than that in supragingival plaques, and the difference was of statistical significance (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of H. pylori in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was obviously higher than that of patients with mild periodontitis (P<0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal health status of elderly people with periodontitis correlated with H. pylori infection in the stomach. PMID:26629215

  7. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  8. TLR9 and NF-κB Are Partially Involved in Activation of Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and Its Purified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils. PMID:24987851

  9. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Indigenous Families of Central America: Serostatus and Oral and Fingernail Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Dowsett, S. A.; Archila, L.; Segreto, V. A.; Gonzalez, C. R.; Silva, A.; Vastola, K. A.; Bartizek, R. D.; Kowolik, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection remains one of the most common in humans, but the route of transmission of the bacterium is still uncertain. This study was designed to elucidate possible sources of infection in an isolated, rural population in Guatemala. A total of 242 subjects in family units participated in the study. A medical history, including a history of dyspepsia, was taken by a physician and immunoglobulin G antibodies to H. pylori were detected with the QuickVue (Quidel, San Diego, Calif.) onsite serology test. Overall, 58% of subjects were seropositive, with a positive relationship between mother and child (P = 0.02) and a positive correlation between the serostatuses of siblings (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.63). There was no association between serostatus and gastric symptoms. Oral H. pylori was detected from periodontal pockets of various depths and the dorsum of the tongue by nested PCR. Eighty-seven percent of subjects had at least one oral site positive for H. pylori, with the majority of subjects having multiple positive sites. There was no association between periodontal pocket depth and the detection of H. pylori. Nested PCR was also used to detect H. pylori from beneath the nail of the index finger of each subject’s dominant hand. Overall, 58% of subjects had a positive fingernail result, with a significant positive relationship between fingernail and tongue positivity (P = 0.002). In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that oral carriage of H. pylori may play a role in the transmission of infection and that the hand may be instrumental in transmission. PMID:10405384

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of Patchouli Alcohol, a Natural-occurring Tricyclic Sesquiterpene against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y F; Lian, D W; Chen, Y Q; Cai, Y F; Zheng, Y F; Fan, P L; Ren, W K; Fu, L J; Li, Y C; Xie, J H; Cao, H Y; Tan, B; Su, Z R; Huang, P

    2017-03-20

    This study further evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and potential underlying mechanism of patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene. In in vitro assay, the capacities of PA to inhibit and kill H. pylori were tested on three standard strains at different pH values and 12 clinical isolates. The effects of PA on H. pylori adhesion (and its alpA, alpB and babA genes), motility (and its flaA and flaB genes), ultrastructure and flagellation were investigated. Moreover, the H. pylori resistance and post-antibiotic effect (PAE) of PA were determined. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of PA on H. pylori eradication and gastritis were examined. Results showed that MICs of PA against three standard strains (pH 5.3-9) and twelve clinical isolates were 25-75 and 12.5-50 μg/ml, respectively. The killing kinetics of PA were time- and concentration- dependent, and its MBCs were 25-75 μg/ml. Besides, H. pylori adhesion, motility, ultrastructure and flagellation were significantly suppressed. PA also remarkably inhibited the expression of adhesion genes (alpA and alpB), and motility genes (flaA and flaB). Furthermore, PA treatment caused a long PAE and less bacterial resistance as compared with clarithromycin and metronidazole. The in vivo study showed that PA can effectively eradicate H. pylori, inhibit gastritis, and suppress the expression of inflammatory mediators (Cox-2, Il-1β, Tnf-α and Inos). In conclusion, PA can efficiently kill H. pylori, interfere with its infection process and attenuate gastritis with less bacterial resistance, making it a potential candidate for new drug development.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates Obtained from the Rikers Island Jail System from 2009 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Joshua; Lin, Ying; Kornblum, John; Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Bystritsky, Rachel; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Inmates of Rikers Island jail potentially introduce Staphylococcus aureus into New York State prisons upon transfer. In this study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates (n = 452), collected from infected inmates (2009 to 2013), were characterized. spa type t008 was the predominant clone identified, accounting for 82.3% of the isolates, with no evidence of mupirocin or chlorhexidine resistance. PMID:24899033

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori: separation of H. pylori from East Asian and non-Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Y; Osato, M S; Sepulveda, A R; Gutierrez, O; Figura, N; Kim, J G; Kodama, T; Kashima, K; Graham, D Y

    2000-02-01

    The predominant H. pylori strain circulating among geographic locations differs with regard to the genomic structure. This study determined whether structural subtypes of the cagA 3' repeat region could be used to identify the population of origin of H. pylori isolates. We examined 600 cagA-positive H. pylori (Colombia, 100; USA, 100; France, 100; Canada, 20; Italy, 20; Korea, 100; Japan, 100; Hong Kong, 20; Taiwan, 20; Vietnam, 20). The cagA 3' region was amplified by PCR using primers specific to Japanese and Western 3' cagA gene sequences. PCR using Japanese cagA primers resulted in PCR products in 99-6 % of strains from East Asia but no non-Asian strains. Conversely, PCR using Western cagA primers resulted in amplicons in 100% of non-Asian strains, and only one from East Asia. cagA genotyping is useful for molecular epidemiological studies as strains can be completely separated by differences in the cagA 3' region.

  13. Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance Observed in Escherichia coli Isolates Obtained from Domestic- and Wild-Animal Fecal Samples, Human Septage, and Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Sayah, Raida S.; Kaneene, John B.; Johnson, Yvette; Miller, RoseAnn

    2005-01-01

    A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the patterns of antimicrobial resistance in 1,286 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human septage, wildlife, domestic animals, farm environments, and surface water in the Red Cedar watershed in Michigan. Isolation and identification of E. coli were done by using enrichment media, selective media, and biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by the disk diffusion method was conducted for neomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, ofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ampicillin, nalidixic acid, nitrofurantoin, cephalothin, and sulfisoxazole. Resistance to at least one antimicrobial agent was demonstrated in isolates from livestock, companion animals, human septage, wildlife, and surface water. In general, E. coli isolates from domestic species showed resistance to the largest number of antimicrobial agents compared to isolates from human septage, wildlife, and surface water. The agents to which resistance was demonstrated most frequently were tetracycline, cephalothin, sulfisoxazole, and streptomycin. There were similarities in the patterns of resistance in fecal samples and farm environment samples by animal, and the levels of cephalothin-resistant isolates were higher in farm environment samples than in fecal samples. Multidrug resistance was seen in a variety of sources, and the highest levels of multidrug-resistant E. coli were observed for swine fecal samples. The fact that water sample isolates were resistant only to cephalothin may suggest that the resistance patterns for farm environment samples may be more representative of the risk of contamination of surface waters with antimicrobial agent-resistant bacteria. PMID:15746342

  14. Colonization of an acid resistant Kingella denitrificans in the stomach may contribute to gastric dysbiosis by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Hidekazu; Yanai, Hideo; Nishikawa, Jun; Nakazawa, Teruko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Sakaida, Isao; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    In the stomach of a gastric ulcer patient who had been administered an anti-acid, a gram-negative and urease-negative bacillus similar in size to Helicobacter pylori was infected together with H. pylori. According to biochemical test and 16S rRNA gene analysis, the urease-negative bacterium was identified as Kingella denitrificans, a human nasopharyngeal commensal. In contrast to the standard strain of K. denitrificans, the isolate showed catalase activity, did not produce acid from glucose, and exhibited acid tolerance. Acid tolerance of H. pylori was increased by cocultivation with the K. denitrificans isolate, but not with other isolates of K. denitrificans. Disruption of physiological and immunological niche by dysbiotic colonization of bacterium may provide pathological attributes to human stomach. Collectively, a careful administration of anti-acids to the elderly, especially those with atrophic gastritis, is necessary to avoid repression of the gastric barrier to bacteria.

  15. Oral Helicobacter pylori, its relationship to successful eradication of gastric H. pylori and saliva culture confirmation.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Yee, K C; Hazeki-Taylor, N; Li, J; Fu, H Y; Huang, M L; Zhang, G Y

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to explore the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), its relationship in the oral cavity to the success rate of eradication of the gastric H. pylori infection, and to determine if the mouthwash solution contained lysine (0.4%) and glycerol monolaurate (0.2%) (LGM) could eliminate oral H. pylori, as well as using the saliva H. pylori culture to confirm the existence of oral H. pylori. A total of 159 symptomatic individuals with stomach pain and 118 asymptomatic individuals with no stomach complaints, were recruited and tested using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS), the H. pylori flagellin test (HPF), the urea breath test (UBT C(13)) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which tests were also confirmed by saliva culture. The test subjects also received various treatments. It was found that the H. pylori antigen exists in the oral cavity in UBT C(13) negative individuals. Traditional treatment for gastric eradication had only a 10.67 percent (10.67%) effectiveness rate on the oral H. pylori infection. In groups of patients with the oral H. pylori infection, but with negative UBT C(13), a mouthwash solution provided a 72.58% effectiveness rate in the 95% of the confidence interval (CI) ranges on the oral H. pylori infection. Traditional drug gastric eradication and teeth cleaning (TC) had less than a 10% effectiveness rate. Treatment of the oral infection increased the success rate of eradication of the stomach infection from 61.33% to 82.26% in the 95% CI ranges. We concluded that the successful rate of eradication of gastric H. pylori bears a significant relationship to the oral infection from H. pylori.

  16. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide inhibition of gastric mucosal laminin receptor: effect of sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Yotsumoto, F; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1993-11-01

    1. The effect of cell-wall lipopolysaccharide from Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium implicated in the etiology of gastric disease, on the gastric mucosal laminin-receptor was investigated. 2. The receptor, isolated from gastric epithelial cell membrane by affinity chromatography on laminin-coupled Sepharose, was radioiodinated and incorporated into liposomes which exhibited specific affinity towards laminin-coated surface. 3. The binding of liposomal receptor to laminin-coated surface was inhibited by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide, which at 50 micrograms/ml caused a nearly complete (97%) inhibition in binding. 4. The inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide was prevented by a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, that evoked a 92% restoration in binding at 40 micrograms/ml. 5. The results demonstrate that through its lipopolysaccharide H. pylori is capable of disrupting the gastric mucosal integrity and that this detrimental effect could be successfully countered by sulglycotide.

  17. Unravelling the pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori in peptic ulcer: potential new therapies and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Telford, J L; Covacci, A; Ghiara, P; Montecucco, C; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    The recognition that peptic ulcer is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Helicobacter pylori has revolutionized the approach to diagnosis and therapy of this condition. Treatment of the symptoms of peptic ulcer with drugs that block acid secretion is already being replaced by antibiotic eradication of the causative agent. Studies of the molecular events that lead to H. pylori pathogenesis have shown that clinical isolates can be divided into two groups, only one of which produces a cytotoxin and is associated with severe disease. The cloning of the genes coding for molecules specific for disease-associated strains of H. pylori, and the development of animal models that mimic the human pathology, will provide the basis for better strategies to treat and prevent peptic-ulcer disease.

  18. Photodynamic Treatment versus Antibiotic Treatment on Helicobacter pylori Using RAPD-PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batanouny, M. H.; Amin, R. M.; Ibrahium, M. K.; El Gohary, S.; Naga, M. I.; Salama, M. S.

    2009-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic bacterial infections in humans and is important in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease, such as duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, Gastric adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. Gastric adenocarcinoma remains one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of photodynamic treatment and medication treatment of Helicobacter pylori using RAPD-PCR. The lethal photosensitization effect was determined by mixing suspensions of H.pylori with Toluidine blue O (TBO) and plating out on blood agar before irradiation with Helium neon (He-Ne) 632.8 nm. The susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori isolates to metronidazole and azithromycin were examined by E-test. Nine random primers were used to screen genetic polymorphism in DNA of different H.pylori groups. Six of them produced RAPD products while three failed to generate any product. The resulting data showed that, although the overall genetic differences between control groups and laser treated groups was higher than that between control groups and azithromycin treated groups yet it still law genetic variability. The main cause of cell death of PDT using TBO as a photosensitizer was mainly cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane.

  19. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenol and Cinnamaldehyde against the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shaik Mahaboob; Khan, Aleem A; Ahmed, Irshad; Musaddiq, M; Ahmed, Khaja S; Polasa, H; Rao, L Venkateswar; Habibullah, Chittoor M; Sechi, Leonardo A; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2005-01-01

    Background Eradication of Helicobacter pylori is an important objective in overcoming gastric diseases. Many regimens are currently available but none of them could achieve 100% success in eradication. Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde that are commonly used in various food preparations are known to possess antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria. Aim The present study was performed to assess the in vitro effects of eugenol and cinnamaldehyde against indigenous and standard H. pylori strains, their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and time course lethal effects at various pH. Methods A total of 31 strains (29 indigenous and one standard strain of H. pylori ATCC 26695, one strain of E. coli NCIM 2089) were screened. Agar dilution method was used for the determination of drug sensitivity patterns of isolates to the commonly used antibiotics and broth dilution method for the test compounds. Results Eugenol and cinnamaldehyde inhibited the growth of all the 30 H. pylori strains tested, at a concentration of 2 μg/ml, in the 9th and 12th hours of incubation respectively. At acidic pH, increased activity was observed for both the compounds. Furthermore, the organism did not develop any resistance towards these compounds even after 10 passages grown at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Conclusion These results indicate that the two bioactive compounds we tested may prevent H. pylori growth in vitro, without acquiring any resistance. PMID:16371157

  20. Development of anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulins Y (IgYs) in quail

    PubMed Central

    Najdi, S.; Nikbakht Brujeni, G.; Sheikhi, N.; Chakhkar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that cause the stomach infection in more than 50% of human population worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of anti-H. pylori immunoglobulins Y (IgYs) production in quails and evaluate the effect of the different methods of immunization on titers of IgY in egg yolks. Whole cell bacterial antigen was used for immunization of quails. Forty Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica) were divided into four groups. The first group intramuscularly immunized with one dose of antigen (3 × 108 inactivated bacteria) whereas the second group injected with half dose. Third group administered orally. Yolk IgY was isolated using precipitation method of water dilution combined with chloroform. Dot-blot and ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were used for determining the specificity and quantifying the titer of IgY in egg yolks. Results showed that quails as well as chickens are able to produce anti-H. pylori IgY. Quails antibodies have high titer and specificity that can be used in therapeutic and research purposes. This study indicated that higher amounts of antigen can not develop higher titer of IgY and injection is not necessary for efficient immunization of the quail against H. pylori. PMID:27822235

  1. Curcumin as a potential therapeutic candidate for Helicobacter pylori associated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Avijit; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment and principal polyphenolic Curcuminoid obtained from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa, is commonly used as a food-coloring agent. Studies suggest that curcumin has a wide range of beneficial properties e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, anti-fungal and anti-microbial. These pleiotropic activities prompted several research groups to elucidate the role of curcumin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This is the first review with this heading where we discussed regarding the role of curcumin as an anti-H. pylori agent along with its potential in other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on several in vitro, early cell culture, animal research and few pre-clinical trials, curcumin projected as a potential therapeutic candidate against H. pylori mediated gastric pathogenesis. This review sheds light on the anti-H. pylori effects of curcumin in different models with meticulous emphasis on its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects as well as some critical signaling and effecter molecules. Remarkably, non-toxic molecule curcumin fulfills the characteristics for an ideal chemopreventive agent against H. pylori mediated gastric carcinogenesis but the foremost challenge is to obtain the optimum therapeutic levels of curcumin, due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Further, we have discussed about the possibilities for improving its efficacy and bioavailability. Lastly, we concluded with the anticipation that in near future curcumin may be used to develop a therapeutic drug against H. pylori mediated gastric ailments through improved formulation or delivery systems, facilitating its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. PMID:26973412

  2. Curcumin as a potential therapeutic candidate for Helicobacter pylori associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Avijit; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2016-03-07

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment and principal polyphenolic Curcuminoid obtained from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa, is commonly used as a food-coloring agent. Studies suggest that curcumin has a wide range of beneficial properties e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, anti-fungal and anti-microbial. These pleiotropic activities prompted several research groups to elucidate the role of curcumin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This is the first review with this heading where we discussed regarding the role of curcumin as an anti-H. pylori agent along with its potential in other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on several in vitro, early cell culture, animal research and few pre-clinical trials, curcumin projected as a potential therapeutic candidate against H. pylori mediated gastric pathogenesis. This review sheds light on the anti-H. pylori effects of curcumin in different models with meticulous emphasis on its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects as well as some critical signaling and effecter molecules. Remarkably, non-toxic molecule curcumin fulfills the characteristics for an ideal chemopreventive agent against H. pylori mediated gastric carcinogenesis but the foremost challenge is to obtain the optimum therapeutic levels of curcumin, due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Further, we have discussed about the possibilities for improving its efficacy and bioavailability. Lastly, we concluded with the anticipation that in near future curcumin may be used to develop a therapeutic drug against H. pylori mediated gastric ailments through improved formulation or delivery systems, facilitating its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake.

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 restrains Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and premalignant lesions in the stomach by altering macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, M S; Noto, J M; Piazuelo, M B; Hardbower, D M; Romero-Gallo, J; Delgado, A; Chaturvedi, R; Correa, P; Wilson, K T; Peek, R M

    2015-04-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Although the specific mechanisms by which this pathogen induces carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated, high-expression interleukin (IL)-1β alleles are associated with increased gastric cancer risk among H. pylori-infected persons. In addition, loss of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) increases mucosal inflammation in mouse models of epithelial injury, and we have shown that gastric inflammation is increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. In this report, we define mechanisms that underpin such responses and extend these results into a genetic model of MMP7 deficiency and gastric cancer. Wild-type (WT) or MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice were challenged with broth alone as an uninfected control or the H. pylori strain PMSS1. All H. pylori-challenged mice were successfully colonized. As expected, H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with uninfected or infected WT C57BL/6 animals. Loss of MMP7 resulted in M1 macrophage polarization within H. pylori-infected stomachs, as assessed by Luminex technology and immunohistochemistry, and macrophages isolated from infected MMP7-deficient mice expressed significantly higher levels of the M1 macrophage marker IL-1β compared with macrophages isolated from WT mice. To extend these findings into a model of gastric cancer, hypergastrinemic WT INS-GAS or MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice were challenged with H. pylori strain PMSS1. Consistent with findings in the C57BL/6 model, H. pylori-infected MMP7-deficient INS-GAS mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with either uninfected or infected WT INS-GAS mice. In addition, the incidence of gastric hyperplasia and dysplasia was significantly increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice compared with infected WT INS-GAS mice, and loss of MMP7 promoted M1 macrophage polarization. These

  4. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Alexandre; SKARE, Thelma Larocca; PRESTES, Manoel Alberto; COSTA, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. Aim: To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Methods: Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Results: Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Conclusion: Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa

  5. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yee, John KC

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization. PMID:26811613

  6. Helicobacter pylori colonization of the oral cavity: A milestone discovery.

    PubMed

    Yee, John K C

    2016-01-14

    Over the past several years, the severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections has not significantly diminished. After successful eradication, the annual H. pylori recurrence rate is approximately 13% due to oral H. pylori infection. Established clinical diagnostic techniques do not identify an oral etiologic basis of H. pylori prior to gastric infection. There has been disagreement as to whether oral infection of H. pylori exists or not, with no definite conclusion. In medical practice, negative results with the urea breath test suggest that the stomach infection of H. pylori is cured in these patients. In fact, patients can present negative urea breath test results and yet exhibit H. pylori infection due to oral infection. The present paper provides evidence that H. pylori oral infection is nonetheless present, and the oral cavity represents a secondary site for H. pylori colonization.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Schlesinger, Menachem; Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Vardy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected dyspeptic patients with selective immunoglobulin E deficiency (IgEd). METHODS: All individuals who underwent serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) measurement at the Leumit Healthcare Services (Israel) in 2012 were identified in an electronic database search (n = 18487). From these, selected case group subjects were ≥ 12 years of age and had serum total IgE < 2 kIU/L (n = 158). The control group was selected from a random sampling of the remaining subjects ≥ 12 years of age to obtain a case-control ratio of 1:20 (n = 3160). Dyspeptic diseases, diagnosed no more than 5 years before serum total IgE testing, were identified and retrieved from the electronic database using specific International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Results of C13-urea breath tests were used to identify subjects infected with H. pylori. Categorical variables between case and control subjects were analyzed using Fisher’s exact tests, whereas continuous variables were analyzed using χ2 tests. RESULTS: Dyspepsia was present in 27.2% (43/158) of case subjects and 22.7% (718/3160) of controls. Of these, significantly more case subjects (32/43, 74.4%) than controls (223/718, 31.1%) were positive for H. pylori (P < 0.01). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 19 case and 94 control subjects, revealing that gastritis was more prevalent in IgEd case subjects than in controls (57.9% vs 29.8%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, a significantly greater proportion of case subjects presented with peptic duodenal ulcers (63.2% vs 15.9%, P < 0.01). Histopathologic examination showed marked chronic inflammation, lymphoid follicle formation and prominent germinal centers, with polymorphonuclear cell infiltration of gastric glands, that was similar in case and control biopsy tissues. Finally, IgEd case subjects that underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy were more likely to exhibit treatment

  8. Evaluation of Genetic Polymorphism of Leishmania (V.) braziliensis Isolates Obtained from the Same Patient before and after Therapeutic Failure or Reactivation of Cutaneous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Cibele; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Madeira, Maria de Fatima; de Freitas Campos Miranda, Luciana; Guimarães de Souza Pinto, Andressa; Helena da Silva Barros, Juliana; Conceição-Silva, Fatima; Fernandes Pimentel, Maria Ines; da Silva Pacheco, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genetic polymorphism in Leishmania braziliensis population previously typed through isoenzyme electrophoresis, isolated from the same patient in two different moments: (A) before the beginning of treatment and (B) after treatment failure to meglumine antimoniate or reactivation after successful initial treatment. Fifteen pairs of isolates were assessed using the polymorphic molecular marker LSSP-PCR and following the phenetic analysis. The genetic profiles of the 30 samples were grouped in four clusters. Only two patients presented total identity in the A and B isolates. Most isolates presented similarity coefficients varying from 0.63 to 0.91. In this group of patients genetic polymorphisms could be observed indicating low similarity between the pairs of isolates. The results demonstrate the existence of genetic polymorphism between the samples isolated before treatment and after reactivation or treatment failure, suggesting a possible differentiation of the structure of the original parasite population which could be involved in the mechanisms of resistance to treatment or reactivation of lesions in the ATL. This phenomenon is important, although other factors also could be involved in this context and are discussed in this paper. PMID:23304168

  9. Spore UV and acceleration resistance of endolithic Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis isolates obtained from Sonoran desert basalt: implications for lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Benardini, James N; Sawyer, John; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial spores have been used as model systems for studying the theory of interplanetary transport of life by natural processes such as asteroidal or cometary impacts (i.e., lithopanspermia). Because current spallation theory predicts that near-surface rocks are ideal candidates for planetary ejection and surface basalts are widely distributed throughout the rocky planets, we isolated spore-forming bacteria from the interior of near-subsurface basalt rocks collected in the Sonoran desert near Tucson, Arizona. Spores were found to inhabit basalt at very low concentrations (isolates identified as being most closely related to Bacillus pumilus and one Bacillus subtilis isolate were recovered from near-subsurface basalt samples. Populations of purified spores prepared from the isolated strains were subjected to 254-nm UV and ballistics tests in order to assess their resistance to UV radiation and to extreme acceleration shock, two proposed lethal factors for spores during interplanetary transfer. Specific natural isolates of B. pumilus were found to be substantially more resistant to UV and extreme acceleration than were reference laboratory strains of B. subtilis, the benchmark organism, suggesting that spores of environmental B. pumilus isolates may be more likely to survive the rigors of interplanetary transfer.

  10. Spore UV and Acceleration Resistance of Endolithic Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus subtilis Isolates Obtained from Sonoran Desert Basalt: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benardini, James N.; Sawyer, John; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2003-12-01

    Bacterial spores have been used as model systems for studying the theory of interplanetary transport of life by natural processes such as asteroidal or cometary impacts (i.e., lithopanspermia). Because current spallation theory predicts that near-surface rocks are ideal candidates for planetary ejection and surface basalts are widely distributed throughout the rocky planets, we isolated spore-forming bacteria from the interior of near-subsurface basalt rocks collected in the Sonoran desert near Tucson, Arizona. Spores were found to inhabit basalt at very low concentrations (<=28 colony-forming units/g) in these samples. Six isolates identified as being most closely related to Bacillus pumilus and one Bacillus subtilis isolate were recovered from near-subsurface basalt samples. Populations of purified spores prepared from the isolated strains were subjected to 254-nm UV and ballistics tests in order to assess their resistance to UV radiation and to extreme acceleration shock, two proposed lethal factors for spores during interplanetary transfer. Specific natural isolates of B. pumilus were found to be substantially more resistant to UV and extreme acceleration than were reference laboratory strains of B. subtilis, the benchmark organism, suggesting that spores of environmental B. pumilus isolates may be more likely to survive the rigors of interplanetary transfer.

  11. Multicenter Survey of Routine Determinations of Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to Antimicrobials over the Last 20 Years (1990 to 2009) in Belgium▿

    PubMed Central

    Miendje Deyi, V. Y.; Bontems, P.; Vanderpas, J.; De Koster, E.; Ntounda, R.; Van den Borre, C.; Cadranel, S.; Burette, A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the rates of antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients from 1990 to 2009 and identified risk factors associated with resistance. Gastric biopsy specimens were collected from several digestive disease centers in Brussels, Belgium. We routinely performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing for clarithromycin (CLR), metronidazole, amoxicillin, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin. Evaluable susceptibility testing was obtained for 9,430 strains isolated from patients who were not previously treated for Helicobacter pylori infection (1,527 isolates from children and 7,903 from adults) and 1,371 strains from patients who were previously treated (162 isolates from children and 1,209 from adults). No resistance to amoxicillin was observed, and tetracycline resistance was very rare (<0.01%). Primary metronidazole resistance remained stable over the years, with significantly lower rates for isolates from children (23.4%) than for isolates from adults (30.6%). Ciprofloxacin resistance remained rare in children, while it increased significantly over the last years in adults. Primary clarithromycin resistance increased significantly, reaching peaks in 2000 for children (16.9%) and in 2003 for adults (23.7%). A subsequent decrease of resistance rates down to 10% in both groups corresponded to a parallel decrease in macrolide consumption during the same period. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that female gender, age of the patient of 40 to 64 years, ethnic background, the number of previously unsuccessful eradication attempts, and the different time periods studied were independent risk factors of resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and ciprofloxacin. Our study highlights the need to update local epidemiological data. Thus, the empirical CLR-based triple therapy proposed by the Maastricht III consensus report remains currently applicable to our population. PMID:21450969

  12. Clinicopathological characteristics of invasive gastric Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Jonathan; Wieczorek, Tad; Selig, Martin; Cheung, Hoiwan; Shen, Jeanne; Odze, Robert; Deshpande, Vikram; Zukerberg, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori organisms have been observed deep within the stomach mucosa with an "intracellular" appearance, although the clinicopathological characteristics of such cases remain poorly understood. We analyzed 18 cases of deep mucosal H pylori and associated clinical (sex, age, history of H pylori infection, or proton pump inhibitor [PPI] use, medications, smoking, alcohol use, comorbidities, treatment response) and pathological (presence of lymphoid aggregates, intestinal metaplasia, PPI effect, active and/or chronic inflammation, quantity of invasive versus surface H pylori) characteristics. Electron microscopy was performed on 6 cases with the highest burden of invasive H pylori. Within our sample, 3 of 16 had a history of H pylori infection, 10 of 15 were receiving PPIs at the time of biopsy, and 12 of 13 had a negative posttreatment follow-up. Histology revealed that invasive H pylori were more commonly associated with chronic inflammation, in both the antrum (15/15 chronic, 8/15 acute) and fundus (17/18 chronic, 8/18 acute). Electron microscopy showed organisms within intercellular and luminal spaces, but no intracellular organisms. Deep mucosal H pylori often have an intracellular appearance but are contained within intercellular and luminal spaces and are responsive to standard therapy.

  13. Are probiotics useful in Helicobacter pylori eradication?

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Matjaž; Orel, Rok

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered an etiologic factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Therapeutic schemes to eradicate the bacteria are based on double antibiotic therapy and proton pump inhibitor. Despite many therapeutic improvements in H. pylori eradication treatment, it is still associated with high infection rate also in developed countries. Bacterial resistance and adverse events occurrence are among most frequent causes for anti- H. pylori treatment failure. Several studies have reported that certain probiotic strains can exhibit inhibitory activity against H. pylori bacteria. In addition, some probiotic strains can reduce the occurrence of side effects due to antibiotic therapy and consequently increase the H. pylori eradication rate. The results of the prospective double-blind placebo-controlled studies suggest that specific probiotics, such as S. boulardii and L. johnsonni La1 probably can diminish the bacterial load, but not completely eradicate the H. pylori bacteria. Furthermore, it seems that supplementation with S. boulardii is a useful concomitant therapy in the standard H. pylori eradication treatment protocol and most probably increases eradication rate. L. reuteri is equally effective, but more positive studies are needed. Finally, probiotic strains, such as S. boulardii, L. reuteri and L. GG, decrease gastrointestinal antibiotic associated adverse effects. PMID:26457024

  14. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  15. Rapid identification of Helicobacter pylori and assessment of clarithromycin susceptibility from clinical specimens using FISH

    PubMed Central

    Demiray‐Gürbüz, Ebru; Yılmaz, Özlem; Olivares, Asalia Z; Gönen, Can; Sarıoğlu, Sülen; Soytürk, Müjde; Tümer, Sait; Altungöz, Oğuz; Şimşek, İlkay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori remains one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. Clarithromycin resistance is the most important cause of H. pylori eradication failures. Effective antibiotic therapies in H. pylori infection must be rapidly adapted to local resistance patterns. We investigated the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance due to mutations in positions 2142 and 2143 of 23SrRNA gene of H. pylori by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and compared with culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 234 adult patients with dyspepsia who were enrolled. Antrum and corpus biopsy specimens were obtained for rapid urease test, histopathology and culture. Epsilometer test was used to assess clarithromycin susceptibility. H. pylori presence and clarithromycin susceptibility were determined by FISH in paraffin‐embedded biopsy specimens. We found that 164 (70.1%) patients were positive for H. pylori based on clinical criteria, 114 (69.5% CI 62.5–76.6%) were culture positive, and 137 (83.5% CI 77.8–89.2%) were FISH positive. Thus the sensitivity of FISH was significantly superior to that of culture. However specificity was not significantly different (91.4 versus 100.0%, respectively). The resistance rate to clarithromycin for both antrum and corpus was detected in H. pylori‐positive patients; 20.2% by FISH and 28.0% by E‐test.The concordance between E‐test and FISH was only 89.5% due to the presence of point mutations different from A2143G, A2142G or A2142C. We conclude that FISH is significantly more sensitive than culture and the E‐test for the detection of H. pylori and for rapid determinination of claritromycin susceptibility. The superior hybridisation efficiency of FISH is becoming an emerging molecular tool as a reliable, rapid and sensitive method for the detection and visualisation of H. pylori, especially when the management of H. pylori eradication therapy is necessary. This is particularly important for the

  16. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in six Latin American countries (SWOG Trial S0701)

    PubMed Central

    Nodora, Jesse; Sexton, Rachael; Ferreccio, Catterina; Jimenez, Silvia; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Cook, Paz; Anderson, Garnet; Morgan, Douglas R.; Baker, Laurence H.; Greenberg, E. Robert; Herrero, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential determinants of Helicobacter pylori infection between adults 21–65 years old. Methods Data are from the initial screening visit of a randomized clinical trial of three antibiotic regimens to eradicate H. pylori, conducted in seven sites (Santiago–Chile, Túquerres–Colombia, Guanacaste–Costa Rica, Copán–Honduras, Obregón and Tapachula–México, León–Nicaragua). Thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine adults from the general population were screened for H. pylori infection using an urea breath test (UBT) and were interviewed to assess socioeconomic-, demographic-, and symptom-related characteristics. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between these characteristics and H. pylori positivity at enrollment. Results Among the 1,852 eligible participants for whom a conclusive UBT result was obtained, H. pylori prevalence was 79.4 %, ranging from 70.1 to 84.7 % among the seven centers. Prevalence did not differ by sex (female: 78.4, male: 80.9; p = 0.20) or age (p = 0.08). H. pylori positivity increased with increasing number of siblings (p trend <0.0001). Participants with education beyond 12 years were less likely to be UBT-positive (OR 0.4: 0.3–0.6, compared to participants with 0–6 years of schooling) as were those employed outside the home (OR 0.7: 0.6–1.0). Odds of H. pylori infection increased with the presence of certain living conditions during childhood including having lived in a household with an earth floor (OR 1.8: 1.4–2.4), lack of indoor plumbing (OR 1.3: 1.0–1.8) and crowding (OR 1.4: 1.0–1.8, for having more than two persons per bedroom). Regarding current household conditions, living with more than 3 children in the household (OR 1.7: 1.2–2.5) and crowding (OR 1.8: 1.3–2.3) were associated with H. pylori infection. Conclusions The prevalence of H. pylori in adults was high and differed significantly among the six Latin American countries studied (p < 0.001). Our

  17. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  18. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,866 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2010].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro

    2012-06-01

    Postmarketing surveillance of levofloxacin (LVFX) has been conducted continuously since 1992. The present survey was performed to investigate in vitro susceptibility of recent clinical isolates in Japan to 30 selected antibacterial agents, focusing on fluoroquinolones (FQs). The common respiratory pathogens Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae continue to show a high susceptibility to FQs. In contrast, widely-prevailing resistance to macrolides was markedly noted among S pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. Regarding H. influenzae, the prevalence of beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant isolates has been increasing year by year (25.8% in 2002, 40.0% in 2004, 50.1% in 2007, and 57.9% in 2010). Enterobacteriaceae showed high susceptibility to FQs, however, prevalence of LVFX-resistant Escherichia coli, including intermediate resistance, was 29.3%, showing an increase over time. Nevertheless, the increase in the prevalence of LVFX-resistant E. coli isolates has slowed since 2007 (8.2% in 2000, 11.8% in 2002, 18.8% in 2004, 26.2% in 2007, and 29.3% in 2010), suggesting the influence of LVFX 500 mg tablets since its approval in 2009. Another Enterobacteriaceae member, Klebsiella pneumoniae, showed low resistance to FQs, in contrast with E. coli. In methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the percentage of FQ-susceptible isolates was low, at 51.6% for susceptibility to sitafloxacin, and at only around 10% for susceptibility to other FQs. However, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were highly susceptible to FQs, with the percentage ranging from 88.5% to 99.1%. The prevalence of FQs-resistant isolates in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci was higher than that in methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative staphylococci, although it was lower than the prevalence of FQ-resistance in MRSA. The prevalence of FQs-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates derived from

  19. Carbapenem susceptibility among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates obtained from patients in intensive care units in Taiwan in 2005, 2007, and 2009.

    PubMed

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Lee, Wen-Sen; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chang, Feng-Yi; Ko, Wen-Chien; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lu, Min-Chi; Liu, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Ray-Jade; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the evolutionary trends in non-susceptibility of carbapenems against the isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter cloacae from patients hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs) of major teaching hospitals throughout Taiwan during 2005-2009, we applied the breakpoints of MICs recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in 2013. Escalations in imipenem MIC levels for overall E. coli and E. cloacae isolates and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were noted during this period. The overall MIC levels against imipenem and meropenem for subgroups of ESBL producers of 3 Enterobacteriaceae species were significantly higher than those of respective overall groups in 2007 and 2009. Compared with meropenem, we found that significant evidence of imipenem MIC creep and evidence of extraordinarily high rates of non-susceptibility to ertapenem among isolates of 3 species in 2009 existed. The prominent rises in rates of ertapenem non-susceptibility for ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae during 2005-2009 and rate of ESBL positivity for E. cloacae between 4 years were notably found. Based on our findings, ertapenem should be used cautiously in management of the ICU infections caused by these potentially ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in Taiwan.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection: A brief overview on alternative natural treatments to conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Paula; Fátima Duarte, M; Reis, Celso A; Martins, M Cristina L

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen considered as the etiologic agent of several gastric disorders, that may range from chronic gastritis to more severe outcomes, including gastric cancer. The current therapeutic scheme relies on the combination of several pharmacological substances, namely antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors. However, the cure rates obtained have been declining over the years, mostly due to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. In this context, the use of non-antibiotic substances is of the utmost importance regarding H. pylori eradication. In this review, we present different classes of compounds obtained from natural sources that have shown to present anti-H. pylori potential; we briefly highlight their possible use in the context of developing new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. Material and Methods A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Results Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford’s Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Conclusions Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development. Key words:Campylobacter, elisa, h. pylori, Helicobacter Pylori, RAS, recurrent aphthous

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection modulates the expression of miRNAs associated with DNA mismatch repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Brianti, Mitsue T; Almeida, Victor R; Ortega, Manoela M; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer; Matheu, Ander; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2017-04-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes might lead to modifications in cancer-related gene expression and cancer development. Recently, it has been shown that the infection by Helicobacter pylori, the major causative agent of gastric cancer, induces DNA damage and inhibits MMR DNA repair. Also, it has been reported that microRNAs (miRs) have an important role in regulating genomic stability and MMR DNA repair. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify miRs regulating MMR pathway in H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. To address this question, a gastric epithelial cell line and AGS cancer gastric cells were infected with several H. pylori strains. MMR gene expression and miRs correlating with H. pylori strain infection were evaluated. The results showed that H. pylori infection significantly down-regulated the expression of all selected MMR genes. Also, H. pylori infection modulated the expression of several miRs (including miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163), after 4, 8, and 12 h of infection. Computational prediction of candidate miRs and their predicted MMR targeting sites were obtained from TargetScan, mirDB, and MetaCore. The generated data indicated that the selected miRs (miR-150-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-3163) could possibly target and modulate MMR genes (POLD3, MSH2, and MSH3, respectively). The target validation was performed using mimics and luciferase gene reporter assays. Briefly, this study shows that H. pylori impairs MMR DNA repair pathway and identifies miRs that regulate MMR gene expression in gastric cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests in children: review of the literature from 1999 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Kalach, Nicolas; Elitsur, Yoram; Koletzko, Sibylle

    2010-01-01

    The array of tests that can be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection is large, and it can be confusing to define which test to use particularly in children where results may not be comparable to those obtained in adult patients. Using PubMed, we reviewed the English literature from January 1999 to May 2009 to identify articles that determined sensitivity and specificity of H. pylori invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests in children. We excluded articles that presented a review of the literature, abstracts, case reports, or series where children's results could not be separated from adult populations. Of the tissue based methods, rapid urease tests have better sensitivity than histology to detect presence of H. pylori; however, histology can detect the pathology associated with disease including gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and other conditions that could be the cause of the child's symptoms. Culture of gastric tissues or stool has 100% specificity but sensitivity is low. Of the serologic tests, immunoblot has the best sensitivity. The urea breath tests have >75% sensitivity for detection of H. pylori before and after treatment. Immunoassays in stool using monoclonal antibodies have >95% sensitivity for detection of H. pylori before and after treatment. PCR testing can be performed in tissue and stool samples and can detect genes associated to antibiotic resistance. In summary, the current commercial non-invasive tests have adequate sensitivity and specificity for detecting the presence of H. pylori; however, endoscopy with histopathology is the only method that can detect H. pylori and lesions associated with the infection.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Cholesteryl α-Glucosides Contribute to Its Pathogenicity and Immune Response by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuki; Vela, Jose Luis; Matsumura, Fumiko; Hoshino, Hitomi; Tyznik, Aaron; Lee, Heeseob; Girardi, Enrico; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Liddington, Robert; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Bao, Xingfeng; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Jin, Rongsheng; Zong, Yinong; Seeberger, Peter H.; Nakayama, Jun; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Fukuda, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10–15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer), while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT), which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18−/−) or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18−/− compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis. PMID:24312443

  5. Evaluation for a novel methicillin resistance (mecC) homologue in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from injured military personnel.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Crawford, Katrina; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley; Ellis, Michael; Tribble, David R; Weintrob, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 102 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 50 injured service members (June 2009 to December 2011) at U.S. military treatment facilities were analyzed for the conventional mecA gene and mecC homologue by using standard PCR-based methods. The prevalence of the mecC homologue was zero.

  6. [In-vitro susceptibilites to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 18,639 clinical isolates obtained from 77 centers in 2004].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Tsujio, Yoshiko; Kimoto, Hiroya; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Nishimura, Masaharu; Akizawa, Koji; Katayama, Yosei; Matsuda, Keiko; Hayashi, Tasuku; Yasujima, Minoru; Kasai, Takeshi; Kimura, Masahiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Miki, Makoto; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Nakagawa, Takuo; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Toyoshima, Shunkoh; Sakurai, Masanori; Shiotani, Joji; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Okada, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Yamane, Nobuo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Ieiri, Tamio; Kominami, Hidenori; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Oguri, Toyoko; Itoh, Kouichi; Watanabe, Kiyoaki; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohtake, Teruko; Uchida, Takashi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Murakami, Masami; Yomoda, Sachie; Takahashi, Ayako; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Gonda, Hideo; Yamashita, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; Okada, Motoi; Ikari, Hiromi; Kurosawa, Naomi; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Ishigo, Shiomi; Asano, Yuko; Mikio, Mori; Kano, Ichino; Nagano, Eiko; Kageyama, Fumio; Shaku, Etsuko; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Gemma, Hitoshi; Uemura, Keiichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Maesaki, Shighefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Horii, Toshinobu; Sumitomo, Midori; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Hiraoka, Minoru; Wada, Hideo; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Baba, Hisashi; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Kinosita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Fujita, Shinichi; Kageoka, Takeshi; Hongo, Toshiharu; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Tatewaki, Kenichi; Moro, Kunihiko; Oka, Mikio; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichiro; Nose, Motoko; Fushiwaki, Takeshi; Kuwabara, Masao; Fujiue, Yoshihiro; Shimuzu, Akira; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Hinoda, Yuji; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Takahashi, Hakuo; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Asai, Koji; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Masuda, Junichi; Sano, Reiko; Taminato, Tomohiko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Syuji; Komatsu, Masaru; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Murase, Mitsuharu; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isao; Hirakata, Yoichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Aizawa, Hisamichi; Honda, Junichi; Hamazaki, Naotaka; Okayama, Akihiko; Ono, Junko; Aoki, Yosuke; Okada, Kaoru; Miyanohara, Hiroaki

    2006-12-01

    A total of 18,639 clinical isolates in 19 species collected from 77 centers during 2004 in Japan were tested for their susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and other selected antibiotics. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae showed a high susceptible rate against FQs. The isolation rate of beta lactamase non-producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae was approximately three times as large as those of western countries. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae were also susceptible to FQs. The resistance rate of Escherichia coli against FQs has however been rapidly increasing so far as we surveyed since 1994. The FQs-resistant rate in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) showed approximately 90% except for 36%. of sitafloxacin while FQs-resistant rate in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was around 5%. The FQs-resistant rate of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was also higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), however, it was lower than that of MRSA. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates, 32-34% from UTI and 15-19% of from RTI was resistant to FQs. Acinetobacter spp. showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Although FQs-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae have not been increased in western countries, it is remarkably high in Japan. In this survey, isolates of approximately 85% was resistant to FQs.

  7. The effect of prolonged storage on the virulence of isolates of Bacillus anthracis obtained from environmental and animal sources in the Kars Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Buyuk, Fatih; Sahin, Mitat; Cooper, Callum; Celebi, Ozgur; Saglam, Aliye Gulmez; Baillie, Les; Celik, Elif; Akca, Dogan; Otlu, Salih

    2015-07-01

    The stability of the plasmid-mediated virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis, a tripartite toxin located on pXO1 and an antiphagocytic capsule encoded by genes located on pXO2, following long-term storage was investigated. A collection of 159 isolates of B. anthracis were collected from the Kars region of Turkey between 2000 and 2013 and stored at -20°C in Brucella broth supplemented with 20% glycerine. A total of 142 isolates were recovered of which one failed to express a capsule upon primary culture. A further 35 isolates yielded a mixture of mucoid and non-mucoid colonies; the majority of which had lost the pXO2 plasmid as determined by PCR analysis. Results would suggest that pXO2 is more unstable than pXO1 and that this instability increases with the length of storage. It is possible that the pXO2-deficient isolates of B. anthracis described here could be developed into a vaccine to treat at risk animals in the Kars region as many animal vaccines are based upon pXO2 deficiency.

  8. Choosing a Benchtop Sequencing Machine to Characterise Helicobacter pylori Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Timothy T.; Tay, Chin Yen; Thirriot, Fanny; Marshall, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The fully annotated genome sequence of the European strain, 26695 was first published in 1997 and, in 1999, it was directly compared to the USA isolate J99, promoting two standard laboratory isolates for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) research. With the genomic scaffolds available from these important genomes and the advent of benchtop high-throughput sequencing technology, a bacterial genome can now be sequenced within a few days. We sequenced and analysed strains J99 and 26695 using the benchtop-sequencing machines Ion Torrent PGM and the Illumina MiSeq Nextera and Nextera XT methodologies. Using publically available algorithms, we analysed the raw data and interrogated both genomes by mapping the data and by de novo assembly. We compared the accuracy of the coding sequence assemblies to the originally published sequences. With the Ion Torrent PGM, we found an inherently high-error rate in the raw sequence data. Using the Illumina MiSeq, we found significantly more non-covered nucleotides when using the less expensive Illumina Nextera XT compared with the Illumina Nextera library creation method. We found the most accurate de novo assemblies using the Nextera technology, however, extracting an accurate multi-locus sequence type was inconsistent compared to the Ion Torrent PGM. We found the cagPAI failed to assemble onto a single contig in all technologies but was more accurate using the Nextera. Our results indicate the Illumina MiSeq Nextera method is the most accurate for de novo whole genome sequencing of H. pylori. PMID:23840736

  9. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori colonization on the tonsillar surface versus tonsillar core tissue as determined by the CLO test.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Bijan; Niknejad, Nika; Gandomi, Behrooz; Yeganeh, Firoozeh

    2007-08-01

    We conducted a prospective study to determine the correlation between the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori on the tonsillar surface and in the tonsillar core as determined by the Campylobacter-like organism (CLO) rapid urease enzyme test. Our study population was made up of 55 patients who underwent adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy, or both from December 2002 through April 2003 at Khalili Hospital in Shiraz, Iran. Of these 55 patients, 45 (82%) were positive and 10 (18%) were negative for H pylori colonization as determined by CLO testing. Analysis of samples obtained from individual patients revealed differences in H pylori colonization between tonsillar surface samples and the core tissue samples. Of 106 tonsils obtained from 53 patients who underwent adenotonsillectomy or tonsillectomy, H pylori was found on 56 tonsillar surface samples (53%) and 24 tonsillar core samples (23%); only 13 tonsils (12%) contained H pylori both on the surface and in the core. We conclude that a surface swab is neither specific nor sensitive as an indicator of the presence or absence of H. pylori colonization in tonsillar core tissue.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Two Helicobacter pylori Strains using Genomics and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Roger; Thorell, Kaisa; Hosseini, Shaghayegh; Kenny, Diarmuid; Sihlbom, Carina; Sjöling, Åsa; Karlsson, Anders; Nookaew, Intawat

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gastroenteric pathogen believed to have co-evolved with humans over 100,000 years, shows significant genetic variability. This motivates the study of different H. pylori strains and the diseases they cause in order to identify determinants for disease evolution. In this study, we used proteomics tools to compare two H. pylori strains. Nic25_A was isolated in Nicaragua from a patient with intestinal metaplasia, and P12 was isolated in Europe from a patient with duodenal ulcers. Differences in the abundance of surface proteins between the two strains were determined with two mass spectrometry-based methods, label-free quantification (MaxQuant) or the use of tandem mass tags (TMT). Each approach used a lipid-based protein immobilization (LPITM) technique to enrich peptides of surface proteins. Using the MaxQuant software, we found 52 proteins that differed significantly in abundance between the two strains (up- or downregulated by a factor of 1.5); with TMT, we found 18 proteins that differed in abundance between the strains. Strain P12 had a higher abundance of proteins encoded by the cag pathogenicity island, while levels of the acid response regulator ArsR and its regulatory targets (KatA, AmiE, and proteins involved in urease production) were higher in strain Nic25_A. Our results show that differences in protein abundance between H. pylori strains can be detected with proteomic approaches; this could have important implications for the study of disease progression. PMID:27891114

  11. Helicobacter pylori as an oncogenic pathogen, revisited.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2017-03-21

    Gastric cancer is an inflammation-associated malignancy aetiologically related to infection with the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, which is considered a necessary but insufficient cause. Unless treated, H. pylori causes life-long acute and chronic gastric inflammation resulting in progressive gastric mucosal damage that may result in gastric cancer. The rate of progression from superficial gastritis, to an atrophic metaplastic mucosa, and ultimately to cancer relates to the virulence of the infecting H. pylori as well as host and environmental factors. H. pylori virulence is a reflection of its propensity to cause severe gastric inflammation. Both mucosal inflammation and H. pylori can cause host genomic instability, including dysregulation of DNA mismatch repair, stimulation of expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, abnormal DNA methylation and dysregulation of  micro RNAs, which may result in an accumulation of mutations and loss of normal regulation of cell growth. The difference in cancer risk between the most and least virulent H. pylori strain is only approximately 2-fold. Overall, none of the putative virulence factors identified to date have proved to be disease-specific. The presence, severity, extent and duration of inflammation appear to be the most important factors and current evidence suggests that any host, environmental or bacterial factor that reliably enhances the inflammatory response to the H. pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer.

  12. Metalloregulation of Helicobacter pylori physiology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Kathryn P.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium that colonizes over half of the world's population. Chronic H. pylori infection is associated with increased risk for numerous disease outcomes including gastritis, dysplasia, neoplasia, B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), and invasive adenocarcinoma. The complex interactions that occur between pathogen and host are dynamic and exquisitely regulated, and the relationship between H. pylori and its human host are no exception. To successfully colonize, and subsequently persist, within the human stomach H. pylori must temporally regulate numerous genes to ensure localization to the gastric lumen and coordinated expression of virulence factors to subvert the host's innate and adaptive immune response. H. pylori achieves this precise gene regulation by sensing subtle environmental changes including host-mediated alterations in nutrient availability and responding with dramatic global changes in gene expression. Recent studies revealed that the presence or absence of numerous metal ions encountered in the lumen of the stomach, or within host tissues, including nickel, iron, copper and zinc, can influence regulatory networks to alter gene expression in H. pylori. These expression changes modulate the deployment of bacterial virulence factors that can ultimately influence disease outcome. In this review we will discuss the environmental stimuli that are detected by H. pylori as well as the trans regulatory elements, specifically the transcription regulators and transcription factors, that allow for these significant transcriptional shifts. PMID:26388855

  13. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  14. Acetaldehyde and ethanol production by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Salmela, K S; Roine, R P; Höök-Nikanne, J; Kosunen, T U; Salaspuro, M

    1994-04-01

    By virtue of possessing alcohol dehydrogenase activity, cytosol prepared from Helicobacter pylori produces toxic acetaldehyde from ethanol in vitro. To approach the in vivo situation in the stomach, we have now investigation whether intact H. pylori--without addition of exogenous nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide--also forms acetaldehyde. Furthermore, to assess the energy metabolism of H. pylori, we determined whether the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction can run in the opposite direction with ethanol as the end-product and thereby yield energy for the organism. Intact H. pylori formed acetaldehyde already at low ethanol concentrations (at 0.5% ethanol, acetaldehyde, 64 +/- 21 and 75 +/- 9 mumol/l (mean +/- SEM) for strains NCTC 11637 and NCTC 11638, respectively). H. pylori produced ethanol in concentrations that can be significant for the energy metabolism of the organism. Acetaldehyde production by H. pylori may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases associated with the organism. The primary function of H. pylori alcohol dehydrogenase may, however, be alcoholic fermentation and consequent energy production under microaerobic conditions.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium.

  16. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Mydhily R. B.; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10–20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases. PMID:27504109

  17. Helicobacter pylori eradication as prevention against chronic peptic ulcer disease in children.

    PubMed

    Maciorkowska, E; Kaczmarski, M; Skowrońska, J; Cieśla, J M; Chrzanowska, U; Olejnik, B T; Sacharewicz, A; Ryszczuk, E

    2005-01-01

    The changes caused by Helicobacter pylori are a slow, progressing inflammatory process developing from several to dozen years. H. pylori infection leads to an inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa with granulocyte infiltrates in an acute form of the inflammation, and lymphocytes, plasmatic, macrophages and eosinophils in a chronic form inducing the development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer in some patients. The frequency and the type of morphological changes in the gastric mucosa were analyzed in children with positive IgG against H. pylori and the incidence of gastric and duodenal ulcers in family members of children examined was evaluated in our study. Gastritis was reported in 68.8% of children with positive IgG against H. pylori. Gastric ulcer was confirmed in 37.1% of families of children included in the study. Duodenal ulcers were found in 22.9% of families. The results obtained, indicate the usefulness of long-term observation and clinical follow-up of children with chronic gastritis of H. pylori ethiology taking into consideration bacterium eradication as prophylaxis of peptic ulceration.

  18. Comparison of the nucleic acids of helical and coccoid forms of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Narikawa, S; Kawai, S; Aoshima, H; Kawamata, O; Kawaguchi, R; Hikiji, K; Kato, M; Iino, S; Mizushima, Y

    1997-01-01

    The nucleic acids of the helical and coccoid forms of Helicobacter pylori were studied to determine if the coccoid forms are "viable (capable of growing) but nonculturable." Using a reference strain (NCTC 11638) and five clinical strains, the nucleic acid contents, DNA integrity, and results of PCR and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) were compared for helical H. pylori and coccoid forms induced using glycochenodeoxycholic acid or bismuth citrate. The DNA and RNA contents of the coccoid forms were respectively 6.8- and 8.1-fold lower than those of helical H. pylori after 3 days of induction and 11.5- and 14.7-fold lower after 7 days. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA extracted from the coccoid forms after 3 days of induction showed a smear pattern indicating DNA cleavage, whereas DNA from helical H. pylori showed a single band with a high molecular mass. After 12 days of induction, all RNA samples from 100% coccoid cultures were negative for the mRNA of urease A or the 26-kDa species-specific protein by RT-PCR. However, most RNA samples obtained after 3 or 7 days of induction were positive at low levels despite the lack of recovery from these cultures. These results suggest that the coccoid form of H. pylori has impaired genomic DNA and is in the process of cellular degeneration, thus being still alive but nonincreasable. PMID:9144365

  19. Fermented Foods: Are They Tasty Medicines for Helicobacter pylori Associated Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Nair, Mydhily R B; Chouhan, Deepak; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    More than a million people die every year due to gastric cancer and peptic ulcer. Helicobacter pylori infection in stomach is the most important reason for these diseases. Interestingly, only 10-20% of the H. pylori infected individuals suffer from these gastric diseases and rest of the infected individuals remain asymptomatic. The genotypes of H. pylori, host genetic background, lifestyle including smoking and diet may determine clinical outcomes. People from different geographical regions have different food habits, which also include several unique fermented products of plant and animal origins. When consumed raw, the fermented foods bring in fresh inocula of microbes to gastrointestinal tract and several strains of these microbes, like Lactobacillus and Saccharomyces are known probiotics. In vitro and in vivo experiments as well as clinical trials suggest that several probiotics have anti-H. pylori effects. Here we discuss the possibility of using natural probiotics present in traditional fermented food and beverages to obtain protection against H. pylori induced gastric diseases.

  20. Molecular typing of isolates obtained from aborted foetuses in Brucella-free Holstein dairy cattle herd after immunisation with Brucella abortus RB51 vaccine in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Melzer, Falk; Böttcher, Denny; El-Diasty, Mohamed; El-Beskawy, Mohamed; Rasheed, Nesma; Schmoock, Gernot; Roesler, Uwe; Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    Bovine brucellosis is endemic in Egypt in spite of application of surveillance and control measures. An increase of abortions was reported in a Holstein dairy cattle herd with 600 animals in Damietta governorate in Egypt after immunisation with Brucella (B.) abortus RB51 vaccine. Twenty one (10.6%) of 197 vaccinated cows aborted after 3 months. All aborted cows had been tested seronegative for brucellosis in the past 3 years. B. abortus was isolated from four foetuses. Conventional biochemical and bacteriological identification and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed two B. abortus biovar (bv.) 1 smooth and two B. abortus rough strains. None of the B. abortus isolates were identified as RB51. Genotyping analysis by multiple locus of variable number tandem repeats analysis based on 16 markers (MLVA-16) revealed two different profiles with low genetic diversity. B. abortus bv1 was introduced in the herd and caused abortions.

  1. Identification of the N-acetylneuraminyllactose-specific laminin-binding protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, K H; Wadström, T; Moran, A P

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the gastroduodenal pathogen Helicobacter pylori with the glycoprotein laminin was investigated. Binding of 125I-radiolabelled laminin in a liquid-phase assay by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating strains was rapid, saturable, specific, partially reversible, of high affinity, and insensitive to pH. Inhibition of laminin binding by fetuin, but not asialofetuin, and reduced bacterial binding to periodate- or sialidase-treated laminin indicated that glycosylation, particularly sialylation, was important for laminin binding by H. pylori. Inhibition experiments with monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides showed that the strains bound to a region spanning a trisaccharide. In particular, inhibition and displacement studies showed that binding to the trisaccharide N-acetylneuraminyl-alpha(2-3)-lactose [NeuAc(2-3)Lac] was preferential to that to the NeuAc(2-6)Lac isomer. Complete inhibition of laminin binding by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating strains was achieved only when isolated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as an inhibitor in combination with heat or protease treatment of H. pylori cells, thereby confirming the involvement of both LPS and a protein adhesin in laminin binding. Further inhibition experiments indicated that the protein receptor, rather than LPS, on H. pylori bound NeuAc(2-3)Lac. By using a Western blotting procedure, a 25-kDa outer membrane protein was identified as mediating laminin binding by both hemagglutinating and poorly hemagglutinating H. pylori strains. The specificity of binding was confirmed by complete inhibition of laminin binding by the 25-kDa protein with NeuAc(2-3)Lac. The data collectively suggest that a 25-kDa outer membrane protein acts in a lectin-like manner with LPS to mediate attachment of H. pylori to laminin. PMID:9038297

  2. Anti-Helicobacter pylori and urease inhibition activities of some traditional medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhammad; Anwar, Farooq; Naz, Fauqia; Mehmood, Tahir; Saari, Nazamid

    2013-02-07

    Different parts of Acacia nilotica (L.) Delile, Calotropis procera (Aiton) W.T. Aiton, Adhatoda vasica Nees, Fagoniaar abica L. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. are traditionally used in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of common ailments like nausea, cold, cough, asthma, fevers, diarrhea, sore throat, swelling, etc. The present study was aimed to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter pylori and urease inhibition activities of extracts produced from the above selected medicinal plants native to Soon Valley (home to an old civilization) in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Methanol, acetone and water extracts of the plants were evaluated for anti-bacterial activity against thirty four clinical isolates and two reference strains of H. pylori. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the extracts were determined using the agar dilution method and compared with some standard antibiotics like amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CLA), tetracycline (TET) and metronidazole (MNZ), used in the triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. H. pylori urease inhibition activity of the extracts was assessed by the phenol red method, wherein, Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to determine Michaelis-Menten constants for elucidating the mechanism of inhibition. Methanol and acetone extracts from Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera exhibited stronger anti-H. pylori activity than MNZ, almost comparable activity with TET, but were found to be less potent than AMX and CLT. The rest of the extracts exhibited lower activity than the standard antibiotics used in this study. In the H. pylori urease inhibitory assay, methanol and acetone extracts of Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera showed significant inhibition. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated a competitive mechanism for extract of Acacia nilotica, whereas extract of Calotropis procera exhibited a mixed type of inhibition.

  3. Vaccine against Helicobacter pylori: Inevitable approach

    PubMed Central

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Over three decades have passed since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and yet many questions about its treatment remain unanswered. For example, there is no certainty regarding continued use of current antibiotic therapy against H. pylori. The bad news is that even combined regimens are also unable to eradicate bacterial colonization. The worst problem with H. pylori chemotherapy is that even if we identify the most successful regimen, it cannot eliminate the risk of re-infection. This problem is further complicated by the fact that clinicians have no information as to whether probiotics are useful or not. Moreover, to date, we have no large scale produced vaccine effective against H. pylori. Due to the relatively rapid and abundant dissemination of guidelines globally reported concerning management of gastric cancer prevention and therapeutic regimens, clinicians may choose a vaccine as better effective weapon against H. pylori. Therefore, a radical shift in adopted strategies is needed to guide ultimate decisions regarding H. pylori management. In light of failures in vaccine projects, we should identify better vaccine design targeting conserved/essential genes. The unique character and persistence of H. pylori pose obstacles to making an effective vaccine. Preferably, in developing countries, the best reasonable and logical approach is to recommend prophylactic H. pylori vaccine among children as an obligatory national program to limit primary colonization. Trying to produce a therapeutic vaccine would be postponed until later. In reality, we should not forget to prescribe narrow spectrum antibiotics. In the current review, I draw a route to define the best adopted strategy against this rogue bacterium. PMID:27003991

  4. Vaccine against Helicobacter pylori: Inevitable approach.

    PubMed

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin

    2016-03-21

    Over three decades have passed since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and yet many questions about its treatment remain unanswered. For example, there is no certainty regarding continued use of current antibiotic therapy against H. pylori. The bad news is that even combined regimens are also unable to eradicate bacterial colonization. The worst problem with H. pylori chemotherapy is that even if we identify the most successful regimen, it cannot eliminate the risk of re-infection. This problem is further complicated by the fact that clinicians have no information as to whether probiotics are useful or not. Moreover, to date, we have no large scale produced vaccine effective against H. pylori. Due to the relatively rapid and abundant dissemination of guidelines globally reported concerning management of gastric cancer prevention and therapeutic regimens, clinicians may choose a vaccine as better effective weapon against H. pylori. Therefore, a radical shift in adopted strategies is needed to guide ultimate decisions regarding H. pylori management. In light of failures in vaccine projects, we should identify better vaccine design targeting conserved/essential genes. The unique character and persistence of H. pylori pose obstacles to making an effective vaccine. Preferably, in developing countries, the best reasonable and logical approach is to recommend prophylactic H. pylori vaccine among children as an obligatory national program to limit primary colonization. Trying to produce a therapeutic vaccine would be postponed until later. In reality, we should not forget to prescribe narrow spectrum antibiotics. In the current review, I draw a route to define the best adopted strategy against this rogue bacterium.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Aspholm, Marina; Kalia, Awdhesh; Ruhl, Stefan; Schedin, Staffan; Arnqvist, Anna; Lindén, Sara; Sjöström, Rolf; Gerhard, Markus; Semino-Mora, Cristina; Dubois, Andre; Unemo, Magnus; Danielsson, Dan; Teneberg, Susann; Lee, Woo-Kon; Berg, Douglas E.; Borén, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Adherence of bacterial pathogens to host tissues contributes to colonization and virulence and typically involves specific interactions between bacterial proteins called adhesins and cognate oligosaccharide (glycan) or protein motifs in the host that are used as receptors. A given pathogen may have multiple adhesins, each specific for a different set of receptors and, potentially, with different roles in infection and disease. This chapter provides strategies for identifying and analyzing host glycan receptors and the bacterial adhesins that exploit them as receptors, with particular reference to adherence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. PMID:17132512

  6. Analysis of a single Helicobacter pylori strain over a ten-year period in a primate model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Fero, Jutta B.; Mendez, Melissa; Carpenter, Beth M.; Servetas, Stephanie L.; Rahman, Arifur; Goldman, Matthew D.; Boren, Thomas; Salama, Nina R.; Merrell, D. Scott; Dubois, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori from different individuals exhibits substantial genetic diversity. However, the kinetics of bacterial diversification after infection with a single strain is poorly understood. We investigated evolution of H. pylori following long-term infection in the primate stomach; Rhesus macaques were infected with H. pylori strain USU101 and then followed for 10 years. H. pylori was regularly cultured from biopsies, and single colony isolates were analyzed. At 1-year, DNA fingerprinting showed that all output isolates were identical to the input strain; however, at 5-years, different H. pylori fingerprints were observed. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed that long term persistence of USU101 in the macaque stomach was associated with specific whole gene changes. Further detailed investigation showed that levels of the BabA protein were dramatically reduced within weeks of infection. The molecular mechanisms behind this reduction were shown to include phase variation and gene loss via intragenomic rearrangement, suggesting strong selective pressure against BabA expression in the macaque model. Notably, although there is apparently strong selective pressure against babA, babA is required for establishment of infection in this model as stains in which babA was deleted were unable to colonize experimentally infected macaques. PMID:25804332

  7. Glycosylation of mucins present in gastric juice: the effect of helicobacter pylori eradication treatment.

    PubMed

    Radziejewska, Iwona; Borzym-Kluczyk, Małgorzata; Namiot, Zbigniew; Stefańska, Ewa

    2011-06-01

    It is suggested that gastric mucins, and in particular some specific glycan structures that can act as carbohydrate receptors, are involved in the interactions with Helicobacter pylori adhesins. The main aim of our study was to evaluate glycosylation pattern of glycoproteins of gastric juice before and at the end of eradication therapy. Gastric juices were taken from 13 clinical patients and subjected to analysis. Pooled fractions of the void volume obtained after gel filtration were subjected to ELISA tests. To assess the relative amounts of carbohydrate structures, lectins and monoclonal antibodies were used. Changes in the level of MUC 1 and MUC 5AC mucins and of carbohydrate structures, which are suggested to be receptors for Helicobacter pylori adhesins, were observed by the end of the eradication treatment. Our results support the idea about the involvement of MUC 5AC and MUC 1 with some specific sugar structures in the mechanism of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  8. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma.

  9. Molecular characterization of SAT-2 foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates obtained from cattle during a four-month period in 2001 in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Phologane, B S; Dwarka, R M; Haydon, D T; Gerber, L J; Vosloo, W

    2008-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, highly contagious viral infection of domestic and wild cloven-hoofed animals. The virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that has a high rate of nucleotide mutation and amino acid substitution. In southern Africa the South African Territories (SAT) 1-3 serotypes of FMD virus are maintained by large numbers of African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), which provide a potential source of infection for domestic livestock and wild animals. During February 2001, an outbreak of SAT-2 was recorded in cattle in the FMD control zone of South Africa, adjacent to the Kruger National Park (KNP). They had not been vaccinated against the disease since they form the buffer between the vaccination and free zones but in the face of the outbreak, they were vaccinated as part of the control measures to contain the disease. The virus was, however, isolated from some of them on several occasions up to May 2001. These isolates were characterized to determine the rate of genetic change in the main antigenic determinant, the 1 D/2A gene. Nucleotide substitutions at 12 different sites were identified of which five led to amino acid changes. Three of these occurred in known antigenic sites, viz. the GH-loop and C-terminal part of the protein, and two of these have previously been shown to be subject to positive selection. Likelihood models indicated that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous changes among the outbreak sequences recovered from cattle was four times higher than among comparable sequences isolated from wildlife, suggesting that the virus may be under greater selective pressure during rapid transmission events.

  10. Autophagy impairment by Helicobacter pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 promotes gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Nanjo, Sohachi; Ando, Takayuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maekita, Takao; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces methylation silencing of tumor suppressor genes causing gastric carcinogenesis. Impairment of autophagy induces DNA damage leading to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. We aimed to identify whether H. pylori infection induced methylation silencing of host autophagy-related (Atg) genes, impairing autophagy and enhancing gastric carcinogenesis. Gastric mucosae were obtained from 41 gastric cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers (8 H. pylori-uninfected and 3 H. pylori-infected). Methylation status of Atg genes was analyzed by a methylation microarray and quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP); mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were assessed in normal rat gastric epithelial cells. Gene knock-down was performed by siRNA. Autophagy was assessed by western blotting. Of 34 Atg genes, MAP1LC3A variant 1 (MAP1LC3Av1) and ULK2 were identified by methylation microarray analysis as exhibiting specific methylation in H. pylori-infected mucosae and gastric cancer tissues. Methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 was confirmed by qMSP, qRT-PCR and de-methylation treatment in two gastric cancer cell lines. Knock-down of map1lc3a, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3Av1, inhibited autophagy response and increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion in normal rat gastric epithelial cells, despite the presence of map1lc3b, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3B gene important for autophagy. Furthermore, MAP1LC3Av1 was methylation-silenced in 23.3% of gastric cancerous mucosae and 40% of non-cancerous mucosae with H. pylori infection. MAP1LC3Av1 is essential for autophagy and H. pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 may impair autophagy, facilitating gastric carcinogenesis.

  11. [In vitro susceptibilities to levofloxacin and various antibacterial agents of 12,919 clinical isolates obtained from 72 centers in 2007].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ohno, Akira; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Iwata, Morihiro; Kanda, Makoto; Akizawa, Kouji; Shimizu, Chikara; Kon, Shinichirou; Nakamura, Kastushi; Matsuda, Keiko; Tominaga, Makoto; Nakagawa, Takuo; Sugita, Akihiro; Ito, Tatsumi; Kato, Jun; Suwabe, Akira; Yamahata, Kumiko; Kawamura, Chizuko; Tashiro, Hiromi; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Katayama, Yosei; Kondou, Shigemi; Misawa, Shigeki; Murata, Misturu; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Kenichiro; Okada, Motoi; Haruki, Kosuke; Kanno, Harushige; Aihara, Masanori; Maesaki, Shigefumi; Hashikita, Giichi; Miyajima, Eiji; Sumitomo, Midori; Saito, Takefumi; Yamane, Nobuo; Kawashima, Chieko; Akiyama, Takahisa; Ieiri, Tamio; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Okamoto, Yuki; Okabe, Hidetoshi; Moro, Kunihiko; Shigeta, Masayo; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Yamashita, Masanobu; Hida, Yukio; Takubo, Takayuki; Kusakabe, Tadashi; Masaki, Hiroya; Heijyou, Hitoshi; Nakaya, Hideo; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Sano, Reiko; Matsuo, Syuji; Kono, Hisashi; Yuzuki, Yosuke; Ikeda, Norio; Idomuki, Masayo; Soma, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Go; Kinoshita, Syohiro; Kawano, Seiji; Oka, Mikio; Kusano, Nobuchika; Kang, Dongchon; Ono, Junko; Yasujima, Minoru; Miki, Makoto; Hayashi, Masato; Okubo, Syunji; Toyoshima, Syunkou; Kaku, Mitsuo; Sekine, Imao; Shiotani, Joji; Horiuchi, Hajime; Tazawa, Yoko; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kumasaka, Kazunari; Koike, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Ozaki, Yukio; Uchida, Takashi; Murakami, Masami; Inuzuka, Kazuhisa; Gonda, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Ikuo; fujimoto, Yoshinori; Iriyama, Junji; Asano, Yuko; Genma, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Nakatani, Kaname; Baba, Hisashi; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Fujita, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Masao; Okazaki, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Ota, Hiromi; Nagai, Astushi; Fujita, Jun; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Tetsuro; Kamioka, Mikio; Murase, Mitsuharu; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Okayama, Akihiko; Aoki, Yosuke; Kusaba, Koji; Nakashima, Yukari; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Matsuda, Junichi; Kohno, Shigeru; Mashiba, Koichi

    2009-08-01

    We have reported in this journal in vitro susceptibilities of clinical isolates to antibiotics every year since 1992. In this paper, we report the results of an analysis of in vitro susceptibilities of 12,919 clinical isolates from 72 centers in Japan to selected antibiotics in 2007 compared with the results from previous years. The common respiratory pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae maintained a high susceptibility to fluoroquinolones (FQs). The resistance of S. pyogenes to macrolides has been increasing every year and this was especially clear this year. Most strains of Enterobacteriaceae except for Escherichia coli showed a high susceptibility to FQs. Almost 30% of E. coli strains were resistant to FQs and the resistance increased further this year. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was approximately 95% with the exception of 45% for sitafloxacin (STFX). FQs resistance of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was low at about 10%. FQs resistance of methicillin-resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) was higher than that of methicillin-susceptible coagulase negative Staphylococci (MSCNS), but it was lower than that of MRSA. However, FQs resistance of MSCNS was higher than that of MSSA. FQs resistance of Enterococcus faecalis was 22.5% to 29.6%, while that of Enterococcusfaecium was more than 85% except for STFX (58.3%). In clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa derived from urinary tract infections, FQs resistance was 21-27%, which was higher than that of P. aeruginosa from respiratory tract infections at 13-21%, which was the same trend as in past years. Multidrug resistant strains accounted for 5.6% in the urinary tract and 1.8% in the respiratory tract. Acinetobacter spp. showed high susceptibility to FQs. The carbapenem resistant strains, which present a problem at present, accounted for 2.7%. Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed high

  12. Effects of curcumin on Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Vetvickova, Jana; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a well-established natural molecule with significant biological and pharmaceutical effects. Its effects on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been repeatedly confirmed both in animal and human models. This study directly compared five different samples to evaluate if the effects are general or if they differ among samples. Methods Using a mouse model, we studied the effects of curcumin on lipid peroxide (LPO) level, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and urease activity, number of colonized bacteria, levels of anti-H. pylori antibodies, biofilm formation, IFN-γ, IL-4, gastrin and somatostatin levels in serum, and minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, we evaluated the effects on biofilm production and antibacterial antibody response. Results In all tests, one sample (Sabinsa) was consistently the most active. Conclusions All curcumin samples showed some anti-H. pylori effects, but only some of the tested samples had significant activity. PMID:28149841

  13. Thailand Consensus on Helicobacter pylori Treatment 2015.

    PubMed

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Mairiang, Pisaln; Praisontarangkul, Ong-Ard; Ovartlarnporn, Buncha; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Pisespongsa, Pises; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Sony, Ravin; Sirinthornpunya, Siam; Chaiyamahapurk, Orawan; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Sansak, Inchaya; Harnsomboon, Piyathida; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chuenrattanakul, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is an important aspect of many upper gastrointestinal tract diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The Thailand Consensus on H. pylori treatment 2015 consisted of 22 national experts who took active roles, discussed all important clinical information and investigated clinical aspects in four workshops, focuising on: (1) Diagnosis (2) Treatment (3) Follow-up after eradication and (4) H. pylori infection and special conditions. Experts were invited to participate on the basis of their expertise and contribution to H. pylori works and/or consensus methodology. The results of each workshop were taken to a final consensus vote by all experts. Recommendations were developed from the best evidence and availability to guide clinicians in management of this specific infection associated with variety of clinical outcomes.

  14. Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Mentis, Andreas; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis

    2015-09-01

    During the period reviewed, prevalence studies were essentially performed in less economically advanced countries and a high prevalence was found. The traditional risk factors for Helicobacter pylori positivity were mostly found. Transmission studied by molecular typing showed a familial transmission. The eventual role of water transmission was explored in several studies with controversial results. Concerning diagnosis, most of the invasive and noninvasive methods used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection are long standing with efficient performance. The most interesting recent improvements in H. pylori diagnosis include advances in endoscopy, developments in molecular methods, and the introduction of omics-based techniques. Interpretation of old or newer method should take into account the pretest probability and the prevalence of H. pylori in the population under investigation.

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Genes of Helicobacter pylori under Different Environmental Conditions: Identification of HP0967-HP0968 System.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Ares, Miguel A; Panunzi, Leonardo G; Pacheco, Sabino; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Girón, Jorge A; Torres, Javier; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315-HP0316, HP0892-HP0893, and HP0894-HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967-HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968-hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although, the hp0968-hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968-hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968-hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa.

  16. Volatile Compound, Physicochemical, and Antioxidant Properties of Beany Flavor-Removed Soy Protein Isolate Hydrolyzates Obtained from Combined High Temperature Pre-Treatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang-Hun; Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the volatile compound, physicochemical, and antioxidant properties of beany flavor-removed soy protein isolate (SPI) hydrolyzates produced by combined high temperature pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Without remarkable changes in amino acid composition, reductions of residual lipoxygenase activity and beany flavor-causing volatile compounds such as hexanol, hexanal, and pentanol in SPI were observed after combined heating and enzymatic treatments. The degree of hydrolysis, emulsion capacity and stability, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, and superoxide radical scavenging activity of SPI were significantly increased, but the magnitudes of apparent viscosity, consistency index, and dynamic moduli (G′, G″) of SPI were significantly decreased after the combined heating and enzymatic treatments. Based on these results, it was suggested that the enzymatic hydrolysis in combination with high temperature pre-treatment may allow for the production of beany flavor-removed SPI hydrolyzates with superior emulsifying and antioxidant functionalities. PMID:28078256

  17. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Sapindus mukorossi and Rheum emodi extracts against H pylori: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Khan, Aleem A; Tiwari, Santosh K; Habeeb, Mohammed Aejaz; Khaja, MN; Habibullah, CM

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of Sapindus mukorossi (S. mukorossi) and Rheum emodi (R. emodi). METHODS: Powders of S. mukorossi and R. emodi were extracted successively with petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform and ethanol and were concentrated in vacuum. The disk diffusion method was used for in vitro studies and in vivo studies were performed on male Wister rats. Thirty resistant clinical isolates of H pylori, as determined by their antibiotic sensitivity patterns by E-test, along with two Gram +ve (S. aureus, B. subtilis) and two Gram -ve (E. coli, P. vugaris) organisms were screened for their susceptibility patterns against these extracts. RESULTS: In our screening, all 30 resistant isolates and the other four organisms (two Gram +ve S. aureus, B. subtilis and two Gram -ve, E. coli, P. vugaris) were sensitive to the test compounds. It was found that ethanol and chloroform extracts of S. mukorossi and ethanol and benzene extracts of R. emodi inhibited H pylori at very low concentrations. In the in vitro study, the isolates showed a considerable zone of inhibition at very low concentrations (10 μg/mL) for both the extracts. In the in vivo study, the H pylori infection was cleared with minimal doses of extracts of S. mukorossi (2.5 mg/mL) and R. emodi (3.0 mg/mL) given orally for seven days. CONCLUSION: We can conclude from this study that the extracts of S. mukorossi and R. emodi inhibited the growth of pylori in vitro and, in in vivo studies, the H pylori infection cleared within seven days at very low concentrations. We also found that H pylori did not acquire resistance against these herbal extracts even after 10 consecutive passages. PMID:17131475

  19. Dynamic Expansion and Contraction of cagA Copy Number in Helicobacter pylori Impact Development of Gastric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hanfu; Blum, Faith C.; Bae, Sarang; Choi, Yun Hui; Kim, Aeryun; Hong, Youngmin A.; Kim, Jinmoon; Kim, Ji-Hye; Gunawardhana, Niluka; Jeon, Yeong-Eui; Yoo, Yun-Jung; Merrell, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for development of gastric disease, including gastric cancer. Patients infected with H. pylori strains that express CagA are at even greater risk of gastric carcinoma. Given the importance of CagA, this report describes a new molecular mechanism by which the cagA copy number dynamically expands and contracts in H. pylori. Analysis of strain PMSS1 revealed a heterogeneous population in terms of numbers of cagA copies; strains carried from zero to four copies of cagA that were arranged as direct repeats within the chromosome. Each of the multiple copies of cagA was expressed and encoded functional CagA; strains with more cagA repeats exhibited higher levels of CagA expression and increased levels of delivery and phosphorylation of CagA within host cells. This concomitantly resulted in more virulent phenotypes as measured by cell elongation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) induction. Sequence analysis of the repeat region revealed three cagA homologous areas (CHAs) within the cagA repeats. Of these, CHA-ud flanked each of the cagA copies and is likely important for the dynamic variation of cagA copy numbers. Analysis of a large panel of clinical isolates showed that 7.5% of H. pylori strains isolated in the United States harbored multiple cagA repeats, while none of the tested Korean isolates carried more than one copy of cagA. Finally, H. pylori strains carrying multiple cagA copies were differentially associated with gastric disease. Thus, the dynamic expansion and contraction of cagA copy numbers may serve as a novel mechanism by which H. pylori modulates gastric disease development. PMID:28223454

  20. Changing epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Manami

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is known as the most important cause of gastric cancer. The prevalence of H. pylori infection varies widely by geographic area, age, and socioeconomic status. In Japan, H. pylori infection has been highly correlated with the incidence rate of gastric cancer, and a reduction in H. pylori infection is therefore crucial for decreasing the incidence of gastric cancer, especially at the population level. Infection occurs during childhood, commonly before 5 years of age. In Japan, where gastric cancer has ranked as the most common cancer by incidence and mortality for the last several decades, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has dramatically declined by birth cohort effect, mainly due to improvements in the general hygiene environment in childhood. Older generations born before around 1950 show a high prevalence of around 80-90 %, decreasing with age to reach around 10 % or less in those born around the 1990s, and less than 2 % for children born after the year 2000. This change will have generational effects on gastric cancer prevention strategies, both primary and secondary. The risk-stratified approach to gastric cancer prevention should be considered in Japan and other countries which have similarly experienced rapid economic development.

  1. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Craanen, M E; Blok, P; Dekker, W; Tytgat, G N

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal metaplasia were significantly more common in intestinal type early gastric cancer compared with diffuse type early gastric cancer (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). H pylori was found in 61.3% of intestinal type early gastric cancer and in 54.5% of diffuse type early gastric cancer (NS). The age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia in the patients with antral gastritis was higher in H pylori positive patients in all age groups studied. Comparing gastritis patients with patients with intestinal type early gastric cancer showed the age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia to be significantly higher in the patients with early gastric cancer in all age groups studied. In conclusion, H pylori is associated with both types of early gastric carcinoma. Intestinal metaplasia formation seems to be a multifactorial process in which H pylori may play a part. These findings suggest that gastric cancer may be included in the spectrum of H pylori associated diseases, although many questions about causality remain to be answered. PMID:7959189

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism for Rapid Detection of TR34/L98H- and TR46/Y121F/T289A-Positive Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates Obtained from Patients in Iran from 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Zoll, Jan; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Rafati, Haleh; Dehghan, Parvin; Rezaie, Sasan; Tolooe, Ali; Tamadon, Yalda; van der Lee, Henrich A.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    We employed an endpoint genotyping method to update the prevalence rate of positivity for the TR34/L98H mutation (a 34-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with a substitution at codon L98) and the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation (a 46-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with substitutions at codons Y121 and T289) among clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates obtained from different regions of Iran over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014). The antifungal activities of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole against 172 clinical A. fumigatus isolates were investigated using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. For the isolates with an azole resistance phenotype, the cyp51A gene and its promoter were amplified and sequenced. In addition, using a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR system, a novel endpoint genotyping analysis method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms was evaluated to detect the L98H and Y121F mutations in the cyp51A gene of all isolates. Of the 172 A. fumigatus isolates tested, the MIC values of itraconazole (≥16 mg/liter) and voriconazole (>4 mg/liter) were high for 6 (3.5%). Quantitative analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed the TR34/L98H mutation in the cyp51A genes of six isolates. No isolates harboring the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation were detected. DNA sequencing of the cyp51A gene confirmed the results of the novel endpoint genotyping method. By microsatellite typing, all of the azole-resistant isolates had genotypes different from those previously recovered from Iran and from the Dutch TR34/L98H controls. In conclusion, there was not a significant increase in the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates harboring the TR34/L98H resistance mechanism among isolates recovered over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014) in Iran. A quantitative assay detecting a single

  3. MUC1 Limits Helicobacter pylori Infection both by Steric Hindrance and by Acting as a Releasable Decoy

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Sara K.; Sheng, Yong H.; Every, Alison L.; Miles, Kim M.; Skoog, Emma C.; Florin, Timothy H. J.; Sutton, Philip; McGuckin, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori can cause peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. The cell-surface mucin MUC1 is a large glycoprotein which is highly expressed on the mucosal surface and limits the density of H. pylori in a murine infection model. We now demonstrate that by using the BabA and SabA adhesins, H. pylori bind MUC1 isolated from human gastric cells and MUC1 shed into gastric juice. Both H. pylori carrying these adhesins, and beads coated with MUC1 antibodies, induced shedding of MUC1 from MKN7 human gastric epithelial cells, and shed MUC1 was found bound to H. pylori. Shedding of MUC1 from non-infected cells was not mediated by the known MUC1 sheddases ADAM17 and MMP-14. However, knockdown of MMP-14 partially affected MUC1 release early in infection, whereas ADAM17 had no effect. Thus, it is likely that shedding is mediated both by proteases and by disassociation of the non-covalent interaction between the α- and β-subunits. H. pylori bound more readily to MUC1 depleted cells even when the bacteria lacked the BabA and SabA adhesins, showing that MUC1 inhibits attachment even when bacteria cannot bind to the mucin. Bacteria lacking both the BabA and SabA adhesins caused less apoptosis in MKN7 cells than wild-type bacteria, having a greater effect than deletion of the CagA pathogenicity gene. Deficiency of MUC1/Muc1 resulted in increased epithelial cell apoptosis, both in MKN7 cells in vitro, and in H. pylori infected mice. Thus, MUC1 protects the epithelium from non-MUC1 binding bacteria by inhibiting adhesion to the cell surface by steric hindrance, and from MUC1-binding bacteria by acting as a releasable decoy. PMID:19816567

  4. Rapid and specific detection of Helicobacter pylori macrolide resistance in gastric tissue by fluorescent in situ hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Trebesius, K; Panthel, K; Strobel, S; Vogt, K; Faller, G; Kirchner, T; Kist, M; Heesemann, J; Haas, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of macrolide resistance in Helicobacter pylori is considered an essential reason for failure of antibiotic eradication therapies. The predominant mechanism of resistance to macrolides, particularly clarithromycin, is based on three defined mutations within 23S rRNA, resulting in decreased binding of the antibiotic to the bacterial ribosome.
AIM—To develop an rRNA based whole cell hybridisation method to detect Helicobacter species in situ within gastric tissue, simultaneously with its clarithromycin resistance genotype.
METHODS—A set of fluorescent labelled oligonucleotide probes was developed, binding either to H pylori 16S rRNA or 23S rRNA sequences containing specific point mutations responsible for clarithromycin resistance. After hybridisation and stringent washing procedures, labelling of intact single bacteria was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The new approach was compared with PCR based assays, histology, and microbiological culture.
RESULTS—In comparison with the phenotypic resistance measurement by E test, the genotypic clarithromycin resistance correlated perfectly (100%) for 35 H pylori isolates analysed. In a set of gastric biopsy specimens (27) H pylori infection was confirmed by histology (17/27) and correctly detected by whole cell hybridisation. Five clarithromycin resistant strains were identified in gastric tissue specimens directly. Furthermore, non-cultivable coccoid forms of H pylori were easily detectable by whole cell hybridisation.
CONCLUSIONS—Whole cell hybridisation of rRNA holds great promise for cultivation independent, reliable, and rapid (three hours) genotypic determination of clarithromycin resistance in H pylori. Compared with PCR techniques it is independent of nucleic acid preparations, not prone to inhibition, and allows semiquantitative visualisation of the bacteria within intact tissue samples.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; macrolide resistance; clarithromycin; in

  5. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles: Structural Features and In Vivo and In Vitro Therapeutic Effects against Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Sadaf; Ali, Asghar; Anwar, Farooq; Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Shakir, Imran; Yaqoob, Aqdas; Hasan, Sara; Khan, Safyan Akram; Sajjad-ur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates in vivo and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) efficacy of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) prepared via a cost-effective green chemistry route wherein Peganum harmala L. seeds extract was used as a reducing and capping agent. The structural features, as elucidated by surface plasmon resonance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, revealed the Ag-NPs synthesized to be polydispersed in nature and spherical in shape with 5–40 nm size. A typical Ag-NPs suspension (S5), with size being 15 nm, when tested in vitro against forty-two local isolates and two reference strains, showed a considerable anti-H. pylori activity. In case of in vivo trial against H. pylori induced gastritis, after oral administration of 16 mg/kg body weight of S5 for seven days, a complete clearance was recorded in male albino rates. In comparative time-killing kinetics, S5 exhibited dose- and time-dependent anti-H. pylori activity that was almost similar to tetracycline and clarithromycin, less than amoxicillin, but higher than metronidazole. Furthermore, S5 was found to be an equally effective anti-H. pylori agent at low (≤4) and high pH with no drug resistance observed even up to 10 repeated exposures while a significant drug resistance was recorded for most of the standard drugs employed. The present results revealed the potential of the synthesized Ag-NPs as safer bactericidal agents for the treatment of H. pylori induced gastritis. PMID:25214825

  6. Detection of Clarithromycin-Resistant Helicobacter pylori Strains by a Preferential Homoduplex Formation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shin; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Matsunaga, Hironari; Ogura, Keiji; Kawamata, Osamu; Shiratori, Yasushi; Omata, Masao

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that resistance to clarithromycin, a major cause of failure in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy, is associated with point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. We sought to apply the preferential homoduplex formation assay (PHFA), a novel technique for the efficient detection of point mutations, to detection of the mutations. PHFA was performed on streptavidin-coated microtiter plates with biotin- and dinitrophenyl-labeled amplicons to detect the wild-type gene or each mutant gene. DNA samples were extracted from gastric juice specimens of 412 patients with H. pylori infection and were applied to the assay. The detection threshold of PHFA was as few as 10 gene copies. The sensitivity of PHFA for the detection of H. pylori infection was higher than those of culture and the rapid urease test. A total of 337 (81.8%) samples had the wild-type gene, 38 (9.2%) had the A2144G mutation, and 37 (9.0%) contained both the wild type and a mutation (A2144G in 30 samples, A2143G in 5 samples, and A2143G plus A2144G in 2 samples). About half the strains isolated from patients with mixed infection were susceptible by the agar dilution method (MIC, <0.1 mg/liter). Therefore, PHFA can detect clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strains, even in patients with mixed infections with the wild type, that are not detectable by the agar dilution method. PMID:10618089

  7. Prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs in Helicobacter pylori among dyspeptic patients in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chomvarin, Chariya; Phusri, Karnchanawadee; Sawadpanich, Kookwan; Mairiang, Pisaln; Namwat, Wises; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of cagA type in Helicobacter pylori isolated from dyspeptic patients in northeastern Thailand and to determine whether the pattern of cagA EPIYA motifs were associated with clinical outcomes. One hundred and forty-seven H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients were enrolled, of whom 68 had non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), 57 peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 18 gastric cancer (GCA), and 4 other gastroduodenal diseases. PCR and DNA sequence analysis were used to determine the cagA genotype and the pattern of EPIYA motifs. cagA-positive H. pylori were identified in 138 (94%) of H. pylori-infected dyspeptic patients of whom 75 (54%) were of the Western-type, 44 (32%) the East Asian type and 19 (14%) of the other types. The Western type is significantly found in PUD patients (p = 0.0175). The majority of cagA EPIYA was EPIYA-ABC (43%) and EPIYA-ABD (28%). There is no significant correlation between the increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and clinical outcomes. Thus, the most frequent cagA type found among northeastern Thai dyspeptic patients was the Western cagA type, which is significantly associated with PUD indicating a possible predictive parameter for clinical outcome.

  8. Molecular and Proteomic Analysis of Levofloxacin and Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hanafi, Aimi; Lee, Woon Ching; Loke, Mun Fai; Teh, Xinsheng; Shaari, Ain; Dinarvand, Mojdeh; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean Lee

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria incurs fitness cost, but compensatory mechanisms may ameliorate the cost and sustain the resistance even under antibiotics-free conditions. The aim of this study was to determine compensatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori. Five strains of levofloxacin-sensitive H. pylori were induced in vitro to develop resistance. In addition, four pairs of metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori strains were isolated from patients carrying dual H. pylori populations that consist of both sensitive and resistant phenotypes. Growth rate, virulence and biofilm-forming ability of the sensitive and resistant strains were compared to determine effects of compensatory response. Proteome profiles of paired sensitive and resistant strains were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (LC/MS). Although there were no significant differences in growth rate between sensitive and resistant pairs, bacterial virulence (in terms of abilities to induce apoptosis and form biofilm) differs from pair to pair. These findings demonstrate the complex and strain-specific phenotypic changes in compensation for antibiotics resistance. Compensation for in vitro induced levofloxacin resistance involving mutations of gyrA and gyrB was functionally random. Furthermore, higher protein translation and non-functional protein degradation capabilities in naturally-occuring dual population metronidazole sensitive-resistant strains may be a possible alternative mechanism underlying resistance to metronidazole without mutations in rdxA and frxA. This may explain the lack of mutations in target genes in ~10% of metronidazole resistant strains. PMID:28018334

  9. Effect of Native Gastric Mucus on in vivo Hybridization Therapies Directed at Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rita S; Dakwar, George R; Xiong, Ranhua; Forier, Katrien; Remaut, Katrien; Stremersch, Stephan; Guimarães, Nuno; Fontenete, Sílvia; Wengel, Jesper; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Céu; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Braeckmans, Kevin; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects more than 50% of the worldwide population. It is mostly found deep in the gastric mucus lining of the stomach, being a major cause of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. To face the increasing resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics, antimicrobial nucleic acid mimics are a promising alternative. In particular, locked nucleic acids (LNA)/2'-OMethyl RNA (2'OMe) have shown to specifically target H. pylori, as evidenced by in situ hybridization. The success of in vivo hybridization depends on the ability of these nucleic acids to penetrate the major physical barriers—the highly viscoelastic gastric mucus and the bacterial cell envelope. We found that LNA/2'OMe is capable of diffusing rapidly through native, undiluted, gastric mucus isolated from porcine stomachs, without degradation. Moreover, although LNA/2'OMe hybridization was still successful without permeabilization and fixation of the bacteria, which is normally part of in vitro studies, the ability of LNA/2'OMe to efficiently hybridize with H. pylori was hampered by the presence of mucus. Future research should focus on developing nanocarriers that shield LNA/2'OMe from components in the gastric mucus, while remaining capable of diffusing through the mucus and delivering these nucleic acid mimics directly into the bacteria. PMID:26645765

  10. Human and Helicobacter pylori Interactions Determine the Outcome of Gastric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response is a critical hallmark of Helicobacter pylori infection. Epithelial and myeloid cells produce effectors, including the chemokine CXCL8, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and nitric oxide (NO), in response to bacterial components. Mechanistic and epidemiologic studies have emphasized that dysregulated and persistent release of these products leads to the development of chronic inflammation and to the molecular and cellular events related to carcinogenesis. Moreover, investigations in H. pylori-infected patients about polymorphisms of the genes encoding CXCL8 and inducible NO synthase, and epigenetic control of the ROS-producing enzyme spermine oxidase, have further proven that overproduction of these molecules impacts the severity of gastric diseases. Lastly, the critical effect of the crosstalk between the human host and the infecting bacterium in determining the severity of H. pylori-related diseases has been supported by phylogenetic analysis of the human population and their H. pylori isolates in geographic areas with varying clinical and pathologic outcomes of the infection. PMID:28124148

  11. Molecular and Proteomic Analysis of Levofloxacin and Metronidazole Resistant Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, Aimi; Lee, Woon Ching; Loke, Mun Fai; Teh, Xinsheng; Shaari, Ain; Dinarvand, Mojdeh; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Leow, Alex Hwong Ruey; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean Lee

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria incurs fitness cost, but compensatory mechanisms may ameliorate the cost and sustain the resistance even under antibiotics-free conditions. The aim of this study was to determine compensatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori. Five strains of levofloxacin-sensitive H. pylori were induced in vitro to develop resistance. In addition, four pairs of metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori strains were isolated from patients carrying dual H. pylori populations that consist of both sensitive and resistant phenotypes. Growth rate, virulence and biofilm-forming ability of the sensitive and resistant strains were compared to determine effects of compensatory response. Proteome profiles of paired sensitive and resistant strains were analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrophotometry (LC/MS). Although there were no significant differences in growth rate between sensitive and resistant pairs, bacterial virulence (in terms of abilities to induce apoptosis and form biofilm) differs from pair to pair. These findings demonstrate the complex and strain-specific phenotypic changes in compensation for antibiotics resistance. Compensation for in vitro induced levofloxacin resistance involving mutations of gyrA and gyrB was functionally random. Furthermore, higher protein translation and non-functional protein degradation capabilities in naturally-occuring dual population metronidazole sensitive-resistant strains may be a possible alternative mechanism underlying resistance to metronidazole without mutations in rdxA and frxA. This may explain the lack of mutations in target genes in ~10% of metronidazole resistant strains.

  12. Differential inflammatory response to Helicobacter pylori infection: etiology and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    White, Jonathan Richard; Winter, Jody Anne; Robinson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori commonly colonizes the human gastric mucosa during early childhood and persists throughout life. The organism has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading clearance by the immune system and, despite inducing inflammation in the stomach, the majority of infections are asymptomatic. H. pylori is the leading cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, disease outcomes are related to the pattern and severity of chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa, which in turn is influenced by both bacterial and host factors. Despite over 2 decades of intensive research, there remains an incomplete understanding of the circumstances leading to disease development, due to the fascinating complexity of the host–pathogen interactions. There is accumulating data concerning the virulence factors associated with increased risk of disease, and the majority of these have pro-inflammatory activities. Despite this, only a small proportion of those infected with virulent strains develop disease. Several H. pylori virulence factors have multiple effects on different cell types, including the induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory, immune stimulatory, and immune modulatory responses. The expression of multiple virulence factors is also often linked, making it difficult to assess the meaning of their effects in isolation. Overall, H. pylori is thought to usually modulate inflammation and limit acute damage to the mucosa, enabling the bacteria to persist. If this delicate balance is disturbed, disease may then develop. PMID:26316793

  13. Iron Status and Helicobacter pylori Infection in Symptomatic Children: An International Multi-Centered Study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Paul R.; Sanderson, Ian R.; Windle, Henry J.; Walker, Marjorie M.; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Carvalho, Simone Diniz; Bittencourt, Paulo Fernando Souto; de Castro, Lucia Porto Fonseca; Villagrán, Andrea; Serrano, Carolina; Kelleher, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Objective Iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are global major public health problems, particularly in developing countries. Whilst an association between H. pylori infection and ID/IDA has been proposed in the literature, currently there is no consensus. We studied the effects of H. pylori infection on ID/IDA in a cohort of children undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for upper abdominal pain in two developing and one developed country. Methods In total 311 children (mean age 10.7±3.2 years) from Latin America - Belo Horizonte/Brazil (n = 125), Santiago/Chile (n = 105) - and London/UK (n = 81), were studied. Gastric and duodenal biopsies were obtained for evaluation of histology and H. pylori status and blood samples for parameters of ID/IDA. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 27.7% being significantly higher (p<0.001) in Latin America (35%) than in UK (7%). Multiple linear regression models revealed H. pylori infection as a significant predictor of low ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations in children from Latin-America. A negative correlation was observed between MCV (r = −0.26; p = 0.01) and MCH (r = −0.27; p = 0.01) values and the degree of antral chronic inflammation, and between MCH and the degree of corpus chronic (r = −0.29, p = 0.008) and active (r = −0.27, p = 0.002) inflammation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that H. pylori infection in children influences the serum ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations, markers of early depletion of iron stores and anaemia respectively. PMID:23861946

  14. Furazolidone therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Is it effective and safe?

    PubMed Central

    Francesco, Vincenzo De; Ierardi, Enzo; Hassan, Cesare; Zullo, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects related with the use of furazolidone as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection should be remarked, especially regarding its potential oncologic risk. The inclusion of furazolidone in a treatment regimen for H pylori infection is, at least, controversial, and it does not appear to be safe. PMID:19370795

  15. Telomere length in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and its relationship to H. pylori infection, degree of gastritis, and NSAID use.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Okubo, Masaaki; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Ohmiya, Naoki; Hirata, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. We measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa and assessed its relationship to H. pylori-related gastritis, DNA methylation, ulcer disease, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) usage. Gastric biopsies were obtained from 151 cancer-free subjects including 49 chronic NSAID users and 102 nonusers. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured by real-time PCR. H. pylori infection status, histological severity of gastritis, and serum pepsinogens (PGs) were also investigated. E-cadherin (CDH1) methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Average relative telomere length of H. pylori-infected subjects was significantly shortened when compared to H. pylori-negative subjects (p = 0.002) and was closely associated with all histological parameter of gastritis (all p values <0.01) and CDH1 methylation (p = 0.0002). In H. pylori-negative subjects, NSAID users presented significantly shorter telomere length than nonusers (p = 0.028). Shorter telomere length was observed in duodenal and gastric ulcer patients compared with non-ulcer subjects among NSAID users. Telomere shortening is closely associated with severity of H. pylori-induced gastritis and CDH1 methylation status. Also, telomere shortening is accelerated by NSAID usage especially in H. pylori-negative subjects.

  16. Local Immune Response in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kivrak Salim, Derya; Sahin, Mehmet; Köksoy, Sadi; Adanir, Haydar; Süleymanlar, Inci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been few studies concerning the cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori–infected patients with normal mucosa, chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma (GAC). In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the genomic expression levels and immune pathological roles of cytokines—interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-17A, IL-32—in H pylori–infected patients with normal gastric mucosa (NGM; control), chronic active gastritis (CAG), and GAC. Genomic expression levels of these cytokines were assayed by real-time PCR analysis in gastric biopsy specimens obtained from 93 patients. We found that the genomic expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A mRNA were increased in the CAG group and those of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, TGF-β mRNA were increased in the GAC group with reference to H pylori–infected NGM group. This study is on the interest of cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa among individuals with normal, gastritis, or GAC. Our findings suggest that the immune response of gastric mucosa to infection of H pylori differs from patient to patient. For individual therapy, levels of genomic expression of IL-6 or other cytokines may be tracked in patients. PMID:27196487

  17. Real-Time PCR Improves Helicobacter pylori Detection in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casalots, Alex; Sanfeliu, Esther; Boix, Loreto; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Bella-Cueto, Maria Rosa; Gallach, Marta; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran; Calvet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Histological and rapid urease tests to detect H. pylori in biopsy specimens obtained during peptic ulcer bleeding episodes (PUB) often produce false-negative results. We aimed to examine whether immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR can improve the sensitivity of these biopsies. Patients and Methods We selected 52 histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained during PUB episodes. Additional tests showed 10 were true negatives and 42 were false negatives. We also selected 17 histology-positive biopsy specimens obtained during PUB to use as controls. We performed immunohistochemistry staining and real-time PCR for 16S rRNA, ureA, and 23S rRNA for H. pylori genes on all specimens. Results All controls were positive for H. pylori on all PCR assays and immunohistochemical staining. Regarding the 52 initially negative biopsies, all PCR tests were significantly more sensitive than immunohistochemical staining (p<0.01). Sensitivity and specificity were 55% and 80% for 16S rRNA PCR, 43% and 90% for ureA PCR, 41% and 80% for 23S rRNA PCR, and 7% and 100% for immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Combined analysis of PCR assays for two genes were significantly more sensitive than ureA or 23S rRNA PCR tests alone (p<0.05) and marginally better than 16S rRNA PCR alone. The best combination was 16S rRNA+ureA, with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80%. Conclusions Real-time PCR improves the detection of H. pylori infection in histology-negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy samples obtained during PUB episodes. The low reported prevalence of H. pylori in PUB may be due to the failure of conventional tests to detect infection. PMID:21625499

  18. Probiotic Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C biofilm formation on AGS and Caco-2 cells and Helicobacter pylori inhibition.

    PubMed

    Salas-Jara, M J; Sanhueza, E A; Retamal-Díaz, A; González, C; Urrutia, H; García, A

    2016-11-01

    The ability of the human isolate Lactobacillus fermentum UCO-979C to form biofilm and synthesize exopolysaccharide on abiotic and biotic models is described. These properties were compared with the well-known Lactobacillus casei Shirota to better understand their anti-Helicobacter pylori probiotic activities. The two strains of lactobacilli synthesized exopolysaccharide as detected by the Dubois method and formed biofilm on abiotic and biotic surfaces visualized by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, these strains inhibited H. pylori urease activity by up to 80.4% (strain UCO-979C) and 66.8% (strain Shirota) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, but the two species showed equal levels of inhibition (~84%) in colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. The results suggest that L. fermentum UCO-979C has probiotic potential against H. pylori infections. However, further analyses are needed to explain the increased activity observed against the pathogen in AGS cells as compared to L. casei Shirota.

  19. Diversity of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori strains from patients with gastroduodenal diseases in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Maria Celeste C; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Casingal, Cristine R; Fajardo, Lindsay Sydney N; Juan, Ma Luisa G; De Guzman, Blanquita B; Bondoc, Edgardo M; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Natividad, Filipinas F; Azuma, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori CagA protein is considered a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. There are two major types of CagA proteins: the Western and East Asian CagA. The East Asian CagA-positive H. pylori infection is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The prevalence of gastric cancer is quite low in the Philippines, although Philippine populations are considered to originate from an East Asia source. This study investigates the characteristics of the cagA gene and CagA protein in Philippine H. pylori strains and compares them with previously characterized reference strains worldwide. The full-length cagA gene was sequenced from 19 Philippine isolates and phylogenetic relationships between the Philippine and 40 reference strains were analyzed. All Philippine strains examined were cagA positive, and 73.7% (14/19) strains were Western CagA-positive. The phylogenetic tree based on the deduced amino acid sequence of CagA indicated that the Philippine strains were classified into the two major groups of CagA protein: the Western and the East Asian group. These findings suggest that the modern Western influence may have resulted in more Western type H. pylori strains in the Philippines. Therefore, H. pylori-infected Filipinos can be considered to be at a low risk of developing gastric cancer.

  20. Heterologous production in Wolinella succinogenes and characterization of the quinol:fumarate reductase enzymes from Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Mileni, Mauro; MacMillan, Fraser; Tziatzios, Christos; Zwicker, Klaus; Haas, Alexander H.; Mäntele, Werner; Simon, Jörg; Lancaster, C. Roy D.

    2005-01-01

    The ϵ-proteobacteria Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are both human pathogens. They colonize mucosal surfaces causing severe diseases. The membrane protein complex QFR (quinol:fumarate reductase) from H. pylori has previously been established as a potential drug target, and the same is likely for the QFR from C. jejuni. In the present paper, we describe the cloning of the QFR operons from the two pathogenic bacteria H. pylori and C. jejuni and their expression in Wolinella succinogenes, a non-pathogenic ϵ-proteobacterium. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of heterologous membrane protein production in W. succinogenes. We demonstrate that the replacement of the homologous enzyme from W. succinogenes with the heterologous enzymes yields mutants where fumarate respiration is fully functional. We have isolated and characterized the heterologous QFR enzymes. The high quality of the enzyme preparation enabled us to determine unequivocally by analytical ultracentrifugation the homodimeric state of the three detergent-solubilized heterotrimeric QFR enzymes, to accurately determine the different oxidation–reduction (‘redox’) midpoint potentials of the six prosthetic groups, the Michaelis constants for the quinol substrate, maximal enzymatic activities and the characterization of three different anti-helminths previously suggested to be inhibitors of the QFR enzymes from H. pylori and C. jejuni. This characterization allows, for the first time, a detailed comparison of the QFR enzymes from C. jejuni and H. pylori with that of W. succinogenes. PMID:16367742

  1. Characterization and inactivation of an agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Justin E.; Causey, Corey P.; Lovelace, Leslie; Knuckley, Bryan; Flick, Heather; Lebioda, Lukasz; Thompson, Paul R.

    2010-11-12

    Helicobacter pylori encodes a potential virulence factor, agmatine deiminase (HpAgD), which catalyzes the conversion of agmatine to N-carbamoyl putrescine (NCP) and ammonia - agmatine is decarboxylated arginine. Agmatine is an endogenous human cell signaling molecule that triggers the innate immune response in humans. Unlike H. pylori, humans do not encode an AgD; it is hypothesized that inhibition of this enzyme would increase the levels of agmatine, and thereby enhance the innate immune response. Taken together, these facts suggest that HpAgD is a potential drug target. Herein we describe the optimized expression, isolation, and purification of HpAgD (10-30 mg/L media). The initial kinetic characterization of this enzyme has also been performed. Additionally, the crystal structure of wild-type HpAgD has been determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides a molecular basis for the preferential deimination of agmatine, and identifies Asp198 as a key residue responsible for agmatine recognition, which has been confirmed experimentally. Information gathered from these studies led to the development and characterization of a novel class of haloacetamidine-based HpAgD inactivators. These compounds are the most potent AgD inhibitors ever described.

  2. Optimizing the Growth of Stressed Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Crystal L.; Buchholz, Brittany J.; Ford, Timothy E.; Broadaway, Susan C.; Pyle, Barry H.; Camper, Anne K.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram -negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and is responsible for causing gastric ulcers. H. pylori is known to become stressed and nonculturable after exposure to unfavorable conditions. In this study, we enhanced previously published resuscitation procedures, characterized conditions under which stressed H. pylori can be recovered, and formulated a selective and differential resuscitation medium. Results showed that a specialized broth supplemented with trace minerals and lysed human erythrocytes and serum is required for the recovery of nonculturable H. pylori. The type of stress was an important factor in the efficacy of resuscitation, with cells exposed to atmospheric oxygen more readily resuscitated than nutrient deprived cells. After resuscitation, culturable cells were recovered from previously nonculturable oxygen stressed cells (24 and 72 hours of exposure) and nonculturable nutrient deprived cells (24 hours of exposure). The length of time the cells were exposed to the stress was also an important factor in the recovery of stressed H. pylori. RNA levels were quantified and transcription of the cell division related gene, cdrA (HP0066), was assessed by qRT-PCR. The low levels of RNA detected in stressed cells, after resuscitation, support the idea that a small population of viable cells may be responsible for the colonies recovered on solid agar. The modification of the resuscitation broth into a selective and differential slant culture medium also allowed the recovery of stressed H. pylori. The methods presented here highlight the benefits and limitations of using human blood products for recovering nonculturable H. pylori. PMID:21129415

  3. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  4. The effect of trimethylamine N-oxide on Helicobacter pylori-induced changes of immunoinflammatory genes expression in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Daoyan; Cao, Mei; Peng, Jingshan; Li, Ningzhe; Yi, Sijun; Song, Liju; Wang, Xuege; Zhang, Mao; Zhao, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces immune and inflammatory response in gastric mucosa. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), from diet and metabolite through the action of gut microbiota, has been linked to inflammatory diseases. To investigate the effects of TMAO and H. pylori infection on gene expression in gastric epithelial cells, Human gene chip Affymetrix HTA 2.0 was used in this study. 1312 genes were identified as differentially expressed genes in GES-1 cells with H. pylori and TMAO co-treatment compared to the control. GO and KEGG analyses indicated that the functions of these differentially expressed genes were related closely with immune inflammation. GO-network showed that Toll-like receptor signaling pathway was the most important biological processes and 49 up-regulated genes related to immune inflammation were obtained. The synergistic effects of H. pylori and TMAO enhanced the genes expression of IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL2, FOS and C3 related to immune inflammation in comparison with those of non-infected control cells, H. pylori-infected cells, and TMAO-stimulated cells. RT-PCR verified the expression levels of IL-6, CXCL1. Additionally, expression levels of 2053 genes were altered and 52 immunoinflammatory genes were upregulated in comparison with H. pylori-infected cells. This study suggested that TMAO altered the expression levels of immunoinflammatory genes induced by H. pylori infection, and the synergistic effects of H. pylori and TMAO provided novel insights into the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance profile of Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from skin and soft tissue infections of outpatients from a university hospital in Recife - PE, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Caraciolo, Fabiana Beserra; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira; dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Rabelo, Marcelle Aquino; Magalhães, Vera

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Staphylococcus aureus has a notable ability to acquire resistance to antibiotics, and methicillin resistance represents a growing public health problem. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has also become important outside the hospital environment, particularly in the United States. In Brazil, since 2005, cases of community skin infections caused by MRSA have been reported, but resistance studies involving outpatients are scarce. OBJECTIVE To know the resistance profile of S. aureus involved in skin and soft tissue infections of patients seen at the Dermatology outpatient clinic of a university hospital in Recife, Pernambuco State, northeastern Brazil. METHODS Prospective study involving 30 patients with skin and soft tissue infections, seen at the Dermatology outpatient clinic from May until November 2011. To evaluate the susceptibility of S. aureus to antibiotics, the disk diffusion method and oxacillin screening agar were used. RESULTS From a total of 30 samples of skin lesions, 19 (63%) had positive culture for S. aureus. The following resistance patterns of S. aureus were observed: penicillin, 95%; tetracycline, 32%; erythromycin, 21%; gentamicin, 16%; cefoxitin, 11%; oxacillin, 11%; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 11%; chloramphenicol, 11%; clindamycin, 5% ; and ciprofloxacin, 0%. One of the identified MRSA was obtained from a patient without risk factors for its acquisition, and was resistant, beyond to the beta-lactams, only to tetracycline. CONCLUSIONS With regard to the resistance patterns of S. aureus, resistances to tetracycline, erythromycin and gentamicin were the highest. It was documented, for the first time in Pernambuco, a case of skin infection caused by community-associated MRSA. PMID:23197204

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  7. Expression of catalytically active recombinant Helicobacter pylori urease at wild-type levels in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, L T; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    The genes encoding Helicobacter pylori urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Enzymatic activity, however, has been very weak compared with that in clinical isolates of H. pylori. Conditions under which near wild-type urease activity was achieved were developed. E. coli. SE5000 containing recombinant H. pylori urease genes was grown in minimal medium containing no amino acids, NiCl2 was added to 0.75 microM, and structural genes ureA and ureB (pHP902) were overexpressed in trans to the complete urease gene cluster (pHP808). Under these conditions, E. coli SE5000 pHP808/pHP902) expressed a urease activity up to 87 mumol of urea per min per mg of protein (87 U/mg of protein), a level approaching that of wild-type H. pylori UMAB41 (100 U/mg of protein), from which the genes were cloned. Poor catalytic activity of recombinant clones grown in Luria broth or M9 medium containing 0.5% Casamino Acids was due to chelation of nickel ions by medium components, particularly histidine and cysteine. In cultures containing these amino acids, 63Ni2+ was prevented from being transported into cells and was not incorporated into urease protein. As a consequence, M9 minimal medium cultures containing histidine or cysteine produced only 0.05 and 0.9%, respectively, of active urease produced by control cultures containing no amino acids. We conclude that recombinant H. pylori urease is optimally expressed when Ni2+ transport is not inhibited and when sufficient synthesis of urease subunits UreA and UreB is provided. Images PMID:8500893

  8. The Problem of Helicobacter pylori Resistance to Antibiotics: A Systematic Review in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M. Constanza; García, Apolinaria; Riquelme, Arnoldo; Otero, William; Camargo, Claudia A.; Hernandez-García, Tomas; Candia, Roberto; Bruce, Michael G.; Rabkin, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Latin America has a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and associated diseases, including gastric cancer. Antibiotic therapy can eradicate the bacterial infection and decrease associated morbidity and mortality. To tailor recommendations for optimal treatments, we summarized published literature and calculated region- and country-specific prevalences of antibiotic resistance. METHODS Searches of PubMed and regional databases for observational studies evaluating H. pylori antibiotic resistance yielded a total of 59 independent studies (56 in adults, 2 in children, and 1 in both groups) published up to October 2013 regarding H. pylori isolates collected between 1988 and 2011. Study-specific prevalences of primary resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics were summarized using random-effects models. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by meta-regression. As a sensitivity analysis, we extended our research to studies of patients with prior H. pylori-eradication therapy. RESULTS Summary prevalences of antimicrobial primary resistance among adults varied by antibiotic, including 12% for clarithromycin (n = 35 studies), 53% for metronidazole (n = 34), 4% for amoxicillin (n = 28), 6% for tetracycline (n = 20), 3% for furazolidone (n = 6), 15% for fluoroquinolones (n = 5), and 8% for dual clarithromycin and metronidazole (n = 10). Resistance prevalence varied significantly by country, but not by year of sample collection. Analyses including studies of patients with prior therapy yielded similar estimates. Pediatric reports were too few to be summarized by meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS Resistance to first-line anti- H. pylori antibiotics is high in Latin American populations. In some countries, the empirical use of clarithromycin without susceptibility testing may not be appropriate. These findings stress the need for appropriate surveillance programs, improved antimicrobial regulations, and increased public awareness. PMID:24589670

  9. Surveillance of Helicobacter pylori Antibiotic Susceptibility in Indonesia: Different Resistance Types among Regions and with Novel Genetic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Nusi, Iswan Abbas; Makmun, Dadang; Waskito, Langgeng Agung; Zein, Lukman Hakim; Akil, Fardah; Uwan, Willy Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman; Waleleng, Jimmy Bradley; Saudale, Alexander Michael Joseph; Yusuf, Fauzi; Mustika, Syifa; Adi, Pangestu; Maimunah, Ummi; Maulahela, Hasan; Rezkitha, Yudith Annisa Ayu; Subsomwong, Phawinee; Nasronudin; Rahardjo, Dadik; Suzuki, Rumiko; Akada, Junko; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Information regarding Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance in Indonesia was previously inadequate. We assessed antibiotic susceptibility for H. pylori in Indonesia, and determined the association between virulence genes or genetic mutations and antibiotic resistance. We recruited 849 dyspeptic patients who underwent endoscopy in 11 cities in Indonesia. E-test was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of five antibiotics. PCR-based sequencing assessed mutations in 23S rRNA, rdxA, gyrA, gyrB, and virulence genes. Next generation sequencing was used to obtain full-length sequences of 23S rRNA, infB, and rpl22. We cultured 77 strains and identified 9.1% with clarithromycin resistance. Low prevalence was also found for amoxicillin and tetracycline resistance (5.2% and 2.6%, respectively). In contrast, high resistance rates to metronidazole (46.7%) and levofloxacin (31.2%) were demonstrated. Strains isolated from Sumatera Island had significantly higher metronidazole resistance than those from other locations. Metronidazole resistant strains had highly distributed rdxA amino acid substitutions and the 23S rRNA A2143G mutation was associated with clarithromycin resistance (42.9%). However, one strain with the highest MIC value had a novel mutation in rpl22 without an A2143G mutation. Mutation at Asn-87 and/or Asp-91 of gyrA was associated with levofloxacin-resistance and was related to gyrB mutations. In conclusions, although this is a pilot study for a larger survey, our current data show that Indonesian strains had the high prevalence of metronidazole and levofloxacin resistance with low prevalence of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and tetracycline resistance. Nevertheless, clarithromycin- or metronidazole-based triple therapy should be administered with caution in some regions of Indonesia. PMID:27906990

  10. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    PubMed

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction.

  11. Breath ammonia measurement in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kearney, David J; Hubbard, Todd; Putnam, David

    2002-11-01

    Our aim was to define the utility of breath ammonia measurement in assessing Helicobacter pylori infection. Volunteers breathed into a device containing three fiberoptic NH3 sensors at baseline and after ingesting 300 mg of urea. Breath ammonia levels were compared to the [14C]urea breath test. Thirteen subjects were tested. Before urea ingestion, H. pylori-positive subjects had significantly lower breath ammonia levels than negative subjects (mean +/- SD, 0.04 ppm +/- 0.09 vs 0.49 ppm +/- 0.24, P = 0.002) and had a significantly greater increases in breath ammonia after urea ingestion (range 198-1,494% vs 6-98%). One H. pylori-positive subject underwent treatment and breath ammonia levels shifted from the pattern seen in positive subjects to that seen in negative subjects. In conclusion, breath ammonia measurement for H. Pylori-positive and negative subjects showed distinct patterns. Breath ammonia measurement may be feasible as a diagnostic test for H. pylori.

  12. Immune evasion strategies used by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Alzahrani, Shatha; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is perhaps the most ubiquitous and successful human pathogen, since it colonizes the stomach of more than half of humankind. Infection with this bacterium is commonly acquired during childhood. Once infected, people carry the bacteria for decades or even for life, if not treated. Persistent infection with this pathogen causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and is also strongly associated with the development of gastric cancer. Despite induction of innate and adaptive immune responses in the infected individual, the host is unable to clear the bacteria. One widely accepted hallmark of H. pylori is that it successfully and stealthily evades host defense mechanisms. Though the gastric mucosa is well protected against infection, H. pylori is able to reside under the mucus, attach to gastric epithelial cells and cause persistent infection by evading immune responses mediated by host. In this review, we discuss how H. pylori avoids innate and acquired immune response elements, uses gastric epithelial cells as mediators to manipulate host T cell responses and uses virulence factors to avoid adaptive immune responses by T cells to establish a persistent infection. We also discuss in this review how the genetic diversity of this pathogen helps for its survival.

  13. Can Helicobacter pylori infection influence human reproduction?

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Elena; Figura, Natale; Collodel, Giulia; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could be associated with extra-digestive diseases. Here, we report the evidences concerning the decrease in reproductive potential occurring in individuals infected by H. pylori, especially by strains expressing CagA. This infection is more prevalent in individuals with fertility disorders. Infected women have anti-H. pylori antibodies in cervical mucus and follicular fluid that may decrease sperm motility and cross react immunologically with spermatozoa, conceivably hampering the oocyte/sperm fusion. Infection by CagA positive organisms enhances the risk of preeclampsia, which is a main cause of foetus death. These findings are supported by the results of experimental infections of pregnant mice, which may cause reabsorption of a high number of foetuses and alter the balance between Th1 and Th2 cell response. Infected men have decreased sperm motility, viability and numbers of normally shaped sperm and augmented systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, which may damage spermatozoa. In countries where parasitic infestation is endemic, detrimental effects of infection upon spermatozoa may not occur, because the immune response to parasites could determine a switch from a predominant Th1 type to Th2 type lymphocytes, with production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, the evidences gathered until now should be taken into consideration for future studies aiming to explore the possible role of H. pylori infection on human reproduction. PMID:24914316

  14. N-acetylcysteine, a novel treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hien Quoc; Couper, Richard T L; Tran, Cuong D; Moore, Lynette; Kelso, Richard; Butler, Ross N

    2004-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), being both a mucolytic agent and a thiol-containing antioxidant, may affect the establishment and maintenance of H. pylori infection within the gastric mucus layer and mucosa. Agar and broth dilution susceptibility tests determined the MIC of H. pylori strain SSI to NAC. H. pylori load in SSI strain-infected C57BL mice was determined as colony forming units per gram of gastric tissue. Gastritis assessment was scored and gastric surface hydrophobicity was determined by contact angle measurement. MICs of NAC were 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 mg/ml using the agar dilution and broth dilution methods, respectively. NAC (120 mg per day for 14 days) reduced the H. pylori load in mice by almost 1 log compared with sham treatment. Pretreatment with NAC (40 mg/day) also significantly reduced the H. pylori load but did not prevent H. pylori colonization. Both H. pylori infection and NAC reduced the surface hydrophobicity of murine gastric mucosa. No significant differences were observed in the gastritis scores of H. felis- or H. pylori-infected mice receiving either NAC or sham treatments. This study demonstrates that NAC inhibits the growth of H. pylori in both agar and broth susceptibility tests and in H. pylori-infected mice. NAC did not alter the severity of H. pylori- or H. felis-induced gastritis.

  15. Shear stress, temperature, and inoculation concentration influence the adhesion of water-stressed Helicobacter pylori to stainless steel 304 and polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, N F; Pinto, A R; Reis, N M; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2006-04-01

    Although molecular techniques have identified Helicobacter pylori in drinking water-associated biofilms, there is a lack of studies reporting what factors affect the attachment of the bacterium to plumbing materials. Therefore, the adhesion of H. pylori suspended in distilled water to stainless steel 304 (SS304) coupons placed on tissue culture plates subjected to different environmental conditions was monitored. The extent of adhesion was evaluated for different water exposure times, using epifluorescence microscopy to count total cell numbers. High shear stresses-estimated through computational fluid dynamics-negatively influenced the adhesion of H. pylori to the substrata (P < 0.001), a result that was confirmed in similar experiments with polypropylene (P < 0.05). However, the temperature and inoculation concentration appeared to have no effect on adhesion (P > 0.05). After 2 hours, H. pylori cells appeared to be isolated on the surface of SS304 and were able to form small aggregates with longer exposure times. However, the formation of a three-dimensional structure was only very rarely observed. This study suggests that the detection of the pathogen in well water described by other authors can be related to the increased ability of H. pylori to integrate into biofilms under conditions of low shear stress. It will also allow a more rational selection of locations to perform molecular or plate culture analysis for the detection of H. pylori in drinking water-associated biofilms.

  16. A Case of Small Bowel Ulcer Associated with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Woo, Saet Byul; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Kon Hee; Shin, Su Rin

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of peptic ulcer disease in children may be primary, associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, or secondary, relied on underlying disease. Ulcerative lesions by H. pylori are mainly distributed in the duodenal bulb and they are rare below the ampulla of Vater because H. pylori growth is inhibited by bile juice. In this reason, there are only some restrictive reports presented small bowel ulcer associated H. pylori. We found multiple small bowel ulcerative lesions associated with H. pylori in an 11-year-old girl without any systemic disease while performing esophagogastroenteroscopy to the level of the proximal jejunum for differentiating bezoar. The abdominal pain improved after the patient was administered H. pylori eradication therapy. Because a small bowel ulcer associated with H. pylori has rarely been reported, we report it here with literature review. PMID:24010097

  17. Helicobacter pylori CagA: From Pathogenic Mechanisms to Its Use as an Anti-Cancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Markus; Ruggiero, Paolo; Rappuoli, Rino; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than 50% of the human population, causing chronic inflammation, which however is largely asymptomatic. Nevertheless, H. pylori-infected subjects can develop chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Chronic exposure to the pathogen and its ability to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the injection of cytotoxin-associated gene A into gastric epithelial cells may be key triggers of carcinogenesis. By deregulating cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions as well as DNA methylation, histone modifications, expression of micro RNAs, and resistance to apoptosis, EMT can actively contribute to early stages of the cancer formation. Host response to the infection significantly contributes to disease development and the concomitance of particular genotypes of both pathogen and host may turn into the most severe outcomes. T regulatory cells (Treg) have been recently demonstrated to play an important role in H. pylori-related disease development and at the same time the Treg-induced tolerance has been proposed as a possible mechanism that leads to less severe disease. Efficacy of antibiotic therapies of H. pylori infection has significantly dropped. Unfortunately, no vaccine against H. pylori is currently licensed, and protective immunity mechanisms against H. pylori are only partially understood. In spite of promising results obtained in animal models of infection with a number of vaccine candidates, few clinical trials have been conducted so far and with no satisfactory outcomes. However, prophylactic vaccination may be the only means to efficiently prevent H. pylori-associated cancers. PMID:24133496

  18. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on intragastric urea and ammonium concentrations in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D; Rowe, P A; el Nujumi, A M; Dahill, S; McColl, K E

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To assess the value of measuring the gastric juice urea:ammonium ratio in detecting Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic renal failure. METHODS--Twenty three (12 men) patients with established chronic renal failure and dyspepsia were studied. Gastric juice (2 ml) was aspirated during endoscopy to measure urea and ammonium. The upper gastrointestinal tract was routinely inspected and two antral biopsy specimens obtained. The 14C-urea breath test was conducted within 14 days of endoscopic examination to determine H pylori antibody response. RESULTS--The median (range) serum urea concentration in 11 patients with renal failure and H pylori infection was similar to that in 12 without H pylori infection. The median gastric juice urea concentration in subjects with infection was lower than that in the subjects without infection (p < 0.01). The median gastric juice ammonium concentration in subjects with the infection was higher compared with subjects without infection (p < 0.01). There was an overlap of the urea and ammonium concentrations in gastric juice from both H pylori positive and negative subjects. The urea:ammonium ratio was 0.16 (0.01-1.11) for subjects with H pylori compared with 1.63 (1.0-18.9) in subjects without infection (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION--The urea:ammonium ratio differentiated both groups, with the exception of one false negative result. The urea:ammonium ratio proved almost as effective in identifying the presence of H pylori infection in subjects with chronic renal failure as it had in subjects with normal renal function. PMID:8331178

  19. Helicobacter pylori's cholesterol uptake impacts resistance to docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Correia, Marta; Casal, Susana; Vinagre, João; Seruca, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette; Machado, José C

    2014-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes half of the world population and is associated with gastric cancer. We have previously demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid known for its anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects, directly inhibits H. pylori growth in vitro and in mice. Nevertheless, the concentration of DHA shown to reduce H. pylori mice gastric colonization was ineffective in vitro. Related to the auxotrophy of H. pylori for cholesterol, we hypothesize that other mechanisms, in addition to DHA direct antibacterial effect, must be responsible for the reduction of the infection burden. In the present study we investigated if DHA affects also H. pylori growth, by reducing the availability of membrane cholesterol in the epithelial cell for H. pylori uptake. Levels of cholesterol in gastric epithelial cells and of cholesteryl glucosides in H. pylori were determined by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The consequences of epithelial cells' cholesterol depletion on H. pylori growth were assessed in liquid cultures. We show that H. pylori uptakes cholesterol from epithelial cells. In addition, DHA lowers cholesterol levels in epithelial cells, decreases its de novo synthesis, leading to a lower synthesis of cholesteryl glucosides by H. pylori. A previous exposition of H. pylori to cholesterol influences the bacterium response to the direct inhibitory effect of DHA. Overall, our results suggest that a direct effect of DHA on H. pylori survival is modulated by its access to epithelial cell cholesterol, supporting the notion that cholesterol enhances the resistance of H. pylori. The cholesterol-dependent resistance of H. pylori to antimicrobial compounds raises new important aspects for the development of new anti-bacterial strategies.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease in Asians: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Wei; Ji, Hong-Zan; Yang, Miao-Fang; Wu, Lin; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in an Asian population. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for observational studies published up until June 2014, without language restrictions. Additional references were obtained from reviewed articles. RESULTS: Ten studies involving 1299 IBD patients and 1817 controls were included in the meta-analysis (24.9% of IBD patients had H. pylori infection vs 48.3% of the controls). The pooled risk ratio for H. pylori infection in IBD patients compared with controls was 0.48 (95%CI: 0.43-0.54; P < 0.001). There was no significant heterogeneity in the included studies (I2 = 21%). Egger’s linear regression indicated that there was no significant publication bias (P = 0.203). CONCLUSION: The H. pylori infection rate in Asian IBD patients is significantly lower than in non-IBD patients, indicating that infection protects against the development of IBD. PMID:25914487

  1. Characterization of the low-pH responses of Helicobacter pylori using genomic DNA arrays.

    PubMed

    Allan, E; Clayton, C L; McLaren, A; Wallace, D M; Wren, B W

    2001-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is unique among bacterial pathogens in its ability to persist in the acidic environment of the human stomach. To identify H. pylori genes responsive to low pH, the authors assembled a high-density array of PCR-amplified random genomic DNA. Hybridization of radiolabelled cDNA probes, prepared using total RNA from bacteria exposed to buffer at either pH 4.0 or pH 7.0, allowed both qualitative and quantitative information on differential gene expression to be obtained. A previously described low-pH-induced gene, cagA, was identified together with several novel genes that may have relevance to the survival and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric environment. These include genes encoding enzymes involved in LPS and phospholipid synthesis and secF, encoding a component of the protein export machinery. A hypothetical protein unique to H. pylori (HP0681) was also found to be acid induced. Genes down-regulated at pH 4.0 include those encoding a sugar nucleotide biosynthesis protein, a flagellar protein and an outer-membrane protein. Differential gene expression was confirmed by total RNA slot-blot hybridization.

  2. Helicobacter pylori displays spiral trajectories while swimming like a cork-screw in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Maira A.; Hardcastle, Joseph M.; Bansil, Rama; Jabbarzadeh, Mehdi; Fu, Henry C.

    Helicobacter pylori is a helical shaped bacterium that causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in humans and other animals. In order to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the stomach H. pylori has evolved a unique biochemical mechanism to go across the viscoelastic gel-like gastric mucus layer. Many studies have been conducted on the swimming of H. pylori in viscous media. However a yet unanswered question is if the helical cell shape influences bacterial swimming dynamics or confers any advantage when swimming in viscous solution. We will present measurements of H. pylori trajectories displaying corkscrew motion while swimming in solution obtained by tracking single cells using 2-dimensional phase contrast imaging at high magnification and fast frame rates and simultaneously imaging their shape. We observe a linear relationship between swimming speed and rotation rate. The experimental trajectories show good agreement with trajectories calculated using a regularized Stokeslet method to model the low Reynolds number swimming behavior. Supported by NSF PHY 1410798 (PI: RB).

  3. In Silico Design of a Chimeric Protein Containing Antigenic Fragments of Helicobacter pylori; A Bioinformatic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Nazanin; Karsabet, Mehrnaz Taghipour; Amani, Jafar; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Zadeh, Mohsen Razavi; Gholi, Mohammad Khalifeh; Saffari, Mahmood; Ghasemi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a global health problem which has encouraged scientists to find new ways to diagnose, immunize and eradicate the H. pylori infection. In silico studies are a promising approach to design new chimeric antigen having the immunogenic potential of several antigens. In order to obtain such benefit in H. pylori vaccine study, a chimeric gene containing four fragments of FliD sequence (1-600 bp), UreB (327-334 bp),VacA (744-805 bp) and CagL(51-100 bp) which have a high density of B- and T-cell epitopes was designed. The secondary and tertiary structures of the chimeric protein and other properties such as stability, solubility and antigenicity were analyzed. The in silico results showed that after optimizing for the purpose of expression in Escherichia coli BL21, the solubility and antigenicity of the construct fragments were highly retained. Most regions of the chimeric protein were found to have a high antigenic propensity and surface accessibility. These results would be useful in animal model application and accounted for the development of an epitope-based vaccine against the H. pylori. PMID:27335622

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  5. Heat shock protein produced by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yokota, K; Hirai, Y; Haque, M; Hayashi, S; Isogai, H; Sugiyama, T; Nagamachi, E; Tsukada, Y; Fujii, N; Oguma, K

    1994-01-01

    The cells of Helicobacter pylori were suspended in the medium containing 35S-methionine. After a heat shock of the cells at 42 C for 5, 10, and 30 min, the production of proteins was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Out of many proteins produced by the cells, only 66 kDa protein production was dramatically increased by heat treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 66 kDa protein was quite similar to that of 62 kDa and 54 kDa proteins previously suggested as heat shock protein (HSP) of H. pylori based on the reaction with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against HSP 60 family proteins produced by other bacteria. Therefore, it was concluded that H. pylori produces the 66 kDa protein as its major heat shock protein which belongs to HSP 60 family.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Detection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing

    PubMed Central

    Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori in 1982 was the starting point of a revolution concerning the concepts and management of gastroduodenal diseases. It is now well accepted that the most common stomach disease, peptic ulcer disease, is an infectious disease, and all consensus conferences agree that the causative agent, H. pylori, must be treated with antibiotics. Furthermore, the concept emerged that this bacterium could be the trigger of various malignant diseases of the stomach, and it is now a model for chronic bacterial infections causing cancer. Most of the many different techniques involved in diagnosis of H. pylori infection are performed in clinical microbiology laboratories. The aim of this article is to review the current status of these methods and their application, highlighting the important progress which has been made in the past decade. Both invasive and noninvasive techniques will be reviewed. PMID:17428887

  7. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  8. Rate and extent of Helicobacter pylori phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the gastric epithelium and plays a causative role in the development of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Phagocytosis is an element of innate defense used by macrophages and neutrophils to engulf microorganisms. We and others have shown that strains of H. pylori that contain the cag pathogenicity island actively retard their entry into phagocytes. Consequently, there is a lag of several minutes between bacterial binding and the onset of engulfment, and relative to other particles and microbes, the rate of internalization is slow. Herein, we describe in detail the use of synchronized phagocytosis and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy to quantify the rate and extent of H. pylori phagocytosis. This method is appropriate for primary phagocytes as well as transformed cell lines. More importantly, the effects of opsonins, virulence factors, and other agents on infection can be measured independent of bacterial viability or intracellular locale.

  9. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH)