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Sample records for pylorus

  1. Pylorus-Preserving Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG) is a function-preserving surgery for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC), aiming to decrease the complication rate and improve postoperative quality of life. According to the Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, PPG can be performed for cT1N0M0 gastric cancer located in the middle-third of the stomach, at least 4.0 cm away from the pylorus. Although the length of the antral cuff gradually increased, from 1.5 cm during the initial use of the procedure to 3.0 cm currently, its optimal length still remains unclear. Standard procedures for the preservation of pyloric function, infra-pyloric vessels, and hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, make PPG technically more difficult and raise concerns about incomplete lymph node dissection. The short- and long-term oncological and survival outcomes of PPG were comparable to those for distal gastrectomy, but with several advantages such as a lower incidence of dumping syndrome, bile reflux, and gallstone formation, and improved nutritional status. Gastric stasis, a typical complication of PPG, can be effectively treated by balloon dilatation and stent insertion. Robot-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy is feasible for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach in terms of the short-term clinical outcome. However, any benefits over laparoscopy-assisted PPG (LAPPG) from the patient's perspective have not yet been proven. An ongoing Korean multicenter randomized controlled trial (KLASS-04), which compares LAPPG and laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for EGC in the middle-third of the stomach, may provide more clear evidence about the advantages and oncologic safety of PPG. PMID:27433390

  2. In Vitro Effects of Rabeprazole on Human Pylorus Tone

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Necdet Fatih; Polat, Erdal; Duman, Mustafa; Dağdelen, Meltem; Günal, Mehmet Yalçın; Uzun, Orhan; Akyüz, Cebrail; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Yol, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims It has been reported that proton pump inhibitors induce relaxation in different types of smooth muscles. The aim of this study is to investigate in vitro effects of proton pump inhibitors on human pylorus muscle. Methods Pyloric sphincters were studied in 10 patients who were operated for stomach cancer. In isolated organ bath, control and response to rabeprazole were recorded following contraction with carbachol. During the treatment experiment, while distilled water was applied during the control experiment in every 5 minutes, rabeprazole was administered in every 5 minutes at doses of 10−6, 10−5, 10−4, and 10−3 M respectively. Contraction frequencies, maximum contraction values and muscle tones were measured. Results The contraction frequencies in the control group were greater than the rabeprazole group in the second, third and fourth intervals while the maximum contraction values in the rabeprazole group were lower in the fourth interval. Even though muscles tones were not different in both groups during all intervals, it was remarkable that the muscle tone was significantly decreased in the rabeprazole group during the fourth interval compared to the first and second intervals. Conclusions In the present study, high doses of rabeprazole reduced contraction frequencies, maximum contraction values, and muscle tone of human pylorus. PMID:25843074

  3. Acquired double pylorus: Clinical and endoscopic characteristics and four-year follow-up observations

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jing-Jing; Zhou, Li; Liu, Qi; Xu, Chun-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Double pylorus (DP), or duplication of the pylorus, is an uncommon condition that can be either congenital or acquired. Acquired DP (ADP) occurs when a peptic ulcer erodes and creates a fistula between the duodenal bulb and the distal stomach. The clinical features and endoscopic characteristics of four patients with ADP were reviewed and compared with previously reported cases. An accessory channel connects the lesser curvature of the prepyloric antrum with the duodenal bulb, and in all cases, a peptic ulcer was located in or immediately adjacent to the accessory channel. In one of the patients, the bridge between the double-channel pylorus disappeared, resulting in a single large opening and duodenal kissing ulcer after two years and three months. Finally, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Helicobacter pylori and other risk factors associated with ADP are assessed. PMID:26877621

  4. Determination of the antiulcer properties of sodium cromoglycate in pylorus-ligated albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vivek; Viswanathaswamy, A.H.M.; Mohan, Govind

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To study the ulcer protective property of sodium cromoglycate in pylorusligated rats and the biochemical role in ulcer protection by various biochemical tests. Materials and Methods: The ulcer protective effect of sodium cromoglycate was studied using a Pyloric Ligation Model using Wistar albino rats. The antiulcer effect of sodium cromoglycate 40 mg/kg b.w., i.p., was compared with the reference drug ranitidine 27 mg/kg b.w., i.p. The ulcer index was calculated and other biochemical parameters like free acidity, total acidity, pH, mucin, pepsin and volume of gastric juice were determined. Results: Pylorus ligation showed a significant (P < 0.01) reduction in gastric volume, free acidity, total acidity and ulcer index as compared to the control. Conclusion: Sodium cromoglycate has activity equipotent to ranitidine. PMID:20871772

  5. Peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to choledochoduodenal fistula: A case report

    PubMed Central

    XI, BIN; JIA, JUN-JUN; LIN, BING-YI; GENG, LEI; ZHENG, SHU-SEN

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcers are an extremely common condition, usually occurring in the stomach and proximal duodenum. However, cases of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications are extremely rare and hard to treat. The present case reinforces the requirement for the early recognition and correct treatment of peptic ulcers accompanied with multiple complications. A 67-year-old man presented with recurrent abdominal pain, fever and melena. The laboratory results showed anemia (hemoglobin 62 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (23 g/l). Abdominal imaging examinations revealed stones in the gallbladder and right liver, with air in the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed due to a deformed pylorus. The patient was finally diagnosed with peptic ulcers accompanied with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pylorus obstruction and cholangitis secondary to a choledochoduodenal fistula during an emergency pancreatoduodenectomy, which was performed due to a massive hemorrhage of the GI tract. The patient recovered well after the surgery. PMID:26870237

  6. Different effects of cytoprotective drugs on ethanol- and aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in pylorus-ligated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, K.; Nishiwaki, H.; Niida, H.; Okabe, S. )

    1990-02-01

    In anesthetized rats oral administration (2 ml) of both ethanol (50% in 150 mM HCl) and aspirin (80 mM in 150 mM HCl) produced bandlike lesions in the stomach, while more generalized lesions occurred in the pylorus-ligated stomach when the irritant was given intragastrically through the fistula prepared in the rumen and the mucosal folds were removed by stomach distension. The bandlike lesions induced in the intact stomach by both irritants were significantly and dose-dependently prevented by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2: 3 and 10 micrograms/kg, subcutaneously), cysteamine (30 and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneously) or timoprazole (10 and 30 mg/kg, per os) at the doses which significantly inhibited gastric motility. In the pylorus-ligated stomach, however, neither of these agents showed any protection against the generalized lesions induced by ethanol, but such lesions caused by aspirin were significantly prevented only by dmPGE2. These agents also showed similar effects against the reduction of transmucosal PD in the pylorus-ligated stomach exposed to ethanol and aspirin. These results suggest that (1) the formation of bandlike lesions caused by ethanol and aspirin depends on the presence of mucosal folds and may be prevented by the agents that inhibit gastric motility, (2) the pathogenesis of the lesions induced by aspirin and ethanol may be different in the pylorus-ligated stomach, and (3) dmPGE2 has a unique protective ability that is not shared by usual cytoprotective agents.

  7. Risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis occurred after endoscopic submucosal dissection adjacent to pylorus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Un; Park, Moon Sik; Yun, So Hee; Yang, Min A.; Han, Shang Hoon; Lee, Young Jae; Jung, Gum Mo; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Yong Keun; Cho, Jin Woong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been widely accepted as a curative treatment for gastric neoplasm. Pyloric stenosis is a chronic complication that can be caused by ESD. The aim of this study is to clarify the risk factors and management for pyloric stenosis. From January 2004 to January 2014, a total of 126 patients who underwent ESD adjacent to pylorus were reviewed retrospectively. Pyloric mucosal defect was defined as when any resection margin of ESD was involved in the pyloric ring. Pyloric stenosis was defined as when a conventional endoscope could not be passed to the duodenum. Among the 126 patients, pyloric stenosis was identified in 9. In a univariate analysis, pyloric stenosis was more common in older patients (P < 0.05) and in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, the factor that was associated with pyloric stenosis was the extent of the pyloric ring dissection (P < 0.001). Four of the 9 patients with pyloric stenosis had mild dyspepsia, and the others had gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. The 5 symptomatic patients underwent endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), and the frequency of EBD was 1 to 8 times. The asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. The incidence of pyloric stenosis was higher in lesions with resections over 75% of the pyloric ring circumference. Although EBD was an effective treatment for pyloric stenosis, conservative management was also helpful in patients who had mild symptoms. PMID:27977608

  8. Laparoscopic Pylorus- and Spleen-Preserving Duodenopancreatectomy for a Multifocal Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Schlöricke, Erik; Hoffmann, Martin; Kujath, Peter; Shetty, Ganesh M.; Scheer, Fabian; Liedke, Marc O.; Zimmermann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In contrast to laparoscopic left pancreatic resection, laparoscopic total duodenopancreatectomy is a procedure that has not been standardized until now. It is not only the complexity that limits such a procedure but also its rare indication. The following article demonstrates the technical aspects of laparoscopic pylorus- and spleen-preserving duodenopancreatectomy. Case Report The indication for intervention in the underlying case was a patient diagnosed with a multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I syndrome and a multifocal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) infiltrating the duodenum and the pancreas. The patient was post median laparotomy which was necessary after jejunal perforation due to a peptic ulcer. The resection was carried out entirely laparoscopically, and the reconstruction, which included a biliodigestive anastomosis and a gastroenterostomy, was carried out by means of a median upper abdomen laparotomy of 7 cm in length through which the resected specimen was also removed. The total operative time was 391 min. The blood loss accounted for 250 ml. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on the eighth postoperative day. Conclusion Laparoscopic pancreatectomy is a treatment option in carefully selected indications. The complexity of the operation demands a high level of expertise in the surgical team. PMID:26989393

  9. Meta-analysis of subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy vs pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Wan, Mei-Hua; Szatmary, Peter; Bharucha, Shameena; Gomatos, Ilias; Nunes, Quentin M; Xia, Qing; Sutton, Robert; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differences in outcome following pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) and subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (SSPPD). METHODS: Major databases including PubMed (Medline), EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library were searched for comparative studies between patients with PPPD and SSPPD published between January 1978 and July 2014. Studies were selected based on specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome was delayed gastric emptying (DGE). Secondary outcomes included operation time, intraoperative blood loss, pancreatic fistula, postoperative hemorrhage, intraabdominal abscess, wound infection, time to starting liquid diet, time to starting solid diet, period of nasogastric intubation, reinsertion of nasogastric tube, mortality and hospital stay. The pooled odds ratios (OR) or weighted mean difference (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using either a fixed-effects or random-effects model. RESULTS: Eight comparative studies recruiting 650 patients were analyzed, which include two RCTs, one non-randomized prospective and 5 retrospective trial designs. Patients undergoing SSPPD experienced significantly lower rates of DGE (OR = 2.75; 95%CI: 1.75-4.30, P < 0.00001) and a shorter period of nasogastric intubation (OR = 2.68; 95%CI: 0.77-4.58, P < 0.00001), with a tendency towards shorter time to liquid (WMD = 2.97, 95%CI: -0.46-7.83; P = 0.09) and solid diets (WMD = 3.69, 95%CI: -0.46-7.83; P = 0.08) as well as shorter inpatient stay (WMD = 3.92, 95%CI: -0.37-8.22; P = 0.07), although these latter three did not reach statistical significance. PPPD, however, was associated with less intraoperative blood loss than SSPPD [WMD = -217.70, 95%CI: -429.77-(-5.63); P = 0.04]. There were no differences in other parameters between the two approaches, including operative time (WMD = -5.30, 95%CI

  10. R-alpha-methylhistamine-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats via central histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Barocelli, E; Ballabeni, V; Chiavarini, M; Impicciatore, M

    1995-08-01

    1. The effect of central H3 histamine receptor activation on gastric acid and pepsin production has been investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. 2. Intracerebroventricular injections (i.c.v.) of the selective H3 agonist, R-alpha-methylhistamine (0.5-50 nmol per rat) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric acid secretion while intravenous administration (5-500 nmol per rat) was completely ineffective. 3. I.c.v. microinjections of mepyramine, tiotidine and thioperamide (51 nmol per rat), selective antagonists at H1-, H2- and H3-sites respectively, failed to modify the acid secretory response to pylorus ligation. 4. The antisecretory effect of R-alpha-methylhistamine (5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) was selectively prevented by the H3-blocker, thioperamide (51 nmol per rat, i.c.v.), mepyramine and tiotidine pretreatment being completely inactive. 5. Unlike acid secretion, pepsin production was not significantly affected by all the tested compounds. 6. These findings provide the first pharmacological evidence that the activation of central H3 histamine receptors exerts a negative control in the regulation of gastric acid secretion in conscious pylorus-ligated rats.

  11. Effect of palonosetron (5HT-3 antagonist) and pantoprazole (proton pump inhibitor) against surgical esophagitis induced by forestomach and pylorus ligation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Gautam, S; Rawat, J K; Singh, M; Saraf, S A; Kaithwas, G

    2016-01-01

    This study was embarked upon to evaluate the effects of pantoprazole and palonosetron on experimental esophagitis in albino wistar rats. Groups of rats, fasted for 36 h, were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation, supervened by treatment with normal saline (3 ml/kg, po, sham control), esophagitis control (3 ml/kg, po), pantoprazole (30 mg/kg, po), palonosetron (0.5 mg/kg, po), and their combination. Animals were sacrificed after 12 h and appraised for the volume of gastric juices, total acidity, free acidity, and esophagitis index. Esophageal tissues were further figured out biochemically for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators. The combination therapy comparably inhibited the esophagitis index (52.86%), gastric volume (66.04%), free acidity (43.76%), and total acidity (42.60%) in comparison with toxic control. The combination therapy also subsidized the biochemical and inflammatory markers to the purview less than toxic control. The morphological changes were scrutinized by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to demonstrate momentous protection by the amalgamation therapy. Combination therapy with pantoprazole and palonosetron flaunted sententious protection against experimental esophagitis.

  12. Ca2+ phase waves: a basis for cellular pacemaking and long-range synchronicity in the guinea-pig gastric pylorus

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Dirk F; Imtiaz, Mohammad S

    2003-01-01

    Ca2+ imaging and multiple microelectrode recording procedures were used to investigate a slow wave-like electrical rhythmicity in single bundle strips from the circular muscle layer of the guinea-pig gastric pylorus. The ‘slow waves’ (SWs) consisted of a pacemaker and regenerative component, with both potentials composed of more elementary events variously termed spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) or unitary potentials. STDs and SW pacemaker and regenerative potentials exhibited associated local and distributed Ca2+ transients, respectively. Ca2+ transients were often larger in cellular regions that exhibited higher basal Ca2+ indicator-associated fluorescence, typical of regions likely to contain intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCIM). The emergence of rhythmicity arose through entrainment of STDs resulting in pacemaker Ca2+ transients and potentials, events that exhibited considerable spatial synchronicity. Application of ACh to strips exhibiting weak rhythmicity caused marked enhancement of SW synchronicity. SWs and underlying Ca2+ increases exhibited very high ‘apparent conduction velocities’ (‘CVs’) orders of magnitude greater than for sequentially conducting Ca2+ waves. Central interruption of either intercellular connectivity or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated store Ca2+ release in strips caused SWs at the two ends to run independently of each other, consistent with a coupled oscillator-based mechanism. Central inhibition of stores required much wider regions of blockade than inhibition of connectivity indicating that stores were voltage-coupled. Simulations, made using a conventional store array model but now including depolarization coupled to IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release, predicted the experimental findings. The linkage between membrane voltage and Ca2+ release provides a means for stores to interact as strongly coupled oscillators, resulting in the emergence of Ca2+ phase waves and associated pacemaker

  13. [Complications in morbid obesity treatment--pylorus obstruction caused by a deflated intragastric balloon].

    PubMed

    Constantin, V; Socea, B; Moculescu, C; Sireţeanu, G; Ciofoaia, V; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    An aggressive array of new treatments and improvements of existing approaches for addressing morbid obesity were developed during the last two decades in response to the recognition that a new pandemic affects humanity, i.e. obesity. Initially used as a temporizing solution for other specific interventions used for obesity treatment, the endoscopic placement of an intragastric balloons has currently became in certain cases a complete therapeutic solution. Multiple studies emphasize the efficiency of this new therapeutic method, in some cases resulting in a 45 kg weight loss at the end of the monitoring period. The intragastric balloon, after endoscopic placement can be kept into position for an average period of 4-6 months. After this period, balloon extraction is recommended because of the complications that can occur with prolonged intragastric placement. This paper presents a case of pyloric obstruction by an intragastric balloon kept for 14 months. In this case, the initial approach was endoscopic, but the surgical approach offered the definitive therapeutic solution.

  14. Gastric emptying procedures in the self-poisoned patient: are we forcing gastric content beyond the pylorus?

    PubMed Central

    Saetta, J P; March, S; Gaunt, M E; Quinton, D N

    1991-01-01

    A prospective, randomized, single-blind study was carried out to determine whether gastric content is forced into the small bowel when gastric-emptying procedures are employed in self-poisoned patients. They were asked to swallow barium-impregnated polythene pellets, immediately prior to either gastric lavage or ipecacuanha-induced emesis. A second group of patients, who did not require treatment, were used as controls. Sixty patients were recruited to the study. The data show a significant difference in the number of residual pellets in the small bowel of the treated group (n = 40), when compared with the control group (P less than 0.0001). There was no statistical difference in the number of pellets in the small bowel when the treated groups were compared with each other. In addition, the inefficiency of gastric-emptying procedures is highlighted; 58.5% of the total number of pellets ingested were retained in the gastrointestinal tract of the ipecacuanha-treated group, while 51.8% of total pellets ingested were retained in the gastric lavage-treated group. Images Figure 1. PMID:1674963

  15. Gastroprotective Effect of Oxalis corniculata (Whole Plant) on Experimentally Induced Gastric Ulceration in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakat, S. S.; Tupe, Preeti; Juvekar, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the antiulcer activity of methanol extract of Oxalis corniculata (whole plant) using pylorus ligation and indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in Wistar rats. The extract was preliminary evaluated for acute oral toxicity test using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines 423. Further, it was studied for antiulcer potential at the dose levels of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg. Ranitidine was used as a standard drug (100 mg/kg). Acid secretory parameters like gastric volume, pH, total acidity and free acidity were measured in pylorus ligation model, whereas numbers of ulcers, ulcers score and ulcer index was measured in pylorus ligated and indomethacin treated rats. Pretreatment of test extract significantly (p<0.05) decreased the gastric volume, total acidity, free acidity and increase in the pH of the gastric fluid in pylorus-ligated rats. It also showed significant (p<0.05) decrease in number of ulcers, ulcers score and ulcer index in pylorus ligated and indomethacin treated rats. Results of the study suggest that, the methanol extract of Oxalis corniculata possesses significant antisecretory and antiulcer effects and justify the traditional usage of this herb to treat peptic ulcers. PMID:23204622

  16. How Does the Stomach Pump?---A Fluid Dynamics Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Anupam; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2005-11-01

    The stomach is a pump that empties viscous liquid from a flexible bag (fundus) through a valve (pylorus) by slow squeeze of fundic muscle. In addition, peristaltic contraction waves (CW) travel periodically towards the pylorus in the lower stomach to grind/mix content. As each CW approaches the pylorus, it deepens and the pylorus momentarily closes. Since liquid empties from the pyloric region, one expects content at the farthest reaches of the stomach to empty last. To study the patterns of gastric emptying we applied the lattice Boltzmann method with moving boundary conditions coupled with a stomach geometry model parameterized using MRI. By marking fluid particles leaving the stomach over a 10 min period, we discovered that the CWs create a narrow path of emptying, or ``Magenstrasse'' (stomach road) that directs content from the farthest reaches of the stomach to the pylorus with relatively little mixing. Thus, while drug released off the Magenstrasse (MS) can take an hour or more to empty at low concentration, when released on the MS the drug empties within 10 minutes at high concentration---a discovery with potential implications to other pumping systems.

  17. Antiulcerogenic effect of Justicia prostrata Gamble.

    PubMed

    Sanmugapriya, E; Shanmugasundaram, P; Venkataraman, S

    2005-02-01

    Antiulcerogenic effect of the alcoholic (ALJP) and aqueous (AQJP) extracts of the whole plant of Justicia prostrata was studied in aspirin+pylorus ligated rat models and analysed for gastric volume, ulcer index, free and total acidity. Biochemical parameters like total proteins, total hexoses, hexosamine, fucose and sialic acid were also estimated. Both extracts (ALJP and AQJP) significantly reduced both the gastric volume and the acidity of gastric juice. It also significantly promoted gastric mucus secretion by increasing total carbohydrates and decreasing the protein concentration in aspirin+ pylorus ligated rats. The results suggest that both the extracts (ALJP and AQJP) possess antiulcer activity, whereas AQJP is more effective when compared with ALJP in aspirin+pylorus ligated rat models. The results were compared with the standard drug Rantidine, a H2 receptor antagonist.

  18. Adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis — a description in 1834?

    PubMed Central

    Stout, G.

    1983-01-01

    John Peacock MD was in practice in Darlington when he published his Practical Hints on the Treatment of Several Diseases in 1834. It is suggested that his cases described therein of `scirrhous pylorus' are adult hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. If authenticated, his work would predate the earliest description of this condition by the French pathologist, Professor Jean Cruveilhier in 1835. PMID:6350566

  19. Severe gastric impaction secondary to a gastric polyp in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Snyman, Heindrich Nicolaas; Abrahams, Miranda; Moore, Alison; Vince, Andrew; Anderson, Maureen E.C.

    2013-01-01

    A 13-year-old Percheron gelding was presented for refractory gastric impaction. At necropsy a pedunculated 10 cm × 11 cm × 14 cm mass, histologically identified as an inflammatory polyp, was suspected to have been partly obstructing the pylorus. This is the first report of a polyp resulting in gastric outflow obstruction in a horse. PMID:24155420

  20. Duodenal leiomyosarcoma mimicking a pancreatic pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Sperti, C; Pasquali, C; Di Prima, F; Baffa, R; Pedrazzoli, S

    1994-01-01

    A case of duodenal leiomyosarcoma presenting as a cystic mass is reported. Amylase, tumour markers levels in the cyst fluid and radiological findings suggested an inflammatory pancreatic pseudocyst. Exploratory laparotomy and frozen section examination showed a smooth muscle tumour of the duodenum. Pancreatoduodenectomy with pylorus-preser vation was performed and the patient remained symptom-free at 8 months follow-up.

  1. Botulinum toxin A as a treatment for delayed gastric emptying in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Max L.; Fransson, Boel A.; Barry, Sabrina L.

    2014-01-01

    A toy Australian shepherd dog was referred for bile peritonitis following excision of a biliary mucocele. Subsequent delayed gastric emptying was refractory to prokinetic therapy but responded to injection of botulinum toxin A into the muscularis layer of the pylorus; a novel therapy for delayed gastric emptying in dogs. PMID:24982520

  2. Pyloric stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and mouth, less tearing when crying, and dry diapers Swollen belly Olive-shaped mass when feeling the upper belly, which is the abnormal pylorus Ultrasound of the abdomen may be the first imaging test. Other tests that may be done include: Barium ...

  3. Botulinum toxin A as a treatment for delayed gastric emptying in a dog.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Max L; Fransson, Boel A; Barry, Sabrina L

    2014-07-01

    A toy Australian shepherd dog was referred for bile peritonitis following excision of a biliary mucocele. Subsequent delayed gastric emptying was refractory to prokinetic therapy but responded to injection of botulinum toxin A into the muscularis layer of the pylorus; a novel therapy for delayed gastric emptying in dogs.

  4. Severe gastric impaction secondary to a gastric polyp in a horse.

    PubMed

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Snyman, Heindrich Nicolaas; Abrahams, Miranda; Moore, Alison; Vince, Andrew; Anderson, Maureen E C

    2013-10-01

    A 13-year-old Percheron gelding was presented for refractory gastric impaction. At necropsy a pedunculated 10 cm × 11 cm × 14 cm mass, histologically identified as an inflammatory polyp, was suspected to have been partly obstructing the pylorus. This is the first report of a polyp resulting in gastric outflow obstruction in a horse.

  5. Regional differences in the frequency of slow waves in smooth muscle of the guinea-pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Domae, Kazumasa; Hashitani, Hikaru; Suzuki, Hikaru

    2008-12-01

    The frequency of slow waves recorded from circular muscle bundles with attached longitudinal muscle (intact muscle) was compared with that of slow potentials recorded from isolated circular muscle bundles (isolated muscle) from the guinea-pig stomach. In intact muscle preparations, slow waves were generated in the corpus, antrum and pylorus with a higher frequency in the corpus (about 5 min(-1)) than the other regions (about 2 min(-1) in antrum, about 1.5 min(-1) in pylorus). The resting potential amplitude was graded across the stomach, at about -50 mV in the fundus, -60 mV in the corpus, -65 mV in the antrum and -70 mV in the pylorus. A similar distribution of resting membrane potential and slow potential frequency was also observed in isolated muscle bundles from the different regions. Caffeine (1 mM) abolished slow waves in some corpus preparations and inhibited the 2nd component of slow waves in the antrum and pylorus, and also abolished slow potentials in isolated muscle preparations from any region of the stomach. This suggests that myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) are heterogeneously distributed in the stomach (pylorus, antrum and part of the corpus regions), with a homogeneous distribution of muscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-IM) within the circular muscle bundles. The frequency of slow potentials in smooth muscle isolated from any region of the stomach changed linearly in response to membrane potential changes produced by either current injection or high potassium solutions. The frequency of slow potentials after setting the membrane potential at -60 mV was larger in the corpus than the antrum, suggesting that the high frequency discharge of corpus muscle is produced by the low membrane potential and additional unidentified factors. We suggest that the regional difference in slow wave discharge is produced mainly by ICC-IM, and the role of ICC-MY may be little, if any.

  6. In Vitro Conditioned Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote De Novo Functional Enteric Nerve Regeneration, but Not Through Direct-Transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong; Ding, Zhen; Ma, Huan; Shi, Huiying; Gao, Yuanjun; Qian, Wei; Shi, Weina; Sun, Zhaoli; Hou, Xiaohua; Li, Xuhang

    2015-12-01

    Injury or neurodegenerative disorders of the enteric nervous system (ENS) cause gastrointestinal dysfunctions for which there is no effective therapy. This study, using the benzalkonium chloride-induced rat gastric denervation model, aimed to determine whether transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) could promote ENS neuron regeneration and if so, to elucidate the mechanism. Fluorescently labeled BMSC, isolated from either WT (BMSC labeled with bis-benzimide [BBM]) or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, were preconditioned in vitro using fetal gut culture media containing glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and transplanted subserosally into the denervated area of rat pylorus. In the nerve-ablated pylorus, grafted BMSC survived and migrated from the subserosa to the submucosa 28 days after transplantation, without apparent dedifferentiation. A massive number of PGP9.5/NSE/HuC/D/Tuj1-positive (but GFP- and BBM-negative) neurons were effectively regenerated in denervated pylorus grafted with preconditioned BMSC, suggesting that they were regenerated de novo, not originating from trans-differentiation of the transplanted BMSC. BMSC transplantation restored both basal pyloric contractility and electric field stimulation-induced relaxation. High levels of GDNF were induced in both in vitro-preconditioned BMSC as well as the previously denervated pylorus after transplantation of preconditioned BMSC. Thus, a BMSC-initiated GDNF-positive feedback mechanism is suggested to promote neuron regeneration and growth. In summary, we have demonstrated that allogeneically transplanted preconditioned BMSC initiate de novo regeneration of gastric neuronal cells/structures that in turn restore gastric contractility in pylorus-denervated rats. These neuronal structures did not originate from the grafted BMSC. Our data suggest that preconditioned allogeneic BMSC may have therapeutic value in treating enteric nerve disorders.

  7. Tyramine and β-phenylethylamine, from fermented food products, as agonists for the human trace amine-associated receptor 1 (hTAAR1) in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroto; Takebe, Youhei; Murakami, Yuka; Takahama, Yusei; Morimura, Shigeru

    2017-01-13

    The aromatic amines tyramine and β-phenylethylamine are abundant in fermented foods. Recently, a family of human trace amine-associated receptors (hTAARs) was discovered that responds to these compounds. This study examined the expression of hTAAR genes in five human organs. Among them, the stomach expressed hTAAR1 and hTAAR9. Interestingly, more hTAAR1 was expressed in the pylorus than in the other stomach regions. The CRE-SEAP reporter assay revealed that only hTAAR1 functioned as a Gs-coupled receptor in response to tyramine and β-phenylethylamine stimulation. The β-phenylethylamine-mediated hTAAR1 activity could be potentiated using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. These data suggest that tyramine and β-phenylethylamine in fermented foods act at hTAAR1 as agonists in the pylorus of stomach.

  8. Celiac axis stenosis as a rare but critical condition treated with pancreatoduodenectomy: report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Eung Chang; Lee, In Joon; Han, Sung-Sik; Kim, Hyun Boem; Kim, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soon-ae; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of patients with loss of hepatic arterial flow during surgery for pancreatic head cancer due to celiac stenosis caused by median arcuate ligament compression. The first case underwent pylorus-resecting pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer. After resection of the gastroduodenal artery, flow in the common hepatic artery disappeared, and celiac axis stenosis was identified. Interventional stent insertion was attempted, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac orifice (os). This problem was resolved by arterial reconstruction. The second case underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic head cancer and the same phenomenon occurred during the procedure. Interventional stent insertion was also tried; in this patient, however, it failed due to the acute angle of the celiac os. The problem was resolved by changing a femoral approach to a brachial approach, and the stent was inserted into the celiac os successfully. PMID:27617257

  9. Mucus and pepsin role in gastric damage prevention by H2-receptor antagonists and antiulcer drugs.

    PubMed

    Impicciatore, M; Morini, G; Chiavarini, M; Plazzi, P V; Agosti, A; Soldani, G

    1984-01-01

    The effects of cimetidine and ranitidine, alone or combined with sulglycotide or carbenoxolone, and those of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 were investigated on mucosal lesions induced in pylorus-ligated rats. The drugs were administered orally after pylorus ligation; 3 hr later the animals were killed, the stomachs removed and examined for the presence of mucosal lesions. Volume, pH, total acidity, pepsin, free and barrier mucus were determined. H2-antagonists both at nonantisecretory and antisecretory doses failed to prevent gastric mucosal lesions or to affect significantly mucus and pepsin. Sulglycotide and carbenoxolone inhibited pepsin secretion, the latter enhanced barrier mucus and both reduced lesion severity. A nearly complete prevention of mucosal damage was observed after anti-secretory doses of cimetidine plus sulglycotide or carbenoxolone. Data obtained compared with those of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 suggest that mucus and pepsin might have a partial role in ulcer prevention.

  10. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio.

  11. Protective Effects of Capparis zeylanica Linn. Leaf Extract on Gastric Lesions in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sini, Karanayil R.; Sinha, Barij N.; Rajasekaran, Aiyolu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to study the anti-ulcer activity of the methanolic extract of the leaves of Capparis zeylanica Linn on experimental animal models. The methanol extract of Capparis zeylanica Linn. leaves was investigated for anti-ulcer activity against aspirin plus pylorus ligation induced gastric ulcer in rats. HCl-Ethanol induced ulcer in mice and indomethacin induced ulcer in rats at 200 mg/kg body weight p.o. A significant (p<0.01, p<0.001) anti-ulcer activity was observed in all the models. Pylorus ligation showed significant (p<0.01) reduction in gastric volume, free acidity and ulcer index as compared to control. It also showed 88.5% ulcer inhibition in HCl-ethanol induced ulcer and 83.78% inhibition in indomethacin induced ulcer. PMID:23407576

  12. The diagnosis and treatment of Rapunzel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Cao, Feng; Liu, Diangang; Fang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoars are hairballs or hair-like fibers formed by chewing and swallowing hair or any other indigestible materials. Trichobezoars usually form in the gastric body and are thus prepyloric. However, trichobezoars may rarely pass through the pylorus into the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and even the colon, in a condition referred to as Rapunzel syndrome. Here, we present a case of a 13-year-old girl with this rare syndrome and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:27900201

  13. Evaluation of the gastric antiulcerogenic effect of large cardamom (fruits of Amomum subulatum Roxb).

    PubMed

    Jafri, M A; Farah; Javed, K; Singh, S

    2001-05-01

    Large cardamom (fruit of Amomum subulatum Roxb, N.O. Zingiberaceae) commonly known as 'Heel kalan' or 'Bari Ilaichi' is used in Unani system of medicine in gastrointestinal disorders. A crude methanolic extract and its different fractions, viz. essential oil, petroleum ether (60-80 degrees ), ethyl acetate and methanolic fractions, were studied in rats for their ability to inhibit the gastric lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol and pylorus ligature. In addition their effects on wall mucus, output of gastric acid and pepsin concentration were recorded. The crude methanolic extract of A. subulatum and its fractions, viz. essential oil, petroleum ether and ethyl acetate, inhibited gastric lesions induced by ethanol significantly, but not those which were induced by pylorus ligation and aspirin. However, ethyl acetate fraction increased the wall mucus in pylorus ligated rats. The results suggest a direct protective effect of ethyl acetate fraction on gastric mucosal barrier. While the observation of decrease in gastric motility by essential oil and petroleum ether fractions suggests the gastroprotective action of the test drug. These investigations validate the use of 'Heel kalan' in gastrointestinal disorders by Unani physicians.

  14. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  15. Immune system stimulation by the gut symbiont Frischella perrara in the honey bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Emery, Olivier; Schmidt, Konstantin; Engel, Philipp

    2017-02-16

    Gut bacteria engage in various symbiotic interactions with their host and impact gut immunity and homeostasis in different ways. In honey bees, the gut microbiota is composed of a relatively simple, but highly specialized bacterial community. One of its members, the gammaproteobacterium Frischella perrara induces the so-called scab phenotype, a dark-coloured band that develops on the epithelial surface of the pylorus. To understand the underlying host response, we analysed transcriptome changes in the pylorus in response to bacterial colonization. We find that, in contrast to the gut bacterium Snodgrassella alvi, F. perrara causes strong activation of the host immune system. Besides pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides and transporter genes, the melanization cascade was upregulated by F. perrara, suggesting that the scab phenotype corresponds to a melanization response of the host. In addition, transcriptome analysis of hive bees with and without the scab phenotype showed that F. perrara also stimulates the immune system under in-hive conditions in the presence of other gut bacterial species. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the presence of F. perrara influences gut immunity and homeostasis in the pylorus. This may have implications for bee health, because F. perrara prevalence differs between colonies and increased abundance of this bacterium has been shown to correlate with dietary alteration and impaired host development. Our transcriptome analysis sets the groundwork for investigating the interplay of bee gut symbionts with the host immune system.

  16. The Gastroprotective Role of Acanthus ilicifolius – A Study to Unravel the Underlying Mechanism of Anti-Ulcer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mani Senthil Kumar, K. T.; Puia, Zothan; Samanta, Samir K.; Barik, Rajiv; Dutta, Arnab; Gorain, Bapi; Roy, Dilip K.; Adhikari, Dipan; Karmakar, Sanmoy; Sen, Tuhinadri

    2012-01-01

    Acanthus ilicifolius (Acanthaceae), a mangrove medicinal plant, is widely used by the local inhabitants of the Sundarbans (India) to treat a variety of diseases. As a part of our continued search for novel bioactive products from mangrove medicinal plants, we were able to document the anti-inflammatory effects of this plant. In the present study, we have performed a detailed evaluation of the gastroprotective activity of the methanolic extract of Acanthus ilicifolius using different models of gastric ulceration. Unlike the conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, a methanolic extract of Acanthus ilicifolius leaves (MEAL) possessing significant anti-inflammatory properties, as revealed from our previous studies displayed in rats in dosages of 200 mg and 400 mg/kg BW after intraperitoneal administration, showed significant protective activity (anti-ulcer activity) against the gastric lesions induced by aspirin, indomethacin, stress, ethanol, and pylorus ligation. In pylorus-ligated rats, administration of Methanolic extract of Acanthus ilicifolius leaves (MEAL) significantly decreased gastric volume, acidity, and peptic activity. Moreover, pre-treatment with MEAL significantly restored the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), along with significant inhibition of both lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in pylorus-ligated animals. Ulceration induced with ethanol was significantly inhibited with MEAL, and the extract also resulted in the reduction of both lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, in this experimental model, administration of MEAL improved the activities of SOD, CAT, GSH, and GPX. A similar pattern of action was also noticed in cold-restraint stress-induced (CRS) ulceration, where MEAL pre-treatment inhibited CRS-induced ulceration, improved the status of antioxidant enzymes, and also reduced the level

  17. Combination treatment of lycopene and hesperidin protect experimentally induced ulcer in laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dilpesh; Katti, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Lycopene, a carotenoid and hesperidin, a flavonoid are naturally occurring in vegetables and fruits. Synergistic effect of a combination of carotenoid and flavonoid has been reported due to its antioxidant activity. Therefore, the present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of this combination on pylorus ligation induced ulcers in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups (n = 6). Rats were fasted for 24 h before pylorus ligation. After 24 h of fasting the rats were treated with hesperidin (100 mg/kg) and lycopene (2 mg/kg) and their combination 1h prior to surgery. After an hour under ether anesthesia pylorus ligation was performed, after 5 h the animals were sacrificed, stomach was dissected, and gastric contents were collected and measured. Total acidity and pH of gastric content was estimated. Ulcer index was calculated, and macroscopic examination of the stomach was carried out. Results: The sham operated rats showed a significant increase in pH, volume of gastric content and total acidity and ulcer index. The rats pretreated with lycopene and hesperidin showed significant improvement in the ulcer conditions. However, rats treated with a combination of lycopene and hesperidin showed more significant restoration of gastric function as compared to sham operated rats. Moreover, a significant difference was also noted in rats treated with a combination as compared to lycopene and hesperidin treatment alone. Conclusion: Thus experimentally the combination was seen to treat ulcers by anti-secretory, neutralizing, cytoprotective and mainly due to its antioxidant property. PMID:26401402

  18. Gastroprotective mechanisms of indole alkaloids from Himatanthus lancifolius.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; De Martini Otofuji, Glaucia; de Souza, Wesley Mauricio; de Moraes Santos, Cid Aimbiré; Torres, Luce Maria Brandao; Rieck, Lia; de Andrade Marques, Maria Consuelo; Mesia-Vela, Sonia

    2005-08-01

    The indole alkaloids mixture (AlkF) obtained from the barks of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson was evaluated for gastroprotective properties in rodents. The AlkF potently protected rats from experimentally induced gastric lesions by ethanol (ED (50) = 30 mg/kg, p. o.) and reduced gastric acid hypersecretion induced by pylorus ligature (ED (50) = 82 mg/kg, i. d.). Protective effects of the AlkF in the ethanol and hypersecretion models included increase of GSH levels of gastric mucosa indicating activation of GSH-dependent cytoprotective mechanisms. Also, an increase of the antioxidant capacity as measured through glutathione S-transferase activity was observed in the hypersecretory but not in the ulcerative model. Furthermore, the amount of nitric oxide derivatives (NO (3) + NO (2)) in the forestomach was increased while the amount released into the gastric juice during pylorus ligature was decreased by the AlkF suggesting an alteration of NO-related mechanisms. Reduction of gastric acid hypersecretion induced by pylorus ligature seems to correlate with the blockade of H (+),K (+)-ATPase activity as determined in vitro by the capacity of the AlkF mix to decrease the hydrolysis of ATP by the ATPase isolated from dog gastric mucosa (EC (50) = 212 microg/mL). Cholinergic mechanisms can be excluded since intestinal transit was not modified with doses up to 100 mg/kg ( p. o.). GC-MS investigation of components of the AlkF resulted in the identification of 3 main indole alkaloids, uleine (53 %), its isomer (13 %), demethoxyaspidormine (23.8 %) and traces of at least other five alkaloids. Collectively, the results show the novel gastroprotective properties of the indole AlkF of H. lancifolius through a variety of mechanisms.

  19. Acute pancreatitis secondary to incarcerated paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Kafka, N J; Leitman, I M; Tromba, J

    1994-05-01

    Paraesophageal hiatus hernia can be a morbid and even lethal condition. Although many complications from this entity have been described, they almost always involve gastric incarceration and its related complications. Occasionally, the transverse colon or spleen may be involved in the hernia, causing additional symptoms. An unusual case of paraesophageal hiatus hernia involving incarceration of the pylorus, proximal duodenum, and pancreatic head is described. The patient's presentation, operative management, and perioperative course are discussed to emphasize the importance of early elective repair of paraesophageal hiatus hernia before the development of such occurrences.

  20. Ultrasonic "double track" sign in hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H L; Schechter, S; Mestel, A L; Eaton, D H; Haller, J O

    1987-03-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the diagnosis of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis since the first reports of its use with contact B mode scanners. Real-time imaging has allowed measurements of pyloric diameter, length, and muscle wall thickness. Wall thickness measurements taken with the pylorus in longitudinal (elongated) view improve diagnostic accuracy. Fluid aided real-time examination of 10 cases showed the ultrasound equivalent of the "double track" sign. This finding is the result of pyloric fluid compressed into smaller tracks as it is impinged upon circumferentially by the thickened circular muscle. This sign, previously seen in barium studies, although nonspecific, may prove to be a sensitive diagnostic criterion.

  1. Bouveret syndrome: gallstone ileus of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Englert, Zachary P; Love, Katie; Marilley, Mark D; Bower, Curtis E

    2012-10-01

    This is a case of a 59-year-old woman with Bouveret syndrome. An initial endoscopic approach to management is described. Gallstone ileus occurs when a gallstone passes from a cholecystoduodenal fistula or a choledochoduodenal fistula into the gastrointestinal tract and causes obstruction, usually at the ileocecal valve. Bouveret syndrome is a variant of gallstone ileus where the gallstone lodges in the duodenum or pylorus causing a gastric outlet obstruction. The endoscopic and surgical management of this process are important to keep in mind and may be evolving as endoscopic therapies improve.

  2. Evaluation of gastric anti-ulcer activity of fixed oil of Ocimum basilicum Linn. and its possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Singh, S

    1999-03-01

    Fixed oil of O. basilicum was found to possess significant antiulcer activity against aspirin, indomethacin, alcohol, histamine, reserpine, serotonin and stress-induced ulceration in experimental animal models. Significant inhibition was also observed in aspirin-induced gastric ulceration and secretion in pylorus ligated rats. The lipoxygenase inhibiting, histamine antagonistic and antisecretory effects of the oil could probably contribute towards antiulcer activity. O. basilicum fixed oil may be considered to be a drug of natural origin which possesses both antiinflammatory and anti-ulcer activity.

  3. The mucosa of the digestive tract in Micropogonias furnieri: a light and electron microscope approach.

    PubMed

    Diaz, A O; García, A M; Figueroa, D E; Goldemberg, A L

    2008-08-01

    The histomorphological aspects as well as the histochemical content and distribution of glycoproteins (GPs) in the mucosa of the digestive tract of the white croaker Micropogonias furnieri were studied. The buccopharyngeal cavity and the esophagous showed a squamous stratified epithelium with mucous cells. The stomach presented three portions: cardias, fundus and pylorus. Tubular glands formed by a single type of gland cell were located along the cardias and fundus. Histochemical tests showed that the buccopharyngeal cavity and the esophagous presented the largest amount of the different types of mucosubstances. Both organs showed abundant secretory mucous cells that synthesize large quantities of neutral, sulphated and sialylated GPs. The surface epithelium in the cardias and fundus synthesized and secreted scarce sialylated and neutral GPs whereas the secretions of the apical surface were abundant. The pylorus secreted large amounts of neutral as well as sulphated and sialylated GPs. Gland cells secreted neutral GPs. The ultrastructural features of the gut cells were quite similar to those of other teleosts. The buccopharyngeal cavity and the esophagous surface epithelial cells, identified by their superficial localization, were characterized by cytoplasmic vesicles of different size. Abundant goblet cells with secretory mucous granules were also present. Gastric glands in the stomach contained just one form of cell with a fine structure similar to cells that secrete pepsinogen.

  4. [Action mechanism of sodium polyacrylates against stomach ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kokue, E; Hayama, T

    1975-05-01

    Three sodium polyacrylates (PAS) with different viscosities were examined for antiulcerogenic properties. Rats were fed with sugar containing a PAS for 4 hr and subjected to 12 hr reserpinization or stress by water immersion. Lower incidence of ulceration and larger amount of stomach content after the experiment were found in the PAS administered groups. The higher viscous PAS was more effective in prevention of ulceration and in prolongation of gastric emptying. Intragastric administration of the drugs to pylorus ligated rats reduced forestomach ulceration. However, differences in the antiulcerogenic activity of three drugs were not observed. The effects on the gastric secretion of three PAS (50 mg) were also examined, using pylorus ligated (6 hr) rats. In PAS groups, the free acid in the gastric juice was reduced to some extent. There was, however, no relation between the antiacid effect and viscosity. The drugs inhibited the peptic digestion in vitro, but the difference of viscosity was not related to the antipeptic effect. It is concluded that prolongation of gastric emptying may be a major factor in the antiulcerogenic activity of PAS.

  5. Torus hyperplasia of the pyloric antrum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi-Hun; Han, Hye Seung; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Byung Kook; Sung, In-Kyung; Seong, Moo Kyung; Lee, Kyung Yung

    2010-01-01

    Primary or idiopathic hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle in adult, so called torus hyperplasia, is an infrequent but an established entity. It is caused by a circular muscle hypertrophy affecting the lesser curvature near the pylorus. Since most of the lesions are difficult to differentiate from tumor, distal gastrectomy is usually preformed to rule out most causes of pyloric lesions including neoplastic ones through a pathological study. A 56-yr-old man with a family history of gastric cancer presented with abdominal discomfort of 1 month duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a 1.0 cm sized irregular submucosal lesion proximal to the pylorus to the distal antrum on the lesser curvature. On colonoscopy examination, a 1.5 cm sized protruding mass was noticed on the appendiceal orifice. Gastrectomy and cecectomy were done, and histological section revealed marked hypertrophy of the distal circular pyloric musculature and an appendiceal mucocele. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of torus hyperplasia with appendiceal mucocele which is found incidentally.

  6. Anti-ulcer actions of phytosphingosine hydrochloride in different experimental rat ulcer models.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Woo; Kim, Nam Ki; Jin, Hwan-Jun; Koh, Chang-Woong; Kim, Chul Kyung; Kwon, O-Hyep; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Chan-Koo

    2005-01-01

    The gastroprotective activity of phytosphingosine hydrochloride (PS-HCl, CAS 554-62-1) was assessed in four different rat models of experimentally induced gastric ulcer. Various doses (2.5-10 mg/kg) of PS-HCI were orally administered to rats 30 min before the treatment with HCl/ethanol, indometacin, cysteamine, or to rats with ligated pylorus. Oral administration of PS-HCl (2.5-10 mg/kg) to rats prevented the acute ulcer formation in 4 different types of ulcer in a dose-dependent manner as follows: (1) HCl/ethanol-induced gastric mucosal membrane lesions (20.1-47.8% inhibition), (2) indometacin-induced gastric mucosal membrane lesions (4.6-31.9% inhibition), (3) duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine (10-20% inhibition), (4) gastric secretion and ulceration following pylorus ligation (33.3-61.9% inhibition). These results indicate that PS-HCI may be useful for the prevention of gastric ulcer.

  7. Expression of Cocaine and Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART) in the Porcine Intramural Neurons of Stomach in the Course of Experimentally Induced Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bulc, Michał; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Całka, Jarosław

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-like immunoreactive (CART-LI) enteric nervous structures was investigated within the porcine stomach. To induce diabetes, the pigs were administered intravenously streptozotocin at a dose of 150 mg/kg of body weight. A significant decrease of the number of CART-LI perikarya was observed in the myenteric plexus of the gastric antrum, corpus, and pylorus in the experimental group. In contrast, submucous plexus was devoid of CART-positive neuronal cells both in control and experimental animals. In the control group, the highest densities of CART-LI nerve fibers were observed in the circular muscle layer of antrum and slightly less nerve fibers were present in the muscle layer of corpus and pylorus. In turn, submucous layer of all studied stomach regions revealed relatively smaller number of CART-positive nerve fibers. Diabetes caused statistically significant decrease in the expression of CART-LI nerve fibers only in the antrum circular muscle layer. Also, no changes in the CART-like immunoreactivity in the intraganglionic nerve fibers were observed. The obtained results suggest that acute hyperglycemia produced significant reduction of the CART expression in enteric perikarya throughout entire stomach as well as decrease of density the CART-LI fibers in circular muscle layer of the antrum. Additionally, we suggest that CART might be involved in the regulation of stomach function especially in the gastric motility.

  8. Duodenal bulb control of the flow rate of digesta in the fasted and fed dog.

    PubMed Central

    Malbert, C H; Ruckebusch, Y

    1989-01-01

    1. Continuous measurement of the flow of digesta near the pylorus, and 5 cm aborally, was assessed in the conscious dog using a chronically implanted flowmeter. The patterns of flow were related to motor activity of the gastroduodenal junction. 2. Electromagnetic measurement of the flow was calibrated in vitro by means of a pulsatile pump. Validation was obtained in vivo by direct evaluation of the amount of chyme collected from an open duodenal cannula and indirectly by a dye-dilution technique. 3. After a 12 h fast, only small amounts of gastric contents were delivered into the duodenum. This transfer occurred during periods of irregular motor activity recorded along the gastroduodenal junction, which occupied less than 25% of the recording time. The patterns of flow near the pylorus and beyond the duodenal bulb were correlated to antral and duodenal contractions respectively. 4. After a meal, gastric emptying occurred intermittently and was related to enhanced antral motor activity beyond the duodenal bulb; digesta flowed in clusters of gushes which were related to the duodenal contractions. 5. It is concluded that the mechanical role of the duodenal bulb is to change the intermittent juxtapyloric flow of digesta into a uniform flow at the duodenal level. PMID:2585295

  9. Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Yongbin; Cai, Yunqiang; Liu, Xubao; Peng, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy is a complicated surgical procedure and rarely been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic total pancreatectomy. Patients and Methods: Three patients underwent laparoscopic total pancreatectomy between May 2014 and August 2015. We reviewed their general demographic data, perioperative details, and short-term outcomes. General morbidity was assessed using Clavien–Dindo classification and delayed gastric emptying (DGE) was evaluated by International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definition. Diagnosis and Outcomes: The indications for laparoscopic total pancreatectomy were intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) (n = 2) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (n = 1). All patients underwent laparoscopic pylorus and spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy, the mean operative time was 490 minutes (range 450–540 minutes), the mean estimated blood loss was 266 mL (range 100–400 minutes); 2 patients suffered from postoperative complication. All the patients recovered uneventfully with conservative treatment and discharged with a mean hospital stay 18 days (range 8–24 days). The short-term (from 108 to 600 days) follow up demonstrated 3 patients had normal and consistent glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level with acceptable quality of life. Lessons: Laparoscopic total pancreatectomy is feasible and safe in selected patients and pylorus and spleen preserving technique should be considered. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to obtain a comprehensive understanding the role of laparoscopic technique in total pancreatectomy. PMID:28099344

  10. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out.

  11. Lectin histochemistry of gastrointestinal glycoconjugates in the greater horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum (Schreber, 1774).

    PubMed

    Scillitani, Giovanni; Zizza, Sara; Liquori, Giuseppa Esterina; Ferri, Domenico

    2007-01-01

    Mucins in the gastrointestinal tract of Rhinolophus ferrumequinum were investigated by histochemistry and lectin histochemistry to evaluate morphofunctional variations of different regions and their possible physiological and evolutionary implications. Histochemical methods included periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), Alcian blue (AB) at pH 2.5 and 1.0 and high-iron-diamine AB pH 2.5. Binding of lectins Con A, DBA, WGA, LTA, LFA, PNA and SBA; LFA, PNA and SBA with prior sialidase treatment; and paradoxical Con A were evaluated. The oesophagus lacked glands. The stomach was divided into a short cardias, a wide fundus and a brief pylorus. The surface muciparous cells secreted sulpho- and sialomucins with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) residues, N-acetyllactosamine and (beta1,4 N-acetylglucosamine)(n) chains. Towards the pylorus, N-acetylgalactosamine residues disappeared and acidity decreased. Cardiac glands, neck cells in the fundic glands, pyloric and duodenal Brunner's glands all shared neutral, stable class-III mucins, mainly with N-acetylgalactosamine sequences. The intestine was divided into a duodenum, a jejuno-ileum and a short rectum. The goblet cells produced sulpho- and sialomucins with sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine sequences, (beta1,4 N-acetylglucosamine)(n) and N-acetyllactosamine, whose sialylation increased towards the rectum. The main features of the mucins are probably associated with the requirements of fast absorption and food passage and in protection against mechanical and pathogenic injuries.

  12. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  13. Effect of evening primrose oil on gastric ulceration and secretion induced by various ulcerogenic and necrotizing agents in rats.

    PubMed

    al-Shabanah, O A

    1997-08-01

    The evening primrose oil (EPO) commercially known as Callanish evening primrose oil (omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) is linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)-enriched oil obtained from the seeds of Oenothera biennis L. (Fam. Onagraceae). EPO was investigated for its ability to protect the gastric mucosa against injuries caused by pylorus ligation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; aspirin, indomethacin and phenylbutazone), hypothermic restraint stress and necrotizing agents [0.6 M HCl, 0.2 M NaOH, 25% NaCl or 80% (v/v) aqueous ethanol]. It was administered by gastric intubation at doses of 5 and 10 ml/kg body weight to rats fed standard chow diet. An additional group of animals was given the same amount of corn oil in each experimental model studied. The results showed that EPO at the doses of 5 and 10 ml/kg body weight provided significant protection in various experimental models used. It produced a significant inhibition of gastric mucosal damage induced by pylorus ligation, NSAIDs, or hypothermic restraint ulcers. EPO also had a marked cytoprotective effective effect against all necrotizing agents used in this study. The results suggest that EPO rich in LA and GLA possesses both antisecretory and anti-ulcerogenic effects.

  14. Antral recirculation in the stomach during gastric mixing.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yohsuke; Kobayashi, Ikuma; Ishida, Shunichi; Ishikawa, Takuji; Buist, Martin; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2013-03-01

    We investigate flow in the stomach during gastric mixing using a numerical simulation with an anatomically realistic geometry and free-surface flow modeling. Because of momentum differences between greater and lesser curvatures during peristaltic contractions, time-averaged recirculation is generated in the antrum, with retropulsive flow away from the pylorus and compensation flow along the greater curvature toward the pylorus. Gastric content in the distal stomach is continuously transported to the distal antrum by the forward flow of antral recirculation, and it is then mixed by the backward retropulsive flow. Hence, the content inside the antral recirculation is well mixed independently of initial location, whereas the content outside the recirculation is poorly mixed. Free-surface modeling enables us to analyze the effects of posture on gastric mixing. In the upright, prone, and right lateral positions, most of the antrum is filled with content, and the content is well mixed by antral recirculation. In contrast, in the supine and left lateral positions, most of the content is located outside antral recirculation, which results in poor mixing. The curved, twisted shape of the stomach substantially supports gastric mixing in fluid mechanical terms.

  15. Idiopathic non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an infant successfully treated via endoscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Karnsakul, Wikrom; Cannon, Mary L; Gillespie, Stacey; Vaughan, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis has rarely been reported in pediatric literature. Endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation has been shown to be a safe procedure in treating gastric outlet obstruction in older children and adults. Partial gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) was diagnosed in an infant by history and confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal series (UGI). Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography scan excluded idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, abdominal tumors, gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary-pancreatic anomalies. Endoscopic findings showed a pinhole-sized pylorus and did not indicate peptic ulcer disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, antral web, or evidence of allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases. Three sessions of a step-wise endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation were conducted under general anesthesia and a fluoroscopy at two week intervals using catheter balloons (Boston Scientific Microvasive®, MA, USA) of increasing diameters. Repeat UGI after the first session revealed normal gastrointestinal transit and no intestinal obstruction. The patient tolerated solid food without any gastrointestinal symptoms since the first session. The endoscope was able to be passed through the pylorus after the last session. Although the etiology of GOO in this infant is unclear (proposed mechanisms are herein discussed), endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation was a safe procedure for treating this young infant with non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and should be considered as an initial approach before pyloroplasty in such presentations. PMID:21191516

  16. Assessment of the antiulcer potential of Moringa oleifera root-bark extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manoj Kumar; Bodakhe, Surendra H; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, an ethanolic root-bark extract of Moringa oleifera (MO) was examined for its antiulcer potential in albino Wistar rats using two experimental models: ethanol-induced and pylorus ligation-induced gastric ulceration. The extract was orally administered at three different doses (150, 350, and 500 mg/kg) for 15 consecutive days. The antiulcer effects in rats treated with different doses of the extract and omeprazole (30 mg/kg, p.o.) were determined and compared statistically with the antiulcer effects in the control rats treated with saline (NaCl, 0.9%). The MO at doses of 350 and 500 mg/kg decreased the ulcer index significantly as compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The percentage protections against gastric ulcers were 82.58%, 85.13%, and 86.15% for MO doses of 150, 350, and 500 mg/kg, respectively, in the pylorus-ligated ulcer model and 55.75%, 59.33%, and 78.51%, respectively, in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. The MO significantly reduced the free acidity, total acidity, and ulcer index (p < 0.01) and increased the pH of gastric content compared with the control group. This study suggests that MO possesses valuable antiulcer, antisecretory, and cytoprotective activity. Thus, an ethanolic root-bark extract of Moringa oleifera can be used as source for an antiulcer drug.

  17. Tibetan herbal formula Padma Digestin modulates gastrointestinal motility in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Balsiger, Bruno M; Krayer, Magali; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Flogerzi, Beatrice; Vennos, Cecile; Gschossmann, Juergen M

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of Padma Digestin on the smooth muscle motility of different gastrointestinal segments in vitro. METHODS: The effects of the ethanolic extract of Padma Digestin (at 8.16 mg/mL or 81.6 mg/mL) on the contractility and susceptibility to acetylcholine (ACh) of muscle strips from the cardia, antrum, pylorus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of male Wistar rats were analyzed. RESULTS: Compared with the control treatment, the Padma Digestin extract had a procontractile effect on the antral smooth muscle strips. Padma Digestin decreased ACh sensitivity in cardia muscle strips and increased it in those from the antrum and pylorus. In the intestinal segments, spontaneous contractility was inhibited in both the duodenal and jejunal strips, whereas reactivity to ACh was inhibited in the jejunal strips only. In the colonic samples, Padma Digestin inhibited spontaneous and ACh-stimulated contractility at a low dose but seems to have increasing effects at a high dose. CONCLUSION: Padma Digestin extract has region-specific effects on the contractility and excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Our results support the traditional use of Padma Digestin for maldigestion and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23515138

  18. Anti-ulcer activity of higher primary alcohols of beeswax.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Valdés, S; Arruzazabala, L; Más, R

    1995-09-01

    The anti-ulcer effects of a natural mixture of higher aliphatic primary alcohols, designated D-002, isolated from beeswax, were compared with those of cimetidine on indomethacin-, ethanol-, water-immersion-induced ulcers and on gastric secretion in rats. D-002 (25-50 mg kg-1 p.o.) was similar to cimetidine in dose-dependently reducing the duration of indomethacin-induced ulcers while also being effective in preventing ethanol-induced ulcers, which are not affected by cimetidine. On the other hand, D-002 (100 mg kg-1) moderately decreased the volume of gastric basal secretion in pylorus-ligated rats, but not the acidity. Nevertheless, it inhibited gastric ulcer induced by pylorus-ligation at doses (50 mg kg-1) that were ineffective in decreasing the volume. In addition, 100 mg kg-1 of D-002 prevented the formation of acute gastric ulcers induced in rats by water-immersion stress. The results demonstrate the anti-ulcer activity of the preparation in different experimental models suggesting its potential value for ulcer therapy.

  19. Aqueous suspension of anise “Pimpinella anisum” protects rats against chemically induced gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Al Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Mossa, Jaber S; Al-Soohaibani, Mohammed O; Rafatullah, Syed

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To substantiate the claims of Unani and Arabian traditional medicine practitioners on the gastroprotective potential effect of a popular spice anise, “Pimpinella anisum L.” on experimentally-induced gastric ulceration and secretion in rats. METHODS: Acute gastric ulceration in rats was produced by various noxious chemicals including 80% ethanol, 0.2 mol/L NaOH, 25% NaCl and indomethacin. Anti-secretory studies were undertaken using pylorus-ligated Shay rat technique. Levels of gastric non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH) and wall mucus were estimated and gastric tissue was also examined histologically. Anise aqueous suspension was used in two doses (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) in all experiments. RESULTS: Anise significantly inhibited gastric mu-cosal damage induced by necrotizing agents and indomethacin. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histologically. In pylorus-ligated Shay rats, anise suspension significantly reduced the basal gastric acid secretion, acidity and completely inhibited the rumenal ulceration. On the other hand, the suspension significantly replenished ethanol-induced depleted levels of gastric mucosal NP-SH and gastric wall mucus concentration. CONCLUSION: Anise aqueous suspension possesses significant cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activities against experimentally-induced gastric lesions. The anti-ulcer effect of anise is possibly prostaglandin-mediated and/or through its anti-secretory and antioxidative properties. PMID:17373749

  20. Evaluation of anti-ulcer activity of the leaf extract of Osyris quadripartita Decne. (Santalaceae) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abebaw, Mastewal; Mishra, Bharat; Gelayee, Dessalegn Asmelashe

    2017-01-01

    Osyris quadripartita (OQ) Salzm. ex Decne. has been used to treat peptic ulcer disease in Ethiopian folk medicine, but its efficacy has not been validated. The present study was therefore carried out to evaluate the anti-ulcer activity of 80% methanol leaf extract of OQ in rats. The effect of OQ extract on gastric ulcer in rats in pylorus ligation-induced and ethanol-induced models was studied using single dosing (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) and repeated dosing (200 mg/kg for 10 and 20 days) approaches. Ranitidine (50 mg/kg) and sucralfate (100 mg/kg) were used as the standard drugs. Depending on the model, outcome measures were volume and pH of gastric fluid, total acidity, ulcer score, percent inhibition of ulcer score, ulcer index as well as percent inhibition of ulcer index. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test, and P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. OQ significantly (P<0.001) reduced gastric ulcer index by 55.82% and 62.11%, respectively, in pylorus ligation-induced and ethanol-induced ulcer models at the 400 mg/kg dose, which is comparable to the standard drugs. Ten and 20 days pre-treatment with OQ200 exhibited significant (P<0.001) ulcer inhibition by 66.48% and 68.36% (pylorus ligation-induced model) as well as 71.48% and 85.35% (ethanol-induced model), respectively. OQ possesses both dose-dependent and time-dependent anti-ulcer effect in the two models. The oral median lethal dose (LD50) is estimated to be higher than 2000 mg/kg for the crude hydroalcoholic extract, and secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, tannins, and saponins were present. The findings of this study confirmed that OQ has anti-ulcer pharmacologic activity due to one or more of the secondary metabolites present in it. Therefore, this study validates its anti-ulcer use in Ethiopian folk medicine. Further investigations on isolation of specific phytochemicals and elucidating mechanisms of action are needed. PMID:28144167

  1. Mechanics of pulsatile transpyloric flow in the pig.

    PubMed

    Anvari, M; Dent, J; Malbert, C; Jamieson, G G

    1995-10-01

    1. In eight conscious pigs equipped with gastric and duodenal cannulae, the relationship of transpyloric flow to gastro-duodenal motor events was evaluated during gastric emptying of 1000 ml of saline. Rates of liquid gastric emptying were correlated with pressures at the antrum, pylorus and duodenum, recorded by a sleeve sensor and multiple perfused side-holes. Transpyloric flow was recorded concurrently by continuous collection and weighing of the duodenal effluent. 2. In three pigs the above measurements were repeated during concurrent videofluoroscopy of gastric emptying after adding 100 ml of liquid barium to the gastric instillate. 3. The mean volume of saline emptied in 30 min was 627 +/- 51.2 ml. Pulsatile flow accounted for 71% of total emptying. Pulses had a mean flow rate of 3.9 +/- 0.44 ml s-1. Most flow pulses (59%) occurred during the first 5 min of emptying. 4. Distinctive, low-amplitude (4.8 +/- 0.33 mmHg), relatively long-lasting (15.8 +/- 0.46 s) antral pressure waves were associated with 58% of flow pulses. In all antral pressure recording points, the first and longest duration component of these pressure waves had an identical timing, amplitude and waveform consistent with pressurization of the entire antrum-gastric cavity. 5. Videofluoroscopy and concurrent manometry showed that these antral common cavity pressure waves were associated with non-lumen-occlusive contractions of the gastric wall, initially observed at the corpus which propagated down to the pylorus; 93% of these contractions became lumen occlusive in the terminal antrum and pylorus when pressure waves of a unique pattern for each recording point were recorded at this level. 6. The onset of 68% of the flow pulses which accounted for 62% of pulsatile emptying occurred in the interval (mean 7.9 +/- 0.65 s) between the onset of the common cavity wave and the onset of localized, lumen-occlusive distal antral-pyloric pressure waves. 7. These findings indicate that in the pig, pulsatile

  2. Tissue fibrinolysis in experimental gastric ulcer: a study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, B; Risberg, B; Hedman, L; Peterson, H I

    1981-10-01

    Gastric mucosal lesions were induced in rats by pyloric ligature and intragastric instillation of hydrochloric acid. Within 4 h all rats developed focal mucosal lesions. Early regeneration was observed 72 h after release of the pyloric ligature and replacement of the hydrochloric acid by a phosphate buffer. A significantly increased gastric mucosal fibrinolytic activity was found 4 h after pylorus ligation. The submucosal vascular fibrinolysis remained unchanged. Following release of the pyloric ligature the increased mucosal fibrinolysis returned to normal values after 72 h. Intravenous administration of tranexamic acid significantly decreased the mucosal and vascular fibrinolytic activity without influencing the formation of induced gastric lesions. Increased mucosal fibrinolysis is probably not involved in the development of mucosal lesions.

  3. The rare malignancy of the hepatobiliary system: ampullary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mustafa; Ozsoy, Yucel; Canda, Aras Emre; Nalbant, Olcay Ak; Haskaraca, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Carcinoid tumors are low-grade tumors originating from endoderm and mostly involving the gastrointestinal system. However; they may be seen in any site within the gastrointestinal system. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old female patient. The results of blood tests were observed to be consistent with obstructive jaundice. A mass appearance was not encountered on tomographic examination. Papilla that was tumor-like macroscopically was seen in the second part of the duodenum in diagnostic endoscopy. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy surgical procedure was applied. On pathological examination of the mass, a tumoral mass was detected in ampulla vateri localization, 1.5 × 1 × 0.8 cm in size, which, in immunohistochemical staining, was evaluated as a neuroendocrine tumor. Also, Metastasis was observed. Conclusion. The rarest type of carcinoid tumor is ampullary located carcinoid tumor, and tumor size is not a reliable indicator for tumor aggressivity in ampullary carcinoid tumors.

  4. Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) offers protection against gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Campos, A R; Barros, A I S; Santos, F A; Rao, V S N

    2003-12-01

    The effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana) extract were analyzed in rats on acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin and were compared to those produced by caffeine, a methylxanthine. Guarana (50 and 100 mg/kg p.o.) pretreated animals showed a significant reduction in the severity of gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol in a manner similar to caffeine (20 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). Against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration, guarana at a higher dose offered significant protection but caffeine was ineffective at the doses tested. In 4 h pylorus-ligated rats, both guarana and caffeine caused significant diminution in the gastric secretory volume as well as the total acidity. Gastrointestinal transit in mice was not significantly affected by either of these agents. These findings indicate that guarana has a gastroprotective property that needs further elucidation as regards to its mechanism.

  5. Gastrointestinal granuloma due to Candida albicans in an immunocompetent cat

    PubMed Central

    Duchaussoy, Anne-Claire; Rose, Annie; Talbot, Jessica J.; Barrs, Vanessa R.

    2015-01-01

    A 3.5 year-old cat was admitted to the University of Melbourne Veterinary Teaching Hospital for chronic vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a focal, circumferential thickening of the wall of the duodenum extending from the pylorus aborally for 3 cm, and an enlarged gastric lymph node. Cytology of fine-needle aspirates of the intestinal mass and lymph node revealed an eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate and numerous extracellular septate acute angle branching fungal-type hyphae. Occasional hyphae had globose terminal ends, as well as round to oval blastospores and germ tubes. Candida albicans was cultured from a surgical biopsy of the duodenal mass. No underlying host immunodeficiencies were identified. Passage of an abrasive intestinal foreign body was suspected to have caused intestinal mucosal damage resulting in focal intestinal candidiasis. The cat was treated with a short course of oral itraconazole and all clinical signs resolved. PMID:26862475

  6. Effect of Monotherapy and Combination Therapy of Pantoprazole and Aprepitant in Gastric Esophageal Reflux Disease in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Kamleshwar; Raj, Prince; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Mukesh; Kaithwas, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of pantoprazole and aprepitant on experimental esophagitis in albino rats. Groups of rats, fasted overnight, received normal saline (3 mL/kg, sham control) or toxic control (3 mL/kg) or pantoprazole (30 mg/kg) or aprepitant (10 mg/kg), or their combinations and were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation. Animals were sacrificed after 8 h and evaluated for the gastric pH, volume of gastric juices, total acidity, esophagitis index, and free acidity. Esophageal tissues were further subjected to estimations of TBARS, GSH, catalase, and SOD. Treatment with pantoprazole and aprepitant significantly inhibited the gastric secretion, total acidity, and esophagitis index. The treatment also helped to restore the altered levels oxidative stress parameters to normal. PMID:24790551

  7. Primary gastric tuberculosis presenting as pyloric outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Tromba, J L; Inglese, R; Rieders, B; Todaro, R

    1991-12-01

    A 38-yr-old Haitian male with a longstanding history of peptic ulcer disease presented with persistent vomiting and weight loss. Barium studies and upper endoscopy revealed gastric outlet obstruction with prepyloric ulcerations. Endoscopic biopsies were consistent with chronic gastritis. The patient did not respond to intensive medical management, including total parenteral nutrition, intravenous cimetidine, and nasogastric suctioning. At the time of surgery, large celiac lymph nodes were noted surrounding the pylorus and the first portion of the duodenum. Biopsies of the wall of the stomach and lymph nodes demonstrated necrotizing granulomas. Cultures for acid-fast bacilli subsequently grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A search for foci outside the gastrointestinal tract was negative. Primary gastric tuberculosis remains an extremely uncommon clinical entity; the definitive diagnosis is made by biopsy and positive culture for the organism.

  8. Nicotinamide derivatives as a new class of gastric (H+/K+)-ATPase inhibitors. III. Synthesis and gastric antisecretory activity of 2-[(2- and 4-aminobenzyl, and alpha-methylbenzyl)sulfinyl]-N-(4-pyridinyl) -3-pyridinecarboxamides.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, H; Tanitame, A; Tada, K; Nakamura, K; Seto, Y; Nishikawa, Y

    1997-07-01

    A new series of 2-[(2-aminobenzyl, 4-aminobenzyl, and alpha-methylbenzyl) sulfinyl]-N-(4-pyridinyl)-3-pyridinecarboxamides. was synthesized and evaluated for gastric antisecretory activities. Several of the compounds synthesized exhibited potent inhibitory activities against [14C]aminopyrine accumulation stimulated by dibutyryl cyclic AMP in isolated rabbit parietal cells and histamine-induced gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats by intraduodenal administration. In particular, the more polar diastereoisomer of 2-[(4-methoxy-alpha-methylbenzyl)sulfinyl] -N-(4-pyridinyl)-3-pyridinecarboxamide (13b) showed in vivo inhibitory activity equivalent or superior to that of omeprazole and was a more selective (H+/K+)-ATPase inhibitor than omeprazole.

  9. Evaluation of Antiulcer and Antioxidant Activity of Barleria gibsoni Dalz. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Firoj A.; More, Harinath N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peptic ulcer is a digestive disorder most commonly found in clinical practice. Given the many side effects of modern medicine, the initial acquisition of fewer side effects, and medication of indigenous drugs, it should be considered as a better alternative for the treatment of peptic ulcer. Objective: To assess antiulcer and antioxidant activity of ethanol extract of Barleria gibsoni (EBG) Dalz. leaves in ulcer-induced rats and in vitro antioxidants method, respectively. Materials and Methods: Ethanol EBG was screened for antiulcer activity in pylorus ligation-induced ulcer models in Wistar rats. In vitro antioxidant activity of the extracts was tested using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging activity. Total phenol and flavonoid content in the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. Results: Oral administration of ethanol extract of leaves at doses of 250, 500 mg/kg p.o. reduced significant gastric lesions induced by pylorus ligation-induced ulcer as compared to standard omeprazole (20 mg/kg p.o.). The IC50 values were found to be 150 μg/mL in leaves extract. The ethanol extracts showed good antioxidant capacity in DPPH radical scavenging assay and NO radical scavenging activity when compared to standard. The total phenolic content using Folin–Ciocalteu reagent estimated in 1 mg of leaves extracts was 368 μg and 481 μg with gallic acid equivalent and also the total flavonoid content found to be 240 and 410 μg, respectively, with quercetin equivalence. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the leaves of B. gibsoni possessed antiulcer potential and antioxidant compared to standard. This is the first ever report of antiulcer and antioxidant activities in B. gibsoni (Acanthaceae). SUMMARY In vivo antiulcer and in vitro antioxidant activity of Barleria gibsoni was evaluated.Soxhelt extraction was carried out and extracts were subjected to qualitative phytochemical analysis. Extract obtained by

  10. [Potentiation of the gastro-protective effect of sulglicotide in the presence of cimetidine in the rat].

    PubMed

    Morini, G

    1989-10-01

    The effects of sulglicotide, alone or combined with cimetidine, have been investigated on mucosal lesions induced in rats by pylorus ligation. In the same animals, the measurement of acid and pepsin output and of soluble and barrier mucus has been performed. Dose-dependent sulglicotide prevented the development of mucosal lesions and its protective effect was achieved without significant modifications in gastric acid secretion. The secretion of pepsin and of mucus was markedly inhibited at every dosage of the compound. Neither the damage to gastric mucosa nor the secretion of acid, pepsin and mucus were affected by cimetidine. The combination of the highest doses of both compounds resulted in a synergistic gastro-protective effect, not dependent on a synergistic effect on the reduction in acid secretion.

  11. The effect of long-term treatment with antisecretory and antiulcer drugs on gastric secretory and motor responsiveness to caerulein in rats with chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Impicciatore, M; Morini, G; Chiavarini, M; Barocelli, E

    1986-07-15

    In the present paper the gastric secretory and motor responsiveness to a gastrin-like peptide, caerulein, was assessed in rats with a chronic gastric ulcer induced by 'isolation', 48 h after completing prolonged treatments (30 and 60 days) with cimetidine (80 and 160 mg/kg), pirenzepine (8 and 16 mg/kg) and sulglycotide (160 mg/kg) administered orally as a single daily dose. After a 30 day pretreatment with both doses of cimetidine, gastric acid secretion was inhibited and the pylorus spasmogenic activity induced by caerulein was enhanced. The gastric effects of the peptide were not modified by pirenzepine pretreatment while an antisecretory action was shown by sulglycotide after the completion of prolonged treatment (60 days). The ulcers were significantly reduced by cimetidine (low dose) and sulglycotide after 30 day pretreatment. The effects are more likely to be related to the treatment than to the presence of the drugs on gastric receptors.

  12. A case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a Shih Tzu dog: successful treatment of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Chun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jee, Cho-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Moon, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Cho, Kyu-Woan; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2014-07-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu dog was referred to us, because of chronic vomiting. The patient's hematological, radiographic, ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological examinations were evaluated for diagnosis. Hematologic analysis indicated moderate anemia and azotemia. Based on the imaging studies, an oval-shaped mass was identified in the gastric pylorus area. A proliferative mass was found on endoscopic examination, and we performed biopsy using grasping forceps. The histopathological findings of the biopsy specimens indicated hypertrophic gastritis, and Y-U pyloroplasty was performed. However, histopathological examination of the surgically resected mass revealed tubular adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Then, carboplatin chemotherapy was performed 4 times for 13 weeks. Clinical signs, such as vomiting, were resolved gradually after surgery and chemotherapy, and the patient's condition was managed favorably until recently (30 months after surgery). This case report describes clinical features, imaging studies, endoscopic characteristics and histopathological and immunohistochemical features of gastric tubular adenocarcinoma as early gastric cancer in a dog.

  13. Endoscopic diagnosis in Ascaris lumbricoides case with pyloric obstruction.

    PubMed

    Peker, Kemal; Kılıç, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the largest and most prevalent helminth seen in the human body. Ascariasis having high morbidity and mortality causes a unique type of intestinal obstruction with specific problems. This is probably due to reduced intestinal absorption and luminal obstruction, which can lead to anorexia and blockage of the absorbing surface. It affects humans especially in developing countries. This essay presented a 78-year-old female case had severe abdominal pain, nausea and constipation for seven days and the pylorus was obstructed by A. lumbricoides and diagnosis was obtained by endoscopy. During endoscopy in the treatment, the ascariasis that could be removed was. Afterwards, 100 mg mebendazole was given for 3 days once in two months.The purpose of the presentation of this case is that it is seen in advanced ages and it sets us thinking of stomach tumor due to its obstruction and anemia clinic.

  14. Intraoperative thermal imaging in esophageal replacement: its use in the assessment of gastric tube viability.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Katsunori; Matsudaira, Hideki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Ryouji; Hanyuu, Nobuyoshi; Iwabuchi, Shuuichi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We examined the use of intraoperative thermal imaging to assess the gastric vascularization and gastric tube viability during esophagectomy. The surface temperatures of the intact stomach, devascularized stomach, and gastric tube were measured in 13 patients from the proximal end to the pylorus longitudinally along the greater curvature or along the entire gastric tube during esophagectomy. Thermal images clearly demonstrated a surface temperature decline in the proximal region of the gastric tube. The mean decline rate in the surface temperature in the proximal region of the gastric tube in comparison to the intact stomach was 17.7% (P < 0.001). One patient who developed gastric tube necrosis exhibited a prominent drop in the surface temperature in the proximal region of 20.6% in comparison to that in the distal region, compared to that of 12.5% in other patients. Intraoperative thermal imaging is a noninvasive and reliable technique for the assessment of the gastric tube viability.

  15. Neopylorus: a functional reflux-free gastroenteral anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Eloff, S J

    1992-10-01

    To minimize the loss of pyloric function associated with partial gastrectomy (PG), a functional surrogate pylorus, or neopylorus, was made by means of a pantaloon jejunoplastic pouch into which the gastrojejunal stoma was invaginated. This report concerns a consecutive series of 84 patients who underwent PG according to currently accepted criteria. The results showed that formation of the neopylorus apparently prevents dumping and may avoid the necessity for vagotomy in cases without serious hypersecretion. PG patients with a neopylorus formed over 13 years ago still exhibit no enterogastric reflux, gastritis, anaemia, steatorrhoea or sequelae of impaired digestion. Patient satisfaction has been most encouraging. Because this report is a feasibility trial only, no statistical analysis is presented.

  16. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency.

  17. Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation involving adjacent duodenum with gastrointestinal bleeding: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Eiji; Aimoto, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Katsuno, Akira; Chou, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao; Ono, Shinpei; Ishii, Nobuaki; Miyake, Kazumasa; Fujimori, Shunji; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-12-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with the symptoms of palpitation, dyspnea, and tarry stool. Upper gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed submucosal lesions with vascular ectasia in the second part of the duodenum. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) detected a hypervascular lesion in the pancreatic head and the duodenum. Selective angiography showed proliferation of a vascular network and early filling of the portal vein at the early arterial phase. With a diagnosis of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM), we performed pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. At laparotomy, localized and meandering vessels were seen on the surface of the head of the pancreas. Histological examination showed dilated tortuous vessels accompanied by severed elastic fibers in the vessel media and blood clot formation. The incidence of pancreatic AVM remains extremely low, and recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent complication. To prevent recurrent bleeding and progressive portal hypertension, surgery may be the definitive management of symptomatic AVM.

  18. Gastric mucosal damage induced by nonsalicylate nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in rats is mediated systemically.

    PubMed

    Skeljo, M V; Giraud, A S; Yeomans, N D

    1993-11-01

    The gastric toxicities of an enteric-coated formulation and conventional indomethacin were compared in rats. Both formulations were equally damaging to the mucosa, suggesting that topical damage was not the major route of injury. The importance of systemically mediated damage was further determined by gastrotoxicity dose-response curves and pyloric ligation experiments in which indomethacin was administered either orally or parenterally, or into stomach or duodenum with the pylorus occluded. Gastric damage was significantly higher in those groups that had received the drug parenterally or intraduodenally. The extent of deeper mucosal damage, assessed histologically, was greater in parenterally dosed rats. In further experiments, oral and parenteral routes of administration of two other nonsalicylate NSAIDs, naproxen and sodium diclofenac, were found to be equally damaging to the mucosa. Our results show that indomethacin-induced gastric damage, unlike aspirin injury, is mediated mainly systemically. Enteric-coating may not be a useful strategy in reducing gastric injury by nonsalicylate, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  19. Postoperative recurrence of an IPMN of the pancreas with a fistula to the stomach.

    PubMed

    Uesato, Masaya; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Aoki, Taito; Akai, Takashi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Tanizawa, Tohru; Miyazaki, Masaru; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2010-10-16

    We report on a case of a 74 year old man who was diagnosed with a recurrence of non-invasive carcinoma of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (non-invasive IPMN) by postoperative gastroscopy (GS). A pylorus preserving pancreatico duodenectomy for IPMN in the pancreatic head was performed. A histopathological study revealed non-invasive adenocarcinoma. At first, the local recurrence of the tumor around the superior mesenteric artery circumference was diagnosed and disappeared with gemcitabine. Later, the GS showed the elevated lesion with mucin hypersecretion in the remnant stomach. The lesion had a central dip and a fistula common to the pancreas was confirmed on fisterography. We diagnosed a recurrence of IPMN and administered chemotherapy again. However, he died of his original illness. There are no reports of postoperative recurrence of IPMN checked by GS. It should be remembered that the elevated lesion of the remnant stomach is considered as one of the recurrent patterns of IPMN.

  20. Gastroprotective effects of hydroethanolic root extract of Arrabidaea brachypoda: Evidences of cytoprotection and isolation of unusual glycosylated polyphenols.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Claudia Quintino; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Kitano, Bruna Tiemi; Ghilardi, Amanda Franceschini; Luiz Ferreira, Anderson; de Almeida, Ana Cristina Alves; Dunder, Ricardo José; Souza-Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; Hamburger, Matthias; Vilegas, Wagner; Queiroz, Emerson Ferreira; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The hydroethanolic root extract of Arrabidaea brachypoda, from Bignoniaceae family, a Brazilian medicinal plant, demonstrated significant in vivo gastroprotective effects using different in vivo assays. The activity was evaluated in several models of experimental gastric ulcer in rats (absolute ethanol, glutathione depletion, nitric oxide depletion, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, pylorus ligation and acetic acid). Using 300 mg/kg (p.o.) the extract significantly reduced gastric injury in all models. In depth phytochemical investigation of this extract led to the isolation of two previously undescribed phenylethanoid glycosides derivatives and seven unusual glycosylated dimeric flavonoids. The structures were elucidated using UV, NMR and HRMS analysis. Absolute configuration of the dimeric flavonoids was performed by electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy.

  1. [Secretory activity of the stomach during modeling of increased filling of abdominal veins].

    PubMed

    Afonin, B V; Goncharova, N P

    2009-01-01

    Determination of the stomach secretory activity and ultrasonic investigation of the gastroduodenal organs and vessels were performed in test-subjects tilted at -12 degrees and -15 degrees. Short HDT(12-24 hrs.) as a hypokinesia factor was minimized which caused enlargement of the parenchymatous and thickening of walls of the hollow organs. Increased filling of the abdominal veins was paralleled by rise in pepsinogen levels in blood and urine, and increase in the intravitelline content in fasting subjects. Elevated tone of the pylorus and retarded evacuation from the stomach indicated active hydrochloric acid secretion. Concurrently, bile and pancreas juices were secreted more profusely and intestinal content in the duodenum increased. It was shown that modeled increase of abdominal vein filling stimulates secretion as by fasting stomach so by the liver and pancreas.

  2. Effect of monotherapy and combination therapy of pantoprazole and aprepitant in gastric esophageal reflux disease in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kamleshwar; Raj, Prince; Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Mukesh; Kaithwas, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of pantoprazole and aprepitant on experimental esophagitis in albino rats. Groups of rats, fasted overnight, received normal saline (3 mL/kg, sham control) or toxic control (3 mL/kg) or pantoprazole (30 mg/kg) or aprepitant (10 mg/kg), or their combinations and were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation. Animals were sacrificed after 8 h and evaluated for the gastric pH, volume of gastric juices, total acidity, esophagitis index, and free acidity. Esophageal tissues were further subjected to estimations of TBARS, GSH, catalase, and SOD. Treatment with pantoprazole and aprepitant significantly inhibited the gastric secretion, total acidity, and esophagitis index. The treatment also helped to restore the altered levels oxidative stress parameters to normal.

  3. Aripiprazole an atypical antipsychotic protects against ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Kadasah, Saeed; Robayan, Abdulrahman Al; Asmary, Saeed Al

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of aripiprazole (ARI) an atypical antipsychotic drug in ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats. ARI (10, 30, 100 mg/kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of male Sprague Dawley rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and serotonin were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ethanol resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a high index of ulcer. Pretreatment with ARI significantly (P < 0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and also resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric secretion, and total acidity in pylorus ligated rats. ARI also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P < 0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited by ARI. Ethanol induced depletion in the levels of serotonin in the gastric tissue were also significantly restored by pretreatment with ARI (p < 0.001). ARI showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against ethanol induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of ARI may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and also due to the restoration of the depleted gastric serotonin levels. PMID:25232384

  4. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL.

  5. Immunoreactivity to cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript in the enteric nervous system of the pig and wild boar stomach.

    PubMed

    Zacharko-Siembida, A; Arciszewski, M B

    2014-02-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a recently discovered peptide inducing strong anxiogenic-like effect. CART distribution and its role(s) at periphery are not well understood. Immunohistochemisty was utilized to investigate the distribution patterns of CART in the stomach of the pig and wild boar. Double immunohistochemisty was applied to elucidate whether CART-immunoreactive (IR) neuronal elements coexpress galanin, substance P (SP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). In the pig stomach, different proportions of CART-IR myenteric neurons were found in the antrum (42.3 ± 3.5%), corpus (18.0 ± 1.9%) and pylorus (33.2 ± 3.0%). CART-IR myeneric neurons were also found in the antrum, corpus and pylorus of the wild boar stomach (41.7 ± 3.2, 36.0 ± 2.2 and 35.8 ± 3.5%; respectively). In both species, none of gastric submucous neurons were CART-IR; however, CART-IR nerve fibres encircled submucous perikarya. In all portions of the pig and wild boar stomach, CART-IR nerve fibres were frequently found in the smooth muscle layer as well as in the lamina muscularis mucosae. In all regions of the pig and wild boar stomach, the expression of galanin and SP was found in CART-IR myenteric neurons and smooth muscle-supplying nerve fibres. CART/NPY coexpression was not found in the porcine stomach; however, in different regions of the wild boar stomach, subpopulations of CART-IR/NPY-IR myenteric neurons were noted. In conclusion, in this study, the existence and distribution patterns of CART in discrete regions of the pig and wild boar stomach were described in details. Colocalization studies revealed that in both animal species, a functional cooperation of CART with several neuropeptides is likely.

  6. Morphometry of myenteric neurons in stomach.

    PubMed

    Saini, Narbada; Gupta, Madhur

    2007-06-01

    The wall of the gastrointestinal tract presents extensive plexuses of nerve fibres and neuronal cell bodies responsible for the modulation of the rhythmic gastrointestinal peristaltic activities, among other functions. One of the most developed ganglionated plexuses of the gastrointestinal tract is the Myenteric plexus located between the inner circular layer and outer longitudinal layer of the smooth muscle tunica. The musculature of fundus, body and pyloric parts of stomach are differently disposed and they perform different functions. Thus the present study was conducted to study the myenteric plexus of all parts of stomach by counting the number of collections of neurons, number of neurons in each collection, diameter and area of the neurons of the plexus. The stomach walls of 1 cm in size were taken from 5 cadavers of medical post mortem cases from Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Chandigarh and were processed for paraffin sections. 5 and 10 micro thick sections were stained with haematoxylin and Eosin and examined under light microscope. Randomly selected sections were photomicrographed using digital camera and morphometrical analysis was done using Image-Pro Express software. Number of collections of neurons was maximum in fundus with an average of 4.521 and each collection on an average contain 5.27 neurons ranging from 1-31, while body had 3.292 collections containing 1-19 neurons (mean: 3.198), pylorus had 3.883 collections of neurons which contained 1-16 neurons (mean: 4.411). The neurons were classified as small, medium and large according to the size of the area of their cell bodies. In this way, 11.3% neurons were found to be small, 69.5% medium and 19.1% large in fundus, 8.7% small, 80.6% medium and 11.2% large in body and 11.1% small, 74.3% medium and 14.5% large in pylorus.

  7. Effect of Brazilian green propolis on experimental gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Muriel Primon; Sousa, João Paulo Barreto; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2007-04-04

    Propolis is a resinous hive product collected by honeybees from plants. The propolis produced in Southeastern of Brazil is known as green propolis because of its color. Modern herbalists recommend its use because it displays antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-ulcer properties. The anti-ulcer activity of green propolis hydroalcoholic crude extract was evaluated by using models of acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol, indomethacin and stress in rats. Moreover, the effects of extract on gastric content volume, pH and total acidity, using pylorus ligated model were evaluated. Animals pretreated with propolis hydroalcoholic crude extract (50, 250 and 500 mg/kg) showed a significant reduction in lesion index, total affected area and percentage of lesion in comparison with control group (p<0.05) in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. Green propolis extract, at a higher dose (500 mg/kg), displayed a significant protection by reducing (p<0.05) the evaluated parameters in the gastric ulceration induced by indomethacin. In the stress-induced ulcer model it was observed a significant reduction (p<0.05) in those parameters in animals treated with green propolis extract (250 and 500 mg/kg). Regarding the pylorus ligated model it was observed that green propolis extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) displayed an anti-secretory activity, which lead to a reduction in the gastric juice volume, total acidity and pH. These findings indicate that Brazilian green propolis displays good anti-ulcer activity, corroborating the folk use of propolis preparations, and contributing for its pharmacological validation.

  8. Interferon-inducer polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid: a potent anti-gastric ulcer agent and inhibitor of the gastric proton pump in rats.

    PubMed

    Nath, C; Rastogi, L; Dikshit, M; Patnaik, G K; Saxena, R C; Gupta, M B

    1998-01-01

    1. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (Poly I:Poly C), an interferon inducer was studied for its effect on gastric ulceration in rats. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.m.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric ulcers induced by aspirin, cold restraint stress and pylorus ligation (Shay's model). Protective dose (PD50) +/- SEM values of Poly I:Poly C on these models of ulcers were 1.9 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 (mg/kg, i.m.) respectively. 2. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (10-60 micrograms) produced dose-dependent inhibition of gastric proton pump (H+/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the gastric parietal microsomal fraction. The concentration of Poly I:Poly C causing a 50% inhibition (IC50) +/- SEM was found to be 17.6 +/- 1.2 micrograms. 3. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid caused a significant decrease in free and total acid and pepsin and an increase in mucin content in Shay (pylorus-ligated) rat. 4. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid did not exert a significant influence on isolated tissue preparations for anti-cholinergic (acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum) and H2-anti-histaminic (histamine-induced contraction of rat uterus and guinea-pig auricle) activities. 5. Thus, the present study indicates that Poly I:Poly C may possess anti-gastric ulcer activity as a result of inhibition of the gastric proton pump.

  9. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity.

  10. Combination of Five Body Positions Can Effectively Improve the Rate of Gastric Mucosa's Complete Visualization by Applying Magnetic-Guided Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuting; Wu, Sheng; Wang, Qi; Wei, Lumin; Wu, Wei; Wang, Lifu; Chu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Achieving a comprehensive view of gastric mucosa has been a challenge for magnetic-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) for years. This study works on optimizing the performance of MGCE by changing the conventional positions to the five body positions. Methods. Sixty patients were enrolled in the study and underwent MGCE. All patients were asked to adopt five body positions (left lateral, supine, right lateral, knee-chest, and sitting). In each position, the ability to visualize the six gastric landmarks (cardia, fundus, body, angulus, antrum, and pylorus) was assessed. Rates of complete visualization were calculated for different position combinations. Results. Supine position was the best for cardia and body visualization (91.7% and 86.7%, resp., p < 0.001). Left lateral position was the best for fundus visualization (91.7%, p < 0.001). Knee-chest position was the best for angulus observation (80.0%, p < 0.001). Right lateral and sitting positions were the best for antrum observation (88.3% and 90.0%, resp., p < 0.001). Right lateral position was the best for pylorus observation (81.7%, p < 0.001). The supine + right lateral + knee-chest combination achieved better angulus visualization than conventional 3-position combination (93.3% versus 63.3%, p < 0.001). Five-position combination significantly improved the comprehensive gastric landmark visualization (93.3%, p < 0.001). Conclusion. Compared with 3-position combination, 5-position combination should be adopted for gastric mucosal visualization by MGCE.

  11. Clinical significance of pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sisir Kumar

    2009-04-01

    Despite so much contributions reported in the literature, the aetiology of the duodenal ulcer remains an enigmatic subject to the medical profession. Findings of Helicobacter pylori seem to have overshadowed the real issue, in that, how a small area of the duodenal mucosa could be inflicted with the acid-pepsin injury has not been questioned? One hundred and sixty-eight consecutive patients, presented with epigastric pain were included in the endoscopic study. The aim of the study was to find out the prevalence and its clinical importance on the sizes of the pyloric aperture in the aetiology of peptic ulcer disease. Demographic data on the sizes of the pyloric aperture were divided into two groups, in that, those up to 3 mm in diameter were included in one and those over the size of 3 mm in another. Among the 168 cases, the gastric ulcer was found in 12 and duodenal ulcer in 27 patients. The sex ratio of men to women was 1.4:1 found in the former and 8:1 in the latter. Among other findings, a knuckle of duodenal mucoa was noticed prolapsing through the large pyloric aperture. It could be postulated that a knuckle of the mucosa that keeps peeping through the pylorus acts as a mucosal plug in empty stomach, like a cork in the acid bottle. The main physiological function is to protect the mucosa from being damaged by the acid-pepsin injury or by the reflux of bile, but the tip of the plug seems to be subjected to such injury. Furthermore, the surface epithelial cells could also be subjected to ischaemic change while prolapsing through the pylorus. This may lead to reduced production of the mucosal gel and bicarbonate secretion, thus exposing the damaged mucosa to acid bath. This supports the concept, how a small area of the stomach or duodenum could be inflicted with ulceration.

  12. Entrainment of intestinal slow waves with electrical stimulation using intraluminal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Hayes, J; Peters, L J; Chen, J D

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the intestinal stimulation would be feasible using a less invasive method: intraluminal electrodes. The study was performed in nine healthy hound dogs (15-26 kg). Four pairs of electrodes were implanted on the serosa of the jejunum at an interval of 5 cm with the most proximal pair 35 cm beyond the pylorus. An intestinal fistula was made 20 cm beyond the pylorus. Simultaneous recordings of intestinal myoelectrical activity were made for 2 h in the fasting state from both intraluminal and serosal electrodes. Various pacing parameters were tested. The frequency of the intestinal slow wave recorded from the intraluminal electrodes was identical to that from the serosal electrodes (18.78+/-0.3 cpm vs 18.75+/-0.3 cpm, r=0.99, p <0.001), and so was the percentage of normal 17-22 cycles/ min waves (95.83+/-3.9% vs 98.16+/-1.33%, r=0.96, p<0.01). A complete entrainment of the intestinal slow wave was achieved in every dog with electrical stimulation using intraluminal ring electrodes. The effective pacing parameters were pulse width of 70 ms, amplitude of 4 mA and frequency of 1.1 IF (intrinsic frequency). The time required for the entrainment of the intestinal slow wave with intraluminal pacing was 25.0+/-2.1 s. The maximum driven frequency was found to be 1.43+/-0.01 IF. The results reveal that intraluminal pacing is an effective and efficient method for the entrainment of intestinal slow waves. It may become a potential approach for the treatment of intestinal motor disorders associated with myoelectrical abnormalities.

  13. Combination of Five Body Positions Can Effectively Improve the Rate of Gastric Mucosa's Complete Visualization by Applying Magnetic-Guided Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Wang, Qi; Wei, Lumin; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Achieving a comprehensive view of gastric mucosa has been a challenge for magnetic-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) for years. This study works on optimizing the performance of MGCE by changing the conventional positions to the five body positions. Methods. Sixty patients were enrolled in the study and underwent MGCE. All patients were asked to adopt five body positions (left lateral, supine, right lateral, knee-chest, and sitting). In each position, the ability to visualize the six gastric landmarks (cardia, fundus, body, angulus, antrum, and pylorus) was assessed. Rates of complete visualization were calculated for different position combinations. Results. Supine position was the best for cardia and body visualization (91.7% and 86.7%, resp., p < 0.001). Left lateral position was the best for fundus visualization (91.7%, p < 0.001). Knee-chest position was the best for angulus observation (80.0%, p < 0.001). Right lateral and sitting positions were the best for antrum observation (88.3% and 90.0%, resp., p < 0.001). Right lateral position was the best for pylorus observation (81.7%, p < 0.001). The supine + right lateral + knee-chest combination achieved better angulus visualization than conventional 3-position combination (93.3% versus 63.3%, p < 0.001). Five-position combination significantly improved the comprehensive gastric landmark visualization (93.3%, p < 0.001). Conclusion. Compared with 3-position combination, 5-position combination should be adopted for gastric mucosal visualization by MGCE. PMID:28018426

  14. The Protective Potential of Phyllanthus niruri and Corilagin on Gastric Lesions Induced in Rodents by Different Harmful Agents.

    PubMed

    Klein-Júnior, Luiz C; da Silva, Luísa Mota; Boeing, Thaise; Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Beber, Ana P; Rocha, Jady A R; Henriques, Amélia T; Andrade, Sérgio F; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir

    2017-01-01

    The gastroprotective effect of the methanol extract of Phyllantus niruri and its main constituent, corilagin, were studied in vivo. The extract (50, 125, or 250 mg/kg, p. o.) inhibited ethanol-induced lesions in rats by 43 % (p < 0.001), 69 % (p < 0.001), and 99 % (p < 0.001), respectively. It also inhibited the formation of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers in rats by 80 % (p < 0.01), 89 % (p < 0.01), and 97 % (p < 0.01). A decrease in lipid hydroperoxide levels (p < 0.01) and in myeloperoxidase activity (p < 0.05) evidenced a reduction of oxidative damage and neutrophil infiltration in gastric tissues from ulcerated mice using ethanol/HCl. Potent in vitro free radical scavenger activity (IC50 = 0.07) using the DPPH assay was observed. In contrast, the extract (250 mg/kg, i. d.) did not show antisecretory activity in pylorus-ligated rats, and also failed to inhibit the H(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro. However, in pylorus-ligated rats, the extract (50, 125, and 250 mg/kg, i. d.) increased adhered mucus content by 22 % (p < 0.05), 28 % (p < 0.01), and 38 % (p < 0.01), respectively. The involvement of prostaglandins, nonprotein endogenous sulfhydryl compounds, α2-receptors, and endogenous nitric oxide in the gastroprotection elicited by the extract was also evaluated. Finally, corilagin reduced the lesion area of ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in mice by 88 % (30 mg/kg, p. o.; p < 0.001). Based on these results, it has been concluded that P. niruri methanol extract possesses gastroprotective activity by different and complementary pathways, which together promote an improvement in gastric cytoprotection. The presence of corilagin may partially explain the effectiveness of the extract against gastric damage.

  15. Berberine protects against esophageal mucosal damage in reflux esophagitis by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    CHOO, BYUNG KIL; ROH, SEONG-SOO

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of berberine (BB) in a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), induced by pylorus and forestomach ligation. We evaluated cytotoxicity and proinflammatory biomarkers (nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-1β and prostaglandin E2) in RAW 264.7 cells in vitro and anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. A total of 54 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: intact control rats; reflux esophagitis (RE) control rats; RE rats treated with 20 mg/kg omeprazole and RE rats treated with BB at doses of 20, 40 and 60 mg/kg, respectively. All rats were fasted. RE was induced by pylorus and forestomach ligation one hour subsequent to the oral treatment. Six hours subsequent to the surgery, the rats were sacrificed, blood was collected from the abdominal vein and the esophagus and stomach were dissected. The gastric volume and the pH of the gastric juice were evaluated, prior to the esophagus being cut longitudinally and an inner mucosal area being imaged, to analyze mucosal damage indices. Proinflammatory biomarkers in the serum, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, while the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 was analyzed using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Esophagic tissue damage in the BB groups was dose-dependently decreased compared with that in the RE control group. This result was consistent with significant reductions in the levels of proinflammatory biomarkers in the serum and in the expression of proinflammatory mRNA, specifically, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and PAI-1. The results suggest that the anti-inflammatory and protective effects of BB may attenuate the severity of RE and prevent esophageal mucosal damage, in addition to validating the use of BB as a pharmacological treatment for esophageal reflux disease

  16. Perioperative Evaluation of Patient Outcomes after Severe Acid Corrosive Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ho; Wu, Han-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed 64 patients with perforation or full-thickness injury of the alimentary tract after acid ingestion. Based on our classification of laparotomy findings, there were class I (n = 15); class II (n = 13); class III (n = 16); and class IV (n = 20). Study parameters were preoperative laboratory data, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, and extension of the injury. End points of the study were the patients' mortality and length of hospital stay. All these patients underwent esophagogastrectomy with (n = 16) or without (n = 24) concomitant resection, esophagogastroduodenojejunectomy with (n = 4) or without (n = 13) concomitant resection, and laparotomy only (n = 7). Concomitant resections were performed on the spleen (n = 10), colon (n = 2), pancreas (n = 1), gall bladder (n = 1), skipped areas of jejunum (n = 4), and the first portion of the duodenum (n = 4). The study demonstrates five preoperative risk factors, female gender, shock status, shock index, pH value, and base deficit, and four intraoperative risk factors, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, injury beyond the pylorus, and continuous involvement of the jejunum over a length of 50 cm. The overall mortality rate was 45.3%, which increased significantly with advancing class of corrosive injury. PMID:26582190

  17. Role of putative neurotransmitters in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Puurunen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The role of putative neurotransmitters of the central nervous system in the central gastric antisecretory effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. Pretreatment of the rats with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) prevented the antisecretory effect of the i.c.v. administration of PGE2, whereas pretreatment with 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT) plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) had no effect. I.c.v.-administered phentolamine and idazoxan antagonized the inhibition of gastric secretion induced by i.c.v. PGE2, whereas prazosin, propranolol and sulpiride injected via the same route were ineffective. Diphenhydramine, cimetidine, naloxone and theophylline, all administered i.c.v., did not modify the antisecretory effect of i.c.v. PGE2. The results suggest that an activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the brain is involved in the central gastric antisecretory effect of PGE2, whereas neither central 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, alpha 1- or beta-adrenoceptors, D2-dopamine receptors, histamine or opioid receptors nor adenosine seem to play any role here. PMID:2862940

  18. Gross anatomy of the intestine and its mesentery in the nutria (Myocastor coypus).

    PubMed

    Pérez, W; Lima, M; Bielli, A

    2008-11-01

    The intestines and mesentery of the nutria (Myocastor coypus) have not been fully described. In the present study 30 adult nutrias were studied using gross dissection. The small intestine was divided into the duodenum, jejunum and ileum as usual. The duodenum started at the pylorus with a cranial portion, which dilated forming a duodenal ampulla. The ileum was located within the concavity of the caecum and attached to the coiled caecum by means of the iliocaecal fold. The ascending colon had two ansae, one proximal and one distal. The proximal ansa was fixed to the caecum by the caecocolic fold. The base of the caecum and a short proximal part of the ascending colon belonging to the proximal ansa were attached to the mesoduodenum descendens. The distal ansa of the ascending colon had a proximal part which was sacculated and a distal part which was smooth. The two parts of the distal ansa of the ascending colon were parallel and joined by a flexure of variable localisation. The smooth part of the distal ansa of the ascending colon was attached to the initial portion of the descending colon by a peritoneal fold. The short transverse colon was directly attached to the mesoduodenum and greater omentum. In conclusion, we have described the anatomy of the intestines of the nutria and its mesentery in detail, and provided a nomenclature list adapted to the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria.

  19. Fluid mechanical consequences of pendular activity, segmentation and pyloric outflow in the proximal duodenum of the rat and the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    de Loubens, Clément; Lentle, Roger G; Love, Richard J; Hulls, Corrin; Janssen, Patrick W M

    2013-06-06

    We conducted numerical experiments to study the influence of non-propagating longitudinal and circular contractions, i.e. pendular activity and segmentation, respectively, on flow and mixing in the proximal duodenum. A lattice-Boltzmann numerical method was developed to simulate the fluid mechanical consequences for each of 22 randomly selected sequences of high-definition video of real longitudinal and radial contractile activity in the isolated proximal duodenum of the rat and guinea pig. During pendular activity in the rat duodenum, the flow was characterized by regions of high shear rate. Mixing was so governed by shearing deformation of the fluid that increased the interface between adjacent domains and accelerated their inter-diffusion (for diffusion coefficients approx. less than 10(-8) m² s(-1)). When pendular activity was associated with a slow gastric outflow characteristic of post-prandial period, the dispersion was also improved, especially near the walls. Mixing was not promoted by isolated segmentative contractions in the guinea pig duodenum and not notably influenced by pylorus outflow. We concluded that pendular activity generates mixing of viscous fluids 'in situ' and accelerates the diffusive mass transfer, whereas segmentation may be more important in mixing particulate suspensions with high solid volume ratios.

  20. Gastric flow and mixing studied using computer simulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Anupam; Indireshkumar, Keshavamurthy; Schwizer, Werner; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Fried, Michael; Brasseur, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The fed human stomach displays regular peristaltic contraction waves that originate in the proximal antrum and propagate to the pylorus. High-resolution concurrent manometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the stomach suggest a primary function of antral contraction wave (ACW) activity unrelated to gastric emptying. Detailed evaluation is difficult, however, in vivo. Here we analyse the role of ACW activity on intragastric fluid motions, pressure, and mixing with computer simulation. A two-dimensional computer model of the stomach was developed with the 'lattice-Boltzmann' numerical method from the laws of physics, and stomach geometry modelled from MRI. Time changes in gastric volume were specified to match global physiological rates of nutrient liquid emptying. The simulations predicted two basic fluid motions: retrograde 'jets' through ACWs, and circulatory flow between ACWs, both of which contribute to mixing. A well-defined 'zone of mixing', confined to the antrum, was created by the ACWs, with mixing motions enhanced by multiple and narrower ACWs. The simulations also predicted contraction-induced peristaltic pressure waves in the distal antrum consistent with manometric measurements, but with a much lower pressure amplitude than manometric data, indicating that manometric pressure amplitudes reflect direct contact of the catheter with the gastric wall. We conclude that the ACWs are central to gastric mixing, and may also play an indirect role in gastric emptying through local alterations in common cavity pressure. PMID:15615685

  1. Comparative antidiarrheal and antiulcer effect of the aqueous and ethanolic stem bark extracts of Tinospora cordifolia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mohanjit; Singh, Amarjeet; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2014-01-01

    Tinospora cordifolia is indigenous to the tropical areas of India, Myanmar and Sri Lanka. The use of plant as remedy for diarrhea and ulcer is well-documented in Ayurvedic system of medicine. However, pharmacological evidence does not exist to substantiate its therapeutic efficacy for the same. The aim was to investigate the antidiarrheal and antiulcer activity of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of T. cordifolia in rats. The antidiarrheal activity of T. cordifolia extracts was evaluated by castor oil and magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea using parameters such as onset of diarrhea, number of wet stools, total number of stool and weight of total number of stools. The antiulcer activity of extracts was investigated using ethanol and pylorus ligation-induced ulcer. Furthermore, tissue antioxidant parameters such as reduced glutathione, catalase activity and lipid peroxidation level were also investigated. Tinospora cordifolia extracts were more efficacious in reducing number of total stools in both the models of diarrhea and showed a dose-dependent antidiarrheal effect. The antiulcer activity of the extracts was confirmed by a reduction in ulcer index along with the decrease in gastric volume, total acidity, and an increase in pH of gastric content in both the models. The obtained results have established a pharmacological evidence for the folkloric use of the T. cordifolia as antidiarrhoeal and antiulcer agent. PMID:25126533

  2. [Gastroduodenal mucosa sensitivity to estrogen in ulcers complicated by hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Duzhiy, I D; Romanyuk, A M; Kharchenko, S V; Moskalenko, R A; Pyatykop, G I; Lyndin, M S

    2015-02-01

    Expression of alpha-receptors of estrogen (RE) in accordance to immunohistochemical (IHC) labeling in gastroduodenal mucosa cells was studied up in patients, suffering the ulcer disease and without it. In 4 patients (group I) a gastroduodenal mucosa affection was revealed, they were operated on for hemorrhage from gastroduodenal ulcers; in 3 patients (group II) gastroduodenal mucosa affection was not observed; in 4 patients (group III, control), a mammary gland cancer was diagnosed, a positive reaction on alpha-RE was noted. In groups I and II the biopsies were studied, obtained from pylorus and gastric fundus, as well as from duodenal ampula, and in a group III--obtained from the tumor. In a control group a positive labeling of nuclei was revealed in biopsies. In patients of groups I and II the alpha-RE expression by cellular nuclei was not revealed, but, the lots of positive IHC labeling of cytoplasm in glandular and stromal mucosal cells of the investigated gut were noted. Positive IHC labeling of cytoplasm for alpha-RE witnesses about sensitivity to them in norma and pathological processes. But, a trustworthy difference of alpha-RE expression by cellular nuclei was not noted. For confirmation or denial of this hypothesis further clinical and IHC investigations are needed.

  3. Diagnostic and treatment modalities for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Atul S; Palazzo, Francesco; Chung, Joanne; Hager, Eric; Abdollahi, Hamid; Yeo, Charles J

    2006-09-01

    Since the recognition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) as a clinical entity, many advances have been made in defining clinical, radiologic, histologic, and laboratory parameters to assist in a complete definition of the disease. Despite all these efforts, a preoperative diagnosis still remains a clinical challenge but is of paramount importance, as these cases have been reported to be steroid-responsive; therefore, early treatment may obviate the need for surgical resection. Although the utilization of recently proposed guidelines by the Japanese Pancreas Society and an Italian study group may further assist the clinician and prompt the initiation of steroid treatment, the response to therapy should be observed within 2 to 4 weeks and reflected in progressive resolution of the presenting radiologic and laboratory abnormalities. Should these fail to demonstrate improvement, the diagnosis of AIP should undergo re-evaluation, and consideration for surgical exploration should be made, as the patient may be harboring a malignancy. Surgical resection in the form of pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy remains the optimal solution in the attempt to clarify the diagnosis and offer treatment with low complication rates.

  4. The anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Icardo, José M; Wong, Wai P; Colvee, Elvira; Loong, Ai M; Ip, Yuen K

    2010-07-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens is a composite, which includes the gut, the spleen, and the pancreas. The gut is formed by a short oesophagus, a longitudinal stomach, a pyloric valve, a spiraling intestine, and a cloaca. Coiling of the intestine begins dorsally below the pylorus, winding down to form six complete turns before ending into the cloaca. A reticular tissue of undisclosed nature accompanies the winding of the intestinal mucosa. The spleen is located along the right side of the stomach, overlapping the cranial end of the pancreas. The pancreas occupies the shallow area, which indicates on the gut dorsal side the beginning of the intestine coiling. In addition, up to 25 lymphatic-like nodes accompany the inner border of the spiral valve. The mesenteric artery forms a long axis for the intestine. All the components of the gastrointestinal tract are attached to each other by connective sheaths, and are wrapped by connective tissue, and by the serosa externally. We believe that several previous observations have been misinterpreted and that the anatomy of the lungfish gut is more similar among all the three lungfish genera than previously thought. Curiously, the gross anatomical organization is not modified during aestivation. We hypothesize that the absence of function is accompanied by structural modifications of the epithelium, and are currently investigating this possibility.

  5. Pyloric obstruction secondary to epicardial pacemaker implantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bedoya Nader, G; Kellihan, H B; Bjorling, D E; McAnulty, J

    2017-02-01

    A 10-year old Lhasa Apso dog was presented for an acute history of exercise intolerance and hind limb weakness. High grade second degree atrioventricular block with an atrial rate of 200 beats per minute, ventricular rate of 40 beats per minute and an intermittent ventricular escape rhythm, was diagnosed on electrocardiograph. A transdiaphragmatic, unipolar, epicardial pacemaker was implanted without immediate surgical complications. Severe vomiting was noted 12 h post-operatively. Abdominal ultrasound and a barium study supported a diagnosis of pyloric outflow obstruction and exploratory abdominal surgery was performed. The pyloric outflow tract appeared normal and no other causes of an outflow obstruction were identified. The epicardial generator was repositioned from the right to the left abdominal wall. Pyloric cell pacing was presumed to be the cause for the pyloric obstruction and severe vomiting, and this was thought to be due to close proximity of the pacemaker generator to the pylorus situated in the right abdominal wall. Repositioning of the pulse generator to the left abdominal wall resulted in resolution of vomiting.

  6. Morphogenesis and three-dimensional movement of the stomach during the human embryonic period.

    PubMed

    Kaigai, N; Nako, A; Yamada, S; Uwabe, C; Kose, K; Takakuwa, T

    2014-05-01

    The stomach develops as the local widening of the foregut after Carnegie stage (CS) 13 that moves in a dramatic and dynamic manner during the embryonic period. Using the magnetic resonance images of 377 human embryos, we present the morphology, morphometry, and three-dimensional movement of the stomach during CS16 and CS23. The stomach morphology revealed stage-specific features. The angular incisura and the cardia were formed at CS18. The change in the angular incisura angle was approximately 90° during CS19 and CS20, and was <90° after CS 21. The prominent formations of the fundus and the pylorus differentiate at around CS20. Morphometry of the stomach revealed that the stomach gradually becomes "deflected" during development. The stomach may appear to move to the left laterally and caudally due to its deflection and differential growth. The track of the reference points in the stomach may reflect the visual three-dimensional movement. The movement of point M, representing the movement of the greater curvature, was different from that of points C (cardia) and P (pyloric antrum). The P and C were located just around the midsagittal plane in all the stages observed. Point M moved in the caudal-left lateral direction until CS22. Moreover, the vector CP does not rotate around the dorsoventral axis, as widely believed, but around the transverse axis. The plane CPM rotated mainly around the longitudinal axis. The data obtained will be useful for prenatal diagnosis in the near future.

  7. Histamine delays gastric emptying of solid food in man through histamine, receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Lange, R.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have shown that histamine (H) contracts the cat pylorus and duodenum through H/sub 1/ receptor mechanisms. The authors investigated the effect of H infusion on gastric emptying (GE) and the role of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptor blockade in healthy volunteers. Radionuclide GE studies were performed using chicken liver labeled in vivo with /sup 99m/Technetium-sulfur colloid as a marker of solid food. Study days were as follows: a baseline GE study (Day 1); H infused continuously IV at a rate of 40 ..mu..g/kg/hr during the GE study (Day 2); an IV bolus of 50 mg of diphenhydramine (Day 3), or 300 mg cimetidine (Day 4) given just prior to the continuous infusion of H; a final day when cimetidine was given alone (Day 5). GE was monitored for 2 hours on each day. The results of days 1, 2 and 3 are summarized below (+p<0.05 vs baseline or Day 1). Pretreatment with cimetidine (Day 4) augmented the delay in GE induced by H infusion, while cimetidine without H (Day 5) had no effect on GE. The authors conclude that: 1) H given at a dose which elicits maximal acid secretory response in man significantly delays GE; and 2) H/sub 1/ receptor blockade but not H/sub 2/ blockade prevented this effect. Histamine may play a modulatory role in human gastric emptying through an H/sub 1/ receptor mechanism.

  8. Structural modification of H/sub 2/-receptor antagonists provide post-H/sub 2/-receptor gastric antisecretory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, S.T.; Dove, P.A.; Strike, D.P.; Schiehser, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    In the course of investigations into the gastric antisecretory activity of potential H/sub 2/-receptor antagonists, examples were discovered in which structural modification of the molecule altered a) antisecretory activity in the pylorus-ligated rat and b) the response to various stimulants of (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine (AP) uptake in isolated rat gastric mucosal cell preparations. Wy-45,662 (N-(3-(3-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy)propyl)thieno(3,4-d) isothiazol-3-amine 1, 1-dioxide)), a very potent histamine H/sub 2/-antagonist and antisecretory agent in the rat (ED/sub 50/ (approx.) 0.3 mg/kg), had no effect in vitro at 1 ..mu..M on forskolin-induced (/sup 14/C)AP uptake while 10 nM Wy-45,662 completely suppressed histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP uptake. In contrast, the N-benzylated form of Wy-45,662, Wy-46,499 dose-dependently (10/sup -7/-10/sup -6/M) suppressed forskolin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)AP uptake while retaining modest antisecretory activity (ED/sub 50/approx.8 mg/kg) in vivo. Wy-46,499's modest antisecretory activity was thus attributable to inhibition via a post-histamine H/sub 2/-receptor mechanism.

  9. Antiulcerogenic activity of fractions and 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane isolated from Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae).

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Comunello, Eros; Noldin, Vânia Floriani; Monache, Franco Delle; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo

    2008-01-01

    The hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous-soluble fractions from leaves of Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) were evaluated for their protective actions against ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats. The treatment with all fractions (150 mg/kg) and omeprazol (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced the lesion index, the total lesion area, and the percentage of lesion, in comparison with the control group (p<0.05). Since the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction was found to be most active in the pylorus ligated model, this fraction was further investigated and resulted in the isolation of triterpene 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane. The triterpene was evaluated in the HCl/ethanol-induced ulcer model in mice. In this assay, both the groups treated with 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane and omeprazol, at a dose of 30 mg/kg, presented a significant reduction in lesion index, total lesion area, and in the percentage of the lesion, when compared with the control group (p<0.05). The result suggests that the antiulcer effect observed in the extract and fractions may be attributed, at least in part, to this compound. Further experiments are underway to determine which antiulcer mechanisms involved in gastroprotection.

  10. Effects of cisapride on ulcer formation and gastric secretion in rats: comparison with ranitidine and omeprazol.

    PubMed

    Alarcón de la Lastra, C; Martin, M J; La Casa, M; López, A; Motilva, V

    1996-12-01

    1. The antiulcerogenic effects of cisapride, a potent benzamide-stimulating gastrointestinal motility agent, were studied on cold-resistant and pylorus-ligated gastric ulcers. Acidity, composition of gastric secretion, and quantitative and qualitative changes on mucus glycoprotein content were also determined. These effects were compared with those of ranitidine (50 mg/kg) and omeprazol (10 mg/kg). 2. Oral cisapride (10-100 mg/kg) dose-relatedly and significantly (P < 0.01, P < 0.05) decreased the severity of the lesions induced by cold-resistant stress. In stressed rats, cisapride increased the amount of mucus secretion and markedly enhanced the glycoprotein content. Morphometric evaluation of mucus secretion revealed a significant increase in both the PAS area (neutral glycoproteins) and Alcian blue area (sulfated glycoproteins). 3. In 4 h pyloric-ligated animals, cisapride (10-100 mg/kg) showed a significant reduction in the number and severity of ulcers (P < 0.01) and histamine concentration (P < 0.01, P < 0.001). In addition, at the highest doses (50-100 mg/kg), cisapride produced a significant decreases in acidity; however, it did not alter the gastric volume secretion or pepsin concentrations. 4. These results suggest that cisapride shows antiulcerogenic effects which could possibly be explained through antisecretory and cytoprotective mechanisms involving an enhancement of cuality and production of gastric mucus.

  11. Gastroprotective effect of cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum Maton. fruits in rats.

    PubMed

    Jamal, A; Javed, Kalim; Aslam, M; Jafri, M A

    2006-01-16

    Cardamom, the fruits of Elettaria cardamomum Maton. (Zingiberaceae) commonly known as "Heel khurd" is used in Unani system of medicine to treat gastrointestinal disorders. A crude methanolic extract (TM), essential oil (EO), petroleum ether soluble (PS) and insoluble (PI) fractions of methanolic extract, were studied in rats at doses of 100-500, 12.5-50, 12.5-150 and 450 mg/kg, respectively for their ability to inhibit the gastric lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol and pylorous ligature. In addition their effects on wall mucus and gastric acid output were recorded. All fractions (TM, EO, PS, PI) significantly inhibited gastric lesions induced by ethanol and aspirin but not those induced by pylorus ligation. TM proved to be active reducing lesions by about 70% in the EtOH-induced ulcer model at 500 mg/kg. The PS fraction reduced the lesions by 50% at 50 and 100mg/kg (no dose response was observed) with similar effect than the PI fraction at 450 mg/kg. In the aspirin-induced gastric ulcer, the best gastroprotective effect was found in the PS fraction, which inhibited lesions by nearly 100% at 12.5mg/kg. In our experimental conditions, the PS extract at doses >or=12.5mg/kg proved to be more active than ranitidine at 50mg/kg.

  12. Microinjection of l-glutamate into the nucleus ambiguus partially inhibits gastric motility through the NMDA receptor - nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Zhao; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Ai, Hong-Bin

    2014-06-01

    We have previously reported that both l-glutamate (l-Glu) and nitric oxide (NO) modulate gastric motility in the nucleus ambiguus (NA). The aim of this study is to explore the potential correlation between the l-Glu and NO. A latex balloon connected to a pressure transducer was inserted into the pylorus through the fundus of anesthetized male Wistar rats to continuously record changes in gastric smooth muscle contractile curves. Pretreatment with the NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methylester (l-NAME) did not completely abolish the inhibitory effect of l-Glu on gastric motility, but intravenous injection of the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium bromide (Hb) did. By using a specific N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, we blocked the inhibitory effect of the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on gastric motility. These results suggest that microinjections of l-Glu into the NA inhibits gastric motility by activating the cholinergic preganglionic neurons, partially through the NMDA receptor - NO pathway.

  13. Analysis of the Distribution of Mucins in Adult Human Gastric Mucosa and Its Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mucins are complex composition of carbohydrates seen in the epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Normal distribution of such mucins in different part of the GIT and its alteration in various inflammatory, benign and malignant lesions of GIT has aroused interest in the field of histochemistry. Aim By applying variety of histochemical techniques an attempt has been made to draw a map of mucin secretion by the different epithelial cell types in different parts of the stomach. Materials and Methods Fifty samples were taken each from different parts of the stomach like fundus, body and pylorus, from dissected fresh specimens (total of 150 specimens). Tissue samples were subjected for routine process and studied for histological and different histochemical staining. Results Mucin pattern in adult predominantly secretes neutral mucosubstances. Surface epithelium shows predominant neutral mucin while cardiac and gastric glands with foveolar cells show moderate amount. Sialomucin is present in a few cells of the surface epithelium, foveolar cells and in most of the mucous neck cells. Small amount of sialomucin and sulphomucin are found in surface epithelial foveolar cells while traces of sulphomucin are found in deep foveolar cells. Mucous neck cells secrete both sulphomucin and sialomucin. Conclusion Normal gastric mucosa adjacent to gastric ulcers and malignant tumours of stomach secretes mucins which differ histochemically and biochemically from that of normal. Early recognition of such changes could be useful in recognizing the different type of carcinomas and their prognosis. PMID:27042436

  14. In-vivo evaluation of apocynin for prevention of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Tessa; Boulet, Gaëlle; van Kerckhoven, Marian; Bogers, Johannes; Thys, Sofie; Vervaet, Chris; Vervaeck, Anouck; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains impacts the efficacy of eradication therapy and promotes the development of alternative treatment strategies. Apocynin inhibits neutrophil NADPH oxidase and hence may decrease reactive oxygen species-mediated tissue damage in H. pylori-infected stomach tissue. Apocynin was tested in vitro for its cytotoxic and direct antibacterial effects. The therapeutic efficacy of orally administered apocynin (100 mg/kg/day through drinking water or 200 mg/kg/day through combined administration of drinking water and slow-release formulation) was assessed at 9 weeks after infection in the Mongolian gerbil model. Bacterial burdens were quantified by viable plate count and quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of antrum and pylorus provided insight into mucosal inflammation and injury. Apocynin showed no cytotoxic or direct antibacterial effects in vitro or in vivo. Nine weeks of apocynin treatment at 200 mg/kg/day reduced active H. pylori gastritis as neutrophil infiltration in the mucous neck region and pit abscess formation decreased significantly. In our gerbil model, prolonged high-dose apocynin treatment significantly improved H. pylori-induced pit abscess formation without indications of drug toxicity and thus further investigation of the dosage regimen and formulation and the long-term impact on neoplastic development should be carried out.

  15. Functional association between proximal and distal gastric motility during fasting and duodenal nutrient stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, N Q; Fraser, R J; Bryant, L K; Holloway, R H

    2007-08-01

    A functional integration exists between proximal and distal gastric motor activity in dogs but has not been demonstrated in humans. To determine the relationship between proximal and distal gastric motor activity in humans. Concurrent proximal (barostat) and distal (antro-pyloro-duodenal (APD) manometry) gastric motility were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers (28 +/- 3 years) during (i) fasting and (ii) two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure((R)) (1 and 2 kcal min(-1)) in random order. Proximal and APD motor activity and the association between fundic and propagated antral waves (PAWs) were determined. During fasting, 32% of fundic waves (FWs) were followed by a PAW. In a dose-dependent fashion, duodenal nutrients (i) increased proximal gastric volume, (ii) reduced fundic and antral wave (total and propagated) activity, and (iii) increased pyloric contractions. The proportion of FWs followed by a distal PAW was similar between both infusions and did not differ from fasting. During nutrient infusion, nearly all PAWs were antegrade, propagated over a shorter distance and less likely to traverse the pylorus, compared with fasting. In humans, a functional association exists between proximal and distal gastric motility during fasting and duodenal nutrient stimulation. This may have a role in optimizing intra-gastric meal distribution.

  16. Semantic and topological classification of images in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Rennert, P.; Juloski, A. L.; Lalande, A.; Angelopoulou, E.; Kuth, R.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-03-01

    Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) is a nascent technology with the goal to allow the steering of a capsule endoscope inside a water filled stomach through an external magnetic field. We developed a classification cascade for MGCE images with groups images in semantic and topological categories. Results can be used in a post-procedure review or as a starting point for algorithms classifying pathologies. The first semantic classification step discards over-/under-exposed images as well as images with a large amount of debris. The second topological classification step groups images with respect to their position in the upper gastrointestinal tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum). In the third stage two parallel classifications steps distinguish topologically different regions inside the stomach (cardia, fundus, pylorus, antrum, peristaltic view). For image classification, global image features and local texture features were applied and their performance was evaluated. We show that the third classification step can be improved by a bubble and debris segmentation because it limits feature extraction to discriminative areas only. We also investigated the impact of segmenting intestinal folds on the identification of different semantic camera positions. The results of classifications with a support-vector-machine show the significance of color histogram features for the classification of corrupted images (97%). Features extracted from intestinal fold segmentation lead only to a minor improvement (3%) in discriminating different camera positions.

  17. Transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: Short-term results and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Mittermair, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has gained popularity and acceptance among bariatric surgeons, mainly due its low morbidity and mortality. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While the single-incision transumbilical (SITU) approach represents an advance, especially for cosmetic reasons, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. We describe our short-term surgical results and technical considerations with SITU-SG. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SITU-SG was performed in 10 patients between June 2010 and June 2011. SG was performed in a standard fashion and was started 6 cm from the pylorus using a 36 French bougie. RESULTS: They were all females with a mean age of 45 years. Preoperative BMI was 40 kg/m2 (range, 35–45). The mean operative time was 98 min. No peri- or postoperative complications or deaths occurred. All patients were very satisfied with the cosmetic outcomes and excess weight loss. CONCLUSION: True SITU laparoscopic SG is safe and feasible and can be performed without changing the existing principles of the procedure. PMID:24019687

  18. Post-gastrectomy Syndrome Successfully Treated With Kampo Medicine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ohgishi, Miwako; Horiba, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related gastrectomy can cause post-gastrectomy syndrome, which includes weight loss, dumping syndrome, and reflux esophagitis and negatively affects the quality of life. Comprehensive and individualized patient management is required; however, there is a limit to Western medicine's ability to treat these symptoms. Kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, adapts treatments to each individual's symptoms and constitution. We treated a 68-year-old male patient with post-gastrectomy syndrome using senpukukataishasekito, a Kampo medicine. He was diagnosed with Stage II-A gastric cancer at age 66 years and underwent a laparoscopic, pylorus-preserving gastrectomy followed by chemotherapy for 13 months. He visited our clinic for chemotherapy-related fatigue, postsurgical weight loss, and limb numbness. He was prescribed both hachimijiogan and hochuekkito. At the second visit, he complained of stomach discomfort, so we prescribed senpukukataishasekito. As his stomach function improved, his body weight increased and his fatigue decreased. We suggest that senpukukataishasekito may be an effective treatment for post-gastrectomy syndrome. PMID:26937322

  19. Papillary carcinoma of the duodenum combined with right renal carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Zhen-hong; Cai, Shou-wang; Dong, Jia-hong

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the duodenum combined with right renal carcinoma. A 58-year-old man underwent a physical examination that revealed intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation on B ultrasound. Intrahepatic bile duct dilatation could be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the head of the pancreas and distal bile duct showed no tumor signals, which led to a diagnosis of periampullary carcinoma and right renal carcinoma. Considering the trauma of pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with renal resection operation is greater, we carried out the laparoscopic right renal radical resection first, and then a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. However, postoperative intra-abdominal infections and bleeding occurred; our patient improved after vascular interventional microcoil embolization for the treatment of hemostasis. The second operation for celiac necrotic tissue elimination, jejunal fistulization and peritoneal lavage and drainage was performed 14 days latter. Our patient improved gradually and was discharged on the 58th postoperative day. There has been no tumor recurrence after a follow-up of 26 months.

  20. Semipurified Ethyl Acetate Partition of Methanolic Extract of Melastoma malabathricum Leaves Exerts Gastroprotective Activity Partly via Its Antioxidant-Antisecretory-Anti-Inflammatory Action and Synergistic Action of Several Flavonoid-Based Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ismail Suhaimy, Noor Wahida; Noor Azmi, Ahmad Khusairi; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Cheema, Manraj Singh

    2017-01-01

    Recent study has demonstrated the gastroprotective activity of crude methanolic extract of M. malabathricum leaves. The present study evaluated the gastroprotective potential of semipurified extracts (partitions): petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EAMM), and aqueous obtained from the methanolic extract followed by the elucidation of the gastroprotective mechanisms of the most effective partition. Using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer assay, all partitions exerted significant gastroprotection, with EAMM being the most effective partition. EAMM significantly (i) reduced the volume and acidity (free and total) while increasing the pH of gastric juice and enhanced the gastric wall mucus secretion when assessed using the pylorus ligation assay, (ii) increased the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activity of the stomach tissue, (iii) lost its gastroprotective activity following pretreatment with N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; NO blocker) or carbenoxolone (CBXN; NP-SH blocker), (iv) exerted antioxidant activity against various in vitro oxidation assays, and (v) showed moderate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity via the LOX-modulated pathway. In conclusion, EAMM exerts a remarkable NO/NP-SH-dependent gastroprotective effect that is attributed to its antisecretory and antioxidant activities, ability to stimulate the gastric mucus production and endogenous antioxidant system, and synergistic action of several gastroprotective-induced flavonoids. PMID:28168011

  1. Protective Effect of Liriodendrin Isolated from Kalopanax pictus against Gastric Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Yoon Ah; Hwang, Seon A; Lee, Sun Yi; Hwang, In Young; Kim, Sun Whoe; Kim, So Yeon; Moon, Aree; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Keum Jee; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities on gastritis and gastric ulcer using liriodendrin which is a constituent isolated from Kalopanax pictus. To elucidate its abilities to prevent gastric injury, we measured the quantity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as the protective factor, and we assessed inhibition of activities related to excessive gastric acid be notorious for aggressive factor and inhibition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization known as a cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. Liriodendrin exhibited higher PGE2 level than rebamipide used as a positive control group at the dose of 500 μM. It was also exhibited acid-neutralizing capacity (10.3%) and H+/K+-ATPase inhibition of 42.6% (500 μM). In pylorus-ligated rats, liriodendrin showed lower volume of gastric juice (4.38 ± 2.14 ml), slightly higher pH (1.53 ± 0.41), and smaller total acid output (0.47 ± 0.3 mEq/4 hrs) than the control group. Furthermore liriodendrin inhibited colonization of H. pylori effectively. In vivo test, liriodendrin significantly inhibited both of HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis (46.9 %) and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer (46.1%). From these results, we suggest that liriodendrin could be utilized for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis and gastric ulcer. PMID:25593644

  2. Duodenogastric reflux and foregut carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, K; Hattori, T; Miyazaki, I

    1995-03-15

    Epidemiologic cohort studies have established that after distal gastric resection, there is a higher risk of gastric carcinoma. It is likely that a main factor of this higher risk is the excessive duodenogastric reflux induced by surgery, because the incidence of stump carcinomas is higher in Billroth II than in Billroth I, and most of the stump carcinomas are located near the stoma. In addition, several groups of investigators have suggested that duodenogastric reflux per se induces stump carcinomas in rats. There is another human duodenogastric reflux, the primary duodenogastric reflux, through the pylorus. Experiments in animals have demonstrated that this type of duodenal reflux also induces gastric carcinomas in the antrum of the stomach that has not undergone surgery. Recent clinical attention has focused on the role of duodenogastric reflux in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus and subsequent esophageal adenocarcinomas. Experimentally, reflux of duodenal contents into the esophagus can cause not only Barrett's esophagus and subsequent adenocarcinomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas. These findings suggest that duodenogastric reflux may be implicated in gastric and esophageal, that is, foregut carcinogenesis.

  3. Effects of beta-adrenoceptor drug stimulation on various models of gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J.; Lloris, J. M.; Martí-Bonmatí, E.; Morcillo, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    1. Experiments were designed to evaluate the effect of the pharmacological activation of beta-adrenoceptors on various models of gastric ulcer in the rat. 2. Pretreatment with the beta-adrenoceptor stimulant drugs, isoprenaline or salbutamol, significantly inhibited stress-induced gastric ulcers. This anti-ulcer effect was abolished by propranolol but not by atenolol, suggesting that beta 2-adrenoceptors mediate this response. 3. In the pylorus-ligation model, salbutamol inhibited lesion formation and reduced the intragastric content of hydrogen ions, histamine and pepsin although the latter was only affected with the higher dose of salbutamol. 4. Salbutamol also prevented the ulcerogenic action on the gastric mucosa of an exogenously perfused artificial gastric juice, showing that the anti-ulcer effect is not necessarily dependent on acid inhibition. 5. Salbutamol also reduced the formation of acute ulcers induced by various iatrogenic means (histamine, polymyxin B, reserpine and indomethacin). 6. Long-term treatment with salbutamol accelerated the healing of experimental chronic gastric ulcer. 7. In anaesthetized rats, salbutamol produced a dose-related increase in mucosal blood flow which may contribute to its mode of action. 8. It is concluded that beta-adrenoceptor agonists exert preventive and curative effects on gastric damage induced in the rat. This effect seems specific and mediated through beta-adrenoceptor activation. PMID:6125225

  4. Evaluation of bile reflux in HIDA images based on fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rong-Chin; Huang, Wen-Lin; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method to help physicians assess, using a hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan image, whether or not there is bile reflux into the stomach. The degree of bile reflux is an important index for clinical diagnosis of stomach diseases. The proposed method applies image-processing technology combined with a hydrodynamic model to determine the extent of bile reflux or whether the duodenum is also folded above the stomach. This condition in 2D dynamic images suggests that bile refluxes into the stomach, when endoscopy shows no bile reflux. In this study, we used optical flow to analyze images from Tc99m-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (Tc99m-DISIDA) to ascertain the direction and velocity of bile passing through the pylorus. In clinical diagnoses, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the main clinical tool for evaluating functional images of hepatobiliary metabolism. Computed tomography (CT) shows anatomical images of the external contours of the stomach, liver, and biliary extent. By exploiting the functional fusion of the two kinds of medical image, physicians can obtain a more accurate diagnosis. We accordingly reconstructed 3D images from SPECT and CT to help physicians choose which cross sections to fuse with software and to help them more accurately diagnose the extent and quantity of bile reflux.

  5. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of the ethanol extract of Acalypha wilkesiana leaves in rats.

    PubMed

    Owoyele, B V; Okoye, O C; Dolor, R O; Oloruntola, O P; Soladoye, A O

    2011-11-23

    The leaves of Acalypha wilkesiana are commonly used for the treatment of pain, fever and ulcer by traditional medical practitioners without any scientific data to evaluate the appropriateness of some of the practices. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine whether the ethanol extract of Acalypha wilkesiana has analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic as well as anti-ulcer effects. The hot plate latency assay and formalin- induced paw licking models were used to evaluate analgesic effects. Animals were divided into groups comprising of five rats each. There were control (administered saline) and reference (administered indomethacin) groups. Also there were three extract groups administered 25, 50 or 100 mg/Kg body weight of extracts. Ulcer was induced using absolute ethanol followed by pylorus ligation in all animals; inflammation was induced using carrageenan while pyrexia was induced by injecting brewer's yeast intramuscularly into the dorsal part of the abdominal cavities of the rats. Different sets of rats were used for the anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic studies although animal grouping for extract administration were as in analgesic studies. The results show that the extract produced dose-dependent and significant (p<0.05) analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The extract also significantly protected against ethanol induced ulcer. Likewise, the extract significantly (p<0.05) reduced the pyretic states of the animals. This study has therefore further provides evidences that may support the ethnomedicinal uses of the ethanolic extracts of Acalypha wilkesiana leaves.

  6. Successful treatment with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with coca cola for gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Sheng; Tung, Chun-Fang; Peng, Yen-Chun; Chow, Wei-Keung; Chang, Chi-Sen; Hu, Wei-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction that was successfully treated with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with Coca Cola. A 73-year-old diabetic woman had a history of perforated peptic ulcer and had received pyloroplasty more than 20 years previously. She had been ingesting Pho Pu Zi (Cordia dichotoma Forst. f.) as an appetizer for 1 month. She presented with epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, performed at a local hospital, showed 2 gastric bezoars in the stomach, and 1 of them impacted at the pylorus. She was referred to our emergency department for removal of the gastric bezoars that were suspected to be causing gastric outlet obstruction. All attempts at endoscopic removal using a polypectomy snare, biopsy forceps and Dormia basket failed. We then injected Coca Cola directly into the bezoar mass, followed by irrigation with Coca Cola. Follow-up endoscopy was performed the next day, which revealed that the gastric bezoars had dissolved spontaneously.

  7. Endoscopic retrieval of gastric trichophytobezoar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiu-ling; Zhao, Wei-chuan; Wang, Yu-shui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Trichophytobezoars, which are composed of hair and plant fibers, are usually located in the stomach. They are often associated with trichophagia and trichotillomania. The most commonly reported methods of trichophytobezoar treatment are open surgery and laparoscopic retrieval; there are few reports of endoscopic removal of trichophytobezoars. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: Twelve-year-old girl presented with a 3-day history of increasing upper abdominal pain, anorexia, and postprandial emesis. She had a 3-year history of pulling out and eating her own hair. Endoscopic examination showed a large intragastric trichophytobezoar measuring 10.5 cm × 3.5 cm in size, with extension of a few hairs through the pylorus. Interventions and Outcomes: The trichophytobezoar was packed with hair fibers and contained a hard core of mixed hair and vegetable fibers. After the core was cut, the trichophytobezoar was fragmented into pieces with the alternating use of a polypectomy snare and argon plasma coagulation. A small amount of hair and nondigestible food fibers was removed with grasping forceps during the initial procedure. The remaining hairball was loosened with biopsy forceps and was injected with sodium bicarbonate solution. The trichophytobezoar was removed completely at repeat endoscopy 5 days later. After 6 months of psychological intervention, the patient had no recurrence of trichophagia or trichophytobezoar. Lessons: Endoscopy with sodium bicarbonate injection is an effective and minimally invasive method of retrieving a gastric trichophytobezoar. PMID:28099364

  8. Gastroprotective Effect of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Is Dependent on Production of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Junior, Jerônimo Aparecido; Franchin, Marcelo; Cavallini, Miriam Elias; Denny, Carina; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective activity of ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and to investigate the possible mechanisms of action. The gastroprotective activity of the EEGP was evaluated using model ulcer induced by ethanol. To elucidate the possible mechanisms of action, we investigated the involvement of the nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) groups, nitric oxide and prostaglandins. In addition, the antisecretory activity of EEGP was also evaluated by pylorus ligated model. The EEGP orally administrated (300 mg/kg) reduced the ulcerative lesions induced by the ethanol (P < 0.05). Regarding the mechanism of action, the prior administration of nitric oxide and prostaglandins antagonists suppressed the activity of gastroprotective EEGP (P < 0.05). On the other hand the gastroprotective activity of EEGP was kept in the group pretreated with the antagonist of the NP-SH groups; furthermore the antisecretory activity was not significant (P > 0.05). These results support the alternative medicine use of geopropolis as gastroprotective and the activities observed show to be related to nitric oxide and prostaglandins production. PMID:25949263

  9. Involvement of nitric oxide in the gastroprotective effects of an aqueous extract of Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng) Pedersen, Amaranthaceae, in rats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cristina Setim; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; Rieck, Lia; de Moraes Santos, Cid Aimbiré; Júnior, Cirino Corrêa; Ming, Lin Chau; Garcia Cortez, Diógenes Aparício; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade

    2004-01-16

    The plants belonging to Pfaffia genus are used in folk medicine to treat gastric disturbances. This study examined the effects of an aqueous extract of Pfaffia glomerata (Spreng) Pedersen (AEP) on the gastrointestinal tract. Wistar rats were pretreated orally (p.o.) with the AEP (125, 250, 500 and 1000 mg.kg(-1)) before induction of ulcers by hypothermic restraint stress (HRS, 3 h restraint stress at 4 degrees C), ethanol (ET, 70%; 0.5 ml/animal; p.o.) or indomethacin (IND, 20 mg.kg(-1); s.c.). Control animals received water (C) or ranitidine (60 mg.kg(-1)) p.o. The AEP protected rats against HRS and ET-induced ulcers, but was not able to protect the gastric mucosa against IND-induced ulcers. When injected into the duodenal lumen, the AEP reduced total acidity and both basal and histamine-stimulated acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats. In addition, gastric secretion from AEP-treated animals exhibited increased concentrations of nitrite and nitrate. Treatment of animals with L-NAME (120 mg.kg(-1), p.o.) prevented both the reduction of total acidity and the increase in NOx levels promoted by AEP treatment. In conclusion, AEP effectively protected the gastric mucosa and inhibited gastric acid secretion in rats, probably by involving the histaminergic pathway and an enhanced production of nitric oxide in the stomach.

  10. Gross anatomical features of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna) - oesophagus to cloaca.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, J; Tivane, C; Rodrigues, M N; Wagner, P G; Campos, D B; Guerra, R R; Miglino, M A

    2013-12-01

    Morphological studies of the gastrointestinal tract of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna) are scarce. In view of the paucity of information regarding the digestive tract of macaws, this study aims to describe the gross anatomical features (oesophagus to cloaca) as part of a broad study of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of these birds. Three animals (two males and one female) adult macaws were anatomically dissected from the oropharynx to the cloaca to expose the GIT. The oesophagus was identified as a muscle-membranous tube continuous with the crop, which was intimately attached to the skin. The internal longitudinal folds of the cervical oesophagus were sparser cranial to the crop and less evident compared to the portion caudal to the crop. The duodenum began in the pylorus and was grey-coloured exhibiting a large lumen. The jejunum was formed by loops in a spiral-fashion model supported by mesojejunum. The ileum was also composed by small loops and was continuous with the colo-rectum forming the large intestine, because the caeca were absent. The large intestine was short, median in position, suspended in the dorsal wall of the abdominal cavity by mesentery and ended in the cloaca. The GIT was similar to the basic patterns in birds, in general, and also presented new unreported morphological data that might be important when studying nutrition and health of the macaws.

  11. Animal model of acid-reflux esophagitis: pathogenic roles of acid/pepsin, prostaglandins, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Nagahama, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis was induced in rats within 3 h by ligating both the pylorus and transitional region between the forestomach and glandular portion under ether anesthesia. This esophageal injury was prevented by the administration of acid suppressants and antipepsin drug and aggravated by exogenous pepsin. Damage was also aggravated by pretreatment with indomethacin and the selective COX-1 but not COX-2 inhibitor, whereas PGE2 showed a biphasic effect depending on the dose; a protection at low doses, and an aggravation at high doses, with both being mediated by EP1 receptors. Various amino acids also affected this esophagitis in different ways; L-alanine and L-glutamine had a deleterious effect, while L-arginine and glycine were highly protective, both due to yet unidentified mechanisms. It is assumed that acid/pepsin plays a major pathogenic role in this model of esophagitis; PGs derived from COX-1 are involved in mucosal defense of the esophagus; and some amino acids are protective against esophagitis. These findings also suggest a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of esophagitis, in addition to acid suppressant therapy. The model introduced may be useful to test the protective effects of drugs on esophagitis and investigate the mucosal defense mechanism in the esophagus.

  12. Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and short bowel syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Sever, Marko; Klicek, Robert; Radic, Bozo; Brcic, Luka; Zoricic, Ivan; Drmic, Domagoj; Ivica, Mihovil; Barisic, Ivan; Ilic, Spomenko; Berkopic, Lidija; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Coric, Marijana; Kolenc, Danijela; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2009-10-01

    The gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, which was shown to be safe as an antiulcer peptide in trials for inflammatory bowel disease (PL14736, Pliva), successfully healed intestinal anastomosis and fistula in rat. Therefore, we studied for 4 weeks rats with escalating short bowel syndrome and progressive weight loss after small bowel resection from fourth ileal artery cranially of ileocecal valve to 5 cm beneath pylorus. BPC 157 (10 microg/kg or 10 ng/kg) was given perorally, in drinking water (12 ml/rat/day) or intraperitoneally (once daily, first application 30 min following surgery, last 24 h before sacrifice). Postoperatively, features of increasingly exhausted presentation were: weight loss appearing immediately regardless of villus height, twofold increase in crypt depth and fourfold increase in muscle thickness within the first week, jejunal and ileal overdilation, and disturbed jejunum/ileum relation. In contrast, constant weight gain above preoperative values was observed immediately with BPC 157 therapy, both perorally and parenterally, and villus height, crypt depth, and muscle thickness [inner (circular) muscular layer] also increased, at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Moreover, rats treated with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 showed not different jejunal and ileal diameters, constant jejunum-to-ileum ratio, and increased anastomosis breaking strength. In conclusion, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 could be helpful to cure short bowel syndrome.

  13. Effect of γ-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex on the Absorption of R-α-Lipoic Acid in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Ryota; Iwamoto, Kosuke; Nagayama, Suetada; Miyajima, Atsushi; Okamoto, Hinako; Ikuta, Naoko; Fukumi, Hiroshi; Terao, Keiji; Hirota, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    R-α-lipoic acid (RLA) is an endogenous organic acid, and works as a cofactor for mitochondrial enzymes and as a kind of antioxidant. Inclusion complexes of RLA with α-, β- or γ-cyclodextrins (CD) were prepared and orally administered as a suspension to rats. Among them, RLA/γ-CD showed the highest plasma exposure, and its area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of RLA was 2.2 times higher than that after oral administration of non-inclusion RLA. On the other hand, the AUC after oral administration of non-inclusion RLA and RLA/γ-CD to pylorus-ligated rats did not differ. However, the AUC after intraduodenal administration of RLA/γ-CD was 5.1 times higher than that of non-inclusion RLA, and was almost comparable to the AUC after intraduodenal administration of RLA-Na solution. Furthermore, the AUC after intraduodenal administration of RLA/γ-CD was not affected by biliary ligation or co-administration of an amylase inhibitor. These findings demonstrated that RLA was absorbed from the small intestine effectively when orally administered as a γ-CD inclusion complex, which could be easily dissolved in the lumen of the intestine. In conclusion, γ-CD inclusion complex is an appropriate formulation for supplying RLA as a drug or nutritional supplement with respect to absorption. PMID:25946345

  14. Semipurified Ethyl Acetate Partition of Methanolic Extract of Melastoma malabathricum Leaves Exerts Gastroprotective Activity Partly via Its Antioxidant-Antisecretory-Anti-Inflammatory Action and Synergistic Action of Several Flavonoid-Based Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ismail Suhaimy, Noor Wahida; Noor Azmi, Ahmad Khusairi; Mohtarrudin, Norhafizah; Omar, Maizatul Hasyima; Tohid, Siti Farah Md; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2017-01-01

    Recent study has demonstrated the gastroprotective activity of crude methanolic extract of M. malabathricum leaves. The present study evaluated the gastroprotective potential of semipurified extracts (partitions): petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EAMM), and aqueous obtained from the methanolic extract followed by the elucidation of the gastroprotective mechanisms of the most effective partition. Using the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer assay, all partitions exerted significant gastroprotection, with EAMM being the most effective partition. EAMM significantly (i) reduced the volume and acidity (free and total) while increasing the pH of gastric juice and enhanced the gastric wall mucus secretion when assessed using the pylorus ligation assay, (ii) increased the enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activity of the stomach tissue, (iii) lost its gastroprotective activity following pretreatment with N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; NO blocker) or carbenoxolone (CBXN; NP-SH blocker), (iv) exerted antioxidant activity against various in vitro oxidation assays, and (v) showed moderate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity via the LOX-modulated pathway. In conclusion, EAMM exerts a remarkable NO/NP-SH-dependent gastroprotective effect that is attributed to its antisecretory and antioxidant activities, ability to stimulate the gastric mucus production and endogenous antioxidant system, and synergistic action of several gastroprotective-induced flavonoids.

  15. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the gastric-type with focal nodular growth of the arborizing papillae: a case of high-grade transformation of the gastric-type IPMN.

    PubMed

    Ban, Shinichi; Naitoh, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Michio; Yasumoto, Akihiro; Koyama, Isamu

    2006-07-01

    We present a case of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas, demonstrating a process of high-grade transformation of the gastric-type IPMN. An 83-year-old Japanese woman underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for removal of a multicystic mass of the pancreas head, which had been followed up for 7 years. The removed tumor was a low-grade gastric-type IPMN spreading in the branch ducts, focally forming an intraluminal nodular lesion. The nodular lesion was comprised of arborizing papillotubular proliferation of cuboidal to columnar epithelia with high-grade atypia, and was characterized by diffuse MUC1 expression and a gastric mucin phenotype (focal MUC5AC and MUC6 expressions). Therefore, the nodular lesion was consistent with the pancreatobiliary-type IPMN, and the present case suggests that the low-grade gastric-type IPMN may progress to a focal intraductal carcinoma over the years, and the pancreatobiliary-type IPMN may be one of the forms of such high-grade transformation of the gastric-type IPMN. One of the cystic lesions was an oligocystic-type serous cystic neoplasm (serous cystadenoma), which might be an incidental concomitance or have a common basis.

  16. Protective Effects of Chlorogenic Acid against Experimental Reflux Esophagitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal reflux of gastric contents causes esophageal mucosal damage and inflammation. Recent studies show that oxygen-derived free radicals mediate mucosal damage in reflux esophagitis (RE). Chlorogenic acid (CGA), an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is one of the most abundant polyphenols in the human diet and possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-oxidant activities. In this context, we investigated the effects of CGA against experimental RE in rats. RE was produced by ligating the transitional region between the forestomach and the glandular portion and covering the duodenum near the pylorus ring with a small piece of catheter. CGA (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) and omeprazole (positive control, 10 mg/kg) were administered orally 48 h after the RE operation for 12 days. CGA reduced the severity of esophageal lesions, and this beneficial effect was confirmed by histopathological observations. CGA reduced esophageal lipid peroxidation and increased the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio. CGA attenuated increases in the serum level of tumor necrosis factor-α, and expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein. CGA alleviates RE-induced mucosal injury, and this protection is associated with reduced oxidative stress and the anti-inflammatory properties of CGA. PMID:25414772

  17. A case of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia associated with phycomycetes.

    PubMed

    Grau-Roma, L; Galindo-Cardiel, I; Isidoro-Ayza, M; Fernandez, M; Majó, N

    2014-11-01

    Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia (FGESF) is a recently described inflammatory condition of domestic cats with unknown aetiology. A proportion of cases of FGESF are associated with bacteria, but antibiotic treatment is ineffective. It has been hypothesized that genetically predisposed cats may develop FGESF in response to the introduction of bacteria or other antigens into the intestinal wall. A 9- month-old male Persian cat presented with a history of marked acute haematemesis. A mass (10 cm diameter) was detected within the pylorus and proximal duodenum and this was not surgically accessible. On necropsy examination the duodenal wall was seen to be markedly thickened with extensive mucosal ulceration. Microscopically, there were haphazardly oriented trabecular bands of dense eosinophilic collagen, separated by wide, clear areas containing variable numbers of fibroblasts, eosinophils, mast cells, neutrophils, macrophages, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Numerous pleomorphic, non-parallel walled, sparsely septate hyphae, characteristic of phycomycetes, were present within the collagen matrix. Colonies of gram-positive and gram-negative rods were also present within the lesion. This is the first description of FGESF with intralesional fungi.

  18. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: preoperative diagnosis and molecular alterations.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Yujiro; Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Uemura, Kenichiro; Sasaki, Masaru; Morifuji, Masahiko; Sueda, Taijiro

    2003-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which has a less favorable prognosis than common ductal cell carcinoma of the pancreas, and a definite preoperative diagnosis of this tumor is quite difficult. We herein report two cases of this rare variant. The patients were a 41-year-old man (patient 1) and a 67-year-old woman (patient 2). Patient 1 had a hypoechoic mass measuring 3 cm in the uncus of the pancreas, while patient 2 had a huge mass, measuring 8 cm, in the tail of the pancreas. Patient 2 was successfully diagnosed preoperatively as having an adenosquamous carcinoma, by cytological examination of the pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic retrograde pancreatic juice aspiration. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed for patient 1, and a distal pancreatectomy with resection of the spleen and the left kidney was performed for patient 2. Subsequent pathological findings of these two tumors revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas. K- ras point mutation, p53 overexpression, and telomerase activity in both tumor specimens were detected by the mutant allele specific amplification method, immunohistochemical staining, and telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay, respectively. The two patients died of recurrent disease 5 and 4 months, respectively, after surgery. Cytological examination of pure pancreatic juice is a useful modality for the preoperative diagnosis of this tumor, and frequent molecular alterations may be associated with the poor prognosis of adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas.

  19. Successful transfusion-free pancreatectomy in Jehovah's Witness patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Oh; Kim, Dong Won; Jeong, Mi Ae; Lee, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyu Nam

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Although perioperative therapies have improved greatly, pancreatectomies still often need blood transfusions. However, the morbidity from blood transfusions, the poor prognosis of blood transfused patients, high cost, and decreasing supply of blood products is accelerating transfusion-free (TF) surgery in the patients who have pacreatectomies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of TF pancreatectomies for patients who are Jehovah's Witness. Methods We investigated the possibility of TF pancreatectomies for the Jehovah's Witness patients undergoing pancreatectomies between January 2007 and Februay 2014. There were 4 cases of Whipple's operation, 4 of pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, 2 of radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy and 1 of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. All were performed by one surgeon. Results Most of the TF pancreatecomies patients received perioperative blood augmentation and intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH). They received no blood transfusions at any time during their hospitalization, and pre- and intra-operative data and outcomes were acceptably favorable. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first successful consecutive pancreatectomy program for Jehovah's Witness not involving blood transfusion. TF pancreatectomy can be performed successfully in selected Jehovah's Witness. Postoperative prognosis and outcomes should be confirmed in follow up studies. PMID:27621749

  20. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for complex injuries of the pancreas and duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Krige, Jake E; Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H

    2014-01-01

    Background This single-centre study evaluated the outcome of a pancreatoduodenectomy for Grade 5 injuries of the pancreas and duodenum. Methods Prospectively recorded data of patients who underwent a pancreatoduodenectomy for trauma at a Level I Trauma Centre during a 22-year period were analysed. Results Nineteen (17 men and 2 women, median age 28 years, range 14–53 years) out of 426 patients with pancreatic injuries underwent a pancreatoduodenectomy (gunshot n = 12, blunt trauma n = 6 and stab wound n = 1). Nine patients had associated inferior vena cava (IVC) or portal vein (PV) injuries. Five patients had initial damage control procedures and underwent a definitive operation at a median of 15 h (range 11–92) later. Twelve had a pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) and 7 a standard Whipple. Three patients with APACHE II scores of 15, 18, 18 died post-operatively of multi-organ failure. All 16 survivors had Dindo-Clavien grade I (n = 1), grade II (n = 7), grade IIIa (n = 2), grade IVa (n = 6) post-operative complications. Factors complicating surgery were shock on admission, number of associated injuries, coagulopathy, hypothermia, gross bowel oedema and traumatic pancreatitis. Conclusions A pancreatoduodenectomy is a life-saving procedure in a small cohort of stable patients with non-reconstructable pancreatic head injuries. Damage control before a pancreatoduodenectomy will salvage a proportion of the most severely injured patients who have multiple injuries. PMID:24841125

  1. Nematode-associated intramural alimentary nodules in pumas are histologically similar to gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, C D; Barr, B C; Woods, L W; Spangler, T; Murphy, B

    2013-05-01

    Intramural alimentary nodules in the gastric pylorus and proximal duodenum are a common finding in free-ranging pumas (Puma concolor) in North America, and are often associated with the presence of an indwelling nematode (most commonly Cylicospirura spp.). This study compares the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical appearance of three proximal gastrointestinal nodules in pumas with four cases of eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in domestic cats. Histologically, the pattern of inflammation and repair was strikingly similar, consisting of lamillated anastomosing trabeculae of dense sclerotic collagen with interspersed inflammatory cells and reactive fibroblasts. The stromal trabeculae were histologically reminiscent of osteoid and were uniformly positive for collagenous protein by Masson's trichrome stain and negative for mineralized osteoid deposits with Von Kossa's stain. Trabecular cells expressed osteonectin, but not osteocalcin immunohistochemically. Collectively, these findings are most consistent with a stroma comprised of dense collagenous trabeculae that resembles, but is distinct, from osteoid. Both the puma and domestic cat lesions demonstrated an eosinophilic inflammatory component; however, eosinophils were present in small numbers in the puma nodules relative to the nodules in domestic cats. These entities likely represent a unique and stereotypic gastrointestinal repair response of felids, given their similar histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles.

  2. Laparoscopic Finney pyloroplasty in the emergency setting: first case report in the literature and technical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Hadjittofi, Christopher; Berti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Pyloroplasty is currently reserved for emergencies (perforation, bleeding), but may occasionally be performed to treat benign gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). Historically, two techniques are available: the Mikulicz pyloroplasty, by which the pylorus is incised longitudinally and sutured vertically, and the Finney pyloroplasty, by which a U-shaped inverted incision is made in the second part of duodenum (D1–D2), followed by a side-to-side gastroduodenostomy. We report our experience in this single case of laparoscopic Finney pyloroplasty (LFP) performed in the emergency setting for a woman with a perforated duodenal ulcer and severe loss of tissue in D1–D2. Due to the presence of severely inflamed perforation edges and the risk of duodenal narrowing with subsequent GOO, Finney technique was favored over direct ulcer repair. The patient achieved a full postoperative recovery free of complications, with a dynamic oral contrast study demonstrating good gastric evacuation. Review of the current literature revealed no similar cases, as LFP has only been performed in the canine model. Although LFP requires a specific surgical skill-set, we believe it can be effective and feasible in cases of duodenal perforation with significant loss of mural substance. PMID:27294093

  3. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Bilioenteric Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Taek

    2016-01-01

    For diagnosis and treatment of pancreatobiliary diseases, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is useful method nowadays and its technically success rate is usually in about 90%-95% of patients with normal gastric and pancreaticobiliary anatomy. Recently ERCP is significantly challenging after intestinal reconstruction, particularly in patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, classic Whipple’s operation) or pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) with reconstruction. PD and PPPD relate to numerous techniques have been presented for reconstruction of the digestive tract and pancreaticobiliary tree during the resection bilioenteric stricture commonly occurs later in the postoperative course and developed in 5-year cumulative probability of biliary stricture rate of 8.2% and pancreaticoenteric stricture of 4.6%. This complication was no difference in incidence between patients with benign or malignant disease. In PD or PPPD with reconstruction, short pancreatobiliary limb with biliojejunal anastomosis site is made usually, modestly success rate of intubation to blind loop and cannulation with conventional endoscope. However, in combined Reux-en-Y anastomosis, longer pancreatobiliary limb and additional Reux limb are obstacle to success intubation and cannulation by using conventional endoscope. In this situation, new designed enetroscope with dedicated accessories is efficient. PMID:27838918

  4. Development of pressure-sensitive dosage forms with a core liquefying at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Lisa; Bock, Mona; Wolf, Marieke; Glöckl, Gunnar; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2014-04-01

    Pressure-sensitive dosage forms have been developed that are intended for pulsatile delivery of drugs to the proximal small intestine. The novel dosage forms are composed of insoluble shell and either a hard fat W32 or polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000 core that are both liquidizing at body temperature. The release is triggered by predominant pressure waves such as contractions of the pylorus causing rupture of the shell and an immediate emptying of the liquefied filling containing the active ingredient. In consequence immediately after the trigger has been effective the total amount of the drug is intended to be available for absorption in the upper small intestine. Both core types were coated with a cellulose acetate film that creates a pressure-sensitive shell in which mechanical resistance is depending on the coating thickness. Results of the texture analysis confirmed a correlation between the polymer load of the coating and the mechanical resistance. The dissolution test performed under conditions of physiological meaningful mechanical stress showed that the drug release is triggered by pressure waves of ⩾300 mbar which are representing the maximal pressure occurring during the gastric emptying.

  5. Essential oil of Croton zehntneri and its major constituent anethole display gastroprotective effect by increasing the surface mucous layer.

    PubMed

    Coelho-de-Souza, Andrelina N; Lahlou, Saad; Barreto, João E F; Yum, Maria E M; Oliveira, Ariclécio C; Oliveira, Hermógenes D; Celedônio, Nathalia R; Feitosa, Roney G F; Duarte, Gloria P; Santos, Cláudia F; de Albuquerque, Aline A C; Leal-Cardoso, José H

    2013-06-01

    Croton zehntneri, a plant native to northeastern Brazil, is widely used in folk medicine to treat gastrointestinal problems and has rich essential oil content. The effects of the essential oil of Croton zehntneri (EOCZ) and its main constituent anethole on several models of gastric lesions were studied in mice and rats. Oral treatment with EOCZ and anethole, both at doses of 30-300 mg/kg, caused similar and dose-dependent gastroprotection against ethanol- and indomethacin-induced gastric damage, but did not change cold-restraint stress-induced ulcers in rats. Furthermore, EOCZ and anethole (both at 30 and 300 mg/kg) similarly and significantly increased the mucus production by the gastric mucosa, measured by Alcian blue binding, in ethanol-induced ulcer model. However, at the same doses, neither EOCZ nor anethole promoted significant alteration in gastric production of non-protein sulfhydryl groups. In pylorus-ligated model, neither EOCZ nor anethole (both at 30 and 300 mg/kg) had a significant effect on the volume of gastric juice, pH, or total acidity. The results of this study show for the first time that EOCZ possesses a gastroprotective potential, an effect mostly attributed to the action of anethole. This activity is related predominantly to the ability of EOCZ and anethole to enhance the production of gastric wall mucus, an important gastroprotective factor. Furthermore, they suggest that EOCZ has potential therapeutic application for the treatment of gastric ulcers.

  6. Gastric and duodenal antiulcer and cytoprotective effects of proglumide in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, M.; Parmar, N.S.; Ageel, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Proglumide has been studied for its ability to inhibit gastric secretion and to protect the gastroduodenal mucosa against the injuries caused by pyloric ligation, hypothermic restraint stress, acetic acid, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, reserpine, cysteamine and the cytodestructing agents: 80% ethanol, 0.6 M HCl, 0.2 M NaOH, 25% NaCl and 30 mg of acetylsalicylic acid in 0.35 M HCl in rats. The results of this study demonstrate that proglumide has both prophylactic and curative effects on various experimentally induced ulcers. It produced a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric secretion in the pylorus-ligated rats and reduced significantly the intensity of gastric lesions induced by pyloric ligation, hypothermic restraint stress, acetic acid, mucosal damaging agents and that of duodenal ulcers induced by cysteamine. The intensity of gastric lesions induced by nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and reserpine was also reduced significantly by proglumide. Cimetidine, which was used as a standard antiulcer drug for comparison, also produced a similar protective effect in most of the models used by us. It was found to have a more potent antisecretory effect but failed to protect the rats against the gastric mucosal damage induced by hyperthermic restraint stress and 0.2 M NaOH. Our findings suggest that proglumide exerts these antiulcer effects by its antisecretory, gastric mucosal resistance increasing and cytoprotective activities. Further studies are required to find out its exact mechanism of action and therapeutic usefulness.

  7. Post-gastrectomy Syndrome Successfully Treated With Kampo Medicine: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ohgishi, Miwako; Horiba, Yuko; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related gastrectomy can cause post-gastrectomy syndrome, which includes weight loss, dumping syndrome, and reflux esophagitis and negatively affects the quality of life. Comprehensive and individualized patient management is required; however, there is a limit to Western medicine's ability to treat these symptoms. Kampo, a traditional Japanese medicine, adapts treatments to each individual's symptoms and constitution. We treated a 68-year-old male patient with post-gastrectomy syndrome using senpukukataishasekito, a Kampo medicine. He was diagnosed with Stage II-A gastric cancer at age 66 years and underwent a laparoscopic, pylorus-preserving gastrectomy followed by chemotherapy for 13 months. He visited our clinic for chemotherapy-related fatigue, postsurgical weight loss, and limb numbness. He was prescribed both hachimijiogan and hochuekkito. At the second visit, he complained of stomach discomfort, so we prescribed senpukukataishasekito. As his stomach function improved, his body weight increased and his fatigue decreased. We suggest that senpukukataishasekito may be an effective treatment for post-gastrectomy syndrome.

  8. Inhomogeneities in the propagation of the slow wave in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J

    2015-10-01

    The propagation of the slow wave in the stomach and its role in inducing sweeping peristaltic contractions toward the pylorus, essential for a proper digestion and emptying, have been studied for many years. Irregularities in the timing or in the pattern of propagation of the slow wave have been known to induce various gastric malfunctions and, recently, several types of gastric dysrhythmias have been described which could lead to gastric contraction abnormalities. In this study, Du et al. have analyzed the disturbances caused by a simple transmural incision in a human stomach, performed to obtain a biopsy of the muscle, on the propagation pattern of the slow wave. In addition, they show that such an incision may by itself also induce new types of gastric dysrhythmias. These results are important in demonstrating that the function of the stomach can easily be disturbed by such procedures. This mini-review describes several ways in which inhomogeneities in propagation may affect the conduction pattern of the slow wave, including the genesis of several dysrhythmias, and what is currently known about their impact on gastric contraction and digestion.

  9. Protective Effect of Liriodendrin Isolated from Kalopanax pictus against Gastric Injury.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Yoon Ah; Hwang, Seon A; Lee, Sun Yi; Hwang, In Young; Kim, Sun Whoe; Kim, So Yeon; Moon, Aree; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Keum Jee; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities on gastritis and gastric ulcer using liriodendrin which is a constituent isolated from Kalopanax pictus. To elucidate its abilities to prevent gastric injury, we measured the quantity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as the protective factor, and we assessed inhibition of activities related to excessive gastric acid be notorious for aggressive factor and inhibition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization known as a cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. Liriodendrin exhibited higher PGE2 level than rebamipide used as a positive control group at the dose of 500 μM. It was also exhibited acid-neutralizing capacity (10.3%) and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition of 42.6% (500 μM). In pylorus-ligated rats, liriodendrin showed lower volume of gastric juice (4.38 ± 2.14 ml), slightly higher pH (1.53 ± 0.41), and smaller total acid output (0.47 ± 0.3 mEq/4 hrs) than the control group. Furthermore liriodendrin inhibited colonization of H. pylori effectively. In vivo test, liriodendrin significantly inhibited both of HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis (46.9 %) and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer (46.1%). From these results, we suggest that liriodendrin could be utilized for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis and gastric ulcer.

  10. The appearance of free-air in the abdomen with related pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis: Three case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aziret, Mehmet; Erdem, Hasan; Ülgen, Yiğit; Kahramanca, Şahin; Çetinkünar, Süleyman; Bozkurt, Hilmi; Bali, İlhan; İrkörücü, Oktay

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pneumatosis sistoides intestinalis (PSI) is a rare condition with unknown origin, defined as the appearance of gas-filled cysts in the intestinal wall. It usually occurs due to respiratory infections, tumor or collagen disease, traumas, immunosuppression. PRESENTATION OF CASE Three patients with PSI were examined that followed up and treated in our clinic. The first patient was hospitalized for emergency treatment of previously diagnosed free-air under the diaphragm. He had a defense on physical examination and free-air was detected in X-ray and abdomen CT. We decided to laparatomy and peroperatively, stenotic pylorus with an abnormally increased stomach and gas-filled cysts were seen in the terminal ileum. Antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy with partial ileum and cecum resection and end ileostomy were performed. The second patient underwent laparatomy because of intraperitoneal free-air and acute abdomen. Partial ileum and cecum resection and ileotransversostomy were performed. The third patient with intraperitoneal free-air was treated with antibiotics, oxygen treatment and bowel rest. DISCUSSION PSI is usually asymptomatic. Plain radiographs, USG, CT, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy can use for diagnosis. Treatment of PSI depends on the underlying cause; include elemental diet, antibiotics, steroids, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and surgery. CONCLUSION In patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic PSI are different treat. Symptomatic PSI can be safely treated antrectomy and gastrojejunostomy with partial ileum and cecum resection. PMID:25460434

  11. Ulcer Protective Activity of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Arumugam Ramamoorthy; Daniel, Epison Prabu; Ilavarasan, Raju; Venkataraman, S.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several synthetic drugs are useful in the treatment of peptic ulcer, but almost of these drugs are used in prolonging time, it may cause several adverse reactions. However, the herbal medicines are more potent to the treatment and minimize the side effects. Objective: To evaluate the methanol extract of Jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. (MEJG) for gastro protective activity against Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Anti-ulcer potency of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w.) was assessed using aspirin (200 mg/kg, p.o.) plus pylorus ligation ulcer model and the parameters studied were ulcer index (UI), gastric juice volume, pH, total acidity, and total acid output. Same extract was studied by ethanol-induced (80%, 5 mL/kg, intragastrically) ulcer model, and the UI and biochemical parameters were studied. Results: The oral administration of MEJG (100 and 200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated the ulcer score and anti-secretary parameters (such as the volume of gastric content, free acidity, total acidity, and total acid output) in the aspirin plus pylorus ligation rats. The extract also significantly attenuated (P < 0.001) ulcer score in ethanol-induced ulcer model and lipid peroxidation level and significantly increased the level of glutathione peroxides, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activity. The MEJG may possess active constituents such as alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids, and terpenes, which may play a major role in gastroprotective effect in Wistar rats. Conclusion: The present study provides scientific support for the anti-ulcer activities of extracts of JG and also claimed that antioxidant potential of the extracts. However, substantiates the traditional claims for the usage of this drug in the treatment of gastric ulcer. SUMMARY The methanolic extract of jatropha gossypiifolia Linn. for gastro protective activity against aspirin plus pyloric ligation and ethanol induced ulcer models was studied in Wistar rats. JG shows significantly

  12. Gastric antiulcer, antisecretory and cytoprotective properties of celery (Apium graveolens) in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Howiriny, Tawfeq; Alsheikh, Abdulmalik; Alqasoumi, Saleh; Al-Yahya, Mohammed; ElTahir, Kamal; Rafatullah, Syed

    2010-07-01

    In the present investigation, an ethanol extract of celery [Apium graveolens L. (Apiaceae/Umbelliferae)], at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, was evaluated for antigastric ulcer activity using various experimental gastric ulcer models in rats. Ulcers were induced by indomethacin, cytodestructive agents (80% ethanol, 0.2 M NaOH and 25% NaCl) and cold restraint stress. Gastric secretory studies were undertaken by using pylorus ligation (Shay rat model). In addition to gastric wall mucus (GWM), non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also estimated in gastric tissues after 80% ethanol treatment. Pretreatment of celery extract produced dose-dependent reduction in all experimentally induced gastric lesions. Ethanol (80%) decreased the levels of GWM, NP-SH and increase in MDA concentration in gastric tissue. Celery extract showed the ability to significantly replenish the ethanol-induced depleted levels of GWM and gastric mucosal NP-SH. The gastric mucosal MDA level was also significantly lowered in extract pretreated rats. The celery extract showed stomach protection against the models used for ulcerogenesis. Results were further confirmed by using histopathological assessment. The phytochemical screening showed the presence of various chemical constituents such as flavonoids, tannins, volatile oils, alkaloids, sterols and/or triterpenes. Acute toxicity test revealed no deleterious or toxic symptoms or mortality over a period of 14 days. However, the LD(50) was found to be 7.55 g/kg, and showed a large margin of safety. The results suggest that Apium graveolens extract significantly protects the gastric mucosa and suppresses the basal gastric secretion in rats, possibly through its antioxidant potential.

  13. Gastroprotective effect of alpha-pinene and its correlation with antiulcerogenic activity of essential oils obtained from Hyptis species

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marcelo de Almeida; Magalhães, Rafael Matos; Torres, Danielle Mesquita; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Mota, Francisca Sheila Xavier; Oliveira Coelho, Emanuela Maria Araújo; Moreira, Henrique Pires; Lima, Glauber Cruz; Araújo, Pamella Cristina da Costa; Cardoso, José Henrique Leal; de Souza, Andrelina Noronha Coelho; Diniz, Lúcio Ricardo Leite

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-pinene (α-pinene) is a monoterpene commonly found in essential oils with gastroprotective activity obtained from diverse medicinal plants, including Hyptis species. The genus Hyptis (lamiaceae) consists of almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. In the north and northeastern Brazil, some Hyptis species are used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal disturbances. Objective: The present study has investigated the gastoprotective effect of purified α-pinene in experimental gastric ulcer induced by ethanol and indomethacin in mice. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcers were induced in male Swiss mice (20-30 g) by oral administration of absolute ethanol or indomethacin 45 min after oral pretreatment with vehicle, standard control drugs or α-pinene (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg). One hour after the ulcerative challenges, the stomach were removed, and gastric lesions areas measured. The effects of α-pinene on the gastric juice acidity were determined by pylorus ligation model. The gastrointestinal motility and mucus depletion were determined by measuring the gastric levels of phenol red and alcian blue, respectively. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of gastric mucosa of the experimental groups were used for histology analysis. Results: α-pinene pretreatment inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions, reduced volume and acidity of the gastric juice and increased gastric wall mucus (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we showed an interesting correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species (P Pearson = 0.98). Conclusion: Our data showed that the α-pinene exhibited significant antiulcerogenic activity and a great correlation between concentration of α-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species was also observed. PMID:25709221

  14. Protective effects of nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate on gastroduodenal ulcers: a comparative study in rats.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammad; Moutaery, Meshal Al; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Arshaduddin, Mohammad; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad

    2006-08-01

    Stabilization of mast cells plays a key mechanism to protect gastrointestinal tract from injury. This study presents a comparative evaluation of mast cell stabilizers nedocromil sodium (NDS) and sodium cromoglycate (SCG) in experimental gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. Wistar rats of either sex were used in this study. Both NDS and SCG, in the doses of 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg were given intraperitoneally for gastric secretion studies and by gavage for antiulcer studies. Acid secretion studies were undertaken in pylorus-ligated rats. Gastric lesions were induced by water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), indomethacin and ethanol whereas duodenal ulcers were produced by cysteamine. The level of glutathione (GSH) and gastric wall mucus were measured in glandular stomach of rats following ethanol-induced gastric lesions. SCG was more effective than NDS in preventing WIRS- and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions whereas reverse was true in ethanol- and cysteamine-induced ulcers. All the 3 doses of SCG offered almost equal protection against WIRS-induced gastric lesions whereas only medium and high dose of NDS provided significant protection in this model of ulcer. NDS significantly inhibited cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers whereas SCG failed to do so. Pretreatment with NDS or SCG significantly and dose-dependently protected gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced injury, while the former drug appeared to be more effective. The cytoprotective effects of these two drugs were accompanied by the attenuation of ethanol-induced depletion of gastric wall mucus and GSH. The differential effects of NDS and SCG against various gastric lesions rationalize the possible benefits of a combined therapy (NDS+SCG) for the treatment of complex gastroduodenal ulcers.

  15. The role of pancreaticoduodenectomy in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vickers, S M; Chan, C; Heslin, M J; Bartolucci, A; Aldrete, J S

    1999-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis remains a debilitating disease with few definitive options for treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of pancreaticoduodenectomy in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. The results were evaluated by standard descriptive statistics. In a retrospective study, we reviewed the patients at a single institution undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1994 and 1997 for complications of chronic pancreatitis. Patients were evaluated for preoperative indication for surgery and perioperative morbidity and mortality, as well as long-term results. Thirty-two patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for chronic pancreatitis; 56 per cent (18) underwent pylorus-preserving and 44 per cent (14) underwent classic pancreaticoduodenectomy. The mean age of these patients was 56+/-14.7 years (range, 23-79). All patients underwent preoperative CT scan and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The preoperative indication for surgery in 81 per cent (26) of these patients was intractable pain in the setting of a nondilated pancreatic duct. The other 19 per cent were treated for biliary/pancreatic duct stricture and pancreatic head fibrosis (mass suspicious of malignancy). Fifty-three per cent of the patients had a history of previous abdominal surgery. There were no perioperative deaths. The mean postoperative stay was 12.2+/-7.4 days. The postoperative morbidity rate was 31 per cent (10), consisting of 25 per cent with delayed gastric emptying, 3 per cent with pneumonia, and 3 per cent with wound infections. There was no occurrence of pancreatic fistulas. With a mean follow-up of 40 months (range, 10-52 months), 85 per cent reported a significant improvement in pain with 71 per cent being pain free and not requiring narcotics. Twenty per cent developed new-onset diabetes. The overall event survival rate at 5 years was 97 per cent. Thus, in a selected group of patients with severe chronic pancreatitis, resection of the head of

  16. Challenges in pancreatic adenocarcinoma surgery - National survey and current practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Dhayat, Sameer A.; Mirgorod, Philip; Lenschow, Christina; Senninger, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most deadly cancers in Europe and the USA. There is consensus that radical tumor surgery is the only viable option for any long-term survival in patients with PDAC. So far, limited data are available regarding the routine surgical management of patients with advanced PDAC in the light of surgical guidelines. Methods A national survey on perioperative management of patients with PDAC and currently applied criteria on their tumor resectability in German university and community hospitals was carried out. Results With a response rate of 81.6% (231/283) a total of 95 (41.1%) participating departments practicing pancreatic surgery in Germany are certified as competence and reference centers for surgical diseases of the pancreas in 2016. More than 95% of them indicate to carry out structured and interdisciplinary therapies along with an interdisciplinary pre- and postoperative tumor board. The majority of survey respondents prefer the pylorus-preserving partial pancreatoduodenectomy (93.1%) with standard lymphadenectomy for cancer of the pancreatic head. Intraoperative histological evaluation of the resection margins is used regularly by 99% of the survey respondents. 98.7% of survey respondents carry out partial or complete vein resection, 126 respondents (54.5%) would resect tumor adjacent arteries, and 102 respondents (44.2%) would perform metastasectomy if complete PDAC resection (R0) is possible. Conclusion Evidence-based and standardized pancreatic surgery is practiced by a large number of hospitals in Germany. However, a significant number of survey respondents support an extended radical tumor resection in patients with advanced PDAC even when not indicated by current clinical guidelines. PMID:28267771

  17. Professor Ludwik Rydygier father and legend of Polish surgery.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, K

    2011-02-01

    Ludwik Rydygier is undoubtedly the father of Polish gastrointestinal surgery. He performed two pioneering stomach operations: on 16 November 1880, first in Poland and second in the world after Jules Pean, the surgical removal of the pylorus in a 64-year-old patient suffering from stomach cancer; the operation took about four hours, unfortunately the patient died 12 hours later, and on 21 November 1881 he performed the world's first pylorectomy due to gastric ulcer, applying his own method of pylorectomy followed by the restoration by end-to-end anastomosis of the duodenal stump with the stomach stump; the patient survived the operation and recovered. Three years later, Rydygier introduced a new method of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer disease by means of gastroenterostomy. This review was designed to commemorate the outstanding achievements of Professor Rydygier, who worked at two universities: at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, and at the Lemberg (Lviv) University. He was one of the founders of the Association of Polish Surgeons and an organizer of the first Meeting of Polish Surgeons in 1889. He was the author of over 200 published papers and several text-books on surgical infections, surgical techniques, orthopaedics and traumatology, urology, neurosurgery, and gynaecology. Professor Ludwik Rydygier possessed comprehensive knowledge of surgery and other medical disciplines, he was a courageous surgeon and skilled operator, being at the same time an extremely gifted organizer. His promotion to the rank of General of Polish Army crowned his credits for country's defence. At the anniversary of 90 years after his death, Polish surgeons pay the tribute to their mentor.

  18. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways.

    PubMed

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25-44% (oral extract) and to 29-37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways.

  19. Density-dependent gastroretentive microparticles motion in human gastric emptying studied using computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shilei; Wang, Bochu; Wang, Yazhou

    2015-04-05

    Density-dependent gastroretentive drug delivery systems have been used to prolong the gastric retention time of drugs since the 1960s. The design of density-dependent gastroretentive dosage forms, however, usually focuses on specific parameters rather than combines with the fluid dynamics of dosage form in the gastric emptying. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to develop a 2-D model of multiple-phase flows for the simulation of gastric emptying and gastroretentive microparticles motion, and the influence of microparticle density, microparticle viscosity, and gastric juice viscosity on the gastric retention were studied. The recirculating flows, formed in the gastric emptying, could mix the conventional-density microparticles and transport them to the pylorus. However, the low-density microparticles remained floating on the surface of gastric juice, while the high-density microparticles could sink and deposit in the bottom of the stomach. The remaining integral area of microparticles was higher than 90% after 18.33min of simulation when the density of microparticles was lower than 550kg/m(3) or higher than 2500kg/m(3), which was higher compared to conventional-density microparticles (67.05%). These results are in good agreement with experimental data previously reported. In addition, the viscosity of microparticle and gastric juice also influenced the remaining integral area of gastroretentive microparticles. This study shows that the multiple-phase computational fluid dynamics models could provide detailed insights into the fluid dynamics of density-dependent gastroretentive microparticles in gastric emptying, which offers a powerful tool to further understand the mechanism of gastric retention for gastroretentive dosage forms and study the influence of different parameters on their ability for gastric retention.

  20. Gastroprotective activity of alkaloid extract and 2-phenylquinoline obtained from the bark of Galipea longiflora Krause (Rutaceae).

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Francielle; Gandolfi, Renan Becker; Lemos, Marivane; Ticona, Juan Carlos; Gimenez, Alberto; Clasen, Bruna Kurz; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2009-07-15

    As part of our continuing search for bioactive natural products from plants, the present study was carried out in order to evaluate the gastroprotective properties of alkaloid extract and 2-phenylquinoline obtained from the bark of Galipea longiflora (Rutaceae). Anti-ulcer assays were performed using the following protocols in mice: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/bethanecol-induced ulcer, ethanol/HCl-induced ulcer, and stress-induced ulcer. The effects of the extract on gastric content volume, pH and total acidity were also evaluated, using the pylorus ligated model. Treatment using doses of 50, 125 and 250 mg/kg of G. longiflora alkaloid extract and positive controls (omeprazol or cimetidine) significantly diminished the lesion index, total lesion area, and percentage of lesion, in comparison with the negative control groups in all the models evaluated. Regarding the model of gastric secretion, a reduction in volume of gastric juice and total acidity was observed, as well as an increase in gastric pH. The main alkaloid of the plant, 2-phenylquinoline, was also evaluated in the ethanol-induced ulcer model. The results showed that at a dose of 50 mg/kg, it significantly inhibited ulcerative lesions. However, this effect was less than that of the alkaloid extract. All these results taken together show that G. longiflora displays gastroprotective activity, as evidenced by its significant inhibition of the formation of ulcers induced by different models. There are indications that mechanisms involved in anti-ulcer activity are related to a decrease in gastric secretion and an increase in gastric mucus content. Also, there is evidence of involvement of NO in the gastroprotector mechanisms. These effects may be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of some alkaloids, particularly 2-phenylquinoline.

  1. Rare causes of gastric outlet obstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiexiong; Gu, Weizhong; Li, Minju; Yuan, Jiyan; Weng, Yizhen; Wei, Minfa; Zhou, Xuefeng

    2005-08-01

    Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) presenting beyond the newborn period is a relatively rare condition, when infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) is excluded. This report describes the clinical features, evaluation and management of 18 patients with GOO which was not caused by IHPS. The sex, age, and main presenting features were recorded on admission. Hemoglobin estimation, serum chemistry and blood gas analysis were also assessed in these patients. The diagnosis was confirmed with gastrointestinal barium, B ultrasound, gastroscopy, or at surgery. Some of them underwent gastroscopy with biopsy sampling for rapid urease test or histologic examination with Giemsa stains for Helicobacter pylori. Thirteen patients had peptic ulcer disease, of which six were successfully treated with medications. While the other seven needed operative management which included Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty, gastroduodenostomy or gastrojejunostomy, respectively. All the patients who had Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty or gastrojejunostomy developed bile reflux gastritis that could be alleviated with omeprazol. None of the patients developed dumping syndrome, failing to thrive, or anemia. Three children with antral diaphragm recovered without any complications by diaphragm excision with Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty. The pylorus was compressed by fibrotic band in one 30-month boy, and he recovered uneventfully with Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty during 10-year follow-up. Gastric outlet obstruction secondary to ingestion of sulfuric acid was noted in one patient, and he was successfully treated with gastroduodenostomy. Our data suggests that the satisfactory results could be expected in children with GOO with different therapeutic modalities based on the specific cause and degree of obstruction.

  2. Anti-ulcerogenic mechanisms of the sesquiterpene lactone onopordopicrin-enriched fraction from Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae): role of somatostatin, gastrin, and endogenous sulfhydryls and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Ana Beatriz Albino; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Cola, Maíra; Di Pietro Magri, Luciana; Batista, Leonia Maria; de Paiva, Joseilson Alves; Trigo, José Roberto; Souza-Brito, Alba R M

    2012-04-01

    Arctium lappa L. has been used in folk medicine as a diuretic, depurative, and digestive stimulant and in dermatological conditions. The mechanisms involved in the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the sesquiterpene onopordopicrin (ONP)-enriched fraction (termed the ONP fraction), obtained from A. lappa leaves, were studied. The gastroprotective mechanism of the ONP fraction was evaluated in experimental in vivo models in rodents, mimicking this disease in humans. ONP fraction (50 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly inhibited the mucosal injury induced by ethanol/HCl solution (75%), indomethacin/bethanecol (68.9%), and stress (58.3%). When the ONP fraction was investigated in pylorus ligature, it did not induce alteration in the gastric volume but did modify the pH and total acid concentration of gastric juice. ONP fraction significantly increased serum somatostatin levels (82.1±4.1 vs. control group 12.7±4 pmol/L) and decreased serum gastrin levels (62.6±6.04 vs. control group 361.5±8.2 μU/mL). Mucus production was not significantly altered by the ONP fraction. Gastroprotection by the ONP fraction was completely inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide treatment and did not modify the effect in the animals pretreated with l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester. These results suggest an antisecretory mechanism involved with the antiulcerogenic effect of the ONP fraction. However, only endogenous sulfhydryls play an important role in gastroprotection of the ONP fraction.

  3. Increased Expression of Pyloric ERβ Is Associated With Diabetic Gastroparesis in Streptozotocin-Induced Male Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Crimmins, Stephen; Smiley, Rebecca; Preston, Kerry; Yau, Amy; Mccallum, Richard; Ali, Mohammed Showkat

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastroparesis is a significant co-morbidity affecting up to 50% of patients with diabetes and is disproportionately found in women. Prior studies have suggested that loss of interstitial cells of Cajal, hyperglycemia, and nitric oxide dysfunction are potential causes of gastroparesis. Since diabetic gastroparesis affects more women than men, we performed an exploratory study with a diabetic rat model to determine if sex hormone signaling is altered in those where gastroparesis develops. Methods We injected male rats with streptozotocin (STZ) to model type I diabetes, as confirmed by blood glucose levels. Gastroparesis was determined by acetaminophen gavage and serum acetaminophen levels. Rats were grouped based on acetaminophen and blood glucose data: diabetic (DM), diabetic and gastroparetic (DM + GP), and control (CM). Serum levels of testosterone, estrogen, and insulin were determined as well as aromatase expression in pyloric tissue and serum. Androgen receptor and estrogen receptor α (ERα) and β (ERβ) were also measured in the pylorus. Results Compared to CM, estrogen increased and testosterone decreased in both DM and DM + GP rats. Sex hormone levels were not different between DM and DM + GP. Serum aromatase was increased in DM and DM + GP rats; however, pyloric tissue levels were not significantly different from controls. ERα was unchanged and androgen receptor decreased in DM and DM + GP. ERβ was increased only in DM + GP animals. Conclusion Our study implicates increased pyloric ERβ in the development of gastroparesis in STZ-induced male diabetic rats. Increased serum aromatase is likely responsible for altered sex hormone levels. Our study supports the implication of sex hormone signaling in diabetic development and demonstrates a potential unique role for pyloric ERβ in male diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:27785323

  4. Exploring gastric bacterial community in young pigs

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Vincenzo; Trevisi, Paolo; Bertolini, Francesca; Ribani, Anisa; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Fontanesi, Luca; Bosi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota plays an important role in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract. Understanding the variations of the commensal microbiota composition is crucial for a more efficient control of enteric infectious diseases and for the reduction of the use of antibiotics in animal production, which are the main points of interest for improved animal healthcare and welfare and for consumer health protection. Even though the intestinal microbiota has been extensively studied, little is known about the gastric microbiota. This pilot study was aimed at a descriptive analysis of the gastric microbiota in healthy pigs and at the identification of any differences among four potentially distinct microbial niches in the stomach. Gastric mucosal samples from the oxyntic area, the pylorus and the gastric groove, and a sample of gastric contents were collected from four healthy weaned pigs. Bacterial DNA was isolated and extracted from each sample and amplicons from the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene were sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM. The data were analysed by an “unsupervised” and a “supervised” approach in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) pipeline. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all the samples. Differences in bacterial community composition were found between mucosal and content samples (one-way ANOSIM pairwise post hoc test, p < 0.05); instead, the different mucosal regions did not show differences between them. The mucosal samples were characterised by Herbiconiux and Brevundimonas, two genera which include cellulolytic and xylanolytic strains. Nevertheless, additional larger trials are needed to support the data presented in this pilot study and to increase the knowledge regarding the resident microbiota of the stomach. PMID:28249050

  5. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a cause of obstructive jaundice with simultaneous extrahepatic portal vein obstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masao; Umekita, Nobutaka; Noda, Kazumasa

    2008-07-07

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare cause of biliary obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the peripancreatic region causing obstructive jaundice with simultaneous portal vein (PV) invasion has not yet been reported. We present a 50-year-old patient with obstructive jaundice whose extrahepatic portal vein was obstructed by the invasion of a peripancreatic non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient denied any other symptoms such as recurrent fever, night sweat and loss of body weight. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a 10 cm mass in the retroperitoneal space behind the head of the pancreas causing obstruction of the distal bile duct and the PV. A pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy combined with a PV resection was performed. The PV was reconstructed using an autologous right internal jugular vein graft. The resected specimen showed endoluminal invasion of both the bile duct and the PV. Histological examination showed the mass consisting of diffuse sheets of large malignant lymphoid cells. These cells were positive for CD20 and CD79a, partially positive for CD10, and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8 and CD30. The pathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the patient was transferred to the Department of Hematology and Oncology for chemotherapy. He received four cycles of combined chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone plus rituximab, and three cycles of intrathecal chemoprophylaxis including methotorexate, cytosine arbinoside and prednisone. The patient is alive with no evidence of the disease for 7 mo after operation and will receive additional courses of chemotherapy.

  6. Role of nitric oxide in the central interferon-alpha-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Czimmer, Jozsef; Király, Ágnes; Szabó, Imre Laszlo; Mózsik, Gyula; Sütő, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play a key role in regulation of gastric functions. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has been published to impair gastric motility. Aims of this study were to clarify effect of IFN-α on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and determine role of nitric oxide (NO) in the process. Both subcutaneous (1000, 10000, 100 000 IU, s.c.) and intracisternal (10, 100, 1000 IU, i.c.) injections of IFN-α dose-dependently inhibited GAS induced by pylorus ligation in male SD rats in 2 hrs (370±40, 233±39, 208±50 micromol vs control 415±59 micromol and 481±50, 249±75, 141±25 micromol vs control 485±65 micromol, respectively). Central doses inducing same level inhibition were 100 times lower. NOS inhibitor L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the inhibitory effect of i.c. ED(50) dose 100 IU IFN-α (507±75 micromol/2 hrs), while L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) prevented L-NAME action (266±82 micromol/2 hrs). D-arginine failed to prevent L-NAME action on IFN-α-induced inhibition of GAS. Aminoguanidine, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS) failed to block IFN-α induced inhibition of GAS. Results suggest that IFN-α inhibits GAS centrally through nitric oxide pathways probably mediated by continuous isoform of NOS that can be important in regulation of GAS in healthy or pathological conditions.

  7. Morphological features of the stomach of Malayan pangolin, Manis javanica.

    PubMed

    Nisa', C; Agungpriyono, S; Kitamura, N; Sasaki, M; Yamada, J; Sigit, K

    2010-10-01

    The morphology of the stomach of Malayan pangolin, Manis javanica was studied at macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic levels. The stomach of M. javanica was C-shaped with short lesser curvature. At the oesophageal junction, the inner smooth muscle was thickened in the greater curvature side. The entire stomach was lined by a thick cornified stratified squamous epithelium, except at the duct orifices of glands and in the pyloric gland region. The wall of the fundus was thin and devoid of glands. The gastric glands consisted of mucous, oxyntic, and pyloric glands. The mucous glands were observed in the lesser curvature (Mg-L), in the greater curvature (Mg-G), and in the pyloric canal (Mg-C) respectively. The oxyntic glands were organized into gland mass, making an oval mound elevated to the gastric lumen, in the middle of the greater curvature. The oxyntic gland mass has a single common duct with opening directed to the pyloric side. This duct was surrounded by mucus gland (Mg-G). The pyloric glands were located caudal to the pylorus. There was no sphincter at the pyloric-duodenal junction. Large mucosal protuberance, the torus pyloricus was observed in the side of the lesser curvature of the pyloric canal. In the lumen of pyloric canal region, numerous spines and small pebbles were observed. The muscle layers in the wall of this region were considerably thickened. The present results on the stomach of M. javanica are thought to be closely related to the toothless and eating habits of this animal species.

  8. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti- Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl) blume

    PubMed Central

    Sidahmed, Heyam Mohamed Ali; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Mohan, Syam; Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Taha, Manal Mohamed Elhassan; Dehghan, Firouzeh; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose β-Mangostin (BM) from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. Materials and methods BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. Results BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound showed intense periodic acid–Schiff staining to the gastric mucus layer and marked amount of alcian blue binding to free gastric mucus. BM significantly increased the gastric homogenate content of prostaglandin E2 glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds. The compound inhibited the lipid peroxidation revealed by the reduced gastric content of malondialdehyde. Moreover, BM upregulate HSP70 expression and downregulate Bax expression. Furthermore, the compound showed interesting anti-H. pylori activity. Conclusion Thus, it could be concluded that BM possesses gastroprotective activity, which could be attributed to the antisecretory, mucus production, antioxidant, HSP70, antiapoptotic, and anti-H. pylori mechanisms. PMID:26834460

  9. Spectral computed tomography in advanced gastric cancer: Can iodine concentration non-invasively assess angiogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Ren, Ke; Liang, Pan; Chai, Ya-Ru; Chen, Kui-Sheng; Gao, Jian-Bo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the correlation of iodine concentration (IC) generated by spectral computed tomography (CT) with micro-vessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with advanced gastric carcinoma (GC). METHODS Thirty-four advanced GC patients underwent abdominal enhanced CT in the gemstone spectral imaging mode. The IC of the primary lesion in the arterial phase (AP) and venous phase (VP) were measured, and were then normalized against that in the aorta to provide the normalized IC (nIC). MVD and VEGF were detected by immunohistochemical assays, using CD34 and VEGF-A antibodies, respectively. Correlations of nIC with MVD, VEGF, and clinical-pathological features were analyzed. RESULTS Both nICs correlated linearly with MVD and were higher in the primary lesion site than in the normal control site, but were not correlated with VEGF expression. After stratification by clinical-pathological subtypes, nIC-AP showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD, particularly in the group with tumors at stage T4, without nodular involvement, of a mixed Lauren type, where the tumor was located at the antrum site, and occurred in female individuals. nIC-VP showed a positive correlation with MVD in the group with the tumor at stage T4 and above, had nodular involvement, was poorly differentiated, was located at the pylorus site, of a mixed and diffused Lauren subtype, and occurred in male individuals. nIC-AP and nIC-VP showed significant differences in terms of histological differentiation and Lauren subtype. CONCLUSION The IC detected by spectral CT correlated with the MVD. nIC-AP and nIC-VP can reflect angiogenesis in different pathological subgroups of advanced GC. PMID:28321168

  10. Screening pre-bariatric surgery patients for esophageal disease with esophageal capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Boettcher, Erica; Fahmy, Marianne; Savides, Thomas; Horgan, Santiago; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Sedrak, Michael; Kalmaz, Denise

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if esophageal capsule endoscopy (ECE) is an adequate diagnostic alternative to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in pre-bariatric surgery patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective pilot study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ECE (PillCam ESO2, Given Imaging) vs conventional EGD in pre-bariatric surgery patients. Patients who were scheduled for bariatric surgery and referred for pre-operative EGD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent ECE followed by standard EGD. Two experienced gastroenterologists blinded to the patient’s history and the findings of the EGD reviewed the ECE and documented their findings. The gold standard was the findings on EGD. RESULTS: Ten patients with an average body mass index of 50 kg/m2 were enrolled and completed the study. ECE identified 11 of 14 (79%) positive esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) findings and 14 of 17 (82%) combined esophageal and gastric findings identified on EGD. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the findings and no significant difference was found between ECE and EGD (P = 0.64 for esophageal/GEJ and P = 0.66 for combined esophageal and gastric findings respectively). Of the positive esophageal/GEJ findings, ECE failed to identify the following: hiatal hernia in two patients, mild esophagitis in two patients, and mild Schatzki ring in two patients. ECE was able to identify the entire esophagus in 100%, gastric cardia in 0%, gastric body in 100%, gastric antrum in 70%, pylorus in 60%, and duodenum in 0%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the likelihood of identifying a positive finding using ECE compared with EGD in preoperative evaluation of bariatric patients. PMID:24115815

  11. D-002 (Beeswax Alcohols): Concurrent Joint Health Benefits and Gastroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Vivian; Mas, R.; Carbajal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs include the traditional drugs and more selective COX-2 inhibitors. Traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use is hampered by their gastrotoxicity, while COX-2-inhibitors increase the cardiovascular risk. The search of safer substances for managing inflammatory conditions is updated, a challenge wherein dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors have a place. This review summarizes the benefits of D-002, a mixture of higher aliphatic beeswax alcohols, on joint health and gastric mucosa. D-002 elicits gastroprotection through a multiple mechanism that involves the increased secretion and improved quality of the gastric mucus, the reduction of hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, neutrophil infiltration and the increase of antioxidant enzymes on the gastric mucosa. Consistently, D-002 inhibits NSAIDs, ethanol, pylorus-ligation and acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats, and has reduced gastrointestinal symptoms in clinical studies. Early results found that D-002 was effective in the cotton pellet-induced granuloma and carrageenan-induced pleurisy model in rats, lowering pleural leukotriene B4 levels without causing gastrointestinal ulceration. However, D-002 effects on inflammation received little attention for years. Recent data have shown that D-002 inhibited both COX and 5-LOX activities with a greater affinity for 5-LOX and could act as a dual COX/5-LOX inhibitor. This mechanism might explain efficacy in experimental inflammatory and osteoarthritic models as well as clinical efficacy in osteoarthritic patients while supporting the lack of D-002 gastrotoxicity, but not the gastroprotective effects, which appear to be due to multiple mechanisms. In summary oral D-002 intake could help manage inflammatory conditions that impair joint health, while offering gastroprotection. PMID:26009643

  12. Effects of flunixin and flunixin plus prednisone on the gastrointestinal tract of dogs.

    PubMed

    Dow, S W; Rosychuk, R A; McChesney, A E; Curtis, C R

    1990-07-01

    Flunixin meglumine has been reported to induce gastrointestinal lesions in dogs when administered at therapeutic dosages. We administered flunixin meglumine to dogs daily for 10 days to assess the effect of this drug on the gastrointestinal tract. We also evaluated the possibility of corticosteroid potentiation of gastrointestinal toxicosis by concurrent administration of prednisone to 1 group of dogs. Dogs were monitored for gastrointestinal toxicosis by means of serial endoscopic evaluation, measurement of fecal occult blood, PCV, and total solid concentration, and by physical examination. There were 3 treatment groups of 5 dogs each. Group-1 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; group-2 dogs were given 4.4 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; and group-3 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM plus 1.1 mg of prednisone/kg/d orally, in 2 divided doses. A fourth group of 5 dogs served as a control group. Endoscopically visible gastric mucosal lesions developed in all treated dogs within 4 days of initiating treatment. Lesions first developed in the gastric pylorus and antrum and lesions at these sites were more severe than those observed elsewhere. Dogs treated with flunixin meglumine plus prednisone developed the earliest and most severe lesions; lesion scores in group-2 dogs were higher than those in group-1 dogs. All dogs treated had occult blood in their feces by day 5 and its presence appeared to correlate more closely with endoscopic findings than did physical examination findings or changes in values for PCV or total solids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Exploring gastric bacterial community in young pigs.

    PubMed

    Motta, Vincenzo; Trevisi, Paolo; Bertolini, Francesca; Ribani, Anisa; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Fontanesi, Luca; Bosi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Microbiota plays an important role in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal tract. Understanding the variations of the commensal microbiota composition is crucial for a more efficient control of enteric infectious diseases and for the reduction of the use of antibiotics in animal production, which are the main points of interest for improved animal healthcare and welfare and for consumer health protection. Even though the intestinal microbiota has been extensively studied, little is known about the gastric microbiota. This pilot study was aimed at a descriptive analysis of the gastric microbiota in healthy pigs and at the identification of any differences among four potentially distinct microbial niches in the stomach. Gastric mucosal samples from the oxyntic area, the pylorus and the gastric groove, and a sample of gastric contents were collected from four healthy weaned pigs. Bacterial DNA was isolated and extracted from each sample and amplicons from the V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene were sequenced using Ion Torrent PGM. The data were analysed by an "unsupervised" and a "supervised" approach in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) pipeline. Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in all the samples. Differences in bacterial community composition were found between mucosal and content samples (one-way ANOSIM pairwise post hoc test, p < 0.05); instead, the different mucosal regions did not show differences between them. The mucosal samples were characterised by Herbiconiux and Brevundimonas, two genera which include cellulolytic and xylanolytic strains. Nevertheless, additional larger trials are needed to support the data presented in this pilot study and to increase the knowledge regarding the resident microbiota of the stomach.

  14. RADIOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC ABDOMINAL ANATOMY IN CAPTIVE RING-TAILED LEMURS (LEMUR CATTA).

    PubMed

    Makungu, Modesta; du Plessis, Wencke M; Barrows, Michelle; Groenewald, Hermanus B; Koeppel, Katja N

    2016-06-01

    The ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) is primarily distributed in south and southwestern Madagascar. It is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Various abdominal diseases, such as hepatic lipidosis, intestinal ulcers, cystitis, urinary tract obstruction, and neoplasia (e.g., colonic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma), have been reported in this species. The aim of this study was to describe the normal radiographic and ultrasonographic abdominal anatomy in captive ring-tailed lemurs to provide guidance for clinical use. Radiography of the abdomen and ultrasonography of the liver, spleen, kidneys, and urinary bladder were performed in 13 and 9 healthy captive ring-tailed lemurs, respectively, during their annual health examinations. Normal radiographic and ultrasonographic reference ranges for abdominal organs were established and ratios were calculated. The majority (12/13) of animals had seven lumbar vertebrae. The sacrum had mainly (12/13) three segments. Abdominal serosal detail was excellent in all animals, and hypaxial muscles were conspicuous in the majority (11/13) of animals. The spleen was frequently (12/13) seen on the ventrodorsal (VD) view and rarely (3/13) on the right lateral (RL) view. The liver was less prominent and well contained within the ribcage. The pylorus was mostly (11/13) located to the right of the midline. The right and left kidneys were visible on the RL and VD views, with the right kidney positioned more cranial and dorsal to the left kidney. On ultrasonography, the kidneys appeared ovoid on transverse and longitudinal views. The medulla was hypoechoic to the renal cortex. The renal cortex was frequently (8/9) isoechoic and rarely (1/9) hyperechoic to the splenic parenchyma. The liver parenchyma was hypoechoic (5/5) to the renal cortex. Knowledge of the normal radiographic and ultrasonographic abdominal anatomy of ring-tailed lemurs may be useful in the diagnosis of diseases and in

  15. Evaluation of antral motility in humans using manometry and scintigraphy.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K; Edelbroek, M; Horowitz, M; Sun, W M; Dent, J; Roelofs, J; Muecke, T; Akkermans, L

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that scintigraphy can be used to evaluate non-invasively antral motility in humans, although scintigraphic techniques have not yet been compared with more conventional measurements of intraluminal pressures by manometry. Simultaneous scintigraphic and manometric measurements of antral motility were performed in nine healthy volunteers. After intubation with a sleeve/sidehole catheter which incorporated five pressure sideholes located at 1.5 cm intervals spanning the antrum, each subject ingested 100 g minced beef labelled with 100 MBq 99mTc-chicken liver and 150 ml water. Between 40-43, 60-63, 80-83, and 100-103 minutes after meal ingestion, radioisotopic data were acquired in two second frames. Time-activity curves showing antral 'contractions' resulting from wall motion were derived by drawing small regions of interest over the antrum to coincide with the position of the antral manometric sideholes. Scintigraphic contraction rates approximated 3/minute, whereas antral pressure waves that occluded the lumen were less frequent (p < 0.01 for all), particularly in the proximal antrum. The amplitude of wall motion, evaluated scintigraphically, and the amplitude of pressure waves were both inversely related to the distance from the pylorus (r > -0.32, p < 0.05) and antral volume r > -0.29 (p < 0.05). There were significant relationships between the amplitude of contractions assessed scintigraphically and the number of lumen-occlusive antral pressure waves in the distal antrum (r -0.48, p < 0.05) but not in the more proximal antral regions. It is concluded that scintigraphy can detect antral wall motion with greater sensitivity than manometry, particularly in the proximal antrum. As manometry gives information on the amplitude as well as the temporal and spatial organisation of those contractions which result in lumen occlusion, the combination of scintigraphic and manometric techniques in the evaluation of antral motility shows considerable

  16. Antiulcer and in vitro antioxidant activities of Jasminum grandiflorum L.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, M; Asokkumar, K; Rathidevi, R; Sivashanmugam, A T; Subhadradevi, V; Ravi, T K

    2007-04-04

    The study was aimed at evaluating the antiulcer and antioxidant activities of 70% ethanolic axtract of leaves of Jasminum grandiflorum L. (JGLE). The leaves of Jasminum grandiflorum L. (Family: Oleaceae) is used in folk medicine for treating ulcerative stomatitis, skin diseases, ulcers, wounds, corns - a hard or soft hyperkeratosis of the sole of the human foot secondary to friction and pressure (Stedman's Medical Dictionary, 28th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia. p. 443), etc., Antiulcerogenic activity of JGLE (100 and 200 mg/kg, b.w., orally) was evaluated employing aspirin + pylorus ligation (APL) and alcohol (AL) induced acute gastric ulcer models and ulcer-healing activity using acetic acid-induced (AC) chronic ulcer model in rats. Both the antisecretory and cytoprotection hypothesis were evaluated. The antioxidant activity of JGLE has been assayed by using in vitro methods like 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate (DPPH) assay, reductive ability, superoxide anion scavenging activity, nitric oxide scavenging activity and total phenolic content, in order to explain the role of antioxidant principles in the antiulcerogenic activity of the extract. There was a significant (P<0.01) dose-dependent decrease in the ulcerative lesion index produced by all the three models in rats as compared to the standard drug famotidine (20 mg/kg, b.w. orally). The reduction in gastric fluid volume, total acidity and an increase in the pH of the gastric fluid in APL rats proved the antisecretory activity of JGLE. Additionally, JGLE completely healed the ulcer within 20 days of treatment in AC model as evidenced by histopathological studies. Like antiulcer activity, the free radical scavenging activities of JGLE depends on concentration and increased with increasing amount of the extract. These results suggest that leaves of Jasminum grandiflorum possess potential antiulcer activity, which may be attributed to its antioxidant mechanism of action.

  17. Effect of sodium hydrosulfide on mRNA expression of prostaglandin E2 receptors in response to mucosal acidification and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Mahini, Simin; Dianat, Mahin; Farbood, Yaghoob

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Prostaglandins have been shown to mediate the gastro-protective effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) but effect of NaHS on mRNA expression of prostaglandin E2 receptors (EP1, 3-4; EPs) has not been investigated. Therefore, this study designed to evaluate the effect of NaHS on mRNA expression of EPs receptors in response to mucosal acidification and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in rats. Materials and Methods: Fasted rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n=6/group). They were control, and NaHS-treated groups. To evaluate the effect of NaHS on mucosal mRNA expression of EPs receptors, the gastric mucosa exposed to stimulated gastric acid output and mucosal acidification. The pylorus sphincter catheterized for instillation of isotonic neutral saline or acidic solution. Ninety min after beginning the experiments, animals sacrificed and the gastric mucosa collected to determine the pH, mucus secretion and to quantify the mRNA expression of EPs receptors by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: present results showed that a) NaHS increased the mucus secretion, mRNA expression of EP3 and EP4 receptors in response to distention-induced expression; b) The mRNA expression of EP1 receptors increased while EP4 mRNA receptors decreased in response to mucosal acidification in NaHS-pretreated rats; and c) NaHS increased pH of gastric contents both in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion and mucosal acidification. Conclusion: NaHS behaves in a different manner. It effectively only increased the pH of gastric contents to reinforce the gastric mucosa against a highly acidic solution but modulated both acid and mucus secretion when the rate of acid increase in the stomach was slower. PMID:28293390

  18. Gastroprotective Effect of an Aqueous Suspension of Black Cumin Nigella sativa on Necrotizing Agents-Induced Gastric Injury in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Al Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; Mossa, Jaber S.; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed O.; Al-Yahya, Mohammed A; Rafatullah, Syed; Shaik, Shaffi A.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aim Previous studies on “Black seed” or “Black Cumin” Nigella sativa (NS) have reported a large number of pharmacological activities including its anti-ulcer potential. These studies employed either fixed oil, volatile oil components or different solvent extracts. In folkloric practices, NS seeds are taken as such, in the form of coarse dry powder or the powdered seeds are mixed with water. This study examines the effect of NS aqueous suspension on experimentally induced gastric ulcers and basal gastric secretion in rats to rationalize its use by herbal and Unani medicine practitioners. Materials and Methods The study was conducted at the Medicinal, Aromatic and Poisonous Plants Research Center, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Acute gastric ulceration was produced by various noxious chemicals (80% ethanol, 0.2 M NaOH, 25% NaCl and indomethacin) in Wistar albino rats. Anti-secretory studies were undertaken in a separate group of rats. Gastric wall mucus contents and non-protein sulfhydryl concentration were estimated, and gastric tissue was examined histopathologically. Results An aqueous suspension of Black seed significantly prevented gastric ulcer formation induced by necrotizing agents. It also significantly ameliorated the ulcer severity and basal gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated Shay rats. Moreover, the suspension significantly replenished the ethanol-induced depleted gastric wall mucus content levels and gastric mucosal non-protein sulfhydryl concentration. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histopathologically. Conclusion These findings validate the use of Black seed in gastropathies induced by necrotizing agents. The anti-ulcer effect of NS is possibly prostaglandin-mediated and/or through its antioxidant and anti-secretory activities. PMID:19568521

  19. Delayed gastric emptying following pancreaticoduodenectomy: Incidence, risk factors, and healthcare utilization

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren II, George; McElhany, Amy; Silberfein, Eric J; Fisher, William E

    2017-01-01

    AIM To characterize incidence and risk factors for delayed gastric emptying (DGE) following pancreaticoduodenectomy and examine its implications on healthcare utilization. METHODS A prospectively-maintained database was reviewed. DGE was classified using International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery criteria. Patients who developed DGE and those who did not were compared. RESULTS Two hundred and seventy-six patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) (> 80% pylorus-preserving, antecolic-reconstruction). DGE developed in 49 patients (17.8%): 5.1% grade B, 3.6% grade C. Demographic, clinical, and operative variables were similar between patients with DGE and those without. DGE patients were more likely to present multiple complications (32.6% vs 4.4%, ≥ 3 complications, P < 0.001), including postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) (42.9% vs 18.9%, P = 0.001) and intra-abdominal abscess (IAA) (16.3% vs 4.0%, P = 0.012). Patients with DGE had longer hospital stay (median, 12 d vs 7 d, P < 0.001) and were more likely to require transitional care upon discharge (24.5% vs 6.6%, P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, predictors for DGE included POPF [OR = 3.39 (1.35-8.52), P = 0.009] and IAA [OR = 1.51 (1.03-2.22), P = 0.035]. CONCLUSION Although DGE occurred in < 20% of patients after PD, it was associated with increased healthcare utilization. Patients with POPF and IAA were at risk for DGE. Anticipating DGE can help individualize care and allocate resources to high-risk patients.

  20. Infant satiety depends on transient expression of cholecystokinin-1 receptors on ependymal cells lining the third ventricle in mice.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Tomoya; Mohammad, Shahid; Morioka, Eri; Takiguchi, Soichi; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2013-03-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hypothetical controller for suckling and infancy body weight, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the present study analysed the mechanisms using mice lacking the CCK-1 receptor (CCK1R-/-). Although CCK1R-/- mice displayed normal weights at birth and adulthood, CCK1R-/- pups had enlarged adipocytes and were overweight from the first to second week after birth, regardless of maternal genotype. The lacZ reporter gene assay and/or calcium imaging analysis demonstrated that CCK-1 receptors were abundant in satiety-controlling regions such as the hypothalamus, brainstem, nodose ganglion and pylorus in adults, whereas these signals were few to lacking at pre-weanling stages. At postnatal day (PD) 6, the increase in cFos expression in the medullary nucleus tractus solitarius was similarly triggered by gastrointestinal milk- or saline filling in both genotypes, further indicating immature CCK-1 receptor function in an ascending satiety-controlling system during infancy. Conversely, third ventricle ependymal tanycyte-like cells expressed CCK-1 receptors with expression peaking at PD6. At PD6, wild-type but not CCK1R-/- mice had increased cFos immunoreactivity in ependymal cells following gastrointestinal milk filling whereas the response became negligible at PD12. In addition, ependymal cFos was not increased by saline filling, indicating that these responses are dependent on CCK-1 receptors, developmental stage and nutrients. Furthermore, body weights of wild-type pups were transiently increased by blocking ependymal CCK receptor function with microinjection of a CCK-1 antagonist, but not a CCK-2 antagonist. Hence, we demonstrate de novo functions of ependymal CCK-1 receptors and reveal a new aspect of infant satiety-controlling mechanisms.

  1. Urocortins and CRF type 2 receptor isoforms expression in the rat stomach are regulated by endotoxin: role in the modulation of delayed gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Pu-Qing; Wu, S Vincent; Taché, Yvette

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral activation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRF(2)) by urocortin 1, 2, or 3 (Ucns) exerts powerful effects on gastric function; however, little is known about their expression and regulation in the stomach. We investigated the expression of Ucns and CRF(2) isoforms by RT-PCR in the gastric corpus (GC) mucosa and submucosa plus muscle (S+M) or laser captured layers in naive rats, their regulations by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg ip) over 24 h, and the effect of the CRF(2) antagonist astresssin(2)-B (100 μg/kg sc) on LPS-induced delayed gastric emptying (GE) 2-h postinjection. Transcripts of Ucns and CRF(2b,) the most common wild-type CRF(2) isoform in the periphery, were expressed in all layers, including myenteric neurons. LPS increased Ucn mRNA levels significantly in both mucosa and S+M, reaching a maximal response at 6 h postinjection and returning to basal levels at 24 h except for Ucn 1 in S+M. By contrast, CRF(2b) mRNA level was significantly decreased in the mucosa and M+S with a nadir at 6 h. In addition, CRF(2a), reportedly only found in the brain, and the novel splice variant CRF(2a-3) were also detected in the GC, antrum, and pylorus. LPS reciprocally regulated these variants with a decrease of CRF(2a) and an increase of CRF(2a-3) in the GC 6 h postinjection. Astressin(2)-B exacerbated LPS-delayed GE (42-73%, P < 0.001). These data indicate that Ucn and CRF(2) isoforms are widely distributed throughout the rat stomach and inversely regulated by immune stress. The CRF(2) signaling system may act to counteract the early gastric motor alterations to endotoxemia.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 selective and nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and gastric mucosal responses.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, H; Araki, H; Mizoguchi, H; Ukawa, H

    1998-12-01

    Occurrence of gastrointestinal damage and delayed healing of pre-existing ulcer are commonly observed in association with clinical use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We examined the effects of NS-398, the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitor, and nitric oxide (NO)- releasing aspirin (NCX-4016) on gastric mucosal ulcerogenic and healing responses in experimental animals, in comparison with those of nonselective COX inhibitors such as indomethacin and aspirin. Indomethacin and aspirin given orally were ulcerogenic by themselves in rat stomachs, while either NS-398 or NCX-4016 was not ulcerogenic at the doses which exert the equipotent antiinflammatory action with indomethacin or aspirin. Among these NSAIDs, only NCX-4016 showed a dose-dependent protection against gastric lesions induced by HCl/ethanol in rats. On the other hand, the healing of gastric ulcers induced in mice by thermal-cauterization was significantly delayed by repeated administration of these NSAIDs for more than 7 days, except NCX-4016. Gastric mucosal prostaglandin contents were reduced by indomethacin, aspirin and NCX-4016 in both normal and ulcerated mucosa, while NS-398 significantly decreased prostaglandin generation only in the ulcerated mucosa. Oral administration of NCX-4016 in pylorus-ligated rats and mice increased the levels of NO metabolites in the gastric contents. In addition, both NS-398 and NCX-4016 showed an equipotent anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats as compared with indomethacin and aspirin. These results suggest that both indomethacin and aspirin are ulcerogenic by themselves and impair the healing of pre-existing gastric ulcers as well. The former action is due to inhibition of COX-1, while the latter effect may be accounted for by inhibition of COX-2 and mimicked by NS-398, the COX-2 selective NSAID. NCX-4016, despite inhibiting both COX-1 and COX-2, protects the stomach against damage and preserves the healing

  3. Gastroprotective activity of essential oil of the Syzygium aromaticum and its major component eugenol in different animal models.

    PubMed

    Santin, José Roberto; Lemos, Marivane; Klein-Júnior, Luiz Carlos; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Costa, Philipe; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Tilia, Crislaine; de Souza, Juliana Paula; de Sousa, João Paulo Barreto; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2011-02-01

    Syzygium aromaticum, a medicinal plant commonly known as clove, is used to treat toothache, respiratory disorders, inflammation, and gastrointestinal disorders. From the flower buds of S. aromaticum, it is possible to obtain an essential oil comprised of a mixture of aliphatic and cyclic volatile terpenes and phenylpropanoids, being eugenol as the main component. The aims of this study were: (1) to extract the essential oil of the flower buds of S. aromaticum, (2) to identify and quantify the main component of the essential oil, and (3) to evaluate its antiulcer activity using different animal models. Assays were performed using the following protocols in rats: indomethacin-induced and ethanol/HCl-induced ulcer model. Both essential oils from S. aromaticum and eugenol displayed antiulcer activities in the rat models of indomethacin- and ethanol-induced ulcer. Studies focusing on the possible mechanisms of gastroprotection were also undertaken using the following experiments: evaluation of gastric secretion by the pylorus-ligated model, determination of mucus in gastric content, participation of nitric oxide (NO) and endogenous sulfhydryl in gastric protection. The results show that there was no significant effect on the volume of gastric juice and total acidity. However, the quantification of free gastric mucus showed that the clove oil and eugenol were capable of significantly enhancing mucus production. With regard to the NO and endogenous sulfhydryls, the results demonstrated that the gastroprotection induced by clove oil and eugenol are not related to the activities of the nitric oxide and endogenous sulfhydryls. No sign of toxicity was observed in the acute toxicity study. In conclusion, the results of this study show that essential oil of S. aromaticum, as well as its main component (eugenol), possesses antiulcer activity. The data suggest that the effectiveness of the essential oil and eugenol is based on its ability to stimulate the synthesis of mucus, an

  4. Predicting the Insertion Length for Gastric Tube Placement in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ellett, Marsha L. Cirgin; Cohen, Mervyn D.; Perkins, Susan M.; Smith, Coral E.; Lane, Kathleen A.; Austin, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare error rates of three existing methods of predicting the gastric tube insertion length in a group of neonates < one month corrected age: age-related, height-based (ARHB); direct distance nose-ear-xiphoid (NEX); and direct distance nose-ear-mid-umbilicus (NEMU). Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Five neonatal care units in a large midwestern city. Participants One hundred seventy-three hospitalized neonates. Methods Neonates were randomly assigned to one of three groups: ARHB, NEX, or NEMU. For primary analysis, only tubes placed too high with the tube tip in the esophagus or at the gastroesophageal junction were considered to be misplaced. For secondary analysis, a stricter definition was used, and low placements (pylorus or duodenum) were also considered to be misplaced. All radiographs were blinded and read by a pediatric radiologist. Results For the primary analysis, the differences in percentages of correctly placed tubes among the three methods was statistically significant (chi-square = 34.45; p < 0.0001), with both NEMU and ARHB more accurate than NEX (NEMU chi-square = 18.59, p < 0.0001; ARHB chi-square = 21.34, p < 0.0001). Using the stricter definition for placement, ARHB was not significantly different from NEX (p = 0.0615). A new ARHB equation was developed specific for neonates < 1 month corrected age. Conclusions Direct distance nose-ear-xiphoid should no longer be used as an NG/OG tube insertion-length predictor in neonates. Either NEMU for nasogastric/orogastric (NG/OG) tubes or the new ARHB equation for NG tubes should be used. PMID:21639864

  5. Antiulcer Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Salvadora indica (W.) Leaves on Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Saroj Kumar; Priyadarshini, D.; Soundarya, G.; Kumar, Ch. Kishore; Rani, K. Usha

    2016-01-01

    Background Ulcer can be developed inside the inner lining of the stomach (gastric ulcer) or the small intestine (duodenal ulcer). Both the ulcers are also cumulatively referred as peptic ulcers. It affects nearly 10% of world population. Aim To investigate the antiulcer activity of ethanolic extract of Salvadora indica W. leaves (ESIL) on albino rats. Materials and Methods The present study was carried by pylorus ligation, ethanol and cysteamine induced ulcer models in albino rats. The antiulcer activity of ESIL (150, 300 and 600 mg/kg p.o. for 7 days) was compared with standard drugs (Ranitidine). In pyloric ligation induced ulcer model, the studied parameters were gastric volume, pH, total acidity, free acidity, and ulcer index whereas in ethanol and cysteamine induced ulcer model, the ulcer index was determined for severity of ulcers. The parameters studied were ulcer index, gastric juice volume, pH, free acidity and total acidity. Results In pyloric ligation model; the volume of gastric content, total/free acidity and pepsin activity was significantly decreased at p<0.05 and p<0.01 and pH of the gastric juice was significantly increased at p<0.05 and p<0.01 in ESIL treated groups as compared to control group. All the doses of ESIL showed dose dependent antiulcer effect as well as significant (p<0.05 and p<0.01) reduction in the ulcer index as compared to control group in all the experimental models. Conclusion The results of the study indicate that the ESIL have better potential against ulcer which supports the traditional claims in folklore medicine. PMID:27790462

  6. Acute gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen in an adult treated laparoscopically after endoscopic reduction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Omata, Jiro; Utsunomiya, Katsuyuki; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Takahata, Risa; Miyasaka, Nobuo; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Sakamoto, Naoko; Yamagishi, Yoji; Fukumura, Makiko; Kitagawa, Daiki; Konno, Mitsuhiko; Okusa, Yasushi; Murayama, Michinori

    2016-12-01

    A 43-year-old female was referred to our hospital for sudden onset of abdominal pain, fullness, and vomiting. Physical examination revealed abdominal distension with mild epigastric tenderness. Abdominal radiography showed massive gastric distension and plain computed tomography (CT) a markedly enlarged stomach filled with gas and fluid. A large volume of gastric contents was suctioned out via a nasogastric (NG) tube. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a grossly distended stomach with displacement of the antrum above the gastroesophageal junction, and the spleen was dislocated inferiorly. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) series showed the greater curvature to be elevated and the gastric fundus to be lower than normal. Acute mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus was diagnosed. GI endoscopy showed a distortion of the gastric anatomy with difficulty intubating the pylorus. Various endoscopic maneuvers were required to reposition the stomach, and the symptoms showed immediate and complete solution. GI fluoroscopy was performed 3 days later. Initially, most of the contrast medium accumulated in the fundus, which was drawn prominently downward, and then began flowing into the duodenum with anteflexion. Elective laparoscopic surgery was performed 1 month later. The stomach was in its normal position, but the fundus was folded posteroinferiorly. The spleen attached to the fundus was normal in size but extremely mobile. We diagnosed a wandering spleen based on the operative findings. Gastropexy was performed for the treatment of gastric volvulus and wandering spleen. The patient remained asymptomatic, and there was no evidence of recurrence during a follow-up period of 24 months. This report describes a rare adult case of acute gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen. Because delay in treatment can result in lethal complications, it is critical to provide a prompt and correct diagnosis and surgical intervention. We advocate laparoscopic surgery after endoscopic reduction because

  7. Antiulcerogenic activity of Carica papaya seed in rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lorraine Aparecida; Cordeiro, Kátia Wolff; Carrasco, Viviane; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Cardoso, Cláudia Andréa Lima; Argadoña, Eliana Janet Sanjinez; Freitas, Karine de Cássia

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and healing effects of the methanolic extract of the seed of the papaya Carica papaya L. (MECP) in rats. Models of acute gastric ulcer induction by ethanol and indomethacin and of chronic ulcer by acetic acid were used. The gastric juice and mucus parameters were evaluated using the pylorus ligation model, and the involvement of sulfhydryl compounds (GSH) and nitric oxide in the gastroprotective effect was analyzed using the ethanol model. The toxicity was assessed through toxicity tests. No signs of toxicity were observed when the rats received a single dose of 2000 mg/kg of extract. The MECP in doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg significantly reduced the gastric lesion with 56, 76, and 82 % inhibition, respectively, and a dose of 30 mg/kg lansoprazole showed 79 % inhibition in the ethanol model. MECP (125, 250, 500 mg/kg) and cimetidine (200 mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion in the indomethacin model, with 62, 67, 81, and 85 % inhibition, respectively. The MECP (500 mg/kg) and cimetidine (200 mg/kg) treatments showed a reduction in ulcerative symptoms induced by acetic acid by 84 and 73 %, respectively. The antiulcerogenic activity seems to involve GSH because the inhibition dropped from 72 to 13 % in the presence of a GSH inhibitor. Moreover, the MECP showed systemic action, increasing the mucus production and decreasing gastric acidity. Treatments with MECP induce gastroprotection without signs of toxicity. This effect seems to involve sulfhydryl compounds, increased mucus, and reduced gastric acidity.

  8. The location of obstruction predicts stent occlusion in malignant gastric outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Douglas; Cohen, Jonah; Bartley, Anthony; Sheridan, Jennifer; Chuttani, Ram; Sawhney, Mandeep S.; Pleskow, Douglas K.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) can occur with locally invasive or metastatic cancer involving the upper gastrointestinal tract at the pylorus or the duodenum. Endoscopic management with self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs) is often the preferred palliative approach. Stent occlusion is a common reason for failure and reintervention. We set out to determine whether the location of the malignant obstruction is associated with the angulation of the stent and can predict stent occlusion. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients who underwent successful duodenal stenting with SEMS for malignant GOO between 2006 and 2015 at a large advanced endoscopy referral center. We determined the location of obstruction, the stent angle, and the rate of technical and clinical success of stent placement. We then identified cases of subsequent stent occlusion confirmed by endoscopic evaluation. Results: A total of 100 consecutive patients were included in the study; 91 of these patients had enough data to evaluate SEMS occlusion. A total of 21 patients (23%) developed stent occlusion with a median time of 39 days. The risk of occlusion sequentially increased as the obstruction occurred more distally from the antrum to the third or fourth portion of the duodenum (p = 0.006). This relationship was maintained after controlling for stent angle (p = 0.05). Conclusions: A distal location of malignant GOO was strongly predictive of stent occlusion, independent of stent angle. This may be due to longer and more complex distal obstructions, along with foreshortening of the stent during placement and tumor infiltration. If replicated, these results will have implications for endoscopic practice and future device development. PMID:27803736

  9. Paracrine Hedgehog signaling in stomach and intestine: new roles for Hedgehog in gastrointestinal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Kolterud, Åsa; Grosse, Ann S.; Zacharias, William J.; Walton, Katherine D.; Kretovich, Katherine E.; Madison, Blair; Waghray, Meghna; Ferris, Jennifer E.; Hu, Chunbo; Merchant, Juanita L.; Dlugosz, Andrzej; Kottmann, Andreas H.; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Hedgehog signaling is critical in gastrointestinal patterning. Mice deficient in Hedgehog signaling exhibit abnormalities that mirror deformities seen in the human VACTERL (vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheal, esophageal, renal, limb) association. However, the direction of Hedgehog signal flow is controversial and the cellular targets of Hedgehog signaling change with time during development. We profiled cellular Hedgehog response patterns from embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) to adult in murine antrum, pyloric region, small intestine and colon. Methods Hedgehog signaling was profiled using Hedgehog pathway reporter mice and in situ hybridization. Cellular targets were identified by immunostaining. Ihh-overexpressing transgenic animals were generated and analyzed. Results Hedgehog signaling is strictly paracrine from antrum to colon throughout embryonic and adult life. Novel findings include: mesothelial cells of the serosa transduce Hedgehog signals in fetal life; the hindgut epithelium expresses Ptch but not Gli1 at E10.5; the two layers of the muscularis externa respond differently to Hedgehog signals; organogenesis of the pyloric sphincter is associated with robust Hedgehog signaling; dramatically different Hedgehog responses characterize stomach and intestine at E16; after birth, the muscularis mucosa and villus smooth muscle (SM) consist primarily of Hedgehog responsive cells and Hh levels actively modulate villus core SM. Conclusions These studies reveal a previously unrecognized association of paracrine Hedgehog signaling with several gastrointestinal patterning events involving the serosa, pylorus and villus smooth muscle. The results may have implications for several human anomalies and could potentially expand the spectrum of the human VACTERL association. PMID:19445942

  10. The evaluation of anti-ulcerogenic effect of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.) on pyloric ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekhara, N.; Ashok, B. K.; Sharma, Parmeshwar P.; Ravishankar, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the present era, because of the life-style, the disorders such as hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently. Satwa (starch) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn. are used in folklore practice for the treatment of above complaints under the name Tugaksheeree. Aim: To compare the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the above two drugs in pyloric ligation induced gastric ulcer in albino rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 Wistar strain albino rats of both sexes grouped into three groups. Group C served as pyloric ligated control group, Group I received starch of C. angustifolia suspension and Group II received starch of M. arundinacea for seven days. On 8th day pylorus was ligated. After ligation the animals were deprived of food and water and sacrificed at the end of 14 h. The collected gastric contents were used for biochemical estimation and ulcer index was calculated from excised stomach. Results: Both the test drugs showed statistically significant decrease in the volume, increase in the pH, reduced the free acidity of gastric juice and decreased the peptic activity. The starch of C. angustifolia reduced a total acidity non-significantly while M. arundinacea reduced it significantly. Among the two drugs the M. arundinacea has effectively reduced the peptic activity, which is statistically significant. M. arundinacea shown statistically significant increase of total carbohydrates. Conclusion: Both the test drugs proved anti-ulcer activity and prevents the chance of gastric ulcer. Among these two M. arundinacea is more effective. PMID:25558167

  11. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V.; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25–44% (oral extract) and to 29–37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways. PMID:24695819

  12. Role of the homeodomain transcription factor Bapx1 in mouse distal stomach development

    PubMed Central

    Verzi, Michael P.; Stanfel, Monique N.; Moses, Kelvin A.; Kim, Byeong-Moo; Zhang, Yan; Schwartz, Robert J.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Zimmer, Warren E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Expansion and patterning of the endoderm generate a highly ordered, multi-organ digestive system in vertebrate animals. Among distal foregut derivatives, the gastric corpus, antrum, pylorus and duodenum are distinct structures with sharp boundaries. Some homeodomain transcription factors expressed in gut mesenchyme convey positional information required for anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive tract. Barx1, in particular, controls stomach differentiation and morphogenesis. The NK homeobox gene Bapx1 (Nkx3-2) has an established role in skeletal development but its function in the mammalian gut is less clear. Methods We generated a Bapx1Cre knock-in allele to fate map Bapx1-expressing cells and evaluate its function in gastrointestinal development. Results Bapx1-expressing cells populate the gut mesenchyme with a rostral boundary in the hindstomach, near the junction of the gastric corpus and antrum. Smooth muscle differentiation and distribution of early regional markers are ostensibly normal in Bapx1Cre/Cre gut, but there are distinctive morphologic abnormalities near this rostral Bapx1 domain: the antral segment of the stomach is markedly shortened and the pyloric constriction is lost. Comparison of expression domains and examination of stomach phenotypes in single and compound Barx1 and Bapx1 mutant mice suggest a hierarchy between these two factors; Bapx1 expression is lost in the absence of Barx1. Conclusions This study reveals the non-redundant requirement for Bapx1 in distal stomach development, places it within a Barx1-dependent pathway, and illustrates the pervasive influence of gut mesenchyme homeobox genes on endoderm differentiation and digestive organogenesis. PMID:19208343

  13. Negative oncologic impact of poor postoperative pain control in left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Eun-Ki; Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Pae, Sang Joon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS From January 2009 to December 2014, 221 patients were diagnosed with PDAC and underwent resection with curative intent. Retrospective review of the patients was performed based on electronic medical records system. One patient without records of numerical rating scale (NRS) pain intensity scores was excluded and eight patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were also excluded. NRS scores during 7 postoperative days following resection of PDAC were reviewed along with clinicopathologic characteristics. Patients were stratified into a good pain control group and a poor pain control group according to the difference in average pain intensity between the early (POD 1, 2, 3) and late (POD 5, 7) postoperative periods. Cox-proportional hazards multivariate analysis was performed to determine association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. RESULTS A total of 212 patients were dichotomized into good pain control group (n = 162) and poor pain control group (n = 66). Median follow-up period was 17 mo. A negative impact of poor postoperative pain control on overall survival (OS) was observed in the group of patients receiving distal pancreatectomy (DP group; 42.0 mo vs 5.0 mo, P = 0.001). Poor postoperative pain control was also associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) in the DP group (18.0 mo vs 8.0 mo, P = 0.001). Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD group) did not show associations between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. Poor patients’ perceived pain control was revealed as an independent risk factor of both DFS (HR = 4.157; 95%CI: 1.938-8.915; P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 4.741; 95%CI: 2.214-10.153; P < 0.001) in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION Adequate postoperative pain relief during the early

  14. Transport of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in a Simulated Gastric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Ryan T.

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the use of many types of nano sized materials in the consumer sector. Potential uses include encapsulation of nutrients, providing antimicrobial activity, altering texture, or changing bioavailability of nutrients. Engineered nanoparticles (ENP) possess properties that are different than larger particles made of the same constituents. Properties such as solubility, aggregation state, and toxicity can all be changed as a function of size. The gastric environment is an important area for study of engineered nanoparticles because of the varied physical, chemical, and enzymatic processes that are prevalent there. These all have the potential to alter those properties of ENP that make them different from their bulk counterparts. The Human Gastric Simulator (HGS) is an advanced in vitro model that can be used to study many facets of digestion. The HGS consists of a plastic lining that acts as the stomach cavity with two sets of U-shaped arms on belts that provide the physical forces needed to replicate peristalsis. Altering the position of the arms or changing the speed of the motor which powers them allows one to tightly hone and replicate varied digestive conditions. Gastric juice, consisting of salts, enzymes, and acid levels which replicate physiological conditions, is introduced to the cavity at a controllable rate. The release of digested food from the lumen of simulated stomach is controlled by a peristaltic pump. The goal of the HGS is to accurately and repeatedly simulate human digestion. This study focused on introducing foods spiked with zinc oxide ENP and bulk zinc oxide into the HGS and then monitoring how the concentration of each changed at two locations in the HGS over a two hour period. The two locations chosen were the highest point in the lumen of the stomach, which represented the fundus, and a point just beyond the equivalent of the pylorus, which represented the antrum of the stomach. These points were

  15. Radiopaque markers to evaluate gastric emptying and small intestinal transit time in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Chandler, M L; Guilford, G; Lawoko, C R

    1997-01-01

    Determinations of gastric emptying time (GET) and small intestinal transit time (SITT) are useful in detecting gastrointestinal motility disorders and partial obstructions of the pylorus or small intestine. Barium-impregnated, polyethylene radiopaque spheres with diameters of 1.5 mm and 5.0 mm have been developed for quantitative assessment of gastrointestinal transit. The purpose of this study was to evaluate GET and SITT using these radiopaque spheres in 10 healthy cats. The cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: fasted, fed, and fed plus sedation (acetylpromazine maleate 0.10 mg/kg subcutaneously). A repeated measures study design was used. The mean GETs of 50%, 75%, and 90% of the 1.5-mm and the 5-mm spheres in the unfed cats were 0.36, 0.58, and 0.74 hours, and 0.41, 0.68, and 1.02 hours, respectively. These values were significantly (P < or = .05) more rapid than the GETs of 50%, 75%, and 90% of the 1.5-mm and 5-mm spheres of either the sedated fed cats (4.39, 5.68, 6.65 and 5.15, 5.99, 6.91 hours) or the unsedated fed cats (6.43, 8.12, 9.06 and 7.49, 8.49, 9.22 hours). The mean GETs of 50% and 75% of the 1.5-mm and 5-mm and of 90% of the 1.5-mm spheres were significantly (P < or = .05) more rapid in sedated than in unsedated fed cats. The GET of 50% of the 1.5-mm spheres was significantly more rapid (P < or = .05) than that of the 5-mm spheres in the fed cats. The mean SITTs, which ranged from 2.25 to 3.05 hours, were not significantly different (P > .05) among the treatment groups or between the 1.5-mm and 5-mm spheres. The GET of spheres given to fasted cats is significantly more rapid than that of fed cats. Subcutaneous injection of acetylpromazine speeds GET in fed cats. The SITT of small and large spheres was not influenced by feeding or by acetylpromazine injection.

  16. Twelve year experience of laparoscopic gastric plication in morbid obesity: development of the technique and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic Gastric Plication (LGP) is a new restrictive bariatric surgery, previously introduced by the author. The aim of this study is to explain the modifications and to present the 12-year experience, regarding early and long term results, complications and cost. Methods We used LGP for morbid obesity during the past 12 years. Anterior plication (10 cases), one-row bilateral plication while right gastroepiploic artery included (42 cases), and excluded from the plication (104 cases) and two-row plication (644 cases). The gastric greater curvature was plicated using 2/0 prolen from fundus at the level of diaphragm preserving the His angle to just proximal to the pylorus. The anatomic and functional volume of stomach was 50cc and 25cc respectively in two-row method. Ordered postop visits also included evaluation of weight loss, complications, change of diet and control of exercise. Results LGP was performed in 800 cases (mean age: 27.5, range: 12 to 65 years, nine under 18). Female to male ratio was 81% to 19% and average BMI was 42.1 (35-59). The mean excess weight loss (EWL) was 70% (40% to 100%) after 24 months and 55% (28% to 100%) after 5 years following surgery. 134 cases (16.7%) did not completed long term follow-up. The average time of follow up was 5 years (1 month to 12 years). 5.5% and 31% of cases complained from weight regain respectively during 4 and 12 years after LGP. The mean time of operation was 72 (49–152) minutes and average hospitalization time was 72 hours (24 hours to 45 days). The cost of operation was 2000 $ less than gastric banding or sleeve and 2500 $ less than gastric bypass. Eight patients out of 800 cases (1%) required reoperation due to complications like: micro perforation, obstruction and vomiting following adhesion of His angle. Other complications included hepatitis pneumonia, self-limiting intra-abdominal bleeding and hypocalcaemia. Conclusion The percentage of EWL in this technique is comparable to other

  17. Effect of carbachol on intestinal mucosal blood flow, activity of Na+-K+-ATPase, expression of aquaporin-1, and intestinal absorption rate during enteral resuscitation of burn shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengmei; Hu, Sen; Zhou, Guoyong; Tian, Yijun; Wu, Yan; Sheng, Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of carbachol (CAR, a cholinergic agent) on intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF), activity of Na-K-ATPase, expression of aquaporin (AQP)-1, and intestinal absorption rate during enteral resuscitation of a 35%TBSA scald in rats with a glucose electrolyte solution (GES). One hundred male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: sham scald (N group); scald without fluid resuscitation (S group); scald resuscitated with enteral GES alone (GES group); scald resuscitated with enteral CAR alone (CAR group); and scald resuscitated with enteral CAR plus GES (GES/CAR group). The rats were inflicted 35%TBSA third degree of scald injury on the back with boiling water (100 degrees C, 15 seconds) in all groups, except the sham scald group. A catheter was inserted into the proximal duodenum (5 cm distal to pylorus) and distal ileum (5 cm proximal to cecum), of each rats through laparotomy, thus a segment of intestine was virtually isolated to form a loop for inlet and outlet of introduced fluid. In N, GES, and GES/CAR groups, fluids were introduced 30 minutes after scald injury. The speed of fluid infusion was 4 ml/kg/1%TBSA for 4 hours. CAR (60 microg/kg) was injected into the intestinal lumen at 30-minute after injury in CAR and GES/CAR groups. At 2 and 4 hours after scald, intestinal absorption rate of water and Na, and IMBF were determined, respectively. Then, animals were killed, and specimens of intestinal tissue were obtained for the determination of the activity of Na-K-ATPase, hematoxylin-eosin coloring, and expression of AQP-1. The intestinal absorption rate was reduced markedly in GES group compared with sham scald group at 2 and 4 hours after scald, and absorption rate of small intestine in GES/CAR was significantly higher than that in GES group (P < .05). It was also found that there was significant decrease in IMBF, activity of Na-K-ATPase, and expression of AQP-1 in scald group compared with the sham group. However, in GES

  18. Gastric antral webs in adults: A case series characterizing their clinical presentation and management in the modern endoscopic era

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Shannon J; Nigam, Neha; Chalhoub, Walid M; Abdelaziz, Dalia I; Lewis, James H; Benjamin, Stanley B

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the current management of gastric antral webs (GAWs) among adults and identify optimal endoscopic and/or surgical management for these patients. METHODS We reviewed our endoscopy database seeking to identify patients in whom a GAW was visualized among 24640 esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD) over a seven-year period (2006-2013) at a single tertiary care center. The diagnosis of GAW was suspected during EGD if aperture size of the antrum did not vary with peristalsis or if a “double bulb” sign was present on upper gastrointestinal series. Confirmation of the diagnosis was made by demonstrating a normal pylorus distal to the GAW. RESULTS We identified 34 patients who met our inclusion criteria (incidence 0.14%). Of these, five patients presented with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), four of whom underwent repeated sequential balloon dilations and/or needle-knife incisions with steroid injection for alleviation of GOO. The other 29 patients were incidentally found to have a non-obstructing GAW. Age at diagnosis ranged from 30-87 years. Non-obstructing GAWs are mostly incidental findings. The most frequently observed symptom prompting endoscopic work-up was refractory gastroesophageal reflux (n = 24, 70.6%) followed by abdominal pain (n = 11, 33.4%), nausea and vomiting (n = 9, 26.5%), dysphagia (n = 6, 17.6%), unexplained weight loss, (n = 4, 11.8%), early satiety (n = 4, 11.8%), and melena of unclear etiology (n = 3, 8.82%). Four of five GOO patients were treated with balloon dilation (n = 4), four-quadrant needle-knife incision (n = 3), and triamcinolone injection (n = 2). Three of these patients required repeat intervention. One patient had a significant complication of perforation after needle-knife incision. CONCLUSION Endoscopic intervention for GAW using balloon dilation or needle-knife incision is generally safe and effective in relieving symptoms, however repeat treatment may be needed and a risk of perforation exists with thermal

  19. Protective effects of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on gastric ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiao-Chang; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ming-Tang; Li, Wen-Guang; Zhao, Ning; Wang, Zeng-Lu; Bao, Chun-Jie; Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Ying-Qi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effects of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on acute and chronic gastric ulcers in rats and to compare the results in therapy of human gastric ulcers by different administration methods. METHODS: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 was administered (initial single or continuous administration) into rats either intragastrically or intramuscularly before (induced acute gastric ulcer) or after (induced chronic gastric ulcer) the applications of inducing agents, and each animal was sacrificed to observe the protective effects of BPC 157 on gastric ulcers. RESULTS: Both intramuscular (im) and intragastric (ig) administration of BPC 157 could apparently reduce the ulcer area and accelerate the healing of induced ulcer in different models and the effect of im administered BPC 157 was better than that of ig. The rats treated with higher dosages (400 ng/kg, 800 ng/kg) of BPC 157 (im and ig) showed significantly less lesion (P < 0.01 vs excipient or saline control), the inhibition ratio of ulcer formation varied between 45.7% and 65.6%, from all measurements except 400 ng/kg BPC 157 in pylorus ligation induced model (P < 0.05), in which the inhibition rate was 54.2%. When im administered (800 ng/kg BPC 157) in three models, the inhibition ratio of ulcer formation was 65.5%, 65.6% and 59.9%, respectively, which was better than that of famotidine (its inhibition rate was 60.8%, 57.2% and 34.3%, respectively). Continuous application of BPC 157 (in chronic acetate induced gastric ulcer) could accelerate rebuilding of glandular epithelium and formation of granulation tissue (P < 0.05 at 200 ng/kg and P < 0.01 at 400 ng/kg and 800 ng/kg vs excipient or saline control). CONCLUSION: Both im and ig administered gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 can apparently ameliorate acute gastric ulcer in rats and antagonize the protracted effect of acetate challenge on chronic ulcer. The effect of im administration of BPC 157 is better than that of ig, and the

  20. Protective effect of anacardic acids from cashew (Anacardium occidentale) on ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais, Talita C; Pinto, Natália B; Carvalho, Karine Maria M B; Rios, Jeison B; Ricardo, Nagila Maria P S; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2010-01-05

    Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids (AAs) have been shown to possess antioxidant, lipoxygenase inhibitory, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. Despite these known effects, hitherto there were no published reports on their likely gastroprotective effects. The present study was designed to verify whether AAs afford gastroprotection against the ethanol-induced gastric damage and to examine the underlying mechanism(s). Gastric damage was induced by intragastric administration of 0.2mL of ethanol (96%). Mice in groups were pretreated orally with AAs (10, 30 and 100mg/kg), misoprostol (50 microg/kg), or vehicle (2% Tween 80 in saline, 10mL/kg), 45min before ethanol administration. They were sacrificed 30min later, the stomachs excised, and the mucosal lesion area (mm(2)) measured by planimetry. Gastroprotection was assessed in relation to inhibition of gastric lesion area. To study the gastroprotective mechanism(s), its relations to capsaicin-sensitive fibers, endogenous prostaglandins, nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels were analysed. Treatments effects on ethanol-associated oxidative stress markers GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD, and total nitrate/nitrite levels as an index of NO were measured in gastric tissue. Besides, the effects of AAs on gastric secretory volume and total acidity were analysed in 4-h pylorus-ligated rat. AAs afforded a dose-related gastroprotection against the ethanol damage and further prevented the ethanol-induced changes in the levels of GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD and nitrate/nitrite. However, they failed to modify the gastric secretion or the total acidity. It was observed that the gastroprotection by AAs was greatly reduced in animals pretreated with capsazepine, indomethacin, l-NAME or glibenclamide. These results suggest that AAs afford gastroprotection principally through an antioxidant mechanism. Other complementary mechanisms include the activation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric afferents

  1. Effects of cyclooxygenase-2 selective and nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on mucosal ulcerogenic and healing responses of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, H; Yamakuni, H; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    1998-09-01

    Effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398) and nitric oxide (NO) -releasing aspirin (NO-ASA) on gastric ulcerogenic and healing responses were examined in comparison with nonselective COX inhibitors such as indomethacin and aspirin (ASA). Hypothermic stress (28-30 degrees C, 4 hr) induced gastric lesions in anesthetized rats with an increase of acid secretion. The lesions induced by hypothermic stress were markedly worsened by subcutaneous administration of both indomethacin and ASA but were not affected by either NS-398 or NO-ASA, although the increased acid secretion during hypothermia was not affected by any of the drugs. On the other hand, the healing of gastric ulcers induced in mice by thermal cauterization (70 degrees C, 15 sec) was significantly delayed by daily subcutaneous administration of indomethacin and ASA as well as NS-398, but not by NO-ASA. COX-2 mRNA was not detected in the intact mucosa but was positively expressed in the ulcerated mucosa, most potently on day 3 after ulceration. Prostaglandin contents in the intact mouse stomach were reduced by indomethacin, ASA, and NO-ASA, while the increased prostaglandin generation in the ulcerated mucosa was inhibited by all drugs including NS-398. After subcutaneous administration of NO-ASA to pylorus-ligated rats and mice, high amounts of NOx were detected in both the gastric contents and serum. In addition, both NS-398 and NO-ASA showed an equipotent antiinflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats as compared with indomethacin and ASA. These results suggest that both indomethacin and ASA not only increased the mucosal ulcerogenic response to stress but impaired the healing response of gastric ulcers as well. The former action was due to inhibition of COX-1, while the latter effect was accounted for by inhibition of COX-2 and was mimicked by the COX-2-selective inhibitor NS-398. NO-ASA, although it inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2 activity, had no deleterious

  2. Small amounts of tissue preserve pancreatic function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zipeng; Yin, Jie; Wei, Jishu; Dai, Cuncai; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Xu, Qing; Dai, Hao; Li, Qiang; Guo, Feng; Chen, Jianmin; Xi, Chunhua; Wu, Pengfei; Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Middle-segment preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) is a novel procedure for treating multifocal lesions of the pancreas while preserving pancreatic function. However, long-term pancreatic function after this procedure remains unclear. The aims of this current study are to investigate short- and long-term outcomes, especially long-term pancreatic endocrine function, after MPP. From September 2011 to December 2015, 7 patients underwent MPP in our institution, and 5 cases with long-term outcomes were further analyzed in a retrospective manner. Percentage of tissue preservation was calculated using computed tomography volumetry. Serum insulin and C-peptide levels after oral glucose challenge were evaluated in 5 patients. Beta-cell secreting function including modified homeostasis model assessment of beta-cell function (HOMA2-beta), area under the curve (AUC) for C-peptide, and C-peptide index were evaluated and compared with those after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and total pancreatectomy. Exocrine function was assessed based on questionnaires. Our case series included 3 women and 2 men, with median age of 50 (37–81) years. Four patients underwent pylorus-preserving PD together with distal pancreatectomy (DP), including 1 with spleen preserved. The remaining patient underwent Beger procedure and spleen-preserving DP. Median operation time and estimated intraoperative blood loss were 330 (250–615) min and 800 (400–5500) mL, respectively. Histological examination revealed 3 cases of metastatic lesion to the pancreas, 1 case of chronic pancreatitis, and 1 neuroendocrine tumor. Major postoperative complications included 3 cases of delayed gastric emptying and 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula. Imaging studies showed that segments representing 18.2% to 39.5% of the pancreas with good blood supply had been preserved. With a median 35.0 months of follow-ups on pancreatic functions, only 1 patient developed new-onset diabetes mellitus of the 4

  3. Preliminary studies of Mammea americana L. (Guttiferae) bark/latex extract point to an effective antiulcer effect on gastric ulcer models in mice.

    PubMed

    Toma, W; Hiruma-Lima, C A; Guerrero, R O; Brito, A R M Souza

    2005-05-01

    Plant extracts are some of the most attractive sources of new drugs and have shown promising results for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Several folk medicinal plants and herbs have been used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, including gastric ulcers. Mammea americana L. (Guttiferae) fruit is very common in the diet of the population of northern South America. Our research interest in this plant arose because of its potential medicinal value as a tonic and against stomachache, as used in folk medicine. In this paper we evaluated three different extracts (ethanolic/EtOH, methanolic/MeOH and dichloromethane/DCM) obtained from M. americana L., for their ability to protect the gastric mucosa against injuries caused by necrotizing agents (0.3 M HCl/60% EtOH), hypothermic restraint stress, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID, indomethacin) and pylorus ligation. In the HCl/EtOH-induced gastric-ulcer model, EtOH and DCM extracts demonstrated significant inhibition of the ulcerative lesion index by 54% (12.0 +/- 2.6 mm) and 86% (3.7 +/- 1.8 mm), respectively, in relation to the control value (26.0 +/- 1.4 mm) (p<0.0001). In the NSAID/cholinomimetic-induced lesion model, both EtOH and DCM extracts showed antiulcerogenic effects with significant reduction in the damage to these gastric lesions of 36% (8.3 +/- 2.0 mm) and 42% (7.5 +/- 1.4 mm), respectively, as compared to the control group (13.0 +/- 0.9 mm) (p<0.0001). In the gastric ulcer induced by hypothermic-restraint stress, both extracts also showed significant activity, and inhibited the gastric lesion index by 58% and 75%, respectively. The EtOH and DCM extracts also changed gastric juice parameters as well as those of cimetidine, decreased gastric acid secretion significantly (p<0.0001), increased pH values and promoted reduced acid output (p<0.0001). In all gastric-ulcer-induced models, MeOH extract did not show any significant antiulcerogenic activity, nor did it change gastric-juice parameters (p>0

  4. Gastroprotective effect of standardized extract of Amukkara choornam on experimental gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kartik Chandra; Jayaram Kumar, K; Ahirwar, Dheeraj Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Amukkara choornam ethanolic extract (ACE) was investigated for phytochemical screening, content of total phenolics and flavonoids, in vitro radical scavenging activity (RSA), quantification of various antiulcer marker compounds (i.e., eugenol, piperine, trans-caryophyllene, and withaferine A) by a validated HPTLC method, and evaluated for its in vivo gastroprotective ability against ethanol (EtOH)-induced and pylorus ligation (PL)-induced ulcer models in rats. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids, saponins, phenols, bitter principles, and steroids. Total phenolic and flavonoid content was found to be 61.12 ± 0.72 mg GAE/g of ACE and 24.06 ± 1.07 mg RE/g of ACE, respectively; this was found to be very high in plant extracts showing very good antioxidant and antiulcerogenic effect. RSA of ACE appeared significantly (p < 0.05) lower than that of ascorbic acid (AA), but higher than that of ranitidine (RAN). In vivo the pretreatment of rats with RAN (100 mg/kg) and 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg doses of ACE significantly reduced the ulcer index in a dose-dependant manner in both the models by blocking lipid peroxidation and by significant increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activity. But rats treated with AA (200 mg/kg) did not have any effect on the ulcer induced by EtOH or PL as it has very good in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. HPTLC analysis showed the presence of 0.198 ± 0.01 μg/g, 0.754 ± 0.06 mg/g, 3.50 ± 0.04, and 0.854 ± 0.04 μg/g of eugenol, piperine, trans-caryophyllene, and withaferine A per gram of Amukkara choornam (AC). So the antiulcerogenic activity of ACE might be due to a possible synergistic antioxidant, supported by the holistic approach of polyherbal formulations, i.e., systematism, multi-target and multi-channel owing to their complex chemical constituents and antihistaminic-like effects.

  5. Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by a standardized aqueous extract of Cecropia glaziovii Sneth and underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Souccar, C; Cysneiros, R M; Tanae, M M; Torres, L M B; Lima-Landman, M T R; Lapa, A J

    2008-06-01

    F were assayed on gastric acid secretion of pylorus-ligated mice, on acute models of gastric mucosal lesions, and on rabbit gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase preparations. Intraduodenal injection of AE or BuF (0.5-2.0g/kg, i.d) produced a dose-related decrease of the basal gastric acid secretion in 4-h pylorus-ligated mice. At 1.0g/kg, BuF decreased the volume (28%) and total acidity (33%) of the basal acid secretion, and reversed the histamine (2.5mg/kg, s.c.)- or bethanecol (1.0mg/kg, s.c.)-induced acid secretion to basal values, indicating inhibition of the gastric proton pump. Pretreatment of mice with the BuF (0.05-0.5g/kg, p.o.) protected against gastric mucosal lesions induced by 75% ethanol, indomethacin (30mg/kg, s.c.) or restraint at 4 degrees C. BuF also decreased the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro proportionately to the concentration (IC(50)=58.8microg/ml). The compounds isolated from BuF, consisting mainly of cathechins, procyanidins and flavonoids [Tanae, M.M., Lima-Landman, M.T.R., De Lima, T.C.M., Souccar, C., Lapa, A.J., 2007. Chemical standardization of the aqueous extract of Cecropia glaziovii Sneth endowed with antihypertensive, bronchodilator, antacid secretion and antidepressant-like activities. Phytomedicine 14, 309-313], inhibited the in vitro gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase activity at equieffective concentrations to that of BuF. The results indicate that C. glazioui constituents inhibit the gastric proton pump; this effect may account for the effective antisecretory and antiulcer activities of the standardized plant extract.

  6. Effect of type of grinding of barley and dehydrated alfalfa on performance, digestion, and crude mucin ileal concentration in growing rabbits.

    PubMed

    Romero, C; Nicodemus, N; Rodríguez, J D; García, A I; de Blas, C

    2011-08-01

    The effects of type of grinding of barley and dehydrated alfalfa (DA) were tested in rabbits weaned at 35 d of age with an average BW of 846 ± 93 g. Four nonmedicated diets were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial structure, with type of grinding (coarse grinding with a 4.5-mm screen or fine grinding with a 1.5-mm screen) of barley (TGB) and DA (TGDA) as the main factors. A total of 1,056 mixed-sex rabbits (264 per diet) were fattened until d 63. Most of these rabbits (216 per diet) were housed in pairs and were used only to record mortality rate. Mortality was also recorded for the remaining 192 rabbits, which were housed individually and used to determine growth performance. From this group, 100 rabbits were used to determine digestive traits. Apart from those rabbits, a different group of 88 rabbits (44 housed individually and the remaining 44 housed in pairs) was used in the digestibility trial. All rabbits in this group were used to determine ileal digestibility (13 pools of ileal digesta per diet) and ileal mucin concentration (6 pools of ileal digesta per diet), whereas only the 44 individually housed rabbits were used to assess the fecal digestibility coefficients (11 rabbits per diet). Last, a jejunal sample was excised from 32 of the 44 individually housed rabbits to determine mucosal histology. Treatments did not affect ADG, ADFI, or G:F in the entire fattening period, but in the 49- to 63-d period, the diet containing both finely ground barley and DA reduced ADFI (P=0.08) compared with the other treatments (130 vs. 137 g). Moreover, this diet increased total digestive tract (4.76%, P=0.08) and cecal content (11.3%, P=0.08) weights compared with the other 3 treatments. Pylorus (P=0.09) and mixed digesta (P=0.06) pH, respectively, were reduced from 1.53 and 1.59 to 1.37 and 1.44 when both barley and DA were finely instead of coarsely ground. Grinding both barley and DA coarsely reduced the ileal digestibility of starch (0.899 vs. 0.936, P=0.06), increased (P

  7. Surgical strategies in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Cui, Naiqiang; Wang, Ximo; Cui, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common and frequently occurring disease. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD), and duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) are important treatment options for patients with chronic pancreatitis. The Beger and Frey procedures are 2 main duodenum-preserving techniques in duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) strategies. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical efficacy of DPPHR versus PD, the Beger procedure versus PD, the Frey procedure versus PD, and the Beger procedure versus the Frey procedure in the treatment of pancreatitis. The optimal surgical option for chronic pancreatitis is still under debate. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of different surgical strategies for chronic pancreatitis. Methods: Five databases (PubMed, Medline, SinoMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library) were searched with the limitations of human subjects and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) text. Data were extracted by 2 of the coauthors independently and analyzed using the RevMan statistical software, version 5.3. Weighted mean differences (WMDs), risk ratios (RRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the risk of bias. Results: Seven studies involving a total of 385 patients who underwent the surgical treatments were assessed. The methodological quality of the trials ranged from low to moderate and included PD (n = 134) and DPPHR (n = 251 [Beger procedure = 100; Frey procedure = 109; Beger or Frey procedure = 42]). There were no significant differences between DPPHR and PD in post-operation mortality (RR = 2.89, 95% CI = 0.31–26.87, P = 0.36), pain relief (RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.94–1.25, P = 0.26), exocrine insufficiency (follow-up time > 60 months