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Sample records for pyloric sphincter dysfunction

  1. Prolonged esophagitis after primary dysfunction of the pyloric sphincter in the rat and therapeutic potential of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Petrovic, Igor; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Sever, Marko; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Zoricic, Ivan; Mise, Sandro; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Babel, Jaksa; Ilic, Spomenko; Vuksic, Tihomir; Jelic, Ivan; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2007-05-01

    Seven or fourteen days or twelve months after suturing one tube into the pyloric sphincter (removed by peristalsis by the seventh day), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis with a constantly lowered pressure not only in the pyloric, but also in the lower esophageal sphincter and a failure of both sphincters. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) is given intraperitoneally once a day (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg, last application 24 h before assessment), or continuously in drinking water at 0.16 microg/ml, 0.16 ng/ml (12 ml/rat per day), or directly into the stomach 5 min before pressure assessment (a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through an esophageal or duodenal incision). This treatment alleviates i) the esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or interval), ii) the pressure in the pyloric sphincter, and iii) the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (cmH2O). In the normal rats it increases lower esophageal sphincter pressure, but decreases the pyloric sphincter pressure. Ranitidine, given using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) does not have an effect in either rats with esophagitis or in normal rats.

  2. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction: A Perplexing Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Din, Sana Ahmad; Naimi, Iman; Beg, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is caused by stenosis or dyskinesia of the sphincter of Oddi, leading to blockage of bile drainage from the common bile duct. We present the case of a 16-year-old female with chronic abdominal pain who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis but continued to experience abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting along with persistently elevated ALT and AST levels. Postoperative abdominal ultrasound was nondiagnostic. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed mild reflux esophagitis and mild chronic Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis. Omeprazole was started, but it did not decrease the frequency and severity of the abdominal symptoms. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography did not reveal any pathology. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with manometry confirmed an elevated biliary sphincter pressure. Biliary sphincterotomy was performed, and the symptoms improved. PMID:28100991

  3. Characterization of ionic currents of circular smooth muscle cells of the canine pyloric sphincter.

    PubMed

    Vogalis, F; Sanders, K M

    1991-05-01

    1. The ionic currents of circular muscle cells from canine pyloric sphincter were characterized using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. 2. Subpopulations of circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal halves of the circular layer were isolated and studied separately to determine whether differences in the currents expressed by these cells could explain differences in electrical behaviour observed in situ. 3. Resting potentials of isolated cells were about 20 mV positive to cells in intact muscles. Polarization under current clamp to the level of tissue resting potentials caused spontaneous discharge of action potentials in many cells. 4. Outward current measured under voltage clamp could be divided into a voltage-dependent component and a voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent component. The latter was affected by manipulations of external [Ca2+], nifedipine and dialysis of cells with EGTA. 5. A few cells exhibited a channel that was activated with hyperpolarization. These channels produced inward current at potentials positive to the potassium reversal potential, EK, and reversed at -13 mV. 6. Inward currents, recorded from Cs(+)-loaded cells, were characterized by a transient phase and a sustained phase that persisted throughout the test depolarization. The inward current was reduced by nifedipine but in some cells a nifedipine-resistant component was observed. 7. There were no fundamental differences in the ionic currents recorded from circular muscle cells from the myenteric and submucosal regions, suggesting that the electrical activity of the tissue must be dependent upon structural characteristics (i.e. electrical coupling, fibre bundle dimensions, etc.) of the tissue. 8. The ionic conductance characterized can be related to many of the excitable events recorded from pyloric muscles.

  4. Translational and clinical perspectives on sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kyanam Kabir Baig, Kondal Rao; Wilcox, Charles Melbern

    2016-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is a complex pathophysiologic entity that is associated with significant morbidity causing abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. The purpose of this review is to describe the anatomy and physiology of the sphincter of Oddi, to understand the pathologic mechanisms thought to be responsible for symptomatology, review recent major studies, explore endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies and their efficacy, and to explore future research avenues. PMID:27555792

  5. [Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: case report].

    PubMed

    Calzadilla, Jeannette; Sanhueza, Natalia; Farías, Solange; González, Félix

    2016-10-21

    Dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi is a rare disease that causes about 20% of recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis. In order to suspect its existence, it is mandatory to have ruled out all other causes of acute pancreatitis. Then, the disease needs to be classified by degree of dysfunction and have a manometry performed as it is considered the gold standard of diagnosis. Manometry is used to guide treatment and its method of choice is usually an endoscopic sphincterotomy. In this article a case of recurrent pancreatitis is discussed, which after a thorough study that ruled out other etiologies, was diagnosed as a pancreatic-type dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi. The dysfunction was resolved by endoscopic sphincterotomy and the patient had a favorable course without any recurrence of symptoms.

  6. Transduodenal sphincteroplasty and transampullary septectomy for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Tzovaras, George; Rowlands, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and management of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are controversial issues. Both surgical and endoscopic series report modest success in the treatment of this condition. There is evidence from endoscopic series that the Milwaukee classification could predict the clinical outcome after sphincterotomy. We reviewed our long-term results of surgical sphincter ablation for sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, in order to correlate outcome with underlining pathology (biliary versus pancreatic) and Milwaukee biliary group classification. PATIENTS AND METHODS: During a 10 year period (1987-1996), 36 patients with either biliary (n = 26) or pancreatic (n = 10) presentation of suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction were selected for surgery according to a standard protocol of investigation and management. All patients were classified according to the Milwaukee classification for the biliary group or its version for the pancreatic group and had transduodenal sphincteroplasty and transampullary septectomy. RESULTS: Despite a trend towards a better outcome in the biliary group (good result 62%, moderate 23%, poor 15%) compared to the pancreatic (good result 40%, moderate 40%, poor 20%) the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.48). Milwaukee classification for the biliary group correlated well with a favourable outcome (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The modest outcome despite careful patient selection for surgery emphasises the need for more objective diagnostic tools. Milwaukee classification appears to be of good predictive value, and a good result can be anticipated in type I or even type II patients. The trend towards a better outcome in the biliary group may reflect the weakness of a drainage procedure to treat patients with parenchymal pancreatic disease. PMID:11890620

  7. Ileocecal Valve as Substitute for the Missing Pyloric Sphincter After Partial Distal Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Jürg; Degen, Lukas P.; Beglinger, Christoph; Siegemund, Martin; Studer, Wolfgang; Heberer, Michael; Harder, Felix; von Flüe, Markus O.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives Accelerated gastric emptying (including dumping syndrome) occurs frequently after gastric resections, largely resulting from rapid entry of meal contents into the small intestine. The authors hypothesized that an ileocecal segment used as an interpositional graft placed between the remaining part of the stomach and the small intestine would slow down food transit and thus replace pyloric function. Methods Thirty Göttingen minipigs were randomized into three groups. Group 1: partial gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y reconstruction; Group 2: partial gastrectomy and ileocecal interpositional graft; and Group 3: sham laparotomy. Gastric emptying in the nonsedated animals was quantified using radioscintigraphy at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The animals ingested 300 grams of soft food containing 99mTc labeled resin- pellets using a technique previously described. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results Three months postoperatively, the ileocecal group had a significantly prolonged gastric emptying time compared with the Roux-en-Y group, but gastric emptying time was also significantly faster compared to the control group (sham laparotomy). After 6 months no significant difference was seen between the ileocecal group and the controls, while emptying rates were still significantly faster in the Roux-en-Y group. Conclusions Reconstruction of the gastric reservoir with an ileocecal segment largely restores gastric emptying patterns of food in minipigs. Six months postoperatively, gastric emptying time is similar to that of controls, and significantly slower when compared with the group with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. These results suggest that the ileocecal interposition graft could offer specific advantages over current reconstruction procedures. PMID:12131082

  8. Sphincter of Oddi Function and Risk Factors for Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Afghani, Elham; Lo, Simon K.; Covington, Paul S.; Cash, Brooks D.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    The sphincter of Oddi (SO) is a smooth muscle valve regulating the flow of biliary and pancreatic secretions into the duodenum, initially described in 1887 by the Italian anatomist, Ruggero Oddi. SO dysfunction (SOD) is a broad term referring to numerous biliary, pancreatic, and hepatic disorders resulting from spasms, strictures, and relaxation of this valve at inappropriate times. This review brings attention to various factors that may increase the risk of SOD, including but not limited to: cholecystectomy, opiates, and alcohol. Lack of proper recognition and treatment of SOD may be associated with clinical events, including pancreatitis and biliary symptoms with hepatic enzyme elevation. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches are discussed to help recognize, prevent, and treat SOD. Future studies are needed to assess the treatment benefit of agents such as calcium-channel blockers, glyceryl trinitrate, or tricyclic antidepressants in patients with SOD. PMID:28194398

  9. Sphincter of Oddi Function and Risk Factors for Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Lo, Simon K; Covington, Paul S; Cash, Brooks D; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    The sphincter of Oddi (SO) is a smooth muscle valve regulating the flow of biliary and pancreatic secretions into the duodenum, initially described in 1887 by the Italian anatomist, Ruggero Oddi. SO dysfunction (SOD) is a broad term referring to numerous biliary, pancreatic, and hepatic disorders resulting from spasms, strictures, and relaxation of this valve at inappropriate times. This review brings attention to various factors that may increase the risk of SOD, including but not limited to: cholecystectomy, opiates, and alcohol. Lack of proper recognition and treatment of SOD may be associated with clinical events, including pancreatitis and biliary symptoms with hepatic enzyme elevation. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches are discussed to help recognize, prevent, and treat SOD. Future studies are needed to assess the treatment benefit of agents such as calcium-channel blockers, glyceryl trinitrate, or tricyclic antidepressants in patients with SOD.

  10. Anatomical Disruption & Length-Tension Dysfunction of Anal Sphincter Complex Muscles in Women with Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sun; Weinstein, Milena; Raizada, Varuna; Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Rajasekaran, M. Raj; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anal sphincter complex muscles; internal anal sphincter, external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles, play important role in the anal continence mechanism. Patients with symptoms of fecal incontinence have weak anal sphincter complex muscles; however, their length-tension properties and relationship to anatomical disruption have never been studied. OBJECTIVE To assess the anatomy of anal sphincter complex muscles using 3D-ultrasound imaging system and determine the relationship between anatomical defects and length-tension property of external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles in women with incontinence symptoms and control subjects. DESIGN Severity of anal sphincter muscle damage was determined by static and dynamic 3Dimensional-ultrasound imaging. Length-tension property was determined by anal and vaginal pressure respectively using custom designed probes. PATIENTS 44 asymptomatic controls and 24 incontinent patients participated in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEAUSURES Anatomical defects and length-tension dysfunction of anal sphincter complex muscles in FI patients were evaluated. RESULT Prevalence of injury to sphincter muscles are significantly higher in the incontinent patients compared to controls. 85% of patients but only 9% controls reveal damage to ≥2 of the 3 muscles of anal sphincter complex. Anal and vaginal squeeze pressure increased with increase in the probe size (length-tension curve) in majority of controls. In patients, the increase in anal and vaginal squeeze pressures was either significantly smaller than controls or it decreased with the increasing probe size (abnormal length-tension). CONCLUSIONS Length-tension property of the external anal sphincter and puborectalis muscles is significantly impaired in incontinent patients. Our findings have therapeutic implication in the treatment of anal incontinence. PMID:24105004

  11. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study

    PubMed Central

    Marola, Silvia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient. Results Group A patients were noted to have greater sphincter hypotonia at rest and during contraction compared with those in group C (p=0.02); the rectal sensitivity threshold was lower in group B than in group D patients (p=0.02). No voluntary postcontraction sphincter relaxation was observed in either group A or group B patients (p=0.891 and p=0.939, respectively). Conclusions The decrease in the difference in resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers suggests post-contraction sphincter spasticity, indicating impaired pelvic floor coordination in multiple sclerosis patients. A knowledge of manometric alterations in such patients may be clinically relevant in the selection of patients for appropriate treatments and for planning targeted rehabilitation therapy. PMID:28352843

  12. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst. Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy. Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated. The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts. Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:26632721

  13. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction Type III: New studies suggest new approaches are needed.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, C Mel

    2015-05-21

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has been classified into three types based upon the presence or absence of objective findings including liver test abnormalities and bile duct dilatation. Type III is the most controversial and is classified as biliary type pain in the absence of any these objective findings. Many prior studies have shown that the clinical response to endoscopic therapy is higher based upon the presence of these objective criteria. However, there has been variable correlation of the manometry findings to outcome after endoscopic therapy. Nevertheless, manometry and sphincterotomy has been recommended for Type III patients given the overall response rate of 33%, although the reported response rates are highly variable. However, all of the prior data was non-blinded and non-randomized with variable follow-up. The evaluating predictors in SOD study - a prospective randomized blinded sham controlled one year outcome study showed no correlation between manometric findings and outcome after sphincterotomy. Furthermore, patients receiving sham therapy had a statistically significantly better outcome than those undergoing biliary or dual sphincterotomy. This study calls into question the whole concept of SOD Type III and, based upon prior physiologic studies, one can suggest that SOD Type III likely represents a right upper quadrant functional abdominal pain syndrome and should be treated as such.

  14. OnabotulinumtoxinA Urethral Sphincter Injection as Treatment for Non-neurogenic Voiding Dysfunction – A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction including dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity caused by a spastic or non-relaxing external urethral sphincter can theoretically be treated by injections of botulinum A toxin into the external urethral sphincter. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injections in patients with dysfunctional voiding or detrusor underactivity. Patients with medically refractory dysfunctional voiding (n = 31) or detrusor underactivity (n = 31) were randomly allocated in a 2:1 ratio to receive either onabotulinumtoxinA (100 U) (n = 38) or placebo (normal saline) (n = 24). There were no significant differences in subjective or objective parameters between patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA and those who received saline injection therapy, and the overall success rate was 43.5% (reduction in Patient perception of Bladder Condition by ≥2: onabotulinumtoxinA 36.8% vs placebo 54.2%, p = 0.114). The results were similar between the dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity subgroups; however, a significant reduction in detrusor voiding pressure was only observed in dysfunctional voiding patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA. Repeat urethral sphincter onabotulinumtoxinA injections offered greater therapeutic effects in both dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity patients. For patients with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, the success rate of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injection was not superior to placebo. PMID:27958325

  15. Quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal in the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction and acalculous cholecystopathy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Arun, Sasikumar; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the role of quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal in the management of biliary dyskinesia and to describe the findings according to Sostre score (SS) criteria in patients with gallbladder (GB) in-situ and biliary pain. We performed a retrospective analysis of the hepatobiliary (HIDA) studies (n = 35) performed for evaluation of biliary dyskinesia either due to biliary pain, opioid induced sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), recurrent pancreatitis (RP) or post cholecystectomy syndrome (PCS). Gallbladder ejection fraction (GBEF) was calculated from the post fatty meal HIDA images (excluding PCS patients). Studies with GBEF ≤40 % and SS >4 were considered to have cholecystopathy and SOD respectively. Three of the 13 patients with PCS had SS of 6 each, suggestive of SOD. Delayed biliary visualization (>15 min) and activity in common bile duct 60 min > liver 15 min were the specific features in these cases. Opioid induced SOD patients had SS >4 with retrograde refilling of GB in one patient and normalization of the SS parameters after nifedipine challenge in the other patient. Patients with RP and biliary pain were stratified into four groups, normal (GBEF >40 % and SS ≤4), cholecystopathy (GBEF ≤40 % and SS ≤4), normal with SOD (GBEF >40 % and SS >4) and cholecystopathy with SOD (GBEF ≤40 % and SS >4). Four patients with intact GB had cholecystopathy with scintigraphic features of SOD. Quantitative cholescintigraphy with fatty meal and SS scoring identified biliary dyskinesia and SOD in patients with biliary pain, recurrent pancreatitis and post-cholecystectomy syndrome.

  16. Characterization of functional biliary pain and dyspeptic symptoms in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: Effect of papillotomy

    PubMed Central

    Madácsy, László; Fejes, Roland; Kurucsai, Gábor; Joó, Ildikó; Székely, András; Bertalan, Viktória; Szepes, Attila; Lonovics, János

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize functional biliary pain and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in postcholecystectomy syndrome (PCS) patients with and without sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) proved by endoscopic sphincter of Oddi manometry (ESOM), and to assess the post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) outcome. METHODS: We prospectively investigated 85 cholecystectomized patients referred for ERCP because of PCS and suspected SOD. On admission, all patients completed our questionnaire. Physical examination, laboratory tests, abdominal ultrasound, quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy (QHBS), and ERCP were performed in all patients. Based on clinical and ERCP findings 15 patients had unexpected bile duct stone disease and 15 patients had SOD biliary typeI. ESOM demonstrated an elevated basal pressure in 25 patients with SOD biliary-type III. In the remaining 30 cholecystectomized patients without SOD, the liver function tests, ERCP, QHBS and ESOM were all normal. As a control group, 30 ‘asymptomatic’ cholecystectomized volunteers (attended to our hospital for general cardiovascular screening) completed our questionnaire, which is consisted of 50 separate questions on GI symptoms and abdominal pain characteristics. Severity of the abdominal pain (frequency and intensity) was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). In 40 of 80 patients having definite SOD (i.e. patients with SOD biliary typeIand those with elevated SO basal pressure on ESOM), an EST was performed just after ERCP. In these patients repeated questionnaires were filled at each follow-up visit (at 3 and 6 mo) and a second look QHBS was performed 3 mo after the EST to assess the functional response to EST. RESULTS: The analysis of characteristics of the abdominal pain demonstrated that patients with common bile duct stone and definite SOD had a significantly higher score of symptomatic agreement with previously determined biliary-like pain features than patient groups of PCS without SOD and controls

  17. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure.

  18. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  19. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes episodes of severe abdominal pain. Doctor-Patient Communication Doctors often consider SOD in patients who experience ... with a long-term digestive disorder. Doctor–Patient Communication How to Help Your Doctor Help You How ...

  20. Wide disparities in attitudes and practices regarding Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: a survey of expert U.S. endoscopists

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rabindra R.; Klapman, Jason; Komanduri, Srinadh; Shah, Janak N.; Wani, Sachin; Muthusamy, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) is recommended in the evaluation of suspected Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD2), though its utility is uncertain. Little is known about the practice of expert endoscopists in the United States regarding SOD2. Methods: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to 128 expert biliary endoscopists identified from U.S. advanced endoscopy training programs. Results: The response rate was 46.1 % (59/128). Only 55.6 % received training in SOM, and 49.2 % currently perform SOM. For biliary SOD2, 33.3 % routinely obtain SOM, 33.3 % perform empiric sphincterotomy, and 26.3 % perform single session endoscopic ultrasound/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (EUS/ERCP). In contrast, an equal number (35.1 %) favor SOM or single session EUS/ERCP for suspected acute idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis, while 19.3 % would perform empiric sphincterotomy. Those who perform SOM believe it to be important in predicting response to treatment compared with those who do not (71.8 % vs 23.1 %, P = 0.01). Yet only 51.7 % of this group performs SOM for suspected SOD2. Most (78.6 %) believe that < 50 % of patients report improvement in symptoms after sphincterotomy. Common reasons for not obtaining SOM included unreliable results (50 %), and procedure-related risks (39.3 %). Most (59.3 %) believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder; only 3.7 % felt SOD is a legitimate disorder of the sphincter of Oddi. Conclusions: Our survey of U.S. expert endoscopists suggests that SOM is not routinely performed for SOD2 and concerns regarding its associated risks and validity persist. Most endoscopists believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder that will not respond to sphincterotomy in the majority of cases. PMID:27652298

  1. [Genital and sphincter disorders].

    PubMed

    Joseph, P A; de Sèze, M

    2001-09-01

    Symptomatic bladder dysfunction occurs at some time in most patients with multiple sclerosis. Detrusor hypereflexia and sphincter dyssynergia are the main dysfunctions. Anticholinergic medication is currently the most effective and the most common treatment of overactive bladder with reduced bladder capacity and uninhibited detrusor contractions. Desmopressin, surgery, permanent indwelling catheter or external device are used in some cases. Nevertheless essential to bladder management is understanding to what extent the patient has incomplete emptying while complaining predominantly of symptoms of detrusor overactivity: frequency and urgency, with or without urge incontinence. Intravesical capsaicin and botulinum toxin injected into the detrusor seems promising means of treating intractable bladder hyperreflexia. If the post-micturition residual volume is raised, intermittent self-catheterization is the most adequate method to achieve bladder emptying of patients with MS. Physical and cognitive disability as well as patients motivation can reduce their ability to perform catheterization. In such situation, alphablockers show moderate efficacy and botulinum toxin urethral sphincter injection or surgical solution may be discussed. Disturbed anorectal physiology is common in MS, but there are as yet few specific treatments. The efficacy of oral sildenafil for treatment of neurogenic erectile failure increases the range of treatment available for men with sexual dysfunction. In women, mechanical remedies, treatment of motor and sensory loss are effective for dyspareunia. Patients of both sexes are likely to welcome to discuss their problem, and counselling or psychotherapy may be of use.

  2. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  3. Epidermolysis bullosa and congenital pyloric atresia

    PubMed Central

    Mithwani, Anwar Adil; Hashmi, Asif; Adil, Salman

    2013-01-01

    The association between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and pyloric atresia (PA) is rare but well documented. Herein, we report a case of EB associated with congenital PA. A female baby, weighing 1480 g, was born vaginally to a 31-year-old gravida 7 lady at 33 weeks of gestation. Polyhydramnios was detected on antenatal assessment. The parents were non-consanguineous Saudis with no family history of significant illness. At birth, well-demarcated areas of peeled skin were present over knees, left leg and periumbilical region. Systemic examination revealed no other abnormality. On second day, the patient developed recurrent vomiting and abdominal distension. An abdominal X-ray revealed a single gastric gas bubble suggesting pyloric obstruction. Following gastroduodenostomy, the baby developed severe sepsis with multiorgan dysfunction and expired on 25th day of life. Skin biopsy showed cleavage within lamina lucida. PMID:24068383

  4. Inflatable artificial sphincter - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100115.htm Inflatable artificial sphincter - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  5. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  6. [Gastric adenomyoma clinically simulating hypertrophic pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez García, S; Rubio Solís, D; Anes González, G; González Sánchez, S

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenomyomas are extremely uncommon benign tumors in children. On histologic examination, these tumors have an epithelial component similar to pancreatic ducts. We present a case of a pyloric adenomyoma that clinically simulated hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn girl. Imaging tests, fundamentally magnetic resonance imaging, were very important in the characterization and diagnosis of this entity.

  7. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  8. An experimental model of prolonged esophagitis with sphincter failure in the rat and the therapeutic potential of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Igor; Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Mise, Stjepan; Baotic, Tomislav; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Vuksic, Tihomir; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-11-01

    We report a simple novel rat model that combines prolonged esophagitis and parallel sphincters failure. The anti-ulcer gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, which was found to be stable in gastric juice, and is being evaluated in inflammatory bowel disease trials, is an anti-esophagitis therapy that recovers failed sphincters. Twelve or twenty months after the initial challenge (tubes sutured into sphincters for one week and then spontaneously removed by peristalsis), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis (confluent hemorrhagic and yellowish lesions, thinner epithelium and superficial corneal layer, with stratification derangement); constantly lowered pressure of both sphincters (assessed by using a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through esophageal or duodenal incision); and both lower esophageal and pyloric sphincter failure. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, BPC 157 was given at either 10 micro g/kg, i.p., once a day (last application 24 h before assessment) or alternatively, it was given continuously in drinking water at 0.16 micro g/ml (12 ml/rat). This treatment recovers i) esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or investigated time period) and ii) pressure in both sphincters (cmH2O). In addition, BPC 157 (10 micro g/kg) or saline (1 ml/rat, 5 ml/kg) was specifically given directly into the stomach; pressure assessment was performed at 5 min thereafter. The effect of BPC 157 is specific because in normal rats, it increases lower esophageal sphincter-pressure, but decreases pyloric sphincter-pressure. Ranitidine, given as the standard drug using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, i.p., once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; or 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) had no effect.

  9. Trends in pyloric stenosis incidence, Atlanta, 1968 to 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, E J; Edmonds, L D

    1987-01-01

    Four studies reported an increasing incidence of pyloric stenosis during the late 1970s from geographically diverse areas of the United Kingdom. It was suggested that the increased incidence might be related to changes in infant feeding practices. We used data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population based birth defects registry, to examine the secular trends and descriptive epidemiology of pyloric stenosis in a North American city. For the period 1968 to 1982, the incidence of pyloric stenosis was 1.33 per 1000 live births; there was no evidence of an increasing trend for either race or sex specific rates of pyloric stenosis. The descriptive epidemiology of the pyloric stenosis cases showed higher rates for males, whites, and infants of higher birth weight. We found no increasing trend in pyloric stenosis incidence in Atlanta, despite well documented changes in US infant feeding practices (an increased prevalence of breast feeding) during the 1970s. PMID:3656370

  10. Torus hyperplasia of the pyloric antrum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi-Hun; Han, Hye Seung; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Byung Kook; Sung, In-Kyung; Seong, Moo Kyung; Lee, Kyung Yung

    2010-01-01

    Primary or idiopathic hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle in adult, so called torus hyperplasia, is an infrequent but an established entity. It is caused by a circular muscle hypertrophy affecting the lesser curvature near the pylorus. Since most of the lesions are difficult to differentiate from tumor, distal gastrectomy is usually preformed to rule out most causes of pyloric lesions including neoplastic ones through a pathological study. A 56-yr-old man with a family history of gastric cancer presented with abdominal discomfort of 1 month duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a 1.0 cm sized irregular submucosal lesion proximal to the pylorus to the distal antrum on the lesser curvature. On colonoscopy examination, a 1.5 cm sized protruding mass was noticed on the appendiceal orifice. Gastrectomy and cecectomy were done, and histological section revealed marked hypertrophy of the distal circular pyloric musculature and an appendiceal mucocele. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of torus hyperplasia with appendiceal mucocele which is found incidentally.

  11. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in the third world.

    PubMed

    Saula, P W; Hadley, G P

    2011-10-01

    The relative rarity of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) in the developing world makes its diagnosis a challenge to many physicians. This study audits the management of HPS at a tertiary hospital in South Africa, with a view to defining its regional pattern. This is a retrospective review of records of all patients (n = 63) managed for HPS over an eight-year period (2002-2010). The mean age at presentation was 6.2 weeks and the male/female ratio was 6:1. The majority of patients presented with non-bilious vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound had a sensitivity of 65% and 81.3% when the criteria of pyloric muscle thickness >4 mm and pyloric channel length >16 mm were used, respectively. The overall complication rate was 14.3% and the mortality rate was 0%. Despite the rarity of HPS in the Third World, the outcome of its management is favourable. However, the sensitivity of abdominal ultrasound for diagnosing HPS is low.

  12. Factors associated with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jedd, M B; Melton, L J; Griffin, M R; Kaufman, B; Hoffman, A D; Broughton, D; O'Brien, P C

    1988-03-01

    We examined perinatal factors in relation to the rise in incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis among children in Olmsted County, Minnesota, during the period from 1950 through 1984. Primogeniture was associated with male infants but not female infants; some factor related to primogeniture, such as breast-feeding, may be etiologically important. Our data did not support a role for maternal disease, use of doxylamine succinate-pyridoxide hydrochloride (Bendectin), or an infectious process. Further study should be directed toward environmental factors associated with primogeniture.

  13. Identification of groupers based on pyloric caeca differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roy, T S C; Gopalakrishnan, A

    2011-11-01

    The examination of nine species of groupers present in south-east Indian waters has indicated that the pyloric caeca number, pattern and colouration are reliable and useful characters for identification. Three distinct morphotypes of pyloric caeca were observed in this study.

  14. Frequencies and cyclical pattern of the human sphincter of Oddi phasic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Torsoli, A; Corazziari, E; Habib, F I; De Masi, E; Biliotti, D; Mazzarella, R; Giubilei, D; Fegiz, G

    1986-01-01

    Basal frequency of sphincter of Oddi phasic contractility has been repeatedly measured during endoscopic manometry and reported to range, in control subjects, from (M +/- SE) 3.0 +/- 0.6 to 7.5 +/- 0.7 c/min. Recently, high frequency (greater than 8 c/min) phasic contractions or absence of phasic activity were recorded in patients with postcholecystectomy or pancreatic complaints, possibly suggesting a sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In the present study, sphincter of Oddi (biliary tract) phasic contractility was measured by perendoscopic manometry in 13 subjects without specific clinical symptoms of biliopancreatic disease and with a normal common bile and pancreatic duct at ERCP. Four T-tube patients with no evidence of common bile duct stones or papillary stenosis were studied for comparison (transductal sphincter of Oddi manometry). Basal frequency was found to range from 0 to 7 c/min (M +/- SE: 2.99 +/- 0.46) in perendoscopic manometry (85 min of recording time) and from 0 to 12 c/min (2.0 +/- 0.3) in transductal manometry (2546 min of recording time). Long lasting transductal recordings also showed that frequency of activity derived from the sphincter area varied cyclically in close relation with the duodenal migrating motor complex. It is concluded that the sphincter of Oddi in man is likely to participate in the interdigestive gastrointestinal motor activity and that short perendoscopic recordings may not be representative of the overall sphincter of Oddi activity. PMID:3957107

  15. Ultrasonic "double track" sign in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H L; Schechter, S; Mestel, A L; Eaton, D H; Haller, J O

    1987-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis since the first reports of its use with contact B mode scanners. Real-time imaging has allowed measurements of pyloric diameter, length, and muscle wall thickness. Wall thickness measurements taken with the pylorus in longitudinal (elongated) view improve diagnostic accuracy. Fluid aided real-time examination of 10 cases showed the ultrasound equivalent of the "double track" sign. This finding is the result of pyloric fluid compressed into smaller tracks as it is impinged upon circumferentially by the thickened circular muscle. This sign, previously seen in barium studies, although nonspecific, may prove to be a sensitive diagnostic criterion.

  16. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn.

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn.

  17. Epidermolysis Bullosa with Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in a Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Ammar, Saloua; Louati, Hamdi; Zitouni, Hayet; Jallouli, Mohamed; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited blistering disorder characterized by the fragility of the skin and mucous membranes. Extracutaneous manifestations can be associated. We report a unique concomitant occurrence of EB and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn. PMID:26500857

  18. Genetics Home Reference: epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia ...

  19. [Ultrasound diagnosis of pyloric stenosis in young children].

    PubMed

    Krivchenia, D Iu; Babko, S A; Chekanova, L R

    1992-01-01

    The results of observation of 12 children ranging in age from 1 to 4 mos with tentative diagnosis of pyloric stenosis are presented. The study was performed by special method, using "Aloka" SSD-280 (Japan) ultrasound apparatus. The characteristic symptoms of the disease were revealed in 9 children, diagnosis of pyloric stenosis was confirmed by means of endoscopy, palpation, and intraoperatively. The use of US is practically harmless, and can completely substitute for a roentgenologic method in detecting the given congenital pathology.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes reduced in lower esophageal sphincter of patients with achalasia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Zheng, Z; Wang, T; Zhao, C; Zhou, G; Jin, H; Wang, B

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of achalasia remains largely unknown. Considerable evidence reveals that the lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction is due to the lack of inhibitory neurotransmitter, secondary to esophageal neuronal inflammation or loss. Recent studies suggest hydrogen sulfide may act as an inhibitory transmitter in gastrointestinal tract, but study about hydrogen sulfide in human esophagus still lack. The aim of the study was to investigate if hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes could be detected in human esophagus and if the synthesis of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide could be affected in achalasia patients. Tissue samples in cardia, lower esophageal sphincter, 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from achalasia patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy. Control tissues in lower esophageal sphincter were obtained from esophageal carcinoma patients. Expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients and control were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In addition, expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were compared among different parts of esophagus in achalasia patients. Compared with control, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase in lower esophageal sphincter of achalasia patients was significantly reduced (χ(2) = 11.429, P = 0.010). The expression of cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase were lower in lower esophageal sphincter than that in 2 cm and 4 cm above lower esophageal sphincter, respectively (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, the expression of hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes, cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine-γ-lyase, can be detected in human esophagus and is reduced in patients with achalasia, which implicates the involvement of the two hydrogen sulfide synthesis enzymes in the pathophysiology of achalasia.

  1. Risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis occurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection adjacent to pylorus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Un; Park, Moon Sik; Yun, So Hee; Yang, Min A.; Han, Shang Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Jung, Gum Mo; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Yong Keun; Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been widely accepted as a curative treatment for gastric neoplasm. Pyloric stenosis is a chronic complication that can be caused by ESD. The aim of this study is to clarify the risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis. From January 2004 to January 2014, a total of 126 patients who underwent ESD adjacent to pylorus were reviewed retrospectively. Pyloric mucosal defect was defined as when any resection margin of ESD was involved in the pyloric ring. Pyloric stenosis was defined as when a conventional endoscope could not be passed to the duodenum. Among the 126 patients, pyloric stenosis was identified in 9. In a univariate analysis, pyloric stenosis was more common in older patients (P < 0.05) and in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, the factor that was associated with pyloric stenosis was the extent of the pyloric ring dissection (P < 0.001). Four of the 9 patients with pyloric stenosis had mild dyspepsia, and the others had gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. The 5 symptomatic patients underwent endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), and the frequency of EBD was 1 to 8 times. The asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. The incidence of pyloric stenosis was higher in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference. Although EBD was an effective treatment for pyloric stenosis, conservative management was also helpful in patients who had mild symptoms. PMID:27977608

  2. Videourodynamic and sphincter motor unit potential analyses in Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Uchiyama, T; Yamanishi, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Urinary dysfunction is a prominent autonomic feature in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), which is not only troublesome but also a cause of morbidity in these disorders. Recent advances in investigative uroneurology offer a better insight into the underlying pathophysiology and appropriate management for urinary dysfunction.
METHODS—twenty one patients with PD (15 men, six women, mean age 64 (49-76), mean disease duration 4 years (1-8 years), median Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 (1-4), all taking 300 mg/day of levodopa (100-500 mg)) and 15 with MSA (eight men, seven women, mean age 59 (48-72), mean disease duration 3 years (0.5-6 years)) were recruited. Videourodynamic and sphincter motor unit potential analyses in the patients with PD and MSA were carried out, looking for distinguishing hallmarks that might be useful in the differential diagnosis of these two diseases.
RESULTS—Urinary symptoms were found in 72% of patients with PD and in 100% with MSA. Filling phase abnormalities in the videourodynamic study included detrusor hyperreflexia in 81% of patients with PD and 56% with MSA, and uninhibited external sphincter relaxation in 33% of patients with PD and 33% of those with MSA. However, open bladder neck at the start of filling was not seen in patients with PD but was present in 53% of those with MSA, suggestive of internal sphincter denervation. Sphincter motor unit potential analysis showed neurogenic motor unit potentials in 5% of patients with PD and in 93% of those with MSA, suggestive of external sphincter denervation. On voiding, detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia was not seen in patients with PD but was present in 47% of those with MSA. Pressure-flow analysis showed that the Abrams-Griffiths number, a grading of urethral obstruction (outflow obstruction >40), in PD (40 in women and 43 in men) was larger than that in MSA (12 in women and 28 in men). Weak detrusor in PD (66% of women and 40% of men) was less

  3. Intravenous atropine treatment in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, H; Imura, K; Nishikawa, M; Yagi, M; Kubota, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess the efficacy of a new regimen of intravenous atropine treatment for infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) with special reference to regression of pyloric hypertrophy. Methods: Atropine was given intravenously at a dose of 0.01 mg/kg six times a day before feeding in 19 patients with IHPS diagnosed from radiographic and ultrasonographic findings. When vomiting ceased and the infants were able to ingest 150 ml/kg/day formula after stepwise increases in feeding volume, they were given 0.02 mg/kg atropine six times a day orally and the dose was decreased stepwise. Results: Of the 19 infants, 17 (89%) ceased projectile vomiting after treatment with intravenous (median seven days) and subsequent oral (median 44 days) atropine administration. The remaining two infants required surgery. No significant complications were encountered. Ultrasonography showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in pyloric muscle thickness, but no significant shortening of the pyloric canal after completion of the atropine treatment. The patients exhibited failure to thrive at presentation, but were thriving at 6 months of age (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This atropine therapy resulted in satisfactory clinical recovery. Pyloric muscle thickness was significantly reduced. PMID:12089130

  4. Penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: an association or a random coexistence?

    PubMed

    Yagmurlu, Aydin; Vargun, Rahsan; Gollu, Gulnur; Gokcora, I Haluk

    2004-01-01

    A neonate with penile agenesis and congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patterns of associated anomalies with penile agenesis, and those of congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis are discussed.

  5. Pyloric atresia: A report of ten patients.

    PubMed

    Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayett; Zrig, Ahmad; Laamiri, Rachida; Chioukh, Fatma; Ayari, Eya; Sahnoun, Lassaad; Maazoun, Kais; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Belghith, Mohsen; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Pyloric atresia (PA) is uncommon. It occurs in 1:100000 live births. Neonates usually present soon after birth with copious non-bilious vomiting. The treatment is surgical and its prognosis is poor, especially, when it is associated with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical presentation, diagnosis, operative management, post-operative courses, and outcome in infant with PA, based in our cases and literature review. Charts of 10 patients who underwent surgery for PA in the department of paediatric surgery in a Teaching Hospital in Tunisia (Monastir) between 1990 and 2012 were reviewed. Data were analysed for demographic, clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics. The average of age at presentation was 2 days and there were six males and four females. The main presenting symptoms were non-bilious vomiting in 90% of cases. Abdominal X-ray showed gastric dilatation with an absence of gas in the rest of the intestinal tract in 90%, and a pneumoperitoneum in one. The surgical approach was laparotomy in all cases. Gastric perforation was observed in one patient and was completely repaired. The distribution of the anatomic variations was type A in nine cases and type B in one. Five patients underwent excision of the diaphragm and Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty and gastroduodenostomy in the other five cases. Identified associated anomalies were Down's syndrome in one and EB in 2 (20%), one family has three affected sibling. Post-operative mortality rate was 70%. No standard surgical approach can be adopted a better management of PA or the associated anomalies depends on an early diagnosis and the availability of neonatal intensive care unit.

  6. Gallbladder carcinoma - a rare cause of pyloric-duodenal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Zizi; Ulmeanu, Victoria; Ghinea, Mihaela Maria; Mocanu, Liliana; Niculescu, Costin; Grigorian, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Pyloric duodenal stenosis is usually caused by pyloric, juxtapyloric or duodenal ulcer, or by postbulbar ulcer. Gallbladder cancer (GBC), duodenal diverticula, annular pancreas and superior mesenteric artery syndrome (Wilkie's syndrome) are rare causes of pyloric duodenal stenosis. The case of a 66-year-old female patient is presented. The patient was admitted to hospital presenting anorexia, repeated alimentary vomiting, epigastric pain, and weight loss. Objective clinical examination upon admission: clapotage à jeun is present, triggered by tapping the epigastric region. Laboratory tests reveal moderate anemia, hypokalemic alkalosis, increased levels of cholestatic enzymes and of tumor markers. Gastroendoscopy: Stomach presenting stasis fluid in large quantity. Deformed antropyloric region caused by extrinsic compression. Abdominal native magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and with contrast medium: cholecyst lumen entirely obstructed with calculi; thickened wall, with heterogeneous gadolinophilia; gadolinophilic mass erasing the bordering limit in relation to the cholecyst wall and the colon hepatic angle, and leaving a print on the pyloric region. During surgery, upon opening the peritoneal cavity, a tumoral pericholecystic block was observed, including the pyloric-duodenal region and the transverse mesocolon. Histopathology tests of tissue samples showed adipose conjunctive tissue with invasive adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical tests [cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK17, CK19, CK20, CDX2, mucin (MUC) 1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)] were consistent with infiltrating neoplastic carcinoma, originating in the gallbladder epithelium. Gastrointestinal obstruction cases caused by gallbladder carcinoma are rare. The pyloric-duodenal region is more frequently affected, as compared to the small intestine or the colon.

  7. Gastric versus post-pyloric feeding: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Marik, Paul E; Zaloga, Gary P

    2003-01-01

    Background Our objective was to evaluate the impact of gastric versus post-pyloric feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, caloric intake, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS), and mortality in critically ill and injured ICU patients. Method Data sources were Medline, Embase, Healthstar, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, personal files, and contact with expert informants. From 122 articles screened, nine were identified as prospective randomized controlled trials (including a total of 522 patients) that compared gastric with post-pyloric feeding, and were included for data extraction. Descriptive and outcomes data were extracted from the papers by the two reviewers independently. Main outcome measures were the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, average caloric goal achieved, average daily caloric intake, time to the initiation of tube feeds, time to goal, ICU LOS, and mortality. The meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Results Only medical, neurosurgical and trauma patents were enrolled in the studies analyzed. There were no significant differences in the incidence of pneumonia, percentage of caloric goal achieved, mean total caloric intake, ICU LOS, or mortality between gastric and post-pyloric feeding groups. The time to initiation of enteral nutrition was significantly less in those patients randomized to gastric feeding. However, time to reach caloric goal did not differ between groups. Conclusion In this meta-analysis we were unable to demonstrate a clinical benefit from post-pyloric versus gastric tube feeding in a mixed group of critically ill patients, including medical, neurosurgical, and trauma ICU patients. The incidences of pneumonia, ICU LOS, and mortality were similar between groups. Because of the delay in achieving post-pyloric intubation, gastric feeding was initiated significantly sooner than was post-pyloric feeding. The present study, while providing the best current evidence regarding

  8. Increased Expression of Pyloric ERβ Is Associated With Diabetic Gastroparesis in Streptozotocin-Induced Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Crimmins, Stephen; Smiley, Rebecca; Preston, Kerry; Yau, Amy; Mccallum, Richard; Ali, Mohammed Showkat

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastroparesis is a significant co-morbidity affecting up to 50% of patients with diabetes and is disproportionately found in women. Prior studies have suggested that loss of interstitial cells of Cajal, hyperglycemia, and nitric oxide dysfunction are potential causes of gastroparesis. Since diabetic gastroparesis affects more women than men, we performed an exploratory study with a diabetic rat model to determine if sex hormone signaling is altered in those where gastroparesis develops. Methods We injected male rats with streptozotocin (STZ) to model type I diabetes, as confirmed by blood glucose levels. Gastroparesis was determined by acetaminophen gavage and serum acetaminophen levels. Rats were grouped based on acetaminophen and blood glucose data: diabetic (DM), diabetic and gastroparetic (DM + GP), and control (CM). Serum levels of testosterone, estrogen, and insulin were determined as well as aromatase expression in pyloric tissue and serum. Androgen receptor and estrogen receptor α (ERα) and β (ERβ) were also measured in the pylorus. Results Compared to CM, estrogen increased and testosterone decreased in both DM and DM + GP rats. Sex hormone levels were not different between DM and DM + GP. Serum aromatase was increased in DM and DM + GP rats; however, pyloric tissue levels were not significantly different from controls. ERα was unchanged and androgen receptor decreased in DM and DM + GP. ERβ was increased only in DM + GP animals. Conclusion Our study implicates increased pyloric ERβ in the development of gastroparesis in STZ-induced male diabetic rats. Increased serum aromatase is likely responsible for altered sex hormone levels. Our study supports the implication of sex hormone signaling in diabetic development and demonstrates a potential unique role for pyloric ERβ in male diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:27785323

  9. Sphincter of Oddi Manometry: Reproducibility of Measurements and Effect of Sphincterotomy in the EPISOD Study

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Alejandro L; Pauls, Qi; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie; Cotton, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The reproducibility of sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) measurements and results of SOM after sphincterotomy has not been studied sufficiently. The aim of our study is to evaluate the reproducibility of SOM and completeness of sphincter ablation. Methods The recently published Evaluating Predictors and Interventions in sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (EPISOD) study included 214 subjects with post-cholecystectomy pain, and fit the criteria of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type III. They were randomized into 3 arms, irrespective of manometric findings: sham (no sphincterotomy), biliary sphincterotomy, and dual (biliary and pancreatic). Thirty-eight subjects had both biliary and pancreatic manometries performed twice, at baseline and at repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 1–11 months. Sham arm was examined to assess the reproducibility of manometry, and the treatment arms to assess whether the sphincterotomies were complete (elevated pressures were normalized). Results Biliary and pancreatic measurements were reproduced in 7/14 (50%) untreated subjects. All 12 patients with initially elevated biliary pressures in biliary and dual sphincterotomy groups normalized after biliary sphincterotomy. However, 2 of 8 subjects with elevated pancreatic pressures in the dual sphincterotomy group remained abnormal after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Paradoxically, normal biliary pressures became abnormal in 1 of 15 subjects after biliary sphincterotomy, and normal pancreatic pressures became abnormal in 5 of 15 patients after biliary sphincterotomy, and in 1 of 9 after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Conclusions Our data suggest that SOM measurements are poorly reproducible, and question whether we could adequately perform pancreatic sphincterotomy. PMID:26951046

  10. Pyloric obstruction secondary to epicardial pacemaker implantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bedoya Nader, G; Kellihan, H B; Bjorling, D E; McAnulty, J

    2017-02-01

    A 10-year old Lhasa Apso dog was presented for an acute history of exercise intolerance and hind limb weakness. High grade second degree atrioventricular block with an atrial rate of 200 beats per minute, ventricular rate of 40 beats per minute and an intermittent ventricular escape rhythm, was diagnosed on electrocardiograph. A transdiaphragmatic, unipolar, epicardial pacemaker was implanted without immediate surgical complications. Severe vomiting was noted 12 h post-operatively. Abdominal ultrasound and a barium study supported a diagnosis of pyloric outflow obstruction and exploratory abdominal surgery was performed. The pyloric outflow tract appeared normal and no other causes of an outflow obstruction were identified. The epicardial generator was repositioned from the right to the left abdominal wall. Pyloric cell pacing was presumed to be the cause for the pyloric obstruction and severe vomiting, and this was thought to be due to close proximity of the pacemaker generator to the pylorus situated in the right abdominal wall. Repositioning of the pulse generator to the left abdominal wall resulted in resolution of vomiting.

  11. Adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis — a description in 1834?

    PubMed Central

    Stout, G.

    1983-01-01

    John Peacock MD was in practice in Darlington when he published his Practical Hints on the Treatment of Several Diseases in 1834. It is suggested that his cases described therein of `scirrhous pylorus' are adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. If authenticated, his work would predate the earliest description of this condition by the French pathologist, Professor Jean Cruveilhier in 1835. PMID:6350566

  12. Prematurity Affects Age of Presentation of Pyloric Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Caitlyn M; Vinocur, Charles; Berman, Loren

    2017-02-01

    Term infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) typically present between 4 and 6 weeks. There is limited consensus, however, regarding age of presentation of premature infants. We aim to determine if there is an association between the degree of prematurity and chronological age of presentation of HPS. A total of 2988 infants who had undergone a pyloromyotomy for HPS were identified from the 2012 and 2013 NSQIP-P Participant Use Files. Two hundred seventeen infants (7.3%) were born prematurely. A greater degree of prematurity was associated with an older chronological age of presentation ( P < .0001). Prematurity was significantly associated with an increase in overall postoperative morbidity, reintubation, readmission, and postoperative length of stay. When clinicians evaluate an infant with nonbilious emesis with a history of prematurity, they should consider pyloric stenosis if the calculated postconceptional age is between 44 and 50 weeks. When counseling families of premature infants, surgeons should discuss the increased incidence of postpyloromyotomy morbidity.

  13. Bendectin (Debendox) as a risk factor for pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Eskenazi, B; Bracken, M B

    1982-12-15

    The maternal use of Bendectin (Debendox) in the first trimester of pregnancy was examined in a case-control (n = 1,427 and 3,001, respectively) study of malformed infants whose mothers were interviewed between 1974 and 1976. Mothers of infants with congenital malformation showed an increased likelihood (odds ratio = 1.40) of having used Bendectin, with a stronger association of Bendectin with birth defects for mothers who also smoked (odds ratio = 2.91). A significant association was observed between the occurrence of pyloric stenosis in the infant and exposure to Bendectin in utero (odds ratio = 4.33). When maternal sociodemographic factors, including smoking, and smoking alone, were controlled, the association between Bendectin and pyloric stenosis was further increased (odds ratio = 4.63 and 5.24, respectively). Except for a possible association of Bendectin with heart valve anomalies (odds ratio = 2.99), we were unable to document other significantly increased risks for congenital malformations.

  14. Pyloric trichobezoar in a Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Munsterman, Amelia S

    2013-12-01

    An adult female Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) was presented with a 3-wk history of anorexia and lethargy. Initial examination and diagnostics did not provide a diagnosis. The lynx continued to demonstrate vague clinical signs, including anorexia and an abnormal gait. During follow-up immobilizations 2 wk later, a barium gastrointestinal study revealed a pyloric obstruction. Abdominal exploratory surgery was elected, and a gastrotomy and an enterotomy of the proximal duodenum were performed to remove the pyloric obstruction. The obstruction was determined to be a trichobezoar. Fleas, a likely cause of hair ingestion through grooming, were noted during surgical preparation. The lynx made a full recovery from surgery. Reoccurrence of the trichobezoar was prevented after surgery with the use of monthly flea control and three times a week hairball laxative.

  15. [Pyloric stenosis complicated by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bataller, R; Salmerón, J M; Muñoz, J E; Obach, V; Elizalde, J I; Mas, A; Tolosa, E; Terés, J

    1997-03-01

    The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a picture of oculomotor alterations, ataxia and confusion presented in chronic alcoholics. It has more rarely been described in non alcoholic patients with malnutrition. The case of a patient with ulcerous peptic disease of long evolution who consulted for a picture compatible with WKS following clinical manifestations of repeated vomiting secondary to complete pyloric stenosis is presented. The peculiarity of the picture and the convenience of prevention in malnourished patients receiving intravenous glucose sera is discussed.

  16. Anal sphincter dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: an observation manometric study.

    PubMed

    Marola, Silvia; Ferrarese, Alessia; Gibin, Enrico; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio; Enrico, Stefano; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Destefano, Ines; Nano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Constipation, obstructed defecation, and fecal incontinence are frequent complaints in multiple sclerosis. The literature on the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these disorders is scant. Using anorectal manometry, we compared the anorectal function in patients with and without multiple sclerosis. 136 patients referred from our Center for Multiple Sclerosis to the Coloproctology Outpatient Clinic, between January 2005 and December 2011, were enrolled. The patients were divided into four groups: multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group A); multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group B); non-multiple sclerosis patients with constipation (group C); non-multiple sclerosis patients with fecal incontinence (group D). Anorectal manometry was performed to measure: resting anal pressure; maximum squeeze pressure; rectoanal inhibitory reflex; filling pressure and urge pressure. The difference between resting anal pressure before and after maximum squeeze maneuvers was defined as the change in resting anal pressure calculated for each patient.

  17. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  18. The Role of the Velopharyngeal Sphincter in the Speech of Patients with Cleft Palate or Cleft Lip and Palate Using Perceptual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Georgievska-Jancheska, Tatjana; Gjorgova, Juliana; Popovska, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The velopharyngeal sphincter (VPS) plays the main role in speech formation. The cleft palate, due to the damage of the soft palate, leads to dysfunction of the velopharyngeal sphincter thus causing speech disorder. AIM: To establish a link between the nasal air escape and the perceptual symptoms in the speech of patients with cleft palate or cleft lip and palate using auditory-visual perceptual procedures for determining the influence the velopharyngeal dysfunction has on speech. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with speech disorders, out of which 10 have cleft palate or cleft lip and palate (experimental group), participated in the perceptual assessment by means of Czermak mirror fogging test for assessing the nasal air escape and Pittsburgh Weighted Speech Scale (PWSS) for assessing the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. RESULTS: The respondents with a considerable nasal air escape have a higher velopharyngeal inability, that is, probably incompetent nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter. There is a strong correlation between the nasal air escape and the probable nature of the velopharyngeal sphincter (the coefficient of linear correlation r = 0.9756). The calculated p-value is p = 0.000002. CONCLUSION: The perceptual speech symptoms and the nasal air escape provide unique insight into the state and role the velopharyngeal sphincter has in speech. PMID:28028412

  19. Modifications to installed Sphincter design gloveports

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, S.S.; Gilkison, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of alternative methods for replacing Sphincter designed gloveports in gloveboxes. In addition, the paper discusses modifications that are required on metal glovebox wall panels to allow replacement of the Sphincter gloveports. A review of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) maintenance records showed that gloveports manufactured by Central Research, Incorporated, provide the lowest risk for failure. This assessment is based on the records of glove-to-port seal life and air in-leakage. These records also indicate the glove changes are made in shorter times with fewer workers than required by alternate gloveport designs studied. These attributes culminate in a significant decrease in radiation exposure and assimilation risk of maintenance personnel replacing gloves. Further, the Central Research design reduces the number of expandable hardware parts required to achieve a glove replacement. This reduction in expendable materials can result in a significant reduction in contaminated waste volume generated during a glove replacement.

  20. Effect of glucose supplementation on appetite and the pyloric motor response to intraduodenal glucose and lipid.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J M; Doran, S; Hebbard, G S; Rassias, G; Sun, W M; Horowitz, M

    1998-04-01

    The effects of different macronutrients on appetite and pyloric motility and the impact of short-term dietary glucose supplementation on these responses were evaluated. Ten males (aged 19-38 yr) received isocaloric (2.9 kcal/min) intraduodenal infusions of glucose and lipid while antropyloroduodenal motility and appetite were assessed by manometry and visual analog scales, respectively. Effects of each intraduodenal nutrient on appetite and motility were evaluated before and after 7 days of dietary supplementation with glucose (400 g daily). Initially, both nutrients caused a similar rise in pyloric tone, but intraduodenal lipid was a more potent stimulus of phasic pyloric motility (P = 0.05) and suppressed appetite more (P = 0.013) than intraduodenal glucose. After dietary glucose supplementation, the increase in pyloric tone during intraduodenal glucose was attenuated. Although intraduodenal lipid remained a more potent stimulant of phasic pyloric motility (P = 0.016), it no longer decreased appetite. We conclude that in healthy young males 1) intraduodenal infusion of lipid is a more potent stimulus of phasic pyloric motility and suppresses appetite more than intraduodenal glucose and 2) dietary glucose supplementation alters both the appetite suppressant effect of intraduodenal lipid and the pyloric motor response to intraduodenal glucose infusion.

  1. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  2. Gastric lipoma and pyloric obstruction in a 51-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Furtado, W S; Mello, D A C P G; Santos, V M; Bringel, T L; Oliveira Junior, W P; Moura, H J L

    2013-01-01

    Gastric lipoma is considered a rare condition that may constitute a challenging diagnosis. A 51-year-old woman presented dysphagia and abdominal pain, and an upper digestive endoscopic study disclosed a gastric tumor located in the submucosa of the pyloric antrum. Conclusive diagnosis was established after repeated endoscopic biopsies, and the patient was subjected to an atypical gastrectomy, which evolved into a pyloric stenosis. This complication was appropriately corrected and the patient remains symptomless, under outpatient surveillance.

  3. Idiopathic non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an infant successfully treated via endoscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Karnsakul, Wikrom; Cannon, Mary L; Gillespie, Stacey; Vaughan, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis has rarely been reported in pediatric literature. Endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation has been shown to be a safe procedure in treating gastric outlet obstruction in older children and adults. Partial gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) was diagnosed in an infant by history and confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal series (UGI). Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography scan excluded idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, abdominal tumors, gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary-pancreatic anomalies. Endoscopic findings showed a pinhole-sized pylorus and did not indicate peptic ulcer disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, antral web, or evidence of allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases. Three sessions of a step-wise endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation were conducted under general anesthesia and a fluoroscopy at two week intervals using catheter balloons (Boston Scientific Microvasive®, MA, USA) of increasing diameters. Repeat UGI after the first session revealed normal gastrointestinal transit and no intestinal obstruction. The patient tolerated solid food without any gastrointestinal symptoms since the first session. The endoscope was able to be passed through the pylorus after the last session. Although the etiology of GOO in this infant is unclear (proposed mechanisms are herein discussed), endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation was a safe procedure for treating this young infant with non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and should be considered as an initial approach before pyloroplasty in such presentations. PMID:21191516

  4. Contractility of sphincter pharyngoplasty: Relevance to speech outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Bradley A; Rice, Gale; Muzaffar, Arshad R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sphincter pharyngoplasty has demonstrated time-tested results as a surgical treatment for velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI). However, controversy surrounding the contractility of the transposed muscles persists. Completely unaddressed in the literature is whether the dynamism of the sphincter affects speech outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether active sphincter contraction following sphincter pharyngoplasty influences velopharyngeal closure, nasal emission and hypernasality. METHODS: A prospective analysis of patients with VPI after cleft palate repair undergoing sphincter pharyngoplasty by a single surgeon was performed. Video nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at three and 12 months. Eighteen consecutive patients with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and VPI were reviewed. The average age of the patients at initial evaluation was 7.3 years, with a range of three to 19 years. Dynamicity of sphincter pharyngoplasty, velar closing ratio (VCR), and lateral wall movement (LWM) were assessed by nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Nasal emission and hypernasality were assessed by perceptual speech examination. RESULTS: For longitudinal comparison, three groups were created: dynamic at three and 12 months (n=12); adynamic at three months and dynamic at 12 months (n=4); and adynamic at three and 12 months (n=2). Perceived hypernasality scores significantly improved at three months (P=0.0001) and showed continued improvement at 12 months (P=0.03), despite no change in VCR and LWM from three to 12 months. There were no significant differences among the three groups at any time point. DISCUSSION: Sphincter pharyngoplasty effectively treats VPI in appropriately selected patients. Although the VCR and LWM remained stable between three months and one year, four of six adynamic sphincters became dynamic. Considering all patients, hypernasality showed continued improvement from three months to one year

  5. Velopharyngeal sphincter physiology in deaf individuals.

    PubMed

    Ysunza, A; Vazquez, M C

    1993-03-01

    Fifty-three deaf subjects with a history of prelingual profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, similar language habilitation with hearing aids, and normal velopharyngeal structures underwent a study protocol including speech evaluation, behavioral pure-tone audiometry, videonasopharyngoscopy, multiview videofluoroscopy, and electromyography of the velopharyngeal muscles. Subjects were divided into two groups: the first group included 13 subjects with normal nasal resonance or mild hypernasality (four normals and nine with mild hypernasality); the second group had subjects with severe hypernasality and severe articulation deficits. Pure-tone thresholds, velopharyngeal closure patterns, and electromyographic activity of velopharyngeal muscles were similar for both groups of subjects. However, in subjects with severe hypernasality, despite normal muscle activity as observed by electromyography, velopharyngeal valving activity lacked rhythm and strength during speech. It is concluded that deaf subjects may present a functional disorder of the velopharyngeal sphincter related to absence of auditory regulation during phonation. Visual biofeedback using videonasopharyngoscopy may be useful for treating this disorder.

  6. Pyloric ceca of fish: a new absorptive organ

    SciTech Connect

    Buddington, R.K.; Diamond J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The functions of the blind appendages attached to the proximal intestine of many fish, the pyloric ceca, have been disputed. Hence the authors recorded morphological parameters and nutrient uptake rates in the ceca and intestine of four fish species (rainbow trout, cod, largemouth bass, and striped bass) with various degrees of cecal development. Proline and glucose uptake, measured in vitro, is similar in the ceca and proximal intestine. For these two solutes in these four species, and for 10 other solutes (9 amino acids and 1 dipeptide) in trout, the ceca contribute about the same percentage to uptake as to total gut area. Trout ceca and intestine have similar membrane-bound disaccharidase activity. Separate experiments with trout fed either graded glass beads or a radiopaque marker and then X-rayed show that the ceca fill and empty with particles <150 ..mu..m and over the same time course as the proximal intestine. Thus ceca are an adaptation for increasing intestinal surface area without increasing the length or thickness of the intestine itself. Fish ceca are entirely different from the distally located ceca of birds and mammals, which have fermentation functions.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Subthreshold Resonant Properties in Pyloric Dilator Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (ICa) and calcium-dependent potassium (IKCa) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih) and ICa (in association with IKCa) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that Ih and IKCa affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, ICa only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons. PMID:25960999

  8. Mathematical modeling of subthreshold resonant properties in pyloric dilator neurons.

    PubMed

    Vazifehkhah Ghaffari, Babak; Kouhnavard, Mojgan; Aihara, Takeshi; Kitajima, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Various types of neurons exhibit subthreshold resonance oscillation (preferred frequency response) to fluctuating sinusoidal input currents. This phenomenon is well known to influence the synaptic plasticity and frequency of neural network oscillation. This study evaluates the resonant properties of pacemaker pyloric dilator (PD) neurons in the central pattern generator network through mathematical modeling. From the pharmacological point of view, calcium currents cannot be blocked in PD neurons without removing the calcium-dependent potassium current. Thus, the effects of calcium (I(Ca)) and calcium-dependent potassium (I(KCa)) currents on resonant properties remain unclear. By taking advantage of Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of neuron and its equivalent RLC circuit, we examine the effects of changing resting membrane potential and those ionic currents on the resonance. Results show that changing the resting membrane potential influences the amplitude and frequency of resonance so that the strength of resonance (Q-value) increases by both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential. Moreover, hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)) and I(Ca) (in association with I(KCa)) are dominant factors on resonant properties at hyperpolarized and depolarized potentials, respectively. Through mathematical analysis, results indicate that I h and I(KCa) affect the resonant properties of PD neurons. However, I(Ca) only has an amplifying effect on the resonance amplitude of these neurons.

  9. Sphincter-saving procedures for distal carcinoma of the rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, T J; Bland, K I

    1989-01-01

    Methods of sphincter preservation were developed more than a century ago. Combining these techniques with adequate anterior resection has permitted the resurrection of sphincter-saving procedures that are currently being applied in the therapy of cancer at every level of the rectum. Although Miles' abdominoperineal resection still remains the "gold standard" for the treatment of low rectal neoplasms, restorative resection may now be possible with equivalent oncologic disease control and survival. Further, current trends also suggest that the abdominoperineal resection is being used less frequently in the treatment of most rectal cancers and is being replaced with sphincter-preserving techniques that afford excellent functional results. In this review, the pertinent anorectal anatomy, current issues, and sphincter-saving surgical techniques presently available for the treatment of distal cancers of the rectum are presented. PMID:2642688

  10. A rhythmic modulatory gating system in the stomatogastric nervous system of Homarus gammarus. III. Rhythmic control of the pyloric CPG.

    PubMed

    Cardi, P; Nagy, F

    1994-06-01

    1. Two modulatory neurons, P and commissural pyloric (CP), known to be involved in the long-term maintenance of pyloric central pattern generator operation in the rock lobster Homarus gammarus, are members of the commissural pyloric oscillator (CPO), a higher-order oscillator influencing the pyloric network. 2. The CP neuron was endogenously oscillating in approximately 30% of the preparations in which its cell body was impaled. Rhythmic inhibitory feedback from the pyloric pacemaker anterior burster (AB) neuron stabilized the CP neuron's endogenous rhythm. 3. The organization of the CPO is described. Follower commissural neurons, the F cells, and the CP neuron receive a common excitatory postsynaptic potential from another commissural neuron, the large exciter (LE). When in oscillatory state, CP in turn excites the LE neuron. This positive feedback may maintain long episodes of CP oscillations. 4. The pyloric pacemaker neurons follow the CPO rhythm with variable coordination modes (i.e., 1:1, 1:2) and switch among these modes when their membrane potential is modified. The CPO inputs strongly constrain the pyloric period, which as a result may adopt only a few discrete values. This effect is based on mechanisms of entrainment between the CPO and the pyloric oscillator. 5. Pyloric constrictor neurons show differential sensitivity from the pyloric pacemaker neurons with respect to the CPO inputs. Consequently, their bursting period can be a shorter harmonic of the bursting period of the pyloric pacemakers neurons. 6. The CPO neurons seem to be the first example of modulatory gating neurons that also give timing cues to a rhythmic pattern generating network.

  11. Artificial urinary sphincter for post-prostatectomy incontinence: a review.

    PubMed

    James, Mary H; McCammon, Kurt A

    2014-06-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for treatment of post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. The AMS 800 (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA) is the most commonly implanted artificial urinary sphincter. Having been on the market for almost 40 years, there is an abundance of literature regarding its use, but no recent review has been published. We reviewed the current literature regarding the indications, surgical principles, outcomes and complications of artificial urinary sphincter implantation for stress urinary incontinence after prostatectomy. A PubMed search was carried out for articles on the artificial urinary sphincter from 1995 to present. The review was centered on articles related to the use of the AMS 800 for stress urinary incontinence in males after prostatectomy. Relevant articles were reviewed. The majority of patients will achieve social continence (1 pad per day) after artificial urinary sphincter implantation; however, rates of total continence (no pad usage) are significantly lower. Patient satisfaction outcomes average greater than 80% in most series. Potential complications requiring reoperation include infection (0.5-10.6%) and urethral erosion (2.9-12%). Revision surgeries are most commonly as a result of urethral atrophy, which ranges from 1.6 to 11.4%. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from reoperation ranges from 50 to 79%, while the 10-year Kaplan-Meier freedom from mechanical failure is 64%. The artificial urinary sphincter is a reliable device with good outcomes. As expected with any prosthetic device, complications including mechanical failure, infection, erosion and recurrent incontinence remain significant concerns. Despite known complications, the patient satisfaction rates after artificial urinary sphincter implantation remain high. Appropriate patient counseling and adherence to surgical principles are imperative.

  12. Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in Postoperative Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    R A A, Hassan; Y U, Choo; R, Noraida; I, Rosida

    2015-01-01

    Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis during postoperative period in EA with TEF is rare. Postoperative vomiting or feeding intolerance in EA is more common which is due to esophageal stricture, gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal dysmotility. A typical case of IHPS also presents with non-bilious projectile vomiting at around 3-4 weeks of life. The diagnosis of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in this subset is usually delayed because of its rarity. We report a case of IHPS in postoperative EA and emphasize on high index of suspicion to avoid any delay in diagnosis with its metabolic consequences.

  13. Vagal control of lower oesophageal sphincter motility in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J.; Niel, J. P.; Roman, C.

    1977-01-01

    1. The effects of vagal efferent fibre stimulation on the smooth muscle of the lower oesophageal sphincter have been studied on the anaesthetized animal and on the isolated and perfused organ. 2. In both muscle layers (longitudinal and circular) vagal stimulation elicits two types of electromyographic (e.m.g.) potentials: (a) excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) where there is a depolarization of the smooth muscle fibres. E.j.p.s can give rise to spike potentials inducing a contraction of the sphincter; (b) inhibitory junction potentials (i.j.p.s) where there is hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle fibres, often followed by a transient depolarization which may initiate spikes (post-inhibitory rebound). 3. Pure i.j.p.s are observed after atropine treatment which suppresses e.j.p.s. Under these conditions, a long lasting vagal stimulation induces a long duration hyperpolarization concomitant with an opening of the lower oesophageal sphincter followed after the cessation of stimulation by a powerful rebound leading to a strong contraction which closes the sphincter. 4. Several arguments, pharmacological (action of acetylcholine (ACh), atropine and hexamethonium) and physiological (threshold and latency of responses) lead to the following conclusions. Preganglionic vagal fibres are cholinergic and they activate (a) intramural excitatory cholinergic neurones; (b) intramural non-adrenergic inhibitory neurones (purinergic neurones). Preganglionic fibres leading to inhibition have a higher threshold than those leading to excitation. Both excitatory and inhibitory pathways are interconnected inside the intramural network. In particular, activation of intramural inhibitory neurones, by relaxing the oesophagus orally to the lower oesophageal sphincter, inhibits intramural excitatory neurones and subsequently blocks vagal excitatory responses. 5. Two functions may be attributed to the vagal extrinsic innervation: (a) closure of the lower oesophageal sphincter by

  14. Control of belching by the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wyman, J B; Dent, J; Heddle, R; Dodds, W J; Toouli, J; Downton, J

    1990-06-01

    The mechanism that controls venting of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus was studied manometrically in 14 healthy subjects. The stomach was distended abruptly with one litre of carbon dioxide. Gas reflux was characterised by an abrupt increase in basal oesophageal body pressure to intragastric pressure. Reflux of gas from the stomach into the oesophagus occurred during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations that generally had a pattern distinctly different from swallow-induced lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation. Thus, at the onset of an episode of gas reflux lower oesophageal sphincter pressure had relaxed to 3 mmHg, or less, in 96% of instances. After gas loading of the stomach the prevalence of gas reflux was significantly less when the subjects were supine (1.2/10 min) than when they were sitting (6.8/10 min) (p less than 0.001). The lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with most episodes of gas reflux had a distinctive pattern that resembled those of the lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations associated with acid gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  15. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  16. [Anatomy of the urethral sphincteric vesico-prostatic complex].

    PubMed

    Gadda, F; Carmignani, L; Favini, P; Acquati, P; Avogadro, A; Rocco, F

    2001-09-01

    As 27 different names have been proposed for the components of the urethral sphincter, it is difficult to build a clear anatomical model of it. Starting from a review of the literature and from some personal observations of surgical anatomy, our aim is to draw a vision as much organic as possible of the anatomy of the urethral sphincter. The components of the urethral sphincter are: the bladder neck (preprostatic sphincter), the smooth muscle urethral sphincter, the rhabdosphincter and levator ani muscle. Recently the rhabdosphincter has been proposed as a vertical structure that extends from the pelvic cavity (bladder base) to the perineal cavity. It can be round-shaped or omega-shaped. The anterior insertions are along the anterolateral aspect of the prostate (superiorly) and on the perineal fascia (inferiorly). The posterior insertions are on the Denonvilliers fascia and posterior aspect of the prostatic apex (superiorly) and on the central perineal tendon (inferiorly). The rhabdosphincter has strong means of fixations: anteriorly it is fixed to the pubis by the pubo-urethral ligaments, posteriorly it is supported by the medial fibrous raphe of the perineum. The anteromedial fibres of levator ani muscle are involved in the continence mechanism by their strong relation with the rhabdosphincter and the prostate.

  17. [The importance of x-ray cinematography of deglutition for indicating the need for myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter].

    PubMed

    Augustiny, N; Schmid, H; Brühlmann, W F

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients were examined one to four years after cricopharyngeal myotomy that had been carried out because of dysfunction of the pharyngo-esophageal sphincter. Twelve patients were examined radiologically. Eleven of the 14 patients were clinically improved or cured. In two patients who were not improved, the underlying condition was a polymyositis. The other patients suffered from an idiopathic dysfunction. Because of the small numbers involved, no detailed statistical analysis was carried out. Nevertheless, our results indicate that: Cricopharyngeus myotomy produces marked improvement or cure in patients with idiopathic dysfunction. Weak propulsive peristalsis of the pharyngeal constrictors is a prognostic factor indicating a poor clinical result of surgery. There is little chance of clinical improvement in patients with polymyositis.

  18. Anatomic dilatation of the cardia and competence of the lower esophageal sphincter: a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Korn, O; Csendes, A; Burdiles, P; Braghetto, I; Stein, H J

    2000-01-01

    Anatomic and clinical data suggest that the gastroesophageal junction or cardia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD) may be dilated. We hypothesized that anatomic dilatation of the cardia induces a lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction that may be corrected by narrowing the gastroesophageal junction (i.e., calibration of the cardia). We measured the perimeter of the cardia during surgery in control subjects and patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. We then tested our hypothesis in a mechanical model. The model was based on a pig gastroesophageal specimen with perpendicularly placed elastic bands around the cardia simulating the action of the "sling" and "clasp" fibers. "Dilatation" of the cardia was induced by displacing the sling band laterally and decreasing its tension. "Calibration" of the cardia was performed by reapproximation of the sling band toward the esophagus but maintaining the same tension as the dilated model. In the "basal," "dilated," and "calibrated" states, the perimeter of the cardia was noted and rapid mechanized pullback manometry with a water-perfused catheter was performed. The opening pressure was determined, and three-dimensional sphincter pressure images were analyzed. The average cardia perimeter was 6.3 cm in control subjects, 8.9 cm in GERD patients, and 13.8 cm in patients with Barrett's esophagus. The arrangement of the bands in the experimental model generated a manometric high-pressure zone similar to that in the human lower esophageal sphincter. Dilatation of the cardia resulted in a decrease in the resting pressure, length, and vector volume of the high -pressure zone, and reduced the opening pressure. Calibration restored the resting and opening pressure, and normalized the three-dimensional pressure image. In patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus, the cardia is dilated. Our model supports the hypothesis that lower esophageal sphincter function is compromised by anatomic dilatation of the cardia and

  19. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  20. [Surgical management of urinary and fecal incontinence in neurological sphincter disorders of children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lemelle, J L; Barthelme, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-01-01

    The management of urinary and fecal incontinence in children and adolescents with neurogenic disorders related to congenital or acquired conditions was frequently considered to be of secondary importance compared with orthopaedic complications. The improvement of artificial urinary sphincter and continent urinary diversion techniques allowed to establish for each case an individual plan considering overall, abilities and voiding dysfunction as well as renal complications. Antegrade colonic enema has greatly improved the quality of life of children with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Surgical management requires a large contribution by the patients and their closest relatives and complete information about goals, advantages and obligations of surgical management. Surgical principles for bladder augmentation, bladder neck reconstruction and continent urinary diversion are presented and discussed according to data in the recent literature and the author's clinical experience.

  1. Management of patients with biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder without sphincter of Oddi manometry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The paucity of controlled data for the treatment of most biliary sphincter of Oddi disorder (SOD) types and the incomplete response to therapy seen in clinical practice and several trials has generated controversy as to the best course of management of these patients. In this observational study we aimed to assess the outcome of patients with biliary SOD managed without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Methods Fifty-nine patients with biliary SOD (14% type I, 51% type II, 35% type III) were prospectively enrolled. All patients with a dilated common bile duct were offered endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy whereas all others were offered medical treatment alone. Patients were followed up for a median of 15 months and were assessed clinically for response to treatment. Results At follow-up 15.3% of patients reported complete symptom resolution, 59.3% improvement, 22% unchanged symptoms, and 3.4% deterioration. Fifty-one percent experienced symptom resolution/improvement on medical treatment only, 12% after sphincterotomy, and 10% after both medical treatment/sphincterotomy. Twenty percent experienced at least one recurrence of symptoms after initial response to medical and/or endoscopic treatment. Fifty ERCP procedures were performed in 24 patients with an 18% complication rate (16% post-ERCP pancreatitis). The majority of complications occurred in the first ERCP these patients had. Most complications were mild and treated conservatively. Age, gender, comorbidity, SOD type, dilated common bile duct, presence of intact gallbladder, or opiate use were not related to the effect of treatment at the end of follow-up (p > 0.05 for all). Conclusions Patients with biliary SOD may be managed with a combination of endoscopic sphincterotomy (performed in those with dilated common bile duct) and medical therapy without manometry. The results of this approach with regards to symptomatic relief and ERCP complication rate are comparable

  2. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  3. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS.

  4. A new technique for measuring lower oesophageal sphincter competence in patients.

    PubMed

    Byrne, P J; Stuart, R C; Lawlor, P; Walsh, T N; Hennessy, T P

    1993-09-01

    Oesophageal sphincter measurements were carried out on 80 patients using the stationary pull through technique; Normals (n = 21), Nutcracker (n = 12), Refluxers (n = 21), and Barrett's (n = 26). Sphincter pressure (LOSP), abdominal length of sphincter, and overall sphincter length were measured. The Sphincter Function Index (SFI) was calculated as the product of sphincter pressure and percentage sphincter length (AL) exposed to abdominal pressure. Patients also had routine endoscopy and 24 hour pHmetry. SFI values discriminated between all four groups. LOSP was significantly different for Barrett's (p < 0.01) and Nutcracker (p < 0.01) compared to normals. AL was significant for Refluxers (p < 0.001) and Barrett's (p < 0.001) compared to normals. SFI gives better discrimination than LOSP or AL alone and may be useful in evaluating the response to treatment.

  5. Neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2001-11-01

    Children with a neurological defect have a clear cause for their bladder dysfunction; however, in neurologically normal children the cause of their incontinence is usually unclear. When no anatomical abnormalities seem to be present a functional problem is generally the cause. This type of incontinence is referred to as 'functional incontinence'. The different forms of bladder and sphincter dysfunction will be discussed and treatment modalities described. As the treatment modalities in children with neuropathic bladders focus on medical and especially surgical options, special attention is paid to new developments in surgical treatment. For those with functional incontinence treatment options are more variable and the new developments are described.

  6. Parasitisation by Bathycreadium elongatum (Digenea, Opecoelidae) in pyloric caeca of Trachyrincus scabrus (Teleostei, Macrouridae).

    PubMed

    Constenla, M; Carrassón, M; Moyà, C M; Fernàndez-Chacón, A; Padrós, F; Repullés-Albelda, A; Montero, F E

    2011-10-06

    A novel process of transmural passive displacement of a digenean parasite was studied in the digestive tract of the roughsnout grenadier Trachyrincus scabrus, which is found in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. This mechanism seems to facilitate the elimination of a significant portion of intestinal parasites. The digenean parasite Bathycreadium elongatum was found in the intestine, mainly within pyloric caeca, in 74.4% of T. scabrus, with a mean abundance of 44 individuals per fish. Nodule-like lesions were also found in the mesentery of pyloric caeca of infected T. scabrus. Histological sections of the nodules revealed granulomatous inflammatory responses surrounding degraded digeneans. Partial nucleotide sequences of the 28S rRNA gene obtained from intracaecal B. elongatum and from the core of the nodules of the mesentery of pyloric caeca showed 100% mutual identity with an overlap of 971 bp. The greatest abundance of both intracaecal B. elongatum and nodules occurred in spring. During summer, and especially autumn, the abundance of intracaecal B. elongatum decreased. Prevalence and abundance of nodules increased in autumn. In winter intracaecal parasite abundance and prevalence began to increase, but decreased again in nodules. During spring and summer, parasites pass into the visceral cavity, hypothetically owing to the fragility of the wall of pyloric caeca in their apical zone, and become degraded through a granulomatous inflammatory response. This process seems to have a detrimental effect on the B. elongatum cycle since some of parasites are trapped and degrade in the connective tissue in which they are unable to complete their life cycle.

  7. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season.

  8. Slow Conductances Could Underlie Intrinsic Phase-Maintaining Properties of Isolated Lobster (Panulirus interruptus) Pyloric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Scott L.; Buchman, Einat; Weaver, Adam L.; Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    The rhythmic pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric system approximately maintains phase (that is, the burst durations and durations between the bursts of its neurons change proportionally) when network cycle period is altered by current injection into the network pacemaker (Hooper, 1997a,b). When isolated from the network and driven by rhythmic hyperpolarizing current pulses, the delay to firing after each pulse of at least one network neuron type (Pyloric, PY) varies in a phase-maintaining manner when cycle period is varied (Hooper, 1998). These variations require PY neurons to have intrinsic mechanisms that respond to changes in neuron activity on time scales at least as long as two seconds. Slowly activating and deactivating conductances could provide such a mechanism. We tested this possibility by building models containing various slow conductances. This work showed that such conductances could indeed support intrinsic phase-maintenance and we show here results for one such conductance, a slow potassium conductance. These conductances supported phase maintenance because their mean activation level changed, hence altering neuron post-inhibition firing delay, when the rhythmic input to the neuron changed. Switching the sign of the dependence of slow conductance activation and deactivation on membrane potential resulted in neuron delays switching to change in an anti-phase maintaining manner. These data suggest that slow conductances or similar slow processes such as changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could underlie phase maintenance in pyloric network neurons. PMID:19211890

  9. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H J; DeMeester, T R; Naspetti, R; Jamieson, J; Perry, R E

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the lower esophageal sphincter to reflux of gastric juice is determined by the integrated effects of radial pressures exerted over the entire length of the sphincter. This can be quantitated by three-dimensional computerized imaging of sphincter pressures obtained by a pullback of radially oriented pressure transducers and by calculating the volume of this image, in other words, the sphincter pressure vector volume. Validation studies showed that sphincter imaging based on a stepwise pullback of a catheter with four or eight radial side holes is superior to a rapid motorized pullback. Compared with 50 healthy volunteers, the total and abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume was lower in 150 patients with increased esophageal acid exposure (p less than 0.001) and decreased with increasing esophageal mucosal damage (p less than 0.01). Calculation of the sphincter pressure vector volume was superior to standard techniques in identifying a mechanically defective sphincter as the cause of increased esophageal acid exposure, particularly in patients without mucosal damage. The Nissen and Belsey fundoplication increased the total and intra-abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume (p less than 0.001) and normalized the three-dimensional sphincter image. Failure to do so was associated with recurrent or persistent reflux. These data indicate that three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter improves the identification of patients who would benefit from an antireflux procedure. Analysis of the three-dimensional sphincter pressure profile should become the standard for evaluation of the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:1953093

  11. The interaction of glucagon and pentagastrin on the lower oesophageal sphincter in man and dog

    PubMed Central

    Jennewein, H. M.; Waldeck, F.; Siewert, R.; Weiser, F.; Thimm, R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of glucagon on the pressure inside the lower oesophageal sphincter in conscious human subjects and anaesthetized dogs was investigated using the continuous withdrawal method. Glucagon causes a decrease in sphincteric resting pressure in both man and dog and antagonizes the pentagastrin-induced pressure increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter. In experiments on isolated muscle strips of the lower oesophageal sphincter of dogs glucagon decreases the tension and antagonizes the increase in tension induced by pentagastrin. The elevated pressure in patients suffering from achalasia is significantly reduced by glucagon. PMID:4761605

  12. Obstetrical Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS): Prevention, Recognition, and Repair.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Pierce, Marianne; Alter, Jens-Erik W; Chou, Queena; Diamond, Phaedra; Epp, Annette; Geoffrion, Roxana; Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Larochelle, Annick; Maslow, Kenny; Neustaedter, Grace; Pascali, Dante; Pierce, Marianne; Schulz, Jane; Wilkie, David; Sultan, Abdul; Thakar, Ranee

    2015-12-01

    Objectif : Analyser les données probantes traitant des lésions obstétricales du sphincter anal (LOSA) en ce qui concerne leur diagnostic, les techniques visant leur réparation et les résultats de l’intervention. Formuler des recommandations permettant d’éclairer les conseils offerts aux patientes ayant connu des LOSA en ce qui a trait à la voie d’accouchement à privilégier dans le cadre des grossesses subséquentes. Options : Les fournisseurs de soins obstétricaux qui comptent des patientes ayant connu des LOSA disposent de l’option de réparer le sphincter anal en faisant appel à la méthode de suture « bout à bout » (end-to-end) ou à la méthode « en paletot » (overlapping). Ils pourraient également être appelés à conseiller des femmes ayant déjà connu des LOSA en ce qui a trait à la voie d’accouchement à privilégier pour les grossesses subséquentes. Issues : Le critère d’évaluation était la continence anale à la suite d’une réparation primaire de LOSA et à la suite d’un accouchement subséquent. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE et The Cochrane Library en mai 2011 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. anal canal, obstetrics, obstetric labour complication, pregnancy complication, treatment outcome, surgery, quality of life) et de mots clés (p. ex. obstetrical anal sphincter injur*, anus sphincter, anus injury, delivery, obstetrical care, surgery, suturing method, overlap, end-to-end, feces incontinence) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2014. La littérature grise (non

  13. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  14. Clinical significance of pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sisir Kumar

    2009-04-01

    Despite so much contributions reported in the literature, the aetiology of the duodenal ulcer remains an enigmatic subject to the medical profession. Findings of Helicobacter pylori seem to have overshadowed the real issue, in that, how a small area of the duodenal mucosa could be inflicted with the acid-pepsin injury has not been questioned? One hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients, presented with epigastric pain were included in the endoscopic study. The aim of the study was to find out the prevalence and its clinical importance on the sizes of the pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease. Demographic data on the sizes of the pyloric aperture were divided into two groups, in that, those up to 3 mm in diameter were included in one and those over the size of 3 mm in another. Among the 168 cases, the gastric ulcer was found in 12 and duodenal ulcer in 27 patients. The sex ratio of men to women was 1.4:1 found in the former and 8:1 in the latter. Among other findings, a knuckle of duodenal mucoa was noticed prolapsing through the large pyloric aperture. It could be postulated that a knuckle of the mucosa that keeps peeping through the pylorus acts as a mucosal plug in empty stomach, like a cork in the acid bottle. The main physiological function is to protect the mucosa from being damaged by the acid-pepsin injury or by the reflux of bile, but the tip of the plug seems to be subjected to such injury. Furthermore, the surface epithelial cells could also be subjected to ischaemic change while prolapsing through the pylorus. This may lead to reduced production of the mucosal gel and bicarbonate secretion, thus exposing the damaged mucosa to acid bath. This supports the concept, how a small area of the stomach or duodenum could be inflicted with ulceration.

  15. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI.

  16. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  17. Molecular cytogenetic characterisation of partial trisomy 9q in a case with pyloric stenosis and a review

    PubMed Central

    Heller, A.; Seidel, J; Hubler, A; Starke, H; Beensen, V; Senger, G; Rocchi, M; Wirth, J; Chudoba, I; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2000-01-01

    Partial trisomy 9q represents a rare and heterogeneous group of chromosomal aberrations characterised by various clinical features including pyloric stenosis. Here, we describe the case of a 1 year old female patient with different dysmorphic features including pyloric stenosis and prenatally detected partial trisomy 9q. This partial trisomy 9q has been analysed in detail to determine the size of the duplication and to characterise the chromosomal breakpoints. According to the data gained by different molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with whole and partial chromosome painting probes, yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) probes, and comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), the derivative chromosome 9 can be described as dup(9)(pter→q22.1::q31.1→q22.1::q31.1→ q22.1::q31.1→qter). Four breakpoint spanning YACs have been identified (y806f02, y906g6, y945f5, and y747b3) for the proximal breakpoint. According to this new case and previously published data, the recently postulated putative critical region for pyloric stenosis can be narrowed down to the subbands 9q22.1-q31.1 and is the result of either partial trisomy of gene(s) located in this region or a gene disrupted in 9q31.


Keywords: partial trisomy 9q; pyloric stenosis; FISH; CGH PMID:10882757

  18. Pyloric stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and mouth, less tearing when crying, and dry diapers Swollen belly Olive-shaped mass when feeling the upper belly, which is the abnormal pylorus Ultrasound of the abdomen may be the first imaging test. Other tests that may be done include: Barium ...

  19. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Inhibited sexual excitement; Sex - orgasmic dysfunction; Anorgasmia; Sexual dysfunction - orgasmic; Sexual problem - orgasmic ... of knowledge about sexual function Negative feelings about sex (often learned in childhood or teen years) Shyness ...

  20. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  1. Treatment of gastrointestinal sphincters spasms with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-05-29

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Incontinence, bladder neck mobility, and sphincter ruptures in primiparous women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the function of the pelvic floor in primiparae before and during pregnancy with the status post partum concerning symptoms of incontinence, sphincter ruptures, bladder-neck mobility and the influence of the different modes of deliveries. Methods Questionnaire evaluating symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence in nulliparous women before and after delivery and correlating these symptoms with functional changes of the pelvic floor based on a careful gynaecologic examination as well as perineal and endoanal ultrasound. Results 112 women were included in our study and came for the first visit, 99 women returned for follow-up 6 months after childbirth. Stress and flatus incontinence significantly increased from before pregnancy (3 and 12%) to after childbirth (21 and 28%) in women with spontaneous delivery or vacuum extraction. No new symptoms occurred after c-section. There was no significant difference between the bladder neck position before and after delivery. The mobility of the bladder neck was significantly higher after vaginal delivery using a vacuum extraction compared to spontaneous delivery or c-section. The bladder neck in women with post partum urinary stress incontinence was significantly more mobile than in continent controls. The endoanal ultrasound detected seven occult sphincter defects without any correlation to symptoms of anal incontinence. Conclusion Several statistically significant changes of the pelvic floor after delivery were demonstrated. Spontaneous vaginal delivery or vacuum extraction increases the risk for stress or anal incontinence, delivery with vacuum extraction leads to higher bladder neck mobility and stress incontinent women have more mobile bladder necks than continent women. PMID:20696633

  3. Urofacial syndrome: a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Tyritzis, S; Karakos, C; Skolarikos, A

    2011-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome (Ochoa syndrome) is considered to represent a subgroup of the non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction, characterized by non-neuropathic bladder-sphincter dysfunction, along with a characteristic inversion of the facial expression with laughing. Recent research suggests that it is probably a genetic inherited disease transmitted in an autosomal recessive fashion and might represent a distinct entity. We report a case of this syndrome in a 14-year-old boy who presented with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis, and bladder dilation.

  4. Temperature Sensitivity of the Pyloric Neuromuscular System and Its Modulation by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Jeffrey B.; Hobbs, Kevin H.; Burstein, Helaine J.; Seiter, Natasha S.; Hooper, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the effects of temperature on the p1 neuromuscular system of the stomatogastric system of the lobster (Panulirus interruptus). Muscle force generation, in response to both the spontaneously rhythmic in vitro pyloric network neural activity and direct, controlled motor nerve stimulation, dramatically decreased as temperature increased, sufficiently that stomach movements would very unlikely be maintained at warm temperatures. However, animals fed in warm tanks showed statistically identical food digestion to those in cold tanks. Applying dopamine, a circulating hormone in crustacea, increased muscle force production at all temperatures and abolished neuromuscular system temperature dependence. Modulation may thus exist not only to increase the diversity of produced behaviors, but also to maintain individual behaviors when environmental conditions (such as temperature) vary. PMID:23840789

  5. [Clinical and therapeutical considerations regarding a rare case of pre-pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sabetay, C; Zavate, A; Ciuca, M; Ciobanu, O; Malos, A

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal obstacle caused by a pre-pyloric diaphragm represent a rare cause of high oclusion in new-born. We present the case of a 6 days old new-born admitted in our department for nonbilious vomiting and feeding intolerance in which the clinical exam and the imagistic explorations (plain and contrast abdominal X-Rays, and ultrasound) could not reveal an evident cause for the oclusion. The surgical intervention imposed by the simptoms revealed the existece of a complete diaphragm in the prepyloric region. The initial excision of the diaphragm was not sufficient, the patient undergoing a second surgical intervention of gastrojejunal anastromosis with favorable evolution this time. The authors are presenting diagnosis and theraputical management peculiarities of this rare condition.

  6. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  7. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats

    PubMed Central

    LaPallo, Brandon K.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-01-01

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2–8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions. PMID:24990895

  8. Long-term recording of external urethral sphincter EMG activity in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats.

    PubMed

    LaPallo, Brandon K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang; Carp, Jonathan S

    2014-08-15

    The external urethral sphincter muscle (EUS) plays an important role in urinary function and often contributes to urinary dysfunction. EUS study would benefit from methodology for longitudinal recording of electromyographic activity (EMG) in unanesthetized animals, but this muscle is a poor substrate for chronic intramuscular electrodes, and thus the required methodology has not been available. We describe a method for long-term recording of EUS EMG by implantation of fine wires adjacent to the EUS that are secured to the pubic bone. Wires pass subcutaneously to a skull-mounted plug and connect to the recording apparatus by a flexible cable attached to a commutator. A force transducer-mounted cup under a metabolic cage collected urine, allowing recording of EUS EMG and voided urine weight without anesthesia or restraint. Implant durability permitted EUS EMG recording during repeated (up to 3 times weekly) 24-h sessions for more than 8 wk. EMG and voiding properties were stable over weeks 2-8. The degree of EUS phasic activity (bursting) during voiding was highly variable, with an average of 25% of voids not exhibiting bursting. Electrode implantation adjacent to the EUS yielded stable EMG recordings over extended periods and eliminated the confounding effects of anesthesia, physical restraint, and the potential for dislodgment of the chronically implanted intramuscular electrodes. These results show that micturition in unanesthetized, unrestrained rats is usually, but not always, associated with EUS bursting. This methodology is applicable to studying EUS behavior during progression of gradually evolving disease and injury models and in response to therapeutic interventions.

  9. The relationship of the sphincter of Oddi to the stomach, duodenum and gall-bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, A. P.

    1967-01-01

    Flow through the sphincter of Oddi was studied by a constant-pressure perfusion apparatus, and by using a constant rate of infusion and measuring pressure changes just proximal to the sphincter. Pressure changes from balloons placed in the gastric antrum and duodenum were recorded. Despite considerable variation in activity and behaviour, the following conclusions were reached. 1. The sphincter of Oddi appears to be partially autonomous but is readily affected by changes in duodenal tone. 2. Reflex inhibition of the sphincter of Oddi is seen on electrical and mechanical stimulation of the gall-bladder but not with passive pressure changes within the gall-bladder. 3. This reflex is relayed through the coeliac ganglion. 4. There is a definite relationship between gastric antral activity and flow through the sphincter of Oddi. This is more obvious when food is present in the stomach. 5. Mechanical or electrical stimulation of the stomach, duodenum, or upper small bowel influences the tone of the sphincter of Oddi. PMID:6065875

  10. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  11. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K N; Karakos, C D

    2010-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  12. Bowel dysfunction in young women with urinary retention.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, M C; Kamm, M A; Fowler, C J

    1993-01-01

    Urinary retention in young women is rare, but a syndrome has recently been described in which urinary retention is associated with abnormal periurethral electromyography. The incidence of bowel dysfunction in these women was investigated, in an attempt to determine whether this might be a more widespread disorder. Of 12 patients with this urological abnormality, eight were constipated. No consistent anorectal abnormality was identified on anorectal physiological testing. The electromyographic abnormality was not seen in the external anal sphincter. One patient had an abnormality of the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle, while another had a generalised disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder resembling a visceral myopathy. Bowel symptoms are common in this group of women with urinary retention, but abnormalities of bowel function are not specific. A common mechanism for bladder and bowel symptoms remains a possibility. PMID:8244109

  13. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer: advanced-stage undifferentiated adenocarcinoma located in the pyloric gland area.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akihiro; Kato, Shigeru; Ohana, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer (HpNGC) is extremely low. A 78-year old female without H. pylori infection was diagnosed with type 4 advanced-stage gastric prepylorus cancer. Distal gastrectomy was performed as for HpNGC (cT3N0M0). Histological findings of the resected specimen showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma, which were located in the pyloric gland area, diffusely invaded beyond the serosa without lymph node metastasis (pT4aN0M0). Most cases of undifferentiated-type HpNGC are diagnosed in the early stage and are located in the fundic gland area. We report the first case of advanced-stage undifferentiated HpNGC located in the pyloric gland area.

  14. Effects of sphincter of Oddi motility on the formation of cholesterol gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Zhong-Hou; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Ma, Bang-Zhen; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms and effects of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility on cholesterol gallbladder stone formation in guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, the control group (n = 10) and the cholesterol gallstone group (n = 24), which was sequentially divided into four subgroups with six guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice. The guinea pigs in the cholesterol gallstone group were fed a cholesterol lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity were obtained by a multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) expression levels in SO smooth muscle were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at each stage in the process of cholesterol gallstone formation. RESULTS: The gallstone formation rate was 0%, 0%, 16.7%, and 83.3% in the 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk groups, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity in the 9 wk group, the amplitude of myoelectric activity in the 9 and 12 wk groups, and the amplitude and the frequency of SO in the 9 wk group were all significantly decreased compared to the control group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased markedly in the 12 wk group, and the CCKAR expression levels increased in the 6 and 12 wk groups compared to the control group. Serum VIP was elevated significantly in the 9 and 12 wk groups and gastrin decreased significantly in the 3 and 9 wk groups. There was no difference in serum CCK-8 between the groups. CONCLUSION: A cholesterol gallstone-causing diet can induce SO dysfunction. The increasing tension of the SO along with its decreasing activity may play an important role in cholesterol gallstone formation. Expression changes of CCKAR in SO smooth muscle and serum

  15. Normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdong; Liu, Tieyan; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Jingyi; Chen, Yuefeng; Sun, Pengyu; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this research, the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males has been studied. Methods: The sagittal, coronal, and axial T2-weighted non-fat suppressed fast spin-echo images of pelvic cavities of 86 Chinese young males were studied. Result: Urethral sphincter complex threaded through the prostate and divided it into 2 parts: transition zone (TZ), periurethral glands internal to the urethral sphincter and peripheral zone (PZ), central zone (CZ), anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFS) zone external to the urethral sphincter. The length of urethral striated sphincter is 12.26-20.94 mm (mean 16.59 mm) at membranous urethra. Conclusions: In this paper, we summarized the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males with no urinary control problems. PMID:26629244

  16. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome.

  17. Function of upper esophageal sphincter during swallowing: the grabbing effect.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Kahrilas, P J

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated deglutitive axial force developed within the pharynx, upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and cervical esophagus. Position and deglutitive excursion of the UES were determined using combined manometry and videofluoroscopy in eight healthy volunteers. Deglutitive clearing force was quantified with a force transducer to which nylon balls of 6- or 8-mm diameter were tethered and positioned within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, UES, and cervical esophagus. Axial force recordings were synchronized with videofluoroscopic imaging. Clearing force was dependent on both sphere diameter (P < 0.05) and location, with greater force exhibited in the hypopharynx and UES compared with the oropharynx and esophagus (P < 0.05). Within the UES, the onset of traction force coincided with passage of the pharyngeal clearing wave but persisted well beyond this. On videofluoroscopy, the persistent force was associated with the aboral motion of the ball caught within the UES. Force abated with gradual slippage of the UES around the ball. The force attributable to the combination of UES contraction and laryngeal descent was named the grabbing effect. The grabbing effect functions to transfer luminal contents distal to the laryngeal inlet at the end of the pharyngeal swallow, presumably acting to prevent regurgitation and/or aspiration of swallowed material.

  18. The impact of androgen deprivation on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, George C.; Linder, Brian J.; Rivera, Marcelino E.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Rangel, Laureano J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) causes systemic tissue atrophy. It is unclear if this tissue atrophy adversely impacts artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) outcomes. We sought to evaluate the effect of ADT on adverse AUS outcomes. Methods We retrospectively identified 518 men undergoing primary AUS placement at our institution between 1998 and 2014. Rates of device explant for infection/erosion, mechanical failure, and urethral atrophy in men with >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement were compared to ADT naive men. Results Fifty of the patients (50/518, 9.7%) had >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement while 442 were ADT naive. Multivariable survival analysis of AUS events by competing risks failed to show any effect of ADT on device explantation for infection/erosion (HR 1.12, P=0.68), replacement for mechanical failure (HR 0.92, P=0.77), or urethral atrophy (HR 0.77, P=0.46). Conclusions This study did not show evidence supporting differences in adverse AUS outcomes between men with ADT use and ADT naive men. PMID:27785433

  19. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-05-01

    The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging.Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT-) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT- group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed.One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT- groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma.PCRT had no beneficial

  20. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT–) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT– group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed. One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT− groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma. PCRT had

  1. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  2. Role of bottle feeding in the etiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    McAteer, Jarod P; Ledbetter, Daniel J; Goldin, Adam B

    2013-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Bottle feeding has been implicated in the etiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS). Further data are needed to define the nature of this relationship and the clinical variables that influence it. OBJECTIVE To determine if bottle feeding after birth is associated with the development of HPS in infants. We hypothesized that bottle feeding is associated with an increased risk of HPS and that this risk is modified by other risk factors. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Population-based case-control study of births from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2009, using Washington State birth certificates linked to hospital discharge data. Cases included all singleton infants born within the study period and subsequently admitted with both a diagnostic code for HPS and a procedure code for pyloromyotomy (n = 714). Controls were randomly chosen among singleton infants who did not develop HPS and were frequency matched to cases by birth year. EXPOSURE Feeding status (breast vs bottle) was coded on the birth certificate as the type of feeding the infant was receiving at birth discharge. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Diagnosis of HPS. RESULTS Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis incidence decreased over time, from 14 per 10,000 births in 2003 to 9 per 10,000 in 2009. Simultaneously, breastfeeding prevalence increased from 80% in 2003 to 94% in 2009. Compared with controls, cases were more likely to be bottle feeding after birth (19.5% vs 9.1%). After adjustment, bottle feeding was associated with an increased risk of HPS (odds ratio [OR], 2.31; 95% CI, 1.81-2.95). This association did not differ according to sex or maternal smoking status but was significantly modified by maternal age (<20 years OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.51-1.88; ≥35 years OR, 6.07; 95% CI, 2.81-13.10) and parity (nulliparous OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.07-2.38; multiparous OR, 3.42; 95% CI, 2.23-5.24). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Bottle feeding is associated with an increased risk of HPS, and this effect seems to

  3. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  4. Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in the Maritimes: examining the waves of change over time

    PubMed Central

    Ednie, Alexander C.; Amram, Ofer; Creaser, Jenna Colleen; Schuurman, Nadine; Leclerc, Suzanne; Yanchar, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Background Changing patterns of referral and management of pediatric surgical conditions, including hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS), have recently been described and often relate to comfort with early nonoperative management, anesthesia and corrective surgery. Travelling distance required for treatment at pediatric centres can also be burdensome for families. We assessed referral patterns for HPS in the maritime provinces of Canada over 10 years to quantify the burden on families travelling for surgical care. Methods We reviewed the charts of all patients with HPS in the Maritimes. Length of hospital stay (LOS) and complication rates were analyzed in regards to resuscitation and management at a pediatric centre and/or peripheral centres. We used postal codes for each patient to track distance travelled for management. Results We assessed 751 cases of HPS. During the study period (Jan. 1, 2001–Dec. 31, 2010), referral to pediatric centres increased from 49% to 71%. Postoperative complications were 2.5-fold higher in peripheral centres. Infants referred to pediatric centres were 78% less likely to have an LOS longer than 3 days. Laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, which was performed only in pediatric centres, was associated with a shorter postoperative LOS. Conclusion Our study supports the current literature demonstrating improved outcomes, shorter overall LOS and decreased risk of complications when infants with HPS are treated in pediatric centres. This should be considered when planning access to pediatric surgical resources. PMID:27669400

  5. Genome-wide linkage analysis in families with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis indicates novel susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Anna; Söderhäll, Cilla; Persson, Sofia; Lundberg, Fredrik; Luthman, Holger; Chung, Eddie; Gardiner, Mark; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2012-02-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) is a common cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction during infancy. A multifactorial background of the disease is well established. Multiple susceptibility loci including the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) gene have previously been linked to IHPS, but contradictory results of linkage studies in different materials indicate genetic heterogeneity. To identify IHPS susceptibility loci, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis in 37 Swedish families. In regions where the Swedish material showed most evidence in favor of linkage, 31 additional British IHPS families were analyzed. Evidence in favor of significant linkage was observed in the Swedish material to two loci on chromosome 2q24 (non-parametric linkage (NPL) =3.77) and 7p21 (NPL=4.55). In addition, evidence of suggestive linkage was found to two loci on chromosome 6p21 (NPL=2.97) and 12q24 (NPL=2.63). Extending the material with British samples did not enhance the level of significance. Regions with linkage harbor interesting candidate genes, such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2 encoded by the glucagon gene GCG), NOS1, motilin (MLN) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). The coding exons for GLP-2, and NPY were screened for mutations with negative results. In conclusion, we could confirm suggestive linkage to the region harboring the NOS1 gene and detected additional novel susceptibility loci for IHPS.

  6. Mechanisms underlying burst generation of the pyloric muscle in the mantis shrimp, Squilla oratoria.

    PubMed

    Tazaki, K; Chiba, C

    1991-12-01

    The pyloric constrictor muscles of the stomach in Squilla can generate spikes by synaptic activation via the motor nerve from the stomatogastric ganglion. Spikes are followed by slow depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs) which lead to sustained depolarization during a burst of spikes. 1. The frequency of rhythmic bursts induced by continuous depolarization is membrane voltage-dependent. A brief depolarizing or hyperpolarizing pulse can trigger or terminate bursts, respectively, in a threshold-dependent manner. 2. The conductance increases during the DAP response. The amplitude of DAP decreases by imposed depolarization, whereas it increases by hyperpolarization. DAPs from successive spikes sum to produce a sustained depolarizing potential capable of firing a burst. 3. The spike and DAP are reduced in amplitude by decreasing [Ca]o, enhanced by Sr2+ or Ba2+ substituted for Ca2+, and blocked by Co2+ or Mn2+. DAPs are selectively blocked by Ni2+, and the spike is followed by a hyperpolarizing afterpotential. 4. The spike and DAP are prolonged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA. A hyperpolarizing afterpotential is abolished by EGTA and enhanced by increasing [Ca]o. The DAP is diminished in Na(+)-free saline and reduced by tetrodotoxin. 5. It is concluded that the muscle fiber is endowed with endogenous oscillatory properties and that the oscillatory membrane events result from changes of a voltage- and time-dependent conductance to Ca2+ and Na+ and a Ca2+ activated conductance to K+.

  7. Quantifying Lgr5-positive stem cell behaviour in the pyloric epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Leushacke, Marc; Barker, Nick; Pin, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Using in-vivo lineage tracing data we quantified clonal expansion as well as proliferation and differentiation of the Lgr5-positive stem cell population in pyloric gastric glands. Fitting clone expansion models, we estimated that there are five effective Lgr5-positive cells able to give rise to monoclonal glands by replacing each other following a pattern of neutral drift dynamics. This analysis is instrumental to assess stem cell performance; however, stem cell proliferation is not quantified by clone expansion analysis. We identified a suitable mathematical model to quantify proliferation and differentiation of the Lgr5-positive population. As expected for populations in steady-state, the proliferation rate of the Lgr5-positive population was equal to its rate of differentiation. This rate was significantly faster than the rate at which effective cells are replaced, estimated by modelling clone expansion/contraction. This suggests that the majority of Lgr5-positive cell divisions serve to renew epithelial cells and only few result in the effective replacement of a neighbour to effect expansion to the entire gland. The application of the model under altered situations with uncoupled differentiation and proliferation was demonstrated. This methodology represents a valuable tool for quantifying stem cell performance in homeostasis and importantly for deciphering altered stem cell behaviour in disease. PMID:26916214

  8. Gastrointestinal hormones and motility of the human sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Suzuki, H; Hada, R; Sasaki, M; Endoh, M

    1985-07-01

    We investigated the mechanism of humoral control of bile discharge into the duodenum. The actions of the GB, SO and duodenum were monitered by cinecholecystocholangiogrphy combined with manometry of the SO area using a hydraulic-capillary infusion system or MIKRO-TIP, and these were correlated with the plasma concentrations of GI hormones. We concluded that one of the most significant roles of the sphincter of Oddi is to limit bile flow. This postulation was favored by the observation of so-called 'spasm' of the SO where 8 to 10 contractions per min., in contrast to 'normal' contraction of 2 to 4 per min., were seen. On this special occasion, no discharge of the contrast material into the duodenum was noticed. Exogenous or endogenous CCK causes a coordinated action of the GB contraction, the SO relaxation and relaxation of the adjacent segment of the duodenum, resulting in an effective discharge of bile into the duodenum. The effect of Pancreozymin on bile discharge revealed by endoscopic cinematography was that Pancreozymin first made the orifice of the papilla of Vater widely open with a profuse bile flow and following this, caused a repeated shuttering action of the orifice with minimal discharge of bile. This observation opposes the opinion that active SO contractile activity is necessary to bile flow into the duodenum. Caerulein or CCK-33 caused no 'post-inhibition' enhancement of the SO activity that was seen in case of Pancreozymin administration. Motilin, calcium or other substances contained in Pancreozymin (Boots) might be causative for this enhancement.

  9. Incomplete Annular Pancreas with Ectopic Opening of the Pancreatic and Bile Ducts into the Pyloric Ring: First Report of a Rare Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Hoshino, Horoyuki; Segami, Kouhei; Koizumi, Satoshi; Ooike, Nobuyuki; Otsubo, Takehito

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had experienced epigastralgia and dorsal pain several times over the last 20 years. She was admitted for a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, and severe intra- and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation with inner air density was noted. No papilla of Vater was present in the descending duodenum, and 2 small holes were present in the pyloric ring. Bile excretion from one of the small holes was observed under forward-viewing endoscope. It was considered that the pancreatic and bile ducts separately opened into the pyloric ring. Based on these findings, malformation of the pancreaticobiliary duct was diagnosed. She did not wish treatment, but the obstruction associated with duodenal stenosis was noted after 2 years. Pancreatoduodenectomy was performed as curative treatment for duodenal stenosis and retrograde biliary infection through the bile duct opening in the pyloric ring. The ventral pancreas encompassed almost the entire circumference of the pyloric ring, suggesting a subtype of annular pancreas. Generally, lesions are present in the descending part of the duodenum in an annular pancreas, and the pancreatic and bile ducts join in the papillary region. However, in this patient, (1) the pancreas encompassed the pyloric ring, (2) the pancreatic and bile ducts opened separately, and (3) the openings of the pancreatic and bile ducts were present in the pyloric ring. The pancreas and biliary tract develop through a complex process, which may cause various types of malformation of the pancreaticobiliary system, but no similar case report was found on a literature search. This case was very rare and could not be classified in any type of congenital anomaly of the pancreas. We would classify it as a subtype of annular pancreas with separate ectopic opening of the pancreatic and bile ducts into the pyloric ring.

  10. Effects of ethanol on the sphincter of Oddi: an endoscopic manometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, G

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ethanol, given either intragastrically or intravenously, on the sphincter of Oddi was evaluated by endoscopic manometry. In 12 subjects intragastric ethanol (150 ml of 32%) was given over 10 minutes. In five control subjects saline solution (150 ml of 0.9%) was given intragastrically instead of ethanol. In five other subjects ethanol was infused intravenously (6 ml/kg of 10%) for 36 minutes. Ethanol given intragastrically produced a significant inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure. Peak pressure fell from a control value of 75.7 +/- 26.35 mmHg to 39 +/- 15.39 mmHg (p less than 0.001) at 35 minutes. Basal pressure fell from a control value of 30.17 +/- 19.47 mmHg to 11.83 +/- 6.35 mmHg (p less than 0.01) at 35 minutes. Wave height fell from a control value of 41.33 +/- 15.4 mmHg to 27.16 +/- 11.25 mmHg (p less than 0.02) at 35 minutes. No effects on sphincter of Oddi wave frequency were observed. No significant modifications of sphincter motor activity were observed after intragastric saline infusion. Ethanol given intravenously also produced an appreciable inhibitory effect on sphincter of Oddi pressure, without affecting its wave frequency. PMID:6848429

  11. Biochemical evaluation of an artificial anal sphincter made from shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Luo, Yun; Higa, Masaru; Zhang, Xiumin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Severe anal incontinence is a socially incapacitating disorder and a major unresolved clinical problem that has a considerable negative impact on quality of life. In this study, we developed a new artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) in order to improve the quality of life of such patients and evaluated the influence of this sphincter on blood serum chemistry in animal experiments. The artificial anal sphincter was driven by two Ti-Ni SMA actuators sandwiching the intestine and was implanted in three female goats. Blood was collected from the jugular vein on days 1 and 4; at weeks 1 and 2; and at months 1, 2, and 3, postoperatively. Biochemical parameters including total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, aspartate amino-transferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and C-reactive protein were examined. The time courses of total bilirubin and aspartate amino transferase of the three goats were within the baseline levels after 1 week of implantation and remained normal, demonstrating no liver function complications. The blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels remained within the normal range, indicating no renal function complications. The total protein and albumin fluctuated within the normal range throughout the duration of this study. In these goats, it was also found that the level of C-reactive protein did not increase and that there was no stricture of the intestine where the artificial sphincter was attached. Our findings indicate that the artificial sphincter SMA demonstrated no adverse influence on blood serum chemistry and exhibited an effective system performance.

  12. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery: The Interim Report of a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome.Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection.Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups.BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829).

  13. The Effect of Biofeedback Therapy on Anorectal Function After the Reversal of Temporary Stoma When Administered During the Temporary Stoma Period in Rectal Cancer Patients With Sphincter-Saving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Gun; Yoo, Ri Na; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effect of biofeedback therapy (BFT) on anorectal function after stoma closure when administered during the interval of temporary stoma after sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer. Impaired anorectal function is common after lower anterior resections, though no specific treatment options are currently available to prevent this adverse outcome. Fifty-six patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy after sphincter-preserving surgery with temporary stoma were randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (received BFT during the temporary stoma period) and group 2 (did not receive BFT). To evaluate anorectal function, anorectal manometry was performed in all patients and subjective symptoms were evaluated using the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. The present study is a report at 6 months after rectal resection. Forty-seven patients, including 21 in group 1 and 26 in group 2, were evaluated by anorectal manometry. Twelve patients (57.1%) in group 1 and 13 patients (50%) in group 2 were scored above 9 points of Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score, which is the reference value for fecal incontinence (P = 0.770). With time, there was a significant difference (P = 0.002) in the change of mean resting pressure according to time sequence between the BFT and control groups. BFT during the temporary stoma interval had no effect on preventing anorectal dysfunction after temporary stoma reversal at 6 months after rectal resection. However, BFT might be helpful for maintaining resting anal sphincter tone (NCT01661829). PMID:27149496

  14. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other heart problems take medications that contain nitrates to help the blood flow better to the ... erectile dysfunction can affect the way that the nitrates work—and cause blood pressure to drop to ...

  15. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yafi, Faysal A.; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M.; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J.; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man’s quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner’s sexual experience and the couple’s quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  16. Action of cholecystokinin and caerulein on the rabbit sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Sarles, J C; Bidart, J M; Devaux, M A; Echinard, C; Castagnini, A

    1976-01-01

    The action of cholecystokinin (CCK) and caerulein upon the rabbit sphincter of Oddi was investigated by electromyography, manometry and measuring of the flow. Intravenous injection of CCK resulted in a marked rise of the sphincter activity with a maximum at the 1st min and return to the basal level at the 10th min. Injection of increasing doses of hormone showed that the effect was proportional to the logarithm of the dose. The same results were obtained with caerulein. Parallely, CCK provoked a rise of the biliary pressure also proportional to the logarithm of the dose and a reduction to the biliary flow. The discrepancies between these results and some other experiments are discussed. It is concluded that, in the rabbit, CCK increases the activity of the sphincter of Oddi.

  17. Biomechanical modeling of the rectum for the design of a novel artificial anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Yan, Guozheng; Liu, Hua; Yang, Banghua; Zhao, Yujuan; Luo, Nianting

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses biomechanical issues that are related to the option of a novel artificial anal sphincter around the human rectum. The prosthesis consists of a compression cuff system inside and a reservoir cuff system outside, which is placed around the debilitated sphincter muscle. The micropump shifts fluid between the cuffs and thus takes over the expansion and compression function of the sphincter muscle. However, the human rectum is not a rigid pipe, and motion in it is further complicated by the fact that the bowel is susceptible to damage. With the goal of engineering a safe and reliable machine, the biomechanical properties of the in-vivo porcine rectum are studied and the tissue ischemia is analyzed.

  18. Role of internal anal sphincter damage in the causation of idiopathic faecal incontinence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Petros, Peter; Anderson, Jim

    2005-02-01

    This prospective study aimed to examine the relationship between internal anal sphincter (IAS) damage and 'idiopathic' faecal incontinence (FI) in 50 consecutive patients, using endoanal ultrasound examination. The external anal sphincter (EAS) was intact on direct and ultrasonic assessment in all patients. IAS damage was defined as complete rupture or attenuation, less than 2 mm thickness in some part of the sphincter. Complete rupture was found in one patient and damage in a further 17 (total 36%). All three nulliparous patients had normal IAS and EAS. IAS damage was only minimally associated with 'idiopathic' FI, suggesting IAS per se is unlikely to be a direct cause of FI in the 'idiopathic' group of FI patients. Its role might be analogous to the periurethral striated horse-shoe shape muscle in the urethra, which is thought to act as a mucosal sealant.

  19. Recognition and Management of Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2012-01-01

    Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction is not widely recognized. Unlike in pelvic floor disorders caused by relaxed muscles (eg, pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, both of which often are identified readily), women affected by nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction may present with a broad range of nonspecific symptoms. These may include pain and problems with defecation, urination, and sexual function, which require relaxation and coordination of pelvic floor muscles and urinary and anal sphincters. These symptoms may adversely affect quality of life. Focus on the global symptom complex, rather than the individual symptoms, may help the clinician identify the condition. The primary care provider is in a position to intervene early, efficiently, and effectively by (1) recognizing the range of symptoms that might suggest nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction, (2) educating patients, (3) performing selective tests when needed to confirm the diagnosis, and (4) providing early referral for physical therapy. PMID:22305030

  20. Motor function of the opossum sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed Central

    Toouli, J; Dodds, W J; Honda, R; Sarna, S; Hogan, W J; Komarowski, R A; Linehan, J H; Arndorfer, R C

    1983-01-01

    We studied the opossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) because in this species the SO is approximately 3 cm in length and its extraduodenal location permits recording of motor activity with negligible interference from duodenal motor activity. The SO segment of 120 animals was evaluated by one or more of the following: (a) intraluminal manometry; (b) electromyography; (c) common bile duct (CBD) flow monitored by a drop counter; (d) cineradiography of intraductal contrast medium; and (e) histologic examination. SO pull-throughs using an infused catheter of 0.6-mm o.d. invariably showed a high pressure zone (HPZ) of 18 +/- 3 SE mm Hg in the terminal 4-5 mm of the SO segment. This HPZ had a narrow lumen, 0.5-0.7 mm in diam, and prominent circular muscle. The HPZ in the terminal SO had both active and passive components. HPZ with minimal amplitude and a paucity of underlying smooth muscle were present inconstantly at the junction of the SO segment with the CBD and pancreatic duct, respectively. The dominant feature of the SO segment was rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originated in the proximal SO and propagated toward the duodenum. These contractions occurred spontaneously at a rate of 2-8/min, ranged up to 200 mm Hg in magnitude, had a duration of approximately 5 s and were not abolished by tetrodotoxin. Concurrent myoelectric and manometric recordings showed that each phasic contraction was immediately preceded by an electrical spike burst. Simultaneous recordings of cineradiography, CBD inflow of contrast medium, SO manometry, and SO electromyography indicated that rhythmic peristaltic contractions stripped contrast medium from the SO into the duodenum. During SO systole, CBD emptying was transiently interrupted, whereas SO filling occurred during the diastolic interval between SO peristaltic contractions. SO distention increased the frequency of SO peristalsis. We conclude that (a) the dominant feature of the opossum SO is rhythmic peristaltic contractions that

  1. Dietary phosphorus-responsive genes in the intestine, pyloric ceca, and kidney of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shozo H; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2004-09-01

    Identification of phosphorus (P)-responsive genes is important in diagnosing the adequacy of dietary P intake well before clinical symptoms arise. The mRNA abundance of selected genes was determined in the intestine, pyloric ceca, and kidney of rainbow trout fed low-P (LP) or sufficient-P (SP) diet for 2, 5, and 20 days. The LP-to-SP ratio (LP/SP) of mRNA abundance was used to evaluate the difference in gene expression between LP and SP fish, and to compare the response with bone and serum P, which are conventional indicators of P status. The LP/SP of intestinal, cecal, and renal type II sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) mRNA abundance changed from approximately 1-2 (day 2) to approximately 1.4-4 (day 5) and to approximately 2-10 (day 20). The LP/SP of renal NaPi-II, vitamin D 24-hydroxylase, and vitamin D receptor mRNA abundance correlated inversely with serum P on day 5 but not on day 2 and day 20. In another study, differentially expressed genes between LP and SP fish were examined by subtractive hybridization, confirmed by Northern blot, and evaluated by t-test and correlation with serum and bone P concentrations. About 30 genes were identified as dietary P responsive at day 20, including intestinal meprin and cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase, renal S100 calcium-binding protein and mitochondrial P(i) carrier, and cecal apolipoprotein E, somatomedin B-related protein, and NaPi-II. The LP/SP of mRNA abundance of renal mitochondrial P(i) carrier and intestinal cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase changed significantly by day 2, and intestinal meprin by day 5. Hence, these genes and NaPi-II are among the earliest steady-response genes capable of predicting P deficiency well before the onset of clinical deficiency.

  2. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan

    2008-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common problem affecting sexual function in men. Approximately one in 10 men over the age of 40 is affected by this condition and the incidence is age related. Erectile dysfunction is a sentinel marker for several reversible conditions including peripheral and coronary vascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Endothelial dysfunction is a common factor between the disease states. Concurrent conditions such as depression, late-onset hypogonadism, Peyronie's disease and lower urinary tract symptoms may significantly worsen erectile function, other sexual and relationship issues and penis dysmorphophobia. A focused physical examination and baseline laboratory investigations are mandatory. Management consists of initiating modifiable lifestyle changes, psychological and psychosexual/couples interventions and pharmacological and other interventions. In combination and with treatment of concurrent comorbid states, these interventions will often bring about successful resolution of symptoms and avoid the need for surgical interventions.

  3. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  4. The localization of two voltage-gated calcium channels in the pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    French, L B; Lanning, C C; Harris-Warrick, R M

    2002-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are critical to all aspects of nervous system function, with differing roles within the neuronal somata, at synaptic terminals, and at the neuromuscular junction. We have developed antibodies against two voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel genes from the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, which are homologous to the Drosophila Ca1A (a P/Q-type channel) and Ca1D (an L-type channel) genes. Using these antibodies, we have found that each channel shows unique patterns of localization within the stomatogastric nervous system. Both antibodies stain somata of most of the neurons in the pyloric network to varying degrees. The high degree of variability in staining intensity within individual pyloric cell classes supports the hypothesis of Golowasch et al. (1999a,b) that individual cells can vary in their composition of ionic currents and still have similar firing properties. Anti-Ca1A stains structures in the neuropil, some of which are terminals of axons descending from higher ganglia; however, the majority of these are neither neurites nor blood vessels, but may instead be glial cells or other support elements. Anti-Ca1A labeling was also prominent in the peripheral axons of pyloric motoneurons as they enter muscles, indicating that this channel may be involved in regulation of synaptic transmission onto the foregut muscles. Anti-Ca1D does not label neurites in the neuropil of the stomatogastric ganglion. It stains glial cells in the stomatogastric ganglion in the region of their nuclei, presumably from protein being produced in the perinuclear rough endoplasmic reticulum, en route to the glial cell periphery. While anti-Ca1D labeling is seen in a patchy distribution along peripheral pyloric axons, it was never seen near the muscle. We conclude that the localization of these two calcium channels is tightly controlled within the stomatogastric nervous system, but we cannot conclusively demonstrate that Ca1A and/or Ca1D channels play roles in

  5. Erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction may affect 30% to 50% of men aged 40 to 70 years, with age, smoking, and obesity being the main risk factors, although 20% of cases have psychological causes. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? What are the effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes, with cardiovascular disease, with spinal cord injury, and with prostate cancer or undergoing prostatectomy? What are the effects of drug treatments other than phosphodiesterase inhibitors in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? What are the effects of devices, psychological/behavioural treatments, and alternative treatments in men with erectile dysfunction of any cause? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 81 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: alprostadil (intracavernosal, intraurethral, topical), cognitive behavioural therapy, ginseng, papaverine, papaverine plus phentolamine (bimix), papaverine plus phentolamine plus alprostadil (trimix), penile prostheses, phosphodiesterase inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil, vardenafil), psychosexual counselling, vacuum devices, and yohimbine. PMID:21711956

  6. Dilated common duct sign. A potential indicator of a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    DeRidder, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1984-05-01

    The cholescintigraphic findings of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) in a 45-year-old woman with persistent right upper quadrant pain and biliary colic are reported. After an overnight fast, the patient was injected with 5 mCi of Tc-99 disofenin and .02 micrograms/kg of cholecystokinin (CCK) post maximal gallbladder filling. Pre and postcholescintiscans were obtained and gallbladder ejection fractions determined. The hepatobiliary scan was normal, except for a delay in biliary-bowel transit. The gallbladder responded normally to CCK, however, the Sphincter of Oddi responded abnormally, as there was a paradoxical response to CCK manifested by a marked dilatation of the common bile duct. It was postulate that this dilatation (the dilated common duct sign) was due to an inappropriate response of the smooth muscle of the Sphincter of Oddi (contraction vs relaxation) to CCK and was the cause of this patient's biliary colic. The dilated common duct sign should alert the physician to the possibility of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  7. Muscle-Derived Cells for Treatment of Iatrogenic Sphincter Damage and Urinary Incontinence in Men

    PubMed Central

    Gerullis, H.; Eimer, C.; Georgas, E.; Homburger, M.; El-Baz, A. G.; Wishahi, M.; Borós, M.; Ecke, T. H.; Otto, T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of injection of autologous muscle-derived cells into the urinary sphincter for treatment of postprostatectomy urinary incontinence in men and to characterize the injected cells prior to transplantation. Methods. 222 male patients with stress urinary incontinence and sphincter damage after uroloical procedures were treated with transurethral injection of autologous muscle-derived cells. The transplanted cells were investigated after cultivation and prior to application by immunocytochemistry using different markers of myogenic differentiation. Feasibility and functionality assessment was achieved with a follow-up of at least 12 months. Results. Follow-up was at least 12 months. Of the 222 treated patients, 120 responded to therapy of whom 26 patients (12%) were continent, and 94 patients (42%) showed improvement. In 102 (46%) patients, the therapy was ineffective. Clinical improvement was observed on average 4.7 months after transplantation and continued in all improved patients. The cells injected into the sphincter were at least ~50% of myogenic origin and representative for early stages of muscle cell differentiation. Conclusions. Transurethral injection of muscle-derived cells into the damaged urethral sphincter of male patients is a safe procedure. Transplanted cells represent different phases of myogenic differentiation. PMID:22919359

  8. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  9. Mechanisms underlying stabilization of temporally summated muscle contractions in the lobster (Panulirus) pyloric system.

    PubMed

    Morris, L G; Hooper, S L

    2001-01-01

    Muscles are the final effectors of behavior. The neural basis of behavior therefore cannot be completely understood without a description of the transfer function between neural output and muscle contraction. To this end, we have been studying muscle contraction in the well-investigated lobster pyloric system. We report here the mechanisms underlying stabilization of temporally summating contractions of the very slow dorsal dilator muscle in response to motor nerve stimulation with trains of rhythmic shock bursts at a physiological intraburst spike frequency (60 Hz), physiological cycle periods (0.5-2 s), and duty cycles from 0.1 to 0.8. For temporal summation to stabilize, the rise and relaxation amplitudes of the phasic contractions each burst induces must equalize as the rhythmic train continues. Stabilization could occur by changes in rise duration, rise slope, plateau duration, and/or relaxation slope. We demonstrate a generally applicable method for quantifying the relative contribution changes in these characteristics make to contraction stabilization. Our data show that all characteristics change as contractions stabilize, but their relative contribution differs depending on stimulation cycle period and duty cycle. The contribution of changes in rise duration did not depend on period or duty cycle for the 1-, 1.5-, and 2-s period regimes, contributing approximately 30% in all cases; but for the 0.5-s period regime, changes in rise duration increased from contributing 25% to contributing 50% as duty cycle increased from 0.1 to 0.8. At all cycle periods decreases in rise slope contributed little to stabilization at small duty cycles but increased to contributing approximately 80% at high duty cycles. The contribution of changes in plateau duration decreased in all cases as duty cycle increased; but this decrease was greater in long cycle period regimes. The contribution of changes in relaxation slope also decreased in all cases as duty cycle increased; but

  10. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  11. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  12. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  13. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  14. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  15. Effects of substance P on the isolated iris sphincter muscle of the albino rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, A; Mochizuki, M; Masuda, K

    1982-01-01

    Effects of substance P on the isolated iris sphincter muscle of the albino rabbit were studied. The muscle was incubated in an organ bath containing Krebs' physiologic solution and the muscle tension was recorded with an isometric transducer. Substance P induced dose-dependent muscle contraction in the concentration range from 3 x 10(-11) to 3 x 10(-7) M and ED50 was estimated to be 3.7 x 10(-9) M. The muscle contraction was not antagonized by tropicamide, phentolamine, propranolol, chlorpheniramine, cimetidine, methysergide or baclofen. Tetrodotoxin (3 x 10(-7) g/ml) pretreatment did not change the muscle contraction induced by substance P. A retrobulbar capsaicin injection did not cause supersensitivity in the muscle response to substance P. These results indicate that the iris sphincter muscle contraction caused by substance P is not mediated by cholinergic-, adrenergic-, histamine- or serotonine-recepters and suggests that its action on the muscle is direct.

  16. Determining the shape of the turns-amplitude cloud during anal sphincter quantitative EMG.

    PubMed

    Gregory, W Thomas; Clark, Amanda L; Simmons, Kimberly; Lou, Jau-Shin

    2008-07-01

    We aimed to compare our normative data for quantitative interference pattern (IP) analysis of the anal sphincter to previously published data. In 28 nulliparous women, we performed IP analysis during quantitative concentric needle electromyography (QEMG) of the anal sphincter. At each sampling site, a 500-ms epoch was analyzed. The data were log transformed. Linear regression lines (with 95% confidence intervals) were calculated from the log transformed variables "turns-second" and "amplitude-turn." These confidence intervals were then transformed back into the original parameters to yield scatterplots with confidence curves. The mean turns-second were 203 (SD 174). The mean amplitude (mcv)-turn was 266 (SD 87). The regression coefficients for the log-transformed variables are constant = 1.5, slope = 0.3, and resultant cloud of raw data has a convex upper boundary. These appear slightly different than previously published reports, potentially influencing the determination of normal and abnormal studies.

  17. Antisecretory, antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects of montelukast on pyloric ligation and water immersion stress induced peptic ulcer in rat.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Arunachalam; Sood, Shailja

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, we tried to explore the mechanism of montelukast as an antiulcerogenic agent in pyloric ligation (PL) and water immersion stress (WIS) induced peptic ulcer. The ameliorative effects of montelukast (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) on gastric volume and total acidity were studied in PL model. We have investigated the alteration in the ulcerative index, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, reduced glutathione, activity of myeloperoxidase, and total calcium level in both models. Estimation of DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis was also performed. Medium and higher doses of montelukast showed significant (p<0.05) ameliorative potential on all the above parameters as compared with omeprazole treated group. DNA fragmentation pattern clearly indicated the antiapoptotic effect of montelukast in preventing mucosal erosion in both models. Hence, the gastroprotective effect of montelukast may be attributed to its antisecretory, antioxidative along with its antiapoptotic effect.

  18. The effects of restraint on uptake of radioactive sulfate in the salivary and gastric secretions of rats with pyloric ligation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chayvialle, J. A.; Lambert, R.; Ruet, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of restraint on the amount of nondialysable radioactive sulfate in the gastric wall and the gastric juice and saliva were investigated. It was found that restraint provokes a significant decrease in salivary radioactive sulfate. This, in turn, is responsible for the decrease of sulfate in the gastric contents observed under these conditions in rats with pyloric ligation. Esophageal ligation associated with this prevents passage of saliva and lowers the amount of radioactive sulfate in the gastric juice. Restraint causes then an increase in the amount of sulfate in the gastric juice, the value observed being very much lower than that of rats with a free esophagus. At the level of the gastric wall, the change observed during restraint does not reach a significant threshold.

  19. Novel artificial anal sphincter system based on transcutaneous energy transmission system tested in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbing; Liu, Hua; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel artificial anal sphincter system (AASS) for severe fecal incontinence. The AASS is composed of an artificial anal sphincter (AAS), an external transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS), and an external control device. The AAS is composed of a cuff, a micropump, a reservoir, and a remote control device. It is designed to be implanted into the body of the patient. The function of the AAS is to open and close the patient's natural anus. Patients suffering from loss of their natural sphincter lose rectal sensation and are thus unable to perceive imminent fecal incontinence. In order to restore rectal sensation, a pressure sensor in the AAS cuff is designed to detect pressure in the colon. The pressure reflects the present quantity of colon contents, allowing patients to control the AAS to open or close the anus according to the pressure. The TETS is designed to provide electrical energy to the implanted AAS without wire connections. The external control device is designed to receive the pressure information from the AAS and send the patient's command to the implanted device. This paper provides a thorough discussion of the design of the novel AASS and describes the performance of the AASS when tested in vivo on two Beagle dogs who were chosen to be the subjects for receiving the implant. The experimental results verified that the performance of the AASS met the functional requirements it was designed for; however, the trial also revealed some challenges to be further studied.

  20. [Factors influencing physiologic pressure variations of the lower esophageal sphincter in healthy probands].

    PubMed

    Bilic, A; Vuckovic, B; Pilas, V; Bakula, B; Hrgovic, Z; Kesselman-Evans, Z; Radosevic, J

    1990-01-01

    Manometric characteristics of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in 59 healthy persons have been investigated. The aim of the investigation was to find out possible physiological changes of LES pressures considering posture, part of the day, maximal inspiration and expiration, empty or partially full stomach and abdominal compression. It has been proved that the minimal value of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in all the investigated patients was 1.77 kPA (13.3 mm Hg) while the maximal one was 4.53 kPa (34.0 mm Hg). The absolute difference between the lowest and the highest measured lower esophageal sphincter pressure was 1.43 kPa (10.77 mm Hg). The mean value of all pressures was 2.99 kPa (22.4 mm Hg). It seems that the posture during pressure measuring is irrelevant. The pressure does not vary more significantly considering neither the time of the day nor any exertion of the examinee.

  1. Sphincter-saving surgeries for rectal cancer: A single center study from Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shabeer Ahmed; Chowdri, Nisar A.; Parray, Fazl Q.; Mir, Parvez Ahmed; Bashir, Yasir; Nafae, Muntakhab

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Background Data: The goals in the treatment of rectal cancer are cure, local control, and preservation of sphincter, bladder and sexual function. Surgical resection using sharp mesorectal dissection is important for achieving these goals. Objectives: The current treatment of choice for carcinoma rectum is sphincter saving procedures, which have practically replaced the previously done abdominoperineal resection. We performed a study in our institute to evaluate the surgical outcome and complications of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: This prospectivestudy included 117 patients, treated for primary rectal cancer by low anterior resection (LAR) from May 2007 to December 2010. All patients underwent standard total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by restoration of continuity. Results: The peri-operative mortality rate was 2.5% (3/117). Post-operative complications occurred in 32% of the patients. After a median follow up of 42 months, local recurrences developed in 6 (5%) patients and distant metastasis in 5 (4.2%). The survival rate was 93%. Conclusion: The concept of total mesorectal excision (TME), advances in stapling technology and neoadjuvant therapy have made it possible to preserve the anal sphincter in most of the patients. Rectal cancer needs to be managed especially in a specialized unit for better results. PMID:24455643

  2. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  3. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications. PMID:27606143

  4. Correlation of Vocal Intensity with Velopharyngeal Closing Mechanism in Individuals with and without Complaint of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Karina; Costa, Sady Selaimen de; Collares, Marcus Vinícius Martins; Dornelles, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Velopharyngeal sphincter is a portion of the muscle of the palatopharyngeal arch that is capable of separating the oral cavity from the nasal cavity. It has not been determined yet whether voice intensity has an influence on this capacity. Velopharyngeal sphincter closure is accomplished by elevating and retracting the soft palate at the same time as the nasopharyngeal walls are constricted. Objective This study aims to correlate voice intensity with velopharyngeal sphincter closure in individuals without velopharyngeal dysfunction and patients with cleft lip and palate. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, comparative, and contemporary study. The sample consisted of 16 individuals in the control group and 16 individuals in the study group. Patients underwent instrumental assessment, which we subsequently analyzed using a computer program, and a brief medical history review. The mean age of the control group was 27.6 years, whereas the mean age of the case group was 15.6 years. Results Cases showed higher voice intensity in regular and weak fricative sentences when compared with controls. There was no agreement on the analysis of the instrumental assessment between the assessors and the computer program. Regardless of voice intensity, the computer program demonstrated a similar closure pattern. Conclusion The computer program showed similar closure pattern for the three levels of intensity. There was no agreement between the three assessors and the closure pattern determined by the computer program. There was no statistically significant correlation between voice intensity and degree of velopharyngeal sphincter closure.

  5. Correlation of Vocal Intensity with Velopharyngeal Closing Mechanism in Individuals with and without Complaint of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Karina; Costa, Sady Selaimen de; Collares, Marcus Vinícius Martins; Dornelles, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Velopharyngeal sphincter is a portion of the muscle of the palatopharyngeal arch that is capable of separating the oral cavity from the nasal cavity. It has not been determined yet whether voice intensity has an influence on this capacity. Velopharyngeal sphincter closure is accomplished by elevating and retracting the soft palate at the same time as the nasopharyngeal walls are constricted. Objective This study aims to correlate voice intensity with velopharyngeal sphincter closure in individuals without velopharyngeal dysfunction and patients with cleft lip and palate. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, comparative, and contemporary study. The sample consisted of 16 individuals in the control group and 16 individuals in the study group. Patients underwent instrumental assessment, which we subsequently analyzed using a computer program, and a brief medical history review. The mean age of the control group was 27.6 years, whereas the mean age of the case group was 15.6 years. Results Cases showed higher voice intensity in regular and weak fricative sentences when compared with controls. There was no agreement on the analysis of the instrumental assessment between the assessors and the computer program. Regardless of voice intensity, the computer program demonstrated a similar closure pattern. Conclusion The computer program showed similar closure pattern for the three levels of intensity. There was no agreement between the three assessors and the closure pattern determined by the computer program. There was no statistically significant correlation between voice intensity and degree of velopharyngeal sphincter closure. PMID:26722340

  6. Family dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hayaki, Chie; Anno, Kozo; Shibata, Mao; Iwaki, Rie; Kawata, Hiroshi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Hosoi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown differences in the psychosocial factors related to chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). However, no studies have done an evaluation of differences between CLP and CWP from the viewpoint of family functioning. We did a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care setting to investigate possible differences in the relation of CWP and CLP to family functioning. Patients with CLP (N = 126) or CWP (N = 75) were assessed for family functioning by the Family Assessment Device (FAD) and a comparison was done. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate associations of family functioning subscales with pain status (CWP vs CLP), controlling for demographic variables, pain variables; pain duration, pain ratings, pain disability, and psychological factors; depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing. The odds ratios (ORs) for the presence of CWP were calculated. Compared to patients with CLP, patients with CWP showed a lower functional status for Roles and Affective Involvement. The ORs for CWP were significantly higher in lower functioning Roles (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.21–4.65) and Affective Involvement (OR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.56–5.24) after adjusting for demographic variables. The significant association of CWP to Roles and Affective Involvement remained after controlling for the pain variables and psychological factors. This study shows that the families of patients with CWP have poorer family functioning than those with CLP. Our findings suggest that early identification and interventions for the family dysfunction of chronic pain patients are important to the treatment and prevention of CWP. PMID:27930535

  7. Cell specific dopamine modulation of the transient potassium current in the pyloric network by the canonical D1 receptor signal transduction cascade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Rodgers, Edmund W; Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Clark, Merry C; Baro, Deborah J

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) modifies the motor pattern generated by the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, by directly acting on each of the circuit neurons. The 14 pyloric neurons fall into six cell types, and DA actions are cell type specific. The transient potassium current mediated by shal channels (I(A)) is a common target of DA modulation in most cell types. DA shifts the voltage dependence of I(A) in opposing directions in pyloric dilator (PD) versus lateral pyloric (LP) neurons. The mechanism(s) underpinning cell-type specific DA modulation of I(A) is unknown. DA receptors (DARs) can be classified as type 1 (D1R) or type 2 (D2R). D1Rs and D2Rs are known to increase and decrease intracellular cAMP concentrations, respectively. We hypothesized that the opposing DA effects on PD and LP I(A) were due to differences in DAR expression patterns. In the present study, we found that LP expressed somatodendritic D1Rs that were concentrated near synapses but did not express D2Rs. Consistently, DA modulation of LP I(A) was mediated by a Gs-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Additionally, we defined antagonists for lobster D1Rs (flupenthixol) and D2Rs (metoclopramide) in a heterologous expression system and showed that DA modulation of LP I(A) was blocked by flupenthixol but not by metoclopramide. We previously showed that PD neurons express D2Rs, but not D1Rs, thus supporting the idea that cell specific effects of DA on I(A) are due to differences in receptor expression.

  8. Pelvic nerve innervation of the external sphincter of urethra as suggested by urodynamic and horse-radish peroxidase studies.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Nishizawa, O; Noto, H; Tsuchida, S

    1984-03-01

    In view of the fact that the detrusor vesicae and external urethral sphincter perform closely synergic functions in micturition, experiments were conducted to explore the action of the pelvic efferent neurons on the external urethral sphincter. The pelvic efferent neurons are generally recognized, by urodynamic assessments and histochemical study with the technique of retrograde axonal transport of horse-radish peroxidase, to innervate the vesical detrusor. In 7 of 15 adult dogs studied, the external urethral sphincter continued to show a normal synergic electromyogram pattern with enhanced electrical activity on vesical distention and disappearance of discharges on vesical contraction even after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerves. The electrical discharges ceased in the sphincter only after subsequent bilateral pelvic neurotomy. Horse-radish peroxidase-positive cells were demonstrated in the intermediolateral and intermediomedial nuclei and in the Onuf nucleus of the sacral cord in approximately half the dogs whose pelvic nerve was injected with the plant peroxidase. The results suggest that the pelvic nerve may contain somatic fibers innervating the external urethral sphincter.

  9. A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Shin, Jin Ho; Chai, Yun; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-03-01

    We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1-7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations.

  10. Inhibition of ENNG-induced pyloric stomach and small intestinal carcinogenesis in mice by high temperature- and pressure-treated garlic.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Shimpo, Kan; Chihara, Takeshi; Beppu, Hidehiko; Tomatsu, Akiko; Shinzato, Masanori; Yanagida, Takamasa; Ieike, Tsutomu; Sonoda, Shigeru; Futamura, Akihiko; Ito, Akihiro; Higashiguchi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    High temperature- and pressure-treated garlic (HTPG) has been shown to have enhanced antioxidative activity and polyphenol contents. Previously, we reported that HTPG inhibited 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced mucin depleted foci (premalignant lesions) and O6-methylguanine DNA adduct formation in the rat colorectum. In the present study, we investigated the modifying effects of HTPG on N-ethyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (ENNG)- induced pyloric stomach and small intestinal carcinogenesis in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were given ENNG (100 mg/l) in drinking water for the first 4 weeks, then a basal diet or diet containing 2% or 5% HTPG for 30 weeks. The incidence and multiplicity of pyloric stomach and small intestinal (duodenal and jejunal) tumors in the 2% HTPG group (but not in the 5% HTPG group) were significantly lower than those in the control group. Cell proliferation of normal-appearing duodenal mucosa was assessed by MIB-5 immunohistochemistry and shown to be significantly lower with 2% HTPG (but again not 5% HTPG) than in controls. These results in dicate that HTPG, at 2% in the diet, inhibited ENNG-induced pyloric stomach and small intestinal (especially duodenal) tumorigenesis in mice, associated with suppression of cell proliferation.

  11. A Pyloric Gland-Phenotype Ovarian Mucinous Tumor Resembling Lobular Endocervical Glandular Hyperplasia in a Patient with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, In Ah; Shin, Jin Ho; Chai, Yun; Kim, Kyu-Rae

    2017-01-01

    We describe an ovarian mucinous neoplasm that histologically resembles lobular endocervical glandular hyperplasia (LEGH) containing pyloric gland type mucin in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS). Although ovarian mucinous tumors rarely occur in PJS patients, their pyloric gland phenotype has not been clearly determined. The histopathologic features of the ovarian mucinous tumor were reminiscent of LEGH. The cytoplasmic mucin was stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction after diastase treatment but was negative for Alcian blue pH 2.5, suggesting the presence of neutral mucin. Immunohistochemically, the epithelium expressed various gastric markers, including MUC6, HIK1083, and carbonic anhydrase-IX. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a germline heterozygous deletion mutation at exons 1–7 of the STK11 gene (c.1-?_920+?del) in peripheral blood leukocytes and mosaic loss of heterozygosity in ovarian tumor tissue. Considering that LEGH and/or gastric-type cervical adenocarcinoma can be found in patients with PJS carrying germline and/or somatic STK11 mutations, our case indicates that STK11 mutations have an important role in the proliferation of pyloric-phenotype mucinous epithelium at various anatomical locations. PMID:27550049

  12. Management of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in a male dog with laparoscopic-guided deferentopexy.

    PubMed

    Salomon, J F; Cotard, J P; Viguier, E

    2002-11-01

    Urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence is uncommon in the male dog. Diagnosis is made on the basis of the history (full bladder intermittent incontinence with persistence of normal micturitions), clinical examination and by exclusion of other causes of incontinence, such as prostatic disease, lower urinary tract abnormalities and cystitis. This report describes a case in an 11-year-old male poodle in which positive contrast urethrocystography showed no anatomical abnormalities. Surgical treatment by fixation of both ductus deferens to the abdominal wall under laparoscopic guidance with cranial displacement of the urinary bladder improved the incontinence.

  13. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  14. Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter: A report of 82 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Zhao; Yu, Yong-Yang; Shu, Ye; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Li; Lei, Wen-Zhang; Wang, Tian-Cai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LTME) of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter. METHODS: From June 2001 to June 2003, 82 patients with low rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic total mesorectal excision with preservation of anal sphincter. The lowest edge of tumors was below peritoneal reflection and 1.5-7 cm from the dentate line (1.5-5 cm in 48 cases, 5-7 cm in 34 cases). RESULTS: LTME with anal sphincter preservation was performed on 82 randomized patients with low rectal cancer, and 100% sphincter preservation rate was achieved. There were 30 patients with laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) at the level of the anastomosis below peritoneal reflection and 2 cm above from the dentate line; 27 patients with laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection (LULAR) at the level of anastomoses 2 cm below from the dentate line; and 25 patients with laparoscopic coloanal anastomoses (LCAA) at the level of the anastomoses at or below the dentate line. No defunctioning ileostomy was created in any case. The mean operating time was 120 min (ranged from 110-220 min), and the mean operative blood loss was 20 mL (ranged from 5-120 mL). Bowel function was restored and diet was resumed on day 1 or 2 after operation. The mean hospital stay was 8 d (ranged from 5-14). Postoperative analgesics were used in 45 patients. After surgery, 2 patients had urinary retention, one had anastomotic leakage, and another 2 patients had local recurrence one year later. No interoperative complication was observed. CONCLUSION: LTME with preservation of anal sphincter is a feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique with less postoperative pain and rapid recovery, and importantly, it has preserved the function of the sphincter. PMID:12854145

  15. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management.

  16. Electrical and mechanical activity in the human lower esophageal sphincter during diaphragmatic contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, R K; Rochester, D F; McCallum, R W

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effect of contraction of the diaphragm on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, we studied eight healthy volunteers during spontaneous breathing, maximal inspiration, and graded inspiratory efforts against a closed airway (Muller's maneuver). Electrical activity of the crural diaphragm (DEMG) was recorded from bipolar esophageal electrodes, transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) was calculated as the difference between gastric and esophageal pressures, and LES pressure was recorded using a sleeve device. During spontaneous breathing, phasic inspiratory DEMG was accompanied by phasic increases in Pdi and LES pressure. With maximal inspiration, DEMG increased 15-20-fold compared with spontaneous inspiration, and LES pressure rose from an end-expiratory pressure of 21 to 90 mmHg. Similar values were obtained during maximal Muller's maneuvers. LES pressure fell promptly when the diaphragm relaxed. Graded Muller's maneuver resulted in proportional increases in the Pdi, LES pressure, and DEMG. The LES pressure was always greater than Pdi and correlated with it in a linear fashion (P less than 0.001). We conclude that the contraction of the diaphragm exerts a sphincteric action at the LES, and that this effect is an important component of the antireflux barrier. PMID:3350968

  17. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence.

  18. Electromagnetic assessment of embedded micro antenna for a novel sphincter in the human body.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Ai, Yutao; Jiang, Enyu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless, miniaturized, bi-directional telemetric artificial anal sphincter system that can be used for controlling patients' anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is mainly composed of an executive mechanism, a wireless power supply system and a wireless communication system. The wireless communication system consists of an internal RF transceiver, an internal RF antenna, a data transmission pathway, an external RF antenna and an external RF control transceiver. A micro NMHA (Normal Mode Helical Antenna) has been used for the transceiver of the internal wireless communication system and a quarter wave-length whip antenna of 7.75 cm has been used for the external wireless communication system. The RF carrier frequency of wireless communication is located in a license-free 433.1 MHz ISM (Industry, Science, and Medical) band. The radiation characteristics and SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) are evaluated using the finite difference time-domain method and 3D human body model. Results show that the SAR values of the antenna satisfy the ICNIRP (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection) limitations.

  19. Effects of prostaglandins and thromboxane analogues on bullock and dog iris sphincter preparations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y J; Jones, R L

    1982-05-01

    1 The bullock iris sphincter was contracted by low concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 16, 16-dimethyl PGE2 and 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-p-chlorophenoxy PGE2. Other compounds with thromboxane-like actions, for example 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2, were also potent spasmogens, ZK 36374, a stable carbacyclin, was a partial agonist on the PGE-sensitive system of this tissue. 2 The thromboxane antagonist, EP 045, had little effect on the action of PGE2 and 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 on the bullock iris. 3 The dog iris sphincter was sensitive to PGF2 alpha but not to PGE2 and 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2. 4 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 had very low activity on the dog iris in contrast to its high activity on the bullock iris. The reverse was found with the 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-m-trifluoromethylphenoxy analogue of PGF2 alpha (ICI 81008). This indicates a considerable selectivity of action of the two analogues. 5 The results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge of prostanoid receptors.

  20. Effects of prostaglandins and thromboxane analogues on bullock and dog iris sphincter preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Y. J.; Jones, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    1 The bullock iris sphincter was contracted by low concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 16, 16-dimethyl PGE2 and 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-p-chlorophenoxy PGE2. Other compounds with thromboxane-like actions, for example 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2, were also potent spasmogens, ZK 36374, a stable carbacyclin, was a partial agonist on the PGE-sensitive system of this tissue. 2 The thromboxane antagonist, EP 045, had little effect on the action of PGE2 and 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 on the bullock iris. 3 The dog iris sphincter was sensitive to PGF2 alpha but not to PGE2 and 11,9-epoxymethano PGH2. 4 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 had very low activity on the dog iris in contrast to its high activity on the bullock iris. The reverse was found with the 17,18,19,20-tetranor-16-m-trifluoromethylphenoxy analogue of PGF2 alpha (ICI 81008). This indicates a considerable selectivity of action of the two analogues. 5 The results are discussed in relation to the existing knowledge of prostanoid receptors. PMID:6177369

  1. [Effects of alpha-1-blocking agent in the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia].

    PubMed

    Gotoh, M; Yoshikawa, Y; Otani, T; Kato, T; Kobayashi, M; Kato, K; Saito, M; Kondo, A; Miyake, K

    1990-12-01

    Effects of adrenergic alpha-1-blocking agent, prazosin, in the treatment of detrusor external-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) were evaluated in both experimental and clinical aspects. Experimentally, in the urethral pressure profile in dogs, the maximum urethral closing pressure was depressed after intravenous injection of 1 mg prazosin. When experimental DSD was obtained in dogs by stimulating electrically the unilateral 2nd sacral root, intra-venous injection of 1 mg prazosin inhibited contraction of the external urethral sphincter. Clinically, 74 patients with DSD based on neurogenic bladder from cerebral vascular attack (CVA) (13 cases) and spinal cord injury (61 cases) were retrospectively surveyed in terms of therapeutical effects of prazosin for DSD. Spinal cord injury was subdivided to 4 groups for clinical evaluation; cervical cord injury (C) with complete paralysis, thoracic cord injury (Th) with complete paralysis, lumbar cord injury (L) with complete paralysis and spinal cord injury with incomplete paralysis. Patients with CVA and spinal cord injury with incomplete paralysis showed good response rates in subjective improvement, 69% and 60% respectively. However, those with spinal cord injury with complete paralysis showed a poor response (28% for C, 23% for Th and 14% for L). The amount of residual urine significantly decreased after treatment, in all the groups except that of lumbar cord injury with complete paralysis. In all the groups, however, even after the drug treatment the amount of residual urine ranged from 80 to 170 ml and the rates of needing clean intermittent catheterization unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  3. The Dose-Effect Safety Profile of Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cell Therapy in a Dog Model of Intrinsic Urinary Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eckman, Delrae; Dean, Ashley; Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Allickson, Julie; Cline, J. Mark; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Locally injected skeletal muscle precursor cells (skMPCs) integrate into and restore the muscle layers, innervation, vasculature, and function of the sphincter complex in animal models of intrinsic urinary sphincter deficiency (ISD). The goal of the present study was to test the dose-effect safety profile of skMPC therapy in a dog model of ISD. Sphincter deficiency was created in 20 adult female dogs by surgically removing the skeletal muscle layer of the urinary sphincter complex. skMPCs isolated from the hind leg were expanded in culture and injected 4 weeks later into the sphincter complex at a dose of 25 million cells (n = 5), 50 million cells (n = 5), or 100 million cells (n = 5) per milliliter in a 2-ml volume. Five dogs received no sphincter injection. The measures of maximal sphincter pressure, complete blood count, and blood chemistry were performed monthly until their sacrifice at 9 months. At that point, full necropsy was performed to assess the safety of the skMPC injections. Injection of different doses of cells had no effects on the body weight, blood cell count, or kidney or liver function test results (p > .05 among the skMPC doses). Some incidental pathologic features were found in the lower urinary tract in all groups and were most likely associated with repeat catheterization. The maximal urinary sphincter pressure was higher in the 50 million cells per milliliter treatment group than in the other experimental groups (p < .05). The findings of the present study have confirmed that urinary sphincter injection of skMPCs results in no significant local or systemic pathologic features within the dose range that improves sphincter pressures. PMID:25637189

  4. Towards a Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Regeneration of the Sphincter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.; Stallkamp, Jan; Klünder, Mario; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Vaegler, Martin; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl D.; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a significant social, medical, and economic problem. It is caused, at least in part, by degeneration of the sphincter muscle controlling the tightness of the urinary bladder. This muscular degeneration is characterized by a loss of muscle cells and a surplus of a fibrous connective tissue. In Western countries approximately 15% of all females and 10% of males are affected. The incidence is significantly higher among senior citizens, and more than 25% of the elderly suffer from incontinence. When other therapies, such as physical exercise, pharmacological intervention, or electrophysiological stimulation of the sphincter fail to improve the patient’s conditions, a cell-based therapy may improve the function of the sphincter muscle. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge on stem cells suitable for therapy of urinary incontinence: mesenchymal stromal cells, urine-derived stem cells, and muscle-derived satellite cells. In addition, we report on ways to improve techniques for surgical navigation, injection of cells in the sphincter muscle, sensors for evaluation of post-treatment therapeutic outcome, and perspectives derived from recent pre-clinical studies. PMID:26237258

  5. Reducing the incidence of Obstetric Sphincter Injuries using a hands-on technique: an interventional quality improvement project

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Ole Bredahl; Yding, Annika; Anh Ø, Jacob; Sander Andersen, Charlotte; Boris, Jane

    2016-01-01

    A main concern for women giving birth is the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. In our department the incidence of sphincter injuries was around 8 % among vaginally delivering first time mothers. We aimed to halve the incidence to 4 % or less. A prospective interventional program was instituted. We implemented a hands-on technique with four elements in a bundle of care together with a certification process for all staff on the delivery ward. The incidence of episiotomies served as a balancing indicator. The adherence to three of the four elements of the care bundle rose significantly while the all-or-nothing indicator leveled around 80 %. The median number of deliveries between cases with a sphincter injury increased from 9.5 in the baseline period to 20 during the intervention period. This corresponded with a reduction in the incidence from 7.0 % to 3.4 %. The rate of episiotomy remained low at 8.4 % in this group. By implementing the hands-on technique, we halved the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Our data suggest that further improvement may be anticipated. The study has demonstrated how implementation of a hands-on technique can be carried out within a quality improvement framework with rapid and sustainable results. PMID:28074131

  6. Metal-sensitive and thermostable trypsin from the crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) pyloric caeca: purification and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past decades, the economic development and world population growth has led to increased for food demand. Increasing the fish production is considered one of the alternatives to meet the increased food demand, but the processing of fish leads to by-products such as skin, bones and viscera, a source of environmental contamination. Fish viscera have been reported as an important source of digestive proteases with interesting characteristics for biotechnological processes. Thus, the aim of this study was to purify and to characterize a trypsin from the processing by-products of crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) fish. Results A 27.5 kDa trypsin with N-terminal amino acid sequence IVGGFECTPHVFAYQ was easily purified from the pyloric caeca of the crevalle jack. Its physicochemical and kinetic properties were evaluated using N-α-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BApNA) as substrate. In addition, the effects of various metal ions and specific protease inhibitors on trypsin activity were determined. Optimum pH and temperature were 8.0 and 50°C, respectively. After incubation at 50°C for 30 min the enzyme lost only 20% of its activity. K m , k cat, and k cat /K m values using BApNA as substrate were 0.689 mM, 6.9 s-1, and 10 s-1 mM-1, respectively. High inhibition of trypsin activity was observed after incubation with Cd2+, Al3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Hg2+ at 1 mM, revealing high sensitivity of the enzyme to metal ions. Conclusions Extraction of a thermostable trypsin from by-products of the fishery industry confirms the potential of these materials as an alternative source of these biomolecules. Furthermore, the results suggest that this trypsin-like enzyme presents interesting biotechnological properties for industrial applications. PMID:24112762

  7. Kinetic properties of three isoforms of trypsin isolated from the pyloric caeca of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    PubMed

    Toyota, Eiko; Iyaguchi, Daisuke; Sekizaki, Haruo; Itoh, Kunihiko; Tanizawa, Kazutaka

    2007-09-01

    Three isoforms of anionic chum salmon trypsin (ST-1, ST-2, and ST-3) were purified from the pyloric caeca of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta). The molecular weights of the three isoforms were about 24 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric points of ST-1, ST-2, and ST-3 were 5.8, 5.4, and 5.6, respectively. The apparent K(m) values of two isoforms (ST-1 and ST-2) for BAPA (benzoyl-L-arginine-p-nitroanilide) hydrolysis at 5, 15, 25 and 35 degrees C were slightly higher than that of the main isoform ST-3, depending on temperature. The turnover numbers, k(cat), of ST-1 and ST-2 were about twice as high as that of ST-3. Consequently, the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of ST-1 and ST-2 were more efficient than ST-3. There were marked differences in both apparent K(m) and k(cat) values of three anionic chum salmon trypsins as compared to bovine cationic trypsin. K(m) values of all chum salmon trypsins were approximately 10 times lower than those of bovine trypsin, depending on the temperature. The k(cat) values of all chum salmon trypsins were about 2- to 5-fold higher than those of bovine trypsin; therefore, the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of chum salmon trypsin were 20- to 40-fold more efficient than those of bovine trypsin. On the other hand, k(cat)/K(m) values of ST-1 for TAME (tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester) hydrolysis were lower than those of bovine trypsin, whereas k(cat)/K(m) values of ST-2 and ST-3 were comparable to those of bovine trypsin, depending on the temperature.

  8. Serotonin transduction cascades mediate variable changes in pyloric network cycle frequency in response to the same modulatory challenge.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Nadja; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Zhang, Hongmei; Edwards, Donald H; Baro, Deborah J

    2008-06-01

    A fundamental question in systems biology addresses the issue of how flexibility is built into modulatory networks such that they can produce context-dependent responses. Here we examine flexibility in the serotonin (5-HT) response system that modulates the cycle frequency (cf) of a rhythmic motor output. We found that depending on the preparation, the same 5-min bath application of 5-HT to the pyloric network of the California spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, could produce a significant increase, decrease, or no change in steady-state cf relative to baseline. Interestingly, the mean circuit output was not significantly different among preparations prior to 5-HT application. We developed pharmacological tools to examine the preparation-to-preparation variability in the components of the 5-HT response system. We found that the 5-HT response system consisted of at least three separable components: a 5-HT(2betaPan)-like component mediated a rapid decrease followed by a sustained increase in cf; a 5-HT(1alphaPan)-like component produced a small and usually gradual increase in cf; at least one other component associated with an unknown receptor mediated a sustained decrease in cf. The magnitude of the change in cf produced by each component was highly variable, so that when summed they could produce either a net increase, decrease, or no change in cf depending on the preparation. Overall, our research demonstrates that the balance of opposing components of the 5-HT response system determines the direction and magnitude of 5-HT-induced change in steady-state cf relative to baseline.

  9. Can endoscopic papillary balloon dilation really preserve sphincter of Oddi function?

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, I; Tomita, E; Enya, M; Kato, T; Moriwaki, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) is assumed to preserve sphincter of Oddi function because it causes little trauma to the papilla. However, few studies have addressed this issue specifically. In this study, we investigated whether EPBD can preserve sphincter function, and evaluated whether or not such preservation has clinical significance.
METHODS—Seventy patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones were randomly assigned to EPBD or endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST). Sphincter of Oddi (SO) function was measured by endoscopic manometry before, one week after, and one year after treatment. Incidence of pneumobilia and later complications were compared between the two groups at one year. Series manometric data were compared within each group and between the two groups. For a more detailed analysis of the cumulative incidence of later complications, retrospective cohorts were added to the study groups, giving a total number of 235 patients in the EPBD group and 126 in the EST group.
RESULTS—Baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between the 35 EPBD and 35 EST patients. CBD stones were discharged successfully in all cases. CBD pressure, SO basal and peak pressures, and contraction frequency decreased significantly at one week in both groups. The damage was more severe in the EST group, and SO contraction completely disappeared in 23 patients in this group. The incidence of pneumobilia was significantly lower in the EPBD group than in the EST group (p<0.01) whereas CBD stones recurred and cholecystitis appeared at a similar rate in both groups at one year. A complete series of manometric data up to one year was obtained in 55 patients; 28 in the post-EPBD and 27 in post-EST groups. In the post-EPBD group, SO basal and peak pressures significantly recovered at one year compared with data at one week but these measures still remained significantly lower than those before EPBD (p< 0.01). In the post-EST group, SO

  10. Lower Esophageal Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation for Persistent Reflux After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Largacha, Juan A; Hess, Donald T; Litle, Virginia R; Fernando, Hiran C

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a good option for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the obese population. However, some patients have significant reflux despite this procedure, and their treatment might be challenging. Laparoscopic lower esophageal magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) has been introduced into clinical practice with encouraging results. Currently, MSA is only approved for patients with hiatal hernias that are less than 3 cm and without history of antireflux procedures. We present two cases of MSA for the treatment of persistent GERD after LRYGB. Since this is an off-label use of this procedure, both patients underwent extensive evaluation before proceeding with surgery. Excellent results were obtained with a significant improvement in symptoms as well as their GERD Health-Related Quality of Life scores.

  11. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  12. Distension of the esophagogastric junction augments triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Michiel P; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Dent, John; Benninga, Marc A; Davidson, Geoffrey P; Omari, Taher I

    2011-10-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease show an increase in esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility and in frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESR) induced by gastric distension. The objective was to study the effect of localized EGJ distension on triggering of TLESR in healthy volunteers. An esophageal manometric catheter incorporating an 8-cm internal balloon adjacent to a sleeve sensor was developed to enable continuous recording of EGJ pressure during distension of the EGJ. Inflation of the balloon doubled the cross-section of the trans-sphincteric portion of the catheter from 5 mm OD (round) to 5 × 11 mm (oval). Ten healthy subjects were included. After catheter placement and a 30-min adaptation period, the EGJ was randomly distended or not, followed by a 45-min baseline recording. Subjects consumed a refluxogenic meal, and recordings were made for 3 h postprandially. A repeat study was performed on another day with EGJ distension status reversed. Additionally, in one subject MRI was performed to establish the exact position of the balloon in the inflated state. The number of TLESR increased during periods of EGJ distension with the effect being greater after a meal [baseline: 2.0(0.0-4.0) vs. 4.0(1.0-11.0), P=0.04; postprandial: 15.5(10.0-33.0) vs. 22.0(17.0-58.0), P=0.007 for undistended and distended, respectively]. EGJ distension augments meal-induced triggering of TLESR in healthy volunteers. Our data suggest the existence of a population of vagal afferents located at sites in/around the EGJ that may influence triggering of TLESR.

  13. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells. PMID:26406476

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells.

  15. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  16. Histomorphology and immunohistochemistry of the lower esophageal sphincter of the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S; Khamas, Wael; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical and histopathological changes in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease have gained interest. The least shrew is able to vomit in response to emetogens and provides a good model to study the histology of this phenomenon relative to the published reports in the commonly used but vomit-incompetent laboratory species. The LES is located at the junction of the esophagus and stomach. It typically closes at rest and opens in response to swallowing. Our findings demonstrate that the least shrew does not have a well-defined LES, lacks esophageal glands and has a mucosal valve-like projection from the terminal end of the esophagus before joining the gastric epithelium at the lesser curvature. In addition, the least shrew has thoracic and abdominal components prior to joining the gastric epithelium. The mucosal lining of the esophagus is folded, becoming clearly convoluted and forming a bucket-like structure at the level of the esophageocardiac junction (ECJ). No significant differences are to be found between the structure and thickness of the wall before and after the ECJ. Thus, the ECJ forming the LES is relatively less complex than those of other mammals including man. The distribution of enterochromaffin (EC) cells is confined to the lamina propria of the junction and is not associated with the cardiac glands, suggesting its functional involvement with the smooth muscle in and around the ECJ. In conclusion, the least shrew's anatomical sphincter appears ill-defined and is replaced by a less sturdy valve-like mucosal flap.

  17. Approaches to driving the evolving understanding of lower oesophageal sphincter mechanical function.

    PubMed

    Dent, John

    2007-02-01

    This article reviews and places into context the development of lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) manometry, the key technique for researching the mechanics of this region. The first of two major challenges, being able to record sphincter pressure accurately with generally available equipment, was solved by the advent of perfused manometry in the 1960s. The other main challenge was to achieve reliable, continuous recording of LOS pressure, despite the constant movements of the LOS relative to the manometric catheter. Though well documented, this challenge is still poorly understood and prioritised, as many clinical/diagnostic and research manometric studies use methods for LOS manometry that are invalidated by LOS movement. There are two techniques that can record continuously from the LOS, despite its movements: high resolution manometry (HRM), which uses multiple point pressure sensors spaced at 1 cm interval or less, and the sleeve, which is a single long sensor. HRM provides valuable additional information on the varied topography of pressure patterns across the gastro-oesophageal junction and how this can change in an individual, second to second. HRM especially, but also sleeve manometry continue to advance understanding of the mechanics of gastro-oesophageal reflux, to unravel the mysteries of the mechanics of hiatus hernia and the diaphragmatic hiatus, to define why antireflux surgery fails or causes dysphagia, to recognise patients with dysphagia due to isolated defects of LOS relaxation and to test novel therapies for reflux disease directed at LOS function. Ample evidence now exists that accurate monitoring of LOS and gastro-oesophageal junction pressures is important for the diagnostic assessment of many patients and for advancing research into several aspects of the mechanical function of the LOS and its surrounding structures. This evidence now needs to be better reflected in the methods used for routine clinical practice and research.

  18. NADPH-, NADH- and cumene hydroperoxide-dependent metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by pyloric caeca microsomes of the sea star Asterias rubens L. (Echinodermata: Asteroidea).

    PubMed

    den Besten, P J; Lemaire, P; Livingstone, D R

    1994-10-01

    1. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) metabolism was studied in microsomes of the pyloric caeca (main digestive tissue and site of P450) of the echinoderm sea star (starfish) Asterias rubens. 2. NADPH-dependent metabolism of BaP produced phenols (36% of total metabolism), quinones (19%), dihydrodiols (25%) and putative protein adducts (20%). 3. NADH-dependent rates of BaP metabolism were approximately twice those found for NADPH-dependent metabolism, and metabolite formation was shifted towards dihydrodiols and quinones. 4. Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP)-dependent rates of BaP metabolism were also higher than NADPH-dependent rates by a factor of six for quinone and putative protein adduct production, and by a factor of four for phenol and dihydrodiol production. 5. Microsomal rates of BaP metabolism in BaP-exposed sea stars appeared to be elevated more in the case of NADPH-dependent than for CHP-dependent metabolism (respectively, increases of 130 and 41%), indicating the induction of forms of P450 preferentially catalysing NADPH-dependent metabolism. 6. 1,1,1-Trichloropropene-2,3-oxide (TCPO) inhibited dihydrodiol formation from both NADPH- and CHP-dependent BaP metabolism, indicating the involvement of epoxide hydratase in BaP metabolism. 7. Incubations of pyloric caeca microsomes with BaP and a superoxide anion radical-generating system (xanthine/xanthine oxidase) produced putative protein adducts but no free metabolites.

  19. Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and dysfunction of the female lower urinary tract: a review.

    PubMed

    Unger, Cécile A; Tunitsky-Bitton, Elena; Muffly, Tyler; Barber, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    The 2 major functions of the lower urinary tract are the storage and emptying of urine. These processes are controlled by complex neurophysiologic mechanisms and are subject to injury and disease. When there is disruption of the neurologic control centers, dysfunction of the lower urinary tract may occur. This is sometimes referred to as the "neurogenic bladder." The manifestation of dysfunction depends on the level of injury and severity of disruption. Patients with lesions above the spinal cord often have detrusor overactivity with no disruption in detrusor-sphincter coordination. Patients with well-defined suprasacral spinal cord injuries usually present with intact reflex detrusor activity but have detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, whereas injuries to or below the sacral spinal cord usually lead to persistent detrusor areflexia. A complete gynecologic, urologic, and neurologic examination should be performed when evaluating patients with neurologic lower urinary tract dysfunction. In addition, urodynamic studies and neurophysiologic testing can be used in certain circumstances to help establish diagnosis or to achieve better understanding of a patient's vesicourethral functioning. In the management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the primary goal is improvement of a patient's quality of life. Second to this is the prevention of chronic damage to the bladder and kidneys, which can lead to worsening impairment and symptoms. Treatment is often multifactorial, including behavioral modifications, bladder training programs, and pharmacotherapy. Surgical procedures are often a last resort option for management. An understanding of the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of the lower urinary tract can guide providers in their evaluation and treatment of patients who present with lower urinary tract disorders. As neurologic diseases progress, voiding function often changes or worsens, necessitating a good understanding of the underlying physiology in question.

  20. Manometric Measurement of the Sphincter of Oddi in Patients with Common Bile Duct Stones: A Consecutive Study of the Han Population of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Jiao, Chunhua; Cheng, Wenfang; Xu, Shunfu; Xiao, Bin; Ni, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Role of dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi (SO) in choledocholithiasis is controversial. This study was to evaluate SO motor activity in patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones in the Han population of China. Patients and Methods. In this study, 76 patients with CBD stones were enrolled in a single tertiary endoscopy center. Data of SO motor activities was prospectively evaluated by endoscopic manometry. Mean basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency were collected and analyzed. Results. The mean basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency were 52.7 ± 40.0 (1.60–171.1) mmHg, 39.9 ± 19.7 (14.9–115.5) mmHg, and 5.7 ± 3.2 (1.3–13.8)/min, respectively. The basal SO pressure was higher in patients with CBD stones < 10 mm in diameter than that in those with CBD stones larger than 10 mm in diameter (60.7 ± 41.0 mmHg versus 36.8 ± 29.4 mmHg, P = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the basal SO pressure, amplitude, and frequency when compared with the CBD diameter, CBD stone number, prior cholecystectomy, periampullary diverticula, and symptoms. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, and alkaline phosphatase showed no significant difference in patients with normal or elevated basal SO pressure. Conclusion. These results identify that, in Chinese Han population, abnormalities of SO motor activity are associated with CBD stones. PMID:28133480

  1. Obstetric Sphincter Injury Interacts with Diarrhea and Urgency to Increase the Risk of Fecal Incontinence in Women with IBS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Palsson, Olafur S; Geller, Elizabeth; Turner, Marsha; Parnell, Brent; Crane, Andrea; Jannelli, Mary; Wells, Ellen; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Lin, Feng-Chang; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To confirm that fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for fecal incontinence (FI), to identify obstetrical risk factors associated with FI in women with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and to determine whether obstetric anal sphincter injuries interact with diarrhea or urgency to explain the occurrence of FI. Methods The study is a supplement to a diary study of bowel symptoms in 164 female patients with IBS. Subjects completed daily bowel symptom diaries for 90 consecutive days and rated each bowel movement (BM) for stool consistency and presence of urgency, pain, and FI. All female participants from the parent study were invited to complete a telephone-administered 33-item bowel symptom and obstetric history questionnaire which included the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Results Out of 164 women in the parent study, 115 (70.1%) completed the interview. Seventy-four (45.1%) reported FI on their diary including 34 (29.6%) who reported at least one episode per month, 112 (97.4%) reported episodes of urgency, and 106 (92.2%) reported episodes of diarrhea. The mean FISI score was 13.9±9.7. Upon multivariable analysis, FI was significantly associated with parity (p=0.007), operative vaginal delivery (p=0.049), obstetrical sphincter lacerations (p=0.007), fecal urgency (p=0.005), diarrhea (p=0.008), and hysterectomy (p=0.004), but was not associated with episiotomy, pelvic organ prolapse, or urinary incontinence. The synergistic interactions of obstetric anal sphincter laceration with urgency (p=0.002) and diarrhea (p=0.004) were significant risk factors for FI. Conclusion Fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for FI, and they interact with obstetric anal sphincter laceration to amplify the risk of FI. PMID:23321658

  2. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors Associated With the Nonreversal Ileostomy Following Sphincter-Preserving Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Ah; Lee, Gil Jae; Park, Sung Won; Lee, Won-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A loop ileostomy is used to protect an anastomosis after anal sphincter-preserving surgery, especially in patients with low rectal cancer, but little information is available concerning risk factors associated with a nonreversal ileostomy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors of ileostomy nonreversibility after a sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. Methods Six hundred seventy-nine (679) patients with rectal cancer who underwent sphincter-preserving surgery between January 2004 and December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 679, 135 (19.9%) underwent a defunctioning loop ileostomy of temporary intent, and these patients were divided into two groups, that is, a reversal group (RG, 112 patients) and a nonreversal group (NRG, 23 patients) according to the reversibility of the ileostomy. Results In 23 of the 135 rectal cancer patients (17.0%) that underwent a diverting ileostomy, stoma reversal was not possible for the following reasons; stage IV rectal cancer (11, 47.8%), poor tone of the anal sphincter (4, 17.4%), local recurrence (2, 8.7%), anastomotic leakage (1, 4.3%), radiation proctitis (1, 4.3%), and patient refusal (4, 17.4%). The independent risk factors of the nonreversal group were anastomotic leakage or fistula, stage IV cancer, local recurrence, and comorbidity. Conclusion Postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage or fistula, advanced primary disease (stage IV), local recurrence and comorbidity were identified as risk factors of a nonreversal ileostomy. These factors should be considered when drafting prudential guidelines for ileostomy closure. PMID:26161377

  3. Prolonged manometric recordings of oesophagus and lower oesophageal sphincter in achalasia patients

    PubMed Central

    van Herwaarden, M A; Samsom, M; Smout, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Conventional short term manometry is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of achalasia but the technique may fail to detect intermittent motor events. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) and oesophageal pressures during prolonged recording in patients with achalasia.
METHODS—Eleven patients with idiopathic achalasia were studied. Prolonged combined oesophageal pH and manometric recordings of the pharynx, LOS, and stomach were performed using a pH glass electrode and a multiple lumen assembly incorporating a Dent sleeve connected to a portable water perfused manometric system.
RESULTS—LOS pressure varied during the day. Postprandial LOS pressures were lower than those recorded preprandially (1.2 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.005) and basal LOS pressures were significantly higher during phase III of the migrating motor complex than during the subsequent phase I (3.3 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.028). Complete LOS relaxations were occasionally observed in seven patients (0.48/h). Complete LOS relaxations were longer in duration than incomplete LOS relaxations (10.8 v 2.8 s; p=0.01) and 57% of complete relaxations fulfilled the criteria of a transient LOS relaxation (TLOSR). Complete LOS relaxations were associated with oesophageal pressure waves with higher amplitudes and longer durations. In addition, a higher proportion of these oesophageal pressure waves were spontaneous (55.6% v 0%; p<0.02) and multipeaked (72.7% v 0%). During prolonged manometry, high amplitude oesophageal pressure waves (>10 kPa) were recorded in six patients and retrograde oesophageal pressure waves in four, phenomena which were not observed during short term manometry.
CONCLUSION—In contrast with short term stationary manometry, prolonged manometry in achalasia patients revealed the occurrence of complete LOS relaxations, TLOSRs, variations in LOS pressure associated with a meal or phase III, and high amplitude and retrograde

  4. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities are strongly predictive of treatment response in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Simon C; Ciarleglio, Maria; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Clarke, John O; Stein, Ellen; Chander Roland, Bani

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities achalasia treatment METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive patients referred for high resolution esophageal manometry with a final manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients were sub-divided by presence or absence of Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) abnormality, and clinical and manometric profiles were compared. Correlation between UES abnormality and sub-type (i.e., hypertensive, hypotensive or impaired relaxation) and a number of variables, including qualitative treatment response, achalasia sub-type, co-morbid medical illness, psychiatric illness, surgical history, dominant presenting symptom, treatment type, age and gender were also evaluated. RESULTS: Among all 41 patients, 24 (58.54%) had a UES abnormality present. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender or any other clinical or demographic profiles. Among those with UES abnormalities, the majority were either hypertensive (41.67%) or had impaired relaxation (37.5%) as compared to hypotensive (20.83%), although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.42). There was no specific association between treatment response and treatment type received; however, there was a significant association between UES abnormalities and treatment response. In patients with achalasia and concomitant UES abnormalities, 87.5% had poor treatment response, while only 12.5% had favorable response. In contrast, in patients with achalasia and no UES abnormalities, the majority (78.57%) had good treatment response, as compared to 21.43% with poor treatment response (P = 0.0001). After controlling for achalasia sub-type, those with UES abnormality had 26 times greater odds of poor treatment response than those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.009). Similarly, after controlling for treatment type, those with UES abnormality had 13.9 times greater odds of poor treatment response

  5. Assessment and in vitro experiment of artificial anal sphincter system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Jiang, Enyu; Wang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel artificial anal sphincter (AAS) system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function is proposed to treat human fecal incontinence. The executive mechanism of the traditional AAS system was redesigned and integrated for a simpler structure and better durability. The novel executive mechanism uses a sandwich structure to simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter. To rebuild the lost rectal sensation function caused by fecal incontinence, we propose a novel method for rebuilding the rectal sensation function based on an Optimal Wavelet Packet Basis (OWPB) using the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and a support vector machine (SVM). OWPB using a DB index is used for feature vector extraction, while a SVM is adopted for pattern recognition.Furthermore, an in vitro experiment with the AAS system based on rectal sensation function rebuilding was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the novel executive mechanism can simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter, and the proposed method is quite effective for rebuilding rectal sensation in patients.

  6. Pyloric Stenosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition that may affect the gastrointestinal tract during infancy, isn't normal — it can cause your baby ... the more common causes of intestinal obstruction during infancy that requires surgery. Causes It is believed that ...

  7. Pyloric Stenosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have normal stools. A baby with allergy to milk protein may also spit up or vomit, as well as have diarrhea. However, these babies do not have projectile vomiting or ... continue to express milk until your baby can once again feed regularly. ...

  8. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review.

  9. Effect of halothane, isoflurane and desflurane on lower oesophageal sphincter tone.

    PubMed

    Chassard, D; Tournadre, J P; Berrada, K R; Bryssine, B; Bouletreau, P

    1996-12-01

    We have studied the effects of volatile anaesthetics on lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) tone in three groups of eight pigs allocated randomly to receive end-tidal concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 MAC of desflurane, isoflurane or halothane for 15 min. LOS and oesophageal barrier pressures (BrP = LOSP - gastric pressure) were measured using a manometric method. The decrease in BrP paralleled the decrease in LOS pressure and was significant at 0.5 MAC for isoflurane and at 1.0 MAC for halothane. At 1.5 MAC, BrP values were approximately 62% of baseline values for halothane, 37% for isoflurane and 83% for desflurane. Inter-group comparisons showed that BrP did not differ at baseline and at 0.5 MAC. At 1.0 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.001) and halothane (P < 0.02) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. At 1.5 MAC the effect of isoflurane on BrP was significantly different from desflurane (P < 0.01) and halothane (P < 0.05) whereas the effect of desflurane on BrP was not significantly different from halothane. We conclude that desflurane maintained BrP and this may be clinically important in patients at high risk of regurgitation.

  10. Patterns of esophageal inhibition during swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and transient LES relaxation. Lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and esophageal body inhibition co-occur during esophageal peristalsis but not necessarily during pharyngeal stimulation or transient LES relaxation (tLESR). This study examined these relationships and the impact on reflux. Nine young volunteers were studied. An artificial high-pressure zone (HPZ) was established, and pH was recorded 8 and 5 cm proximal to the LES. Pharyngeal stimulation was by water injection and gastric distension with liquid or gas. Peristalsis, pharyngeal stimulation, and spontaneous events were recorded. Swallowing relaxed the LES in 100% of trials (the HPZ in 80%) and caused no reflux. Pharyngeal stimulation relaxed the LES in two-thirds of trials, had no effect on the HPZ, and caused no reflux. Gastric distension was associated with 117 tLESRs, 48% with acid reflux, and 32% with gas reflux; there was no effect on the HPZ. We conclude that LES relaxation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for reflux. LES relaxation and esophageal body inhibition are independent events that may be concurrent (swallowing) or dissociated (tLESR).

  11. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  12. Surgical treatment of tumors of the distal rectum with sphincter preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, T M; Oh, C; Steinhagen, R M; Greenstein, A J; Perez, C; Aufses, A H

    1992-01-01

    One hundred one patients with villous adenoma or invasive carcinoma of the distal rectum treated with local excision or coloanal anastomosis were studied. Twenty-three (45%) of the 51 patients with villous adenomas had transanal excision, another 23 (45%) had a posterior proctotomy, and five (10%) had a coloanal anastomosis. Only two patients with a villous adenoma developed a recurrence requiring repeat local excision. Fifteen (30%) of the 50 patients with invasive cancer were treated by transanal excision. All had tumors confined to the submucosa or superficial muscularis. Eighteen (85%) of 21 patients having posterior proctotomy also had tumors with similar depth of invasion. Six (43%) of the 14 patients having coloanal anastomosis had Dukes' B tumors, six (43%) were Dukes' C, and another two (14%) underwent palliative resection. The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 77%. Only four patients treated by transanal excision or posterior proctotomy died of metastatic disease. In the coloanal group, two of 12 patients undergoing curative resection died of recurrent cancer, and another has a pelvic recurrence. Villous adenomas of the distal rectum and selected carcinomas may be treated with local excision and coloanal anastomosis with preservation of sphincter function with good results. PMID:1417192

  13. A synthetic prostaglandin E1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, relaxes sphincter of Oddi in humans.

    PubMed

    Koshitani, Tatsuya; Kodama, Tadashi; Sato, Hideki; Takaaki, Junpei; Imamura, Yoichi; Kato, Keimei; Wakabayashi, Naoki; Tokita, Kazuhiko; Mitsufuji, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that prostaglandins (PGs) exert potent pharmacological actions on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle, although their effects on the sphincter of Oddi (SO) remain to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PGE1 on motility of the human SO. Twenty patients appearing for routine endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) examination were studied. Each patient was randomly allocated to receive an intravenous infusion of normal saline (six patients), or alprostadil alfadex, a synthetic PGE1 analog, at a dose of either 0.05 or 0.1 microg/kg/min (seven patients for each condition). Endoscopic biliary manometry was done with a recording of basal SO pressure, amplitude of SO phasic contractions, and phasic contractile frequency before and 5 min after intravenous infusions, using a 4-French microtransducer catheter. There was no significant change in SO motor variables following application of normal saline. Alprostadil alfadex significantly decreased basal SO pressure at a dose of 0.05 microg/kg/min, and significantly decreased all parameters at a dose of 0.1 microg/kg/min. A synthetic PGE1 analog, alprostadil alfadex, effectively inhibits motility of the human SO. This drug may be of clinical application as a SO-relaxing agent.

  14. Risk Factors for Erosion of Artificial Urinary Sphincters: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.; Erickson, Bradley A.; Elliott, Sean P.; Powell, Christopher; Alsikafi, Nejd; McClung, Christopher; Myers, Jeremy B.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Smith, Thomas G.; Broghammer, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the short- to medium-term outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) placement from a large, multi-institutional, prospective, follow-up study. We hypothesize that along with radiation, patients with any history of a direct surgery to the urethra will have higher rates of eventual AUS explantation for erosion and/or infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective outcome analysis was performed on 386 patients treated with AUS placement from April 2009 to December 2012 at 8 institutions with at least 3 months of follow-up. Charts were analyzed for preoperative risk factors and postoperative complications requiring explantation. RESULTS Approximately 50% of patients were considered high risk. High risk was defined as patients having undergone radiation therapy, urethroplasty, multiple treatments for bladder neck contracture or urethral stricture, urethral stent placement, or a history of erosion or infection in a previous AUS. A total of 31 explantations (8.03%) were performed during the follow-up period. Overall explantation rates were higher in those with prior radiation and prior UroLume. Men with prior AUS infection or erosion also had a trend for higher rates of subsequent explantation. Men receiving 3.5-cm cuffs had significantly higher explantation rates than those receiving larger cuffs. CONCLUSION This outcomes study confirms that urethral risk factors, including radiation history, prior AUS erosion, and a history of urethral stent placement, increase the risk of AUS explantation in short-term follow-up. PMID:25109562

  15. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-07-15

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery.

  16. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Corinne A.; Hammer, Michael J.; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these “mechanical states” of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of “activation state” maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function. PMID:26767985

  17. Design and assessment of novel artificial anal sphincter with adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Yan, Sheng; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the in vitro assessment of a novel elastic scaling artificial anal sphincter system (ES-AASS) with an adaptive transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) for treatment of severe faecal incontinence (FI). The proposed adaptive TETS has a phase control, which can maintain the output voltage at ∼7 V across the full range of the coupling coefficient variation (from 0.09-0.31) during the whole process of charging with a phase shift of 177.5° to 79.1°. A maximum surface temperature of 42.2 °C was measured above the secondary coil during an energy transmission of 3.5 W in air. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density analysis of the biological three-layers structure, including the skin, fat and muscle) surrounding the coil pair were analysed and the results of simulation analysis showed that the value of SAR and current density were very small at any given transmission condition compared with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In conclusion, in vitro experimental results showed that the ES-AASS can control simulated faecal behaviour effectively and the performance of TETS was validated.

  18. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process.

  19. Mechanism of the noradrenergic motor control on the lower oesophageal sphincter in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J; Niel, J P; Roman, C

    1980-01-01

    1. The release of labelled acetylcholine has been measured on lower oesophageal sphincter (l.o.s.) muscular strips previously loaded with tritiated choline. 2. This release was greatly increased by noradrenaline 10(-5) g/ml. and unaffected by atropine 10(-6) g/ml., but it was practically abolished if hemicholinium 5.2 X 10(-4) M was added to the incubating bath containing the tritiated choline. 3. A radioautographic study of sections of l.o.s. strips loaded with tritiated choline showed that the radioactivity was mainly located in the nervous cells of the enteric plexuses and that the muscular cells were very poorly labelled. 4. The increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline did not occur in a Ca2+-free or in a hypermagnesic Tyrode (12 mM). 5. Tetrodotoxin 10(-6) G/ml. had no effect on the increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline. In addition, sucrose gap recordings showed that the depolarizing effect of noradrenaline on l.o.s. muscular strips was unaffected by tetrodotoxin 10(-6) g/ml. 6. It is concluded that acetylcholine released in the l.o.s. under the action of noradrenaline originated from the synaptic endings of the cholinergic intramural neurones. Images Plate 1 PMID:7463362

  20. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  1. Endogenous cholecystokinin in postprandial lower esophageal sphincter function and fundic tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, F; Bruley Des Varannes, S; Scarpignato, C; Leray, V; D'Amato, M; Rozé, C; Galmiche, J P

    1998-12-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations (TLESRs) are the main underlying mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Although CCK acts through CCK-A receptors to increase the TLESRs induced by gastric distension, the respective roles of endogenous CCK and fundic tone in triggering postprandial TLESRs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the CCK-A receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, on postprandial LES function and fundic tone in humans. LES motor events and fundic tone were simultaneously monitored in two groups of healthy volunteers. Recordings were performed during fasting and for 3 h after a liquid meal (200 ml/200 kcal) administered either orally or intraduodenally at a rate mimicking gastric emptying. Each subject received loxiglumide (10 mg. kg-1. h-1) or saline (control) in randomized order, which was started 40 min before the meal and maintained for 3 h thereafter. After the oral meal, loxiglumide significantly reduced TLESRs (P = 0.002) without significantly affecting LES pressure and fundic tone. After duodenal infusion of the meal, loxiglumide totally abolished the increase in TLESRs, reduced LES pressure fall (P < 0.02), and strongly inhibited fundic relaxation (P = 0.0001). We concluded that endogenous CCK is involved in the postprandial control of both LES function and fundic tone through activation of CCK-A receptors.

  2. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  3. Effect of amino acids on lower esophageal sphincter characteristics and gastroesophageal reflux in humans.

    PubMed

    Gielkens, H A; Lamers, C B; Masclee, A A

    1998-04-01

    The effect of a commercially available mixed amino acids solution, when given either intravenously or intragastrically, on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, frequency of transient LES relaxations (TLESRs) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) was investigated in six healthy volunteers. LES pressure and esophageal pH were simultaneously recorded on three separate occasions 1 hr before (basal) and 3 hr during intravenous or intragastric infusion of amino acids (250 mg protein/kg/hr) or saline (control). No significant changes in LES pressure were seen in the control experiment. Intravenous amino acids caused a rapid and sustained (P < 0.01) decrease in LES pressure whereas intragastric amino acids decreased LES pressure only gradually and temporarily (P < 0.01). In the three experiments no significant differences were observed in TLESR frequency, the number of GER episodes, the mechanism of reflux, or duration of acid exposure. In healthy subjects both intragastric and, especially, intravenous infusion of amino acids significantly decrease LES pressure but do not affect the frequency of TLESRs or GER episodes during a continuous liquid gastric load.

  4. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR.

  5. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  6. Lubrication Theory Model to Evaluate Surgical Alterations in Flow Mechanics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Brasseur, James G.; Zaki, Tamer; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2003-11-01

    Surgery is commonly used to rebuild a weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and reduce reflux. Because the driving pressure (DP) is proportional to muscle tension generated in the esophagus, we developed models using lubrication theory to evaluate the consequences of surgery on muscle force required to open the LES and drive the flow. The models relate time changes in DP to lumen geometry and trans-LES flow with a manometric catheter. Inertial effects were included and found negligible. Two models, direct (opening specified) and indirect (opening predicted), were combined with manometric pressure and imaging data from normal and post-surgery LES. A very high sensitivity was predicted between the details of the DP and LES opening. The indirect model accurately captured LES opening and predicted a 3-phase emptying process, with phases I and III requiring rapid generation of muscle tone to open the LES and empty the esophagus. Data showed that phases I and III are adversely altered by surgery causing incomplete emptying. Parametric model studies indicated that changes to the surgical procedure can positively alter LES flow mechanics and improve clinical outcomes.

  7. New data on the morphology of Spinitectus oviflagellis Fourment, 1884 (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) from the pyloric caeca of Macrourus berglax (Macrouridae) in the eastern Greenland Sea.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Klimpel, Sven

    2007-05-01

    Specimens of a little-known nematode, Spinitectus oviflagellis Fourment, 1884, the type-species of Spinitectus Fourment, 1884, were collected mainly from the pyloric caeca of a marine deep-water fish, the onion-eye grenadier Macrourus berglax Lacépède (a new host record), in the eastern Greenland Sea, North Atlantic Ocean. Studies using light and scanning electron microscopy revealed some taxonomically important, previously unreported features of S. oviflagellis, such as the detailed structure of the cephalic end, the position of the excretory pore and the presence of ventral pre-anal cuticular ridges (area rugosa) in the male, which indicated a certain degree of intraspecific biometrical variability in this species. S. oviflagellis is compared with similar congeneric species parasitising marine fishes.

  8. Palliation of Pyloric Stenosis Caused by Gastric Cancer Using an Endoscopically Placed Covered Ultraflex Stent: Covered Stent Inside an Occluded Uncovered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Nishiwaki, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2000-07-15

    A 71-year-old man developed pyloric stenosis caused by gastric cancer. Vomiting and nausea resolved after the insertion of an uncovered Ultraflex stent (length 10 cm, inner diameter 18u23 mm) through a 7-cm-long stenosis, and the patient was able to eat a soft diet. After 6 weeks, stent occlusion occurred due to tumor ingrowth and accumulation of food residue. Endoscopic observation showed a very narrow residual lumen. A covered Ultraflex stent (length 10 cm, inner diameter 18u23 mm) was inserted through the first stent and expanded to its maximum diameter over the next 2 days. The patient's vomiting and nausea improved rapidly. He died 6 months after the second stenting procedure, from metastatic tumor spread, having remained free of nausea and vomiting. In this case, a covered metallic stent prevented tumor ingrowth and maintained gastrointestinal patency.

  9. Linkage analysis of infantile pyloric stenosis and markers from chromosome 9q11-q33: no evidence for a major gene in this candidate region.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, E; Coffey, R; Parker, K; Tam, P; Pembrey, M E; Gardiner, R M

    1993-01-01

    A genetic component in the aetiology of infantile pyloric stenosis (PS) is well established. Segregation analysis is compatible with a multifactorial sex modified threshold model of inheritance but a major gene of low penetrance has not been excluded. PS has been reported to occur in 57% (four of seven) of cases with duplication of chromosome 9q11-q33. Twenty families with PS were studied using genetic markers at loci D9S55, D9S111, D9S15, D9S12, D9S56, D9S59, and ASS from this region of chromosome 9. Pairwise lod scores of -2 were obtained with all these markers at recombination fractions greater or equal to 0.04 under both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive models of inheritance. This provides evidence against the existence of a major locus predisposing to PS within chromosome 9q11-q33. PMID:8320701

  10. The pyloric caeca area is a major site for IgM(+) and IgT(+) B cell recruitment in response to oral vaccination in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Castro, Rosario; Abos, Beatriz; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, Sylvia S; Pérez-Prieto, Sara I; Tafalla, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have characterized some aspects of the immune response of the teleost gut in response to diverse pathogens or stimuli, most studies have focused on the posterior segments exclusively. However, there are still many details of how teleost intestinal immunity is regulated that remain unsolved, including the location of IgM(+) and IgT(+) B cells along the digestive tract and their role during the course of a local stimulus. Thus, in the current work, we have studied the B cell response in five different segments of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) digestive tract in both naïve fish and fish orally vaccinated with an alginate-encapsulated DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). IgM(+) and IgT(+) cells were identified all along the tract with the exception of the stomach in naïve fish. While IgM(+) cells were mostly located in the lamina propria (LP), IgT(+) cells were primarily localized as intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). Scattered IgM(+) IELs were only detected in the pyloric caeca. In response to oral vaccination, the pyloric caeca region was the area of the digestive tract in which a major recruitment of B cells was demonstrated through both real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, observing a significant increase in the number of both IgM(+) and IgT(+) IELs. Our findings demonstrate that both IgM(+) and IgT(+) respond to oral stimulation and challenge the paradigm that teleost IELs are exclusively T cells. Unexpectedly, we have also detected B cells in the fat tissue associated to the digestive tract that respond to vaccination, suggesting that these cells surrounded by adipocytes also play a role in mucosal defense.

  11. The evaluation of anti-ulcerogenic effect of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.) on pyloric ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekhara, N.; Ashok, B. K.; Sharma, Parmeshwar P.; Ravishankar, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the present era, because of the life-style, the disorders such as hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently. Satwa (starch) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn. are used in folklore practice for the treatment of above complaints under the name Tugaksheeree. Aim: To compare the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the above two drugs in pyloric ligation induced gastric ulcer in albino rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 Wistar strain albino rats of both sexes grouped into three groups. Group C served as pyloric ligated control group, Group I received starch of C. angustifolia suspension and Group II received starch of M. arundinacea for seven days. On 8th day pylorus was ligated. After ligation the animals were deprived of food and water and sacrificed at the end of 14 h. The collected gastric contents were used for biochemical estimation and ulcer index was calculated from excised stomach. Results: Both the test drugs showed statistically significant decrease in the volume, increase in the pH, reduced the free acidity of gastric juice and decreased the peptic activity. The starch of C. angustifolia reduced a total acidity non-significantly while M. arundinacea reduced it significantly. Among the two drugs the M. arundinacea has effectively reduced the peptic activity, which is statistically significant. M. arundinacea shown statistically significant increase of total carbohydrates. Conclusion: Both the test drugs proved anti-ulcer activity and prevents the chance of gastric ulcer. Among these two M. arundinacea is more effective. PMID:25558167

  12. Botulinum Toxin A and Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: Pathophysiology and Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    The use of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) for the treatment of lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD) has increased markedly in recent years. The indications for BoNT-A treatment of LUTD now include neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and voiding dysfunction. The mechanisms of BoNT-A action on LUTDs affect many different aspects. Traditionally, the effects of BoNT-A were believed to be attributable to inhibition of acetylcholine release from the presynaptic efferent nerves at the neuromuscular junctions in the detrusor or urethral sphincter. BoNT-A injection in the bladder also regulated sensory nerve function by blocking neurotransmitter release and reducing receptor expression in the urothelium. In addition, recent studies revealed an anti-inflammatory effect for BoNT-A. Substance P and nerve growth factor in the urine and bladder tissue decreased after BoNT-A injection. Mast cell activation in the bladder also decreased. BoNT-A-induced improvement of urothelium function plays an important mitigating role in bladder dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in urothelium decreased after BoNT-A injection, as did apoptosis. Studies also revealed increased apoptosis in the prostate after BoNT-A injection. Although BoNT-A injection has been widely used to treat different LUTDs refractory to conventional treatment, currently, onabotulinumtoxinA has been proven effective only on urinary incontinence due to IDO and NDO in several large-scale clinical trials. The effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on other LUTDs such as interstitial cystitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, dysfunctional voiding or detrusor sphincter dyssynergia have not been well demonstrated. PMID:27110822

  13. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Axillary nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... Multiple mononeuropathy Muscle function loss Numbness and tingling Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Review Date 2/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  14. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 76. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  15. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure), excessive alcohol use or vaginal infections can cause sexual problems. Depression, relationship problems or abuse (current or past abuse) can also cause sexual dysfunction.You may have less sexual desire ...

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  18. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  19. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria da Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices. PMID:28124538

  20. Artificial urinary sphincter urethral erosions: Temporal patterns, management, and incidence of preventable erosions

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Deepak K.; Linder, Brian J.; Elliott, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the mainstay of surgical treatment for male stress urinary incontinence. Although urethral erosions are a known complication, their temporal distribution and optimal management have not been well characterized. We seek to evaluate the timing, etiologies, and management of urethral erosions in primary AUS implantations. Materials and Methods: 1802 male patients underwent AUS procedure at Mayo Clinic (Rochester) from 1983 to 2011, including 1082 primary placements. Of primary placements, 63 had a urethral erosion of their device requiring explanation and were included in our analysis. All cases of urethral erosion were confirmed at the time of explantation through cystoscopy and direct visualization. At our institution, explantation is typically performed without primary urethral repair. Results: There were 63 cases (5.8%) of urethral erosions of primary AUS devices during the study time frame. The median age at AUS implantation was 74 years (interquartile range [IQR] 68–77 years) and median time to explantation was 21 months (IQR 5–59 months). The temporal trend of AUS erosions demonstrates a peak in the 1st year, with a gradual tapering of cases thereafter, persisting beyond 10 years. Three of 36 (8.3%) patients with follow-up developed a urethral stricture. Overall, 32/63 patients (51%) underwent salvage AUS reimplantation at a median of 7.1 months (IQR 3.1–12.9 months). Conclusions: Urethral erosions tend to occur early (within 1–2 years), with gradual tapering over time. However, continued vigilance is needed after AUS placement to decrease late erosions. These data can be used for counseling and to help guide follow-up care of patients with AUS. PMID:28197026

  1. Artificial urinary sphincter for urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: a historical cohort from 2004 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos, Augusto Cesar Soares Dos; Rodrigues, Luíza de Oliveira; Azevedo, Daniela Castelo; Carvalho, Lélia Maria de Almeida; Fernandes, Mariana Ribeiro; Avelar, Sandra de Oliveira Sapori; Horta, Maria Glória Cruvinel; Kelles, Silvana Márcia Bruschi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate a cohort of patients with prostate cancer and persistent urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. From January 2004 to December 2015, eighty-six individuals were identified to have received an AUS implant, provided by a private nonprofit HMO operating in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. On total, there were 91 AUS implants, with a median interval between radical prostatectomy and AUS implant of 3.6 years (IQR 1.9 to 5.5). The rate of AUS cumulative survival, after a median follow-up of 4.1 years (IQR 1.7-7.2 years), was 44% (n=40). The median survival of AUS implants was 2.9 years (IQR 0.5-7.9 years). Thirty-seven AUS implants (40.7%) resulted in grade III surgical complications. There were 5 deaths at 2.1, 4.7, 5.7, 5.7 and 6.5 years of follow-up, but none due to causes directly associated to the AUS implant. Persistent severe incontinence was documented in 14 (15.3%) additional patients. From the 51 AUS implants which resulted in grade III surgical complications or persistent severe incontinence, 24 (47.1%) underwent surgical revisions. Explantation of the sphincter or its components was observed in 6 cases (25.0%). Mechanical failure, described as fluid loss and/or inability to recycle the AUS device, was observed in 4 devices (16.7%). In conclusion, although AUS implants are recommended as the gold-standard treatment of severe urinary incontinence after prostatectomy, the observed high rates of malfunction and grade III adverse events are a matter of concern warranting further assessment on the safety and efficacy of these devices.

  2. COX-1 vs. COX-2 as a determinant of basal tone in the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    de Godoy, Márcio A. F.; Rattan, Neeru; Rattan, Satish

    2009-01-01

    Prostanoids, produced endogenously via cyclooxygenases (COXs), have been implicated in the sustained contraction of different smooth muscles. The two major types of COXs are COX-1 and COX-2. The COX subtype involved in the basal state of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone is not known. To identify the COX subtype, we examined the effect of COX-1- and COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and rofecoxib, respectively, on basal tone in the rat IAS. We also determined the effect of selective deletion of COX-1 and COX-2 genes (COX-1−/− and COX-2−/− mice) on basal tone in murine IAS. Our data show that SC-560 causes significantly more efficacious and potent concentration-dependent decreases in IAS tone than rofecoxib. In support of these data, significantly higher levels of COX-1 than COX-2 mRNA were found in the IAS. In addition, higher levels of COX-1 mRNA and protein were expressed in rat IAS than rectal smooth muscle. In wild-type mice, IAS tone was decreased 41.4 ± 3.4% (mean ± SE) by SC-560 (1 × 10−5 M) and 5.4 ± 2.2% by rofecoxib (P < 0.05, n = 5). Basal tone was 0.172 ± 0.021 mN//mg in the IAS from wild-type mice and significantly less (0.080 ± 0.015 mN/mg) in the IAS from COX-1−/− mice (P < 0.05, n = 5). However, basal tone in COX-2−/− mice was not significantly different from that in wild-type mice. We conclude that COX-1-related products contribute significantly to IAS tone. PMID:19056763

  3. The hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter: a motility disorder with manometric features of outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Lord, Reginald V N; Bremner, Cedric G; Crookes, Peter F; Hamrah, Pedram; DeMeester, Tom R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical presentation, motility characteristics, and prevalence and patterns of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES). HTLES was defined by a resting pressure measured at the respiratory inversion point on stationary manometry of greater than 26 mm Hg (ninety-fifth percentile of normal). One hundred consecutive patients (80 women, 20 men; mean age 54.7 years, range 23 to 89 years), diagnosed with HTLES at our institution between September 1996 and October 1999, were studied. Patients with achalasia or other named esophageal motility disorders or history of foregut surgery were excluded, but patients with both HTLES and "nutcracker esophagus" were included. The most common symptoms in patients with HTLES were regurgitation (75%), heartburn (71%), dysphagia (71%), and chest pain (49%). The most common primary presenting symptoms were heartburn and dysphagia. The intrabolus pressure, which is a manometric measure of outflow obstruction, was significantly higher in patients with HTLES compared to normal volunteers. The residual pressure measured during LES relaxation induced by a water swallow was also significantly higher than in normal persons. There were no significant associations between any of the relaxation parameters studied (residual pressure, nadir pressure, duration of relaxation, time to residual pressure) and either the presence or severity of any symptoms or the presence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure. Seventy-three patients underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 26% had increased distal esophageal acid exposure. Compared to a cohort of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease but no HTLES (n=300), the total and supine periods of distal esophageal acid exposure were significantly lower in the patients with HTLES and abnormal acid exposure. Patients with HTLES frequently present with moderately severe dysphagia and typical reflux symptoms. Approximately one

  4. Risk Factors Associated With Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Patients With Low Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Liang-Hao; Xing, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Chuan-Gang; Yu, En-Da; Zhong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resection (APR) and sphincter-preserving resection (SPR) are the two primary surgical options for rectal cancer. Retrospectively we collected rectal cancer patients for SPR and APR observation between 2005 and 2007. The patient-related, tumor-related, and surgery-related variables of the SPR and APR groups were analyzed by using logistic regression techniques. The mean distance from the anal verge (DAV) of cancer is significantly higher in SPR than that in APR (P < 0.001). In cancers with DAV <40 mm (SPR, 40 versus APR, 110), multivariate analysis shows that surgeon procedure volume (odds ratio [OR] = 0.244; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.077–0.772; P = 0.016) and neoadjuvant radiotherapy (OR = 0.031; 95% CI: 0.002–0.396; P = 0.008) are factors influencing SPR. In cancers with DAV ranging from 40 mm to 59 mm (SPR 190 versus APR 50), analysis shows that patient age (OR = 2.139; 95% CI: 1.124–4.069; P = 0.021), diabetes (OR = 2.657; 95% CI: 0.872–8.095; P = 0.086), and colorectal surgeon (OR = 0.122, 95% CI: 0.020–0.758; P = 0.024), are influencing factors for SPR. The local recurrence and disease-free survival reveal no significant difference. A significant difference exists in DAV, surgeon specialization, procedure volume, age, diabetes, and neoadjuvant radiotherapy between SPR and APR. PMID:25058761

  5. In vitro effect of pantoprazole on lower esophageal sphincter tone in rats

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Mustafa; Özer, Mahmut; Reyhan, Enver; Demirci, Yeliz; Atıcı, Ali E; Dalgıç, Tahsin; Bostancı, Erdal B; Genç, Ece

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of pantoprazole on rat lower esophageal sphincter (LES) tone. METHODS: Rats weighing 250-300 g, provided by the Yeditepe University Experimental Research Center (YÜDETAM), were used throughout the study. They were anesthetized before decapitation. LES tissues whose mucosal lining were removed were placed in a standard 30-mL organ bath with a modified Krebs solution and continuously aerated with 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide gas mixture and kept at room temperature. The tissues were allowed to stabilize for 60 min. Subsequently, the contractile response to 10-6 mol/L carbachol was obtained. Different concentrations of freshly prepared pantoprazole were added directly to the tissue bath to generate cumulative concentrations of 5 × 10-6 mol/L, 5 × 10-5 mol/L, and 1.5 × 10-4 mol/L. Activities were recorded on an online computer via a 4-channel transducer data acquisition system using the software BSL PRO v 3.7, which also analyzed the data. RESULTS: Pantoprazole at 5 × 10-6 mol/L caused a small, but statistically insignificant, relaxation in the carbachol-contracted LES (2.23% vs 3.95%). The 5 × 10-5 mol/L concentration, however, caused a significant relaxation of 10.47% compared with the control. 1.5 × 10-4 mol/L concentration of pantoprazol caused a 19.89% relaxation in the carbachol contracted LES (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate that pantoprazole has a relaxing effect in isolated LESs. These results might have significant clinical implications for the subset of patients using proton pump inhibitors who do not receive full symptomatic alleviation from gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:22171145

  6. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reflex kinetics: effects of peristaltic reflexes and maturation in human premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Pena, Eneysis M; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Fernandez, Soledad A; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2010-12-01

    We defined the sensory-motor characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (LESR) (stimulus threshold volume, response onset, and relaxation period, relaxation magnitude, nadir) during maturation in human neonates. We hypothesized that LESR kinetics differs during maturation and with peristaltic reflex type. Basal and adaptive esophageal motility testing was performed (N = 20 premature neonates) at 34.7 and 39.1 wk (time 1 and time 2). Effects of midesophageal provocation with graded stimuli (N = 1,267 stimuli, air and liquids) on LESR kinetics during esophagodeglutition response (EDR) and secondary peristalsis (SP) were analyzed by mixed models. Frequency of LESR with basal primary peristalsis were different during maturation (P = 0.03). During adaptive responses with maturation, 1) the frequencies of peristaltic reflexes and LESR were similar; 2) liquid stimuli resulted in a shorter LESR response latency and LESR nadir and greater LESR magnitude (all P < 0.05); 3) media differences were noted with LESR response latency (air vs. liquids, P < 0.02); and 4) infusion flow rate-LESR were different (P < 0.01 for air and liquids). Mechanistically, 1) frequency of LESR was greater during peristaltic reflexes at both times (vs. none, P < 0.0001); 2) LESR response latency, duration, and time to complete LESR were longer with EDR (all P < 0.05, vs. SP at time 2); and 3) graded stimulus volume LESR were different for air and liquids (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sensory-motor characteristics of LESR depend on the mechanosensitive properties of the stimulus (media, volume, flow), type of peristaltic reflex, and postnatal maturation. Maturation modulates an increased recruitment of inhibitory pathways that favor LESR.

  7. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Yashika; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Depression is the most debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with significant impact on socio-occupational and well being of individual. The exact pathophysiology of depression is still enigmatic though various theories have been put forwarded. There are evidences showing that mitochondrial dysfunction in various brain regions is associated with depression. Recent findings have sparked renewed appreciation for the role of mitochondria in many intracellular processes coupled to synaptic plasticity and cellular resilience. New insights in depression pathophysiology are revolving around the impairment of neuroplasticity. Mitochondria have potential role in ATP production, intracellular Ca2+ signalling to establish membrane stability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and to execute the complex processes of neurotransmission and plasticity. So understanding the various concepts of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of depression indubitably helps to generate novel and more targeted therapeutic approaches for depression treatment. Objective The review was aimed to give a comprehensive insight on role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. Result Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the mitochondrial functions might act as potential target for the treatment of depression. Conclusion Literature cited in this review highly supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. As impairment in the mitochondrial functions lead to the generation of various insults that exaggerate the pathogenesis of depression. So, it is useful to study mitochondrial dysfunction in relation to mood disorders, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and enhancing the functions of mitochondria might show promiscuous effects in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26923778

  8. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  9. The Utility of Post-Void Residual Volume versus Sphincter Electromyography to Distinguish between Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Asahina, Masato; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Hirano, Shigeki; Fuse, Miki; Koga, Yasuko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of sphincter electromyography (EMG) and post-void residual urine volume (PVR) during a free-flow study and a pressure-flow study (PFS) for distinguishing multiple system atrophy (MSA) from Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 241 case records; both urodynamic study and sphincter EMG were performed in patients with MSA (n = 147) and PD (n = 94). Results There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01) in the mean PVR during the free-flow study (113.1 ± 7.5 mL in MSA and 40.4 ± 3.8 mL in PD), mean PVR during PFS (230.1 ± 12.6 mL in MSA and 71.7 ± 6.6 mL in PD), and mean duration of MUP for sphincter EMG (9.3 ± 0.1 ms in MSA and 7.7 ± 0.1 ms in PD). The area under the curve used for differentiating MSA from PD was 0.79 and 0.73 for PVR during PFS and the free-flow study, respectively. There was a mean duration of 0.69 ms for the sphincter EMG. Conclusions The present results suggested that PVR was more appropriate than sphincter EMG for differentiating MSA from PD. PMID:28060892

  10. A new possibility for repairing the anal dysfunction by promoting regeneration of the reflex pathways in the enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Katsui, Renta; Kojima, Yu; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Shimizu, Juichiro; Koyama, Fumikazu; Fujii, Hisao; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Takaki, Miyako

    2008-04-01

    Moderate rectal distension elicits recto-rectal reflex contractions and simultaneous recto-internal anal sphincter reflex relaxations that together comprise the defecation reflex. Both reflexes are controlled by 1) pelvic nerves, 2) lumbar colonic nerves, and 3) enteric nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore a novel approach to repairing the defecation reflex dysfunction by using the plasticity of enteric nervous pathways. Experiments were performed in anesthetized guinea pigs with ethyl carbamate. The rectum 30 mm oral from the anal verge was transected without damage to extrinsic nerves, and subsequent end-to-end one-layer anastomosis was performed. Recovery of the defecation reflex and associated reflex pathways were evaluated. Eight weeks after sectioning of intrinsic reflex nerve pathways in the rectum, the defecation reflex recovered to the control level, accompanied with regeneration of reflex pathways. The 5-HT(4)-receptor agonist mosapride (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced the recovered defecation reflex 8 wk after surgery. Two weeks after local treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF: 10(-6) g/ml) at the rectal anastomotic site, the recto-internal anal sphincter reflex relaxations recovered and some bundles of fine nerve fibers were shown to interconnect the oral and anal ends of the myenteric plexus. These results suggested a possibility for repairing the anal dysfunction by promoting regeneration of the reflex pathways in the enteric nervous system with local application of BDNF.

  11. An exploratory study for bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; Gupta, Anupam; Reddi, V. Senthil Kumar; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This is an exploratory study, which aimed to analyze urodynamic findings in patients who are on atypical antipsychotics and present with urinary incontinence (UI) in order to understand the mechanisms of antipsychotic-emergent UI. Patients and Methods: Eight patients (34 ± 7.6 years; five males and three females) diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders, who were on risperidone, olanzapine, or clozapine monotherapy and having UI were recruited. Urodynamic study was performed in all patients. Results: Six out of eight (75%) patients had abnormal urodynamic findings. Three of them had detrusor overactivity (DO) without detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD); two had DO with DSD; and one had hypoactive detrusor with nonrelaxing sphincter during void phase. The common urinary symptoms were urgency, enuresis, and straining to void urine. Significant postvoid residual urine was found in two patients. Conclusion: The evidence of bladder dysfunction in atypical antipsychotic-emergent UI is similar to that present in patients with neurological disorders. Urinary complaints in patients on antipsychotics thus need to be evaluated and managed systematically using the protocol followed for neurological conditions. PMID:28197002

  12. [German Artificial Sphincter System--GASS. Development and in vitro evaluation of a novel, fully-implantable, highly integrated sphincter prosthesis for therapy of high-grade fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Schrag, Hans J; Padilla, Federico F; Doll, A; Goldschmidtböing, Frank; Woias, Peter; Hopt, Ulrich T

    2004-10-01

    No highly integrated sphincter prosthesis for therapy of major fecal incontinence exists. Therefore, we developed a novel neosphincter, made of polyurethane. The GASS consists of a support ring (SR) which includes a fluid reservoir, fixed on the outer diameter of the SR, and a multi-chamber occluding cuff (C(int)) on the inside diameter. The total inflation volume of C(int) is about 23 cc. The integrated micropump based on piezotechnology measures 30x13x1 mm3 (flowrate 1.4 cc/min, max. backpressure 40,000 Pa) . GASS was evaluated around the external sphincter of isolated porcine anal canals. The threshold of continence was defined as the inflating volume which water ceased to leak through the area occluded by C(int) under an induced rectal pressure of 150 cm H2O. Minimal filling volumes maintained continence for liquids against high luminal pressures. A low intraanal resting pressure (delta p(anal)) induced by activated GASS indicates a little risk of ischemic injury of the anal canal in vivo (median delta p(anal) 24.1 mm hg:15 cc vs 46.9 mm hg:21 cc). In summary, a highly integrated and efficient high-tech neosphincter for the therapy of major fecal incontinence could be realized.

  13. Longitudinal comparison of quality of life in patients undergoing laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication versus magnetic sphincter augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Lovece, Andrea; Lazzari, Veronica; Bonavina, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Only a minority of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are offered a surgical option. This is mostly due to the fear of potential side effects, the variable success rate, and the extreme alteration of gastric anatomy with the current gold standard, the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. It has been reported that laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) and laparoscopic sphincter augmentation using a magnetic device (LINX) can treat reflux more physiologically and with a lower incidence of side-effects and reoperation rate. We present the first comparing quality of life in patients undergoing LTF versus LINX. Observational cohort study. Consecutive patients undergoing LTF or LINX over the same time period were compared by using the propensity score full matching method and generalized estimating equation. Criteria of exclusion were >3 cm hiatal hernia, grade C–D esophagitis, ineffective esophageal motility, body mass index >35, and previous upper abdominal surgery. The primary study outcome was quality of life measured with the Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease-Health Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use, presence of gas-related symptoms or dysphagia, and reoperation-free probability. Between March 2007 and July 2014, 238 patients with GERD met the criteria of inclusion in the study. Of these, 103 underwent an LTF and 135 a LINX procedure. All patients had a minimum 1-year follow-up. Over time, patients in both groups had similar GERD-HRQL scores (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, confidence interval [CI] 0.89–1.27; P = 0.578), PPI use (OR 1.18, CI 0.81–1.70; P = 0.388), gas-related symptoms (OR 0.69, CI 0.21–2.28; P = 0.542), dysphagia (OR 0.62, CI 0.26–1.30; P = 0.241), and reoperation-free probability (stratified log-rank test = 0.556). In 2 concurrent cohorts of patients with early stage GERD undergoing LTF or LINX and matched by propensity score

  14. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the "mechanical states" of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight different

  15. Electrical activity from smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical activities of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area have been studied in the cat. 2. Electromyographic recordings were achieved with extracellular electrodes, in vivo on acute and chronic animals, and in vitro on the isolated organ. In addition, electrical and mechanical activities were recorded from muscle strips with the sucrose gap technique. 3. Circular muscle coat electrical activity consisted exclusively of slow variations of the membrane potential of the smooth muscle cells. Each slow potential variation was followed by a contraction. 4. The electrical activity and the concomitant contractions were tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). Both disappeared in Ca-free solution or in the presence of Mn ions (10(-3) M). 5. On circular muscle, noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-7) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.1-0.15 mg/kg in vivo) had an excitatory effect consisting in an increase of slow potential frequency. The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by phentolamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.2 mg/kg in vivo). 6. On circular muscle, acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.), used exclusively on muscle strips, did never produce any clear cut effect. 7. Longitudinal muscle coat electrical activity consisted of spike potentials superimposed on slow time course depolarizations which were never observed alone. Each spike was followed by a contraction. This electrical activity was tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). 8. Longitudinal muscle activity was abolished by noradrenaline (10(-6) g/ml.) and enhanced by acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.). The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg I.V.; 10(-6) g/ml.) and that of acetylcholine by atropine (10(-7) g/ml.). 9. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data indicate that electromechanical coupling is achieved (1) in circular muscle, through Ca dependent slow variations in membrane potential of the muscle cells and (2) in longitudinal muscle, through spike

  16. PERFACT procedure to treat supralevator fistula-in-ano: A novel single stage sphincter sparing procedure

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    step sphincter saving procedure to treat SLF with minimal risk of incontinence. PMID:27152140

  17. Diastolic dysfunction in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nazário Leão, R; Marques da Silva, P

    2017-03-03

    Hypertension and coronary heart disease, often coexisting, are the most common risk factors for heart failure. The progression of hypertensive heart disease involves myocardial fibrosis and alterations in the left ventricular geometry that precede the functional change, initially asymptomatic. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is part of this continuum being defined by the presence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction without signs or symptoms of heart failure or poor left ventricular systolic function. It is highly prevalent in hypertensive patients and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Despite its growing importance in clinical practice it remains poorly understood. This review aims to present the epidemiological fundamentals and the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  18. Patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Sifrim, D; Silny, J; Holloway, R; Janssens, J

    1999-01-01

    Background—Belching has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying acid gastro-oesophageal reflux in normal subjects. However, the presence of oesophageal gas has not been measured directly but only inferred from manometry. 
Aims—To investigate, using intraluminal electrical impedance, the patterns of gas and liquid reflux during transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations, the main mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects. 
Methods—Impedance changes associated with the passage of gas were studied in vitro, and in vivo in cats. Oesophageal manometry, pH, and intraluminal electrical impedance measurements were performed in 11 normal subjects after a meal. 
Results—Gas reflux caused a sudden increase in impedance that propagated rapidly to the proximal oesophagus whereas liquid reflux induced a retrogressively propagated fall in impedance. Impedance showed gas or liquid reflux during most (102/141) transient LOS relaxations. When acid reflux occurred, impedance showed evidence of intraoesophageal retrograde flow of liquid in the majority (78%) of events. Evidence of gas retroflow was found in almost half (47%) of acid reflux episodes. When present together, however, liquid preceded gas on 44% of occasions. Overall, gas reflux occurred as the initial event in only 25% of acid reflux episodes. 
Conclusions—These findings suggest that in upright normal subjects, although belching can precipitate acid reflux, most acid reflux occurs as a primary event. 

 Keywords: belching; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; oesophageal manometry; intraluminal electrical impedance; lower oesophageal sphincter PMID:9862825

  19. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  20. Adipocytokines in Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Aydogan, Berna İmge; Sahin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Adipocytokines are important mediators of interorgan crosstalk in metabolic regulation. Thyroid diseases have effects on metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of these effects is not clear. Recently, there are several reports suggesting this interrelation between adipocytokines and thyroid dysfunction. In this review, we summarize this relation according to the literature. PMID:24049662

  1. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  2. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  3. Female sexual dysfunction: Assessment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J B; Kalra, Bharti

    2016-05-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a common complex clinical condition, with multiple etiologies, association and pathophysiologic correlations. This review includes the definition, etiology, and diagnosis of FSD. It calls for a bio psychosocial approach to FSD management, which incorporates, but is not limited to, only the psychological aspects of FSD.

  4. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... on women with certain sexual dysfunctions, but more study is needed. Yoga. During yoga, you perform a series of postures and controlled breathing exercises to promote a flexible body and a calm mind. Certain subsets of yoga aim to channel the ...

  5. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  6. The pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in scleroderma and Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Fisher, R; Lipshutz, W; Turner, R; Myers, A; Schumacher, R

    1972-10-01

    To determine the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in scleroderma and Raynaud's disease, the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) was tested with: (a) methacholine acting directly at the cholinergic receptor on the muscle; (b) edrophonium, a cholinesterase inhibitor, enhancing the effect of released acetylcholine; and (c) gastrin I, acting through the release of acetylcholine. 10 patients with Raynaud's disease and 22 patients with scleroderma were compared with 20 normals and 20 patients with isolated LES incompetence. The mean basal LES pressure in normals was significantly greater than that recorded in both patients with scleroderma and Raynaud's disease. Six patients having scleroderma with normal peristalsis had an LES pressure significantly greater than that noted in 16 patients having scleroderma with abnormal peristalsis. In all groups, the per cent increase in LES pressure was similar when tested by direct muscle stimulation by methacholine. The response to agents that acted indirectly through intact cholinergic nerves differed in these groups. The LES response to gastrin I distinguished patients with normal peristalsis from those with abnormal peristalsis. The patients with normal peristalsis, either with scleroderma or with Raynaud's disease showed only a partial reduction in their response to gastrin I. The response to gastrin I was markedly reduced only in patients with abnormal peristalsis. These data indicate that in patients with scleroderma and Raynaud's disease, the LES response to direct muscle stimulation by methacholine was intact while the response to gastrin I and edrophonium was diminished.

  7. Alkaloids from Mahonia bealei posses anti-H⁺/K⁺-ATPase and anti-gastrin effects on pyloric ligation-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su-Li; Li, Hui; He, Xin; Zhang, Run-Qi; Sun, Yu-He; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-09-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanism(s) of the total alkaloids (TA) from Mahonia bealei in treating pyloric ligation-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Animals were sacrificed after 19 h of the ligation. Gastric acid, peptic activities, mucin levels, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities and the gastrin level were analyzed. To improve the accuracy of the observations, IPP 6.0 software was introduced to measure the area of ulcer. TA (18.56 mg/kg/day, i.g.) showed an antiulcer effect by significantly decreasing the gastric ulcer areas (11.28 mm(2)) compared with model group (26.36 mm(2)). The TA ulcer inhibition ratio was 57.2%, compared with the effect of the positive control, omeprazole (62.96%). The results also showed that TA had a significant effect in inhibiting the release of H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, reducing the content of gastrin and decreasing gastric acidity on experimental animals. However, the TA had no significant effects on gastric mucus secretion and pepsin activity. Data indicated that TA had gastric ulcer protective effects by modulating the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and gastrin level. TA has a potential to be developed as a pharmacological agent for the treatment of gastric ulcers.

  8. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  9. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with peripheral nervous system lesions.

    PubMed

    Podnar, Simon; Vodušek, David B

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction in peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders is larger than in comparable control populations. This is particularly true for polyneuropathies with autonomic nervous system involvement, and for localized lesions with LUT innervation. LUT symptoms may be the guide to the diagnosis of processes localized in the lumbosacral spinal canal (as in cauda equina syndrome), and in the pelvis. Typical LUT dysfunctions (LUTD) caused by PNS involvement include bladder and sphincter hypoactivity with poor emptying, and incontinence. Paradoxically, bladder overactivity may also occur in pure PNS lesions. The acute cauda equina syndrome is an emergency requiring magnetic resonance imaging and surgery; in chronic neurogenic LUTD due to PNS involvement, the diagnosis of the lesion may be clarified by clinical neurophysiologic testing. Other important causes of neurogenic LUT dysfunction are perineoabdominal and pelvic surgeries. Surgeons are devising nerve-sparing techniques to prevent such major and often persistent complications in patients who are otherwise cured of the underlying disease. LUTD significantly affects the quality of life in patients and may lead to recurring urinary infections and upper urinary tract involvement. Thorough assessment of LUT function by urodynamics may be necessary in patients who are not improved by simple conservative measures.

  10. Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jeffrey; Carey, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Ten years of research that has provided data regarding the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions is reviewed. A thorough review of the literature identified 52 studies that have been published in the 10 years since an earlier review by Spector and Carey (1990). Community samples indicate a current prevalence of 0 - 3% for male orgasmic disorder, 0 - 5% for erectile disorder, and 0 - 3% for male hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Pooling current and 1-year figures provides community prevalence estimates of 7 - 10% for female orgasmic disorder and 4 - 5% for premature ejaculation. Stable community estimates of the current prevalence for the other sexual dysfunctions remain unavailable. Prevalence estimates obtained from primary care and sexuality clinic samples are characteristically higher. Although a relatively large number of studies have been conducted since Spector and Carey’s (1990) review, the lack of methodological rigor of many studies limits the confidence that can be placed in these findings. PMID:11329727

  11. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  12. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization.

  13. Sexual Dysfunction After Urethroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Prem Nath; Singh, Prabhjot; Nayyar, Rishi; Yadav, Siddharth

    2017-02-01

    Posturethroplasty sexual dysfunction (SD) is multifactorial and its true incidence is unknown. Even with the current evidence suggesting that it is uncommon, de novo SD causes dissatisfaction even after a successful surgery. Posterior urethroplasty carries the highest chance of SD, mostly attributable to the pelvic fracture itself rather than the urethroplasty. With anterior urethroplasty, transecting bulbar urethroplasty leads to greater SD compared with penile or nontransecting bulbar urethroplasty. Most patients with posturethroplasty SD recover within 6 months after surgery.

  14. Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W.; Chen, Horng H

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as subjects with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF), and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity which remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic heart failure including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared to patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients’ morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning preclinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

  15. Clinical evaluation of a single daily dose of phenylpropanolamine in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Stéphanie; Rustichelli, Frederico; Noël, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the efficacy of a single daily oral dose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) in bitches. Nine bitches diagnosed with USMI were treated with a single daily dose [1.5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] of PPA for at least 1 month. Urethral pressure profiles (UPP) were performed in 7 dogs before treatment and repeated in 4 of them after treatment. Treatment with PPA resulted in long-term continence in 8/9 bitches. One dog did not respond to PPA and was treated surgically later. Recheck UPPs showed a significant increase in maximal urethral closure pressure in the 4 bitches after treatment with PPA compared to before treatment. In conclusion, long-term continence can be achieved in bitches affected with USMI after administration of a single daily dose of PPA (1.5 mg/kg BW).

  16. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  17. Endourethral prosthesis for treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: impact on quality of life for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A C; Juma, S; Niku, S D

    1994-12-01

    Neurogenic bladders with detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) are common in persons with spinal cord injury and with multiple sclerosis. Treatment options such as sphincterotomy, urethral foley and suprapubic catheters are not without complications or failure; however, they are recommended for patients who are unable to do intermittent catheterization. An endourethral prosthesis for DSD has been developed for experimental use in the United States. We report one year results of the clinical trials with endourethral prostheses implanted in ten patients. Initial subjective and objective results show an 80% success rate. At present, preliminary data show that an endourethral prosthesis, which is simple to insert and has few complications, appears to offer an alternative to conventional treatment. A key to success is to prepare for changes in life style that impact the patient's quality of life. Both patient and staff education are necessary pre-operatively to achieve successful outcomes post-operatively.

  18. [Improvement of fecal incontinence with silicone implants in patients with internal anal sphincter injury: First report in North America].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Fernández, O; Valdovinos-Díaz, M A; Hagerman-Ruiz Galindo, G; Salinas-Aragón, L E; Ruíz-Campos, M; Castillo-Machado, W

    2011-01-01

    The injection of bulking agents has been described as a useful treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence. Among them, silicone implants have shown benefits in patients with internal anal sphincter (IAS) injury. We describe two patients with a history of hemorrhoidectomy and IAS injuries, which underwent placement of silicone implants. The implants were inserted into the intersphincteric space and the IAS under ultrasound guidance. The Wexner continente score fell from 17 and 19 before treatment, to 6 and 8 at six months follow up, respectively. Patients had no postoperative complications or implants migration. In our patients, injection of silicone implants improved fecal continence score, without postoperative complications or implants migration at six month follow up.

  19. Sexual dysfunction with antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Prisant, L M; Carr, A A; Bottini, P B; Solursh, D S; Solursh, L P

    1994-04-11

    The relationship of antihypertensive drugs have a long history of association with sexual dysfunction; however, this relationship is poorly documented. There appears to be a higher rate of sexual dysfunction in untreated hypertensive men compared with normotensive men. Sexual dysfunction increases with age and is associated with physical and emotional symptoms. There are few studies assessing sexual dysfunction with female and African-American hypertensive patients. Sexual dysfunction is associated with impairment of quality of life and noncompliance. Since group data may hide individual drug effects, baseline data should be collected on all patients before initiating therapy with any antihypertensive agent. Although questionnaires may not provide objective information on sexual dysfunction, the response rate to direct questioning may be less than the response rate on a questionnaire and may be affected by the gender or race of the interviewer. Research protocols using a double-blind, placebo-controlled design should assess sexual dysfunction in men and women in a standardized fashion.

  20. Inhibition of sphincter of Oddi function by the nitric oxide carrier S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine in rabbits and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Slivka, A; Chuttani, R; Carr-Locke, D L; Kobzik, L; Bredt, D S; Loscalzo, J; Stamler, J S

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Model systems of the gut predict the NO will complex with biological thiol (SH) groups, yielding S-nitrosothiols (RS-NO), which may limit the propensity to form mutagenic nitrosamines. The inhibitory effects of NO and its biologically relevant adducts on sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility have been inferred from animal studies; however, their importance in regulating human SO is not known. The objectives of this study were to (a) provide histologic confirmation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in human SO; (b) characterize the pharmacology of S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (SNAC), an exemplary S-nitrosothiol, on SO motility in a rabbit model; and (c) study the effects of topical SNAC on SO motility in humans. Immunocytochemical and histochemical identification of NOS was performed in human SO. The pharmacologic response of SNAC was defined in isolated rabbit SO using a standard bioassay. Topical SNAC was then applied to the duodenal papilla in patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and biliary manometry. NOS was localized to nerve fibers and bundles of the SO in rabbits and humans. SNAC inhibited spontaneous motility (frequency and amplitude) as well as acetylcholine-induced elevations in SO basal pressure in the rabbit model. In patients undergoing ERCP and biliary manometry, topical SNAC inhibited SO contraction freqency, basal pressure, and duodenal motility. NOS is localized to neural elements in human SO, implicating a role for NO in regulating SO function. Supporting this concept, SNAC is an inhibitor of SO and duodenal motility when applied topically to humans during ERCP. Our data suggest a novel clinical approach using local NO donors to control gastrointestinal motility and regulate sphincteric function. Images PMID:7525649

  1. The efficacy of balloon dilation in achalasia is the result of stretching of the lower esophageal sphincter, not muscular disruption.

    PubMed

    Borhan-Manesh, F; Kaviani, M J; Taghavi, A R

    2016-04-01

    Pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in achalasia is a major palliative treatment. It is generally believed, although never substantiated, that therapeutic efficacy of ballooning in achalasia is the result of the disruption and tearing of the muscular layers of the LES. To clarify this issue, we investigated the frequency of muscular disruption at the LES, 24 hours after PD, by employing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), in a group of 43 consented patients with achalasia. Between July 2009 and March2012, 51 consecutive adult patients with tentative diagnosis of achalasia, some with recurrence of symptoms after an earlier treatment with balloon dilation, were evaluated and underwent PD, using Rigiflex balloon without major adverse effect. Out of the 51 evaluated, 43 eligible and consenting patients who underwent EUS, 24 hours after PD, using Olympus GF-UE 160 echoendoscope and an Aloka Prosound probe at 7.5 MHZ, are the subjects of this study. The EUS in 43 eligible patients revealed an intact LES in 36 (83.7%), small area of muscular disruption in 5 (11.6%) and small hematoma in 2 patients (4.6%). Our data convincingly demonstrate that the clinical effectiveness of balloon dilation in achalasia is not the result of muscular disruption, but of circumferential stretching of the LES. Our findings on the mechanism of action of PD in achalasia could result in modifying the current method of dilation for a safer procedure, by slowing the rate of inflation and allowing the sphincter to slowly stretch itself to the distending balloon.

  2. Spinal stimulation of the upper lumbar spinal cord modulates urethral sphincter activity in rats after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Abud, Edsel M; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Havton, Leif A; Chang, Huiyi H

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), the neurogenic bladder is observed to develop asynchronous bladder and external urethral sphincter (EUS) contractions in a condition known as detrusor-sphincter dyssnergia (DSD). Activation of the EUS spinal controlling center located at the upper lumbar spinal cord may contribute to reduce EUS dyssynergic contractions and decrease urethral resistance during voiding. However, this mechanism has not been well studied. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of epidural stimulation (EpS) over the spinal EUS controlling center (L3) in combination with a serotonergic receptor agonist on EUS relaxation in naive rats and chronic (6-8 wk) T8 SCI rats. Cystometrogram and EUS electromyography (EMG) were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of 5HT-1A receptor agonist and antagonist. The latency, duration, frequency, amplitude, and area under curve of EpS-evoked EUS EMG responses were analyzed. EpS on L3 evoked an inhibition of EUS tonic contraction and an excitation of EUS intermittent bursting/relaxation correlating with urine expulsion in intact rats. Combined with a 5HT-1A receptor agonist, EpS on L3 evoked a similar effect in chronic T8 SCI rats to reduce urethral contraction (resistance). This study examined the effect of facilitating the EUS spinal controlling center to switch between urine storage and voiding phases by using EpS and a serotonergic receptor agonist. This novel approach of applying EpS on the EUS controlling center modulates EUS contraction and relaxation as well as reduces urethral resistance during voiding in chronic SCI rats with DSD.

  3. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  4. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature.

  5. Accelerated Progression of Gastritis to Dysplasia in the Pyloric Antrum of TFF2−/− C57BL6 × Sv129 Helicobacter pylori-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Ohtani, Masa; Jones, Evelyn Kurt; Wang, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Trefoil factor family 2 (TFF2) is up-regulated in Helicobacter spp.-infected gastric tissues of both humans and mice. To ascertain the biological effects of TFF2 in vivo, TFF2−/− C57BL/6 × Sv129 and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 × Sv129 mice were orally infected with Helicobacter pylori SS1. Mice were evaluated for gastric H. pylori colonization, pathology, and cytokine profiles at 6 and 19 months post inoculation (pi). At 6 months pi, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) for epithelial criteria (mucosal defects, atrophy, hyperplasia, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and dysplasia) in the corpus of TFF2−/− versus WT mice. At 19 months pi, a similar statistical difference in epithelial parameters was noted in the antrum of TFF2−/− versus WT mice (P < 0.01). All of the TFF2−/− H. pylori-infected mice had high-grade antral dysplasia, including gastric intraepithelial neoplasia, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05) compared with the infected WT mice. Levels of interferon-γ were markedly elevated in the gastric mucosa of infected TFF2−/− mice at both 6 and 19 months pi. TFF2 provided a cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory effect against the progression of premalignant lesions of the gastric corpus at 6 months pi and in the pyloric antrum in H. pylori-infected mice at 19 months pi. These data support a protective role for TFF2 in part by modulating levels of gastric interferon-γ in the development of H. pylori-associated premalignancy of the distal stomach. PMID:17982128

  6. Contributions of different NaPi cotransporter isoforms to dietary regulation of P transport in the pyloric caeca and intestine of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shozo H; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2004-05-01

    The anatomical proximity and embryological relationship of the pyloric caeca (PC) and small intestine of rainbow trout has led to the frequent assumption, on little evidence, that they have the same enzymes and transporters. In trout, the PC is an important absorptive organ for dietary nutrients, but its role in dietary P absorption has not been reported. We found that apical inorganic phosphate (Pi) transport in PC comprises carrier-mediated and diffusive components. Carrier-mediated uptake was energy- and temperature-dependent, competitively inhibited and Na(+)-independent, and greater than the Na(+)-dependent intestinal uptake. Pi uptake in PC was pH-sensitive in the presence of Na(+). Despite the active Pi transport system in PC, high postprandial luminal Pi concentrations ( approximately 20 mmol l(-1)) indicate that diffusive uptake represents approximately 92% of total Pi uptake in PC of fed fish. The nucleotide sequence of a sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) isoform isolated from PC was approximately 8% different from the intestinal NaPi cotransporter. PC-NaPi mRNA was abundant in PC but rare in the intestine, whereas intestinal NaPi mRNA was abundant in the intestine but scarce in PC. Dietary P restriction reduced serum and bone P concentrations, increased intestine-type, but not PC-type, NaPi mRNA in PC, and increased Pi uptake in intestine but not in PC. Intestine-type NaPi expression may be useful for predicting dietary P deficiency.

  7. [Thyroid dysfunctions and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology of the thyroid function in normal pregnancy have highlighted the importance of the consequences of abnormal thyroid function on mother and fetal outcomes. Thyroid diseases are common in young women of childbearing age while management of thyroid diseases is relatively straightforward. For each thyroid dysfunction (hypothyroxinemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis), the issues with the obstetric complications of the mother and the fetus are considered. Indeed, early recognition of thyroid diseases during pregnancy and appropriate management has the potential to improve outcome for the mother and the fetus.

  8. Dysfunctional voiding in adults.

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Stav, Kobi

    2013-05-01

    Dysfunctional voiding is characterized by an intermittent and/or fluctuating flow rate due to involuntary intermittent contractions of the periurethral striated or levator muscles during voiding in neurologically normal women (International Continence Society definition). Due to the variable etiology, the diagnosis and treatment of DV is problematic. Frequently, the diagnosis is done at a late stage mainly due to non-specific symptoms and lack of awareness. The objectives of treatment are to normalize micturition patterns and prevent complications such as renal failure and recurrent infections. Treatment should be started as early as possible and a multidisciplinary approach is beneficial.

  9. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    PubMed

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  11. Depression and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Makhlouf, Antoine; Kparker, Ashay; Niederberger, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) clearly are associated. Although urologists and psychiatrists have long recognized that antidepressant medications affect erectile function negatively, the interplay between the two conditions remains underappreciated. Psychiatrists may be reluctant to question a patient in detail about ED, and urologists seldom perform a formal assessment of the presence of depression in patients who have ED. This article gives a quick overview of the relationship between these two conditions and provides the clinician with the knowledge required to effectively manage ED with comorbid depression.

  12. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  13. Managing female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Buster, John E

    2013-10-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions (FSDs) range from short-term aggravations to major emotional disturbances adversely affecting family and workplace. This review highlights diagnosis and management of the four most widely diagnosed FSDs. It initially focuses on hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) as a driving force at the heart of all other FSDs; nothing happens without sexual desire. Successful resolution of HSDD frequently facilitates resolution of other disorders. Central to understanding HSDD is the impact of aging female sexual endocrinology and its effect on both prevalence and expression patterns of FSD. Advances in this field have enabled introduction of some the most effective treatments yet described for HSDD. Sexual arousal disorder, though commonly affected by the same factors as HSDD, is heavily associated with psychotropic drugs and mood elevators. Orgasmic disorder is frequently the downstream result of other sexual dysfunctions, particularly HSDD, or the result of a major psychosexual trauma. Successful management of the underlying disorder often resolves orgasmic disorder. Sexual pain disorder is frequently the result of a gynecologic disorder, such as endometriosis, that can be substantially managed through successful treatment of that disorder. This article ends with the article's most important note: how to initiate the conversation.

  14. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M. J.; Coursin, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), though newly described, has manifested itself in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for several decades. As the name implies, it is a syndrome in which more than one organ system fails. Failure of these multiple organ systems may or may not be related to the initial injury or disease process for which the patient was admitted to the ICU. MODS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in current ICU practice. While the pathophysiology of MODS is not completely known, much evidence indicates that, during the initial injury which precipitates ICU admission, a chain of events is initiated which results in activation of several endogenous metabolic pathways. These pathways release compounds which, in and of themselves, are usually cytoprotective. However, an over exuberant activation of these endogenous systems results in an inflammatory response which can lead to development of failure in distant organs. As these organs fail, they activate and propagate the systemic inflammatory response. No therapy has proven entirely efficacious at modulating this inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of MODS. In current ICU practice, treatment is focused on prevention and treating individual organ dysfunction as it develops. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of MODS therapy will come newer modalities which inhibit or interfere with the propagation of the endogenous systemic inflammatory response. These newer therapies hold great promise and already some are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:7825351

  15. [Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Solanas, M

    1999-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a clinical situation that has been described as a result of the rapid progress and advances that have been made in recent decades in the physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic support of critically ill patients. In 1991, in view of the confusing terminology used to characterize processes coursing with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a consensus conference was held. A series of basic definitions were established and the term "multiple organ failure" was replace by MODS. In response to outside aggression, the organism tries to defend itself with two mechanisms: a non-specific humoral and cellular response called inflammation, and a specific antigenic response that modifies the genetic codes of cells of the defense system and constitutes an immunological response. At present it is thought that the inflammatory response is activated (SIRS) in response to an uncontrolled aggression, but an antiinflammatory response syndrome (ARS) exists as well. An exaggerated SIRS can lead to MODS. MODS usually debuts with pulmonary dysfunction. If the aggression persists, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, coagulation, central nervous system, gastrointestinal metabolism, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal failure follow. A series of causes often trigger this syndrome and certain factors favor it. Prevention of these causes and factors in fundamental for controlling the occurrence of MODS. At present, there is no clear treatment for MODS, although numerous studies designed to block the release of certain proinflammatory mediators or to neutralize antiinflammatory responses are being carried out.

  16. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED.

  17. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  18. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,…

  19. Psychotropics and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexual dysfunction (SD) is common in patients taking antipsychotics, and is the most bothersome symptom and adverse drug effect compromising treatment compliance. Mechanisms involved in psychotropics–induced SD are either largely unknown or poorly understood. The aim of this review is to present an updated analysis of SD associated with the use of psychotropic drugs in psychiatric patients. Results Contemporary evidence from available studies demonstrates that SD rates are drug–related rather than drug–class specific, and that these rates vary widely. Mechanisms involved in psychotropics–induced SD are either largely unknown or poorly understood. Our understanding of psychotropics–induced SD is limited by the inability to differentiate whether these effects are really drug–induced or due to different inclusion criteria. Conclusions Rigorous research, basic and clinical, is needed to understand the exact incidence, severity and mechanisms involved in the development of SD induced by various psychotropic treatment regimens. PMID:24757547

  20. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome.

  1. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  2. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Huang, Shih-Che; Tey, Shu-Leei; Hsu, Wen-Li; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong

    2015-08-11

    Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker), nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker), and Ca(2+)-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca(2+)-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca(2+) entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca(2+) release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca(2+) influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca(2+) influx pathway.

  3. Pelvic floor muscles and the external urethral sphincter have different responses to applied bladder pressure during continence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Salcedo, Levilester B.; Song, Bo; Damaser, Margot S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the functional innervation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and if there is PFM activity during an external pressure increase to the bladder in female rats. Methods Thirty-one female adult virgin Sprague Dawley rats received an external increase in bladder pressure until urinary leakage was noted while bladder pressure was recorded (leak point pressure; LPP) under urethane anesthesia. Six of the rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the levator ani nerve. Another 6 rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerve. Simultaneous recordings of PFM (pubo-/iliococcygeus muscles) electromyogram (EMG) and external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG were recorded during cystometry and LPP testing. Results Thirteen rats (42%) showed tonic PFM EMG activity during filling cystometry. Eighteen rats (58%) showed no tonic PFM EMG activity at baseline, but PFM EMG could be activated by pinching the perineal skin. This activity could be maintained unless voiding occurred. The external increase in bladder pressure caused significantly increased EUS EMG activity as demonstrated by increased amplitude and frequency. However, there was no such response in PFM EMG. LPP was not significantly different after levator ani nerve transection, but was significantly decreased after pudendal nerve transection. Conclusions PFM activity was not increased during external pressure increases to the bladder in female rats. Experimental designs using rats should consider this result. PMID:20206969

  4. Functional coupling between motor and sensory nerves through contraction of sphincters in the pudendal area of the female cat.

    PubMed

    Lagunes-Córdoba, Roberto; Hernández, Pablo Rogelio; Raya, José Guadalupe; Muñoz-Martínez, E J

    2010-01-01

    The question of whether skin receptors might help in the perception of muscle contraction and body movement has not been settled. The present study gives direct evidence of skin receptor firing in close coincidence with the contraction of the vaginal and anal sphincters. The distal stump of the sectioned motor pudendal nerve was stimulated. Single shocks induced a wavelike increase in the lumen pressure of the distal vagina and the anal canal, as well as constriction of the vaginal introitus and the anus. The constriction pulls on and moves the surrounding skin, which was initially detected visually. In the present experiments, a thin strain gauge that pressed on the skin surface detected its displacement. Single shocks to the motor nerve induced a wave of skin movement with maximal amplitude at 5 mm from the anus and propagated with decrement beyond 35 mm. The peripheral terminals of the sensory pudendal nerve and the posterior femoral nerve supply the skin that moves. Sensory axons from both nerves fired in response to both tactile stimulation and the skin movement produced by the constriction of the orifices (motor-sensory coupling). In cats with all nerves intact, a single shock to the sensory nerves induced reflex waves of skin movement and lumen pressure (sensory-motor coupling). Both couplings provide evidence for a feedforward action that might help to maintain the female posture during mating and to the perception of muscle contraction.

  5. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (<4 cm): 6 %; Type II (4-7 cm): 36 %; Type III (7-10 cm): 34 %; and Type IV (>10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  6. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance.

  7. Optimal stimulus intensity and reliability of air stimulation technique for elicitation of laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Osamu; Easterling, Caryn; Rittmann, Tanya; Hofmann, Candy; Shaker, Reza

    2005-03-01

    To determine the optimal air stimulus intensity and duration for elicitation of the laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex, we studied 37 healthy volunteers 20 to 81 years of age. A sleeve device monitored the UES pressure. For laryngeal stimulation, we used an air stimulator unit (Pentax AP-4000) that incorporated a nasolaryngeal endoscope. The arytenoids and interarytenoid areas were stimulated at least three times by three different stimuli: 6-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, 10-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, and 6-mm Hg air pulse with 2-second duration. Of 1,165 air stimulations, 1,041 resulted in mucosal deflections. Of these, 451 resulted in an abrupt increase in UES pressure. The response/deflection ratio for 6-mm Hg stimulation with 2-second duration was significantly higher than those for air pulses with 50-ms duration (p < .001). We conclude that although the laryngo-UES contractile reflex can be elicited by an air pulse with 50-ms duration, this ultrashort stimulation is not reliable. Using longer-duration pulses (at least 2 seconds) improves the reliability of elicitation of the laryngo-UES contractile reflex.

  8. Disease, dysfunction, and synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2014-08-01

    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield's hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research in synthetic biology. In particular, I argue that the possibility of artifactual organisms and the case of oncomice and other bred or genetically modified strains of organism constitute a significant objection to Wakefield's etiological account of the dysfunction requirement. I then develop a new alternative understanding of the dysfunction requirement that builds on the organizational theory of function. I conclude that my suggestion is superior to Wakefield's theory because it (a) can accommodate both artifactual and naturally evolved organisms, (b) avoids the possibility of there being a conflict between what an organismic part is supposed to do and the health of the organism, and (c) provides a nonarbitrary and practical way of determining whether dysfunction occurs.

  9. Understanding brain dysfunction in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis often is characterized by an acute brain dysfunction, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its pathophysiology is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes, which may induce significant alterations in vulnerable areas of the brain. Important mechanisms include excessive microglial activation, impaired cerebral perfusion, blood–brain-barrier dysfunction, and altered neurotransmission. Systemic insults, such as prolonged inflammation, severe hypoxemia, and persistent hyperglycemia also may contribute to aggravate sepsis-induced brain dysfunction or injury. The diagnosis of brain dysfunction in sepsis relies essentially on neurological examination and neurological tests, such as EEG and neuroimaging. A brain MRI should be considered in case of persistent brain dysfunction after control of sepsis and exclusion of major confounding factors. Recent MRI studies suggest that septic shock can be associated with acute cerebrovascular lesions and white matter abnormalities. Currently, the management of brain dysfunction mainly consists of control of sepsis and prevention of all aggravating factors, including metabolic disturbances, drug overdoses, anticholinergic medications, withdrawal syndromes, and Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Modulation of microglial activation, prevention of blood–brain-barrier alterations, and use of antioxidants represent relevant therapeutic targets that may impact significantly on neurologic outcomes. In the future, investigations in patients with sepsis should be undertaken to reduce the duration of brain dysfunction and to study the impact of this reduction on important health outcomes, including functional and cognitive status in survivors. PMID:23718252

  10. Psychoanalysis: a dysfunctional family?

    PubMed

    Grosskurth, P

    1998-01-01

    The discussion opens with an account of the author's mother's bizarre family in which a strong, charismatic grandmother maintained absolute control over her large family by encouraging a neurotic dependence in them through daily reports of their complaints. Getting interested in psychoanalysis in an effort to understand the dynamics of this dysfunctional family, the author, a biographer, turned to the study of Melanie Klein, becoming entranced by her ideas. Her research also revealed how Klein had discouraged her followers from developing ideas that diverged in any way from her own. Her portrait of the pioneer analyst provoked intense indignation. A similar pattern of absolute loyalty to his person and theories was to be found in Freud's Secret Committee, formed primarily as a means of getting rid of Jung who had been showing disturbing signs of independence. When Ferenczi and Rank began to pursue independent lines of enquiry in their work, they too were though to be undermining the foundations of classical psychoanalysis. Finally, the author concludes that though there have been sorry incidents in psychoanalysis, we should be mature enough to accept both the contributions of the early pioneers and the realizations that new ideas must be permitted to evolve.

  11. Markers of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin P.; Melman, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    With the development and marketing of oral pharmacotherapy that is both noninvasive and successful in treating erectile dysfunction (ED), the quest to identify markers of organic ED lost ground. Indeed, the multi-factorial nature of ED may have led many researchers to conclude that searching for a universal marker of ED was futile. However, the realization that ED is strongly correlated with the overall health of men, and may act as a predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, has stimulated interest in identifying genes that can distinguish organic ED. In addition, the potential ability to suggest to the patient that ED is reversible (i.e., psychogenic) with a simple test would be of significance to both the physician and patient, as well as for reimbursement issues for therapy by insurance companies. Such a marker may also act as a non-subjective measure of the degree of ED and the efficacy of treatment. This review discusses the importance of identifying such markers and recent work identifying potential markers in human patients. PMID:19468461

  12. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area.

  13. [Female sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Luria, Mijal

    2009-09-01

    Female sexual problems are common, frequently overlooked and have a significant impact on the lives of women. Research in the last decade has brought to the understanding and recognition of a number of standpoints, mainly the broad range of normative function. In 2003, the American Urological Association Foundation convened an international committee of experts in the field of women's sexuality, to reconsider the existing definitions of women's sexual dysfunction. Based on the circular response cycle developed by Basson, the group emphasized motivations that might move a woman from being sexually "neutral" to making a decision to be sexual with her partner, as a normative alternative to the need for spontaneous sexual desire as the trigger for sexual behavior. Etiology may stem from medical as well as psychological factors, thus assessment must include a complete evaluation. Treatment includes psycho-education, improvement of interpersonal communication, cognitive behavioral treatment and elucidation and treatment of medical problems, if necessary. Several pharmacological treatments are under investigation, with modest results and uncertainties about their long term safety. This review presents the female sexual response as it is understood today and the current diagnostic and therapeutic understandings and directions.

  14. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; John, Sandhya Mary; Unni, Amith

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  15. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    PubMed

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  16. The Dysfunctions of Bureaucratic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1988-01-01

    Numerous dysfunctions result from bureaucratic school organization, including an overemphasis on specialized tasks, routine operating rules, and formal procedures for managing teaching and learning. Such schools are characterized by numerous regulations; formal communications; centralized decision making; and sharp distinctions among…

  17. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  18. Obesity, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iantorno, M; Campia, U; Di Daniele, N; Nistico, S; Forleo, G B; Cardillo, C; Tesauro, M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in obese individuals. Obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to originate from disruption in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, impair vascular homeostasis and lead to endothelial dysfunction. An altered endothelial cell phenotype and endothelial dysfunction are common among all obesity-related complications. A crucial aspect of endothelial dysfunction is reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. A systemic pro-inflammatory state in combination with hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and activation of the renin angiotensin system are systemic disturbances in obese individuals that contribute independently and synergistically to decreasing NO bioavailability. On the other hand, pro-inflammatory cytokines are locally produced by perivascular fat and act through a paracrine mechanism to independently contribute to endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in obese individuals. The promising discovery that obesity-induced vascular dysfunction is, at least in part, reversible, with weight loss strategies and drugs that promote vascular health, has not been sufficiently proved to prevent the cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. In this review we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying inflammation and vascular damage in obese patients.

  19. Relationship between interstitial cells of Cajal, fibroblast-like cells and inhibitory motor nerves in the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Cobine, Caroline A; Hennig, Grant W; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Keef, Kathleen D

    2011-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have been shown to participate in nitrergic neurotransmission in various regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Recently, fibroblast-like cells, which are positive for platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα(+)), have been suggested to participate additionally in inhibitory neurotransmission in the GI tract. The distribution of ICC and PDGFRα(+) cell populations and their relationship to inhibitory nerves within the mouse internal anal sphincter (IAS) are unknown. Immunohistochemical techniques and confocal microscopy were therefore used to examine the density and arrangement of ICC, PDGFRα(+) cells and neuronal nitric-oxide-synthase-positive (nNOS(+)) nerve fibers in the IAS of wild-type (WT) and W/W ( v ) mice. Of the total tissue volume within the IAS circular muscle layer, 18% consisted in highly branched PDGFRα(+) cells (PDGFRα(+)-IM). Other populations of PDGFRα(+) cells were observed within the submucosa and along the serosal and myenteric surfaces. Spindle-shaped intramuscular ICC (ICC-IM) were present in the WT mouse IAS but were largely absent from the W/W ( v ) IAS. The ICC-IM volume (5% of tissue volume) in the WT mouse IAS was significantly smaller than that of PDGFRα(+)-IM. Stellate-shaped submucosal ICC (ICC-SM) were observed in the WT and W/W ( v ) IAS. Minimum surface distance analysis revealed that nNOS(+) nerve fibers were closely aligned with both ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. An even closer association was seen between ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. Thus, a close morphological arrangement exists between inhibitory motor neurons, ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM suggesting that some functional interaction occurs between them contributing to inhibitory neurotransmission in the IAS.

  20. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  1. Failed Deglutitive Upper Esophageal Sphincter Relaxation Is a Risk Factor for Aspiration in Stroke Patients with Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taeheon; Park, Jung Ho; Sohn, Chongil; Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Park, Jung Hwan; Jung, Il Seok

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims We attempted to examine the relationship between abnormal findings on high-resolution manometry (HRM) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and to identify the risk factors for aspiration. Methods We performed VFSS and HRM on the same day in 36 ischemic stroke patients (mean age, 67.5 years) with dysphagia. Pressure (basal, median intra bolus, and nadir), relaxation time interval of the UES, and mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractility (as a contractile integral) were examined using HRM. The parameters of VFSS were vallecular residue, pyriform sinus residue, vallecular overflow, penetration, and aspiration. The association between the parameters of VFSS and HRM was analyzed by the Student’s t test. Results Three (8.3%) and 4 (11.1%) stroke patients with dysphagia had pyriform sinus residue and vallecular sinus residue, respectively, and 5 (13.8%) patients showed aspiration. Mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal contractile integrals in patients with residue in the pyriform sinus were significantly lower than those in patients without residue in the pyriform sinus (P < 0.05). Relaxation time intervals in patients with aspiration were significantly shorter than those in patients without aspiration (P < 0.05), and multivariate regression analysis revealed a shorter relaxation time interval as the main risk factor for aspiration (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.01–0.65; P < 0.05). Conclusions Manometric measurements of the pharynx and UES were well correlated with abnormal findings in the VFSS, and a shorter relaxation time interval of the UES during deglutition is an important parameter for the development of aspiration. PMID:27510474

  2. Biofeedback Therapy Before Ileostomy Closure in Patients Undergoing Sphincter-Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Ki; Jeon, Byeong Geon; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Kwon, Yoon-Hye; Park, JI Won; Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prospectively investigated the effects of biofeedback therapy on objective anorectal function and subjective bowel function in patients after sphincter-saving surgery for rectal cancer. Methods Sixteen patients who underwent an ileostomy were randomized into two groups, one receiving conservative management with the Kegel maneuver and the other receiving active biofeedback before ileostomy closure. Among them, 12 patients (mean age, 57.5 years; range, 38 to 69 years; 6 patients in each group) completed the study. Conservative management included lifestyle modifications, Kegel exercises, and medication. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after ileostomy closure by using anal manometry, modified Wexner Incontinence Scores (WISs), and fecal incontinence quality of life (FI-QoL) scores. Results Before the ileostomy closure, the groups did not differ in baseline clinical characteristics or resting manometric parameters. After 12 months of follow-up, the biofeedback group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the mean maximum squeezing pressure (from 146.3 to 178.9, P = 0.002). However, no beneficial effect on the WIS was noted for biofeedback compared to conservative management alone. Overall, the FI-QoL scores were increased significantly in both groups after ileostomy closure (P = 0.006), but did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Although the biofeedback therapy group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the maximum squeezing pressure, significant improvements in the WISs and the FI-QoL scores over time were noted in both groups. The study was terminated early because no therapeutic benefit of biofeedback had been demonstrated. PMID:26361615

  3. Stent placement above the sphincter of Oddi permits implementation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with initially unresectable Klatskin tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kensuke; Hasegawa, Sho; Iwasaki, Akito; Sato, Takamitsu; Fujita, Yuji; Hosono, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Endo, Itaru

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may lead to a successful margin-negative resection in patients with initially unresectable locally advanced Klatskin tumor (IULAKT). Use of removable plastic stents is preferable for the safe implementation of NAC in patients with IULAKT to reduce the risk of recurrent cholangitis. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy associated with the use of plastic stents placed across the stenosis and above the papilla (above stent) during NAC. Patients and methods: In this study, we stratified the patients into two groups chronologically with respect to the period of stent placement: above stent group (n = 17) and across stent group (n = 23) (plastic stent across the sphincter of Oddi). Results: The median stent patency period was 99 days in the above stent group and 31 days in the across stent group (P < 0.0001). The number of stents (P = 0.017) and the rate of emerging undrained cholangitis areas (P = 0.025) were significantly reduced in the above stent group than the counterpart. Regarding time to recurrent biliary obstruction, the above stent group had a longer duration than the across stent group (log rank test, P = 0.004). Length of hospital stay was significantly shorter for the above stent group than the across stent group (P = 0.0475). Multivariate analysis revealed that above stent placement (odds ratio = 33.638, P = 0.0048) was significantly associated with stent patency over a period of 90 days. Conclusions: Above stent placement should be considered for the relief of biliary obstruction and potentially reduces the cost for patients with IULAKT scheduled to receive NAC. PMID:27092322

  4. Evolving paradigms in the treatment of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Nilsson, Matias; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-01-01

    In recent years prescription of opioids has increased significantly. Although effective in pain management, bothersome gastrointestinal adverse effects are experienced by a substantial proportion of opioid-treated patients. This can lead to difficulties with therapy and subsequently inadequate pain relief. Collectively referred to as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, these adverse effects are the result of binding of exogenous opioids to opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. This leads to disturbance of three important gastrointestinal functions: motility, coordination of sphincter function and secretion. In the clinic this manifests in a wide range of symptoms such as reflux, bloating, abdominal cramping, hard, dry stools, and incomplete evacuation, although the most known adverse effect is opioid-induced constipation. Traditional treatment with laxatives is often insufficient, but in recent years a number of novel pharmacological approaches have been introduced. In this review the pathophysiology, symptomatology and prevalence of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction is presented along with the benefits and caveats of a suggested consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation. Finally, traditional treatment is appraised and compared with the latest pharmacological developments. In conclusion, opioid antagonists restricted to the periphery show promising results, but use of different definitions and outcome measures complicate comparison. However, an international working group has recently suggested a consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation and relevant outcome measures have also been proposed. If investigators within this field adapt the suggested consensus and include symptoms related to dysfunction of the upper gut, it will ease comparison and be a step forward in future research. PMID:26557892

  5. Endothelial dysfunction in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Maria Dolores; Aldasoro, Martin; Ortega, Joaquin; Vila, José María

    2013-01-01

    Morbid obesity is a chronic multifunctional disease characterized by an accumulation of fat. Epidemiological studies have shown that obesity is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction, as defined by an imbalance between relaxing and contractile endothelial factors, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these cardiometabolic diseases. Diminished bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) contributes to endothelial dysfunction and impairs endothelium- dependent vasodilatation. But this is not the only mechanism that drives to endothelial dysfunction. Obesity has been associated with a chronic inflammatory process, atherosclerosis, and oxidative stress. Moreover levels of asymmetrical dimethyl-L-arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), are elevated in obesity. On the other hand, increasing prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction and decreasing vasodilator prostanoids also lead to endothelial dysfunction in obesity. Other mechanisms related to endothelin-1 (ET-1) or endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) have been proposed. Bariatric surgery (BS) is a safe and effective means to achieve significant weight loss, but its use is limited only to patients with severe obesity including morbid obesity. BS also proved efficient in endothelial dysfunction reduction improving cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities associated with morbid obesity such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cancer. This review will provide a brief overview of the mechanisms that link obesity with endothelial dysfunction, and how weight loss is a cornerstone treatment for cardiovascular comorbidities obesity-related. A better understanding of the mechanisms of obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction may help develop new therapeutic strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Immuno-Magnetically Sorted Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Restoring Urethral Sphincter Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Green, Morgaine; Wen, Yan; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Wang, Zhe; Reijo Pera, Renee; Chen, Bertha

    2017-04-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-based cell therapy holds promise for treating stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, safety concerns, especially tumorgenic potential of residual undifferentiated cells in hiPSC derivatives, are major barriers for its clinical translation. An efficient, fast and clinical-scale strategy for purifying committed cells is also required. Our previous studies demonstrated the regenerative effects of hiPSC-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) on the injured urethral sphincter in SUI, but the differentiation protocol required fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) which is not practical for autologous clinical applications. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of hiPSC-derived pSMC populations sorted by FDA-approved magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) using cell-surface marker CD34 for restoring urethral sphincter function. Although the heterogeneity of MACS-sorted pSMCs was higher than that of FACS-sorted pSMCs, the percentage of undifferentiated cells dramatically decreased after directed differentiation in vitro. In vivo studies demonstrated long-term cell integration and no tumor formation of MACS-sorted pSMCs after transplantation. Furthermore, transplantation of MACS-sorted pSMCs into immunodeficient SUI rats was comparable to transplantation with FACS-sorted pSMCs for restoration of the extracellular matrix metabolism and function of the urethral sphincter. In summary, purification of hiPSC derivatives using MACS sorting for CD34 expression represent an efficient approach for production of clinical-scale pSMCs for autologous stem cell therapy for regeneration of smooth muscle tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1158-1167.

  7. Placebo controlled, randomised, double blind study of the effects of botulinum A toxin on detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallien, P; Reymann, J; Amarenco, G; Nicolas, B; de Seze, M; Bellissant, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum A toxin in the treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in multiple sclerosis patients. Methods: This was a multicentre, placebo controlled, randomised, double blind study. Patients with chronic urinary retention were included if they had post-voiding residual urine volume between 100 and 500 ml. They received a single transperineal injection of either botulinum A toxin (100 U Allergan) or placebo in the sphincter and also 5 mg slow release alfuzosin bid over 4 months. Main endpoint was post-voiding residual urine volume assessed 1 month after injection. Follow up duration was 4 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a sequential method, the triangular test. Results: The study was stopped after the fourth analysis (86 patients had been included: placebo: 41, botulinum A toxin: 45). At inclusion, there was no significant difference between groups whichever variable was considered. Mean (standard deviation) post-voiding residual urine volume was 217 (96) and 220 (99) ml in placebo and botulinum A toxin groups, respectively. One month later, post-voiding residual urine volume was 206 (145) and 186 (158) ml (p = 0.45) in placebo and botulinum A toxin groups, respectively. However, compared to placebo, botulinum A toxin significantly increased voiding volume (+54%, p = 0.02) and reduced pre-micturition (–29%, p = 0.02) and maximal (–21%, p = 0.02) detrusor pressures. Other secondary urodynamic endpoints and tolerance were similar in the two groups. Conclusions: In multiple sclerosis patients with detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, a single injection of botulinum A toxin (100 U Allergan) does not decrease post-voiding residual urine volume. PMID:16291892

  8. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  9. [Sexual dysfunctions in selected endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Kowalaczyk, Robert

    2005-01-01

    According to the socio-sexological reports approximately 40-45% of women and up to 30% of males may suffer from different sexual dysfunctions. The prevalence of those disorders is gradually increasing with age. Multiply numbers of endocrinopathies may influence the human sexual life. In diabetic patients all phases of the sexual responses cycle, especially orgasm, might be affected. Women diagnosed with PCOS have decreased adaptation to the sexual life, low self-esteem and perception of self sexual attractiveness. The intimacy of infertile couples has not been well described and the characteristic of particular dysfunction in sex life has not been established yet. Interdisciplinary approach, understood as treatment of the endocrinopathy accompanied with psychological and sexological counseling, seems to be the fundamental issue in the therapy of sexual dysfunctions in patients with endocrinological disorders.

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cardiac Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, Autumn; Quarles, Ellen K.; Basisty, Nathan; Gitari, Lemuel; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in most developed nations. While it has received the least public attention, aging is the dominant risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, as the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases increases dramatically with increasing age. Cardiac aging is an intrinsic process that results in impaired cardiac function, along with cellular and molecular changes. Mitochondria play a great role in these processes, as cardiac function is an energetically demanding process. In this review, we examine mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac aging. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction can disrupt morphology, signaling pathways, and protein interactions; conversely, mitochondrial homeostasis is maintained by mechanisms that include fission/fusion, autophagy, and unfolded protein responses. Finally, we describe some of the recent findings in mitochondrial targeted treatments to help meet the challenges of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging. PMID:26191650

  11. Autonomic Dysfunctions in Parkinsonian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyo-Jin; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions are common in the patients with parkinsonian disorders. Because clinical features of autonomic dysfunctions are diverse, the comprehensive evaluation is essential for the appropriate management. For the appreciation of autonomic dysfunctions and the identification of differences, patients with degenerative parkinsonisms are evaluated using structured questionnaire for autonomic dysfunction (ADQ). Methods: Total 259 patients, including 192 patients with [idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD, age 64.6 ± 9.6 years)], 37 with [multiple system atrophy (MSA, 62.8 ± 9.1)], 9 with [dementia with Lewy body (DLB, 73.9 ± 4.3)], and 21 with [progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, 69.4 ± 9.6)]. The ADQ was structured for evaluation of the presence of symptoms and its severity due to autonomic dysfunction, covering gastrointestinal, urinary, sexual, cardiovascular and thermoregulatory domains. Patients were also evaluated for the orthostatic hypotension. Results: Although dementia with Lewy body (DLB) patients were oldest and duration of disease was longest in IPD, total ADQ scores of MSA and PSP (23.9 ± 12.6 and 21.1 ± 7.8) were significantly increased than that of IPD (15.1 ± 10.6). Urinary and cardiovascular symptom scores of MSA and gastrointestinal symptom score of PSP were significantly worse than those of IPD. The ratio of patient with orthostatic hypotension in IPD was 31.2% and not differed between groups (35.1% in MSA, 33.3% in DLB and 33.3% in PSP). But the systolic blood pressure dropped drastically after standing in patients with MSA and DLB than in patients with IPD and PSP. Conclusions: Patients with degenerative parkinsonism showed widespread symptoms of autonomic dysfunctions. The severity of those symptoms in patients with PSP were comparing to that of MSA patients and worse than that of IPD. PMID:24868361

  12. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  13. Quality of Life in the Late Follow-Up of Ulcerative Colitis Patients Submitted to Restorative Proctocolectomy with Sphincter Preservation Over Ten Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Alberto Luiz Monteiro; Teixeira, Magaly Gêmeo; de Almeida, Maristela Gomes; Kiss, Desidério Roberto; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate, by means of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ), the quality of life of ulcerative colitis patients submitted to proctocolectomy with sphincter preservation using J-pouch reconstruction over ten years ago. METHODS The study consisted of 36 patients interviewed using the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire. The score scale, resulting from the addition of each answer, ranged from 32 to 224, where the highest score indicates the best quality of life. The chi square test was used to verify the existence of meaningful differences between the results of the questionnaire and age, and gender proportion. For each section, as well as for all of them combined, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used to verify if there were differences in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire scores among the groups in relation to the proportions. RESULTS After applying the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, it was determined that quality of life was considered excellent for 9 (25%), good for 11 (30.6%), regular for 13 (36.1%), and bad for 3 (8.3%) patients. In our study, we determined that 85% of the patients were pleased with and thankful for the surgery that they underwent. CONCLUSION We can conclude that the possibility of sphincter preservation should always be taken into account, since patients remain clinically stable and have a high quality of life even after long periods. PMID:19759881

  14. Dysphagia-gastroesophageal reflux complex: complications due to dysfunction of solitary tract nucleus-mediated vago-vagal reflex.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Kawashima, Y; Kondo, A; Chikumaru, Y; Matsui, A; Nagata, I; Ohno, K

    2006-06-01

    We report on the complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in four patients with lower brainstem dysfunction. These patients suffered from perinatal asphyxia, cerebellar hemorrhage, or congenital dysphagia of unknown origin and showed facial nerve palsy, inspiratory stridor due to vocal cord paralysis, central sleep apnea, and dysphagia, in various combinations. Naso-intestinal tube feeding was introduced in all of the patients due to recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia resulting from GER. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed symmetrical high intensity lesions in the tegmentum of the lower pons and the medulla oblongata in two of the patients, and pontomedullary atrophy in another patient. In normal subjects, lower esophageal sphincter contraction is provoked by distension of the gastric wall, through a vago-vagal reflex. Since this reflex arc involves the solitary tract nucleus, where the swallowing center is located, the association of dysphagia and GER in the present patients is thought to result from the lesions in the tegmentum of medulla oblongata. We propose the term "dysphagia-GER complex" to describe the disturbed motility of the upper digestive tract due to lower brainstem involvement. In children with brainstem lesions, neurological assessment of GER is warranted, in addition to the examination of other signs of brainstem dysfunction, including dysphagia and respiratory disturbance.

  15. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  16. Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Martin D.; Nicholls, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing mitochondrial dysfunction requires definition of the dysfunction to be investigated. Usually, it is the ability of the mitochondria to make ATP appropriately in response to energy demands. Where other functions are of interest, tailored solutions are required. Dysfunction can be assessed in isolated mitochondria, in cells or in vivo, with different balances between precise experimental control and physiological relevance. There are many methods to measure mitochondrial function and dysfunction in these systems. Generally, measurements of fluxes give more information about the ability to make ATP than do measurements of intermediates and potentials. For isolated mitochondria, the best assay is mitochondrial respiratory control: the increase in respiration rate in response to ADP. For intact cells, the best assay is the equivalent measurement of cell respiratory control, which reports the rate of ATP production, the proton leak rate, the coupling efficiency, the maximum respiratory rate, the respiratory control ratio and the spare respiratory capacity. Measurements of membrane potential provide useful additional information. Measurement of both respiration and potential during appropriate titrations enables the identification of the primary sites of effectors and the distribution of control, allowing deeper quantitative analyses. Many other measurements in current use can be more problematic, as discussed in the present review. PMID:21726199

  17. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  18. Pathophysiology of diabetic sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Morano, S

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with diabetes mellitus. Vascular, neurological and hormonal alterations are involved in this complication. Many studies showed altered endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxations in corpus cavernosum from diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). This finding has been associated with a lack of nitric oxyde (NO) production and a significant increase in NO synthase (NOS) binding sites in penile tissues, induced by diabetes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) concur to diabetic vascular complications by quenching NO activity and by increasing the expression of mediators of vascular damage such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), possessing permeabilizing and neoangiogenic effects, and endothelin-1 (ET-1), with vaso-constricting and mitogenic action. Moreover, the differential gene expression for various growth factors in penile tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of ED associated with diabetes. Neuropathy is also likely to be an important cause of diabetic ED: morphological alterations of autonomic nerve fibers in cavernosal tissue of patients with diabetic ED have been demonstrated. Finally, androgens enhance nNOS gene expression in the penile corpus cavernosum of rats, suggesting that they play a role in maintaining NOS activity. However, sexual dysfunctions in women with diabetes has received less attention in clinical research. Several studies suggest an increased prevalence of deficient vaginal lubrication, making sexual intercourse unpleasant. Sexual dysfunction is associated with lower overall quality of marital relation and more depressive symptoms in diabetic women.

  19. Risk factors for renal scarring in children and adolescents with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Cristiane R; Filgueiras, Maria Francisca T; Vasconcelos, Mônica M; Vasconcelos, Roberta; Marino, Viviane P; Pires, Cleidismar; Pereira, Ana Cristina; Reis, Fernanda; Oliveira, Eduardo A; Lima, Eleonora M

    2007-11-01

    Risk factors for renal scarring in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) were evaluated. The medical records of 120 patients were assessed concerning gender, presence of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), bladder capacity, detrusor overactivity, residual urine, febrile urinary tract infection (UTI), bacteriuria, constipation, detrusor sphincter incoordination (DSI), high detrusor pressure at maximal cystometric capacity (PMCC), low compliance, and thickness and trabeculation of the bladder wall. Renal scarring was diagnosed by (99m)technetium-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan (DMSA). Renal scarring was detected in 38 patients (31%). VUR, UTI, decreased bladder capacity, urinary residue, and trabeculated and thick bladder wall were associated with scarring at univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed VUR (P < 0.0001) as the independent risk factor for renal scarring. Thickness of the bladder wall was a marginal risk factor (P = 0.07). Although UTI was not a risk factor, it was associated with VUR (P = 0.03). In our analysis, VUR was the main risk factor; however, renal scarring was probably due to multifactorial causes, as VUR was associated with UTI.

  20. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... wall repair Urethral bulking with artificial material Retropubic suspension Tension-free vaginal tape Description This procedure may ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 145. Chapple CR. Retropubic suspension surgery for incontinence in women. In: Wein AJ, ...

  1. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E U; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-10-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  2. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  3. Bladder dysfunction in acute transverse myelitis: magnetic resonance imaging and neurophysiological and urodynamic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, J; Shah, S; Kapoor, R; Misra, U

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate micturition abnormalities in acute transverse myelitis and correlate these with evoked potentials, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and urodynamic findings. Setting: Tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients: 18 patients with acute transverse myelitis, aged 4–50 years; 15 had paraparesis and three quadriparesis. Methods: Patients with acute transverse myelitis had a neurological evaluation and tibial somatosensory and motor evoked potential studies in the lower limbs. Spinal MRI was carried out using a 1.5 T scanner. Urodynamic studies were done using Dantec UD 5500 equipment. Neurological outcome was determined on the basis of Barthel index score at six months as poor, partial, or complete. In some patients, urodynamic studies were repeated at six and 12 months. Results: Spinal MRI in 14 of the 18 patients revealed T2 hyperintense signal changes extending for at least three spinal segments in 13; one patient had normal MRI. In the acute stage, 17 patients had a history of urinary retention and one had urge incontinence. On follow up at six months two patients regained normal voiding, retention persisted in six, and storage symptoms developed in 10, of whom five also had emptying difficulties. Urodynamic studies showed an areflexic or hypocontractile bladder in 10, detrusor hyperreflexia with poor compliance in two, and detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in three. Early abnormal urodynamic findings commonly persisted at the six and 12 months examinations. Persistent abnormalities included detrusor hyperreflexia, dyssynergia, and areflexic bladder. The urodynamic abnormalities correlated with muscle tone and reflex changes but not with sensory or motor evoked potentials, muscle power, MRI signal changes, sensory level, or six months outcome. Conclusions: Bladder dysfunction is common in acute transverse myelitis and may be the only sequel. Urodynamic study is helpful in evaluating the bladder dysfunction and also in its management. PMID:12122174

  4. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  5. Early detection of tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Piscator, M

    1991-11-01

    The determination of low-molecular-weight proteins in urine as a tool for early detection of damage to the proximal tubules is briefly discussed. Beta 2-microglobulin, retinol-binding protein and alpha 1-microglobulin are at present the most widely used markers for tubular dysfunction. The determination of beta 2-microglobulin has earlier been the method of choice, but due to its instability at low pH there are certain disadvantages. Available data indicate that alpha 1-microglobulin may replace beta 2-microglobulin for screening purposes. The low-molecular-weight proteins are at present the best markers for early detection of tubular dysfunction; other constituents are not as well suited for this, even if the determination of urine enzymes has its supporters.

  6. Gonadal dysfunction in systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Asterios; Harsoulis, Faidon

    2005-04-01

    Gonadal function is significantly affected in many acute and chronic systemic diseases. As the function of the testes and the ovaries is determined by the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, it is obvious that a systemic disease may affect one or more levels of the axis in such a manner that the gonadal dysfunction may have various clinical and laboratory manifestations. In this brief review, the most common disturbances seen in the main systemic diseases will be discussed.

  7. Erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The link between erectile dysfunction (ED) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is reviewed by assessing original papers, current consensus, previous reviews and meta-analyses. The link between these conditions is confirmed, and the evaluation and assessment summarised with a new evidence-based algorithm. ED, especially in younger men, is a marker of an increased risk of CVD, and ED needs to be incorporated into all risk-screening programmes. PMID:26558084

  8. Temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Herb, Kathleen; Cho, Sung; Stiles, Marlind Alan

    2006-12-01

    Pain caused by temporomandibular disorders originates from either muscular or articular conditions, or both. Distinguishing the precise source of the pain is a significant diagnostic challenge to clinicians, and effective management hinges on establishing a correct diagnosis. This paper examines terminology and regional anatomy as it pertains to functional and dysfunctional states of the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication. A review of the pathophysiology of the most common disorders is provided. Trends in evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and research are presented.

  9. Hypnotic metaphor and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L G

    1987-01-01

    Although hypnosis can be very effective in alleviating sexual problems, few sex therapists use hypnotic methods. This paper seeks to encourage a greater use of hypnosis among clinicians by presenting: a description of the new hypnosis exemplified in the work of Milton H. Erickson; an explanation of one of Erickson's most important and innovative methods, the use of multiple embedded metaphors; and case histories illustrating the application of hypnotic approaches to sexual dysfunction.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  11. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  12. Erectile dysfunction in patients with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ophuis, A.J.M. Oude; Nijeholt, A.A.B. Lycklama à

    2006-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a highly prevalent disease, especially in cardiovascular-compromised men. Many of the well-established risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also risk factors for erectile dysfunction. A correlation between erectile dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction is well established. It is postulated that erectile dysfunction with an arteriovascular aetiology can predate and be an indicator of potential coronary artery disease. In this paper we will attempt to increase awareness among cardiologists for the predictive value of erectile dysfunction for future cardiovascular disease in order to optimise cardiovascular risk management. The treatment of erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular interactions is also discussed in detail. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1B PMID:25696612

  13. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  14. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  15. Swallowing dysfunction following endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Ku, Shih-Chi; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Huang, Guan-Hua; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate postextubation swallowing dysfunction (PSD) 21 days after endotracheal extubation and to examine whether PSD is time-limited and whether age matters. For this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 151 adult critical care patients (≥20 years) who were intubated for at least 48 hours and had no pre-existing neuromuscular disease or swallowing dysfunction. Participants were assessed for time (days) to pass bedside swallow evaluations (swallow 50 mL of water without difficulty) and to resume total oral intake. Outcomes were compared between younger (20–64 years) and older participants (≥65 years). PSD, defined as inability to swallow 50 mL of water within 48 hours after extubation, affected 92 participants (61.7% of our sample). At 21 days postextubation, 17 participants (15.5%) still failed to resume total oral intake and were feeding-tube dependent. We found that older participants had higher PSD rates at 7, 14, and 21 days postextubation, and took significantly longer to pass the bedside swallow evaluations (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.006) and to resume total oral intake (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.003) than their younger counterparts. Older participants also had significantly higher rates of subsequent feeding-tube dependence than younger patients (24.1 vs 5.8%; P = 0.008). Excluding patients with pre-existing neuromuscular dysfunction, PSD is common and prolonged. Age matters in the time needed to recover. Swallowing and oral intake should be monitored and interventions made, if needed, in the first 7 to 14 days postextubation, particularly for older patients. PMID:27310972

  16. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  17. Drug addiction and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Adham; Bella, Anthony J; Shamloul, Rany

    2013-09-01

    This article attempts to review the most current and the well-established facts concerning drug addiction and sexual dysfunction. Surprisingly, even though alcohol is prevalent in many societies with many myths surrounding its sexual-enhancing effects, current scientific research cannot provide a solid conclusion on its effect on sexual function. Unfortunately, the same concept applies to tobacco smoking; however, most of the current knowledge tends to support the notion that it, indeed, can negatively affect sexual function. Similar ambiguities also prevail with substances of abuse.

  18. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  19. Angelman syndrome and thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Monterrubio-Ledezma, C E; Bobadilla-Morales, L; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, H J; Corona-Rivera, J R; Corona-Rivera, A

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic syndrome, has a prevalence of 1:10,000 to 1:40,000. Patients with AS have genetic alterations in maternal imprinting gene UB3A (15q11-q13) and molecular evaluations confirm the diagnosis. Our aim is to report a new case with AS and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) without goiter. Thyroid dysfunction has not been described as part of alterations in AS; the exact pathogenic mechanisms of SCH in patients with AS remains incompletely unknown.

  20. Vocal cord dysfunction during wartime.

    PubMed

    Craig, T; Sitz, K; Squire, E; Smith, L; Carpenter, G

    1992-11-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) often masquerades as asthma. The diagnosis is rarely suspected, but should be considered in cases of asthma that present atypically or that fail to respond to standard therapy. The frequency of VCD would be expected to increase during times of stress, including periods of war, since it is thought to be a conversion reaction. A high level of suspicion for VCD is essential to make the diagnosis so as to avoid unnecessary, potentially toxic medications and to direct the patient to prompt psychiatric care, which along with speech therapy, is the cornerstone of care.

  1. Vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Marko; Montalvo, Enoch

    2007-01-08

    We present two cases of shoulder pain and weakness following influenza and pneumococcal vaccine injections provided high into the deltoid muscle. Based on ultrasound measurements, we hypothesize that vaccine injected into the subdeltoid bursa caused a periarticular inflammatory response, subacromial bursitis, bicipital tendonitis and adhesive capsulitis. Resolution of symptoms followed corticosteroid injections to the subacromial space, bicipital tendon sheath and glenohumeral joint, followed by physical therapy. We conclude that the upper third of the deltoid muscle should not be used for vaccine injections, and the diagnosis of vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction should be considered in patients presenting with shoulder pain following a vaccination.

  2. [Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jarasūniene, Dalia; Simaitis, Audrius

    2003-01-01

    Growing numbers of morbidity and mortality due to the Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is recognized as the more increasing challenge in the world. The initial stage of atherosclerosis, early diagnosis and treatment of CHD are the main objectives of current research. Endothelium dysfunction, the earliest expression of the atherosclerotic process is associated with subtle biochemical changes that gradually are transformed into the structural changes of the arterial wall. The theory of free radicals is the most common among the atherosclerosis explanations. Overproduction or impaired neutralization of the free radicals accounts for oxidative stress that is causing substantial damage to the low density lipoproteins, nitric oxyde (NO), endothelium cells, tissue cells and finally leads to the endothelium dysfuction. Pathophysiology of oxidative stress and its role in the endothelium dysfunction are discussed in this paper. Positive role of various medications (statins, angiotensin converting enzym inhibitors, aldosteron antagonists, estrogens, antioxidants, b-blockers with vasodilatative properties) to the oxidative stress and consequently to the endothelium dysfuction are discussed as well.

  3. [Diaphragm dysfunction : Facts for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Marx, G

    2016-10-20

    Diaphragm function is crucial for patient outcome in the ICU setting and during the treatment period. The occurrence of an insufficiency of the respiratory pump, which is predominantly formed by the diaphragm, may result in intubation after failure of noninvasive ventilation. Especially patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are in danger of hypercapnic respiratory failure. Changes in biomechanical properties and fiber texture of the diaphragm are further cofactors directly leading to a need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. After intubation and the following inactivity the diaphragm is subject to profound pathophysiologic changes resulting in atrophy and dysfunction. Besides this inactivity-triggered mechanism (termed as ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction) multiple factors, comorbidities, pharmaceutical agents and additional hits during the ICU treatment, especially the occurrence of sepsis, influence diaphragm homeostasis and can lead to weaning failure. During the weaning process monitoring of diaphragm function can be done with invasive methods - ultrasound is increasingly established to monitor diaphragm contraction, but further and better powered studies are in need to prove its value as a diagnostic tool.

  4. Multiple sclerosis and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen-Ni; He, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by episodic and progressive neurologic dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. The underlying pathogenesis of MS remains largely unclear. However, it is currently accepted as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Among other clinical manifestations, sexual dysfunction (SD) is a painful but still underreported and underdiagnosed symptom of the disorder. SD in MS patients may result from a complex set of conditions and may be associated with multiple anatomic, physiologic, biologic, medical and psychological factors. SD arises primarily from lesions affecting the neural pathways involved in physiologic function. In addition, psychological factors, the side effects of medications and physical symptoms such as fatigue, muscular weakness, menstrual changes, pain and concerns about bladder and bowel incontinence may also be involved. Since MS primarily affects young people, SD secondary to MS may have a great impact on quality of life. Thus, maintaining a healthy sexual life with MS is an important priority. The treatment of SD requires multidisciplinary teamwork and cooperation among specialists, individual patients, partners and the society. PMID:22447199

  5. Diabetes and sexual dysfunction: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Esposito, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in nearly all countries. It has been associated with sexual dysfunction, both in males and in females. Diabetes is an established risk factor for sexual dysfunction in men, as a threefold increased risk of erectile dysfunction was documented in diabetic men, as compared with nondiabetic men. Among women, evidence regarding the association between diabetes and sexual dysfunction are less conclusive, although most studies have reported a higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in diabetic women as compared with nondiabetic women. Female sexual function appears to be more related to social and psychological components than to the physiological consequence of diabetes. Hyperglycemia, which is a main determinant of vascular and microvascular diabetic complications, may participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms of sexual dysfunction in diabetes. Moreover, diabetic people may present several clinical conditions, including hypertension, overweight and obesity, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and atherogenic dyslipidemia, which are themselves risk factors for sexual dysfunction, both in men and in women. The adoption of healthy lifestyles may reduce insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress – all of which are desirable achievements in diabetic patients. Improved well-being may further contribute to reduce and prevent sexual dysfunction in both sexes. PMID:24623985

  6. The relationship between depression and erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Seidman, S N; Roose, S P

    2000-06-01

    Normal sexual function is a biopsychosocial process; sexual dysfunction almost always has organic and psychologic components, and it requires multidisciplinary, goal-directed evaluation and treatment. Factors such as aging, declining testosterone levels, medical illness, certain medications, and comorbid depressive illness can contribute to sexual dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction encountered in the clinical setting. Comorbidity between ED and depressive illness is high, but the causal relationship is unclear, and likely bidirectional. In this article, we review the existing literature on the relationship between depression and ED.

  7. Inside the Spiral of Dysfunction: The Personal Consequences of Working for a Dysfunctional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Brad; Rose, Kevin; Bergman, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional leaders suffocate others with coercive power and ego, are unpredictable, and often lack self-awareness about their dysfunction. Dysfunctional leaders are incredibly difficult to work with and can cause a series of cascading personal consequences for employees who work with them. This Perspectives in Human Resource Development essay…

  8. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  9. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction.

    PubMed

    R Blair, R James

    2013-06-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause-ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder.

  10. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-05-23

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education.

  11. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment.

  12. Pharmacotherapeutic management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, D J; Burnett, A L

    2015-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common condition in aging men and significantly affects their quality of life and interpersonal relationships. Its prevalence and incidence are associated with aging, lifestyle factors and cardiovascular comorbidities. Preoccupation with male virility has been present for centuries, and a wide variety of herbs and potions have been used to treat any sexual deficiencies. Recent major advances in understanding of erectile physiology and pathophysiology led to development of currently available systemic and local pharmacotherapies. They are designed to work either centrally or peripherally and to either suppress anti-erectile mechanisms, enhance the pro-erectile ones or influence both. Since all the current formulations have variable safety and efficacy profiles, the search for highly specific, simple, convenient and clinically effective impotence treatments or prophylactics continues.

  13. Ulnar intrinsic anatomy and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul C; Sforzo, Christopher R

    2005-01-01

    Normal hand function is a balance between the extrinsic and intrinsic musculature. Although individually the intrinsics are small muscles in diameter, collectively they represent a large muscle that contributes approximately 50% of grip strength. Dysfunction of the intrinsics consequently leads to impaired grip and pinch strength as well recognized deformities. Low ulnar nerve palsy preserves ulnar innervated extrinsics resulting in sensory loss, digital clawing, thumb deformity, abduction of the small finger, and asynchronous finger motion. High ulnar nerve palsy is characterized by the above plus paralysis of the ulnar profundi and the flexor carpi ulnaris. Understanding the normal anatomy allows the clinician to identify the site of the lesion and plan appropriate surgical intervention. This article revisits the classic work of Richard J. Smith on ulnar nerve palsy with contemporary perspective.

  14. On the Etiology of Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfelbaum, Bernard

    1977-01-01

    Lack of consideration of the sexually functional population has led to misconceptions about causes of sexual dysfunction functioning. Automatic functioning can mask effects of pathogenic influences on sexuality, making these effects appear random, confounding etiological issues and creating the belief that causes of sexual dysfunction and disorder…

  15. Male Pseudoheterosexuality and Minimal Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutstadt, Joseph P.

    1976-01-01

    There is often a correlation between "pseudoheterosexuality" and minor sexual dysfunction. Insight alone is not sufficient to provide relief, but when the patient can be helped to a comfortable acceptance of his homosexual feelings as a normal and healthy facet of his personality, very often the dysfunction is relieved. (Author)

  16. Attachment, borderline personality, and romantic relationship dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jonathan; Stepp, Stephanie D; Wan, Ming Wai; Hope, Holly; Morse, Jennifer Q; Steele, Miriam; Steele, Howard; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated attachment and disturbances in romantic relationships as important indicators for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current research extends our current knowledge by examining the specific associations among attachment, romantic relationship dysfunction, and BPD, above and beyond the contribution of emotional distress and nonromantic interpersonal functioning in two distinct samples. Study 1 comprised a community sample of women (N = 58) aged 25-36. Study 2 consisted of a psychiatric sample (N = 138) aged 21-60. Results from both Study 1 and Study 2 demonstrated that (1) attachment was specifically related to BPD symptoms and romantic dysfunction, (2) BPD symptoms were specifically associated with romantic dysfunction, and (3) the association between attachment and romantic dysfunction was statistically mediated by BPD symptoms. The findings support specific associations among attachment, BPD symptoms, and romantic dysfunction.

  17. Pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) is a common non-motor disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, bladder dysfunction is sometimes non-responsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine basal ganglia-frontal circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. The pathophysiology of the bladder dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  18. Endothelial Dysfunction in Renal Failure: Current Update.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, Miroslav; Stojanovic, Marko; Prostran, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is principally characterized by impaired endothelium- dependent transduction mechanisms related to vascular relaxation, as an outcome of decreased release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors, mainly nitric oxide, as well as augmented oxidative stress, increased inflammation and predominance of vascular action produced by endothelium-derived contracting factors. Current data strongly suggest that pathological development of different types of kidney impairment with further progression to renal failure includes notable vascular changes associated with endothelial dysfunction. In accordance, this scientific field represents an advancing area of investigation, involving different biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction linked to renal impairment, as well as clinical findings with new information that can provide a more comprehensive understanding of the role of endothelial dysfunction in kidney disease. With regards to quoted facts, the aim of this article was to review the latest data related to endothelial dysfunction and renal failure by selection of relevant articles released from 2010 to 2015.

  19. Understanding taste dysfunction in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Laura; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2012-04-01

    Taste dysfunction is a significant but underestimated issue for patients with cancer. Impaired taste results in changes in diet and appetite, early satiety, and impaired social interactions. Nurses can play a key role in educating patients and families on the pathophysiology of taste dysfunction by suggesting interventions to treat the consequences of taste dysfunction, when available, and offering psychosocial support as patients cope with this often devastating consequence of treatment. Taste recognition helps humans identify the nutritional quality of food and signals the digestive tract to begin secreting enzymes. Spoiled or tainted foods typically are recognized by their bad taste. Along with the other sensory systems, taste is crucial for helping patients treated for cancer feel normal. This article will review the anatomy and physiology of taste; define the different types of taste dysfunction, including the underlying pathophysiologic basis related to cancer treatment; and discuss potential nursing interventions to manage the consequences of taste dysfunction.

  20. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role.

  1. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hyperglycaemia-induced coronary microvascular dysfunction: Protective role of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mandar S; Williams, David; Horlock, Duncan; Samarasinghe, Thilini; Andrews, Karen L; Jefferis, Ann-Maree; Berger, Philip J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P; Kaye, David M

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular complications are now recognized to play a major role in diabetic complications, and understanding the mechanisms is critical. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of the development of complications; the precise mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction may occur in a diabetic rat heart and may act as a source of the oxidative stress. However, the role of endothelial cell-specific mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vascular complications is poorly studied. Here, we studied the role of diabetes-induced abnormal endothelial mitochondrial function and the resultant endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the role of endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vasculature is critical in order to develop new therapies. We demonstrate that hyperglycaemia leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in microvascular endothelial cells, and that mitochondrial inhibition induces endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that resveratrol acts as a protective agent; resveratrol-mediated mitochondrial protection may be used to prevent long-term diabetic cardiovascular complications.

  2. A new surgical technique versus an old marker: can expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty reduce C-reactive protein levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Binar, Murat; Akcam, Timur; Karakoc, Omer; Sagkan, Rahsan Ilikci; Musabak, Ugur; Gerek, Mustafa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before and after expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty (ESP) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Fifty-one patients with newly diagnosed OSA were prospectively enrolled in this study. We performed ESP in twenty-three patients in the surgery group and twenty-eight patients were included in the CPAP group. Serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays before and 3 months after treatment. The relations between CRP and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), visual analog scale (VAS), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and saturation parameters were evaluated. Both surgical and CPAP treatments caused significant improvements in the clinical and laboratory parameters. However, only the patients whose postoperative AHI levels improved to final AHI of <5 (n = 6) after ESP, had significant decrease in their serum CRP levels (p = 0.028). CPAP group and the rest of the patients in the surgery group did not show statistically significant difference in CRP levels after treatment. We suggest that the successful surgical treatment for OSA-ESP in this study-, which provides OSA cure, can decrease serum levels of CRP and reduce possible cardiovascular morbidity.

  3. Comparison of Effectiveness between Tension-Free Vaginal Tape (TVT) and Trans-Obturator Tape (TOT) in Patients with Stress Urinary Incontinence and Intrinsic Sphincter Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Gon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Paick, Sung Hyun; Choi, Woo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the two types of mid-urethral slings for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). Methods This retrospective study included patients who underwent tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure or transobturator tape (TOT) procedure by a single surgeon for SUI with ISD, defined as Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) < 60 cmH2O in a urodynamic study. Cases of neurogenic bladder, previous SUI surgery, and concomitant cystocele repair were excluded. The primary outcome was treatment success at 12 months, defined by self-reported absence of symptoms, no leakage episodes recorded, and no retreatment. Results Among the 157 women who were included in the final analysis, 105 patients received TVT and 52 patients received TOT. Age, underlying diseases, Stamey grade, cystocele grade, and presence of urge incontinence were not significantly different between the two groups. Urodynamic parameters including maximal urethral closing pressure, detrusor overactivity, VLPP, urethral hypermobility (Q-tip ≥ 30°), were also comparable between the two groups. Success rate was significantly higher in the TVT group than in the TOT group (95.2% vs. 82.7%, p = 0.009). On multivariate analysis, only TOT surgery (OR = 3.922, 95%CI = 1.223–12.582, p = 0.022) was a risk factor for failure following surgical treatment. Conclusion TVT is more effective than TOT in treatment of female SUI with ISD. PMID:27228092

  4. In vitro effect of nicorandil on the carbachol-induced contraction of the lower esophageal sphincter of the rat.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Tomonori; Adachi, Takeshi; Fujisawa, Susumu; Hongoh, Mai; Ohba, Takayoshi; Ono, Kyoichi

    2016-08-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized region of the esophageal smooth muscle that allows the passage of a swallowed bolus into the stomach. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in LES relaxation. Nicorandil possesses dual properties of a NO donor and an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) agonist, and is expected to reduce LES tone. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicorandil on the LES. Rat LES tissues were placed in an organ bath, and activities were recorded using an isometric force transducer. Carbachol-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by KATP channel agonists in a concentration-dependent manner; pinacidil > nicorandil ≈ diazoxide. Nicorandil-induced relaxation of the LES was prevented by pretreatment with glibenclamide, whereas N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and iberiotoxin were ineffective at preventing nicorandil-induced LES relaxation. Furthermore, nicorandil did not affect high K(+)-induced LES contraction. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed expression of KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1) and ABCC9 (SUR2) subunits of the KATP channel in the rat lower esophagus. These findings indicate that nicorandil causes LES relaxation chiefly by activating the KATP channel, and that it may provide an additional pharmacological tool for the treatment of spastic esophageal motility disorders.

  5. Erectile dysfunction in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Ure, Iyimser; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in COPD patients. Ninety-three outpatients who had been diagnosed as COPD and followed in Bolvadin State Hospital, Afyon, Turkey, were included in the study. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. They completed International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale, Short Form 36-item Scale (SF-36), and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Questionnaire. The mean age of 10 (10.8%) mild, 46 (49.5%) moderate, 28 (30.1%) severe, and 9 (9.7%) very severe COPD patients was 61.4 ± 9.8 years. Varying degrees of ED were detected in 67.7% of COPD patients. All patients with hypoxemia had ED. IPAQ score and all SF-36 parameters were low in patients with ED, while MRC score was high. Forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, partial pressure of oxygen in blood, oxygen (O2) saturation, IPAQ score, and role-physical parameters were statistically low in ED patients (p = 0.04, 0.02, <0.01, <0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively); MRC score was statistically higher in patients with ED (p = 0.02). Patients with moderate and severe ED had statistically lower score of mental health (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was a positive correlation between IIEF score and IPAQ scores (p < 0.01), MRC scores (p = 0.01), general health (p < 0.01), role-physical (p < 0.01), role-emotional (p < 0.01), physical functioning (p < 0.01), and mental health (p < 0.01) parameters in SF-36. ED is frequently seen in COPD patients. Hypoxemia, smoking, and limitation of physical activity are thought to be associated with ED in COPD as mechanisms. Quality of life and the functional capacity are negatively affected with the presence of ED. It is important for a physician to question the sexual functions in patients with COPD. The

  6. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  7. Polyphenols in preventing endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Biegańska-Hensoldt, Sylwia; Rosołowska-Huszcz, Danuta

    2017-03-27

    One of the main causes of mortality in developed countries is atherosclerosis. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is associated with endothelial dysfunction. Consumption of food rich in natural antioxidants including polyphenols significantly improves endothelial cells functions. Polyphenols have a beneficial effect on the human body and play an important part in protecting the cardiovascular system. Polyphenols present in food have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, antithrombotic and antiproliferative properties. Catechins cause an increase in the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and decrease in blood pressure. Catechins also reduce platelet adhesion, lower the concentration of C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6. Resveratrol inhibits NADPH oxidase expression, increases the expression of eNOS and NO production as well as decreases the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and also lowers the concentration of the soluble forms of adhesion molecules - sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 in blood. Quercetin reduces the blood level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, reduces the concentration of C-reactive protein and F2-isoprostane level. Curcumin has antagonistic activity to homocysteine. Curcumin increases the expression of eNOS and reduces oxidative DNA damage in rat cardiomyocytes. Numerous attempts are taken for improving the bioavailability of polyphenols in order to increase their use in the body.

  8. The anatomy of group dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, David F

    2014-04-01

    The dysfunction of the radiology group has 2 components: (1) the thinking component-the governance structure of the radiology group; how we manage the group; and (2) the structural component-the group's business model and its conflict with the partner's personal business model. Of the 2 components, governance is more important. Governance must be structured on classic, immutable business management principles. The structural component, the business model, is not immutable. In fact, it must continually change in response to the marketplace. Changes in the business model should occur only if demanded or permitted by the marketplace; instituting changes for other reasons, including personal interests or deficient knowledge of the deciders, is fundamentally contrary to the long-term interests of the group and its owners. First, we must learn basic business management concepts to appreciate the function and necessity of standard business models and standard business governance. Peter Drucker's The Effective Executive is an excellent primer on the subjects of standard business practices and the importance of a functional, authorized, and fully accountable chief executive officer.

  9. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies.

  11. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the nasal and oral cavities by dynamic closure of the velo-pharyngeal port is necessary for normal speech and swallowing. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) may either follow repair of a cleft palate or be independent of clefting. While the diagnosis of VPD is made by audiologic perceptual evaluation of speech, identification of the mechanism of the dysfunction requires instrumental visualization of the velo-pharyngeal port during specific speech tasks. Matching the specific intervention for management of VPD with the type of dysfunction, i.e. differential management for differential diagnosis, maximizes the result while minimizing the morbidity of the intervention. PMID:19884668

  12. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  13. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  14. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  15. [Management of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, José A; Alarcia-Alejos, Raquel

    2015-04-16

    Autonomic dysfunction is a common manifestation in patients with in Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes precede motor impairment. It can be expressed as orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, supine hypertension, hypersalivation, constipation, delayed gastric emptying, dyshidrosis, bladder and sexual dysfunction. It impairs the quality of life of patients and complicates the management of motor symptoms. Evidence available to treat complications is low. Our aim is to review the pathophysiology and clinical features of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and provide a practical approach to handling the available evidence.

  16. Erectile Dysfunction: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Erection problems - aftercare (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Erectile Dysfunction updates ... Erection problems - aftercare Prolactin blood test Related Health Topics Penis Disorders National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  17. Academic Achievement and Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, R. Philip; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The investigation provided no evidence that a diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction based on a pediatric neurological evaluation and/or visual-motor impairment as measured by the Bender-Gestalt, is a useful predictor of academic achievement. (Author)

  18. Erectile Dysfunction: A Sign of Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of plaques in the arteries of your body (atherosclerosis) was believed to be the reason why erectile ... the penis, and aids in the development of atherosclerosis. Erectile dysfunction does not always indicate an underlying ...

  19. Marital sexual dysfunction:introductory concepts.

    PubMed

    Levine, S B

    1976-04-01

    The concepts presented in this overview of marital sexual dysfunction are derived from increasing clinical experience with couples who seek help for their sexual problems. These couples, in marked contrast to couples with good sexual functioning, usually report a steady state of emotional dissatisfaction and minimal physical pleasure from sex. The affectual and behavioral consequences of persistent dysfunction are reviewed. Sexual therapy is discussed in terms of its two elements, sensate focus and psychotherapy. The various tastks which the sexual therapist may have to accomplish with individual couples are described. Consideration is given to the specific hypothese usually offered as explanation for sexual dysfunction-i.e., organic factors, varying degrees of relationship failure, poor communication, sexual ignorance, performance anxiety, and intrapsychic residua of past experience. A protocol for the screening physician to use in the formulation of a reasonable clinical plan for dysfunctional couples is included.

  20. Erectile dysfunction in the cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Jackson, Graham; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Montorsi, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common in the patient with cardiovascular disease. It is an important component of the quality of life and it also confers an independent risk for future cardiovascular events. The usual 3-year time period between the onset of erectile dysfunction symptoms and a cardiovascular event offers an opportunity for risk mitigation. Thus, sexual function should be incorporated into cardiovascular disease risk assessment for all men. A comprehensive approach to cardiovascular risk reduction (comprising of both lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment) improves overall vascular health, including sexual function. Proper sexual counselling improves the quality of life and increases adherence to medication. This review explores the critical connection between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease and evaluates how this relationship may influence clinical practice. Algorithms for the management of patient with erectile dysfunction according to the risk for sexual activity and future cardiovascular events are proposed.

  1. Temporomandibular dysfunction and headache disorder.

    PubMed

    Speciali, José G; Dach, Fabíola

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established that primary headaches (especially migraine, chronic migraine, and tension-type headache) and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) are comorbid diseases, with the presence of one of them in a patient increasing the prevalence of the others. The relationship between the 2 diseases may involve the sharing of common physiopathological aspects. Studies about the treatment of this disease association have shown that a simultaneous therapeutic approach to the 2 diseases is more effective than the separate treatment of each. As a consequence, specialists in orofacial pain are now required to know the criteria for the diagnosis of headaches, and headache physicians are required to know the semiologic aspects of orofacial pain. Nevertheless, a headache may be attributed to TMD, instead be an association of 2 problems - TMD and primary headaches - in these cases a secondary headache, described in item 11.7 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, is still a controversial topic. Attempts to determine the existence of this secondary headache with a specific or suggestive phenotype have been frustrated. The conclusion that can be reached based on the few studies published thus far is that this headache has a preferential unilateral or bilateral temporal location and migraine-like or tension-type headache-like clinical characteristics. In the present review, we will consider the main aspects of the TMD-headache relationship, that is, comorbidity of primary headaches and TMD and clinical aspects of the headaches attributed to TMD from the viewpoint of the International Headache Society and of a group of specialists in orofacial pain. This paper aims to explore our understanding of the association between TMD and headaches in general and migraine in particular.

  2. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  3. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in myofibrillar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Amy E; Grady, John P; Rocha, Mariana C; Alston, Charlotte L; Rygiel, Karolina A; Barresi, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are characterised by focal myofibrillar destruction and accumulation of myofibrillar elements as protein aggregates. They are caused by mutations in the DES, MYOT, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6 and ZASP genes as well as other as yet unidentified genes. Previous studies have reported changes in mitochondrial morphology and cellular positioning, as well as clonally-expanded, large-scale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and focal respiratory chain deficiency in muscle of MFM patients. Here we examine skeletal muscle from patients with desmin (n = 6), ZASP (n = 1) and myotilin (n = 2) mutations and MFM protein aggregates, to understand how mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to the underlying mechanisms causing disease pathology. We have used a validated quantitative immunofluorescent assay to study respiratory chain protein levels, together with oxidative enzyme histochemistry and single cell mitochondrial DNA analysis, to examine mitochondrial changes. Results demonstrate a small number of clonally-expanded mitochondrial DNA deletions, which we conclude are due to both ageing and disease pathology. Further to this we report higher levels of respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency compared to age matched controls, although overall levels of respiratory deficient muscle fibres in patient biopsies are low. More strikingly, a significantly higher percentage of myofibrillar myopathy patient muscle fibres have a low mitochondrial mass compared to controls. We concluded this is mechanistically unrelated to desmin and myotilin protein aggregates; however, correlation between mitochondrial mass and muscle fibre area is found. We suggest this may be due to reduced mitochondrial biogenesis in combination with muscle fibre hypertrophy.

  5. The role of dysfunctional HDL in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Navab, Mohamad; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.; Fogelman, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on HDL function in modulating LDL oxidation and LDL-induced inflammation. Dysfunctional HDL has been identified in animal models and humans with chronic inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The loss of antiinflammatory function correlated with a loss of function in reverse cholesterol transport. In animal models and perhaps in humans, dysfunctional HDL can be improved by apoA-I mimetic peptides that bind oxidized lipids with high affinity. PMID:18955731

  6. Erectile dysfunction: physiology, causes and patient management.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin J

    This article examines the prevalence, causes, identification, assessment and treatment options for men with erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction is thought to affect one in ten men across the UK and is often a consequence of pathology and/or pharmacology. Treatment can be offered to all patients, but the keys to management are identification, accurate assessment and focused therapy. Nurses are well placed to identify and support men who have this distressing problem.

  7. Towards an analysis of dysfunctional grammar.

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau-McKenna, B

    2005-01-01

    This article applies Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) to the study of language dysfunction. It demonstrates the potential that Systemic Functional analysis can offer to one aspect of the analysis of language dysfunction--the failure to realise complexes of clauses. For the purpose of analysis, new concepts and new measures have been created. The newly defined concepts and measures are illustrated in the discourse data of normally developing children and adolescents with brain injury.

  8. Salivary gland dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenfeld, D.; Webster, G.; Cameron, F.; Ferguson, M.M.; MacFadyen, E.E.; MacFarlane, T.W.

    1983-02-01

    Radioactive iodine is used extensively for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis and thyroid carcinoma. Iodine is actively taken up by the salivary glands and, following its use, salivary dysfunction may result as a consequence of radiation damage. The literature is reviewed and a case is reported in which a patient presented with a significant increase in caries rate attributed to salivary dysfunction following radioactive iodine therapy for a thyroid carcinoma.

  9. Thyroid hormone dysfunction during pregnancy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Aynadis; Terefe, Betelihem; Abebe, Molla; Biadgo, Belete

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunctions such as hypothyroidism, thyrotoxicosis and thyroid nodules may develop during pregnancy leading to abortion, placental abruptions, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and reduced intellectual function in the offspring. Epidemiological data have shown the significant role of maternal thyroid hormone in fetal neurologic development and maternal health. It has been suggested that the deleterious effects of thyroid dysfunction can also extend beyond pregnancy and delivery to affect neuro-intellectual development in the early life of the child. Pregnancy poses an important challenge to the maternal thyroid gland as hormone requirements are increased during gestation as a result of an increase in thyroid- binding globulin, the stimulatory effect of HCG on TSH receptors, and increased peripheral thyroid hormone requirements. Maternal thyroid dysfunction is associated with increased risk for early abortion, preterm delivery, neonatal morbidity and other obstetrical complications. Early diagnosis for thyroid dysfunction of pregnant women and treatment of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is important and cost effective to avoid both fetal and maternal complications secondary to thyroid dysfunction. Therefore the aim of this review was to assess the thyroid function changes occurring during pregnancy, the different disorders with their maternal and fetal implications, the laboratory diagnosis and the best ways of management of these conditions. PMID:27981252

  10. Telomere dysfunction induces metabolic and mitochondrial compromise

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ergün; Colla, Simona; Liesa, Marc; Moslehi, Javid; Müller, Florian L.; Guo, Mira; Cooper, Marcus; Kotton, Darrell; Fabian, Attila J.; Walkey, Carl; Maser, Richard S.; Tonon, Giovanni; Foerster, Friedrich; Xiong, Robert; Wang, Y. Alan; Shukla, Sachet A.; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Martin, Eric S.; Heffernan, Timothy P.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Mahoney, John E.; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Perry, Samuel R.; Bronson, Roderick; Liao, Ronglih; Mulligan, Richard; Shirihai, Orian S.; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction activates p53-mediated cellular growth arrest, senescence and apoptosis to drive progressive atrophy and functional decline in high-turnover tissues. The broader adverse impact of telomere dysfunction across many tissues including more quiescent systems prompted transcriptomic network analyses to identify common mechanisms operative in haematopoietic stem cells, heart and liver. These unbiased studies revealed profound repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha and beta (PGC-1α and PGC-1β, also known as Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b, respectively) and the downstream network in mice null for either telomerase reverse transcriptase (Tert) or telomerase RNA component (Terc) genes. Consistent with PGCs as master regulators of mitochondrial physiology and metabolism, telomere dysfunction is associated with impaired mitochondrial biogenesis and function, decreased gluconeogenesis, cardiomyopathy, and increased reactive oxygen species. In the setting of telomere dysfunction, enforced Tert or PGC-1α expression or germline deletion of p53 (also known as Trp53) substantially restores PGC network expression, mitochondrial respiration, cardiac function and gluconeogenesis. We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction activates p53 which in turn binds and represses PGC-1α and PGC-1β promoters, thereby forging a direct link between telomere and mitochondrial biology. We propose that this telomere–p53–PGC axis contributes to organ and metabolic failure and to diminishing organismal fitness in the setting of telomere dysfunction. PMID:21307849

  11. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  12. A new concept of the anatomy of the anal sphincter mechanism and the physiology of defecation: mass contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated both anatomically and physiologically that the external anal (EAS) and urethral (EUS) sphincters and the bulbocavernosus muscle (BC) originate from the puborectalis muscle (PR). It is hypothesized that stimulation of any of these muscles would lead to contraction of all the others. Because the levator ani (pubococcygeus) muscle (LA) also has the same innervation as the above-mentioned muscles, it is further suggested that it, too, contracts reflexly upon stimulation of any of those muscles. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis. The study comprised 18 healthy volunteers (mean age 36.6 +/- 8.4 years; 10 men, 8 women). The EAS was stimulated and the response of the EUS, PR, LA and BC was determined. Each muscle was thereafter stimulated separately and the response of the other pelvic floor muscles registered. Stimulation of any of the pelvic floor muscles effected an increased EMG activity of the rest of the muscles. The muscle contraction was instantaneous with no latency in all the muscles except the LA EMG activity, which showed a mean latency of 21.3 +/- 6.6 ms. The pelvic floor muscles' response seems to be attributable to muscle stimulation both directly and indirectly through activation of pudendal nerve fibers in the muscles. The study demonstrated that the pelvic floor muscles behave as one muscle: they contract or relax en masse. This 'mass contraction' might explain some of the physiologic phenomena that occur during pelvic organ evacuation. However, besides this mass contraction, a voluntary 'selective' individual muscle activity exists by which each individual muscle acts independently of the others.

  13. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence Causes Hypertrophy of the Urethral Sphincters and Reduces Bladder Neck Mobility During Coughing

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). Results The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Conclusion Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. PMID:23861324

  14. The effect of dividing the sphincter of Oddi at endoscopic sphincterotomy on the filling and emptying aspects of function of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Taskin, V; Ozyilkan, E; Sare, M; Hilmioglu, F

    1999-10-01

    The effect of dividing the sphincter of Oddi at endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) on the filling and emptying aspects of gallbladder function has not been definitely established in humans. This prospective study is designed to examine the effects of EST on gallbladder emptying. In 13 patients (8 men and 5 women; mean age, 60.54 years +/- 2.14; range, 45-75 years), postprandial gallbladder emptying was measured ultrasonographically before and after EST (within 1-4 days). The fasting volumes after 8 hours of fasting, at times 0 min and before the test meal was given, residual volume (the smallest postprandial volume), gallbladder ejection fraction (EF), and total ejection volume, at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 min after the test meal, were studied. The fasting gallbladder volume and the residual volume tended to decrease after EST, but the differences were not significant (40.21 +/- 10.79 mL and 35.48 +/- 11.21 mL, 17.79 +/- 4.83 mL, and 13.10 +/- 4.83 mL, respectively; p > 0.05). Maximum EF was found to be 19.72% at 40 min and increased to 28.62% at 70 min after EST. Although the difference was not statistically relevant, a trend of improvement was evident after EST. The ejected volumes after EST have depicted a trend toward increase, without reaching to any statistical significance (p > 0.05). Our results demonstrate at least no adverse effects of EST and further support some positive effects on gallbladder kinetics.

  15. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-17

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55-62 Gy-eq/4 f (13-16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients.

  16. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55–62 Gy-eq/4 f (13–16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28094790

  17. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  18. Erectile dysfunction: oral pharmacotherapy options.

    PubMed

    Vitezic, D; Pelcic, J Mrsic

    2002-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) (impotence) is a widespread, age-related problem, which affects 52% of men between 40 and 70 years of age. It is classified as psychogenic, organic, or mixed psychogenic and organic. ED is not a problem only of men, because the relationship between partners can also be disturbed. Therefore, adequate treatment of ED is needed and the most convenient and simplest way is oral drug therapy. Sildenafil, phosphodiesterase-(PDE)-5-selective inhibitor has been the drug of choice for patients with ED since it has been launched in March 1998. The results of various studies have confirmed the efficacy of the drug in men with ED of various etiologies, as well as the positive effect of sildenafil on the quality of a partnership. The most frequent adverse effects documented with sildenafil usage are headache, flushes, dyspepsia, visual disturbances and nasal congestion/rhinitis. These adverse effects are dose-related, usually transient and mild, with low withdrawal rate. Several studies performed recently have shown that sildenafil is a safe and effective treatment of ED in patients with cardiovascular disease, who do not take nitrates or nitrate donors concomitantly. Other oral medications for ED include apomorphine, phentolamine, yohimbine, trazodone, testosterone and new PDE-5 inhibitors in Phase III clinical trials, such as vardenafil and tadalafil. It is obvious, according to recent data, that the concept of PDE-5 inhibition has a central position in oral pharmacotherapy of ED. However, larger clinical studies of efficacy and safety should be carried out using most of the other above-mentioned oral agents and these may also gain a place in the therapy of ED. There are no studies directly comparing sildenafil and other treatments of ED or assessing its role in combination with other therapies. According to the present knowledge, the quality of life, not only of patients but also of their sexual partners, will be improved significantly with

  19. Motor neuron dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Burrell, James R; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve; Hodges, John R

    2011-09-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease share clinical, genetic and pathological characteristics. Motor neuron disease develops in a proportion of patients with frontotemporal dementia, but the incidence, severity and functional significance of motor system dysfunction in patients with frontotemporal dementia has not been determined. Neurophysiological biomarkers have been developed to document motor system dysfunction including: short-interval intracortical inhibition, a marker of corticospinal motor neuron dysfunction and the neurophysiological index, a marker of lower motor neuron dysfunction. The present study performed detailed clinical and neurophysiological assessments on 108 participants including 40 consecutive patients with frontotemporal dementia, 42 age- and gender-matched patients with motor neuron disease and 26 control subjects. Of the 40 patients with frontotemporal dementia, 12.5% had concomitant motor neuron disease. A further 27.3% of the patients with frontotemporal dementia had clinical evidence of minor motor system dysfunction such as occasional fasciculations, mild wasting or weakness. Biomarkers of motor system function were abnormal in frontotemporal dementia. Average short-interval intracortical inhibition was reduced in frontotemporal dementia (4.3 ± 1.7%) compared with controls (9.1 ± 1.1%, P < 0.05). Short-interval intracortical inhibition was particularly reduced in the progressive non-fluent aphasia subgroup, but was normal in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and semantic dementia. The neurophysiological index was reduced in frontotemporal dementia (1.1) compared with controls (1.9, P < 0.001), indicating a degree of lower motor neuron dysfunction, although remained relatively preserved when compared with motor neuron disease (0.7, P < 0.05). Motor system dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia may result from pathological involvement of the primary motor cortex, with secondary

  20. Pathophysiology of muscle dysfunction in COPD.

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Agustí, Alvar; Roca, Josep

    2013-05-01

    Muscle dysfunction often occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may involve both respiratory and locomotor (peripheral) muscles. The loss of strength and/or endurance in the former can lead to ventilatory insufficiency, whereas in the latter it limits exercise capacity and activities of daily life. Muscle dysfunction is the consequence of complex interactions between local and systemic factors, frequently coexisting in COPD patients. Pulmonary hyperinflation along with the increase in work of breathing that occur in COPD appear as the main contributing factors to respiratory muscle dysfunction. By contrast, deconditioning seems to play a key role in peripheral muscle dysfunction. However, additional systemic factors, including tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, exercise, exacerbations, nutritional and gas exchange abnormalities, anabolic insufficiency, comorbidities and drugs, can also influence the function of both respiratory and peripheral muscles, by inducing modifications in their local microenvironment. Under all these circumstances, protein metabolism imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammatory events, as well as muscle injury may occur, determining the final structure and modulating the function of different muscle groups. Respiratory muscles show signs of injury as well as an increase in several elements involved in aerobic metabolism (proportion of type I fibers, capillary density, and aerobic enzyme activity) whereas limb muscles exhibit a loss of the same elements, injury, and a reduction in fiber size. In the present review we examine the current state of the art of the pathophysiology of muscle dysfunction in COPD.

  1. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  2. [Biofeedback for urinary bladder dysfunctions in childhood. Indications, practice and the results of therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoang-Böhm, J; Lusch, A; Sha, W; Alken, P

    2004-07-01

    In children, abnormal behavior during micturition, i.e. detrusor/sphincter dyscoordination, causes persistent voiding problems, urinary incontinence and/or recurrent urinary tract infections in up to 15% of cases. Contractions of the external urethral sphincter during micturition lead to functional subvesical obstruction. Nowadays, biofeedback training is the most suitable therapy. Biofeedback training for children is based on the assumption that relaxation and contraction of the urinary external sphincter is a habitual phenomenon and can be restored. With specially developed, computer-assisted biofeedback programs, sphincter contraction and relaxation can be transformed into acoustic or visual signals. Acoustic or optical feedback indicates relaxation and contraction control to the patient. The residual urine volume should subsequently be assessed. The results should be reviewed after each micturition. Poor compliance sometimes makes biofeedback training impossible. Further biofeedback training at home is a reasonable suggestion. Good results-a response rate of up to 90%-demonstrates that biofeedback training is successful in the treatment of detrusor-sphincter dyscoordination. After effective therapy, associated urinary tract infections and vesicoureterorenal reflux may disappear.

  3. AB271. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a clinical syndrome characterized by genital/ pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. CPPS is the most common prostatic disease in men younger than 50 years of age and the third most common in men older than 50 years of age. CP/CPPS is a complex entity with unclear etiology. Many articles reported that the high percentage of patients with CP/CPPS had sexual dysfunction. The most common symptoms of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis patients are erectile dysfunction (ED), painful ejaculation and premature ejaculation. So we will discuss about ED and ejaculation problems in CP/CPPS patients.

  4. Taxonomy of segmental myocardial systolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDiarmid, Adam K.; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Cleland, John G.

    2017-01-01

    The terms used to describe different states of myocardial health and disease are poorly defined. Imprecision and inconsistency in nomenclature can lead to difficulty in interpreting and applying trial outcomes to clinical practice. In particular, the terms ‘viable’ and ‘hibernating’ are commonly applied interchangeably and incorrectly to myocardium that exhibits chronic contractile dysfunction in patients with ischaemic heart disease. The range of inherent differences amongst imaging modalities used to define myocardial health and disease add further challenges to consistent definitions. The results of several large trials have led to renewed discussion about the classification of dysfunctional myocardial segments. This article aims to describe the diverse myocardial pathologies that may affect the myocardium in ischaemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, and how they may be assessed with non-invasive imaging techniques in order to provide a taxonomy of myocardial dysfunction. PMID:27147609

  5. Proteasomal dysfunction in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McNaught, Kevin St P; Jackson, Tehone; JnoBaptiste, Ruth; Kapustin, Alexander; Olanow, C Warren

    2006-05-23

    The cause and mechanism of neuronal death in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) continue to elude investigators. Recently, alterations in proteasomal function have been detected in the brain of patients with the illness. The biochemical basis of the defect and its relevance to the disease process are now being studied. The available results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction could underlie protein accumulation, Lewy body formation, and neuron death in PD. The cause of proteasomal dysfunction is unknown at present, but this could relate to gene mutations, oxidative damage, ATP depletion, or the actions of environmental toxins. It remains to be established if proteasomal dysfunction plays a primary or a secondary role in the initiation or progression of the neurodegenerative process in PD.

  6. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Boussaid, Ghilas; Stojkovic, Tanya; Orlikowski, David; Letilly, Nadege; Behin, Anthony; Butel, Sandrine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Prigent, Hélène

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory insufficiency in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy has rarely been studied. We compared two age- and sex-matched groups of 29 patients, with and without respiratory dysfunction. Tests in the 29 patients with respiratory dysfunction suggested predominant expiratory muscle dysfunction, leading to ineffective cough in 17 patients. Supine and upright vital capacities were not different (P = 0.76), suggesting absence of diaphragmatic dysfunction. By stepwise regression, only expiratory reserve volume correlated with the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (R(2) = 0.503; P = 0.001). Compared to controls, patients with respiratory dysfunction had higher values for the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (6.1 ± 1.9 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2; P <0.0001) and body mass index (26.9 ± 6.0 vs. 22.9 ± 4.0 kg/m(2); P = 0.003) and a smaller number of D4Z4 allele repeats (4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 5.7 ± 1.8; P = 0.05). Mechanical ventilation was required eventually in 20 patients, including 14 who were wheelchair bound. Three patients had acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; 16 patients had poor airway clearance, including 10 with sleep apnea syndrome, responsible in 7 for chronic hypercapnia. Two patients presented isolated severe sleep apnea syndrome. Respiratory dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is predominantly related to expiratory muscle weakness. Respiratory function and cough effectiveness should especially be monitored in patients with severe motor impairment and high body mass index.

  7. Female sexual dysfunction: definition, classification, and debates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Hui; Lin, Yen-Chin; Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Chu, Yuan-Hsiang; Ruan, Fang-Fu; Liu, Wei-Min; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2013-03-01

    Sexual dysfunction refers to difficulties that occur during the sexual response cycle that prevent the individual from experiencing satisfaction from sexual activity. It is relatively difficult to estimate the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD), because the definition and diagnostic criteria are still controversial and under development. These difficulties reveal our insufficient understanding of the basis of FSD. This review was conducted in an effort to deal with this complicated clinical issue, by examining the most updated clinical criteria of FSD under the context of a redefined female sexual response model.

  8. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing.

  9. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  11. Diaphragm Dysfunction: Diagnostic Approaches and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Dres, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle, and its dysfunction can lead to significant adverse clinical consequences. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians with an overview of the main causes of uni- and bi-lateral diaphragm dysfunction, explore the clinical and physiological consequences of the disease on lung function, exercise physiology and sleep and review the available diagnostic tools used in the evaluation of diaphragm function. A particular emphasis is placed on the clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in the intensive care unit setting and the use of ultrasound to evaluate diaphragmatic action. PMID:27929389

  12. Longitudinal comparison of quality of life in patients undergoing laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication versus magnetic sphincter augmentation: Observational cohort study with propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Asti, Emanuele; Bonitta, Gianluca; Lovece, Andrea; Lazzari, Veronica; Bonavina, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Only a minority of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are offered a surgical option. This is mostly due to the fear of potential side effects, the variable success rate, and the extreme alteration of gastric anatomy with the current gold standard, the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. It has been reported that laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) and laparoscopic sphincter augmentation using a magnetic device (LINX) can treat reflux more physiologically and with a lower incidence of side-effects and reoperation rate. We present the first comparing quality of life in patients undergoing LTF versus LINX.Observational cohort study. Consecutive patients undergoing LTF or LINX over the same time period were compared by using the propensity score full matching method and generalized estimating equation. Criteria of exclusion were >3 cm hiatal hernia, grade C-D esophagitis, ineffective esophageal motility, body mass index >35, and previous upper abdominal surgery. The primary study outcome was quality of life measured with the Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease-Health Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use, presence of gas-related symptoms or dysphagia, and reoperation-free probability.Between March 2007 and July 2014, 238 patients with GERD met the criteria of inclusion in the study. Of these, 103 underwent an LTF and 135 a LINX procedure. All patients had a minimum 1-year follow-up. Over time, patients in both groups had similar GERD-HRQL scores (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, confidence interval [CI] 0.89-1.27; P = 0.578), PPI use (OR 1.18, CI 0.81-1.70; P = 0.388), gas-related symptoms (OR 0.69, CI 0.21-2.28; P = 0.542), dysphagia (OR 0.62, CI 0.26-1.30; P = 0.241), and reoperation-free probability (stratified log-rank test = 0.556).In 2 concurrent cohorts of patients with early stage GERD undergoing LTF or LINX and matched by propensity score analysis, health

  13. New insights into environmental enteric dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) has been recognised as an important contributing factor to physical and cognitive stunting, poor response to oral vaccines, limited resilience to acute infections and ultimately global childhood mortality. The aetiology of EED remains poorly defined but the ep...

  14. Public Education for Children with Brain Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Sheldon R.

    A foreword by William M. Cruickshank introduces a book designed to provide information on the problems of children with brain dysfunction and to furnish guidelines to habilitation. Subjects discussed are the status of education for these children, preparing the community for a school program, selection of school and preparation of the principal,…

  15. Immunoglobulin therapy in idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huppke, Peter; Heise, Alexander; Rostasy, Kevin; Huppke, Brenda; Gärtner, Jutta

    2009-09-01

    Idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction is a rare disorder presenting at age 3-7 years. Severe hypothalamic and brainstem dysfunction leads to death in 25% of patients. The disease is presumed to be autoimmune, or in some cases paraneoplastic. No successful treatment has been reported. Patient V. developed hyperphagia, hypersomnia, and extreme aggression at age 7 years, accompanied by episodes of hyperthermia, hypothermia, sinus bradycardia, hypernatremia, hyponatremia, persistent hyperprolactinemia, hypothyroidism, and growth-hormone deficiency. At age 9 years, a diagnosis of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction was rendered, and immunoglobulin therapy was commenced. Nine courses of immunoglobulins, at a dose of 2 g/kg every 4 weeks, were administered. Reproducible improvements in behavior and no further episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia and sinus bradycardia were evident. The endocrinologic abnormalities and poor thermoregulation remained. Administration of immunoglobulins during late stages of idiopathic hypothalamic dysfunction led to improvement in some but not all signs. Assuming an autoimmune basis for this disorder, treatment during early stages of disease should be more effective. To facilitate such early treatment, increased awareness of this disorder is necessary, to allow for early diagnosis.

  16. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  17. The Biochemical Basis of Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: C. V. Mosby Company 11830 Westline Industrial Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63141 The research review examines evidence suggesting a biochemical basis for minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), which includes both a relationship between MBD and metabolic abnormalities and a significant genetic influence on the disorder in children. (IM)

  18. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Ling-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype. Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca2+, or oncometabolites are important in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promising strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy. PMID:27022139

  19. Adolescent Depression: Stress and Reward Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Admon, Roee; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a peak period for the onset of depression, and it is also a time marked by substantial stress as well as neural development within the brain reward circuitry. In the current review, we provide a selective overview of current animal and human research investigating the relationship among reward processes, stress, and depression. Three separate, but related, etiological models examine the differential roles that stress may play with regard to reward dysfunction and adolescent depression. First, the reward mediation model suggests that acute and chronic stress contribute to reward deficits, which in turn, potentiate depressive symptoms and/or increase the risk for depression. Second, in line with the stress generation perspective, it is plausible that premorbid reward-related dysfunction generates stress, in particular interpersonal stress, which then leads to the manifestation of depressive symptoms. Last, consistent with a diathesis-stress model, the interaction between stress and premorbid reward dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression. Given the equifinal nature of depression, these models could shed important light on different etiological pathways during adolescence, particularly as they may relate to understanding the heterogeneity of depression. To highlight the translational potential of these insights, a hypothetical case study is provided as means of demonstrating the importance of targeting reward dysfunction in both assessment and treatment of adolescent depression. PMID:24704785

  20. Diaphragm Dysfunction in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    PubMed

    Dot, Irene; Pérez-Teran, Purificación; Samper, Manuel-Andrés; Masclans, Joan-Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Muscle involvement is found in most critical patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Diaphragmatic muscle alteration, initially included in this category, has been differentiated in recent years, and a specific type of muscular dysfunction has been shown to occur in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We found this muscle dysfunction to appear in this subgroup of patients shortly after the start of mechanical ventilation, observing it to be mainly associated with certain control modes, and also with sepsis and/or multi-organ failure. Although the specific etiology of process is unknown, the muscle presents oxidative stress and mitochondrial changes. These cause changes in protein turnover, resulting in atrophy and impaired contractility, and leading to impaired functionality. The term 'ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction' was first coined by Vassilakopoulos et al. in 2004, and this phenomenon, along with injury cause by over-distention of the lung and barotrauma, represents a challenge in the daily life of ventilated patients. Diaphragmatic dysfunction affects prognosis by delaying extubation, prolonging hospital stay, and impairing the quality of life of these patients in the years following hospital discharge. Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique that is readily available in most ICUs, could be used to diagnose this condition promptly, thus preventing delays in starting rehabilitation and positively influencing prognosis in these patients.

  1. Cardiovascular dysfunction in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Fede, Giuseppe; Privitera, Graziella; Tomaselli, Tania; Spadaro, Luisa; Purrello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hyperdynamic syndrome is a well-known clinical condition found in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension, characterized by increased heart rate and cardiac output, and reduced systemic vascular resistance and arterial blood pressure. The leading cause of hyperdynamic circulation in cirrhotic patients is peripheral and splanchnic vasodilatation, due to an increased production/activity of vasodilator factors and decreased vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictors. The term “cirrhotic cardiomyopathy” describes impaired contractile responsiveness to stress, diastolic dysfunction and electrophysiological abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis without known cardiac disease. Underlying circulatory and cardiac dysfunctions are the main determinant in the development of hepatorenal syndrome in advanced cirrhosis. Moreover, the clinical consequences of cirrhosis-related cardiovascular dysfunction are evident during and after liver transplantation, and after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt insertion. Cardiovascular complications following these procedures are common, with pulmonary edema being the most common complication. Other complications include overt heart failure, arrhythmia, pulmonary hypertension, pericardial effusion, and cardiac thrombus formation. This review discusses the circulatory and cardiovascular dysfunctions in cirrhosis, examining the pathophysiologic and clinical implications in light of the most recent published literature. PMID:25608575

  2. Environmental Chemicals and Nervous System Dysfunction 1

    PubMed Central

    Damstra, Terri

    1978-01-01

    Selected examples of associations between nervous system diseases and exposures to occupational and environmental chemicals have been reviewed. Recent outbreaks of human neurotoxicity from both wellknown and previously unknown toxicants reemphasize the need for the medical community to give increased attention to chemical causes of nervous system dysfunction. PMID:87062

  3. New Diagnostic Terminology for Minimal Brain Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaywitz, Bennett A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Minimal brain dysfunction has been redefined by the American Psychological Association as attention deficit disorder (ADD) and subdivided into categories with and without hyperactivity. The revised 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual' (DSM III) is now undergoing field trials. Journal Availability: C. V. Mosby Company, 11830 Westline Industrial…

  4. Effect of Common Visual Dysfunctions on Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Brian P.

    1985-01-01

    Six common visual dysfunctions are briefly explained and their relationships to reading noted: (1) ametropia, refractive error; (2) inaccurate saccades, the small jumping eye movements used in reading; (3) inefficient binocularity/fusion; (4) insufficient convergence/divergence; (5) heterophoria, imbalance in extra-ocular muscles; and (6)…

  5. Trazodone in Methandone Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tatari, Faezeh; Nasiri, Reza Faghih; Najafi, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Objective Based on findings of previous studies, those men on Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) have a high prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction(ED), related to hypogonadism and depression. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of Trazodone (an antidepressant which can improve sexual function) on this sexual dysfunction. Method A structured interview was administered by the clinical staff. The interview contained questions about the subjects' socio-demographic characteristics, their drug use and sexual behavior. In addition to the socio-demographic survey, erectile function was assessed using erectile dysfunction (ED) intensity scale. Of the 157 subjects, 95 suffered from ED. The subjects were informed about the study. Then, seventy five patients voluntarily received 50mg of Trazodone for four days, and the dosage was increased to100 mg and maintained for 6 weeks. Fifty five patients who completed the treatment course were assessed by ED questionnaire again at the end of study. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 8 software. Results The prevalence of ED was 60.5% in our sample. The mean erectile dysfunction (ED) intensity scale was 12.21, and 16.78 before and after the treatment course respectively. (P<0.05) ED severity had no significant relation with age and type of substance dependency (P>0.05); but it had a significant relation with duration of Methadone therapy and Methadone daily dosage. (p<0.05) Conclusion Trazodone may be effective in the treatment of methadone induced ED. Further studies with control groups and greater sample sizes are warranted. PMID:22952511

  6. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ruth A.; Keen, John A.; Walker, Brian R.; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL) is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing’s disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing’s syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6) and horses with EL (n = 6) destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein) and the facial skin (facial skin arteries) by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10−9–10-5M) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10−9–10-5M) and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10−9–10-5M) was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01). In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006) and veins (P = 0.009) from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof. PMID:27684374

  7. Vascular Dysfunction in Horses with Endocrinopathic Laminitis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ruth A; Keen, John A; Walker, Brian R; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    Endocrinopathic laminitis (EL) is a vascular condition of the equine hoof resulting in severe lameness with both welfare and economic implications. EL occurs in association with equine metabolic syndrome and equine Cushing's disease. Vascular dysfunction, most commonly due to endothelial dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular risk in people with metabolic syndrome and Cushing's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that horses with EL have vascular, specifically endothelial, dysfunction. Healthy horses (n = 6) and horses with EL (n = 6) destined for euthanasia were recruited. We studied vessels from the hooves (laminar artery, laminar vein) and the facial skin (facial skin arteries) by small vessel wire myography. The response to vasoconstrictors phenylephrine (10-9-10-5M) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT; 10-9-10-5M) and the vasodilator acetylcholine (10-9-10-5M) was determined. In comparison with healthy controls, acetylcholine-induced relaxation was dramatically reduced in all intact vessels from horses with EL (% relaxation of healthy laminar arteries 323.5 ± 94.1% v EL 90.8 ± 4.4%, P = 0.01, laminar veins 129.4 ± 14.8% v EL 71.2 ± 4.1%, P = 0.005 and facial skin arteries 182.0 ± 40.7% v EL 91.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.01). In addition, contractile responses to phenylephrine and 5HT were increased in intact laminar veins from horses with EL compared with healthy horses; these differences were endothelium-independent. Sensitivity to phenylephrine was reduced in intact laminar arteries (P = 0.006) and veins (P = 0.009) from horses with EL. Horses with EL exhibit significant vascular dysfunction in laminar vessels and in facial skin arteries. The systemic nature of the abnormalities suggest this dysfunction is associated with the underlying endocrinopathy and not local changes to the hoof.

  8. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as

  9. Central Processing Dysfunctions in Children: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalfant, James C.; Scheffelin, Margaret A.

    Research on central processing dysfunctions in children is reviewed in three major areas. The first, dysfunctions in the analysis of sensory information, includes auditory, visual, and haptic processing. The second, dysfunction in the synthesis of sensory information, covers multiple stimulus integration and short-term memory. The third area of…

  10. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery.

  11. In Search of the Optimal Surgical Treatment for Velopharyngeal Dysfunction in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Spruijt, Nicole E.; ReijmanHinze, Judith; Hens, Greet; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) tend to have residual VPD following surgery. This systematic review seeks to determine whether a particular surgical procedure results in superior speech outcome or less morbidity. Methodology/ Principal Findings A combined computerized and hand-search yielded 70 studies, of which 27 were deemed relevant for this review, reporting on a total of 525 patients with 22qDS and VPD undergoing surgery for VPD. All studies were levels 2c or 4 evidence. The methodological quality of these studies was assessed using criteria based on the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Heterogeneous groups of patients were reported on in the studies. The surgical procedure was often tailored to findings on preoperative imaging. Overall, 50% of patients attained normal resonance, 48% attained normal nasal emissions scores, and 83% had understandable speech postoperatively. However, 5% became hyponasal, 1% had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and 17% required further surgery. There were no significant differences in speech outcome between patients who underwent a fat injection, Furlow or intravelar veloplasty, pharyngeal flap pharyngoplasty, Honig pharyngoplasty, or sphincter pharyngoplasty or Hynes procedures. There was a trend that a lower percentage of patients attained normal resonance after a fat injection or palatoplasty than after the more obstructive pharyngoplasties (11–18% versus 44–62%, p = 0.08). Only patients who underwent pharyngeal flaps or sphincter pharyngoplasties incurred OSA, yet this was not statistically significantly more often than after other procedures (p = 0.25). More patients who underwent a palatoplasty needed further surgery than those who underwent a pharyngoplasty (50% versus 7–13%, p = 0.03). Conclusions/ Significance In the heterogeneous group of patients with 22qDS and VPD, a grade C recommendation can be made to

  12. Signal-transduction pathways that regulate smooth muscle function I. Signal transduction in phasic (esophageal) and tonic (gastroesophageal sphincter) smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Karen M; Cao, Weibiao; Biancani, Piero

    2005-03-01

    Contraction of esophageal (Eso) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) circular muscle depends on distinct signal-transduction pathways. ACh-induced contraction of Eso muscle is linked to phosphatidylcholine metabolism, production of diacylglycerol and arachidonic acid (AA), and activation of the Ca(2+)-insensitive PKCepsilon. Although PKCepsilon does not require Ca(2+) for activation, either influx of extracellular Ca(2+) or release of Ca(2+) from stores is needed to activate the phospholipases responsible for hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids and production of second messengers, which activate PKCepsilon. In contrast, the LES uses two distinct intracellular pathways: 1) a PKC-dependent pathway activated by low doses of agonists or during maintenance of spontaneous tone, and 2) a Ca(2+)-calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent pathway activated in response to maximally effective doses of agonists during the initial phase of contraction. The Ca(2+) levels, released by agonist-induced activity of phospholipase C, determine which contractile pathway is activated in the LES. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-MLCK-dependent contractile pathway has been well characterized in a variety of smooth muscles. The steps linking activation of PKC to myosin light chain (MLC20) phosphorylation and contraction, however, have not been clearly defined for LES, Eso, or other smooth muscles. In addition, in LES circular muscle, a low-molecular weight pancreatic-like phospholipase A2 (group I PLA2) causes production of AA, which is metabolized to prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These AA metabolites act on receptors linked to heterotrimeric G proteins to induce activation of phospholipases and production of second messengers to maintain contraction of LES circular muscle. We have examined the signal-transduction pathways activated by PGF(2alpha) and by thromboxane analogs during the initial contractile phase and found that these pathways are the same as those activated by other

  13. [Beyond immunopathogenesis. Insulin resistance and "epidermal dysfunction"].

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W-H; Boehncke, S; Buerger, C

    2012-03-01

    Insulin is a central player in the regulation of metabolic as well as non-metabolic cells: inefficient signal transduction (insulin resistance) not only represents the cornerstone in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, but also drives atherosclerosis through inducing endothelial dysfunction. Last but not least epidermal homeostasis depends on insulin. We summarize the effects of insulin on proliferation and differentiation of human keratinocytes as well as the relevance of cytokine-induced insulin resistance for alterations in epidermal homeostasis characteristic for psoriasis. Kinases involved in both insulin- as well as cytokine-receptor signaling represent potential targets for innovative therapeutics. Such small molecules would primarily normalize "epidermal dysfunction", thus complementing the immunomodulatory strategies of today's biologics.

  14. Oculogyric crisis masquerading as ventriculoperitoneal shunt dysfunction.

    PubMed

    AlAzwary, Nail H; Muayqil, Taim; Siddiqi, Zaeem A; Ahmed, S Nizam

    2008-11-01

    Oculogyric crisis (OGC) is an underrecognized oculodystonic reaction associated with several medications including carbamazepine. The authors present a patient who had presented to the emergency department on multiple occasions with a questionable ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt dysfunction. Symptoms included nausea, vomiting, altered level of consciousness, ataxia, and vertical eye deviation. The patient underwent multiple revisions of the VP shunt with transient and questionable improvement. During her visit to the neurology clinic, OGC from carbamazepine was suspected, and the dose was reduced. The patient has been completely asymptomatic for the past 18 months. The authors report this case to increase the awareness of carbamazepine-induced OGC as one of the differential diagnoses for VP shunt dysfunction.

  15. Mental dysfunctions in dystonia-plus syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sunga, Mary Anne P; Rosales, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing understanding of the involvement of basal ganglia circuits in the functions of movement, cognition, emotion and motivation, the network model of dystonia posits a plausible mechanism for the co-occurrence of mental dysfunctions in dystonia-plus syndromes. Genetic mutations that alter the production of neurotransmitters and receptors can potentially affect the function of these interconnecting circuits and yield non-motor symptoms as well. This article reviews the psychiatric findings in dystonia-plus syndromes reported thus far in the literature, both in animal models and human subjects. Based on this innovative understanding of the pathophysiology, implications to treatment of combined motor and non-motor symptoms (i.e. mental dysfunctions) are also briefly discussed.

  16. Multiple response to sound in dysfunctional children.

    PubMed

    Condon, W S

    1975-03-01

    Methods and findings derived from over a decade of linguistic-kinesic microanalysis of sound films of human behavior were appled to the analysis of sound films of 25 dysfunctional children. Of the children, 17 were markedly dysfunctional (autistic-like) while 8 had milder reading problems. All of these children appeared to respond to sound more than once: when it actually occurred and again after a delay ranging from a fraction of a second up to a full second, depending on the child. Most of the children did not seem to actually hear the sound more than once; however, there is some indication that a few children may have done so. Evidence was also found suggesting a continuum from the longer delay of autistic-like children to the briefer delay of children with reading problems.

  17. Musculoskeletal dysfunctions associated with swimmers' shoulder.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Tate, Angela; Kuppens, Kevin; Feijen, Stef; Michener, Lori A

    2017-02-11

    Shoulder pain is the most reported area of orthopaedic injury in swimmers. The so-called 'swimmers' shoulder' has been applied to a variety of complaints involving shoulder pain in swimmers without specific reference to contributing mechanisms or structures. Knowledge of dysfunctions associated with swimmers' shoulder can assist clinicians in developing rehabilitation strategies. This literature review aims at providing clinicians insight into the musculoskeletal mechanisms and impairments associated with swimmers' shoulder that could aid them in developing rehabilitation strategies. The following musculoskeletal dysfunctions will be discussed: muscle activity, strength, endurance, muscle control, range of motion, glenohumeral laxity, glenohumeral instability, shoulder posture and scapular dyskinesis. The findings in this review may have implications for swimmers, their coaches, and rehabilitation specialists working with swimmers.

  18. Specific aspects of erectile dysfunction in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Farre, J M; Fora, F; Lasheras, M G

    2004-10-01

    The participation of the psychiatrist in the management of erectile dysfunction (ED) is focused on three types of patients based on the origin of the dysfunction: (1) patients with functional or psychogenic ED, (2) patients with mixed, organic psychogenic ED, and (3) patients with ED and active psychopathology. The second group is influenced by three psychological factors: perpetuating factors, aggravating factors, and accompanying factors. The main psychopathological disorders that interfere directly with the erectile mechanism are depressive disorders (18-35%), anxiety disorders (37%), obsessive-compulsive disorder, psychotic disorders (46-47%), and the antipsychotic medications used to treat these disorders. The diagnostic proposal includes psychological and sexologic evaluation and differential diagnosis. The therapeutic proposal includes the basic principles of sex therapy in the model of behavioral-cognitive therapy (eg, prohibition of intercourse, sensate focus, voluntary loss of erections, no expectations about response), pharmacological therapy (eg, sildenafil, intracavernous injection of vasoactive drugs), and a combination of both therapies.

  19. Andropause: endocrinology, erectile dysfunction, and prostate pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hafez, B; Hafez, E S E

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes major biological aspects of andrology of andropause, deficiency in androgens/growth hormones, and molecular parameters; erectile dysfunction (ED), the use of malleable, mechanical, inflatable devices as well as the application of Viagra (Sildenafil), alprotadil (Caverject), Yohimbine, and other drugs not yet approved by FDA, such as Papaverine, phentolamine (Vasomax), and apormorphine (Uprima); osteopenia/osteoporosis: testosterone/osteoporesis; supplementation during andropause: administration of andiogens, possible risk factors of androgens, calcium supplement and muscle mass; prostate pathophysiology: consequences of prostatectomy, prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), hormone-dependent cancers; bladder and urethral dysfunction: neurological parameter, urodynamics technology; models on aging in male animals: comparative physiology of prostate of laboratory animals/farm animals; future research: functional anatomy of male reproductive organs, pharmacokinetics of osteoporosis, endocrinology/neuroendocrinology/chromosome anomalies supplementation during andropause, experimental animal models and future multicenter multidisciplinary research.

  20. Treatment options for men with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J H

    1992-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction can occur in men of any age, but it is more common in older men. It is one of the most devastating problems a man can face. An estimated 10 to 12 million American men experience impotence. Increased sexual expectations for an aging population have resulted in an increased interest in the treatment of impotence. Treatment options range from a simple adjustment in medication to surgical implantation of a penile prosthesis. The good news is that sexual function can almost always be restored. The bad news is that many men with chronic erectile dysfunction never seek help. A sensitive nurse who has an understanding of sexual health and functioning and the conditions that interfere with them can steer those who need help in the direction of treatment.

  1. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Galley, H F

    2011-07-01

    Sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite advances in healthcare and science. Marked oxidative stress as a result of the inflammatory responses inherent with sepsis initiates changes in mitochondrial function which may result in organ damage. Normally, a complex system of interacting antioxidant defences is able to combat oxidative stress and prevents damage to mitochondria. Despite the accepted role that oxidative stress-mediated injury plays in the development of organ failure, there is still little conclusive evidence of any beneficial effect of systemic antioxidant supplementation in patients with sepsis and organ dysfunction. It has been suggested, however, that antioxidant therapy delivered specifically to mitochondria may be useful.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  3. Baroreflex Dysfunction in Prader Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Srivastav, Shival; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a classical hypothalamic insufficiency disorder. This syndrome is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality - which could probably be attributed to autonomic dysfunction. A 21-year-old Prader Willi syndrome patient was referred for cardiovascular and autonomic function assessment. We performed a battery of tests assessing vascular structure (carotid intima thickness), vascular function (arterial stiffness indices), baroreflex sensitivity (overall integrator of short term regulation of blood pressure), blood pressure variability and autonomic tone (heart rate variability) along with autonomic reactivity tests. We observed impaired baroreflex sensitivity along with orthostatic tachycardia with normal vascular function tests. Prader- Willi syndrome patient have baroreflex dysfunction with probable afferent and/ central autonomic neural defects. PMID:27134867

  4. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo; de Kreutzenberg, Saula Vigili

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing, affecting not only adults but also children and adolescents. It is associated with severe metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Adipose tissue secretes a great number of hormones and cytokines that not only regulate substrate metabolism but may deeply and negatively influence endothelial physiology, a condition which may lead to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. In this review, the physiology of the endothelium is summarised and the mechanisms by which obesity, through the secretory products of adipose tissue, influences endothelial function are explained. A short description of methodological approaches to diagnose endothelial dysfunction is presented. The possible pathogenetic links between obesity and cardiovascular disease, mediated by oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction are described as well.

  5. High-voltage electrocution causing bulbar dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, G.; Shaji, C. V.; Kabeer, K. A.; Prasanth, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. High-voltage electrical injuries are uncommonly reported and may predispose to both immediate and delayed neurologic complications. We report the case of a 68-year-old man who experienced a high-voltage electrocution injury, subsequently developed bulbar dysfunction and spontaneously recovered. We describe the development of bulbar palsy following a significant electrical injury, which showed no evidence of this on magnetic resonance imaging. High-voltage electrocution injuries are a serious problem with potential for both immediate and delayed neurologic sequelae. The existing literature has no reports on bulbar dysfunction following electrocution, apart from motor neuron disease. PMID:27365968

  6. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0547 Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism Dr. John Shoffner Georgia State University Research...groups for the fMRI analyses. Additionally, control ranges have been established for fibroblast high resolution respirometry. Autism , functional MRI...Introduction Although the precise frequency of mitochondrial defects in autism are not known, it is hypothesized

  7. Sexual dysfunction in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Soffer, O

    1980-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in end-stage renal disease is a troublesome, multifactorial disorder. Abnormality of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is but one of the causes leading to the impotence and infertility commonly encountered in chronic renal failure. Short of kidney transplantation, no therapy is available. Though infertility is the rule in end-stage renal disease, successful fatherhood and deliveries have occurred on rare occasions.

  8. Cervical balloon for dysfunctional labor following amniotomy.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Rabinerson, D; Feinstein, M; Mamet, Y

    1998-01-01

    The conventional treatment for arrest of protracted active phase dilatation is amniotomy and oxitocin. This kind of labor dystocia is associated with an increased incidence in Cesarean delivery. We describe the use of cervical balloon after amniotomy for protracted active phase dilatation. We have used this approach in five parturients. All five patients had a spontaneous vaginal delivery. Intrapartum cervical balloon in patients with dysfunctional labor may reduce the need for Cesarean delivery.

  9. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  10. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  11. Sexual dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Leyla J; Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2015-04-01

    Sexual health is a broad term that encompasses a variety of functions including sexual thoughts, desire, arousal, intercourse, orgasm, and the impact of body image. Sexual dysfunction in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease is multifactorial including the impact of psychosocial factors, disease activity, medical therapies, surgical interventions, body image perceptions and changes, hypogonadism, and pelvic floor disorders. Providers caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be cognizant of these concerns and develop management plans and techniques for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    a heterogeneous array of OXPHOS genes coded by either the nDNA or the mtDNA. Genetic defects producing mitochondrial dysfunction include: (1...3. Zhu X, Perry G, Moreira PI, Aliev G, Cash AD, et al. (2006) Mitochondrial abnormalities and oxidative imbalance in Alzheimer disease. J... Alzheimers Dis 9: 147-153. 4. de la Monte SM, Wands JR (2001) Alzheimer -associated neuronal thread protein-induced apoptosis and impaired mitochondrial

  13. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following

  14. Molecular genetics of left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Towbin, J A; Bowles, N E

    2001-03-01

    The left ventricle (LV) plays a central role in the maintenance of health of children and adults due to its role as the major pump of the heart. In cases of LV dysfunction, a significant percentage of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure (CHF), leading to the need for therapeutic intervention. Therapy for these patients include anticongestive medications and, in some, placement of devices such as aortic balloon pump or left ventricular assist device (LVAD), or cardiac transplantation. In the majority of patients the etiology is unknown, leading to the term idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). During the past decade, the basis of LV dysfunction has begun to unravel. In approximately 30-40% of cases, the disorder is inherited; autosomal dominant inheritance is most common (although X-linked, autosomal recessive and mitochondrial inheritance occurs). In the remaining patients, the disorder is presumed to be acquired, with inflammatory heart disease playing an important role. In the case of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM), the genetic basis is beginning to unfold. To date, two genes for X-linked FDCM (dystrophin, G4.5) have been identified and four genes for the autosomal dominant form (actin, desmin, lamin A/C, delta-sarcoglycan) have been described. In one form of inflammatory heart disease, coxsackievirus myocarditis, inflammatory mediators and dystrophin cleavage play a role in the development of LV dysfunction. In this review, we will describe the molecular genetics of LV dysfunction and provide evidence for a "final common pathway" responsible for the phenotype.

  15. [Effectiveness of trazodone in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Gałecki, Piotr; Florkowski, Antoni

    2010-07-01

    Sexual dysfunctions may be main cause of social disability. The knowledge of the rates of occurrence of sexual dysfunctions in the general population and the primary risk factors for these conditions is very important to assist in assessing the risk and planning treatment. Sexual dysfunctions are highly prevalent in our society worldwide, and that the occurrence of sexual dysfunctions increases directly with age for both men and women. Specific medical conditions and health behaviors represent major risk factors for sexual disorders. Trazodone is sedative antidepressant drug, which is effective, safe, fast acting, with a few side effects, with proved efficiency in the treatment of sexual dysfunction.

  16. Attention bias for sexual words in female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that attention processes maintain sexual dysfunction. However, few published studies have examined attention bias, and even fewer have studied female participants with sexual dysfunction. Using the Female Sexual Function Index, the authors classified undergraduates as experiencing sexual dysfunction (n = 28) or not (n = 28). The authors assessed whether participants showed attention bias for sexual words using a modified dot-probe task. As expected, female participants with sexual dysfunction showed an attention bias to sexual words, whereas control participants did not. The authors discuss implications for models of sexual dysfunction and clinical intervention.

  17. Peripheral vascular dysfunction in migraine: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have indicated an increased risk of vascular disease among migraineurs. Alterations in endothelial and arterial function, which predispose to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, have been suggested as an important link between migraine and vascular disease. However, the available evidence is inconsistent. We aimed to review and summarize the published evidence about the peripheral vascular dysfunction of migraineurs. We systematically searched in BIOSIS, the Cochrane database, Embase, Google scholar, ISI Web of Science, and Medline to identify articles, published up to April 2013, evaluating the endothelial and arterial function of migraineurs. Several lines of evidence for vascular dysfunction were reported in migraineurs. Findings regarding endothelial function are particularly controversial since studies variously indicated the presence of endothelial dysfunction in migraineurs, the absence of any difference in endothelial function between migraineurs and non-migraineurs, and even an enhanced endothelial function in migraineurs. Reports on arterial function are more consistent and suggest that functional properties of large arteries are altered in migraineurs. Peripheral vascular function, particularly arterial function, is a promising non-invasive indicator of the vascular health of subjects with migraine. However, further targeted research is needed to understand whether altered arterial function explains the increased risk of vascular disease among patients with migraine. PMID:24083826

  18. Compensatory and maladaptive responses to cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Francis, G S; Chu, C

    1994-05-01

    The past few years have witnessed an extraordinary number of important developments in the study of compensatory and maladaptive responses to cardiac dysfunction. It now seems clear that the process whereby the heart remodels in response to left ventricular injury is of paramount importance in the expression of clinical heart failure. There have been parallel attempts by basic scientists and clinical investigators to understand better the fundamental biologic processes that underlie remodeling and to assess numerous new treatments--especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. A general consensus seems to be emerging that holds that the response of the heart to acute injury includes a number of highly compensatory and adaptive mechanisms that ultimately become maladaptive and contribute to cardiomegaly and severe congestive heart failure. Such mechanisms undoubtedly include local and systemic release of cytokines, peptides, and neurohormones, and altered loading conditions leading to unusual mechanical forces on cardiac myocytes and other cells of the heart. At the organ level there is hypertrophy, dilatation and growth of the interstitium. Preliminary evidence also suggests there may be some "remodeling" at the cardiac myocyte level. Reduction in peripheral vasodilator reserve is seen in experimental animal models of heart failure. Patients with heart failure also develop an endothelial-dependent form of peripheral vascular dysfunction expressed clinically as an attenuated ability to dilate in response to such stimuli as acetylcholine. The transition point whereby these myocardial and peripheral vascular abnormalities become clearly dysfunctional and contribute toward the full clinical expression of heart failure remains to be further investigated.

  19. Avanafil for the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Segal, R; Burnett, A L

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent condition afflicting millions of men worldwide and can have disastrous effects on a couple's quality of life. With the understanding of the physiology of erections and the discovery of cGMP-specific 3',5'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (PDE5) inhibitors, therapy for erectile dysfunction was revolutionized, and this class of medication became the first-line treatment option for this widespread condition. Despite the ease of use, efficacy and tolerability of the available PDE5 inhibitors, many men discontinue their use, usually related to lack of efficacy or development of adverse events. As such, research into the development of other medications within this drug class is extensive. Avanafil is a novel PDE5 inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles with good tolerability and limited adverse events. It was recently approved and launched in Korea, and is currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Its efficacy and purported role in the treatment for erectile dysfunction are reviewed here.

  20. Myofacial pain dysfunction: analysis of 476 patients.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B C; Alleva, M; Cooper, D L; Lucente, F E

    1986-10-01

    Myofacial Pain Dysfunction (MPD) is a musculoskeletal dysfunction involving malrelationship among the neuromuscular system, temporomandibular joints, and dental occlusion. The illness affects children and adults of all ages and both sexes. Patients complain of pain and/or dysfunction in the mandible, temporomandibular joints, ears, oral cavity, head, and neck. Electronic measurement of mandibular movement and associated muscle function now provide reproducible data with which the parameters of this illness and therapy can be designed and monitored. In this study, data are presented on 476 MPD patients. Included are statistics on the most commonly occurring symptoms, clinical examination findings, and electronic test data before and following treatment. The mandibular kinesiograph (MKG) is used to track mandibular movement and compare the natural dental occlusal position and a neuromuscularly balanced position of occlusion. Electromyography (EMG) is used to analyze the resting status of mandibular muscles and the functioning in the occlusal position. The data show a positive correlation between the clinical symptoms of MPD and unhealthy mandibular position at occlusion, accompanied by specific unhealthy muscle activity. There is a strong positive correlation between a therapeutic change in the dental occlusion to a neuromuscularly healthy position using a precision orthotic appliance and the relief of symptoms within 1 month as expressed by 88% of the patients. A similar correlation exists at 3 months and long-term.

  1. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Jörg; Zellweger, Michael J; Di Valentino, Marcello; Piazzalonga, Simone; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess sexual function before and after cardiac rehabilitation in relation to medical variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR) between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC) and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indicated by 23.1% at baseline and 21.8% after OCR, no problems with sexual activity by 40.8% at baseline and 38.6% after OCR. Patients showed an increase in specific problems (erectile dysfunction and lack of orgasm) from 18% to 23% (P < .0001) during OCR. We found the following independent positive and negative predictors of sexual problems after OCR: hyperlipidemia, age, CABG, baseline ExC and improvement of ExC, subjective physical and mental capacity, and sense of affiliation. Conclusions. Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of the patients undergoing OCR with no overall improvement during OCR. Age, CABG, low exercise capacity are independent predictors of sexual dysfunction after OCR.

  2. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~ 50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  3. An Exposome Perspective on Environmental Enteric Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mapesa, Job O.; Maxwell, Amy L.; Ryan, Elizabeth P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Environmental exposures to chemicals have been shown to influence gastrointestinal function, yet little is known regarding whether chemical mixtures may be involved in the development of a subclinical enteric dysfunction found in infants and children born into poor hygiene and sanitation. Advances in gastrointestinal and immunotoxicology fields merit inclusion in complex discussions of environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) that severely affects children in developing countries. Objective: We aimed to highlight exposome approaches for investigating the potential influence of environmental chemical exposures on EED development, including a role for toxicant modulation of gut immune system and microbiome function. Discussion: A major focus on fecal–oral contamination in impoverished living conditions already exists for EED, and should now expand to include environmental chemicals such as pesticides and heavy metals that may be anthropogenic or dietary or from microbial sources. A comprehensive characterization of environmental chemical exposures prenatally and occurring in infants and young children will enhance our knowledge of any associated risks for EED and stunting. Conclusions: Integrating EED, chemical exposure, and stunting at various ages during childhood will enhance our apparent limited view when evaluating EED. Etiology and intervention studies should evaluate the suite of environmental chemical exposures as candidates in the composite of EED biomarkers. Citation: Mapesa JO, Maxwell AL, Ryan EP. 2016. An exposome perspective on environmental enteric dysfunction. Environ Health Perspect 124:1121–1126; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510459 PMID:26713888

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with glucocerebrosidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gegg, Matthew E.; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase) is encoded for by the GBA gene. Homozygous GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Furthermore, homozygous and heterozygous GBA mutations are numerically the greatest genetic risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The loss of GCase activity results in impairment of the autophagy‐lysosome pathway (ALP), which is required for the degradation of macromolecules and damaged organelles. Aberrant protein handling of α-synuclein by the ALP occurs in both GD and PD. α-synuclein is the principle component of Lewy bodies, a defining hallmark of PD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also observed in both GD and PD. In this review we will describe how mitochondria are affected following loss of GCase activity. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to mitochondria dysfunction will also be discussed, focusing on the likely inhibition of the degradation of mitochondria by the ALP, also termed mitophagy. Other pathogenic cellular processes associated with GBA mutations that might contribute, such as the unfolding of GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum, calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation will also be described. Impairment of the ALP and mitochondria dysfunction are common pathogenic themes between GD and PD and probably explain why GBA mutations increase the risk of developing PD that is very similar to sporadic forms of the disease. PMID:26388395

  5. Non-surgical management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Levy, A; Crowley, T; Gingell, C

    2000-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common and distressing medical condition that is now highly amenable to treatment almost irrespective of the cause. Safe, non-surgical treatments with unequivocal efficacy are psychological therapy, intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs, transurethral vasodilators and oral sildenafil, all of which have been reported to have a 50-70% overall response rate. Vacuum constriction devices are acceptable for some, usually older patients and oral yohimbine is thought to have marginal efficacy. Local creams to induce or enhance erectile function are currently being investigated. There is no place for androgen supplementation unless the patient is profoundly hypogonadal. Treatment of hyperprolactinaemia is very effective but is a rare cause of erectile dysfunction. As intercourse may entail an unfamiliar level of physical activity, it is sensible to ensure that the patient is able to climb a flight or two of stairs comfortably without provoking undue breathlessness or chest pain and to provide suitable advice about technique before commencing treatment. Once it is clear to the patients that erectile dysfunction can be satisfactorily overcome, the long-term use of treatments to do so tends to wane. Thus, although the prospect of effective treatment for what had been for many a distressing life sentence has the potential to place new demands on the health service, there is no evidence that restrictions on prescribing will prove economically rational.

  6. Insight Into Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Medalia, Alice; Thysen, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Insight into psychotic symptoms is typically poor in schizophrenia; however, it is not known whether insight into neurocognitive impairment is similarly impaired. Most people with schizophrenia experience cognitive dysfunction, and the deficits in attention, memory, and critical thinking have been associated with poor functional outcome. As new treatments are developed for the cognitive impairments, it will be important to know whether patients will be receptive to yet another therapy. Insight is an important factor in treatment compliance and treatment outcome; however, it is not known if patients have insight into their cognitive dysfunction. In order to assess insight into neuro cognitive dysfunction, 75 subjects were administered the Measure of Insight into Cognition–Clinician Rated, a newly created measure based on the Scale to Access the Unawareness of Mental Disorder, that assesses insight into cognitive impairment. Subjects were also administered the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia and Independent Living Scale–Problem Solving to objectively assess neuropsychological status and problem-solving skills needed for independent living. Results demonstrated that virtually all subjects had cognitive impairment, yet insight into their neuro cognitive symptoms was limited. This finding has potential implications for treatment programs seeking to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia PMID:18199632

  7. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  8. Profile of Gaze Dysfunction following Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Fiona J; Wright, David; Brand, Darren; Jackson, Carole; Harrison, Shirley; Maan, Tallat; Scott, Claire; Vogwell, Linda; Peel, Sarah; Akerman, Nicola; Dodridge, Caroline; Howard, Claire; Shipman, Tracey; Sperring, Una; Macdiarmid, Sonia; Freeman, Cicely

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the profile of ocular gaze abnormalities occurring following stroke. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol including assessment of visual acuity, ocular alignment and motility, visual field, and visual perception. Results. 915 patients recruited: mean age 69.18 years (SD 14.19). 498 patients (54%) were diagnosed with ocular motility abnormalities. 207 patients had gaze abnormalities including impaired gaze holding (46), complete gaze palsy (23), horizontal gaze palsy (16), vertical gaze palsy (17), Parinaud's syndrome (8), INO (20), one and half syndrome (3), saccadic palsy (28), and smooth pursuit palsy (46). These were isolated impairments in 50% of cases and in association with other ocular abnormalities in 50% including impaired convergence, nystagmus, and lid or pupil abnormalities. Areas of brain stroke were frequently the cerebellum, brainstem, and diencephalic areas. Strokes causing gaze dysfunction also involved cortical areas including occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. Symptoms of diplopia and blurred vision were present in 35%. 37 patients were discharged, 29 referred, and 141 offered review appointments. 107 reviewed patients showed full recovery (4%), partial improvement (66%), and static gaze dysfunction (30%). Conclusions. Gaze dysfunction is common following stroke. Approximately one-third of patients complain of visual symptoms, two thirds show some improvement in ocular motility.

  9. Renal dysfunction and coronary disease: a high-risk combination.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney dysfunction is recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and complicates strategies and treatment. Therefore, it is important for cardiologists not only to detect and measure potential kidney dysfunction, but also to know the mechanisms by which the heart and kidney interact, and recognize that in cases of acute coronary syndrome, the presence of renal dysfunction increases the risk of death. The detection and classification of kidney dysfunction into 5 stages is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The presence of hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, inflammation, activation of the renin-angiotensin system and specific calcifications are the main mechanisms by which renal dysfunction can induce or compound cardiovascular disease. The magnitude of renal dysfunction is related to the cardiovascular risk; a linear relation links the extent of GFR decrease and the risk of cardiovascular events. Renal dysfunction and acute coronary syndromes are a dangerous combination: more common comorbidities, more frequent contraindications for effective drugs and higher numbers of drug-related adverse events such as bleeding partially explain the higher mortality in patients with renal dysfunction. In addition, despite higher risk, patients with renal dysfunction often receive fewer guideline-recommended treatments even in the absence of contraindications. Renal dysfunction induces and promotes atherosclerosis by various pathophysiologic pathways and is associated with other cardiovascular risk factors and underuse of appropriate therapy. Therefore, the assessment of renal function is an important step in the risk evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease.

  10. Sexual dysfunction in obese and overweight women.

    PubMed

    Yaylali, G F; Tekekoglu, S; Akin, F

    2010-01-01

    Both overweight and obesity have been identified as risk factors for sexual dysfunction in men, but the relationship between sexual function and amount of body fat in females is still obscure. There are few reported studies in women assessing the relationship between female sexual function index (FSFI) and body weight. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) among obese and overweight women. A total of 45 obese and overweight and 30 age-matched voluntary healthy women serving as a control group were evaluated by a detailed medical and sexual history, including the FSFI questionnaire. Serum prolactin, cortisol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), dehydroepiandrosterone-SO(4) (DHEA-S), testosterone, estradiol and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels were measured. No significant difference was observed between controls and patients in terms of the FSH, LH, estradiol, free thyroxine and thyrotropin (TSH), testosterone and DHEA-S levels. The comparison of total FSFI scores between patients and controls showed no significant difference (P=0.74). As the FSFI score of dysfunction. The mean total FSFI score was 22.1+/-4.3 for obese patients and 23.1+/-3.7 for healthy women. FSFI scores were not correlated with any of the anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and fat percent). The levels of total testosterone and DHEA-S were not correlated with total FSFI scores. We found a significant negative correlation between BMI and orgasm (P=0.007, r=-0.413). Satisfaction was also negatively correlated with BMI (P=0.05, r=-0.305) and weight (P=0.03, r=-0.326). Testosterone levels were negatively correlated with only satisfaction domain scores of FSFI (P=0.01, r=-0.385). We found that 86% of obese women and 83% of controls had sexual dysfunction. Although obesity does not

  11. Comparison of dysfunction with mechanical and porcine mitral valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Magilligan, D J; Oyama, C; Alam, M

    1985-09-01

    We reviewed the incidence of dysfunction of the Smeloff-Cutter mechanical prosthetic valve and the Hancock porcine prosthetic valve in the mitral position. The Smeloff-Cutter valve was implanted from 1966 to 1972; 107 patients were discharged from the hospital and were at risk for dysfunction. Follow-up averaged 10 +/- 0.7 years SD. The Hancock valve was implanted from 1971 through 1984; 473 patients were at risk and follow-up averaged 4.7 +/- 3.4 years SD. Dysfunction of the Smeloff-Cutter valve occurred as thrombosis with incomplete poppet opening in 13 patients. Dysfunction of the Hancock valve occurred as primary tissue failure in 47 patients. At 10 years the freedom from dysfunction of the Smeloff-Cutter valve was 84 +/- 5% SE and that for the Hancock valve was 71 +/- 4% SE (p greater than .06). The mortality associated with dysfunction of the Smeloff-Cutter valve was 46%; mortality associated with dysfunction of the Hancock valve was 15% (p less than .02). At 10 years the Hancock valve had a greater incidence of dysfunction than the Smeloff-Cutter valve but this difference was not statistically significant. The mortality associated with dysfunction of the Smeloff-Cutter valve, however, was three times that associated with dysfunction of the Hancock valve.

  12. Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mucheru, Doreen; Hanlon, Mary-Claire; Campbell, Linda E; McEvoy, Mark; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley

    2017-01-19

    This analysis aimed to examine the association of social dysfunction with food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption in people with psychosis from the Hunter New England (HNE) catchment site of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP). Social dysfunction and dietary information were collected using standardised tools. Independent binary logistic regressions were used to examine the association between social dysfunction and food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption. Although social dysfunction did not have a statistically significant association with most diet variables, participants with obvious to severe social dysfunction were 0.872 (95% CI (0.778, 0.976)) less likely to eat breakfast than those with no social dysfunction p < 0.05. Participants with social dysfunction were therefore, 13% less likely to have breakfast. This paper highlights high rates of social dysfunction, significant food insecurity, and intakes of fruits and vegetables below recommendations in people with psychosis. In light of this, a greater focus needs to be given to dietary behaviours and social dysfunction in lifestyle interventions delivered to people with psychosis. Well-designed observational research is also needed to further examine the relationship between social dysfunction and dietary behaviour in people with psychosis.

  13. All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Nehra, Ajay; Jackson, Graham; Bhasin, Shalender; Billups, Kevin; Burnett, Arthur L; Buvat, Jacques; Carson, Culley; Cunningham, Glenn; Ganz, Peter; Goldstein, Irwin; Guay, Andre; Hackett, Geoff; Kloner, Robert A; Kostis, John B; LaFlamme, K Elizabeth; Montorsi, Piero; Ramsey, Melinda; Rosen, Raymond; Sadovsky, Richard; Seftel, Allen; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wu, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.

  14. Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mucheru, Doreen; Hanlon, Mary-Claire; Campbell, Linda E.; McEvoy, Mark; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley

    2017-01-01

    This analysis aimed to examine the association of social dysfunction with food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption in people with psychosis from the Hunter New England (HNE) catchment site of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP). Social dysfunction and dietary information were collected using standardised tools. Independent binary logistic regressions were used to examine the association between social dysfunction and food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption. Although social dysfunction did not have a statistically significant association with most diet variables, participants with obvious to severe social dysfunction were 0.872 (95% CI (0.778, 0.976)) less likely to eat breakfast than those with no social dysfunction p < 0.05. Participants with social dysfunction were therefore, 13% less likely to have breakfast. This paper highlights high rates of social dysfunction, significant food insecurity, and intakes of fruits and vegetables below recommendations in people with psychosis. In light of this, a greater focus needs to be given to dietary behaviours and social dysfunction in lifestyle interventions delivered to people with psychosis. Well-designed observational research is also needed to further examine the relationship between social dysfunction and dietary behaviour in people with psychosis. PMID:28106815

  15. Methylglyoxal promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Rodrigues, Lisa; Fernandes, Rosa; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel M

    2012-05-01

    Modern diets can cause modern diseases. Research has linked a metabolite of sugar, methylglyoxal (MG), to the development of diabetic complications, but the exact mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate whether MG could directly influence endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Wistar and GK rats treated with MG in the drinking water for 3 months were compared with the respective control rats. The effects of MG were investigated on NO-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic arteries from the different groups. Insulin resistance, NO bioavailability, glycation, a pro-inflammatory biomarker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular oxidative stress were also evaluated. Methylglyoxal treated Wistar rats significantly reduced the efficacy of NO-dependent vasorelaxation (p<0.001). This impairment was accompanied by a three fold increase in the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation was significantly increased as well as MCP-1 and the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). NO bioavailability was significantly attenuated and accompanied by an increase in superoxide anion immunofluorescence. Methylglyoxal treated GK rats significantly aggravated endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, AGEs accumulation and diminished NO bioavailability when compared with control GK rats. These results indicate that methylglyoxal induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Wistar rats and aggravated the endothelial dysfunction present in GK rats. The mechanism is at least in part by increasing oxidative stress and/or AGEs formation with a concomitant increment of inflammation and a decrement in NO bioavailability. The present study provides further evidence for methylglyoxal as one of the causative factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of macrovascular

  16. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2006-01-01

    1.--Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. 2.--Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. 3.--Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 microM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 microM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. 4.--Piracetam treatment (100-500 mg kg(-1) daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. 5.--In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients.

  17. Dysfunctional stress responses in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; Picard, Pascale; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Many dysfunctional and chronic pain conditions overlap. This review describes the different modes of chronic deregulation of the adaptive response to stress which may be a common factor for these conditions. Several types of dysfunction can be identified within the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis: basal hypercortisolism, hyper-reactivity, basal hypocortisolism and hypo-reactivity. Neuroactive steroid synthesis is another component of the adaptive response to stress. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form DHEA-S, and progesterone and its derivatives are synthetized in cutaneous, nervous, and adipose cells. They are neuroactive factors that act locally. They may have a role in the localization of the symptoms and their levels can vary both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Persistent changes in neuroactive steroid levels or precursors can induce localized neurodegeneration. The autonomic nervous system is another component of the stress response. Its dysfunction in chronic stress responses can be expressed by decreased basal parasympathethic activity, increased basal sympathetic activity or sympathetic hyporeactivity to a stressful stimulus. The immune and genetic systems also participate. The helper-T cells Th1 secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whereas Th2 secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IGF-10, IL-13. Chronic deregulation of the Th1/Th2 balance can occur in favor of anti- or pro-inflammatory direction, locally or systemically. Individual vulnerability to stress can be due to environmental factors but can also be genetically influenced. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics are the main keys to understanding the influence of genetics on the response of individuals to constraints.

  18. [Endothelial cell apoptosis in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2012-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common male diseases, which seriously affects the patient's quality of life. The risk factors of ED include aging, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and unhealthy lifestyle, and its exact mechanism remains unclear. The apoptosis of endothelial cells in the corpus cavernosum penis may reduce NOS activity, block NO synthesis, and affect penile erection, and the mechanisms of their apoptosis vary with different causes of ED. This article updates the relationship between the apoptosis of endothelial cells and the development of ED.

  19. Sexual dysfunction in cancer patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Cakar, B; Karaca, B; Uslu, R

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a life-threatening disease despite the advanced therapeutic strategies now available. A common problem is that physicians and patients tend to concentrate on intensive medical treatment options and underestimate the treatment-related adverse effects. In this review, we summarize one of these adverse effects in cancer patients; sexual dysfunction (SD). In addition, current therapeutic choices with optimal doses and patient selection strategies are defined. All patients should be informed about problems associated with therapy-related SD and must be guided toward the most appropriate therapeutic options before starting treatment.

  20. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464