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Sample records for pyrimidine dimer formation

  1. Blocking cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Yamaji, Minoru; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-04-26

    The efficiency of thymine (Thy) and uracil (Ura) to form cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in solution, upon UV irradiation differs by one order of magnitude. This could to be partially related to the steric hindrance induced by the methyl at C5 in thymine. The aim of the present work is to establish the influence of a bulky moiety at this position on the photoreactivity of pyrimidines. With this purpose, photosensitization with benzophenone and acetone of a 5-tert-butyl uracil derivative () and the equivalent Thy () has been compared. Introduction of the tert-butyl group completely blocks CPD formation. Moreover, the mechanistic insight obtained by laser flash photolysis is in accordance with the observed photoreactivity. PMID:27112630

  2. Wavelength dependence of pyrimidine dimer formation in DNA of human skin irradiated in situ with ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Freeman, S E; Hacham, H; Gange, R W; Maytum, D J; Sutherland, J C; Sutherland, B M

    1989-07-01

    The UV components of sunlight are believed to be a major cause of human skin cancer, and DNA is thought to be the principal molecular target. Alterations of the intensity and wavelength distribution of solar UV radiation reaching the surface of the earth, for example by depletion of stratospheric ozone, will change the effectiveness of solar radiation in damaging DNA in human skin. Evaluation of the magnitude of such effects requires knowledge of the altered sunlight spectrum and of the action spectrum for damaging DNA in human skin. We have determined an action spectrum for the frequency of pyrimidine dimer formation induced in the DNA of human skin per unit dose of UV incident on the skin surface. The peak of this action spectrum is near 300 nm and decreases rapidly at both longer and shorter wavelengths. The decrease in our action spectrum for wavelengths less than 300 nm is attributed to the absorption of the upper layers of the skin, an in situ effect that is inherently included in our measurements. Convolution of the dimer action spectrum with the solar spectra corresponding to a solar angle of 40 degrees under current levels of stratospheric ozone (0.32-cm O3 layer) and those for 50% ozone depletion (0.16-cm O3 layer), indicate about a 2.5-fold increase in dimer formation. If the action spectrum for DNA damage that results in skin cancer resembles that for dimer induction in skin, our results, combined with epidemiological data, suggest that a 50% decrease in stratospheric ozone would increase the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers among white males in Seattle, Washington, by 7.5- to 8-fold, to a higher incidence than is presently seen in the corresponding population of Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  3. Green tea polyphenol treatment to human skin prevents formation of ultraviolet light B-induced pyrimidine dimers in DNA.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Perez, A; Mukhtar, H

    2000-10-01

    Cancer chemopreventive effects of polyphenols from green tea (GTP) in mouse models of photocarcinogenesis are established. The present study is extended from mouse model to human system in vivo to determine the effect of topical application of GTP to human individuals against UV light-induced DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in the skin. UVB-induced CPDs were detected by immunohistochemical technique using monoclonal antibodies to thymine dimers. With the gradual increase in UVB dose, both erythema response and CPD formation in the skin was increased. GTP treatment inhibited both UVB-induced erythema response as well as CPD formation. Topical treatment with GTP (approximately 1 mg/cm2 of skin area) 20 min before human buttock skin (sun-protected site) exposure to UVB inhibited CPD formation in epidermis by 81, 70, 60, and 60% at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 minimal erythema dose of UV exposure, respectively. Treatment of human skin with varying doses of GTP (1-4 mg/2.5 cm2 of skin area) before a single dose of UVB exposure (4.0 minimal erythema dose) decreased dose dependently the formation of UVB-induced CPDs in both epidermis and dermis. The inhibition of UVB-induced CPDs by GTP treatment may be, at least in part, responsible for the inhibition of photocarcinogenesis. Our data suggest that GTP may be used as a novel chemopreventive candidate and possible strategy to reduce UV-induced skin cancer risk in the human population.

  4. UVAI-induced edema and pyrimidine dimers in murine skin.

    PubMed

    Ley, R D; Fourtanier, A

    2000-10-01

    The induction of edema and pyrimidine dimers in epidermal DNA was determined in the skin of SKH:HR1 mice exposed to graded doses of ultraviolet radiation AI (UVAI; 340-400 nm). Exposure to UVAI induced 1.6 +/- 0.08 x 10(-6) (mean +/- standard error of mean) pyrimidine dimers per 10(8) Da of DNA per J/m2. Edema in irradiated animals was determined as an increase in skinfold thickness. A dose of 1.8 x 10(6) J/m2 of UVAI that resulted in a 50% increase in skinfold thickness (SFT50%) would have induced 1.0 x 10(5) dimers per basal cell genome. A similar increase in SFT induced by full spectrum solar ultraviolet radiation (290-400 nm) would accompany the induction of 11.0 x 10(5) pyrimidine dimers per basal cell genome. These results support a hypothesis that UVAI-induced pathological changes of the skin are mediated through the formation of nondimer photoproducts.

  5. Ligation of oligonucleotides by pyrimidine dimers--a missing 'link' in the origin of life?

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Hanawalt, P C

    1982-07-22

    One of the principal photochemical reactions of DNA on exposure to UV is the formation of intrastrand cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers. The efficiency of this reaction depends on both the wavelength of the UV2 and the specific nucleotide sequence in the DNA. The formation of the pyrimidine dimer and its repair in living cells have been studied extensively. We have examined the possibility that pyrimidines at the ends of DNA strands may be adequately juxtaposed for dimer formation by the presence of a complementary strand, even when no phosphodiester linkage joins their sugars. In these conditions the formation of a dimer will 'ligate' two DNA strands end-to-end. We report here that thymidine oligonucleotides annealed to polydeoxyadenylate can be ligated end-to-end by UV irradiation, via thymine dimerization of the terminal nucleotides in adjacent oligonucleotides. The linkages are susceptible to direct photoreversal by 254 nm UV, as expected for cyclobutane-type thymine dimers, but they are not cleaved by the bacteriophage T4 endonuclease V, a dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme. We demonstrate that the ligating dimers are also resistant to photolyase from Escherichia coli. Although the phosphodiester backbone is not required for dimer formation, it is required for recognition of dimers by these DNA repair enzymes. We discuss the possibility that high molecular weight polynucleotides in primordial seas might have been generated from oligonucleotides by pyrimidine dimerization under the intense solar UV flux unattenuated by an ozone layer.

  6. [Retarded excision of pyrimidine dimers in human unstimulated lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Snopov, S A; Roza, L; de Gruijl, F R

    2006-01-01

    Using immuno-labelling of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in nuclei of peripheral lymphocytes after their UVC-irradiation and cultivation, we have found that within the first four hours of cultivation the CPD-specific fluorescent signal from cell nuclei increased. Earlier, a similar increase in binding of antibody specific for pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts to undenatured DNA isolated from UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells was reported (Mitchell et al., 1986). Our experiments showed that nucleotide excision repair enzyme might induce such of DNA modification in lymphocyte nuclei that increased specific antibody binding to DNA fragments with lesions. We suggest that enzymatic formation of open structures in DNA predominated qualitatively over dual-incision and excision of these fragments, and resulted in the enhanced exposure of the pyrimidine dimers in nuclei to specific antibodies. The results evidence that nucleotid excision repair in unstimualted human lymphocytes being deficient in dual incision and removal of UV-induced DNA lesions appear to be capable of performing chromatin relaxation and pre-incision uncoiling of DNA fragments with lesions.

  7. Ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in rabbit eyes.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Justin D; Rochette, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Sunlight exposure of the eye leads to pathologies including photokeratitis, cortical cataracts, pterygium, actinic conjunctivitis and age-related macular degeneration. It is well established that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiations leads to DNA damage, mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). CPD formation is the principal factor involved in skin cancer. However, the exact mechanism by which sunlight induces ocular pathologies is not well understood. To shed light on this issue, we quantified the CPD formation onto DNA of rabbit ocular cells following UVB exposure. We found that CPDs were induced only in the structures of the ocular anterior chamber (cornea, iris and lens) and were more concentrated in the corneal epithelium. Residual UVB that pass through the cornea are completely absorbed by the anterior layers of the iris. CPDs were also detected in the central portion of the lens that is not protected by the iris (pupil). By determining the UV-induced DNA damage formation in eyes, we showed that anterior ocular structures are a reliable physical barrier that protects the subjacent structures from the toxic effects of UV. Although the corneal epithelium is the structure where most of the CPDs were detected, no cancer is related to solar exposure.

  8. Regulation of pyrimidine formation in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2007-10-01

    The regulation of pyrimidine formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was investigated at the level of enzyme synthesis and at the level of activity for the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. Although pyrimidine supplementation of succinate-grown P. oryzihabitans cells produced little effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain isolated from P. oryzihabitans ATCC 43272 indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the succinate-grown decarboxylase mutant strain cells, aspartate transcarbamoylase and dihydroorotase activities were found to increase by about 3-fold while dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were also observed to increase relative to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. At the level of enzyme activity, aspartate transcarbamoylase in P. oryzihabitans was strongly inhibited by pyrophosphate, ADP, ATP and GTP in the presence of saturating substrate concentrations.

  9. Regulation of pyrimidine formation in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2007-10-01

    The regulation of pyrimidine formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was investigated at the level of enzyme synthesis and at the level of activity for the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase. Although pyrimidine supplementation of succinate-grown P. oryzihabitans cells produced little effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain isolated from P. oryzihabitans ATCC 43272 indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the succinate-grown decarboxylase mutant strain cells, aspartate transcarbamoylase and dihydroorotase activities were found to increase by about 3-fold while dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were also observed to increase relative to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. At the level of enzyme activity, aspartate transcarbamoylase in P. oryzihabitans was strongly inhibited by pyrophosphate, ADP, ATP and GTP in the presence of saturating substrate concentrations. PMID:17910097

  10. Quantitation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA from UVB-irradiated alfalfa (@ L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, B.M.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone will increase the solar ultraviolet radiation in the range from 290-320 nm (UVB) that reaches the surface of the earth, placing an increased UV burden on exposed organisms. One consequence of increased UVB may be decreased productivity of crop plants. A principal lesion caused by UV in DNA is the cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimer. We have adapted a method for measuring these dimers in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA for use in UV-irradiated plants. We find that biologically relevant doses of broad band UVB radiation induce easily detectable frequencies of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA of irradiated alfalfa sprout leaves and that the dose response for dimer formation is linear up to doses of at least 690 J/m{sup 2}. We also find easily measurable frequencies of dimers in the leaves of seedlings grown in glass filtered sunlight but not exposed to additional UVB, suggesting that significant number of dimers are formed in plants exposed to normal sunlight. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms in the Repair of the Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanali, Ali A.; Zhong, Dongping; Singer, Sherwin J.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to far UV radiation induces DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Cyclobutane dimer lesions can be repaired by the enzyme photolyase, in which the absorption of a blue light photon initiates a sequence of photochemical events leading to the injection of an electron at the site of the CPD lesion in DNA. The electron catalyzes the repair of the cyclobutane dimer, splitting the CPD to is original pyrimidine units, and is subsequently recaptured by the photolyase protein. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanism of the repair of the cyclobutane dimer radical anion in aqueous solution using ab initio MD simulations. Umbrella sampling is used to determine a two-dimensional free energy surface as a function of the C5-C5-4 and C6-C6-4 distances. The neutral dimer is unable to surmount a large free energy barrier for repair. Upon addition of an electron, the splitting of the C5-C5-4 coordinate is virtually barrier less. Transition state theory predicts that the splitting of the C6-C6-4 bond is complete on a picosecond timescale. The free energy surface suggests that the splitting of the two bonds is asynchronously concerted. Our work is the first to explicitly include the electronic degrees of freedom for both the cyclobutane dimer and the surrounding water pocket. The ab initio simulations show that at least 30% of the electron density is delocalized onto the surrounding solvent during the splitting process. Simulations on the neutral surface show that back electron transfer from the dimer is critical for the completion of splitting: splitting of the C5-C5' and C6-C6' bonds can be reversed or enhanced depending on when electron return occurs. To maximize splitting yield, the back electron transfer should occur beyond the transition state along the splitting coordinate. Non-equilibrium trajectories are also conducted that begin with the electron added to a neutral unrepaired solvated CPD. Our results indicate that there are two

  12. Pyrimidine dimers block simian virus 40 replication forks

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.A.; Edenberg, H.J.

    1986-10-01

    UV light produces lesions, predominantly pyrimidine dimers, which inhibit DNA replication in mammalian cells. The mechanism of inhibition is controversial: is synthesis of a daughter strand halted at a lesion while the replication fork moves on and reinitiates downstream, or is fork progression itself blocked for some time at the site of a lesion. We directly addressed this question by using electron microscopy to examine the distances of replication forks from the origin in unirradiated and UV-irradiated simian virus 40 chromosomes. If UV lesions block replication fork progression, the forks should be asymmetrically located in a large fraction of the irradiated molecules; if replication forks move rapidly past lesions, the forks should be symmetrically located. A large fraction of the simian virus 40 replication forks in irradiated molecules were asymmetrically located, demonstrating that UV lesions present at the frequency of pyrimidine dimers block replication forks. As a mechanism for this fork blockage, we propose that polymerization of the leading strand makes a significant contribution to the energetics of fork movement, so any lesion in the template for the leading strand which blocks polymerization should also block fork movement.

  13. Pyrimidine dimers in DNA initiate systemic immunosuppression in UV-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Cox, P A; Alas, L G; Yarosh, D B

    1992-08-15

    Exposing the skin of mice to UV radiation interferes with the induction of delayed and contact hypersensitivity immune responses initiated at nonirradiated sites. The identity of the molecular target in the skin for these immunosuppressive effects of UV radiation remains controversial. To test the hypothesis that DNA is the target for UV-induced systemic immunosuppression, we exposed C3H mice to UV radiation and then used liposomes to deliver a dimer-specific excision repair enzyme into the epidermis in situ. The application of T4 endonuclease V encapsulated in liposomes to UV-irradiated mouse skin decreased the number of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the epidermis and prevented suppression of both delayed and contact hypersensitivity responses. Moreover, the formation of suppressor lymphoid cells was inhibited. Control, heat-inactivated endonuclease encapsulated in liposomes had no effect. These studies demonstrate that DNA is the major target of UV radiation in the generation of systemic immunosuppression and suggest that the primary molecular event mediating these types of immunosuppression by UV radiation is the formation of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore, they illustrate that the delivery of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes to living skin after UV irradiation is an effective tool for restoring immune function and suggest that this approach may be broadly applicable to preventing other alterations caused by DNA damage. PMID:1502162

  14. Photoreactivation of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers and erythema in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, R.D.

    1985-04-01

    Post-UV treatment of the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica with photoreactivating light (320-400 nm) suppressed the appearance of UV-induced erythema as evidenced by an increase in the dose of UV required to elicit an erythemal response. Pre-UV exposure to photoreactivating light had no effect on the UV induction of erythema. The dose-response for the photoreversal of pyrimidine dimers in epidermal DNA of M. domestica was similar to that for the photoreactivation of erythema induction. These data not only support the notion that DNA is the primary chromophore involved in the induction of erythema but also identify pyrimidine dimers as the major DNA change responsible for its induction. These results also identify M. domestica as a useful whole-animal system with which to determine the role of pyrimidine dimers in other photobiological responses of mammalian skin.

  15. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin.

  16. Detection of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by near-infrared spectroscopy and aquaphotomics.

    PubMed

    Goto, Noriko; Bazar, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Zoltan; Kunisada, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Tsenkova, Roumiana; Nishigori, Chikako

    2015-07-02

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes cellular DNA damage, among which cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are responsible for a variety of genetic mutations. Although several approaches have been developed for detection of CPDs, conventional methods require time-consuming steps. Aquaphotomics, a new approach based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and multivariate analysis that determines interactions between water and other components of the solution, has become an effective method for qualitative and quantitative parameters measurement in the solutions. NIR spectral patterns of UVC-irradiated and nonirradiated DNA solutions were evaluated using aquaphotomics for detection of UV-induced CPDs. Groups of UV-irradiated and nonirradiated DNA samples were classified (87.5% accuracy) by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). A precise regression model calculated from NIR water spectral patterns based on UVC doses (r Val = 0.9457) and the concentration of cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers (cis-syn T<>Ts; r Val = 0.9993) was developed using partial least squares regression (PLSR), while taking advantage of water spectral patterns, particularly around 1400-1500 nm. Our results suggested that, in contrast to DNA, the formation of cis-syn T<>Ts increased the strongly hydrogen bonded water. Additionally, NIRS could qualitatively and quantitatively detect cis-syn T<>Ts in isolated DNA aqueous solutions upon UVC exposure.

  17. Detection of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by near-infrared spectroscopy and aquaphotomics

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Noriko; Bazar, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Zoltan; Kunisada, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Tsenkova, Roumiana; Nishigori, Chikako

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes cellular DNA damage, among which cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are responsible for a variety of genetic mutations. Although several approaches have been developed for detection of CPDs, conventional methods require time-consuming steps. Aquaphotomics, a new approach based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and multivariate analysis that determines interactions between water and other components of the solution, has become an effective method for qualitative and quantitative parameters measurement in the solutions. NIR spectral patterns of UVC-irradiated and nonirradiated DNA solutions were evaluated using aquaphotomics for detection of UV-induced CPDs. Groups of UV-irradiated and nonirradiated DNA samples were classified (87.5% accuracy) by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). A precise regression model calculated from NIR water spectral patterns based on UVC doses (r Val = 0.9457) and the concentration of cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers (cis-syn T<>Ts; r Val = 0.9993) was developed using partial least squares regression (PLSR), while taking advantage of water spectral patterns, particularly around 1400–1500 nm. Our results suggested that, in contrast to DNA, the formation of cis-syn T<>Ts increased the strongly hydrogen bonded water. Additionally, NIRS could qualitatively and quantitatively detect cis-syn T<>Ts in isolated DNA aqueous solutions upon UVC exposure. PMID:26133899

  18. Differences in pyrimidine dimer removal between rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaart, E.; Lohman, P.H.; Vijg, J.

    1988-03-01

    Pyrimidine dimers, the most abundant type of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light (UV), are rapidly repaired in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In the same cell type from rats, however, there is hardly any removal of such dimers. To investigate whether this low capacity of rat skin cells to repair lesions in their DNA is an inherent characteristic of this species or an artifact due to cell culturing, we measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from rat epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Epidermal keratinocytes in vitro were unable to remove any dimers over the first 3 h after UV-irradiation, while only about 20% was removed during a repair period of 24 h. In this respect, these cells were not different from cultured rat fibroblasts. In contrast to the results obtained with keratinocytes in vitro, we observed a rapid repair of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated keratinocytes in vivo over the first 3 h; this rapid repair phase was followed by a much slower repair phase between 3 and 24 h. These results are discussed in terms of the possibility that mammalian cells are able to switch from one DNA repair pathway to another.

  19. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid in ultraviolet-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.; Deering, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    A sensitive endonuclease assay was used to study the fate of pyrimidine dimers introduced by ultraviolet irradiation into the nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid of the cellular slime mold Dictyostellium discoideum. Analysis of the frequency of T4 endonuclease V-induced single-strand breaks by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation showed that strain NC4 (rad/sup +/) removed >98% of the dimers induced by irradiation at 40 J/m/sup 2/ (254 nm) within 215 min after irradiation. HPS104 (radC44), a mutant sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, removed 91% under these conditions, although at a significantly slower rate than NC4: only 8% were removed during the 10- to 15- min period immediately after irradiation, whereas NC4 excised 64% during this interval. HPS104 thus appears to be deficient in the activity(ies) responsible for rapidly incising ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid at the sites of pyrimidine dimers.

  20. UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Tuteja, N.; Munson, P.J.; Hauser, J.; Kraemer, K.H.; Dixon, K.

    1986-10-01

    We used a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, to determine the role of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers in UV light-induced mutagenesis in monkey cells. The vector DNA was UV irradiated and then introduced into monkey cells by transfection. After replication, vector DNA was recovered from the cells and tested for mutations in its supF suppressor tRNA marker gene by transformation of Escherichia coli carrying a nonsense mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. When the irradiated vector was treated with E. coli photolyase prior to transfection, pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers were removed selectively. Removal of approximately 90% of the pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers increased the biological activity of the vector by 75% and reduced its mutation frequency by 80%. Sequence analysis of 72 mutants recovered indicated that there were significantly fewer tandem double-base changes and G X C----A X T transitions (particularly at CC sites) after photoreactivation of the DNA. UV-induced photoproducts remained (although at greatly reduced levels) at all pyr-pyr sites after photoreactivation, but there was a relative increase in photoproducts at CC and TC sites and a relative decrease at TT and CT sites, presumably due to a persistence of (6-4) photoproducts at some CC and TC sites. These observations are consistent with the fact that mutations were found after photoreactivation at many sites at which only cyclobutane dimers would be expected to occur. From these results we conclude that UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers are mutagenic in DNA replicated in monkey cells.

  1. A prebiotic role for 8-oxoguanosine as a flavin mimic in pyrimidine dimer photorepair.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khiem Van; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2011-09-21

    Redox-active enzyme cofactors derived from ribonucleotides have been called "fossils of the RNA world," suggesting that early catalysts employed modified nucleobases to facilitate redox chemistry in primitive metabolism. Here, we show that the common oxidative damage product 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), when incorporated into a DNA or RNA strand in proximity to a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, can mimic the function of a flavin in photorepair. The OG nucleotide acts catalytically in a mechanism consistent with that of photolyase in which the photoexcited state of the purine donates an electron to a pyrimidine dimer to initiate bond cleavage; subsequent back electron transfer regenerates OG. This unusual example of one form of DNA damage, oxidation, functioning to repair another, photodimerization, may provide insight into the origins of prebiotic redox processes. PMID:21877686

  2. Mechanism of Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase Dimerization Inhibition by Novel Pyrimidine Imidazoles*

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Latika; Haque, Mohammad M.; Saha, Amit; Mukherjee, Nirmalya; Ghosh, Arnab; Ranu, Brindaban C.; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Panda, Koustubh

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) has been etiologically linked to several inflammatory, immunological, and neurodegenerative diseases. As dimerization of NOS is required for its activity, several dimerization inhibitors, including pyrimidine imidazoles, are being evaluated for therapeutic inhibition of iNOS. However, the precise mechanism of their action is still unclear. Here, we examined the mechanism of iNOS inhibition by a pyrimidine imidazole core compound and its derivative (PID), having low cellular toxicity and high affinity for iNOS, using rapid stopped-flow kinetic, gel filtration, and spectrophotometric analysis. PID bound to iNOS heme to generate an irreversible PID-iNOS monomer complex that could not be converted to active dimers by tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) and l-arginine (Arg). We utilized the iNOS oxygenase domain (iNOSoxy) and two monomeric mutants whose dimerization could be induced (K82AiNOSoxy) or not induced (D92AiNOSoxy) with H4B to elucidate the kinetics of PID binding to the iNOS monomer and dimer. We observed that the apparent PID affinity for the monomer was 11 times higher than the dimer. PID binding rate was also sensitive to H4B and Arg site occupancy. PID could also interact with nascent iNOS monomers in iNOS-synthesizing RAW cells, to prevent their post-translational dimerization, and it also caused irreversible monomerization of active iNOS dimers thereby accomplishing complete physiological inhibition of iNOS. Thus, our study establishes PID as a versatile iNOS inhibitor and therefore a potential in vivo tool for examining the causal role of iNOS in diseases associated with its overexpression as well as therapeutic control of such diseases. PMID:23696643

  3. Wavelength-dependent ultraviolet induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Justin D; Rochette, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    Exposition to ultraviolet (UV) light is involved in the initiation and the progression of skin cancer. The genotoxicity of UV light is mainly attributed to the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the most abundant DNA damage generated by all UV types (UVA, B and C). The human cornea is also exposed to the harmful UV radiations, but no UV-related neoplasm has been reported in this ocular structure. The probability that a specific DNA damage leads to a mutation and eventually to cellular transformation is influenced by its formation frequency. To shed light on the genotoxic effect of sunlight in the human eye, we have analyzed CPD induction in the cornea and the iris following irradiation of ex vivo human eyes with UVA, B or C. The extent of CPD induction was used to establish the penetrance of the different UV types in the human cornea. We show that UVB- and UVC-induced CPDs are concentrated in the corneal epithelium and do not penetrate deeply beyond this corneal layer. On the other hand, UVA wavelengths penetrate deeper and induce CPDs in the entire cornea and in the first layers of the iris. Taken together, our results are undoubtedly an important step towards better understanding the consequences of UV exposure to the human eye.

  4. Replication fork bypass of a pyrimidine dimer blocking leading strand DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro-Stone, M; Zaritskaya, L S; Price, L K; Kaufmann, W K

    1997-05-23

    We constructed a double-stranded plasmid containing a single cis, syn-cyclobutane thymine dimer (T[c,s]T) 385 base pairs from the center of the SV40 origin of replication. This circular DNA was replicated in vitro by extracts from several types of human cells. The dimer was placed on the leading strand template of the first replication fork to encounter the lesion. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of replication intermediates documented the transient arrest of the replication fork by the dimer. Movement of the replication fork beyond the dimer was recognized by the appearance of a single fork arc in DNA sequences located between the T[c,s]T and the half-way point around the circular template (180 degrees from the origin). Upon completion of plasmid replication, the T[c,s]T was detected by T4 endonuclease V in about one-half (46 +/- 9%) of the closed circular daughter molecules. Our results demonstrate that extracts prepared from HeLa cells and SV40-transformed human fibroblasts (SV80, IDH4), including a cell line defective in nucleotide-excision repair (XPA), were competent for leading strand DNA synthesis opposite the pyrimidine dimer and replication fork bypass. In contrast, dimer bypass was severely impaired in otherwise replication-competent extracts from two different xeroderma pigmentosum variant cell lines.

  5. Pyrimidine dimer removal enhanced by DNA repair liposomes reduces the incidence of UV skin cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Yarosh, D; Alas, L G; Yee, V; Oberyszyn, A; Kibitel, J T; Mitchell, D; Rosenstein, R; Spinowitz, A; Citron, M

    1992-08-01

    UV exposure has been linked to skin cancer in humans by epidemiology and the rare genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum. However, UV produces multiple photoproducts in DNA, and their relative contribution is uncertain. An enzyme which specifically repairs cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA, T4 endonuclease V, was encapsulated in liposomes for topical delivery into mouse and human skin. In both species, liposomes applied after UV exposure localized in the epidermis and stimulated the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. UV-irradiated mice treated with these liposomes had a dose-dependent decrease in the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma compared to controls. The results demonstrate that unrepaired cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA are a direct cause of cancer in mammalian skin.

  6. Eukaryotic class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase structure reveals basis for improved ultraviolet tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Hitomi, Kenichi; Arvai, Andrew S; Yamamoto, Junpei; Hitomi, Chiharu; Teranishi, Mika; Hirouchi, Tokuhisa; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwai, Shigenori; Tainer, John A; Hidema, Jun; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2012-04-01

    Ozone depletion increases terrestrial solar ultraviolet B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation, intensifying the risks plants face from DNA damage, especially covalent cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Without efficient repair, UV-B destroys genetic integrity, but plant breeding creates rice cultivars with more robust photolyase (PHR) DNA repair activity as an environmental adaptation. So improved strains of Oryza sativa (rice), the staple food for Asia, have expanded rice cultivation worldwide. Efficient light-driven PHR enzymes restore normal pyrimidines to UV-damaged DNA by using blue light via flavin adenine dinucleotide to break pyrimidine dimers. Eukaryotes duplicated the photolyase gene, producing PHRs that gained functions and adopted activities that are distinct from those of prokaryotic PHRs yet are incompletely understood. Many multicellular organisms have two types of PHR: (6-4) PHR, which structurally resembles bacterial CPD PHRs but recognizes different substrates, and Class II CPD PHR, which is remarkably dissimilar in sequence from bacterial PHRs despite their common substrate. To understand the enigmatic DNA repair mechanisms of PHRs in eukaryotic cells, we determined the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic Class II CPD PHR from the rice cultivar Sasanishiki. Our 1.7 Å resolution PHR structure reveals structure-activity relationships in Class II PHRs and tuning for enhanced UV tolerance in plants. Structural comparisons with prokaryotic Class I CPD PHRs identified differences in the binding site for UV-damaged DNA substrate. Convergent evolution of both flavin hydrogen bonding and a Trp electron transfer pathway establish these as critical functional features for PHRs. These results provide a paradigm for light-dependent DNA repair in higher organisms. PMID:22170053

  7. Topical formulation engendered alteration in p53 and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer expression in chronic photodamaged patients.

    PubMed

    Spencer, James M; Morgan, Michael B; Trapp, Kara M; Moon, Summer D

    2013-03-01

    While the clinical attributes of photoaging are well characterized in the literature, the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie these changes are incompletely elucidated. At the molecular level, p53 tumor-suppressor gene product mediated excision repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage is a critical effector in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and potentially in conventional photoaging. We examined p53 activity and measured UV-induced DNA damage via cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) quantitatively in 20 volunteers before and after an 8-week, open-label prospective topical application of a proprietary DNA recovery serum (Celfix). There was a statistically significant decrease in immunohistochemically determined p53 and CPD levels. While these data are preliminary, the findings lend support to the theoretical possibility of a topical agent reversing the effects of photodamage at the molecular level and, potentially, an ameliorative outcome clinically.

  8. Baculovirus cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases show a close relationship with lepidopteran host homologues.

    PubMed

    Biernat, M A; Ros, V I D; Vlak, J M; van Oers, M M

    2011-08-01

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage using blue light. To get insight in the origin of baculovirus CPD photolyase (phr) genes, homologues in the lepidopteran insects Chrysodeixis chalcites, Spodoptera exigua and Trichoplusia ni were identified and characterized. Lepidopteran and baculovirus phr genes each form a monophyletic group, and together form a well-supported clade within the insect photolyases. This suggests that baculoviruses obtained their phr genes from an ancestral lepidopteran insect host. A likely evolutionary scenario is that a granulovirus, Spodoptera litura GV or a direct ancestor, obtained a phr gene. Subsequently, it was horizontally transferred from this granulovirus to several group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), including those that infect noctuids of the Plusiinae subfamily. PMID:21477200

  9. Induction of pyrimidine dimers and unscheduled DNA synthesis in cultured mouse epithelial cells exposed to 254-nm- and u. v. -B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yotti, L.P.; Ley, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    The induction and fate of pyrimidine dimers and unscheduled DNA synthesis were measured in u.v.-irradiated primary, newborn SENCAR mouse epithelial cells. Unscheduled DNA synthesis was induced in a dose responsive manner by two u.v. sources, a germicidal lamp (254 nm) and an FS40 sunlamp (280--400 nm). Using the endonuclease-sensitive site assay to detect pyrimidine dimer production and excision, we examined the response of the newborn mouse cells to both u.v. sources. We were unable to detect the removal of pyrimidine dimers with either of the two sources of u.v. The speculation is made that primary, newborn mouse epidermal cells excise u.v.-induced pyrimidine dimers to an extent below the level of detection of the endonuclease-sensitive site assay but to an extent sufficient to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis.

  10. Dynamics and mechanism of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair by DNA photolyase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheyun; Tan, Chuang; Guo, Xunmin; Kao, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Sancar, Aziz; Zhong, Dongping

    2011-09-01

    Photolyase uses blue light to restore the major ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), to two normal bases by splitting the cyclobutane ring. Our earlier studies showed that the overall repair is completed in 700 ps through a cyclic electron-transfer radical mechanism. However, the two fundamental processes, electron-tunneling pathways and cyclobutane ring splitting, were not resolved. Here, we use ultrafast UV absorption spectroscopy to show that the CPD splits in two sequential steps within 90 ps and the electron tunnels between the cofactor and substrate through a remarkable route with an intervening adenine. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals that the active-site residues are critical to achieving high repair efficiency, a unique electrostatic environment to optimize the redox potentials and local flexibility, and thus balance all catalytic reactions to maximize enzyme activity. These key findings reveal the complete spatio-temporal molecular picture of CPD repair by photolyase and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of the enzyme's high repair efficiency.

  11. Rotational position of a 5-methylcytosine-containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in a nucleosome greatly affects its deamination rate.

    PubMed

    Song, Qian; Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2011-02-25

    C to T mutation hotspots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. These mutations are proposed to arise from the insertion of A by DNA polymerase η opposite the T that results from deamination of the methylC ((m)C) within the CPD. Although the frequency of CPD formation and repair is modestly modulated by its rotational position within a nucleosome, the effect of position on the rate of (m)C deamination in a CPD has not been previously studied. We now report that deamination of a T(m)C CPD whose sugar phosphate backbone is positioned against the histone core surface decreases by a factor of 4.7, whereas that of a T(m)C CPD positioned away from the surface increases by a factor of 8.9 when compared with unbound DNA. Because the (m)Cs undergoing deamination are in similar steric environments, the difference in rate appears to be a consequence of a difference in the flexibility and compression of the two sites due to DNA bending. Considering that formation of the CPD positioned away from the surface is also enhanced by a factor of two, a T(m)CG site in this position might be expected to have up to an 84-fold higher probability of resulting in a UV-induced (m)C to T mutation than one positioned against the surface. These results indicate that rotational position may play an important role in the formation of UV-induced C to T mutation hotspots, as well as in the mutagenic mechanism of other DNA lesions. PMID:21160086

  12. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots. PMID:26354431

  13. Rapid deamination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproducts at TCG sites in a translationally and rotationally positioned nucleosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Pondugula, Santhi; Song, Qian; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-10-30

    Sunlight-induced C to T mutation hot spots in skin cancers occur primarily at methylated CpG sites that coincide with sites of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation. The C and 5-methyl-C in CPDs are not stable and deaminate to U and T, respectively, which leads to the insertion of A by the DNA damage bypass polymerase η, thereby defining a probable mechanism for the origin of UV-induced C to T mutations. Deamination rates for T(m)CG CPDs have been found to vary 12-fold with rotational position in a nucleosome in vitro. To determine the influence of nucleosome structure on deamination rates in vivo, we determined the deamination rates of CPDs at TCG sites in a stably positioned nucleosome within the FOS promoter in HeLa cells. A procedure for in vivo hydroxyl radical footprinting with Fe-EDTA was developed, and, together with results from a cytosine methylation protection assay, we determined the translational and rotational positions of the TCG sites. Consistent with the in vitro observations, deamination was slower for one CPD located at an intermediate rotational position compared with two other sites located at outside positions, and all were much faster than for CPDs at non-TCG sites. Photoproduct formation was also highly suppressed at one site, possibly due to its interaction with a histone tail. Thus, it was shown that CPDs of TCG sites deaminate the fastest in vivo and that nucleosomes can modulate both their formation and deamination, which could contribute to the UV mutation hot spots and cold spots.

  14. Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases.

    PubMed

    Okafuji, Asako; Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kaiser, Gebhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Bacher, Adelbert; Hidema, Jun; Teranishi, Mika; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa has been examined by UV/Vis and pulsed Davies-type electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, and the results compared with structure-known class I enzymes, CPD photolyase and (6-4) photolyase. By ENDOR spectroscopy, the local environment of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor is probed by virtue of proton hyperfine couplings that report on the electron-spin density at the positions of magnetic nuclei. Despite the amino-acid sequence dissimilarity as compared to class I enzymes, the results indicate similar binding motifs for FAD in the class II photolyases. Furthermore, the photoreduction kinetics starting from the FAD cofactor in the fully oxidized redox state, FAD(ox), have been probed by UV/Vis spectroscopy. In Escherichia coli (class I) CPD photolyase, light-induced generation of FADH from FAD(ox), and subsequently FADH(-) from FADH, proceeds in a step-wise fashion via a chain of tryptophan residues. These tryptophans are well conserved among the sequences and within all known structures of class I photolyases, but completely lacking from the equivalent positions of class II photolyase sequences. Nevertheless, class II photolyases show photoreduction kinetics similar to those of the class I enzymes. We propose that a different, but also effective, electron-transfer cascade is conserved among the class II photolyases. The existence of such electron transfer pathways is supported by the observation that the catalytically active fully reduced flavin state obtained by photoreduction is maintained even under oxidative conditions in all three classes of enzymes studied in this contribution. PMID:20227927

  15. Ultraviolet-sensitive syndrome cells are defective in transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela; Itoh, Toshiki; Matsunaga, Tsukasa; Nikaido, Osamu; Hanawalt, Philip; Yamaizumi, Masaru

    2002-08-01

    Patients with ultraviolet-sensitive syndrome (UV(S)S) are sensitive to sunlight, but present neither developmental nor neurological deficiencies. Complementation studies with hereditary DNA repair syndromes show that UV(S)S is distinct from all known xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) groups. UV(S)S cells exhibit some characteristics typical of CS, including normal global genomic (GGR) repair of UV-photoproducts, poor clonal survival and defective recovery of RNA synthesis after UV exposure. Those observations have led us to suggest that UV(S)S cells, like those from CS, are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). We have now examined the repair of CPD in the transcribed and non-transcribed strands of the active dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and p53 genes, and of the silent alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and mid-size neurofilament (NF-M) genes in normal human cells and in cells belonging to UV(S)S and CS complementation group B. Our results provide compelling evidence that the UV(S)S gene is essential for TCR of CPD and probably other bulky DNA lesions. As a possible distinction between UV(S)S and CS patients, we postulate that the UV(S)S gene may not be required for TCR of oxidative lesions. We have also found that repair of CPD in either DNA strand of the genomic fragments examined, occurs at a slower rate in TCR-deficient cells than in the non-transcribed strands in normal cells; we suggest that in the absence of TCR, global repair complexes have hindered access to lesions in genomic regions that extend beyond individual transcription units. PMID:12509286

  16. As(III) inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers repair via generation of nitric oxide in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Hudson, Laurie G.; Sun, Xi; Feng, Changjian; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic enhances skin tumor formation when combined with other carcinogens including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The inhibition of DNA damage repair by arsenic has been hypothesized to contribute to the co-carcinogenic activities of arsenic observed in vivo. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are an important mutagenic UVR photoproduct and implicated in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. The current study demonstrates that low concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) inhibit UVR-induced CPDs repair in a human keratinocyte cell line via nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Following As(III) treatment, NO production and iNOS expression are elevated. Little is known about regulation of iNOS by As(III) and further investigations indicated that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and NF-κB are required for As(III) induction of iNOS expression. This As(III)-stimulated signaling cascade was involved in inhibition of UVR-induced CPDs repair as disruption of p38 MAPK activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation counteracted the effects of As(III) on CPD repair. Selective inhibition of iNOS ameliorated As(III) inhibition of CPDs repair thereby suggesting that iNOS is a downstream mediator of As(III) activity. These findings provide evidence that an As(III) stimulated signal transduction cascade culminating in elevated iNOS expression and NO generation is an underlying mechanism for inhibition of UVR-induced DNA damage repair by arsenic. PMID:18621123

  17. The class III cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase structure reveals a new antenna chromophore binding site and alternative photoreduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Patrick; Zhang, Fan; Kalms, Jacqueline; von Stetten, David; Krauß, Norbert; Oberpichler, Inga; Lamparter, Tilman

    2015-05-01

    Photolyases are proteins with an FAD chromophore that repair UV-induced pyrimidine dimers on the DNA in a light-dependent manner. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer class III photolyases are structurally unknown but closely related to plant cryptochromes, which serve as blue-light photoreceptors. Here we present the crystal structure of a class III photolyase termed photolyase-related protein A (PhrA) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens at 1.67-Å resolution. PhrA contains 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) as an antenna chromophore with a unique binding site and mode. Two Trp residues play pivotal roles for stabilizing MTHF by a double π-stacking sandwich. Plant cryptochrome I forms a pocket at the same site that could accommodate MTHF or a similar molecule. The PhrA structure and mutant studies showed that electrons flow during FAD photoreduction proceeds via two Trp triads. The structural studies on PhrA give a clearer picture on the evolutionary transition from photolyase to photoreceptor.

  18. Specificity of mutation by UV light and delayed photoreversal in umuC-defective Escherichia coli K-12: a targeting intermediate at pyrimidine dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Bockrath, R.; Ruiz-Rubio, M.; Bridges, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Prototrophic mutants produced by UV light in Escherichia coli K-12 strains with argE3(Oc) and hisG4(Oc) defects are distinguished as backmutations and specific nonsense suppressor mutations. In strains carrying a umuC defect, mutants are not produced unless irradiated cells are incubated and then exposed to photoreversing light (delayed photoreversal mutagenesis). The mutants thus produced are found to be specifically suppressor mutations and not backmutations. The suppressor mutations are primarily glutamine tRNA ochre suppressor mutations, which have been attributed previously to mutation targeted at T = C pyrimidine dimers. In a lexA51 recA441 strain, where the SOS mutagenesis functions are constitutive, targeting at dimers is confirmed by demonstrating that the induction of glutamine tRNA suppressor mutations is susceptible to photoreversal. In the same strain induction of backmutations is not susceptible to photoreversal. Thus delayed photoreversal mutagenesis produces suppressor mutations that can be targeted at pyrimidine dimers and does not produce backmutations that are not targeted at pyrimidine dimers. This correlation supports the idea that delayed photoreversal mutagenesis in umuC defective cells reflects a mutation process arrested at a targeting pyrimidine dimer photoproduct, which is the immediate cause of both the alteration in DNA sequence and the obstruction (unless repaired) to mutation fixation and ultimate expression.

  19. Structural characterization of RNA polymerase II complexes arrested by a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in the transcribed strand of template DNA.

    PubMed

    Tornaletti, S; Reines, D; Hanawalt, P C

    1999-08-20

    We have characterized the properties of immunopurified transcription complexes arrested at a specifically located cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) using enzymatic probes and an in vitro transcription system with purified RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and initiation factors. To help understand how RNAP II distinguishes between a natural impediment and a lesion in the DNA to initiate a repair event, we have compared the conformation of RNAP II complexes arrested at a CPD with complexes arrested at a naturally occurring elongation impediment. The footprint of RNAP II arrested at a CPD, using exonuclease III and T4 DNA polymerase's 3'-->5' exonuclease, covers approximately 35 base pairs and is asymmetrically located around the dimer. A similar footprint is observed when RNAP II is arrested at the human histone H3.3 arrest site. Addition of elongation factor SII to RNAP II arrested at a CPD produced shortened transcripts of discrete lengths up to 25 nucleotides shorter than those seen without SII. After addition of photolyase and exposure to visible light, some of the transcripts could be reelongated beyond the dimer, suggesting that SII-mediated transcript cleavage accompanied significant RNAP II backup, thereby providing access of the repair enzyme to the arresting CPD.

  20. The removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA of rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo in relation to aging.

    PubMed

    Mullaart, E; Roza, L; Lohman, P H; Vijg, J

    1989-03-01

    Young and old rats were compared with respect to the capacity of their skin fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes to remove low levels of ultraviolet light (UV) induced UV-endonuclease sensitive sites (pyrimidime dimers) from their DNA, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. In vitro, over a 24-h time period, fibroblasts from both young and old rats were found to remove about 20% of the pyrimidine dimers originally induced by 4.6 J/m2 of UV-C. In vivo, after 2.6 kJ/m2 of UV-B hardly any UV lesions were found to be present in fibroblasts, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry using an anti-thymine dimer antibody. As reported earlier (Mullaart et al., J. Invest. Dermatol., 90 (1988) 346-349) cultured epidermal keratinocytes do not differ from cultured fibroblasts in UV repair kinetics, whereas in vivo they remove at least 50% of the pyrimidine dimers induced by 4 kJ/m2 of UV-B within 3 h. We now show that epidermal keratinocytes from old rats are not deficient in their in vivo repair characteristics upon this low UV-B dose. However, since a considerable fraction of the pyrimidine dimers appeared to be persistent in fibroblasts and keratinocytes, demonstrated by both enzymatic and immunochemical assays, the possibility is discussed that long-term exposure of skin cells to UV may lead to an accumulation of DNA damage with age.

  1. Inhibition of semiconservative DNA synthesis in ICR 2A frog cells by pyrimidine dimers and nondimer photoproducts induced by ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.S.

    1984-11-01

    DNA synthesis was examined in ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated ICR 2A frog cells in which either pyrimidine dimers or nondimer photoproducts represented the major class of DNA lesions. In addition, cells were exposed to /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. The cultures were pulse-labeled and the size distribution of the DNA synthesized was estimated using both sucrose gradient sedimentation and alkaline step elution. Using either of these techniques, it was found that the presence of dimers resulted in a reduction principally in the synthesis of high molecular weight (MW) DNA. In contrast, nondimer photoproducts caused a strong inhibition in the synthesis of low MW DNA, as was also observed in ..gamma..-irradiated cells. Hence the induction of pyrimidine dimers in DNA mainly affected the elongation of replicons, whereas nondimer lesions primarily caused an inhibition of replicon initiation.

  2. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  3. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  4. Site-specific analysis of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in nucleotide excision repair-proficient and -deficient hamster cells: Lack of correlation with mutational spectra.

    PubMed

    Vreeswijk, Maaike P G; Meijers, Caro M; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline; Vrieling, Harry; van Zeeland, Albert A; Mullenders, Leon H F; Loenen, Wil A M

    2009-04-26

    Irradiation of cells with UVC light induces two types of mutagenic DNA photoproducts, i.e. cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP). To investigate the relationship between the frequency of UV-induced photolesions at specific sites and their ability to induce mutations, we quantified CPD formation at the nucleotide level along exons 3 and 8 of the hprt gene using ligation-mediated PCR, and determined the mutational spectrum of 132 UV-induced hprt mutants in the AA8 hamster cell line and of 165 mutants in its nucleotide excision repair-defective derivative UV5. In AA8 cells, transversions predominated with a strong strand bias towards thymine-containing photolesions in the non-transcribed strand. As hamster AA8 cells are proficient in global genome repair of 6-4 PP but selectively repair CPD from the transcribed strand of active genes, most mutations probably resulted from erroneous bypass of CPD in the non-transcribed strand. However, the relative incidence of CPD and the positions where mutations most frequently arose do not correlate. In fact some major damage sites hardly gave rise to the formation of mutations. In the repair-defective UV5 cells, mutations were almost exclusively C>T transitions caused by photoproducts at PyC sites in the transcribed strand. Even though CPD were formed at high frequencies at some TT sites in UV5, these photoproducts did not contribute to mutation induction at all. We conclude that, even in the absence of repair, large variations in the level of induction of CPD at different sites throughout the two exons do not correspond to frequencies of mutation induction.

  5. Faster DNA Repair of Ultraviolet-Induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers and Lower Sensitivity to Apoptosis in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells than in Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Justin D; Dorr, Marie M; Drigeard Desgarnier, Marie-Catherine; Bastien, Nathalie; Gendron, Sébastien P; Rochette, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of UV rays by DNA generates the formation of mutagenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP). These damages are the major cause of skin cancer because in turn, they can lead to signature UV mutations. The eye is exposed to UV light, but the cornea is orders of magnitude less prone to UV-induced cancer. In an attempt to shed light on this paradox, we compared cells of the corneal epithelium and the epidermis for UVB-induced DNA damage frequency, repair and cell death sensitivity. We found similar CPD levels but a 4-time faster UVB-induced CPD, but not 6-4PP, repair and lower UV-induced apoptosis sensitivity in corneal epithelial cells than epidermal. We then investigated levels of DDB2, a UV-induced DNA damage recognition protein mostly impacting CPD repair, XPC, essential for the repair of both CPD and 6-4PP and p53 a protein upstream of the genotoxic stress response. We found more DDB2, XPC and p53 in corneal epithelial cells than in epidermal cells. According to our results analyzing the protein stability of DDB2 and XPC, the higher level of DDB2 and XPC in corneal epithelial cells is most likely due to an increased stability of the protein. Taken together, our results show that corneal epithelial cells have a better efficiency to repair UV-induced mutagenic CPD. On the other hand, they are less prone to UV-induced apoptosis, which could be related to the fact that since the repair is more efficient in the HCEC, the need to eliminate highly damaged cells by apoptosis is reduced. PMID:27611318

  6. Faster DNA Repair of Ultraviolet-Induced Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers and Lower Sensitivity to Apoptosis in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells than in Epidermal Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Justin D.; Bastien, Nathalie; Gendron, Sébastien P.; Rochette, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of UV rays by DNA generates the formation of mutagenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6–4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PP). These damages are the major cause of skin cancer because in turn, they can lead to signature UV mutations. The eye is exposed to UV light, but the cornea is orders of magnitude less prone to UV-induced cancer. In an attempt to shed light on this paradox, we compared cells of the corneal epithelium and the epidermis for UVB-induced DNA damage frequency, repair and cell death sensitivity. We found similar CPD levels but a 4-time faster UVB-induced CPD, but not 6-4PP, repair and lower UV-induced apoptosis sensitivity in corneal epithelial cells than epidermal. We then investigated levels of DDB2, a UV-induced DNA damage recognition protein mostly impacting CPD repair, XPC, essential for the repair of both CPD and 6-4PP and p53 a protein upstream of the genotoxic stress response. We found more DDB2, XPC and p53 in corneal epithelial cells than in epidermal cells. According to our results analyzing the protein stability of DDB2 and XPC, the higher level of DDB2 and XPC in corneal epithelial cells is most likely due to an increased stability of the protein. Taken together, our results show that corneal epithelial cells have a better efficiency to repair UV-induced mutagenic CPD. On the other hand, they are less prone to UV-induced apoptosis, which could be related to the fact that since the repair is more efficient in the HCEC, the need to eliminate highly damaged cells by apoptosis is reduced. PMID:27611318

  7. Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices: Formation of Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Materese, Christopher K.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They are divided into two molecular groups: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites, and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotopic measurements. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2- m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices of astrophysical relevance such as H2O, NH3, CH3OH, CH4, CO, or combinations of these at low temperature (less than or equal to 20 K) leads to the formation of several pyrimidine derivatives including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as precursors such as 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine. Quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways.10 In those residues, other species of prebiotic interest such as urea as well as the amino acids glycine and alanine could also be identified. However, only very small amounts of pyrimidine derivatives containing CH3 groups could be detected, suggesting that the addition of methyl groups to pyrimidine is not an efficient process. For this reason, the nucleobase thymine was not observed in any of the samples. In this work, we study the formation of nucleobases and other photo-products of prebiotic interest from the UV irradiation of pyrimidine in ices containing H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CO, mixed in astrophysical proportions.

  8. Formation of Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, M.; Sandford, S. A.; Milam, S. N.; Materese, C. K.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2011-05-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles which are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. Biological nucleobases are divided in two types: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin has been confirmed by isotope measurements, but no N-heterocycle has ever been observed in the ISM. Experiments showed that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine mixed in astrophysical ices such as H_2O, NH_3, CH_3OH, or any combination of these at low temperature (20-30 K) leads to the formation of multiple photo-products derived from pyrimidine including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine. Theoretical studies on the formation of uracil confirmed its experimental formation pathway and demonstrated that the H_2O matrix plays a key role in the chemistry [9]. Thymine, however, was not found in any of the samples, though other pyrimidine derivatives, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and the amino acid glycine, could be identified [8]. We will extend this study to the formation of nucleobases and other prebiotic species from the UV irradiation of pyrimidine in astrophysically relevant ice mixtures containing H_2O, NH_3, CH_3OH, CO, and CO_2.

  9. In Vivo Spectrum of UVC-induced Mutation in Mouse Skin Epidermis May Reflect the Cytosine Deamination Propensity of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Although ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has a genotoxicity for inducing skin cancers, the skin may tolerate UVC component because the epidermal layer prevents this short wavelength range from passing through. Here, UVC genotoxicity for mouse skin was evaluated in terms of DNA damage formation and mutagenicity. UVC induced UVR photolesions and mutations remarkably in the epidermis but poorly in the dermis, confirming the barrier ability of the epidermis against shorter UVR wavelengths. Moreover, the epidermis itself responded to UVC mutagenicity with mutation induction suppression, which suppressed the mutant frequencies to a remarkably low, constant level regardless of UVC dose. The mutation spectrum observed in UVC-exposed epidermis showed a predominance of UV-signature mutation, which occurred frequently in 5'-TCG-3', 5'-TCA-3' and 5'-CCA-3' contexts. Especially, for the former two contexts, the mutations recurred at several sites with more remarkable recurrences at the 5'-TCG-3' sites. Comparison of the UVC mutation spectrum with those observed in longer UVR wavelength ranges led us to a mechanism that explains why the sequence context preference of UV-signature mutation changes according to the wavelength, which is based on the difference in the mCpG preference of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) formation among UVR ranges and the sequence context-dependent cytosine deamination propensity of CPD.

  10. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGES

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  11. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein acts to regulate the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers on rice DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Changxun; Chen, Weisi; Li, Chengxun; Jian, Xin; Li, Yingzhe; Lin, Hongmei; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    UVB radiation causes cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) to form on the DNA of living organisms. This study found that overexpression of the silicon absorbance gene Lsi1 reduced the accumulation of CPDs in rice, which profited from the reactivation by photolyase. The transcript abundance of deoxyribodipyrimidine photolyase (Os10g0167600) was generally correlated with the silicon content of the rice, and the up-regulation of Os10g0167600 was found to be highest in the UVB-treated Lsi1-overexpressed (Lsi1-OX) rice. A trans-acting factor, methyl-CpG binding domain protein (OsMeCP), was found to interact with the cis-element of Os10g0167600. The nucleic location of OsMeCP effectively enabled the transcriptional regulation. Compared with the WT, the level of OsMeCP was lower in the Lsi1-OX rice but higher in the Lsi1-RNAi line. Rice cultured in a high silicate-concentration solution also exhibited less OsMeCP abundance. Overexpression of OsMeCP led to lower Os10g0167600 transcript levels and a higher CPD content than in the WT, but the reverse was true in the OsMeCP-RNAi line. These findings indicate that OsMeCP acts as a negative regulator of silicon, and can mediate the repression of the transcription from Os10g0167600, which inhibits the photoreactivation of the photolyase involved in the repair of CPDs. PMID:27694845

  12. Ultraviolet-induced dimerization of non-adjacent pyrimidines in poly[d(A-T)].

    PubMed

    Love, J D; Minton, K W

    1992-12-15

    The DNA photoproduct responsible for the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced -1 frameshift mutation remains unknown. We recently identified a UV photoproduct consisting of a cyclobutane dimer occurring between non-adjacent thymine residues in the same strand, [sequence: see text] and proposed that replication across this unrepaired photoproduct might result in a -1 frameshift mutation since the intervening base is extrahelical. Until now this novel photoproduct has only been identified in single-stranded DNA polymers and does not occur in UV-irradiated double-stranded polymers due to conformational restraint. This observation suggested that this photoproduct could only occur in vivo in chromosomal sites that were single-stranded. In the current work the cis-syn dithymine cyclobutane dimer has been identified in the self-complementary polymer poly[d(A-T)] when UV irradiated in solution conditions (concentrated manganese chloride or 60% ethanol plus trace salts) wherein this polymer remains double-stranded but the double-helix is partially destabilized. Taken together, the current findings suggest that dipyrimidine photoproducts between non-adjacent residues on the same strand could occur in vivo in double-stranded, but partially destabilized, DNA.

  13. Efficient removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in barley: differential contribution of light-dependent and dark DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Manova, Vasilissa; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Borisov, Borislav; Stoilov, Lubomir

    2016-10-01

    Barley stress response to ultraviolet radiation (UV) has been intensively studied at both the physiological and morphological level. However, the ability of barley genome to repair UV-induced lesions at the DNA level is far less characterized. In this study, we have investigated the relative contribution of light-dependent and dark DNA repair pathways for the efficient elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) from the genomic DNA of barley leaf seedlings. The transcriptional activity of barley CPD photolyase gene in respect to the light-growth conditions and UV-C irradiation of the plants has also been analyzed. Our results show that CPDs induced in the primary barley leaf at frequencies potentially damaging DNA at the single-gene level are removed efficiently and exclusively by photorepair pathway, whereas dark repair is hardly detectable, even at higher CPD frequency. A decrease of initially induced CPDs under dark is observed but only after prolonged incubation, suggesting the activation of light-independent DNA damage repair and/or tolerance mechanisms. The green barley seedlings possess greater capacity for CPD photorepair than the etiolated ones, with efficiency of CPD removal dependent on the intensity and quality of recovering light. The higher repair rate of CPDs measured in the green leaves correlates with the higher transcriptional activity of barley CPD photolyase gene. Visible light and UV-C radiation affect differentially the expression of CPD photolyase gene particularly in the etiolated leaves. We propose that the CPD repair potential of barley young seedlings may influence their response to UV-stress.

  14. Inducible removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from transcriptionally active and inactive genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Waters, R; Zhang, R; Jones, N J

    1993-05-01

    The prior UV irradiation of alpha haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a UV dose of 25 J/m2 substantially increases the repairability of damage subsequently induced by a UV dose of 70 J/m2 given 1 h after the first irradiation. This enhancement of repair is seen at both the MAT alpha and HML alpha loci, which are, respectively, transcriptionally active and inactive in alpha haploid cells. The presence in the medium of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide in the period between the two irradiations eliminated this effect. Enhanced repair still occurred if cycloheximide was present only after the final UV irradiation. This indicated that the first result is not due to cycloheximide merely blocking the synthesis of repair enzymes associated with a hypothetical rapid turnover of such molecules. The enhanced repairability is not the result of changes in chromatin accessibility without protein synthesis, merely caused by the repair of the damage induced by the prior irradiation. The data clearly show that a UV-inducible removal of pyrimidine dimers has occurred which involves the synthesis of new proteins. The genes known to possess inducible promoters, and which are involved in excision are RAD2, RAD7, RAD16 and RAD23. Studies with the rad7 and rad16 mutants which are defective in the ability to repair HML alpha and proficient in the repair of MAT alpha showed that in rad7, preirradiation enhanced the repair at MAT alpha, whereas in rad16 this increased repair of MAT alpha was absent. The preirradiation did not modify the inability to repair HML alpha in either strain. Thus RAD16 has a role in this inducible repair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Efficient removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in barley: differential contribution of light-dependent and dark DNA repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Manova, Vasilissa; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Borisov, Borislav; Stoilov, Lubomir

    2016-10-01

    Barley stress response to ultraviolet radiation (UV) has been intensively studied at both the physiological and morphological level. However, the ability of barley genome to repair UV-induced lesions at the DNA level is far less characterized. In this study, we have investigated the relative contribution of light-dependent and dark DNA repair pathways for the efficient elimination of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) from the genomic DNA of barley leaf seedlings. The transcriptional activity of barley CPD photolyase gene in respect to the light-growth conditions and UV-C irradiation of the plants has also been analyzed. Our results show that CPDs induced in the primary barley leaf at frequencies potentially damaging DNA at the single-gene level are removed efficiently and exclusively by photorepair pathway, whereas dark repair is hardly detectable, even at higher CPD frequency. A decrease of initially induced CPDs under dark is observed but only after prolonged incubation, suggesting the activation of light-independent DNA damage repair and/or tolerance mechanisms. The green barley seedlings possess greater capacity for CPD photorepair than the etiolated ones, with efficiency of CPD removal dependent on the intensity and quality of recovering light. The higher repair rate of CPDs measured in the green leaves correlates with the higher transcriptional activity of barley CPD photolyase gene. Visible light and UV-C radiation affect differentially the expression of CPD photolyase gene particularly in the etiolated leaves. We propose that the CPD repair potential of barley young seedlings may influence their response to UV-stress. PMID:27021252

  16. Investigation of the mechanisms of photo-induced formation of cyclobutane dimers of cytosine and 2,4-diaminopyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Kancheva, Pavlina B; Delchev, Vassil B

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms of the formation of cyclobutane dimers (CBD) of cytosine and 2,4-diaminopyrimidine were studied at the CC2 theoretical level and cc-pVDZ basis functions. Four orientations of the two monomers are explored: cys-syn, cis-anti, trans-syn, and trans-anti. The research revealed that in all cases the cyclobutane structures are formed along the (1)ππ* excited-state reaction paths of the stacked aggregates. We localized the S1/S0 conical intersections mediating those transformations. The results obtained agree well with the previously reported investigations on the cis-syn cyclodimer formations of other pyrimidines. PMID:27572158

  17. Formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers photosensitized by pyridopsoralens: Quantitative and qualitative distribution within DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moysan, A.; Viari, A.; Vigny, P. ); Voituriez, L.; Cadet J. ); Moustacchi, E.; Sage, E. )

    1991-07-23

    As after irradiation with 254-nm UV light, exposure of thymidine and three isomeric pyridopsoralen derivatives to UVA radiation, in the dry state, leads to the formation of the six diastereomers of cyclobutadithymidine as the predominant reaction. This unexpected photosensitized reaction, which also gives rise to both 5R* and 5S* diastereomers of 5,6-dihydro-5-({alpha}-thymidylyl)thymidine (or spore photoproduct), is selective since (2+2) dimerization of 2{prime}-deoxycytidine was not detected under the same experimental conditions. The cis-syn isomer of cyclobutadithymine was also found to be produced within isolated DNA following UVA irradiation in aqueous solutions containing 7-methylpyrido (3,4-c)psoralen. Quantitatively, this photoproduct represents about one-fifth of the overall yield of the furan-side pyridopsoralen (2+2) photocycloadducts the thymine. DNA sequencing methodology was used to demonstrate that pyridopsoralen-photosensitized DNA is a substrate for T4 endonuclease V and Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme, two enzymes acting specifically on cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. The formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers concomitant to that of thymine-furocoumarin photoadducts and their eventual implication in the photobiological effects of the pyridopsoralens are discussed.

  18. Formation of Nucleobases from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleobases are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They consist of Nheterocycles that belong to either the pyrimidine-base group (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) or the purinebase group (adenine and guanine). Several nucleobases, mostly purine bases, have been detected in meteorites [1-3], with isotopic signatures consistent with an extraterrestrial origin [4]. Uracil is the only pyrimidine-base compound formally reported in meteorites [2], though the presence of cytosine cannot be ruled out [5,6]. However, the actual process by which the uracil was made and the reasons for the non-detection of thymine in meteorites have yet to be fully explained. Although no N-heterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM [7,8], the positions of the 6.2-µm interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present [9]. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including the three nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in ices consisting of several combinations of H(sub2)O, NH(sub3), CH(sub3)OH, and CH(sub4) at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium, in the protosolar nebula, and on icy bodies of the Solar System.

  19. Condensation in CO2 free jet expansions. I - Dimer formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfeld, W. G.; Hudson, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the kinetics of CO2 dimer formation in the adiabatically expanding core of a free jet expansion has been carried out. The theoretical analysis is based on dimer formation by an efficient termolecular process and dimer destruction by bimolecular collisions. Account is taken of the expected variation of the specific heat ratio during the expansion and of the effective increase in the termolecular collision rate at low temperatures due to the presence of loosely bound orbiting pairs. Experimental dimer concentrations were measured mass spectrometrically by forming a molecular beam from the expanded gas mixture after the onset of molecular flow. Observed dimer concentrations, for a range of pre-expansion conditions of 400 to 900 torr pressure and room temperature, are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis, provided that account is taken of the effect of loosely bound orbiting pairs at low temperatures.

  20. Acetylene as an essential building block for prebiotic formation of pyrimidine bases on Titan.

    PubMed

    Jeilani, Yassin A; Fearce, Chelesa; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2015-10-01

    Prebiotic building blocks for the formation of biomolecules are important in understanding the abiotic origin of biomolecules. However, there is a limited choice of the building blocks as precursors for the biomolecules. Acetylene (HCCH) is found in Titan's atmosphere and is an abiotic-precursor of pyrimidine bases. HCCH reacts with urea to form both cytosine and uracil. The mechanisms for the formation of both cytosine and uracil were studied by density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. Ethynyl radicals (˙CCH) are relevant for the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere therefore both HCCH and ˙CCH were evaluated as carbon sources. The pathways, for both HCCH and ˙CCH, lead to intermediates with an unsaturated-group that facilitate the formation of the six-membered ring of the pyrimidine bases. The predicted structures for cytosine and uracil were compared with labeled cytosine and uracil that were formed from the reaction of DCCD with urea. The results suggest that cytosine is formed from HCCH while uracil is formed from ˙CCH. The mechanisms are energetically feasible and there is no conclusive evidence for the preferred pathway (HCCH or ˙CCH). The pathways were further extended for the formation of both uric acid and 8-oxoguanine from HCCH and urea, and demonstrate the utility of HCCH as a carbon source for diverse biomolecules. Biuret is identified as a precursor for the pyridimine bases, and it unifies the free radical pathways for the pyrimidine bases with those of triazines. The pathways are appropriate for the reducing atmosphere that creates both radicals and electrons due to ionizing radiation on Titan. The mechanisms are feasible for the extraterrestrial formation of the pyrimidine bases. PMID:26325173

  1. The Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Pure H2O Ice Subjected to Different Radiation Environments and the Formation of Uracil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, M.; Chen, Y.-J.; Materese. C. K..; Hu, W.-J.; Qiu, J.-M.; Wu, S.-R.; Fung, H.-S.; Sandford, S. A.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S.; Wu, R.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles which are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA. They include pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in several meteorites, although no Nheterocycles have been observed in space to data. Laboratory experiments showed that the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice at low temperature (<=20 K) leads to the formation of pyrimidine derivatives including the nucleobase uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone. These results were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. When pyrimidine is mixed with combinations of H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CH4 ices under similar conditions, uracil and cytosine are formed. In the present work we study the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O ice with high-energy UV photons (Lyman , He I, and He II lines) provided by a synchrotron source. The photo-destruction of pyrimidine in these H2O ices as well as the formation yields for 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil are compared with our previous results in order to study the photo-stability of pyrimidine and the production efficiency of uracil as a function of the photon energy.

  2. Self-assembling of cytosine nucleoside into triply-bound dimers in acid media. A comprehensive evaluation of proton-bound pyrimidine nucleosides by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, X-rays diffractometry, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Armentano, Donatella; De Munno, Giovanni; Di Donna, Leonardo; Sindona, Giovanni; Giorgi, Gianluca; Salvini, Laura; Napoli, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is used to evaluate the assembling of cytosine and thymine nucleosides in the gas phase, through the formation of hydrogen bonded supermolecules. Mixtures of cytidine analogues and homologues deliver in the gas phase proton-bound heterodimers stabilized by multiple interactions, as proven by the kinetics of their dissociation into the corresponding protonated monomers. Theoretical calculations, performed on initial structures of methylcytosine homodimers available in the literature, converged to a minimized structure whereby the two pyrimidine rings interact through the formation of three hydrogen bonds of similar energy. The crystallographic data here reported show the equivalency of the two interacting pyrimidines which is attributable to the presence of an inversion center. Thymine and uracil pyrimidyl nucleosides form, by ESI, gaseous proton-bound dimers. The kinetic of their dissociation into the related protonated monomers shows that the nucleobases are weekly interacting through a single hydrogen bond. The minimized structure of the protonated heterodimer formed by thymine and N-1-methylthymine confirmed the existence of mainly one hydrogen bond which links the two nucleobases through the O4 oxygens. No crystallographic data exists on thymine proton-bound species, nor have we been able to obtain these aggregates in the solid phase. The gaseous phase, under high vacuum conditions, seems therefore a suitable environment where vanishing structures produced by ESI can be studied with a good degree of approximation.

  3. Stability and Formation of Isobutylene Dimers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Isobutylene is an important bulk chemical for the petroleum industry. Dimerization and hydrogenation reactions produce the standard fuel octane rating comparison. This classic chemistry is often misrepresented in modern texts, however, and this paper attempts to correlate the physical organic principles that apply. (Author)

  4. DNA repair after ultraviolet irradiation of ICR 2A frog cells: pyrimidine dimers are long acting blocks to nascent DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenstein, B.S.; Setlow, R.B.

    1980-08-01

    The ability of ICR 2A frog cells to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation was examined. These cells are capable of photoreactivation but are nearly totally deficient in excision repair. They have the ability to convert the small molecular weight DNA made after irradiation into large molecules but do not show an enhancement in this process when the UV dose is delivered in two separate exposures separated by a 3- or 24-h incubation. Total DNA synthesis is depressed and low molecular weight DNA continues to be synthesized during pulse-labeling as long as 48 h after irradiation. The effects of pyrimidine dimer removal through exposure of UV irradiated cells to photoreactivating light indicate that dimers act as the critical lesions blocking DNA synthesis.

  5. Are isomers of the vinyl cyanide ion missing links for interstellar pyrimidine formation?

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Partha P.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schaefer, Henry F. III

    2009-08-21

    In the interstellar medium (ISM) there are many regions where the formation of molecules is kinetically driven rather than thermochemically, which can lead to the formation of many isomers even though some may be fairly higher in energy relative to the molecular global minimum. Recent laboratory experiments where noble gas cations are reacted with pyrimidine favored the formation of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sup +}, but the molecular structure(s) of this fragment was not determined. Microscopic reversibility means that pyrimidine could form under interstellar conditions should the required C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sup +} reactant be detected in the ISM. Hence C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sup +} could be a strong candidate for involvement in the formation of heterocyclic biomolecules such as pyrimidine in the ISM. In this study, we have investigated the low energy isomers of the acrylonitrile ion (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sup +}) using density functional theory as well as high levels of ab initio theory, namely, the singles and doubles coupled-cluster theory that includes a perturbational correction for connected triple excitations, denoted as CCSD(T). An automated stochastic search procedure, Kick, has been employed to find isomers on the ground state doublet potential energy surface. Several new structures, along with all the previously reported minima, have been found. The global minimum H{sub 2}CCCNH{sup +} is energetically much lower than either H{sub 2}CC(H)CN{sup +}, the acrylonitrile ion, or HCC(H)NCH{sup +}, the most likely intermediate of the reaction between HCCH{sup +} and HCN. These isomers are connected to the global minimum via several transition states and intermediates. The results indicate that not only the global minimum but also several higher energy isomers of the C{sub 3}H{sub 3}N{sup +} ion could be important in interstellar pyrimidine formation. The isomeric molecules have the necessary CCNC backbone needed for the reaction with HCN to form the cyclic pyrimidine framework

  6. Kinetics of UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in human skin in vivo: an immunohistochemical analysis of both epidermis and dermis.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Matsui, M S; Mukhtar, H

    2000-12-01

    It is well known that UV exposure of human skin induces DNA damage, and the cumulative effect of such repeated damage is an important contributor to the development of skin cancer. Here, we demonstrate UV dose- and time-dependent induction of DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in skin cells following a single exposure of human skin to UV radiation. CPD+ cells were identified by an immunohistochemical technique using monoclonal antibodies to thymine dimers. The percentage of CPD+ cells was UV dose-dependent, even a suberythemal (0.5 minimal erythemal dose [MED]) dose resulted in detectable level of cells that contained pyrimidine dimers. Forty-eight hours after irradiation the percent of total epidermal cells positive for CPD ranged from 19 +/- 8, 36 +/- 10, 57 +/- 12 and 80 +/- 10, and total percent dermal cells positive for CPD ranged from 1 +/- 1, 7 +/- 3, 16 +/- 3 and 20 +/- 5, respectively, following 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 MED. CPD were also observed in deeper reticular dermis, which suggest the penetrating ability of UV radiation into the skin. The change in CPD+ cells from 0.5 to 240 h post-UV exposure in both epidermal and dermal compartments of the skin was also quantitated. CPD+ cells were observed in skin biopsies at early time points after UV exposure which remained elevated for 48 h, then declined significantly by 3 days post-UV. A close examination of the skin at and after 3 days following UV exposure indicates the significant removal of DNA damaged cells from the epidermis. Ten days after UV exposure the levels of CPD+ cells in both epidermis and dermis were not significantly different from that in unirradiated skin.

  7. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  8. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  9. Resistance of the genome of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes to irradiation evaluated by the induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts using gamma and UV-C radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, S.; Lacroix, M.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of gamma and UV-C irradiation on the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PPs) in DNA was investigated to compare the natural resistance of the genome of a Gram-positive bacterium and a Gram-negative bacterium against irradiation. Solution of pure DNA and bacterial strains Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli were irradiated using gamma and UV-C rays. Extracted DNA from bacteria and pure DNA samples were then analysed by ELISA using anti-CPDs and anti-6-4 PPs monoclonal antibodies. The results show that gamma rays, as well as UV-C rays, induce the formation of CPDs and 6-4 PPs in DNA. During UV-C irradiation, the three samples showed a difference in their sensitivity against formation of CPDs (P≤0.05). Pure DNA was the most sensitive while the genome of L. monocytogenes was the most resistant. Also during UV-C irradiation, the genome of L. monocytogenes was the only one to show a significant resistance against formation of 6-4 PPs (P≤0.05). During gamma irradiation, for both types of lesion, pure DNA and the genome of E. coli did not show significant difference in their sensitivity (P>0.05) while the genome of L. monocytogenes showed a resistance against formation of CPDs and 6-4 PPs.

  10. The inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vink, A A; Moodycliffe, A M; Shreedhar, V; Ullrich, S E; Roza, L; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1997-05-13

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase (Photosomes; Applied Genetics, Freeport, NY), which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosome treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function. PMID:9144224

  11. Targeting pyrimidine single strands by triplex formation: structural optimization of binding.

    PubMed

    Vo, T; Wang, S; Kool, E T

    1995-08-11

    Recent reports describe a new strategy for the binding of single-stranded pyrimidine sequences by triple helix formation. In this approach, a double-length purine-rich oligonucleotide binds a target strand, folding back to form an antiparallel pur.pur.pyr triple helix. We now describe a series of studies in which sequence and structural variations are made in such purine-rich ligands, in an effort to optimize binding properties. Comparison is made between the use of two separate strands and the use of single two-domain ligands; the latter are found to bind more tightly and to aggregate less in media containing Na+ or K+. Placement of mismatched bases in the target shows that sequence selectivity of binding is as high as that for Watson-Crick duplex formation. Variation of the lengths and sequences of loops bridging the binding domains demonstrates that dinucleotide loops composed of pyrimidines give the highest stability. Oligoethylene glycol-derived loop replacements are shown to give good binding affinity as well. The binding of an RNA target is shown to occur with the same affinity as the binding of DNA. In general, it is found that circular variants bind more tightly than do either separate strands or singly-linked ligands and unlike linear oligomers, the circular compounds do not aggregate to a large extent even in buffers containing 100 mM K+. Such structurally optimized ligands are useful in expanding the number of possible naturally-occurring sequences which can be targeted by triplex formation. PMID:7544889

  12. Identification of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer-Responsive Genes Using UVB-Irradiated Human Keratinocytes Transfected with In Vitro-Synthesized Photolyase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Boros, Gábor; Miko, Edit; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Weissman, Drew; Emri, Eszter; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Szegedi, Andrea; Horkay, Irén; Emri, Gabriella; Karikó, Katalin; Remenyik, Éva

    2015-01-01

    Major biological effects of UVB are attributed to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the most common photolesions formed on DNA. To investigate the contribution of CPDs to UVB-induced changes of gene expression, a model system was established by transfecting keratinocytes with pseudouridine-modified mRNA (Ψ-mRNA) encoding CPD-photolyase. Microarray analyses of this model system demonstrated that more than 50% of the gene expression altered by UVB was mediated by CPD photolesions. Functional classification of the gene targets revealed strong effects of CPDs on the regulation of the cell cycle and transcriptional machineries. To confirm the microarray data, cell cycle-regulatory genes, CCNE1 and CDKN2B that were induced exclusively by CPDs were selected for further investigation. Following UVB irradiation, expression of these genes increased significantly at both mRNA and protein levels, but not in cells transfected with CPD-photolyase Ψ-mRNA and exposed to photoreactivating light. Treatment of cells with inhibitors of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) blocked the UVB-dependent upregulation of both genes suggesting a role for JNK in relaying the signal of UVB-induced CPDs into transcriptional responses. Thus, photolyase mRNA-based experimental platform demonstrates CPD-dependent and -independent events of UVB-induced cellular responses, and, as such, has the potential to identify novel molecular targets for treatment of UVB-mediated skin diseases. PMID:26121660

  13. Formation of CN (B2Σ+) radicals in the vacuum-ultraviolet photodissociation of pyridine and pyrimidine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, Tomasz J.; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello; Zubek, Mariusz

    2014-03-01

    Formation of the excited CN(B2Σ+) free radicals in the photodissociation of pyridine (C5H5N) and pyrimidine (C4H4N2) molecules was investigated over the energy ranges 16-27 and 14.7-25 eV, respectively. Photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to detect the vibrationally and rotationally excited CN radicals by recording the B2Σ+→X2Σ+ emission bands (violet system). The measured dissociation yield curves demonstrate that the CN(B2Σ+) formation occurs via excitation of pyridine and pyrimidine molecules into higher-lying superexcited states. This is followed by rearrangement and isomerization of the excited molecules before dissociation. The vertical excitation energies of the superexcited states were determined and the probable dissociation mechanisms of both molecules are discussed.

  14. Radical Pathways for the Prebiotic Formation of Pyrimidine Bases from Formamide.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huyen Thi; Jeilani, Yassin A; Hung, Huynh Minh; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2015-08-20

    The prebiotic formation of nucleobases, the building blocks of RNA/DNA, is of current interest. Highly reactive radical species present in the atmosphere under irradiation have been suggested to be involved in the prebiotic synthesis of nucleobases from formamide (FM). We studied several free radical reaction pathways for the synthesis of pyrimidine bases (cytosine, uracil, and thymine) from FM under cold conditions. These pathways are theoretically determined using density functional theory (DFT) computations to examine their kinetic and thermodynamic feasibilities. These free radical reaction pathways share some common reaction types such as H-rearrangement, (•)H/(•)OH/(•)NH2 radical loss, and intramolecular radical cyclization. The rate-determining steps in these pathways are characterized with low energy barriers. The energy barriers of the ring formation steps are in the range of 3-7 kcal/mol. Although DFT methods are known to significantly underestimate the barriers for addition of (•)H radical to neutral species, many of these reactions are highly exergonic with energy release of -15 to -52 kcal/mol and are thus favorable. Among the suggested pathways for formation of cytosine (main route, routes 7a and 1a), uracil (main route, routes 7b and 1b), and thymine (main route and route 26a), the main routes are in general thermodynamically more exergonic and more kinetically favored than other alternative routes with lower overall energy barriers. The reaction energies released following formation of cytosine, uracil, and thymine from FM via the main radical routes amount to -59, -81, and -104 kcal/mol, respectively. Increasing temperature induces unfavorable changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of the suggested routes. However, the main routes are still more favored than the alternative pathways at the temperature up to the boiling point of FM. PMID:26196536

  15. Formation of uracil from the ultraviolet photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N; Sandford, Scott A; Elsila, Jamie E; Dworkin, Jason P

    2009-09-01

    The detection of nucleobases in carbonaceous chondrites such as Murchison supports the scenario in which extraterrestrial organic molecules could have contributed to the origin of life on Earth. However, such large molecules have not been observed to date in astrophysical environments, in particular, comets and the interstellar medium (ISM). The physico-chemical conditions under which nucleobases and, more generally, N-heterocycles were formed are unknown, as are their mechanisms of formation. In this work, H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures were irradiated with UV photons under interstellar/cometary-relevant conditions to study the formation of pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. Liquid and gas chromatography analyses of the samples produced in our experiments revealed the presence of numerous photoproducts among which 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil could be conclusively identified. The photostability of pyrimidine against UV photons was also studied, and we showed that it would survive from the ISM to the solar nebula if formed and preserved in ice mantles on the surface of cold grains. We propose pathways for the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil under astrophysically relevant conditions and discuss the possibility for such molecules to survive from the ISM to their delivery to Earth and other Solar System bodies. PMID:19778279

  16. Preferential repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of a gene in yeast chromosomes and plasmids is dependent on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sweder, K S; Hanawalt, P C

    1992-01-01

    While preferential repair of the transcribed strands within active genes has been demonstrated in organisms as diverse as humans and Escherichia coli, it has not previously been shown to occur in chromosomal genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the transcribed strand of the expressed RPB2 gene in the chromosome of a repair-proficient strain is much more rapid than that in the nontranscribed strand. Furthermore, a copy of the RPB2 gene borne on a centromeric ARS1 plasmid showed the same strand bias in repair. To investigate the relation of this strand bias to transcription, we studied repair in a yeast strain with the temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. When exponentially growing rpb1-1 cells are shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, they rapidly cease mRNA synthesis. At the permissive temperature, both rpb1-1 and the wild-type, parental cells exhibited rapid, proficient repair in the transcribed strand of chromosomal and plasmid-borne copies of the RPB2 gene. At the nonpermissive temperature, the rate of repair in the transcribed strand in rpb1-1 cells was reduced to that in the nontranscribed strand. These findings establish the dependence of strand bias in repair on transcription by RNA polymerase II in the chromosomes and in plasmids, and they validate the use of plasmids for analysis of the relation of repair to transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1438266

  17. Ultraviolet Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Interstellar Ice Analogs: Formation and Photo-Stability of Nucleobases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott A.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Astrochemistry laboratory experiments recently showed that molecules of prebiotic interest can potentially form in space, as supported by the detection of amino acids in organic residues formed by the UV photolysis of ices simulating interstellar and cometary environments (H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, NH3, etc.). Although the presence of amino acids in the interstellar medium (ISM) is still under debate, experiments and the detection of amino acids in meteorites both support a scenario in which prebiotic molecules could be of extraterrestrial origin, before they are delivered to planets by comets, asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles. Nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, have also been detected in meteorites, although they have not yet been observed in the ISM. Thus, these molecules constitute another family of prebiotic compounds that can possibly form via abiotical processes in astrophysical environments. Nucleobases are nitrogen-bearing cyclic aromatic species with various functional groups attached, which are divided into two classes: pyrimidines (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purines (adenine and guanine). In this work, we study how UV irradiation affects pyrimidine mixed in interstellar ice analogs (H2O, NH3, CH3OH). In particular, we show that the UV irradiation of H2O:pyrimidine mixtures leads to the production of oxidized compounds including uracil, and show that both uracil and cytosine are formed upon irradiation of H2O:NH3:pyrimidine mixtures. We also study the photostability of pyrimidine and its photoproducts formed during these experiments.

  18. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-07-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation.

  19. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model — using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27381287

  20. Conformational Heterogeneity of Bax Helix 9 Dimer for Apoptotic Pore Formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Andrews, David W; Lin, Jialing; Li, Jianing

    2016-01-01

    Helix α9 of Bax protein can dimerize in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and lead to apoptotic pores. However, it remains unclear how different conformations of the dimer contribute to the pore formation on the molecular level. Thus we have investigated various conformational states of the α9 dimer in a MOM model - using computer simulations supplemented with site-specific mutagenesis and crosslinking of the α9 helices. Our data not only confirmed the critical membrane environment for the α9 stability and dimerization, but also revealed the distinct lipid-binding preference of the dimer in different conformational states. In our proposed pathway, a crucial iso-parallel dimer that mediates the conformational transition was discovered computationally and validated experimentally. The corroborating evidence from simulations and experiments suggests that, helix α9 assists Bax activation via the dimer heterogeneity and interactions with specific MOM lipids, which eventually facilitate proteolipidic pore formation in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27381287

  1. DNA excision repair: where do all the dimers go?

    PubMed

    Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2012-08-15

    Exposure of cells to UV light from the sun causes the formation of pyrimidine dimers in DNA that have the potential to lead to mutation and cancer. In humans, pyrimidine dimers are removed from the genome in the form of ~30 nt-long oligomers by concerted dual incisions. Though nearly 50 y of excision repair research has uncovered many details of UV photoproduct damage recognition and removal, the fate of the excised oligonucleotides and, in particular, the ultimate fate of the chemically very stable pyrimidine dimers remain unknown. Physiologically relevant UV doses introduce hundreds of thousands of pyrimidine dimers in diploid human cells, which are excised from the genome within ~24 h. Once removed from the genome, "where do all the dimers go?" In a recent study we addressed this question. Although our study did not determine the fate of the dimer itself, it revealed that the excised ~30-mer is released from the duplex in a tight complex with the transcription/repair factor TFIIH. This finding combined with recent reports that base and oligonucleotide products of the base and double-strand break repair pathways also make stable complexes with the cognate repair enzymes, and that these complexes activate the MAP kinase and checkpoint signaling pathways, respectively, raises the possibility that TFIIH-30-mer excision complexes may play a role in signaling reactions in response to UV damage.

  2. Intrinsic site-selectivity of ubiquitin dimer formation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristen A; Martin, Langdon J; Prince, Joel M; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin can take on many forms, including the decoration of substrates with polymeric ubiquitin chains. These chains are linked through one of the seven lysine residues in ubiquitin, with the potential to form a panoply of linkage combinations as the chain length increases. The ensuing structural diversity of modifications serves a variety of signaling functions. Still, some linkages are present at a much higher level than others in cellulo. Although ubiquitination is an enzyme-catalyzed process, the large disparity of abundancies led us to the hypothesis that some linkages might be intrinsically faster to form than others, perhaps directing the course of enzyme evolution. Herein, we assess the kinetics of ubiquitin dimer formation in an enzyme-free system by measuring the rate constants for thiol–disulfide interchange between appropriate ubiquitin variants. Remarkably, we find that the kinetically expedient linkages correlate with those that are most abundant in cellulo. As the abundant linkages also appear to function more broadly in cellulo, this correlation suggests that the more accessible chains were selected for global roles. PMID:25401704

  3. Hydration of the pyrimidine radical cation and stepwise solvation of protonated pyrimidine with water, methanol, and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Sharma, Pramod; El-Shall, M Samy; Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-08-28

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using an ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes associated with the stepwise hydration of the biologically significant ions pyrimidine radical cation and protonated pyrimidine. The binding energy of the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation is weaker than that of the proton-bound dimer pyrimidineH(+)(H2O) consistent with the formation of a weak carbon-based CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (11.9 kcal/mol) and a stronger NH(+)··OH2 hydrogen bond (15.6 kcal/mol), respectively. Other proton-bound dimers such as pyrimidineH(+)(CH3OH) and pyrimidineH(+)(CH3CN) exhibit higher binding energies (18.2 kcal/mol and 22.8 kcal/mol, respectively) due to the higher proton affinities and dipole moments of acetonitrile and methanol as compared to water. The measured collisional cross sections of the proton-bound dimers provide experimental-based support for the DFT calculated structures at the M06-2x/6-311++G (d,p) level. The calculations show that the hydrated pyrimidine radical cation clusters form internally solvated structures in which the water molecules are bonded to the C4N2H4(●+) ion by weak CH(δ+)··OH2 hydrogen bonds. The hydrated protonated pyrimidine clusters form externally solvated structures where the water molecules are bonded to each other and the ion is external to the water cluster. Dissociative proton transfer reactions C4N2H4(●+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H3(●) + (H2O)(n)H(+) and C4N2H5(+)(H2O)(n-1) + H2O → C4N2H4 + (H2O)(n)H(+) are observed for n ≥ 4 where the reactions become thermoneutral or exothermic. The absence of the dissociative proton transfer reaction within the C4N2H5(+)(CH3CN)n clusters results from the inability of acetonitrile molecules to form extended hydrogen bonding structures such as those formed by water and methanol due to the presence of the methyl groups which block the extension of hydrogen bonding networks.

  4. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex can catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosome structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A; Vassiliev, Oleg L

    2010-08-10

    The Swi/Snf chromatin-remodeling complexes, human BAF/PBAF and yeast RSC, can catalyze formation of stably altered dimeric forms of nucleosomes. However, the ability to create remodeled dimers has not yet been reported for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi/Snf complex. Despite its similarity with the other Swi/Snf proteins, the yeast Swi/Snf complex features certain structural and functional differences. This raises the question of whether ySwi/Snf can in fact catalyze formation of dimeric nucleosomes. Dimer formation was proposed to have a specific impact on chromatin regulatory effects. Thus, the answer to the above question may be helpful in clarifying the ySwi/Snf functions in vivo and generalizing the notions of the regulatory principles of Swi/Snf family proteins. Here we describe ySwi/Snf-catalyzed formation of nucleosome dimers using mono- and dinucleosome templates assembled from purified histones and DNA of the high-affinity (601) nucleosome positioning sequence. We evaluated effects of nucleosome template geometry on the formation of altered dimers and assayed formation of altered nucleosome pairs on reconstituted dinucleosomes.

  5. Transition Metal Free Intermolecular Direct Oxidative C-N Bond Formation to Polysubstituted Pyrimidines Using Molecular Oxygen as the Sole Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Li, Chunsheng; Liao, Jianhua; Ji, Fanghua; Liu, Dongqing; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-07-01

    Various polysubstituted pyrimidines are smoothly formed via a base-promoted intermolecular oxidation C-N bond formation of allylic C(sp(3))-H and vinylic C(sp(2))-H of allyllic compounds with amidines using O2 as the sole oxidant. This protocol features protecting group free nitrogen sources, good functional group tolerance, high atom economy, and environmental advantages.

  6. Enhanced UV-induced mutagenesis in the UV61 cell line, the Chinese hamster homologue of Cockayne's syndrome B, is associated with defective transcription coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vreeswijk, M P; Overkamp, M W; Westland, B E; van Hees-Stuivenberg, S; Vrieling, H; Zdzienicka, M Z; van Zeeland, A A; Mullenders, L H

    1998-10-21

    Cells from Cockayne's syndrome (CS) patients are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of UV-irradiation and are defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR). We have examined the mutagenic consequences of impaired TCR in the Chinese hamster cell line UV61, the rodent homologue of CS complementation group B. Analysis of the two major UV-induced photolesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP), revealed that repair of CPD from the transcribed strand was strongly reduced in UV61 cells, but repair of 6-4 PP was indistinguishable from that in wild-type hamster cells. UV-induced mutation induction was enhanced in UV61 compared to that observed in repair proficient cells. The spectrum of UV-induced base substitutions in UV61 was clearly different from that observed in wild-type hamster cells and resembled the spectrum previously observed in nucleotide excision repair deficient hamster cells. In UV61 cells a strong strand bias for mutation induction was found; assuming that premutagenic lesions occur at dipyrimidine sequences, 76% of the mutations could be attributed to lesions in the transcribed strand. These data strongly favour the hypothesis that defective TCR of CPD is responsible for the enhanced UV-induced mutagenesis in UV61 cells. PMID:9806502

  7. Formation of salt bridges mediates internal dimerization of myosin VI medial tail domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeongjun; Hsin, Jen; Liu, Yanxin; Selvin, Paul R; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-11-10

    The unconventional motor protein, myosin VI, is known to dimerize upon cargo binding to its C-terminal end. It has been shown that one of its tail domains, called the medial tail domain, is a dimerization region. The domain contains an unusual pattern of alternating charged residues and a few hydrophobic residues. To reveal the unknown dimerization mechanism of the medial tail domain, we employed molecular dynamics and single-molecule experimental techniques. Both techniques suggest that the formation of electrostatic-based interhelical salt bridges between oppositely charged residues is a key dimerization factor. For the dimerization to occur, the two identical helices within the dimer do not bind in a symmetric fashion, but rather with an offset of about one helical repeat. Calculations of the dimer-dissociation energy find the contribution of hydrophobic residues to the dimerization process to be minor; they also find that the asymmetric homodimer state is energetically favorable over a state of separate helices. PMID:21070943

  8. Data on dimer formation between importin α subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yoichi; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This article describes data related to the research article titled “Functional characterization of importin α8 as a classical nuclear localization signal receptor” [1]. A GST pull-down assay showed that both importin α1 and α8, which are classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS) receptors, can form a dimer with importin α6, α7, or α8. Importin α8 has higher dimer-forming ability than importin α1. In addition, our data show that either importin α1 or importin α8 can form a heterodimer with importin α3, which exists in a preformed complex with cNLS substrates such as the conventional SV40TNLS or the p53 protein, resulting in the release of the cNLS substrates from importin α3. PMID:27222842

  9. Formation of Enhanced Uniform Chiral Fields in Symmetric Dimer Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaorui; Fang, Yurui; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-01-01

    Chiral fields with large optical chirality are very important in chiral molecules analysis, sensing and other measurements. Plasmonic nanostructures have been proposed to realize such super chiral fields for enhancing weak chiral signals. However, most of them cannot provide uniform chiral near-fields close to the structures, which makes these nanostructures not so efficient for applications. Plasmonic helical nanostructures and blocked squares have been proved to provide uniform chiral near-fields, but structure fabrication is a challenge. In this paper, we show that very simple plasmonic dimer structures can provide uniform chiral fields in the gaps with large enhancement of both near electric fields and chiral fields under linearly polarized light illumination with polarization off the dimer axis at dipole resonance. An analytical dipole model is utilized to explain this behavior theoretically. 30 times of volume averaged chiral field enhancement is gotten in the whole gap. Chiral fields with opposite handedness can be obtained simply by changing the polarization to the other side of the dimer axis. It is especially useful in Raman optical activity measurement and chiral sensing of small quantity of chiral molecule. PMID:26621558

  10. Formation and Diffusion of Water Dimers on Rutile TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiesen, J.; Hansen, J. Ø.; Wendt, S.; Lira, E.; Schaub, R.; Lægsgaard, E.; Besenbacher, F.; Hammer, B.

    2009-06-01

    From an interplay of time-lapsed high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations we reveal the formation and diffusion of water dimers on hydrated rutile TiO2(110)-(1×1) surfaces, i.e., surfaces containing OHbr groups. At temperatures between ˜150 and ˜210K water monomers diffusing along the Ti troughs were found to form stable water dimers that diffuse faster than the water monomers. An H bond mediated rollover mechanism operating for the water dimers explains the experimental findings.

  11. A balanced pyrimidine pool is required for optimal Chk1 activation to prevent ultrafine anaphase bridge formation.

    PubMed

    Gemble, Simon; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Biard, Denis; Lambert, Sarah; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2016-08-15

    Cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency induces an excess of cellular dCTP, which reduces basal PARP-1 activity, thereby compromising complete DNA replication, leading to ultrafine anaphase bridge (UFB) formation. CDA dysfunction has pathological implications, notably in cancer and in Bloom syndrome. It remains unknown how reduced levels of PARP-1 activity and pyrimidine pool imbalance lead to the accumulation of unreplicated DNA during mitosis. We report that a decrease in PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells impairs DNA-damage-induced Chk1 activation, and, thus, the downstream checkpoints. Chemical inhibition of the ATR-Chk1 pathway leads to UFB accumulation, and we found that this pathway was compromised in CDA-deficient cells. Our data demonstrate that ATR-Chk1 acts downstream from PARP-1, preventing the accumulation of unreplicated DNA in mitosis, and, thus, UFB formation. Finally, delaying entry into mitosis is sufficient to prevent UFB formation in both CDA-deficient and CDA-proficient cells, suggesting that both physiological and pathological UFBs are derived from unreplicated DNA. Our findings demonstrate an unsuspected requirement for a balanced nucleotide pool for optimal Chk1 activation both in unchallenged cells and in response to genotoxic stress.

  12. A balanced pyrimidine pool is required for optimal Chk1 activation to prevent ultrafine anaphase bridge formation.

    PubMed

    Gemble, Simon; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Biard, Denis; Lambert, Sarah; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2016-08-15

    Cytidine deaminase (CDA) deficiency induces an excess of cellular dCTP, which reduces basal PARP-1 activity, thereby compromising complete DNA replication, leading to ultrafine anaphase bridge (UFB) formation. CDA dysfunction has pathological implications, notably in cancer and in Bloom syndrome. It remains unknown how reduced levels of PARP-1 activity and pyrimidine pool imbalance lead to the accumulation of unreplicated DNA during mitosis. We report that a decrease in PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells impairs DNA-damage-induced Chk1 activation, and, thus, the downstream checkpoints. Chemical inhibition of the ATR-Chk1 pathway leads to UFB accumulation, and we found that this pathway was compromised in CDA-deficient cells. Our data demonstrate that ATR-Chk1 acts downstream from PARP-1, preventing the accumulation of unreplicated DNA in mitosis, and, thus, UFB formation. Finally, delaying entry into mitosis is sufficient to prevent UFB formation in both CDA-deficient and CDA-proficient cells, suggesting that both physiological and pathological UFBs are derived from unreplicated DNA. Our findings demonstrate an unsuspected requirement for a balanced nucleotide pool for optimal Chk1 activation both in unchallenged cells and in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27383768

  13. A Strategy for Complex Dimer Formation When Biomimicry Fails: Total Synthesis of Ten Coccinellid Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature’s presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  14. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class.

  15. A strategy for complex dimer formation when biomimicry fails: total synthesis of ten coccinellid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Trevor C; Trotta, Adam H; Snyder, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    Although dimeric natural products can often be synthesized in the laboratory by directly merging advanced monomers, these approaches sometimes fail, leading instead to non-natural architectures via incorrect unions. Such a situation arose during our studies of the coccinellid alkaloids, when attempts to directly dimerize Nature's presumed monomeric precursors in a putative biomimetic sequence afforded only a non-natural analogue through improper regiocontrol. Herein, we outline a unique strategy for dimer formation that obviates these difficulties, one which rapidly constructs the coccinellid dimers psylloborine A and isopsylloborine A through a terminating sequence of two reaction cascades that generate five bonds, five rings, and four stereocenters. In addition, a common synthetic intermediate is identified which allows for the rapid, asymmetric formal or complete total syntheses of eight monomeric members of the class. PMID:24959981

  16. Homochiral Selectivity in RNA Synthesis: Montmorillonite-catalyzed Quaternary Reactions of D, L-Purine with D, L- Pyrimidine Nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Aldersley, Michael F.; Ferris, James P.

    2011-06-01

    Selective adsorption of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on the platelets of montmorillonite demonstrates an important reaction pathway for the origin of homochirality in RNA synthesis. Our earlier studies have shown that the individual reactions of D, L-ImpA or D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite catalyst produced oligomers which were only partially inhibited by the incorporation of both D- and L-enantiomers. Homochirality in these reactions was largely due to the formation of cyclic dimers that cannot elongate. We investigated the quaternary reactions of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite. The chain length of these oligomers increased from 9-mer to 11-mer as observed by HPLC, with a concominant increase in the yield of linear dimers and higher oligomers in the reactions involving D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU as compared to the similar reactions carried out with D-enantiomers only. The formation of cyclic dimers of U was completely inhibited in the quaternary reactions. The yield of cyclic dimers of A was reduced from 60% to 10% within the dimer fraction. 12 linear dimers and 3 cyclic dimers were isolated and characterized from the quaternary reaction. The homochirality and regioselectivity of dimers were 64.1% and 71.7%, respectively. Their sequence selectivity was shown by the formation of purine-pyrimidine (54-59%) linkages, followed by purine-purine (29-32%) linkages and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (9-13%) linkages. Of the 16 trimers detected, 10 were homochiral with an overall homochirality of 73-76%. In view of the greater homochirality, sequence- and regio- selectivity, the quaternary reactions on montmorillonite demonstrate an unexpectedly favorable route for the prebiotic synthesis of homochiral RNA compared with the separate reactions of enantiomeric activated mononucleotides.

  17. Influence of cyclic dimer formation on the phase behavior of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Janecek, Jiri; Paricaud, Patrice

    2012-07-12

    A new thermodynamic approach based on the Sear and Jackson association theory for doubly bonded dimers [Mol. Phys.1994, 82, 1033] is proposed to describe the thermodynamic properties of carboxylic acids. The new model is able to simultaneously represent the vapor pressures, saturated densities, and vaporization enthalpies of the shortest acids and is in a much better agreement with experimental data than other approaches that do no consider the formation of cyclic dimers. The new model is applied to mixtures of carboxylic acids with nonassociating compounds, and a very good description of the vapor-liquid equilibria in mixtures of alkanes + carboxylic acids is obtained.

  18. Methanol dimer formation drastically enhances hydrogen abstraction from methanol by OH at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Siebrand, Willem; Smedarchina, Zorka; Martínez-Núñez, Emilio; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2016-08-10

    The kinetics of the reaction of methanol with hydroxyl radicals is revisited in light of the reported new kinetic data, measured in cold expansion beams. The rate constants exhibit an approximately 10(2)-fold increase when the temperature decreases from 200 to 50 K, a result that cannot be fully explained by tunneling, as we confirm by new calculations. These calculations also show that methanol dimers are much more reactive to hydroxyl than monomers and imply that a dimer concentration of about 30% of the equilibrium concentration can account quantitatively for the observed rates. The assumed presence of dimers is supported by the observation of cluster formation in these and other cold beams of molecules subject to hydrogen bonding. The calculations imply an important caveat with respect to the use of cold expansion beams for the study of interstellar chemistry. PMID:27479134

  19. The RAD7 and RAD16 genes, which are essential for pyrimidine dimer removal from the silent mating type loci, are also required for repair of the nontranscribed strand of an active gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; de Groot, N; Gleig, F; Bang, D D; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1994-01-01

    The rad16 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was previously shown to be impaired in removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the silent mating-type loci (D. D. Bang, R. A. Verhage, N. Goosen, J. Brouwer, and P. van de Putte, Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3925-3931, 1992). Here we show that rad7 as well as rad7 rad16 double mutants have the same repair phenotype, indicating that the RAD7 and RAD16 gene products might operate in the same nucleotide excision repair subpathway. Dimer removal from the genome overall is essentially incomplete in these mutants, leaving about 20 to 30% of the DNA unrepaired. Repair analysis of the transcribed RPB2 gene shows that the nontranscribed strand is not repaired at all in rad7 and rad16 mutants, whereas the transcribed strand is repaired in these mutants at a fast rate similar to that in RAD+ cells. When the results obtained with the RPB2 gene can be generalized, the RAD7 and RAD16 proteins not only are essential for repair of silenced regions but also function in repair of nontranscribed strands of active genes in S. cerevisiae. The phenotype of rad7 and rad16 mutants closely resembles that of human xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, suggesting that RAD7 and RAD16 in S. cerevisiae function in the same pathway as the XPC gene in human cells. RAD4, which on the basis of sequence homology has been proposed to be the yeast XPC counterpart, seems to be involved in repair of both inactive and active yeast DNA, challenging the hypothesis that RAD4 and XPC are functional homologs. Images PMID:8065346

  20. Mutations that affect coenzyme binding and dimer formation of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brunskole, Mojca; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2009-03-25

    The 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl) is an NADPH-dependent member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, and it functions as a dimer that is composed of two identical subunits. By constructing the appropriate mutants, we have examined the M204 residue that is situated in the coenzyme binding pocket, for its role in the binding of the coenzyme NADP(H). We have also studied the importance of hydrophobic interactions through F124, F132, F133 and F177 for 17beta-HSDcl dimer formation. The M204G substitution decreased the catalytic efficiency of 17beta-HSDcl, suggesting that M204 sterically coerces the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme into the appropriate position for further hydride transfer. Phenylalanine substitutions introduced at the dimer interface produced inactive aggregates and oligomers with high molecular masses, suggesting that these hydrophobic interactions have important roles in the formation of the active dimer.

  1. Trion and dimer formation in three-color fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, J.; Privitera, A.; Titvinidze, I.; Hofstetter, W.

    2013-02-01

    We study the problem of three ultracold fermions in different hyperfine states loaded into a lattice with spatial dimension D=1,2. We consider SU(3)-symmetric attractive interactions and also eventually include a three-body constraint, which mimics the effect of three-body losses in the strong-loss regime. We combine exact diagonalization with the Lanczos algorithm, and evaluate both the eigenvalues and the eigenstates of the problem. In D=1, we find that the ground state is always a three-body bound state (trion) for arbitrarily small interaction, while in D=2, due to the stronger influence of finite-size effects, we are not able to provide conclusive evidence of the existence of a finite threshold for trion formation. Our data are, however, compatible with a threshold value which vanishes logarithmically with the size of the system. Moreover, we are able to identify the presence of a fine structure inside the spectrum, which is associated with off-site trionic states. The characterization of these states shows that only the long-distance behavior of the eigenstate wave functions provides clear-cut signatures about the nature of bound states and that on-site observables are not enough to discriminate between them. The inclusion of a three-body constraint due to losses promotes these off-site trions to the role of lowest-energy states, at least in the strong-coupling regime.

  2. Formation dynamics of fullerene dimers C118+, C119+, and C120+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zettergren, H.; Rousseau, P.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Domaracka, A.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Cederquist, H.; Alcamí, M.; Martín, F.

    2014-06-01

    Dumbbell-shaped fullerene dimers C118+ and C119+ have recently been observed in mass spectra resulting from collisions between clusters of C60 molecules and keV He2+ or Ar2+ ions [H. Zettergren et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 185501 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.185501 and F. Seitz et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 034309 (2013), 10.1063/1.4812790]. To unveil the formation mechanisms of these fullerene dimers, systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method have been performed for Cn+ + C60 (n =58,59,60) collisions following prompt atom knockouts by the fast ions. The statistics from the MD simulations indicate a much higher reactivity of C59+ and C58+ fragments compared to that of C60+. It is found that the covalently bonded dumbbell-shaped fullerene dimers C118+ and C119+ can be formed at very low-collision energies within 1 ps and are stable enough to survive on the microsecond time scale of the experiment. The thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities, as well as the bonding features, have been investigated for the most stable dumbbell dimers C118+, C119+, and C120+.

  3. Formation of the Ras dimer is essential for Raf-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Inouye, K; Mizutani, S; Koide, H; Kaziro, Y

    2000-02-11

    Although it is well established that Ras requires membrane localization for activation of its target molecule, Raf-1, the reason for this requirement is not fully understood. In this study, we found that modified Ras, which is purified from Sf9 cells, could activate Raf-1 in a cell-free system, when incorporated into liposome. Using a bifunctional cross-linker and a protein-fragmentation complementation assay, we detected dimer formation of Ras in the liposome and in the intact cells, respectively. These results suggest that dimerization of Ras in the lipid membrane is essential for activation of Raf-1. To support this, we found that, when fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), unprocessed Ras expressed in Escherichia coli could bypass the requirement for liposome. A Ras-dependent Raf-1 activator, which we previously reported (Mizutani, S., Koide, H., and Kaziro, Y. (1998) Oncogene 16, 2781-2786), was still required for Raf-1 activation by GST-Ras. Furthermore, an enforced dimerization of unmodified oncogenic Ras mutant in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, using a portion of gyrase B or estrogen receptor, also resulted in activation of Raf-1. From these results, we conclude that membrane localization allows Ras to form a dimer, which is essential, although not sufficient, for Raf-1 activation.

  4. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail. PMID:27630059

  5. Oncogenic Mutations Differentially Affect Bax Monomer, Dimer, and Oligomeric Pore Formation in the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of Bax, a pro-apoptotic regulator of cellular metabolism is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We have constructed the first atomistic models of the Bax oligomeric pore consisting with experimental residue-residue distances. The models are stable, capturing well double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy measurements and provide structural details in line with the DEER data. Comparison with the latest experimental results revealed that our models agree well with both Bax and Bak pores, pointed to a converged structural arrangement for Bax and Bak pore formation. Using multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we probed mutational effects on Bax transformation from monomer → dimer → membrane pore formation at atomic resolution. We observe that two cancer-related mutations, G40E and S118I, allosterically destabilize the monomer and stabilize an off-pathway swapped dimer, preventing productive pore formation. This observation suggests a mechanism whereby the mutations may work mainly by over-stabilizing the monomer → dimer transformation toward an unproductive off-pathway swapped-dimer state. Our observations point to misfolded Bax states, shedding light on the molecular mechanism of Bax mutation-elicited cancer. Most importantly, the structure of the Bax pore facilitates future study of releases cytochrome C in atomic detail. PMID:27630059

  6. Structural diversity of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β dimers and their role in oligomerization and fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L; Greenberg, Jerry P; Wrasidlo, Wolfgang; Gonzalez, Tania; Desplats, Paula; Michael, Sarah E; Trejo-Morales, Margarita; Overk, Cassia R; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the formation of toxic amyloid-β (Aβ)42 oligomers, and recent evidence supports a role for Aβ dimers as building blocks for oligomers. Molecular dynamics simulation studies have identified clans for the dominant conformations of Aβ42 forming dimers; however, it is unclear if a larger spectrum of dimers is involved and which set(s) of dimers might evolve to oligomers verse fibrils. Therefore, for this study we generated multiple structural conformations of Aβ42, using explicit all-atom molecular dynamics, and then clustering the different structures based on key conformational similarities. Those matching a selection threshold were then used to model a process of oligomerization. Remarkably, we showed a greater diversity in Aβ dimers than previously described. Depending on the clan family, different types of Aβ dimers were obtained. While some had the tendency to evolve into oligomeric rings, others formed fibrils of diverse characteristics. Then we selected the dimers that would evolve to membranephilic annular oligomers. Nearly one third of the 28 evaluated annular oligomers had the dimer interfaces between the neighboring Aβ42 monomers with possible salt bridges between the residue K28 from one side and either residue E22 or D23 on the other. Based on these results, key amino acids were identified for point mutations that either enhanced or suppressed the formation and toxicity of oligomer rings. Our studies suggest a greater diversity of Aβ dimers. Understanding the structure of Aβ dimers might be important for the rationale design of small molecules that block formation of toxic oligomers.

  7. Structural diversity of Alzheimer’s disease Aβ dimers and their role in oligomerization and fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Wrasidlo, Wolfgang; Gonzalez, Tania; Desplats, Paula; Michael, Sarah E.; Trejo-Morales, Margarita; Overk, Cassia R.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the formation of toxic Aβ42 oligomers and recent evidence supports a role for Aβ dimers as building blocks for oligomers. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies have identified clans for the dominant conformations of Aβ42 forming dimers; however, it is unclear if a larger spectrum of dimers is involved and which set(s) of dimers might evolve to oligomers verse fibrils. Therefore, for this study we generated multiple structural conformations of Aβ42, using explicit all-atom MD, and then clustering the different structures based on key conformational similarities. Those matching a selection threshold were then used to model a process of oligomerization. Remarkably, we showed a greater diversity in Aβ dimers than previously described. Depending on the clan family, different types of Aβ dimers were obtained. While some had the tendency to evolve into oligomeric rings, others formed fibrils of diverse characteristics. Then we selected the dimers that would evolve to membranephilic annular oligomers. Nearly one third of the 28 evaluated annular oligomers had the dimer interfaces between the neighboring Aβ42 monomers with possible salt bridges between the residue K28 from one side and either residue E22 or D23 on the other. Based on these results, key amino acids were identified for point mutations that either enhanced or suppressed the formation and toxicity of oligomer rings. Our studies suggest a greater diversity of Aβ dimers. Understanding the structure of Aβ dimers might be important for the rationale design of small molecules that block formation of toxic oligomers. PMID:24240640

  8. Photoinduced formation of an azobenzene-based CD-active supramolecular cyclic dimer.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Hiromitsu; Terada, Kayo; Miyagi, Yu; Shiotsuki, Masashi; Inai, Yoshihito; Masuda, Toshio; Sanda, Fumio

    2015-04-27

    A series of new photo-responsive amino acid-derived azobenzenedicarboxylic acid derivatives (S)-1 a-e were synthesized. Compound (S)-1 a in the trans form exhibited no circular dichroism (CD) signal in DMF under ambient conditions, whereas intense Cotton effects were observed upon UV irradiation, indicating the formation of a chiral supramolecular structure in the cis form. The CD signals disappeared when trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was added to the solution. The ester counterpart [(S)-1 a'] showed no CD signal. Hydrogen bonding between the carboxy groups seemed necessary for constructing the supramolecular structure. The kinetic studies of cis to trans isomerization of (S)-1 a demonstrated that the formation of a chiral supramolecule enhances the stability of the cis-azobenzene structure. The ESI mass spectrum of stilbenedicarboxylic acid (S)-4, an analogue of (S)-1 b, confirmed the formation of a dimer. A theoretical CD study revealed that (S)-1 a in the cis form should be present as a cyclic chiral dimer.

  9. Reactivity of damaged pyrimidines: formation of a Schiff base intermediate at the glycosidic bond of saturated dihydrouridine.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yajun; Lin, Gengjie; Chomicz, Lidia; Li, Lei

    2015-03-11

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The chemistry used by these enzymes for deglycosylation has been largely considered as the chemistry of the oxocarbenium ion, e.g., direct rupture of the C1'-N1 bond resulting in an oxocarbenium ion intermediate. Here we present mechanistic studies revealing the 2'-deoxyribose isomerization and subsequent deglycosylation processes in two pyrimidine lesions: 5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine (dHdU) and 5,6-dihydrothymidine (dHT), formed via ionizing radiation damage to 2'-deoxycytidine and thymidine, respectively, under anoxic conditions. Acid or heat treatment of these two lesions leads to the production of two pairs of C1' epimers containing a pyranose and a furanose, respectively, indicating that both lesions favor the rupture of the C1'-O4' bond, resulting in a Schiff base intermediate at the N-glycosidic bond. Such a Schiff base intermediate was trapped and characterized by either Pd-catalyzed hydrogenation or thiol-mediated addition reaction. In contrast, in undamaged 2'-deoxyuridine and thymidine, reactions at elevated temperatures lead to the release of nucleobases most likely via the traditional oxocarbenium ion pathway. DFT calculations further support the experimental findings, suggesting that the oxocarbenium ion intermediate is responsible for the deglycosylation process if the integrity of the pyrimidine ring is maintained, while the Schiff base intermediate is preferred if the C5═C6 bond is saturated. Currently, the oxocarbenium ion pathway is indicated to be solely responsible for the deglycosylation in BER enzymes, however our results suggest an alternative Schiff base mechanism which may be responsible for the repair of saturated pyrimidine damages.

  10. p53 mutant human glioma cells are sensitive to UV-C-induced apoptosis due to impaired cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer removal.

    PubMed

    Batista, Luis F Z; Roos, Wynand P; Kaina, Bernd; Menck, Carlos F M

    2009-02-01

    The p53 protein is a key regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and it has been shown that it sensitizes glioma cells to the alkylating agent temozolomide by up-regulating the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, whereas it increases the resistance to chloroethylating agents, such as ACNU and BCNU, probably by enhancing the efficiency of DNA repair. However, because these agents induce a wide variety of distinct DNA lesions, the direct importance of DNA repair is hard to access. Here, it is shown that the induction of photoproducts by UV light (UV-C) significantly induces apoptosis in a p53-mutated glioma background. This is caused by a reduced level of photoproduct repair, resulting in the persistence of DNA lesions in p53-mutated glioma cells. UV-C-induced apoptosis in p53 mutant glioma cells is preceded by strong transcription and replication inhibition due to blockage by unrepaired photolesions. Moreover, the results indicate that UV-C-induced apoptosis of p53 mutant glioma cells is executed through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, with Bcl-2 degradation and sustained Bax and Bak up-regulation. Collectively, the data indicate that unrepaired DNA lesions induce apoptosis in p53 mutant gliomas despite the resistance of these gliomas to temozolomide, suggesting that efficiency of treatment of p53 mutant gliomas might be higher with agents that induce the formation of DNA lesions whose global genomic repair is dependent on p53.

  11. Inducible nucleotide excision repair (NER) of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the cell cycle of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence that inducible NER is confined to the G1 phase of the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Scott, A D; Waters, R

    1997-03-18

    We previously reported on an inducible component of nucleotide excision repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is controlled by the RAD16 gene. Here we describe a study of this event at the MAT alpha and HML alpha mating-type loci and on the transcribed (TS) and nontranscribed (NTS) strands of the RAD16 gene. Events were examined at various stages of the mitotic cycle in cells synchronised by centrifugal elutriation. Repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) following a single UV dose does not vary significantly in different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. CPDs are removed more rapidly from the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus than from the silent HML alpha locus, and the TS of RAD16 is repaired faster than the NTS in all stages of the cycle following a single UV irradiation. Enhanced excision of CPDs at MAT alpha and HML alpha can be induced only in the G1 and early S stages of the cell cycle. Here prior irradiation of cells with 25 J/m2 enhances the removal of CPDs following a second UV dose of 70 J/m2. The level of enhancement of repair does not differ significantly between MAT alpha and HML alpha in G1. Enhanced removal of CPDs is absent when cells receive the inducing dose in late S or G2/M. Repair of CPDs in both strands of RAD16 is similarly enhanced only if cells receive the initial irradiation in G1 and early S. The level of enhanced removal of CPDs is not significantly different in the TS and NTS of RAD16 either in asynchronous cells or in cells preirradiated in G1 and early S. It has been shown by others that UV-induced expression of RAD16 remains at high levels if cells are held in G1 by treatment with alpha factor. Therefore the increase in RAD16 transcript levels in G1 may be responsible for the ability to enhance NER solely in this stage of the cell cycle.

  12. Amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer formations studied by a multicanonical-multioverlap molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okamoto, Yuko

    2008-03-13

    Amyloid-beta peptides are known to form amyloid fibrils and are considered to play an important role in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta(29-42) is a fragment of the amyloid-beta peptide and also has a tendency to form amyloid fibrils. In order to study the mechanism of amyloidogenesis of this fragment, we applied one of the generalized-ensemble algorithms, the multicanonical-multioverlap algorithm, to amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer in aqueous solution. We obtained a detailed free-energy landscape of the dimer system. From the detailed free-energy landscape, we examined monomer and dimer formations of amyloid-beta(29-42) and deduced dimerization processes, which correspond to seeding processes in the amyloidogenesis of amyloid-beta(29-42).

  13. A Sustainable Multicomponent Pyrimidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deibl, Nicklas; Ament, Kevin; Kempe, Rhett

    2015-10-14

    Since alcohols are accessible from indigestible biomass (lignocellulose), the development of novel preferentially catalytic reactions in which alcohols are converted into important classes of fine chemicals is a central topic of sustainable synthesis. Multicomponent reactions are especially attractive in organic chemistry as they allow the synthesis of large libraries of diversely functionalized products in a short time when run in a combinatorial fashion. Herein, we report a novel, regioselective, iridium-catalyzed multicomponent synthesis of pyrimidines from amidines and up to three (different) alcohols. This reaction proceeds via a sequence of condensation and dehydrogenation steps which give rise to selective C-C and C-N bond formations. While the condensation steps deoxygenate the alcohol components, the dehydrogenations lead to aromatization. Two equiv of hydrogen and water are liberated in the course of the reactions. PN5P-Ir-pincer complexes, recently developed in our laboratory, catalyze this sustainable multicomponent process most efficiently. A total of 38 different pyrimidines were synthesized in isolated yields of up to 93%. Strong points of the new protocol are its regioselectivity and thus the immediate access to pyrimidines that are highly and unsymmetrically decorated with alkyl or aryl substituents. The combination of this novel protocol with established methods for converting alcohols to nitriles now allows to selectively assemble pyrimidines from four alcohol building blocks and 2 equiv of ammonia.

  14. A Sustainable Multicomponent Pyrimidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deibl, Nicklas; Ament, Kevin; Kempe, Rhett

    2015-10-14

    Since alcohols are accessible from indigestible biomass (lignocellulose), the development of novel preferentially catalytic reactions in which alcohols are converted into important classes of fine chemicals is a central topic of sustainable synthesis. Multicomponent reactions are especially attractive in organic chemistry as they allow the synthesis of large libraries of diversely functionalized products in a short time when run in a combinatorial fashion. Herein, we report a novel, regioselective, iridium-catalyzed multicomponent synthesis of pyrimidines from amidines and up to three (different) alcohols. This reaction proceeds via a sequence of condensation and dehydrogenation steps which give rise to selective C-C and C-N bond formations. While the condensation steps deoxygenate the alcohol components, the dehydrogenations lead to aromatization. Two equiv of hydrogen and water are liberated in the course of the reactions. PN5P-Ir-pincer complexes, recently developed in our laboratory, catalyze this sustainable multicomponent process most efficiently. A total of 38 different pyrimidines were synthesized in isolated yields of up to 93%. Strong points of the new protocol are its regioselectivity and thus the immediate access to pyrimidines that are highly and unsymmetrically decorated with alkyl or aryl substituents. The combination of this novel protocol with established methods for converting alcohols to nitriles now allows to selectively assemble pyrimidines from four alcohol building blocks and 2 equiv of ammonia. PMID:26414993

  15. Regioisomeric allene dimer formation by the reaction of tetraarylbutatrienes with tetracyanoethene.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Shoko; Hida, Kazuo; Nishiuchi, Masaki; Kawamura, Yasuhiko

    2014-05-01

    The reaction of tetraarylbutatrienes (tetraaryl[3]cumulenes) with tetracyanoethene (TCNE), a strong electron-accepting molecule, at room temperature yielded novel four-membered ring compounds (head-to-tail unsymmetrically substituted diarylallene dimers) by [2 + 2] cycloaddition of the central C=C bond of the butatrienes. This reaction proceeded through a head-to-head symmetrically substituted diarylallene dimer intermediate. Unsymmetrical butatriene also formed a small amount of another head-to-tail dimer. Although the allene dimer is stable in nonpolar solvents, it converts to other bicyclic and tricyclic compounds in MeOH or CH3CN at room temperature.

  16. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway.

  17. A staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein regulates biofilm formation independently of cyclic dimeric GMP.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda M; O'Donnell, Sinéad T; Ryjenkov, Dmitri A; Gomelsky, Larissa; Slater, Shawn R; Fey, Paul D; Gomelsky, Mark; O'Gara, James P

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important biofilm regulator that allosterically activates enzymes of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Proteobacterial genomes usually encode multiple GGDEF domain-containing diguanylate cyclases responsible for c-di-GMP synthesis. In contrast, only one conserved GGDEF domain protein, GdpS (for GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus), and a second protein with a highly modified GGDEF domain, GdpP, are present in the sequenced staphylococcal genomes. Here, we investigated the role of GdpS in biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Inactivation of gdpS impaired biofilm formation in medium supplemented with NaCl under static and flow-cell conditions, whereas gdpS overexpression complemented the mutation and enhanced wild-type biofilm development. GdpS increased production of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide, poly-N-acetyl-glucosamine, by elevating icaADBC mRNA levels. Unexpectedly, c-di-GMP synthesis was found to be irrelevant for the ability of GdpS to elevate icaADBC expression. Mutagenesis of the GGEEF motif essential for diguanylate cyclase activity did not impair GdpS, and the N-terminal fragment of GdpS lacking the GGDEF domain partially complemented the gdpS mutation. Furthermore, heterologous diguanylate cyclases expressed in trans failed to complement the gdpS mutation, and the purified GGDEF domain from GdpS possessed no diguanylate cyclase activity in vitro. The gdpS gene from Staphylococcus aureus exhibited similar characteristics to its S. epidermidis ortholog, suggesting that the GdpS-mediated signal transduction is conserved in staphylococci. Therefore, GdpS affects biofilm formation through a novel c-di-GMP-independent mechanism involving increased icaADBC mRNA levels and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Our data raise the possibility that staphylococci cannot synthesize c-di-GMP and have only remnants of a c-di-GMP signaling pathway. PMID:18502872

  18. A molecular beam mass spectrometric study of the formation and photolysis of C(lc)lO dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Frank T.; Robaugh, David A.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the chlorine oxides present at temperatures and pressures typical of the Antarctic stratosphere was carried out. A series of low temperature flow reactors was constructed and used in conjunction with molecular beam mass spectrometric techniques to identify species and characterize their kinetic behavior at temperatures of -20 to -70 C and pressures of from 30 to 130 Torr. It was found that the gas phase chlorine-oxygen system was quite complex at low temperatures. ClO dimer was identified and found to be thermodynamically very stable under stratospheric conditions. It was also found that any system which contained ClO also contained a larger oxide. The oxide was identified as Cl2O3. A survey of possible higher oxides, which have been postulated as possible chlorine sinks in the stratosphere, was also carried out. The rate of formation of ClO dimer was measured as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements were made of both the decay of ClO and the formation of the dimer. By comparing these rates it was determined that virtually all of the ClO was converted to the dimer under stratospheric conditions, and that the other ClO reactions were not important under these conditions.

  19. Sulfur dimers adsorbed on Au(111) as building blocks for sulfur octomers formation: A density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Tamargo, Carlos E.; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Pujals, Daniel Codorniu; Mikosch, Hans

    2014-07-28

    Experimental scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies have shown for more than two decades rectangular formations when sulfur atoms are deposited on Au(111) surfaces. The precursors have ranged from simple molecules or ions, such as SO{sub 2} gas or sulfide anions, to more complex organosulfur compounds. We investigated, within the framework of the Density Functional Theory, the structure of these rectangular patterns assuming them entirely composed of sulfur atoms as the experimental evidence suggests. The sulfur coverage at which the simulations were carried out (0.67 ML or higher) provoked that the sulfur-sulfur association had to be taken into account for achieving a good agreement between the sets of simulated and experimental STM images. A combination of four sulfur dimers per rectangular formation properly explained the trends obtained by the experimental STM analysis which were related with the rectangles' size and shape fluctuations together with sulfur-sulfur distances within these rectangles. Finally, a projected density of states analysis showed that the dimers were capable of altering the Au(5d) electronic states at the same level as atomic sulfur adsorbed at low coverage. Besides, sulfur dimers states were perfectly distinguished, whose presence near and above the Fermi level can explain both: sulfur-sulfur bond elongation and dimers stability when they stayed adsorbed on the surface at high coverage.

  20. Protective V127 prion variant prevents prion disease by interrupting the formation of dimer and fibril from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuangyan; Shi, Danfeng; Liu, Xuewei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered a novel protective prion protein variant: V127 variant, which was reported intrinsically resistant to prion conversion and propagation. However, the structural basis of its protective effect is still unknown. To uncover the origin of the protective role of V127 variant, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the influence of G127V mutation on two key processes of prion propagation: dimerization and fibril formation. The simulation results indicate V127 variant is unfavorable to form dimer by reducing the main-chain H-bond interactions. The simulations of formed fibrils consisting of β1 strand prove V127 variant will make the formed fibril become unstable and disorder. The weaker interaction energies between layers and reduced H-bonds number for V127 variant reveal this mutation is unfavorable to the formation of stable fibril. Consequently, we find V127 variant is not only unfavorable to the formation of dimer but also unfavorable to the formation of stable core and fibril, which can explain the mechanism on the protective role of V127 variant from the molecular level. Our findings can deepen the understanding of prion disease and may guide the design of peptide mimetics or small molecule to mimic the protective effect of V127 variant. PMID:26906032

  1. C...H...N Hydrogen Bond Formation in Trimethylamine Dimer upon One-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Fujii, Asuka

    2011-06-01

    Structures of trimethylamine dimer cluster cations which are generated by the vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization are investigated by a combination of infrared spectroscopic methods and theoretical reaction-pass calculations. In the trimethylamine dimer cluster cation, a proton of a methyl group is shared with the N atom of the other trimethylamine moiety. This is evidence that the methyl group acts as a proton donor in the cation state.

  2. Influence of cyclic dimer formation on the phase behavior of carboxylic acids. II. Cross-associating systems.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Jiří; Paricaud, Patrice

    2013-08-15

    The doubly bonded dimer association scheme (DBD) proposed by Sear and Jackson is extended to mixtures exhibiting both self- and cross-associations. The PC-SAFT equation of state is combined with the new DBD association contribution to describe the vapor-liquid equilibria of binary mixtures of carboxylic acids + associating compounds (water, alcohols, and carboxylic acids). The effect of doubly bonded dimers on the phase behavior in such systems is less important than in mixtures of carboxylic acids with nonassociating compounds, due to the cross-associations that compete with the formation of DBDs. Nevertheless, a clear improvement in the description of vapor-liquid coexistence curves is achieved over the classical 2B association model, particularly for the dew point curves.

  3. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir4+ in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir-Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram.

  4. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir(4+) in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir-Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram. PMID:26776664

  5. Strongly frustrated triangular spin lattice emerging from triplet dimer formation in honeycomb Li2IrO3

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Satoshi; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Yushankhai, Viktor; Stoll, Hermann; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Hozoi, Liviu; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Iridium oxides with a honeycomb lattice have been identified as platforms for the much anticipated Kitaev topological spin liquid: the spin-orbit entangled states of Ir4+ in principle generate precisely the required type of anisotropic exchange. However, other magnetic couplings can drive the system away from the spin-liquid phase. With this in mind, here we disentangle the different magnetic interactions in Li2IrO3, a honeycomb iridate with two crystallographically inequivalent sets of adjacent Ir sites. Our ab initio many-body calculations show that, while both Heisenberg and Kitaev nearest-neighbour couplings are present, on one set of Ir–Ir bonds the former dominates, resulting in the formation of spin-triplet dimers. The triplet dimers frame a strongly frustrated triangular lattice and by exact cluster diagonalization we show that they remain protected in a wide region of the phase diagram. PMID:26776664

  6. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  7. Switching plasmon coupling through the formation of dimers from polyaniline-coated gold nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nina; Ruan, Qifeng; Qin, Feng; Wang, Jianfang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Active modulation of the plasmon coupling in homodimers of polyaniline (PANI)-coated Au nanospheres is achieved by changing the proton-doping state of the PANI shell. Such a PANI-enabled modulation of the plasmon coupling in the dimers gives rise to remarkable spectral shifts, which show an exponential dependence on the interparticle gap distance. For the dimer with a 10 nm PANI shell thickness and a 0.5 nm gap distance, the shift of the stronger scattering peak in response to the active modulation reaches 231 nm. Electrodynamic simulations reveal that the shift of the dipolar bonding plasmon mode dominates the position variation of the stronger scattering peak for the dimers with different gap distances. Moreover, the quadrupolar bonding plasmon mode can be turned on and off by controlling the proton-doping state of the dimers with gap distances of less than ∼3 nm. These results are of high importance for fundamentally understanding the sensitivity of coupled plasmon resonance modes to the dielectric environment, as well as for designing active plasmonic devices with high modulation performances.

  8. Rotational spectrum and structure of the linear CO2-HCN dimer: Dependence of isomer formation on carrier gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klots, T. D.; Ruoff, R. S.; Gutowsky, H. S.

    1989-04-01

    A linear hydrogen-bonded dimer, OCO-HCN, has been identified and characterized via its microwave rotational spectrum. The study was made using the pulsed nozzle Fourier transform method with the Flygare/Balle Mark II spectrometer. A T-shaped HCN-CO2 dimer was reported earlier by the Klemperer group. Rotational constants have been determined for all seven monoisotopically substituted species of the linear form. B0, DJ, and χaa (14 N) for the normal isotopic dimer are 1057.9397(2) MHz, 1.372(8) kHz, and -4.2466(5) MHz, respectively. The average torsional displacements of the OCO and HCN monomers about their center of mass (c.m.) are found to be 7.66° and 12.40°, based on the substitution O-C and C-N bond distances for the dimer. With these values for α and γ, the B0 for the normal isotopic dimer corresponds to a c.m. to c.m. distance R=5.035 Å. Bending and stretching force constants and the well depth (ɛ˜590 cm-1 ) are estimated from the centrifugal distortion. The relative concentrations of the linear and T-shaped isomers are unusually sensitive to the carrier gas used in the supersonic jet expansion. The linear form could not be detected at all with argon as the carrier gas but gave a strong signal in neon first run (70% Ne, 30% He). In contrast, the T form gave strong signals in both carrier gases. However, a carrier-gas effect was not found for the N2 O/HF dimer pair, which has a high barrier between the bent NNO-HF and linear FH-NNO isomers. Similar results were obtained for chlorocyclohexane (CCH) and ethyl formate (EF), which have two conformational isomers. In CCH which has a high barrier to a↔e interconversion, the two conformers gave strong signals in both Ar and He. In EF, with a low barrier, the gauche conformer could not be detected in Ar but gave a strong signal in He, while the trans form gave strong signals in both carrier gases.

  9. Speciation and structure of ferriprotoporphyrin IX in aqueous solution: spectroscopic and diffusion measurements demonstrate dimerization, but not mu-oxo dimer formation.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Katherine A; Kaschula, Catherine H; Egan, Timothy J; Marques, Helder M

    2007-01-01

    Changes in epsilon (393) (the Soret band) of aqueous ferriprotoporphyrin IX [Fe(III)PPIX] with concentration indicate that it dimerizes, but does not form higher aggregates. Diffusion measurements support this observation. The diffusion coefficient of aqueous Fe(III)PPIX is half that of the hydrated monomeric dicyano complex. Much of the apparent instability of aqueous Fe(III)PPIX solutions could be attributed to adsorption onto glass and plastic surfaces. However, epsilon (347) was found to be independent of the aggregation state of the porphyrin and was used to correct for the effects of adsorption. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous dimer is not consistent with that expected for a mu-oxo dimer and the (1)H NMR spectrum is characteristic of five-coordinate, high-spin Fe(III)PPIX. Magnetic susceptibility measurements using the Evans method showed that there is no antiferromagnetic coupling in the dimer. By contrast, when the mu-oxo dimer is induced in 10% aqueous pyridine, characteristic UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectra of this species are observed and the magnetic moment is consistent with strong antiferromagnetic coupling. We propose a model in which the spontaneously formed aqueous Fe(III)PPIX dimer involves noncovalent interaction of the unligated faces of two five-coordinate H(2)O/HO-Fe(III)PPIX molecules, with the axial H(2)O/OH(-) ligands directed outwards. This arrangement is consistent with the crystal structures of related five-coordinate iron(III) porphyrins and accounts for the observed pH dependence of the dimerization constant and the spectra of the monomer and dimer. Structures for the aqueous dimer are proposed on the basis of molecular dynamics/simulated annealing calculations using a force field previously developed for modeling metalloporphyrins.

  10. Hairpin-dimer equilibrium of a parallel-stranded DNA hairpin: formation of a four-stranded complex.

    PubMed Central

    Dornberger, U; Behlke, J; Birch-Hirschfeld, E; Fritzsche, H

    1997-01-01

    The 24mer deoxyoligonucleotide 3'-d(T)10-5'-5'-d(C)4- d(A)10-3'(psC4) with an uncommon 5'-p-5'phosphodiester linkage was designed to enable the formation of a hairpin structure with unusual parallel-stranded stem. As reference hairpin structure with an antiparallel-stranded stem, the 24mer 5'-d(T)10-d(C)4-d(A)10-3'(apsC4) was chosen. The behaviour of these oligonucleotides at different temperatures, DNA and salt concentrations was characterised by a combination of UV melting, CD, CD melting, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, infrared melting and analytical ultracentrifugation. The parallel-stranded hairpin structure was found to be formed by psC4 only under conditions of low DNA concentration and low salt concentration. Increase of the NaCl concentration beyond the physiological level or high DNA concentration supports the formation of intermolecular multi-stranded structures. The experimental data are in agreement with a four-stranded complex formed by two molecules of psC4. The base pairing model of this asymmetric four-stranded complex is based on the pyrimidine motif of a triple helix with two bifurcated hydrogen bonds at the O4 of the thymine each directed towards one of the amino protons of both adenines. In contrast, the reference oligonucleotide apsC4 forms only an antiparallel-stranded hairpin under all experimental conditions. PMID:9016633

  11. Hairpin-dimer equilibrium of a parallel-stranded DNA hairpin: formation of a four-stranded complex.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Behlke, J; Birch-Hirschfeld, E; Fritzsche, H

    1997-02-15

    The 24mer deoxyoligonucleotide 3'-d(T)10-5'-5'-d(C)4- d(A)10-3'(psC4) with an uncommon 5'-p-5'phosphodiester linkage was designed to enable the formation of a hairpin structure with unusual parallel-stranded stem. As reference hairpin structure with an antiparallel-stranded stem, the 24mer 5'-d(T)10-d(C)4-d(A)10-3'(apsC4) was chosen. The behaviour of these oligonucleotides at different temperatures, DNA and salt concentrations was characterised by a combination of UV melting, CD, CD melting, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, infrared melting and analytical ultracentrifugation. The parallel-stranded hairpin structure was found to be formed by psC4 only under conditions of low DNA concentration and low salt concentration. Increase of the NaCl concentration beyond the physiological level or high DNA concentration supports the formation of intermolecular multi-stranded structures. The experimental data are in agreement with a four-stranded complex formed by two molecules of psC4. The base pairing model of this asymmetric four-stranded complex is based on the pyrimidine motif of a triple helix with two bifurcated hydrogen bonds at the O4 of the thymine each directed towards one of the amino protons of both adenines. In contrast, the reference oligonucleotide apsC4 forms only an antiparallel-stranded hairpin under all experimental conditions.

  12. Time-resolved FRET reports FGFR1 dimerization and formation of a complex with its effector PLCγ1

    PubMed Central

    Perdios, Louis; Bunney, Tom D.; Warren, Sean C.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M.W.; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo imaging of protein tyrosine kinase activity requires minimally invasive, molecularly precise optical probes to provide spatiotemporal mechanistic information of dimerization and complex formation with downstream effectors. We present here a construct with genetically encoded, site-specifically incorporated, bioorthogonal reporter that can be selectively labelled with exogenous fluorogenic probes to monitor the structure and function of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). GyrB.FGFR1KD.TC contains a coumermycin-induced artificial dimerizer (GyrB), FGFR1 kinase domain (KD) and a tetracysteine (TC) motif that enables fluorescent labelling with biarsenical dyes FlAsH-EDT2 and ReAsH-EDT2. We generated bimolecular system for time-resolved FRET (TR-FRET) studies, which pairs FlAsH-tagged GyrB.FGFR1KD.TC and N-terminal Src homology 2 (nSH2) domain of phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ), a downstream effector of FGFR1, fused to mTurquoise fluorescent protein (mTFP). We demonstrated phosphorylation-dependent TR-FRET readout of complex formation between mTFP.nSH2 and GyrB.FGFR1KD.TC. By further application of TR-FRET, we also demonstrated formation of the GyrB.FGFR1KD.TC homodimer by coumermycin-induced dimerization. Herein, we present a spectroscopic FRET approach to facilitate and propagate studies that would provide structural and functional insights for FGFR and other tyrosine kinases. PMID:26482290

  13. Fibroblast growth factor 2 dimer with superagonist in vitro activity improves granulation tissue formation during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Decker, Caitlin G; Wang, Yu; Paluck, Samantha J; Shen, Lu; Loo, Joseph A; Levine, Alex J; Miller, Lloyd S; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific chemical dimerization of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) with the optimal linker length resulted in a FGF2 homodimer with improved granulation tissue formation and blood vessel formation at exceptionally low concentrations. Homodimers of FGF2 were synthesized through site-specific linkages to both ends of different molecular weight poly(ethylene glycols) (PEGs). The optimal linker length was determined by screening dimer-induced metabolic activity of human dermal fibroblasts and found to be that closest to the inter-cysteine distance, 70 Å, corresponding to 2 kDa PEG. A straightforward analysis of the kinetics of second ligand binding as a function of tether length showed that, as the polymerization index (the number of monomer repeat units in the polymer, N) of the tether decreases, the mean time for second ligand capture decreases as ∼N(3/2), leading to an enhancement of the number of doubly bound ligands in steady-state for a given (tethered) ligand concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 induced greater fibroblast metabolic activity than FGF2 alone, all other dimers, and all monoconjugates, at each concentration tested, with the greatest difference observed at low (0.1 ng/mL) concentration. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 further exhibited superior activity compared to FGF2 for both metabolic activity and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as well as improved angiogenesis in a coculture model in vitro. Efficacy in an in vivo wound healing model was assessed in diabetic mice. FGF2-PEG2k-FGF2 increased granulation tissue and blood vessel density in the wound bed compared to FGF2. The results suggest that this rationally designed construct may be useful for improving the fibroblast matrix formation and angiogenesis in chronic wound healing.

  14. Nitrobenzene anti-parallel dimer formation in non-polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Sakai, Yuji; Watanabe, Junji

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the dielectric and depolarized Rayleigh scattering behaviors of nitrobenzene (NO2-Bz), which is a benzene mono-substituted with a planar molecular frame bearing the large electric dipole moment 4.0 D, in non-polar solvents solutions, such as tetrachloromethane and benzene, at up to 3 THz for the dielectric measurements and 8 THz for the scattering experiments at 20 °C. The dielectric relaxation strength of the system was substantially smaller than the proportionality to the concentration in a concentrated regime and showed a Kirkwood correlation factor markedly lower than unity; gK ˜ 0.65. This observation revealed that NO2-Bz has a tendency to form dimers, (NO2-Bz)2, in anti-parallel configurations for the dipole moment with increasing concentration of the two solvents. Both the dielectric and scattering data exhibited fast and slow Debye-type relaxation modes with the characteristic time constants ˜7 and ˜50 ps in a concentrated regime (˜15 and ˜30 ps in a dilute regime), respectively. The fast mode was simply attributed to the rotational motion of the (monomeric) NO2-Bz. However, the magnitude of the slow mode was proportional to the square of the concentration in the dilute regime; thus, the mode was assigned to the anti-parallel dimer, (NO2-Bz)2, dissociation process, and the slow relaxation time was attributed to the anti-parallel dimer lifetime. The concentration dependencies of both the dielectric and scattering data show that the NO2-Bz molecular processes are controlled through a chemical equilibrium between monomers and anti-parallel dimers, 2NO2-Bz ↔ (NO2-Bz)2, due to a strong dipole-dipole interaction between nitro groups.

  15. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  16. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5′ Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5′ leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via intermolecular kissing loop (KL) base pairing. The KL dimer can be stabilized by including the DIS stem nucleotides in the intermolecular base pairing, forming an extended dimer (ED). The role of the ED RNA dimer in HIV-1 replication has hardly been addressed because of technical challenges. We analyzed a set of leader mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin for in vitro RNA dimerization and virus replication in T cells. In agreement with previous observations, DIS hairpin stability modulated KL and ED dimerization. An unexpected previous finding was that mutation of three nucleotides immediately upstream of the DIS hairpin significantly reduced in vitro ED formation. In this study, we tested such mutants in vivo for the importance of the ED in HIV-1 biology. Mutants with a stabilized DIS hairpin replicated less efficiently than WT HIV-1. This defect was most severe when the upstream sequence motif was altered. Virus evolution experiments with the defective mutants yielded fast replicating HIV-1 variants with second site mutations that (partially) restored the WT hairpin stability. Characterization of the mutant and revertant RNA molecules and the corresponding viruses confirmed the correlation between in vitro ED RNA dimer formation and efficient virus replication, thus indicating that the ED structure is important for HIV-1 replication. PMID:25368321

  17. Orbital-selective singlet dimer formation and suppression of double exchange in 4d and 5d systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, Sergey; Cao, Gang; Khomskii, Daniel

    One of the main mechanisms of ferromagnetic ordering in conducting materials is the double exchange (DE). It is usually supposed in DE model that the Hund's coupling JH is much larger than electron hopping t; in this case one stabilizes the state with maximum spin per pair of ions, which finally leads to ferromagnetism in bulk systems. We show that in the dimerized 4 d / 5 d transition metal oxides for which JH is reduced and t is in contrast enhanced, another situation is possible, when formation of the spin-singlets on delocalized orbitals is more favorable. This leads to suppression of the DE and to a strong decrease of the total spin. The model calculations using the dynamical mean-field theory show that this effect survives even in the extended systems, not only for dimers. Such a situation is realized, e.g., in Y5Mo2O12, CrO2 under pressure and in many other 4 d / 5 d based materials. Another mechanism, which may suppress DE and which is also typical for 4 d / 5 d compounds is the spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We show on the example of Ba5AlIr2O11, that in this system it is the combination of molecular-orbital formation and SOC that strongly decreases magnetic moment on Ir. Civil Research and Development Foundation via FSCX-14-61025-0.

  18. Formation of nNOS/PSD-95 PDZ dimer requires a preformed beta-finger structure from the nNOS PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Tochio, H; Mok, Y K; Zhang, Q; Kan, H M; Bredt, D S; Zhang, M

    2000-10-27

    PDZ domains are modular protein units that play important roles in organizing signal transduction complexes. PDZ domains mediate interactions with both C-terminal peptide ligands and other PDZ domains. Here, we used PDZ domains from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) to explore the mechanism for PDZ-dimer formation. The nNOS PDZ domain terminates with a approximately 30 residue amino acid beta-finger peptide that is shown to be required for nNOS/PSD-95 PDZ dimer formation. In addition, formation of the PDZ dimer requires this beta-finger peptide to be physically anchored to the main body of the canonical nNOS PDZ domain. A buried salt bridge between the beta-finger and the PDZ domain induces and stabilizes the beta-hairpin structure of the nNOS PDZ domain. In apo-nNOS, the beta-finger peptide is partially flexible and adopts a transient beta-strand like structure that is stabilized upon PDZ dimer formation. The flexibility of the NOS PDZ beta-finger is likely to play a critical role in supporting the formation of nNOS/PSD-95 complex. The experimental data also suggest that nNOS PDZ and the second PDZ domain of PSD-95 form a "head-to-tail" dimer similar to the nNOS/syntrophin complex characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Formation of the Antarctic ozone hole by the ClO dimer mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R. L.; Jaramillo, M.; Emmons, L.

    1988-01-01

    New measurements of the low-altitude ClO profile, made during September 1987, are presented along with detailed observations of ozone depletion over McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the same period. The results show that both the rate and altitude range of ozone depletion can be quantitatively accounted for by a mechanism in which the ClO dimer is the important intermediary in the catalytic destruction of ozone. An alternative bromine mechanism appears capable of contributing only 5-15 percent to the ozone loss rate.

  20. Unanticipated role of melanin in causing carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers.

    PubMed

    Premi, Sanjay; Brash, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) instantaneously generates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Paradoxically, we recently observed that UV enables the protective pigment melanin to create CPDs in the dark long after the exposure ends. UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidize melanin to create melanin carbonyls in a high-energy quantum state. These energetic melanin carbonyls transfer their energy to DNA in the dark, creating CPDs in the absence of UVR. PMID:27308551

  1. The ATP-dependent remodeler RSC transfers histone dimers and octamers through the rapid formation of an unstable encounter intermediate.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Claire E; Narlikar, Geeta J

    2010-11-16

    RSC, an essential chromatin remodeling complex in budding yeast, is involved in a variety of biological processes including transcription, recombination, repair, and replication. How RSC participates in such diverse processes is not fully understood. In vitro, RSC uses ATP to carry out several seemingly distinct reactions: it repositions nucleosomes, transfers H2A/H2B dimers between nucleosomes, and transfers histone octamers between pieces of DNA. This raises the intriguing mechanistic question of how this molecular machine can use a single ATPase subunit to create these varied products. Here, we use a FRET-based approach to kinetically order the products of the RSC reaction. Surprisingly, transfer of H2A/H2B dimers and histone octamers is initiated on a time scale of seconds when assayed by FRET, but formation of stable nucleosomal products occurs on a time scale of minutes when assayed by native gel. These results suggest a model in which RSC action rapidly generates an unstable encounter intermediate that contains the two exchange substrates in close proximity. This intermediate then collapses more slowly to form the stable transfer products seen on native gels. The rapid, biologically relevant time scale on which the transfer products are generated implies that such products can play key roles in vivo.

  2. Pressure stabilized Se-Se dimer formation in PbSe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremholm, M.; Hor, Y. S.; Cava, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of PbSe 2 through the reaction of PbSe with excess Se at 4.5 GPa and 650 °C is reported. The crystal structure, determined from X-ray powder diffraction data (CuAl 2 structure type, I4/mcm (#140), a = 6.42695(11) Å, c = 7.70254(13) Å, Z = 4), consists of layers of [Se 2] 2- dimers with Pb 2+ in square antiprismatic coordination with Se. This is a rare crystal structure for divalent metal chalcogenides, previously only identified for SrS 2 and BaTe 2. Undoped PbSe 2 as well as Bi 3+- and Ag +-doped samples (10% Pb substitution) show semi-metallic resistivity down to 0.4 K. Magnetic susceptibility measurement of PbSe 2 shows no magnetic ordering above 1.8 K. The Seebeck coefficients show nearly linear behavior from 35 to 400 K and the largest numerical values are found in the case of undoped PbSe 2, + 99 μVK -1, and Bi 3+-doped PbSe 2, - 146 μVK -1, at the highest temperature measured, 400 K.

  3. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species.

  4. Thiamin Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Candida albicans: A Remarkable Reaction between Histidine and Pyridoxal Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Rung-Yi; Huang, Siyu; Fenwick, Michael K.; Hazra, Amrita; Zhang, Yang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Philmus, Benjamin; Kinsland, Cynthia; Sanders, Jennie Mansell; Ealick, Steven E.; Begley, Tadhg P.

    2012-06-26

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thiamin pyrimidine is formed from histidine and pyridoxal phosphate (PLP). The origin of all of the pyrimidine atoms has been previously determined using labeling studies and suggests that the pyrimidine is formed using remarkable chemistry that is without chemical or biochemical precedent. Here we report the overexpression of the closely related Candida albicans pyrimidine synthase (THI5p) and the reconstitution and preliminary characterization of the enzymatic activity. A structure of the C. albicans THI5p shows PLP bound at the active site via an imine with Lys62 and His66 in close proximity to the PLP. Our data suggest that His66 of the THI5 protein is the histidine source for pyrimidine formation and that the pyrimidine synthase is a single-turnover enzyme.

  5. Nature and possible mechanisms of formation of potential mutations arising at emerging of thymine dimers after irradiation of double-stranded DNA by ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebneva, H. A.

    2003-01-01

    The mutagenesis under ultraviolet (UV)-irradiation is discussed. It is assumed, that the basic damages resulting in transitions, transversions, mutations of the frameshift and complex mutations are changes of the tautomeric state of the bases. The bases may be a part of dimers or may be not the dimer components. We consider such rare tautomeric states, which may influence the character of base pairing. A model of the formation of the above rare tautomeric forms of nucleotide bases under the UV-irradiation of the DNA is proposed. In the case of a radiation deexcitation of the DNA, which has absorbed the UV-quantum of the triplet energy level, there occur strong forced oscillations. They may result in changes of the lengths of hydrogen bonds between DNA bases. As a result, at H-bond shortening, the hydrogen atom may be almost in the center of H-bond. In the case of H-bond elongation, it may remain near the partner atom. Because of the H-bond breaking, during the formation of dimers, rare tautomeric forms of bases influencing the character of pairing can be realized. If a pair of the bases is not a part of dimer, then the only new stable configuration of the hydrogen atoms is the one that occurred at double-proton phototautomerism. It is shown that only those dimers are mutational, in which the change of a tautomeric state of the DNA bases have taken place. This is one of the differences between the proposed model and the standard one. The latter assumes, that from the point of view of ability of forming the mutations all the dimers are identical, and the DNA-polymerase is sometimes mistaken, incidentally building uncomplementary bases in. The consideration is only of qualitative character, it needs experimental verification, subsequent study by methods of quantum chemistry and theoretical physics. A list of problems to be studied in this respect is given.

  6. Thermal degradation of green tea flavan-3-ols and formation of hetero- and homocatechin dimers in model dairy beverages.

    PubMed

    Song, Brian J; Manganais, Chris; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2015-04-15

    Interactions between polyphenols and macromolecules may impact polyphenol stability and bioavailability from foods. The impact of milk on tea flavan-3-ol stability to thermal treatment was investigated. Single strength (36.2 protein per L), quarter strength (9.0 g protein per L) milk, and control model beverages were incubated with epigallocatechin gallate and green tea extract at 62 or 37 °C for 180 min. Intact flavan-3-ols and select auto-oxidation products [theasinesins (THSNs) and P-2 dimers] were quantified by LC-MS. Generally, greater polyphenol to protein ratios increased first order degradation rates, consequently decreasing formation of oxidation products. The presence of galloyl and hydroxy moieties was associated with higher stability of monomeric flavan-3-ols with increasing protein concentrations suggesting potential for protein affinity to stabilise flavan-3-ols to thermal treatment. Absence of these moieties led to no observable improvements in stability. These results suggest that protein interactions may be useful in stabilising flavan-3-ols through thermal processing.

  7. Charge-ordering transition in iron oxide Fe4O5 involving competing dimer and trimer formation.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V; Bykov, Maxim; Bykova, Elena; Kozlenko, Denis P; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Karkin, Alexander E; Shchennikov, Vladimir V; Kichanov, Sergey E; Gou, Huiyang; Abakumov, Artem M; Egoavil, Ricardo; Verbeeck, Johan; McCammon, Catherine; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; van Smaalen, Sander; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S

    2016-05-01

    Phase transitions that occur in materials, driven, for instance, by changes in temperature or pressure, can dramatically change the materials' properties. Discovering new types of transitions and understanding their mechanisms is important not only from a fundamental perspective, but also for practical applications. Here we investigate a recently discovered Fe4O5 that adopts an orthorhombic CaFe3O5-type crystal structure that features linear chains of Fe ions. On cooling below ∼150 K, Fe4O5 undergoes an unusual charge-ordering transition that involves competing dimeric and trimeric ordering within the chains of Fe ions. This transition is concurrent with a significant increase in electrical resistivity. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements and neutron diffraction establish the formation of a collinear antiferromagnetic order above room temperature and a spin canting at 85 K that gives rise to spontaneous magnetization. We discuss possible mechanisms of this transition and compare it with the trimeronic charge ordering observed in magnetite below the Verwey transition temperature. PMID:27102685

  8. Thermal degradation of green tea flavan-3-ols and formation of hetero- and homocatechin dimers in model dairy beverages.

    PubMed

    Song, Brian J; Manganais, Chris; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2015-04-15

    Interactions between polyphenols and macromolecules may impact polyphenol stability and bioavailability from foods. The impact of milk on tea flavan-3-ol stability to thermal treatment was investigated. Single strength (36.2 protein per L), quarter strength (9.0 g protein per L) milk, and control model beverages were incubated with epigallocatechin gallate and green tea extract at 62 or 37 °C for 180 min. Intact flavan-3-ols and select auto-oxidation products [theasinesins (THSNs) and P-2 dimers] were quantified by LC-MS. Generally, greater polyphenol to protein ratios increased first order degradation rates, consequently decreasing formation of oxidation products. The presence of galloyl and hydroxy moieties was associated with higher stability of monomeric flavan-3-ols with increasing protein concentrations suggesting potential for protein affinity to stabilise flavan-3-ols to thermal treatment. Absence of these moieties led to no observable improvements in stability. These results suggest that protein interactions may be useful in stabilising flavan-3-ols through thermal processing. PMID:25466027

  9. Charge-ordering transition in iron oxide Fe4O5 involving competing dimer and trimer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Bykov, Maxim; Bykova, Elena; Kozlenko, Denis P.; Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Karkin, Alexander E.; Shchennikov, Vladimir V.; Kichanov, Sergey E.; Gou, Huiyang; Abakumov, Artem M.; Egoavil, Ricardo; Verbeeck, Johan; McCammon, Catherine; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; van Smaalen, Sander; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2016-05-01

    Phase transitions that occur in materials, driven, for instance, by changes in temperature or pressure, can dramatically change the materials’ properties. Discovering new types of transitions and understanding their mechanisms is important not only from a fundamental perspective, but also for practical applications. Here we investigate a recently discovered Fe4O5 that adopts an orthorhombic CaFe3O5-type crystal structure that features linear chains of Fe ions. On cooling below ∼150 K, Fe4O5 undergoes an unusual charge-ordering transition that involves competing dimeric and trimeric ordering within the chains of Fe ions. This transition is concurrent with a significant increase in electrical resistivity. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements and neutron diffraction establish the formation of a collinear antiferromagnetic order above room temperature and a spin canting at 85 K that gives rise to spontaneous magnetization. We discuss possible mechanisms of this transition and compare it with the trimeronic charge ordering observed in magnetite below the Verwey transition temperature.

  10. Dimerization of lipocalin allergens

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Merja H.; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Miettinen, Ilja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins are one of the most important groups of inhalant animal allergens. The analysis of structural features of these proteins is important to get insights into their allergenicity. We have determined two different dimeric crystal structures for bovine dander lipocalin Bos d 2, which was earlier described as a monomeric allergen. The crystal structure analysis of all other determined lipocalin allergens also revealed oligomeric structures which broadly utilize inherent structural features of the β-sheet in dimer formation. According to the moderate size of monomer-monomer interfaces, most of these dimers would be transient in solution. Native mass spectrometry was employed to characterize quantitatively transient dimerization of two lipocalin allergens, Bos d 2 and Bos d 5, in solution. PMID:26346541

  11. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer.

  12. Crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1: Insights into the molecular basis of formation of a dimer.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Ching-Ting; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-23

    Dihydropyrimidinase, a tetrameric metalloenzyme, is a member of the cyclic amidohydrolase family, which also includes allantoinase, dihydroorotase, hydantoinase, and imidase. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of dihydropyrimidinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure of P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase reveals a classic (β/α)8-barrel structure core embedding the catalytic dimetal center and a β-sandwich domain, which is commonly found in the architecture of dihydropyrimidinases. In contrast to all dihydropyrimidinases, P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase forms a dimer, rather than a tetramer, both in the crystalline state and in the solution. Basing on sequence analysis and structural comparison of the C-terminal region and the dimer-dimer interface between P. aeruginosa dihydropyrimidinase and Thermus sp. dihydropyrimidinase, we propose a working model to explain why this enzyme cannot be a tetramer. PMID:27576201

  13. Formation of a cyclic dimer containing two mirror image monomers in the solid state controlled by van der Waals forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zibin; Yu, Guocan; Han, Chengyou; Liu, Jiyong; Ding, Xia; Yu, Yihua; Huang, Feihe

    2011-09-16

    Two new copillar[5]arenes were prepared. They are arranged in two completely different motifs, a cyclic dimer containing two monomers with two different conformations that are mirror images of each other and linear supramolecular polymers in the solid state. Not only has it been shown that to form this kind of dimer is a unique feature associated with pillar[5]arene macrocycles but also it was demonstrated that weak van der Waals forces can be used to control the self-organization of monomers during their supramolecular polymerization process.

  14. Studies on the Effect of Sub-zero Temperatures on the Formation of Extremely Low Volatility Dimer Esters in Secondary Organic Aerosol from Alpha-Pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Normann Jensen, Louise; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is considered a major source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Recently, extremely low volatility organic compounds, or ELVOC, formed from the oxidation of VOCs have been shown to play a crucial role in new particle formation (Ehn et al., 2014). In addition, higher molecular weight dimer esters originating from the oxidation of the biogenic VOC alpha-pinene have been observed in both laboratory-generated and ambient SOA (Kristensen et al., 2013). The low volatility of the dimer esters along with an observed rapid formation makes these high molecular weight compounds likely candidates involved in new particle formation from the oxidation of alpha-pinene. Furthermore, laboratory experiments show that the dimer esters only form in the presence of ozone, thus may be used as tracers for the ozone-initiated oxidation of alpha-pinene, and are therefore indicative of enhanced anthropogenic activities. In this work, we present the results of a series of oxidation experiments performed in the newly constructed cold-room smog chamber at Aarhus University. This unique and state-of-the-art Teflon chamber allows for atmospheric simulations of the oxidation VOCs and subsequent SOA formation at temperatures down to -16 °C. In this study, ozonolysis and photochemical oxidations of alpha-pinene are performed at temperatures ranging from +20 to -16 °C. Chemical characterization of the formed SOA is performed using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results show significant differences in the chemical composition related to the experiment temperature. In particularly, the concentration of the high molecular weight dimer esters showed to be highly affected by temperature. Interestingly, preliminary results show higher formation of dimer esters related to increased SOA formation rate, thus indicating that these particle-phase ELVOCs may be linked with new particle

  15. Molecular chirality and chiral capsule-type dimer formation of cyclic triamides via hydrogen-bonding interactions.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Noriko; Matsumura, Mio; Azumaya, Isao; Nishiyama, Shizuka; Masu, Hyuma; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Tanatani, Aya

    2012-05-18

    Chiral properties of bowl-shaped cyclic triamides bearing functional groups with hydrogen-bonding ability were examined. Chiral induction of cyclic triamide 3a was observed by addition of chiral amine in solution, and chiral separation was achieved by simple crystallization to afford chiral capsule-type dimer structure of 4a.

  16. Quantifying Dimer and Trimer Formation of Tri-n-butyl Phosphates in Different Alkane Diluents: FTIR Study.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh N; Unangst, Jaclynn L; Nguyen, Hung D; Nilsson, Mikael

    2016-07-21

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), a representative of neutral organophosphorous metal-ion-extracting reagents, is an important ligand used in solvent extraction processes for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, as well as other non-nuclear applications. Ligand-ligand and organic solvent-ligand interactions play an important role in these processes. The self-association behavior of TBP in various alkane diluents of different chain lengths (8, 12, and 16 carbons) and a branched alkane (iso-octane) was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements. By careful deconvolution of the spectra into multiple peaks, our results indicate that TBP self-associates to form not only dimers, as previous studies showed, but also trimers in the practical concentration range. Using a mathematical fitting procedure, the dimerization and trimerization constants were determined. As expected, these equilibrium constants are dependent on the solvent used. As the alkane chain for linear hydrocarbon solvents becomes longer, dimerization decreases whereas trimerization increases. For the more branched hydrocarbon, we observe a significantly higher dimerization constant. These effects are most likely due to the intermolecular van der Waals interactions between the butyl tails of each TBP molecule and the diluent hydrocarbon chain as all solvents in this study are relatively nonpolar. PMID:27399338

  17. Use of Improved Orbitals for CCSD(T) Calculations for Predicting Heats of Formation of Group IV and Group VI Metal Oxide Monomers and Dimers and UCl6.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zongtang; Lee, Zachary; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the heats of formation of group IV and group VI metal oxide monomers and dimers with the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method has been improved by using Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) and Brueckner orbitals for the initial wave function. The valence and core-valence contributions to the total atomization energies for the CrO3 monomer and dimer are predicted to be significantly larger than when using the Hartree-Fock (HF) orbitals. The predicted heat of formation of CrO3 with CCSD(T)/PW91 is consistent with previous calculations including high-order corrections beyond CCSD(T) and agrees well with the experiment. The improved heats of formation with the DFT and Brueckner orbitals are due to these orbitals being closer to the actual orbitals. Pure DFT functionals perform slightly better than the hybrid B3LYP functional due to the presence of exact exchange in the hybrid functional. Comparable heats of formation for TiO2 and the second- and the third-row group IV and group VI metal oxides are predicted well using either the DFT PW91 orbitals, Brueckner orbitals, or HF orbitals. The normalized clustering energies for the dimers are consistent with our previous work except for a larger value predicted for Cr2O6. The prediction of the reaction energy for UF6 + 3Cl2 → UCl6 + 3F2 was significantly improved with the use of DFT or Brueckner orbitals as compared to HF orbitals. PMID:27398941

  18. Dimerization of VirD2 Binding Protein Is Essential for Agrobacterium Induced Tumor Formation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Padavannil, Abhilash; Jobichen, Chacko; Qinghua, Yang; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Yang, Liu; Pan, Shen Q.; Sivaraman, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) is the only bacterial secretion system known to translocate both DNA and protein substrates. The VirB/D4 system from Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a typical T4SS. It facilitates the bacteria to translocate the VirD2-T-DNA complex to the host cell cytoplasm. In addition to protein-DNA complexes, the VirB/D4 system is also involved in the translocation of several effector proteins, including VirE2, VirE3 and VirF into the host cell cytoplasm. These effector proteins aid in the proper integration of the translocated DNA into the host genome. The VirD2-binding protein (VBP) is a key cytoplasmic protein that recruits the VirD2–T-DNA complex to the VirD4-coupling protein (VirD4 CP) of the VirB/D4 T4SS apparatus. Here, we report the crystal structure and associated functional studies of the C-terminal domain of VBP. This domain mainly consists of α-helices, and the two monomers of the asymmetric unit form a tight dimer. The structural analysis of this domain confirms the presence of a HEPN (higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding) fold. Biophysical studies show that VBP is a dimer in solution and that the HEPN domain is the dimerization domain. Based on structural and mutagenesis analyses, we show that substitution of key residues at the interface disrupts the dimerization of both the HEPN domain and full-length VBP. In addition, pull-down analyses show that only dimeric VBP can interact with VirD2 and VirD4 CP. Finally, we show that only Agrobacterium harboring dimeric full-length VBP can induce tumors in plants. This study sheds light on the structural basis of the substrate recruiting function of VBP in the T4SS pathway of A. tumefaciens and in other pathogenic bacteria employing similar systems. PMID:24626239

  19. Dimerization of VirD2 binding protein is essential for Agrobacterium induced tumor formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Padavannil, Abhilash; Jobichen, Chacko; Qinghua, Yang; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Yang, Liu; Pan, Shen Q; Sivaraman, J

    2014-03-01

    The Type IV Secretion System (T4SS) is the only bacterial secretion system known to translocate both DNA and protein substrates. The VirB/D4 system from Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a typical T4SS. It facilitates the bacteria to translocate the VirD2-T-DNA complex to the host cell cytoplasm. In addition to protein-DNA complexes, the VirB/D4 system is also involved in the translocation of several effector proteins, including VirE2, VirE3 and VirF into the host cell cytoplasm. These effector proteins aid in the proper integration of the translocated DNA into the host genome. The VirD2-binding protein (VBP) is a key cytoplasmic protein that recruits the VirD2-T-DNA complex to the VirD4-coupling protein (VirD4 CP) of the VirB/D4 T4SS apparatus. Here, we report the crystal structure and associated functional studies of the C-terminal domain of VBP. This domain mainly consists of α-helices, and the two monomers of the asymmetric unit form a tight dimer. The structural analysis of this domain confirms the presence of a HEPN (higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding) fold. Biophysical studies show that VBP is a dimer in solution and that the HEPN domain is the dimerization domain. Based on structural and mutagenesis analyses, we show that substitution of key residues at the interface disrupts the dimerization of both the HEPN domain and full-length VBP. In addition, pull-down analyses show that only dimeric VBP can interact with VirD2 and VirD4 CP. Finally, we show that only Agrobacterium harboring dimeric full-length VBP can induce tumors in plants. This study sheds light on the structural basis of the substrate recruiting function of VBP in the T4SS pathway of A. tumefaciens and in other pathogenic bacteria employing similar systems. PMID:24626239

  20. Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Lactobacillus leichmannii

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Judith Y.; Downing, Mancourt

    1968-01-01

    Tracer studies of pyrimidine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus leichmannii (ATCC 7830) indicated that, while aspartate is utilized in the usual manner, the guanido carbon of arginine, rather than carbon dioxide, is utilized as a pyrimidine precursor. The guanido carbon of arginine also contributes, to some extent, to the carbon dioxide pool utilized for purine biosynthesis. The enzyme of the first reaction leading from arginine to pyrimidines, arginine deiminase, was investigated in crude bacterial extracts. It was inhibited by thymidylic acid and purine ribonucleotides, and to a lesser extent by purine deoxynucleotides and deoxycytidylic acid. Under the assay conditions employed, a number of nucleotides had no effect on the enzyme activity of the aspartate transcarbamylase of L. leichmannii. Growth of the cells in media containing uracil, compared to growth in media without uracil, resulted in a four- to fivefold decrease in the concentrations of aspartate transcar-bamylase and dihydroorotase and a twofold increase in the concentration of arginine deiminase, as estimated from specific enzyme activity in crude extracts of the cells. A small increase in specific enzyme activity of ornithine transcarbamylase and carbamate kinase was also observed in extracts obtained from cells grown on uracil. No appreciable change in concentration of any of the five enzymes studied was detected when the cells were grown in media containing thymidine or guanylic acid. A hypothetical scheme which suggests a relationship between the control of purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis in this bacterium and which is consistent with the experimental results obtained is presented. PMID:5686000

  1. Formation and dimerization of the phosphodiesterase active site of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MorA, a bi-functional c-di-GMP regulator.

    PubMed

    Phippen, Curtis William; Mikolajek, Halina; Schlaefli, Henry George; Keevil, Charles William; Webb, Jeremy Stephen; Tews, Ivo

    2014-12-20

    Diguanylate cyclases (DGC) and phosphodiesterases (PDE), respectively synthesise and hydrolyse the secondary messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), and both activities are often found in a single protein. Intracellular c-di-GMP levels in turn regulate bacterial motility, virulence and biofilm formation. We report the first structure of a tandem DGC-PDE fragment, in which the catalytic domains are shown to be active. Two phosphodiesterase states are distinguished by active site formation. The structures, in the presence or absence of c-di-GMP, suggest that dimerisation and binding pocket formation are linked, with dimerisation being required for catalytic activity. An understanding of PDE activation is important, as biofilm dispersal via c-di-GMP hydrolysis has therapeutic effects on chronic infections.

  2. 5-Thiocyanato-2′-deoxyuridine as a Possible Radiosensitizer: Electron-Induced Formation of Uracil-C5-Thiyl Radical and Its Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Chomicz, Lidia; Żyndul, Michał; Wityk, Paweł; Wiegand, Tyler J.; Hanson, Cameron G.; Adhikary, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have synthesized 5-thiocyanato-2′-deoxyuridine (SCNdU) along with the C6-deuterated nucleobase 5-thiocyanatouracil (6-D-SCNU) and studied their reactions with radiation-produced electrons. ESR spectra in γ-irradiated nitrogen-saturated frozen homogeneous solutions (7.5 M LiCl in H2O or D2O) of these compounds show that electron-induced S-CN bond cleavage occurs to form a thiyl radical (dU-5-S• or 6-D-U-5-S•) and CN− via the initial π-anion radical (SCNdU•−) intermediate in which the excess electron is on the uracil base. HPLC and LC-MS/MS studies of γ-irradiated N2-saturated aqueous solutions of SCNdU in the presence of sodium formate as a OH-radical scavenger at ambient temperature show the formation of the dU-5S-5S-dU dimer in preference to dU by about 10 to 1 ratio. This shows that both possible routes of electron-induced bond cleavage (dUC5-SCN and S-CN) in SCNdU•− and dU-5-S• formation are preferred for the production of the σ-type uracilyl radical (dU•) by 10 fold. DFT/M06-2x/6-31++G(d,p) calculations employing the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for aqueous solutions show that dU-5-S• and CN− formation was thermodynamically favored by over 15 kcal/mol (ΔG) compared to dU• and SCN− production. The activation barriers for C5-S and S-CN bond cleavage in SCNdU•− amount to 8.7 and 4.0 kcal/mol, respectively, favoring dU-5-S• and CN− formation. These results support the experimental observation of S-CN bond cleavage by electron addition to SCNdU that results in the formation of dU-5-S• and the subsequent dU-5S-5S-dU dimer. This establishes SCNdU as a potential radiosensitizer that could cause intra- and inter-strand crosslinking as well as DNA-protein crosslinking via S-S dimer formation. PMID:26059609

  3. 5-Thiocyanato-2'-deoxyuridine as a possible radiosensitizer: electron-induced formation of uracil-C5-thiyl radical and its dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zdrowowicz, Magdalena; Chomicz, Lidia; Żyndul, Michał; Wityk, Paweł; Rak, Janusz; Wiegand, Tyler J; Hanson, Cameron G; Adhikary, Amitava; Sevilla, Michael D

    2015-07-14

    In this work, we have synthesized 5-thiocyanato-2'-deoxyuridine (SCNdU) along with the C6-deuterated nucleobase 5-thiocyanatouracil (6-D-SCNU) and studied their reactions with radiation-produced electrons. ESR spectra in γ-irradiated nitrogen-saturated frozen homogeneous solutions (7.5 M LiCl in H2O or D2O) of these compounds show that electron-induced S-CN bond cleavage occurs to form a thiyl radical (dU-5-S˙ or 6-D-U-5-S˙) and CN(-)via the initial π-anion radical (SCNdU˙(-)) intermediate in which the excess electron is on the uracil base. HPLC and LC-MS/MS studies of γ-irradiated N2-saturated aqueous solutions of SCNdU in the presence of sodium formate as a OH-radical scavenger at ambient temperature show the formation of the dU-5S-5S-dU dimer in preference to dU by about 10 to 1 ratio. This shows that both possible routes of electron-induced bond cleavage (dUC5-SCN and S-CN) in SCNdU˙(-) and dU-5-S˙ formation are preferred for the production of the σ-type uracilyl radical (dU˙) by 10 fold. DFT/M06-2x/6-31++G(d,p) calculations employing the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for aqueous solutions show that dU-5-S˙ and CN(-) formation was thermodynamically favored by over 15 kcal mol(-1) (ΔG) compared to dU˙ and SCN(-) production. The activation barriers for C5-S and S-CN bond cleavage in SCNdU˙(-) amount to 8.7 and 4.0 kcal mol(-1), respectively, favoring dU-5-S˙ and CN(-) formation. These results support the experimental observation of S-CN bond cleavage by electron addition to SCNdU that results in the formation of dU-5-S˙ and the subsequent dU-5S-5S-dU dimer. This establishes SCNdU as a potential radiosensitizer that could cause intra- and inter-strand crosslinking as well as DNA-protein crosslinking via S-S dimer formation.

  4. Mechanistic Analysis and Thermochemical Kinetic Simulation of the Pathways for Volatile Product Formation from Pyrolysis of Polystyrene, Especially of the Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Poutsma, Marvin L

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of the initial distribution of volatiles from pyrolysis of polystyrene were based on propagation rate constants estimated by thermochemical kinetic procedures. The voluminous database exhibits a disturbing lack of consistency with respect to effects of conversion level, temperature, and reactor type. It therefore remains difficult to assign the true primary distribution of the major products, styrene, 2,4-diphenyl-1-butene (''dimer''), 2,4,6-triphenyl-1-hexene (''trimer''), 1,3-diphenylpropane, and toluene, and its dependence on conditions. Probable perturbations by secondary reactions and selective evaporation are considered. The rate constant for 1,3-hydrogen shift appears much too small to accommodate the commonly proposed ''back-biting'' mechanism for dimer formation. Dimer more likely arises by addition of benzyl radical to olefinic chain-ends, followed by {beta}-scission, although ambiguities remain in assigning rate constants for the addition and {beta}-scission steps. With this modification, the major products can be successfully associated with decay of the sec-benzylic chain-end radical. In contrast, the minimal formation of allylbenzene, 2,4-diphenyl-1-pentene, and 2,4,6-triphenyl-1-heptene suggests a minimal chain-propagating role for the prim chain-end radical. Compared with polyethylene, the much enhanced ''unzipping'' to form monomer from polystyrene and the more limited depth of ''back-biting'' into the chain arise from an enthalpy-driven acceleration of {beta}-scission coupled with a kinetically driven deceleration of intramolecular hydrogen transfer. In contrast, the greater ''unzipping'' of poly(isobutylene) compared with polyethylene is proposed to result from relief of steric strain.

  5. Quantifying Dimer and Trimer Formation by Tri-n-butyl Phosphates in n-Dodecane: Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh N; Dang, Liem X; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D

    2016-07-21

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), a representative of neutral organophosphorous ligands, is an important extractant used in the solvent extraction process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Microscopic pictures of TBP isomerism and its behavior in n-dodecane diluent were investigated utilizing MD simulations with previously optimized force field parameters for TBP and n-dodecane. Potential mean force (PMF) calculations on a single TBP molecule show seven probable TBP isomers. Radial distribution functions (RDFs) of TBP suggest the existence of TBP trimers at high TBP concentrations in addition to dimers. 2D PMF calculations were performed to determine the angle and distance criteria for TBP trimers. The dimerization and trimerization constants of TBP in n-dodecane were obtained and match our own experimental values using the FTIR technique. The new insights into the conformational behaviors of the TBP molecule as a monomer and as part of an aggregate could greatly aid in the understanding of the complexation between TBP and metal ions in a solvent extraction system. PMID:27398866

  6. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Berkowski, J Andrew; Sigoillot, Severine M; Kotsis, Damian H; Guy, Hedeel I

    2003-01-31

    De novo pyrimidine biosynthesis is activated in proliferating cells in response to an increased demand for nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. The pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in baby hamster kidney cells, synchronized by serum deprivation, was found to be up-regulated 1.9-fold during S phase and subsequently down-regulated as the cells progressed through the cycle. The nucleotide pools were depleted by serum starvation and were not replenished during the first round of cell division, suggesting that the rate of utilization of the newly synthesized nucleotides closely matched their rate of formation. The activation and subsequent down-regulation of the pathway can be attributed to altered allosteric regulation of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase), a multifunctional protein that initiates mammalian pyrimidine biosynthesis. As the culture approached S-phase there was an increased sensitivity to the allosteric activator, 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, and a loss of UTP inhibition, changes that were reversed when cells emerged from S phase. The allosteric regulation of CAD is known to be modulated by MAP kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylations as well as by autophosphorylation. CAD was found to be fully autophosphorylated in the synchronized cells, but the level remained invariant throughout the cycle. Although the MAPK activity increased early in G(1), the phosphorylation of the CAD MAPK site was delayed until just before the onset of S phase, probably due to antagonistic phosphorylation by PKA that persisted until late G(1). Once activated, pyrimidine biosynthesis remained elevated until rephosphorylation of CAD by PKA and dephosphorylation of the CAD MAPK site late in S phase. Thus, the cell cycle-dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis results from the sequential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CAD under the control of

  7. [Theoretical study of hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of uracil and its dimers].

    PubMed

    Ten, G N; Kadrov, D M; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of the uracil elementary nucleic acids bases on its solubility and structure in aqueous solution was studied. Complexes of uracil with water molecules (from 1 to 14) were then calculated. The geometrical parameters of the hydrogen bridge of uracil and the changes in the frequency of valence vibrations of the bonds participating directly in hydrogen bond formation were calculated. It is shown that for the hydrogen bonds O(w)...HN(1) and O(w)...HN3 the hydrogen atom can tear, it may lead to tautomeric transformation of uracil. The results obtained having calculated the structure of uracil dimers, formed with the hydrogen bonds, in an isolated state and water solution, energy, dipole moments and the hydrogen bridge parameters made it possible to explain low solubility of uracil in water at room temperature. It is shown that water molecules with increase in their number are located mainly at one side of the plane of a pyrimidine uracil ring, that leads to the formation of stacking. Of two possible variants of stacking formation, the most profitable grouping is when a dipole moment of the formed dimer is equal to zero (anti-parallel stacking). PMID:25707232

  8. Pseudophosphorylation of tau at S422 enhances SDS-stable dimer formation and impairs both anterograde and retrograde fast axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Chelsea T; Combs, Benjamin; Cox, Kristine; Morfini, Gerardo; Brady, Scott T; Counts, Scott E; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), tau undergoes numerous modifications, including increased phosphorylation at serine-422 (pS422). In the human brain, pS422 tau protein is found in prodromal AD, correlates well with cognitive decline and neuropil thread pathology, and appears associated with increased oligomer formation and exposure of the N-terminal phosphatase-activating domain (PAD). However, whether S422 phosphorylation contributes to toxic mechanisms associated with disease-related forms of tau remains unknown. Here, we report that S422-pseudophosphorylated tau (S422E) lengthens the nucleation phase of aggregation without altering the extent of aggregation or the types of aggregates formed. When compared to unmodified tau aggregates, the S422E modification significantly increased the amount of SDS-stable tau dimers, despite similar levels of immunoreactivity with an oligomer-selective antibody (TOC1) and another antibody that reports PAD exposure (TNT1). Vesicle motility assays in isolated squid axoplasm further revealed that S422E tau monomers inhibited anterograde, kinesin-1 dependent fast axonal transport (FAT). Unexpectedly, and unlike unmodified tau aggregates, which selectively inhibit anterograde FAT, aggregates composed of S422E tau were found to inhibit both anterograde and retrograde FAT. Highlighting the relevance of these findings to human disease, pS422 tau was found to colocalize with tau oligomers and with a fraction of tau showing increased PAD exposure in the human AD brain. This study identifies novel effects of pS422 on tau biochemical properties, including prolonged nucleation and enhanced dimer formation, which correlate with a distinct inhibitory effect on FAT. Taken together, these findings identify a novel mechanistic basis by which pS422 confers upon tau a toxic effect that may directly contribute to axonal dysfunction in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27373205

  9. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted. PMID:27227997

  10. Fragmentation, auto-modification and post ionisation proton bound dimer ion formation: the differential mobility spectrometry of low molecular weight alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, D M; Thomas, C L P; Eiceman, G A

    2016-08-01

    Differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) is currently being used for environmental monitoring of space craft atmospheres and has been proposed for the rapid assessment of patients at accident and emergency receptions. Three studies investigated hitherto undescribed complexity in the DMS spectra of methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol product ions formed from a (63)Ni ionisation source. 54 000 DMS spectra obtained over a concentration range of 0.01 mg m(-3)(g) to 1.80 g m(-3)(g) revealed the phenomenon of auto-modification of the product ions. This occurred when the neutral vapour concentration exceeded the level required to induce a neutral-ion collision during the low field portion of the dispersion field waveform. Further, post-ionisation cluster-ion formation or protonated monomer/proton bound dimer inter-conversion within the ion-filter was indicated by apparent shifts in the values of the protonated monomer compensation field maximum; indicative of post-ionisation conversion of the protonated monomer to a proton-bound dimer. APCI-DMS-quadrupole mass spectrometry studies enabled the ion dissociation products from dispersion-field heating to be monitored and product ion fragmentation relationships to be proposed. Methanol was not observed to dissociate, while propan-1-ol and butan-1-ol underwent dissociation reactions consistent with dehydration processes that led ultimately to the generation of what is tentatively assigned as a cyclo-C3H3(+) ion (m/z 39) and hydrated protons. Studies of the interaction of ion filter temperature with dispersion-field heating of product ions isolated dissociation/fragmentation product ions that have not been previously described in DMS. The implications of these combined findings with regard to data sharing and data interpretation were highlighted.

  11. Thermodynamics of the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the binary (H2SO4-H2O) and ternary (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, A.; Münch, S.; Rondo, L.; Bianchi, F.; Duplissy, J.; Jokinen, T.; Junninen, H.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Franchin, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Petäjä, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2015-09-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important gas influencing atmospheric new particle formation (NPF). Both the binary (H2SO4-H2O) system and the ternary system involving ammonia (H2SO4-H2O-NH3) may be important in the free troposphere. An essential step in the nucleation of aerosol particles from gas-phase precursors is the formation of a dimer, so an understanding of the thermodynamics of dimer formation over a wide range of atmospheric conditions is essential to describe NPF. We have used the CLOUD chamber to conduct nucleation experiments for these systems at temperatures from 208 to 248 K. Neutral monomer and dimer concentrations of sulfuric acid were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). From these measurements, dimer evaporation rates in the binary system were derived for temperatures of 208 and 223 K. We compare these results to literature data from a previous study that was conducted at higher temperatures but is in good agreement with the present study. For the ternary system the formation of H2SO4·NH3 is very likely an essential step in the formation of sulfuric acid dimers, which were measured at 210, 223, and 248 K. We estimate the thermodynamic properties (dH and dS) of the H2SO4·NH3 cluster using a simple heuristic model and the measured data. Furthermore, we report the first measurements of large neutral sulfuric acid clusters containing as many as 10 sulfuric acid molecules for the binary system using chemical ionization-atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometry.

  12. Biosynthesis of the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine. A new route of pyrimidine biosynthesis involving purine intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Newell, P. C.; Tucker, R. G.

    1968-01-01

    1. The pattern of distribution on the purine pathway of mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 that had the double growth requirement for a purine plus the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine (ath mutants) indicated that purines and the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine share the early part of their biosynthetic pathways, and that 4-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) is the last common intermediate. Two mutants that at first appeared anomalous were further investigated and found not to affect this deduction. 2. The ribonucleoside form of AIR (AIRs) satisfied the requirements both for a purine and for the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine of an ath mutant. 3. Methionine was required for the conversion of AIR into the pyrimidine moiety. 4. Radioactive AIRs was converted into radioactive pyrimidine moiety by an ath mutant without significant dilution of specific radioactivity. 5. Possible mechanisms for pyrimidine-moiety biosynthesis from AIR are discussed. PMID:4889364

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for the dimer formation of beta amyloid peptide 1-42 in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Yoshiki; Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Matsuzaki, Mizuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Narita, Akihiro; Hoshi, Minako; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease involves accumulation of senile plaques in which filamentous aggregates of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are deposited. Recent studies demonstrate that oligomerization pathways of Aβ peptides may be complicated. To understand the mechanisms of Aβ(1-42) oligomer formation in more detail, we have established a method to produce (15)N-labeled Aβ(1-42) suited for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. For physicochemical studies, the starting protein material should be solely monomeric and all Aβ aggregates must be removed. Here, we succeeded in fractionating a "precipitation-resistant" fraction of Aβ(1-42) from an "aggregation-prone" fraction by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), even from bacterially overexpressed Aβ(1-42). However, both Aβ(1-42) fractions after 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) treatment formed amyloid fibrils. This indicates that the "aggregation seed" was not completely monomerized during HFIP treatment. In addition, Aβ(1-42) dissolved in HFIP was found to display a monomer-dimer equilibrium, as shown by two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N NMR. We demonstrated that the initial concentration of Aβ during the HFIP pretreatment altered the kinetic profiles of Aβ fibril formation in a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. The findings described here should ensure reproducible results when studying the Aβ(1-42) peptide. PMID:26772162

  14. Interruption of electronically excited Xe dimer formation by the photoassociation of Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) thermal collision pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. C.; Wagner, C. J.; Eden, J. G.

    2016-06-01

    The diatomic collisional intermediate responsible for the formation of an electronically excited molecule by teratomic recombination has been observed in both the spectral and temporal domains by laser spectroscopy. We report experiments demonstrating thermal Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) atomic collision pairs to be the immediate precursor to the formation of Xe 2∗ ( a 3 Σu + , A 1 Σu +) by the three body process: Xe∗(6s) + 2Xe ⟶ Xe 2∗ + Xe, where the asterisk denotes an excited electronic state. Photoassociating Xe(6s)-Xe atomic pairs by free ⟵ free transitions of the collision complex interrupts the production of the electronically excited Xe dimer, thereby suppressing Xe2 spontaneous emission in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ ˜ 172 nm, A 1 Σu + → X 1 Σg +). Intercepting Xe(6s)-Xe pairs before the complex is stabilized by the arrival of the third atom in the teratomic collision process selectively depletes the pair population in a specific Franck-Condon region determined by the probe laser wavelength (λ). Measurements of the variation of VUV emission suppression with λ provide a spectral signature of the [Xe(6s[3/2]2) - Xe(1S0)]∗ complex and map the probe laser wavelength onto the thermal energy (ɛ″) of the incoming collision pairs.

  15. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  16. Role of Human DNA Polymerase kappa in Extension Opposite from a cis-syn Thymine Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    R Vasquez-Del Carpio; T Silverstein; S Lone; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    Exposure of DNA to UV radiation causes covalent linkages between adjacent pyrimidines. The most common lesion found in DNA from these UV-induced linkages is the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. Human DNA polymerase {Kappa} (Pol{Kappa}), a member of the Y-family of DNA polymerases, is unable to insert nucleotides opposite the 3'T of a cis-syn T-T dimer, but it can efficiently extend from a nucleotide inserted opposite the 3'T of the dimer by another DNA polymerase. We present here the structure of human Pol{Kappa} in the act of inserting a nucleotide opposite the 5'T of the cis-syn T-T dimer. The structure reveals a constrained active-site cleft that is unable to accommodate the 3'T of a cis-syn T-T dimer but is remarkably well adapted to accommodate the 5'T via Watson-Crick base pairing, in accord with a proposed role for Pol{Kappa} in the extension reaction opposite from cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in vivo.

  17. Structural Basis for Dimer Formation of Human Condensin Structural Maintenance of Chromosome Proteins and Its Implications for Single-stranded DNA Recognition.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Susumu; Kawahara, Kazuki; Hosokawa, Yuki; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Oki, Hiroya; Nakamura, Shota; Kojima, Yukiko; Noda, Masanori; Takino, Rie; Miyahara, Yuya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic structural maintenance of chromosome proteins (SMC) are major components of cohesin and condensins that regulate chromosome structure and dynamics during cell cycle. We here determine the crystal structure of human condensin SMC hinge heterodimer with ~30 residues of coiled coils. The structure, in conjunction with the hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry analyses, revealed the structural basis for the specific heterodimer formation of eukaryotic SMC and that the coiled coils from two different hinges protrude in the same direction, providing a unique binding surface conducive for binding to single-stranded DNA. The characteristic hydrogen exchange profiles of peptides constituted regions especially across the hinge-hinge dimerization interface, further suggesting the structural alterations upon single-stranded DNA binding and the presence of a half-opened state of hinge heterodimer. This structural change potentially relates to the DNA loading mechanism of SMC, in which the hinge domain functions as an entrance gate as previously proposed for cohesin. Our results, however, indicated that this is not the case for condensins based on the fact that the coiled coils are still interacting with each other, even when DNA binding induces structural changes in the hinge region, suggesting the functional differences of SMC hinge domain between condensins and cohesin in DNA recognition.

  18. The catalytic effect of water, water dimers and water trimers on H2S + (3)O2 formation by the HO2 + HS reaction under tropospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlei; Yang, Chen; Feng, Xukai; Kang, Jiaxin; Song, Liang; Lu, Yousong; Wang, Zhiyin; Xu, Qiong; Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Zhuqing

    2016-06-29

    In this article, the reaction mechanisms of H2S + (3)O2 formation by the HO2 + HS reaction without and with catalyst X (X = H2O, (H2O)2 and (H2O)3) have been investigated theoretically at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2pd)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) level of theory, coupled with rate constant calculations by using conventional transition state theory. Our results show that in the presence of catalyst X (X = H2O, (H2O)2 and (H2O)3) into the channel of H2S + (3)O2 formation, the reactions between the SH radical and HO2(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes are more favorable than the corresponding reactions of the HO2 radical with HS(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes due to the lower barrier of the former reactions and the higher concentrations of HO2(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes. Meanwhile, the catalytic effect of water, water dimers and water trimers is mainly taken from the contribution of a single water vapor molecule, since the total effective rate constant of HO2H2O + HS and H2OHO2 + HS reactions was, respectively, larger by 7-9 and 9-12 orders of magnitude than that of SH + HO2(H2O)2 and SH + HO2(H2O)3 reactions. Besides, the enhancement factor of water vapor is only 0.37% at 240 K, while at high temperatures, such as 425 K, the positive water vapor effect is enhanced up to 38.00%, indicating that at high temperatures the positive water effect is obvious under atmospheric conditions. Overall, these results show how water and water clusters catalyze the gas phase reactions under atmospheric conditions.

  19. Homogeneous gas-phase formation of polychlorinated naphthalene from dimerization of 4-chlorophenoxy radicals and cross-condensation of phenoxy radical with 4-chlorophenoxy radical: Mechanism and kinetics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Ruiming; Li, Yunfeng; Zhang, Qingzhu

    2015-10-01

    A direct density functional theory (DFT) calculation was performed for the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) from dimerization of 4-chlorophenoxy radicals (4-CPRs) and cross-condensation of phenoxy radical (PhR) with 4-CPR, respectively. Several energetically feasible formation routes were proposed. The rate constants were computed by the canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) contribution over temperature range of 600-1200 K. This study shows that PCN productions from the dimerization of 4-CPRs just contain DCNs. All the monochlorinated naphthalene (MCN) detected in the experiment from 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) as precursor are formed form the cross-condensation of PhR with 4-CPR.

  20. Nucleobases and other Prebiotic Species from the Ultraviolet Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Nuevo, M.; Materese, C. K.; Milam, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are N-heterocycles that are the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no Nheterocycles have ever been observed in the ISM, the positions of the 6.2-m interstellar emission features suggest a population of such molecules is likely to be present. In this work we study the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases, as well as other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in combinations of H2O, NH3, CH3OH, and CH4 ices at low temperature, in order to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the interstellar medium and icy bodies of the Solar System. Experimental: Gas mixtures are prepared in a glass mixing line (background pressure approx. 10(exp -6)-10(exp -5) mbar). Relative proportions between mixture components are determined by their partial pressures. Gas mixtures are then deposited on an aluminum foil attached to a cold finger (15-20 K) and simultaneously irradiated with an H2 lamp emitting UV photons (Lyman and a continuum at approx.160 nm). After irradiation samples are warmed to room temperature, at which time the remaining residues are recovered to be analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Results: These experiments showed that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine mixed in these ices at low temperature leads to the formation of several photoproducts derived from pyrimidine, including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as their precursors 4(3H)-pyrimidone and 4-aminopyrimidine (Fig. 1). Theoretical quantum calculations on the formation of 4(3H)-pyrimidone and uracil from the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices are in agreement with their experimental formation pathways. In

  1. Nucleobases and Other Prebiotic Species from the UV Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Astrophysical Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Materese, Christopher; Nuevo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Nucleobases are aromatic N-heterocycles that constitute the informational subunits of DNA and RNA and are divided into two families: pyrimidine bases (uracil, cytosine, and thymine) and purine bases (adenine and guanine). Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origin confirmed by isotope measurement. Although no N-heterocycles have been individually identified in the ISM, the 6.2-micron interstellar emission feature seen towards many astronomical objects suggests a population of such molecules is likely present. We report on a study of the formation of pyrimidine-based molecules, including nucleobases and other species of prebiotic interest, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of pyrimidine in low temperature ices containing H2O, NH3, C3OH, and CH4, to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which prebiotic species may be formed in the Solar System.

  2. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  3. D-dimer test

    MedlinePlus

    D-dimer tests are used to check for blood clotting problems. Blood clots can cause health problems, such ... that you probably do not have problems with blood clotting. If you are getting the D-dimer test ...

  4. Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Homogenous 2-Hydroxypyridine Dimer Electron Induced Proton Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlk, Alexandra; Stokes, Sarah; Wang, Yi; Hicks, Zachary; Zhang, Xinxing; Blando, Nicolas; Frock, Andrew; Marquez, Sara; Bowen, Kit; Bowen Lab JHU Team

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopic (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) studies on the dimer anion of (2-hydroxypyridine)2-are reported. The experimentally measured vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 1.21eV compares well with the theoretically predicted values. The 2-hydroxypyridine anionic dimer system was investigated because of its resemblance to the nitrogenous heterocyclic pyrimidine nucleobases. Experimental and theoretical results show electron induced proton transfer (EIPT) in both the lactim and lactam homogeneous dimers. Upon electron attachment, the anion can serve as the intermediate between the two neutral dimers. A possible double proton transfer process can occur from the neutral (2-hydroxypyridine)2 to (2-pyridone)2 through the dimer anion. This potentially suggests an electron catalyzed double proton transfer mechanism of tautomerization. Research supported by the NSF Grant No. CHE-1360692.

  5. Glycal Formation in Crystals of Uridine Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; O’Leary, Sen E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Bu, Weiming; Toms, Angela; Settembre, Ethan C.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-22

    Uridine phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate (or 2{prime}-deoxyuridine to 2{prime}-deoxyribose 1-phosphate). Here we report the structure of hexameric Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluorouridine and sulfate and dimeric bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine or uridine, plus sulfate. In each case the electron density shows three separate species corresponding to the pyrimidine base, sulfate, and a ribosyl species, which can be modeled as a glycal. In the structures of the glycal complexes, the fluorouracil O2 atom is appropriately positioned to act as the base required for glycal formation via deprotonation at C2{prime}. Crystals of bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 2{prime}-deoxyuridine and sulfate show intact nucleoside. NMR time course studies demonstrate that uridine phosphorylase can catalyze the hydrolysis of the fluorinated nucleosides in the absence of phosphate or sulfate, without the release of intermediates or enzyme inactivation. These results add a previously unencountered mechanistic motif to the body of information on glycal formation by enzymes catalyzing the cleavage of glycosyl bonds.

  6. Enzymology of Pyrimidine Metabolism and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Vincenzetti, Silvia; Polzonetti, Valeria; Micozzi, Daniela; Pucciarelli, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that disorders of pyrimidine pathways may lead to neurological, hematological, immunological diseases, renal impairments, and association with malignancies. Nucleotide homeostasis depends on the three stages of pyrimidine metabolism: de novo synthesis, catabolism and recycling of these metabolites. Cytidine and uridine, in addition to be used as substrates for pyrimidine nucleotide salvaging, also act as the precursors of cytidine triphosphate used in the biosynthetic pathway of both brain's phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine via the Kennedy cycle. The synthesis in the brain of phosphatidylcholine and other membrane phosphatides can utilize, in addition to glucose, three compounds present in the blood stream: choline, uridine, and a polyunsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid. Some authors, using rat models, found that oral administration of two phospholipid precursors such as uridine and omega-3 fatty acids, along with choline from the diet, can increase the amount of synaptic membrane generated by surviving striatal neurons in rats with induced Parkinson's disease. Other authors found that in hypertensive rat fed with uridine and choline, cognitive deficit resulted improved. Uridine has also been recently considered as a neuroactive molecule, because of its involvement in important neurological functions by improving memory, sleep disorders, anti-epileptic effects, as well as neuronal plasticity. Cytidine and uridine are uptaken by the brain via specific receptors and successively salvaged to the corresponding nucleotides. The present review is devoted to the enzymology of pyrimidine pathways whose importance has attracted the attention of several researchers investigating on the mechanisms underlying the physiopathology of brain. PMID:27063261

  7. Reversible dimer formation and stability of the anti-tumour single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 by neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yie Chia; Boehm, Mark K; Chester, Kerry A; Begent, Richard H J; Perkins, Stephen J

    2002-06-28

    seven other scFv molecules have shown that, while the contact residues for symmetric back-to-back dimer formation in MFE-23 are not fully conserved, in principle, back-to-back contacts can be formed in these too. This offers possibilities for the creation of other forms of scFv molecules.

  8. Dynamic combinatorial enrichment of polyconformational D-/L-peptide dimers.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Lichtenecker, Roman J; Bullach, Anke; Mandal, Bhubaneswar; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    D-/L-peptides such as gramicidin A (gA) adopt unique dimeric β-helical structures of different topologies. To overcome their conformational promiscuity and enrich individual components, a dynamic combinatorial approach assisted by thiol tags was developed. This method led to identification of the preferential formation of antiparallel dimers under a broad range of conditions, which was independent of peptide side-chain polarity. Exclusive formation of an antiparallel cyclic dimer was achieved in the presence of cesium ions.

  9. Biomimetic synthesis of active isorhapontigenin dimers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Fen; Zhang, Yuan; Lin, Ming-Bao; Hou, Qi; Yao, Chun-Suo; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic isorhapontigenin was treated with several kinds of inorganic reagents and peroxidase so as to prepare active stilbene dimers. Among them, silver acetate in methanol gave two new isorhapontigenin dimers 4 and 5, together with four known natural stilbene dimers 2, 3, 6, and 7. Their structures and relative configurations were determined on the basis of spectral analysis, and their possible formation mechanisms were discussed, respectively. Compounds 2, 6, and 7 were artificially synthesized for the first time. All the products were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activities.

  10. Photochemical dimerization of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.; Muedas, C.A.; Ferguson, R.R.

    1992-04-14

    This patent describes improvement in a Group IIb photosensitized vapor phase dimerization of an organic compound in which a gaseous mixture of a Group IIB metal and the organic compound is irradiated in a reaction zone with a photosensitizing amount of radiant energy. The improvement comprises: a continuous stream of the gaseous mixture is passed as a vapor phase in a single pass through the reaction zone at a temperature at which the thus-produced dimer condenses immediately upon the formation thereof; the starting gaseous mixture comprises hydrogen and two ethylenically unsaturated compounds selected from the group consisting of alkenes of at least six carbon atoms, unsaturated nitriles, unsaturated epoxides, unsaturated silanes, unsaturated amines, unsaturated phosphines, and fluorinated alkenes; the gaseous mixture comprises nitrous oxide and the organic compound is a saturated compound with C-H bond strengths greater than 100 kcal/mol or a mixture of the saturated compound and an alkene; or the starting gaseous comprises an activating amount of hydrogen and the dimerization is a dehydrodimerization or cross-dimerization of a saturated hydrocarbon.

  11. tert-Butyl N-{4-methyl-3-[4-(3-pyrid-yl)pyrimidin-2-yl-oxy]phen-yl}carbamate.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Gui; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Guo, Cheng

    2009-07-11

    In the mol-ecule of the title compound, C(21)H(22)N(4)O(3), the pyrimidine ring is oriented at dihedral angles of 0.51 (3) and 50.76 (3)° to the pyridine and benzene rings, respectively. In the crystal structure, inter-molecular N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into centrosymmetric dimers, forming R(2) (2)(24) ring motifs; the dimers are linked by inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a two-dimensional network. π-π contacts between the benzene rings and between the pyrimidine and pyridine rings [centroid-centroid distances = 3.891 (1) and 3.646 (1) Å, respectively] may further stabilize the structure. Two weak C-H⋯π inter-actions are also present.

  12. tert-Butyl N-{4-methyl-3-[4-(3-pyrid­yl)pyrimidin-2-yl­oxy]phen­yl}carbamate

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Gui; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Guo, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title compound, C21H22N4O3, the pyrimidine ring is oriented at dihedral angles of 0.51 (3) and 50.76 (3)° to the pyridine and benzene rings, respectively. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into centrosymmetric dimers, forming R 2 2(24) ring motifs; the dimers are linked by inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a two-dimensional network. π–π contacts between the benzene rings and between the pyrimidine and pyridine rings [centroid–centroid distances = 3.891 (1) and 3.646 (1) Å, respectively] may further stabilize the structure. Two weak C—H⋯π inter­actions are also present. PMID:21583549

  13. Structure of cyanase reveals that a novel dimeric and decameric arrangement of subunits is required for formation of the enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Martin A; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Perrakis, Anatassis; Anderson, Paul M; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanase is an enzyme found in bacteria and plants that catalyzes the reaction of cyanate with bicarbonate to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. In Escherichia coli, cyanase is induced from the cyn operon in response to extracellular cyanate. The enzyme is functionally active as a homodecamer of 17 kDa subunits, and displays half-site binding of substrates or substrate analogs. The enzyme shows no significant amino acid sequence homology with other proteins. Results We have determined the crystal structure of cyanase at 1.65 Å resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method. Cyanase crystals are triclinic and contain one homodecamer in the asymmetric unit. Selenomethionine-labeled protein offers 40 selenium atoms for use in phasing. Structures of cyanase with bound chloride or oxalate anions, inhibitors of the enzyme, allowed identification of the active site. Conclusions The cyanase monomer is composed of two domains. The N-terminal domain shows structural similarity to the DNA-binding α-helix bundle motif. The C-terminal domain has an ‘open fold’ with no structural homology to other proteins. The subunits of cyanase are arranged in a novel manner both at the dimer and decamer level. The dimer structure reveals the C-terminal domains to be intertwined, and the decamer is formed by a pentamer of these dimers. The active site of the enzyme is located between dimers and is comprised of residues from four adjacent subunits of the homodecamer. The structural data allow a conceivable reaction mechanism to be proposed. PMID:10801492

  14. The Photochemistry of Pyrimidine in Realistic Astrophysical Ices and the Production of Nucleobases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) in H2O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH3, CH3OH, or CH4 leads to the formation of the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H2O, CH3OH, and NH3, with or without CH4, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.

  15. Salt Bridges Regulate Both Dimer Formation and Monomeric Flexibility in HdeB and May Have a Role in Periplasmic Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J.; Booth, Nuala A.; Booth, Ian R.; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility. PMID:22138344

  16. Steric and Electronic Control over the Reactivity of a Thiolate-Ligated Fe(II) Complex with Dioxygen and Superoxide: Reversible μ-Oxo Dimer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Roslyn M.; Shearer, Jason; Kaminsky, Werner; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivity between a thiolate-ligated five-coordinate complex [FeII(SMe2N4(tren))]+ (1) and dioxygen is examined in order to determine if O2 activation, resembling that of the metalloenzyme cytochrome P450, can be promoted even when O2 binds cis, as opposed to trans, to a thiolate. Previous work in our group showed that [FeII(SMe2N4-(tren))]+ (1) reacts readily with superoxide (O2−) in the presence of a proton source to afford H2O2 via an FeIII–OOH intermediate, thus providing a biomimetic model for the metalloenzyme superoxide reductase (SOR). Addition of O2 to 1 affords binuclear μ-oxo-bridged [FeIII(SMe2N4(tren))]2(μ2-O)(PF6)2•3MeCN (3). At low temperatures, in protic solvents, an intermediate is detected, the details of which will be the subject of a separate paper. Although the thiolate ligand does not appear to perturb the metrical parameters of the unsupported μ-oxo bridge (Fe–O=1.807(8) Å, and Fe–O–Fe= 155.3(5)° fall in the usual range), it decreases the magnetic coupling between the irons (J = −28 cm−1) and creates a rather basic oxo site. Protonation of this oxo using strong (HBF4, HCl) or weak (HOAc, NH4PF6, LutNHCl) acids results in bridge cleavage to cleanly afford the corresponding monomeric anion-ligated (OAc− (6), or Cl− (7)) or solvent-ligated (MeCN (4)) derivatives. Addition of OH− converts [FeIII(SMe2N4-(tren))(MeCN)]2+ (4) back to μ-oxo 3. Thus, μ-oxo bridge cleavage is reversible. The protonated μ-hydroxo-bridged intermediate is not observed. In an attempt to prevent μ-oxo dimer formation, and facilitate the observation of O2-bound intermediates, a bulkier tertiary amine ligand, tren-Et4= N-(2-amino-ethyl)-N-(2-diethylamino-ethyl)-N′,N′-diethyl-ethane-1,2-diamine, and the corresponding [FeII(SMe2N4(tren-Et4))]+ (5) complex was synthesized and structurally characterized. Steric repulsive interactions create unusually long FeII-N(3,4) amine bonds in 5 (mean distance = 2.219(1) Å). The [(tren-Et4)N4SMe2]1

  17. Chemical evolution. XXIX - Pyrimidines from hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Joshi, P. C.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Compounds obtained by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers formed by allowing pH 9.2, 0.1 M cyanide to stand at room temperature for 4 to 12 months were analyzed. Hydrolysis of HCN oligomers yielded 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine and 5-hydroxyuracil; orotic acid was detected after hydrolysis at pH 8.5. A unified pathway from diaminofumaronitrile to the pyrimidines observed is suggested. As purines, pyrimidines and amino acids are released by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers in either acidic or mildly basic aqueous solutions, they could have been formed on the primitive earth in spite of fluctuations in pH. 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidines appear to be likely candidates for incorporation into primitive nucleic acids, as they should undergo Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with adenine.

  18. Effect of carbon source on pyrimidine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2010-08-01

    The effect of carbon source on the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was studied at the level of enzyme synthesis. Although pyrimidine supplementation of glucose-grown Ps. oryzihabitans cells produced a slight but statistically significant effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, catabolite repression of the enzyme activities by glucose appeared to be occurring. Pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain grown on glucose indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the mutant strain cells, dihydroorotase and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase activities were found to about double while aspartate transcarbamoylase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were slightly elevated compared to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil.

  19. Effect of carbon source on pyrimidine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2010-08-01

    The effect of carbon source on the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was studied at the level of enzyme synthesis. Although pyrimidine supplementation of glucose-grown Ps. oryzihabitans cells produced a slight but statistically significant effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, catabolite repression of the enzyme activities by glucose appeared to be occurring. Pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain grown on glucose indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the mutant strain cells, dihydroorotase and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase activities were found to about double while aspartate transcarbamoylase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were slightly elevated compared to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. PMID:20473969

  20. Alkoxy-1,3,5-triazapentadien(e/ato) copper(II) complexes: template formation and applications for the preparation of pyrimidines and as catalysts for oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl products.

    PubMed

    Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Karabach, Yauhen Yu; da Silva, M Fátima C Guedes; Figiel, Paweł J; Lasri, Jamal; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2012-01-16

    Template combination of copper acetate (Cu(AcO)(2)⋅H(2)O) with sodium dicyanamide (NaN(C≡N)(2), 2 equiv) or cyanoguanidine (N≡CNHC(=NH)NH(2), 2 equiv) and an alcohol ROH (used also as solvent) leads to the neutral copper(II)-(2,4-alkoxy-1,3,5-triazapentadienato) complexes [Cu{NH=C(OR)NC(OR)=NH}(2)] (R = Me (1), Et (2), nPr (3), iPr (4), CH(2)CH(2)OCH(3) (5)) or cationic copper(II)-(2-alkoxy-4-amino-1,3,5-triazapentadiene) complexes [Cu{NH=C(OR)NHC(NH(2))=NH}(2)](AcO)(2) (R = Me (6), Et (7), nPr (8), nBu (9), CH(2)CH(2)OCH(3) (10)), respectively. Several intermediates of this reaction were isolated and a pathway was proposed. The deprotonation of 6-10 with NaOH allows their transformation to the corresponding neutral triazapentadienates [Cu{NH=C(OR)NC(NH(2))=NH}(2)] 11-15. Reaction of 11, 12 or 15 with acetyl acetone (MeC(=O)CH(2)C(=O)Me) leads to liberation of the corresponding pyrimidines NC(Me)CHC(Me)NCNHC(=NH)OR, whereas the same treatment of the cationic complexes 6, 7 or 10 allows the corresponding metal-free triazapentadiene salts {NH(2)C(OR)=NC(NH(2))=NH(2)}(OAc) to be isolated. The alkoxy-1,3,5-triazapentadiene/ato copper(II) complexes have been applied as efficient catalysts for the TEMPO radical-mediated mild aerobic oxidation of alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes (molar yields of aldehydes of up to 100 % with >99 % selectivity) and for the solvent-free microwave-assisted synthesis of ketones from secondary alcohols with tert-butylhydroperoxide as oxidant (yields of up to 97 %, turnover numbers of up to 485 and turnover frequencies of up to 1170 h(-1)).

  1. Pyrimidine salvage pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Villela, A D; Sánchez-Quitian, Z A; Ducati, R G; Santos, D S; Basso, L A

    2011-01-01

    The causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, infects one-third of the world population. TB remains the leading cause of mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen. The worldwide increase in incidence of M. tuberculosis has been attributed to the high proliferation rates of multi and extensively drug-resistant strains, and to co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. There is thus a continuous requirement for studies on mycobacterial metabolism to identify promising targets for the development of new agents to combat TB. Singular characteristics of this pathogen, such as functional and structural features of enzymes involved in fundamental metabolic pathways, can be evaluated to identify possible targets for drug development. Enzymes involved in the pyrimidine salvage pathway might be attractive targets for rational drug design against TB, since this pathway is vital for all bacterial cells, and is composed of enzymes considerably different from those present in humans. Moreover, the enzymes of the pyrimidine salvage pathway might have an important role in the mycobacterial latent state, since M. tuberculosis has to recycle bases and/or nucleosides to survive in the hostile environment imposed by the host. The present review describes the enzymes of M. tuberculosis pyrimidine salvage pathway as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents. Enzyme functional and structural data have been included to provide a broader knowledge on which to base the search for compounds with selective biological activity.

  2. Genetic Dissection of Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Salvage in Leishmania donovani*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Zachary N.; Gilroy, Caslin A.; Boitz, Jan M.; Ullman, Buddy; Yates, Phillip A.

    2012-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus express the metabolic machinery to synthesize pyrimidine nucleotides via both de novo and salvage pathways. To evaluate the relative contributions of pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage to pyrimidine homeostasis in both life cycle stages of Leishmania donovani, individual mutant lines deficient in either carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS), the first enzyme in pyrimidine biosynthesis, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT), a salvage enzyme, or both CPS and UPRT were constructed. The Δcps lesion conferred pyrimidine auxotrophy and a growth requirement for medium supplementation with one of a plethora of pyrimidine nucleosides or nucleobases, although only dihydroorotate or orotate could circumvent the pyrimidine auxotrophy of the Δcps/Δuprt double knockout. The Δuprt null mutant was prototrophic for pyrimidines but could not salvage uracil or any pyrimidine nucleoside. The capability of the Δcps parasites to infect mice was somewhat diminished but still robust, indicating active pyrimidine salvage by the amastigote form of the parasite, but the Δcps/Δuprt mutant was completely attenuated with no persistent parasites detected after a 4-week infection. Complementation of the Δcps/Δuprt clone with either CPS or UPRT restored infectivity. These data establish that an intact pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is essential for the growth of the promastigote form of L. donovani in culture, that all uracil and pyrimidine nucleoside salvage in the parasite is mediated by UPRT, and that both the biosynthetic and salvage pathways contribute to a robust infection of the mammalian host by the amastigote. These findings impact potential therapeutic design and vaccine strategies for visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:22367196

  3. Urea: obligate intermediate of pyrimidine-ring catabolism in Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, W M; Davis, C H; Wallis-Biggart, N; Wondrack, L M; Abbott, M T

    1979-01-01

    Urea has been shown to be an obligate intermediate in and the penultimate product of the catabolism of pyrimidine-ring nitrogen in Rhodosporidium toruloides (Rhodotorula). One of a series of mutants selected for its inability to utilize uracil as a sole source of nitrogen was unable to utilize urea also. The mutant accumulated urea and failed to form 14CO2 during supplementation with [2-14C]uracil. Radioautograms from the resulting cell extracts and media failed to reveal expected intermediates. Cell-free extracts of the mutant were shown to lack urease activity. Revertants of the mutant were essentially wild type in all tested attributes. Elements of the reductive pathway for pyrimidine catabolism are present in Rhodosporidium (O. A. Milstein and M. L. Bekker, J. Bacteriol. 127: 1-6, 1976), but is has not been determined whether this pathway is involved with production of urea. Images PMID:571431

  4. A facile environment-friendly one-pot two-step regioselective synthetic strategy for 3,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines related to zaleplon and 3,6-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-amines assisted by KHSO[Formula: see text] in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Devi, Asem Satyapati; Kaping, Shunan; Vishwakarma, Jai Narain

    2015-11-01

    3-Aminopyrazoles required for the synthesis of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines were obtained by the reaction of enaminonitriles with hydrazine hydrate. The resulting aminopyrazoles are reacted with formylated acetophenones under reflux at [Formula: see text] assisted by KHSO[Formula: see text] in aqueous media to form regioselectively 3,7-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and 3,6-diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-amines. X-ray crystallography of selected compounds 5b and 7i further confirmed the regioselective formation of these products.

  5. Photocyclizable resorcin[4]arene dimers.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian; Strübe, Frank; Bringmann, Sebastian; Mattay, Jochen

    2008-12-01

    The synthesis of covalently linked dimers, containing two resorcin[4]arene moieties connected over two 9,10-functionalized anthracene units, is reported. Besides the synthetic route, which involves for example the formation of anthracene-9,10-dialkanols ( and ), and characterization of the compounds, the photochemical properties, introduced through the anthracene groups, were investigated by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy. Both resorcin[4]arene dimers ( and ) were able to undergo an intramolecular [4+4] cycloaddition, therefore changing the size of the inner cavity. Unfortunately, the back reaction, which was expected to take place on irradiation below 300 nm or upon heating, was not observed yet and will be the focus of our future work.

  6. Isolation and characterization of pyrimidine-psoralen-pyrimidine photodiadducts from DNA. [Ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, D.; Straub, K.; Hearst, J.E.; Rapoport, H.

    1982-12-01

    The isolation and characterization of pyrimidine-psoralen-pyrimidine photodiadducts from DNA are reported for the first time. For each of the four psoralens studied, a single pair of diastereomeric thymidine-psoralen-thymidine photodiadducts, each with cis-syn stereochemistry, was found to account for > 90% of the diadducts formed. Additionally, pulse-chase experiments that establish that these photo cross-links are formed by cycloaddition of a second thymidine residue to the 3,4 double bond (pyrone side) of an initially formed 4',5' (furan-side) psoralen-thymidine photomonoadduct have been carried out.

  7. DNA photochemistry: geometrically unconstrained pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts do photoisomerize.

    PubMed

    Douki, Thierry; Rebelo-Moreira, Silvestre; Hamon, Nadège; Bayle, Pierre-Alain

    2015-01-16

    Structural features are of major importance for the formation of mutagenic photoproducts in DNA. It was recently reported that lack of constraints between two adjacent nucleosidic units prevents the conversion of pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts into their Dewar valence isomers. We here report that this is not the case for the thymidine photoproducts which, although unconstrained, are quantitatively converted into photolysis products identified as Dewar valence isomers by mass spectrometry and NMR and infrared spectroscopies.

  8. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained.

  9. Cytochrome P450 as dimerization catalyst in diketopiperazine alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Yagishita, Fumitoshi; Mino, Takashi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-03-21

    As dimeric natural products frequently exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding their mechanisms of dimerization is of great interest. One such compound is (−)-ditryptophenaline, isolated from Aspergillus flavus, which inhibits substance P receptor for potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. Through targeted gene knockout in A. flavus and heterologous yeast gene expression, we determined for the first time the gene cluster and pathway for the biosynthesis of a dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid. We also determined that a single cytochrome P450, DtpC, is responsible not only for pyrroloindole ring formation but also for concurrent dimerization of N-methylphenylalanyltryptophanyl diketopiperazine monomers into a homodimeric product. Furthermore, DtpC exhibits relaxed substrate specificity, allowing the formation of two new dimeric compounds from a non-native monomeric precursor, brevianamide F. A radical-mediated mechanism of dimerization is proposed.

  10. Regulation of the Bacillus subtilis pyrimidine biosynthetic (pyr) gene cluster by an autogenous transcriptional attenuation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Turner, R J; Lu, Y; Switzer, R L

    1994-06-01

    A complete transcript of the Bacillus subtilis pyr operon contains the following elements in 5' to 3' order: a 151-nucleotide (nt) untranslated leader; pyrR, encoding a 20-kDa protein; a 173-nt intercistronic region; pyrP, encoding a 46-kDa protein; a 145-nt intercistronic region; and eight overlapping cistrons encoding all of the six enzymes for de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Transcription is controlled by the availability of pyrimidines via an attenuation mechanism. There are three transcription terminators within the operon, each of which is preceded by another stem-loop structure, the antiterminator, whose formation would prevent formation of the terminator stem-loop. These are located in the leader, the pyrR-pyrP intercistronic region, and the pyrP-pyrB intercistronic region. Northern (RNA) blot analysis has identified transcripts of lengths which coincide with termination at these proposed attenuation sites and whose relative abundances vary in the expected pyrimidine-dependent manner. Each antiterminator contains a 50-base conserved sequence in its promoter-proximal half. Various transcriptional fusions of the pyr promoter and surrounding sequences to promoterless reporter genes support an attenuation mechanism whereby when pyrimidines are abundant, the PyrR protein binds to the conserved sequence in the pyr mRNA and disrupts the antiterminator, permitting terminator hairpin formation and promoting transcription termination. Deletion of pyrR from the chromosome resulted in the constitutive, elevated expression of aspartate transcarbamylase, which is encoded by pyrB, the third gene in the operon. Complementation of an E. coli upp mutant, as well as direct enzymatic assay, has demonstrated that pyrR also confers uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Analysis of pyrR and upp deletion mutants demonstrated that upp, not pyrR, encodes the quantitatively important uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity. The pyrP gene probably encodes an integral membrane

  11. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Purine and Pyrimidine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2011-01-01

    Among the purine and pyrimidine receptors, the discovery of small molecular allosteric modulators has been most highly advanced for the A1 and A3 ARs. These AR modulators have allosteric effects that are structurally separated from the orthosteric effects in SAR studies. The benzoylthiophene derivatives tend to act as allosteric agonists, as well as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the A1 AR. A 2-amino-3-aroylthiophene derivative T-62 has been under development as a PAM of the A1 AR for the treatment of chronic pain. Several structurally distinct classes of allosteric modulators of the human A3 AR have been reported: 3-(2-pyridinyl)isoquinolines, 2,4-disubstituted quinolines, 1H-imidazo-[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amines, endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol and the food dye Brilliant Black BN. Site-directed mutagenesis of A1 and A3 ARs has identified residues associated with the allosteric effect, distinct from those that affect orthosteric binding. A few small molecular allosteric modulators have been reported for several of the P2X ligand-gated ion channels and the G protein-coupled P2Y receptor nucleotides. Metal ion modulation of the P2X receptors has been extensively explored. The allosteric approach to modulation of purine and pyrimidine receptors looks promising for development of drugs that are event-specific and site-specific in action. PMID:21586360

  13. Dimer vacancy interactions on the Si(0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianlin; Stott, M. J.

    1998-07-01

    Dimer vacancy (DV) interactions on the Si(0 0 1) surface are studied using ab initio total energy calculations. Two kinds of DVs are considered: single DV (1-DV) and a DV cluster composed of two single DVs in the nearest-neighbor positions on the same dimer row (2-DV). Calculation of the total energy as a function of DV separation gives the DV interaction energy. Attractive interactions between 1-DVs on the same dimer row and 2-DVs on neighboring dimer rows are found which provide an explanation of the experimentally observed formation of 2-DVs, the aligning of 2-DVs in the direction perpendicular to the dimer row to form long extended DV lines, and subsequently, the formation of 2× n periodic structures on the surface.

  14. The photochemistry of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ices and the production of nucleobases

    SciTech Connect

    Nuevo, Michel; Materese, Christopher K.; Sandford, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Nucleobases, together with deoxyribose/ribose and phosphoric acid, are the building blocks of DNA and RNA for all known life. The presence of nucleobase-like compounds in carbonaceous chondrites delivered to the Earth raises the question of an extraterrestrial origin for the molecules that triggered life on our planet. Whether these molecules are formed in interstellar/protostellar environments, in small parent bodies in the solar system, or both, is currently unclear. Recent experiments show that the UV irradiation of pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) in H{sub 2}O-rich ice mixtures that contain NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OH, or CH{sub 4} leads to the formation of the pyrimidine-based nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we discuss the low-temperature UV irradiation of pyrimidine in realistic astrophysical ice mixtures containing H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}OH, and NH{sub 3}, with or without CH{sub 4}, to search for the production of nucleobases and other prebiotic compounds. These experiments show the presence of uracil, urea, glycerol, hexamethylenetetramine, small amino acids, and small carboxylic acids in all samples. Cytosine was only found in one sample produced from ices irradiated with a higher UV dose, while thymine was not found in any sample, even after irradiation with a higher UV dose. Results are discussed to evaluate the role of the photochemistry of pyrimidine in the inventory of organic molecules detected in meteorites and their astrophysical/astrobiological implications.

  15. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2015-07-10

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  16. Superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, Iñigo; Ederra, Iñigo; Gonzalo, Ramón; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-07-01

    The theory and design of superbackscattering nanoparticle dimers are presented. We analytically derive the optimal configurations and the upper bound of their backscattering cross-sections. In particular, it is demonstrated that electrically small nanoparticle dimers can enhance the backscattering by a factor of 6.25 with respect to single dipolar particles. We demonstrate that optimal designs approaching this theoretical limit can be found by using a simple circuit model. The study of practical implementations based on plasmonic and high-permittivity particles has been also addressed. Moreover, the numerical examples reveal that the dimers can attain close to a fourfold enhancement of the single nanoparticle response even in the presence of high losses.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationship of Indole-Tethered Pyrimidine Derivatives that Concurrently Inhibit Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Other Angiokinases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiho; Yoo, Jakyung; Kwon, Ara; Kim, Doran; Nguyen, Hong Khanh; Lee, Bong-Yong; Suh, Wonhee; Min, Kyung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents have been widely investigated in combination with standard chemotherapy or targeted cancer agents for better management of advanced cancers. Therapeutic agents that concurrently inhibit epidermal growth factor receptor and other angiokinases could be useful alternatives to combination therapies for epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent cancers. Here, we report the synthesis of an indole derivative of pazopanib using a bioisosteric replacement strategy, which was designated MKP101. MKP101 inhibited not only the epidermal growth factor receptor with an IC50 value of 43 nM but also inhibited angiokinases as potently as pazopanib. In addition, MKP101 effectively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced endothelial proliferation, tube formation, migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and proliferation of HCC827, an epidermal growth factor receptor-addicted cancer cell line. A docking model of MKP101 and the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor was generated to predict its binding mode, and validated by synthesizing and evaluating MKP101 derivatives. Additionally, a study of structure-activity relationships of indolylamino or indolyloxy pyrimidine analogues derived from MKP101 demonstrated that selectivity for epidermal growth factor receptor and other angiokinases, especially vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 depends on the position of substituents on pyrimidine and the type of link between pyrimidine and the indole moiety. We believe that this study could provide a basis for developing angiokinase inhibitors having high affinity for the epidermal growth factor receptor, from the pyrimidine scaffold. PMID:26401847

  18. Titanium(IV) isopropoxide mediated synthesis of pyrimidin-4-ones.

    PubMed

    Ramanjulu, Joshi M; Demartino, Michael P; Lan, Yunfeng; Marquis, Robert

    2010-05-21

    A novel, one-step method for the synthesis of tri- and tetrasubstituted pyrimidin-4-ones is reported. This method involves a titanium(IV)-mediated cyclization involving two sequential condensations of primary and beta-ketoamides. The reaction is operationally facile, readily scalable, and offers rapid entry into differentially substituted pyrimidin-4-one scaffolds. The high functional group compatibility allows for substantial diversification in the products generated from this transformation.

  19. Acceleration of 5-methylcytosine deamination in cyclobutane dimers by G and its implications for UV-induced C-to-T mutation hotspots.

    PubMed

    Cannistraro, Vincent J; Taylor, John-Stephen

    2009-10-01

    Sunlight-induced C-->T mutation hotspots occur most frequently at methylated CpG sites in tumor suppressor genes and are thought to arise from translesion synthesis past deaminated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). While it is known that methylation enhances CPD formation in sunlight, little is known about the effect of methylation and sequence context on the deamination of 5-methylcytosine ((m)C) and its contribution to mutagenesis at these hotspots. Using an enzymatic method, we have determined the yields and deamination rates of C and (m)C in CPDs and find that the frequency of UVB-induced CPDs correlates with the oxidation potential of the flanking bases. We also found that the deamination of T(m)C and (m)CT CPDs is about 25-fold faster when flanked by G's than by A's, C's or T's in duplex DNA and appears to involve catalysis by the O6 group of guanine. In contrast, the first deamination of either C or (m)C in AC(m)CG with a flanking G was much slower (t(1/2) >250 h) and rate limiting, while the second deamination was much faster. The observation that C(m)CG dimers deaminate very slowly but at the same time correlate with C-->T mutation hotspots suggests that their repair must be slow enough to allow sufficient time for deamination. There are, however, a greater number of single C-->T mutations than CC-->TT mutations at C(m)CG sites even though the second deamination is very fast, which could reflect faster repair of doubly deaminated dimers.

  20. Quantum Dimer Model: Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Chamon, Claudio; Castelnovo, Claudio

    We present new theoretical analysis of the Quantum Dimer Model. We study dimer models on square, cubic and triangular lattices and we reproduce their phase diagrams (which were previously known only numerically). We show that there are several types of dimer liquids and solids. We present preliminary analysis of several other models including doped dimers and planar spin ice, and some results on the Kagome and hexagonal lattices.

  1. Pyrimidine Biosynthesis Is Not an Essential Function for Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Forms

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Donachie, Anne; Morrison, Liam J.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2013-01-01

    Background African trypanosomes are capable of both pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of preformed pyrimidines from the host, but it is unknown whether either process is essential to the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Pyrimidine requirements for growth were investigated using strictly pyrimidine-free media, with or without single added pyrimidine sources. Growth rates of wild-type bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei were unchanged in pyrimidine-free medium. The essentiality of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway was studied by knocking out the PYR6-5 locus that produces a fusion product of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and Orotidine Monophosphate Decarboxylase (OMPDCase). The pyrimidine auxotroph was dependent on a suitable extracellular pyrimidine source. Pyrimidine starvation was rapidly lethal and non-reversible, causing incomplete DNA content in new cells. The phenotype could be rescued by addition of uracil; supplementation with uridine, 2′deoxyuridine, and cytidine allowed a diminished growth rate and density. PYR6-5−/− trypanosomes were more sensitive to pyrimidine antimetabolites and displayed increased uracil transport rates and uridine phosphorylase activity. Pyrimidine auxotrophs were able to infect mice although the infection developed much more slowly than infection with the parental, prototrophic trypanosome line. Conclusions/Significance Pyrimidine salvage was not an essential function for bloodstream T. b. brucei. However, trypanosomes lacking de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis are completely dependent on an extracellular pyrimidine source, strongly preferring uracil, and display reduced infectivity. As T. brucei are able to salvage sufficient pyrimidines from the host environment, the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is not a viable drug target, although any interruption of pyrimidine supply was lethal. PMID:23505454

  2. Mineral catalysis of the formation of dimers of 5'-AMP in aqueous solution: The possible role of montmorillonite clays in the prebiotic synthesis of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gözen; Agarwal, Vipin

    1989-03-01

    The reaction of the 5'-AMP with water soluble carbodiimide (EDAC) in the presence of Na+-montmorillonite 22A results in the formation of 2',5'-(pA)2 (18.9%), 3',5'-(pA)2 (11%), and AppA (4.8%). When poly(U) is used in place of the clay the product yields are 2',5'-(pA)2 (15.5%), 3',5'-(pA)2 (3.7%) and AppA (14.9%). The 3',5'-cyclic dinucleotide, 3',5'-c(pA)2, is also formed when poly(U) is used. AppA is the principal reaction product when neither clay nor poly(U) is present in the reaction mixture. Products which contain the phophodiester bond are formed at different ionic strengths, pH and temperatures using Na+-montmorillonite. Phosphodiester bond formation was not observed when Cu2+-montmorillonite was used or when DISN was used in the place of EDAC. The extent catalysis of phophodiester bond formation varied with the particular clay mineral used. Those Na+-clays which bind 5'-AMP more strongly are better catalysts. Cu2+-montmorillonite, which binds 5'-AMP strongly, exhibits no catalytic activity.

  3. Dimer excision in Escherichia coli in the presence of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.H.

    1980-07-01

    The observation that polA1 and recL152 mutations result in both slow pyrimidine dimer excision and large repair patch size leads to the hypothesis that patch size is directly related to the rate of excision. In this study caffeine, a known inhibitor of excision repair, was used to examine the extent of correlation between excision rate and patch size by measuring patch size in the presence of several concentrations of caffeine. Both the rate of excision and the resistance to ultraviolet radiation were reduced with increasing concentrations of caffeine after irradiation. Caffeine also inhibited the rate at which incisions were made and prolonged the time required to rejoin the discontinuities. Patch size, however, was unaffected by caffeine treatment.

  4. Redesigning the procaspase-8 dimer interface for improved dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunxiao; MacKenzie, Sarah H; Clay Clark, A

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-8 is a cysteine directed aspartate-specific protease that is activated at the cytosolic face of the cell membrane upon receptor ligation. A key step in the activation of caspase-8 depends on adaptor-induced dimerization of procaspase-8 monomers. Dimerization is followed by limited autoproteolysis within the intersubunit linker (IL), which separates the large and small subunits of the catalytic domain. Although cleavage of the IL stabilizes the dimer, the uncleaved procaspase-8 dimer is sufficiently active to initiate apoptosis, so dimerization of the zymogen is an important mechanism to control apoptosis. In contrast, the effector caspase-3 is a stable dimer under physiological conditions but exhibits little enzymatic activity. The catalytic domains of caspases are structurally similar, but it is not known why procaspase-8 is a monomer while procaspase-3 is a dimer. To define the role of the dimer interface in assembly and activation of procaspase-8, we generated mutants that mimic the dimer interface of effector caspases. We show that procaspase-8 with a mutated dimer interface more readily forms dimers. Time course studies of refolding also show that the mutations accelerate dimerization. Transfection of HEK293A cells with the procaspase-8 variants, however, did not result in a significant increase in apoptosis, indicating that other factors are required in vivo. Overall, we show that redesigning the interface of procaspase-8 to remove negative design elements results in increased dimerization and activity in vitro, but increased dimerization, by itself, is not sufficient for robust activation of apoptosis. PMID:24442640

  5. Clay catalysis of oligonucleotide formation: kinetics of the reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolides of nucleotides with the non-basic heterocycles uracil and hypoxanthine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ferris, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The montmorillonite clay catalyzed condensation of activated monocleotides to oligomers of RNA is a possible first step in the formation of the proposed RNA world. The rate constants for the condensation of the phosphorimidazolide of adenosine were measured previously and these studies have been extended to the phosphorimidazolides of inosine and uridine in the present work to determine of substitution of neutral heterocycles for the basic adenine ring changes the reaction rate or regioselectivity. The oligomerization reactions of the 5'-phosphoromidazolides of uridine (ImpU) and inosine (ImpI) on montmorillonite yield oligo(U)s and oligo(I)s as long as heptamers. The rate constants for oligonucleotide formation were determined by measuring the rates of formation of the oligomers by HPLC. Both the apparent rate constants in the reaction mixture and the rate constants on the clay surface were calculated using the partition coefficients of the oligomers between the aqueous and clay phases. The rate constants for trimer formation are much greater than those dimer synthesis but there was little difference in the rate constants for the formation of trimers and higher oligomers. The overall rates of oligomerization of the phosphorimidazolides of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in the presence of montmorillonite clay are the same suggesting that RNA formed on the primitive Earth could have contained a variety of heterocyclic bases. The rate constants for oligomerization of pyrimidine nucleotides on the clay surface are significantly higher than those of purine nucleotides since the pyrimidine nucleotides bind less strongly to the clay than do the purine nucleotides. The differences in the binding is probably due to Van der Waals interactions between the purine bases and the clay surface. Differences in the basicity of the heterocyclic ring in the nucleotide have little effect on the oligomerization process.

  6. Conformational properties of purine-pyrimidine and pyrimidine-purine dinucleoside monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Ezra, F S; Lee, C H; Kondo, N S; Danyluk, S S; Sarma, R H

    1977-05-01

    The detailed conformational features and dynamics of heterodinucleoside monophosphates ApU, ApC, GpU, GpC, UpA, CpA, UpG, and CpG have been studied in aqueous solution by high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Analysis of the resultant NMR parameters leads to a number of discernible trends throughout the series. Thus the ribose rings of the dimers exist as equilibrium mixtures of C(2')-endo(2E) in equilibrium C(3')-endo(3E) conformers with a proclivity for the 3E pucker in most cases; the C(4')-C(5') bonds of both nucleotidyl units show significant preference (74-96%) for a gg conformation and the dominant conformer (85-89%) about C(5')-O(5') is g'g'. Orientation about the C(3')-O(3') bond is coupled to the ribose conformational equilibrium and the system exists with a bias for the 3Eg- coupled conformation in which the H(3')-C(3')-O(3')-P dihedral angle occupies the narrow range of 33-35 degrees. Dimerization, on the average, causes about 10% increase in gg and g'g' populations and the g-domain becomes increasingly populated about the C(3')-O(3') bond. The ribose equilibrium 2E in equilibrium 3E shifts in favor of 3E upon dimerization, the effect being very conspicuous for the pu-py series (similar to 40 yields 60%) and less noticeable for the py-pu systems (similar to 47 yields 58%), clearly suggesting a correlation between sequence and ribose conformational equilibrium. The temperature and dimerization data for the heterodinucleoside monophosphates show that the transition 2E yields 3E is directly related to XCN changes induced by dimerization and stacking. Analysis of the ribose coupling data shows that the percentage populations of stacked species vary from dimer to dimer with GpC displaying a maximum of 45% stacked population and UpG about 10%. However, in general, the pu-py dimers show a higher preference (27-45%) for stacked conformations than py-pu dimers (10-25%). It is proposed that the pronounced deshielding of H(5') of the 5

  7. Purine and pyrimidine excretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H. A.; Bowyer, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Urinary purine excretion has been investigated in two healthy controls and two patients with psoriasis, one a hyperuricaemic, one a normouricaemic. No difference was detected between the patients and controls. Therapy with allopurinol effectively lowered blood and urinary uric acid levels and produced a deficit in total urinary oxypurine excretion in both controls and patients with psoriasis. The concomitant increase in xanthine excretion was greater than the increase in hypoxanthine excretion and xanthine/hypoxanthine ratios (average 0.70 and 1.0 prior to therapy) were increased by allopurinol to an average of 3.0 and 3.8 respectively in the two groups. Allopurinol also reduced the excretion of 8-hydroxy-7-methyl guanine but no effect on the excretion levels of other minor purine bases was noted. 2 Allopurinol was metabolized similarly by both patients and controls, 84% of the administered allopurinol being accounted for as urinary metabolites. 74% of the drug in the urine was excreted as oxipurinol, 26% as unchanged allopurinol plus allopurinol riboside, the remainder being oxipurinol riboside. 3 Pseudouridine excretion in 25 healthy controls was 86.5 ± 17.8 mg/24 hours. Pseudouridine excretion was not excessive in the patients with psoriasis and was not altered by allopurinol therapy. 4 No abnormality or difference in purine or pyrimidine excretion in either patient was detected prior to or during therapy which could be related to the epidermal lesion. PMID:22454896

  8. Low-energy positron scattering by pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Pastega, Diego F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2015-12-28

    This work reports elastic integral and differential cross sections for positron collisions with pyrimidine, for energies up to 20 eV. The cross sections were computed with the Schwinger multichannel method in the static plus polarization approximation. We also employed the Born closure procedure to account for the long range potential due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. Our results are compared with the experimental total cross section of Zecca et al. [J. Phys. B 43, 215204 (2010)], the experimental grand-total, quasi-elastic integral and differential cross section of Palihawadana et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 12717 (2013)]. We also compare our results with theoretical integral and differential cross sections obtained by Sanz et al. [Phys. Rev. A 88, 62704 (2013)] with the R-matrix and the independent atom model with screening-corrected additivity rule methods, and with the results computed by Franz and Gianturco [Phys. Rev. A 88, 042711 (2013)] using model correlation-polarization potentials. The agreement between the theory and the experiment is encouraging.

  9. Calculation and interpretation of vibronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of the first electronic nπ* transitions of pyridine and pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten, G. N.; Kadrov, D. M.; Berezin, M. K.; Baranov, V. I.

    2014-11-01

    We have calculated vibronic spectra of the first electronic nπ* transitions of pyridine and pyrimidine in the isolated state using the DFT method in the Franck-Condon approximation. Vibrational spectra for the ground and excited states have been calculated in the anharmonic approximation, which allowed us to refine the assignment of normal vibrations of pyridine and pyrimidine. We have done a complete interpretation of the vibrational structure of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of pyridine and pyrimidine. It has been shown that Fermi resonances between fundamental and combination vibrations and overtones 12 and 16 b + 4, 6 a and 2 × 16 b affect the formation of the vibrational structure of electronic spectra of pyrimidine. Good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra confirms the correctness of the models of the two molecules in their ground and excited states, which makes it possible to use the models in further investigations of various properties of these molecules in electronically excited states, e.g., tautomerism of pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids.

  10. Spectroscopy of dimers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The method of Stogryn and Hirschfelder, which divides two-particle phase space into bound, metastable, and free particle parts, is applied to the statistical averages which determine the first three spectroscopic moments of 'collision-induced' far-infrared and Raman spectra. Numerical results are presented for a number of models of noble gas systems. It is shown that for some systems, but not all, dimers make important, although not necessarily well-separated, contributions to the spectrum.

  11. Crystal structure of 5,7-diphenyl-4,7-di­hydro­tetra­zolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ivy K.; Rougeot, Celine; Hein, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C16H13N5, the plane of the tetra­zole ring forms dihedral angles of 16.37 (7) and 76.59 (7)° with the two phenyl rings. The dihedral angle between the phenyl rings is 68.05 (6)°. The pyrimidine ring is in a flattened boat conformation. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers. PMID:25844243

  12. Ethyl 4-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-6-methyl-2-sulfanylidene-1,2,3,4-tetra­hydro­pyrimidine-5-carboxyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Susanta K.; Venugopala, K. N.; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Maguire, Glenn E. M.; Row, Tayur N. Guru

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C15H16N2O4S, the dihedral angles between the planes of the benzodioxole and ester groups and the plane of the six-membered tetra­hydro­pyrimidine ring are 89.5 (1) and 20.2 (1)°, respectively. Inter­molecular N—H⋯S hydrogen bonds assemble the mol­ecules into dimers, which are further connected via N—H⋯O inter­actions into chains parallel to [010]. Weak C—H⋯S and C—H⋯π inter­actions enhance the stability of the crystal structure. PMID:22220078

  13. 7-Chloro-5-(2-ethoxy-phen-yl)-1-methyl-3-propyl-2,6-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Qiu; Zhu, Kai; Lv, Xiao-Ping; Han, Ping-Fang; Wei, Ping

    2009-09-05

    In the title compound, C(17)H(21)ClN(4)O, the benzene ring is oriented at dihedral angles of 1.59 (3) and 1.27 (3)° with respect to the pyrimidine and pyrazole rings, while the dihedral angle between the pyrimidine and pyrazole rings is 0.83 (3)°. An intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bond results in the formation of a planar (r.m.s. deviation 0.004 Å) six-membered ring.

  14. Metalloporphines: Dimers and Trimers.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, Walter; Shelnutt, John A; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-06-20

    Procedures for the purification and subsequent crystallization of the slightly soluble four-coordinate metallporphines, the simplest possible porphyrin derivatives, are described. Crystals of the porphine derivatives of cobalt(II), copper(II), platinum(II), and two polymorphs of zinc(II) were obtained. Analysis of the crystal and molecular structures shows that all except the platinum(II) derivative form an unusual trimeric species in the solid state. The isomorphous cobalt(II), copper(II), and one zinc(II) polymorph pack in the unit cell to form dimers as well as the trimers. Interplanar spacings between porphine rings are similar in both the dimers and trimers and range between 3.24 and 3.37 Å. Porphine rings are strongly overlapped with lateral shifts between ring centers in both the dimers and trimers with values between 1.52 and 1.70 Å or in Category S as originally defined by Scheidt and Lee. Periodic trends in the M-Np bond distances parallel those observed previously for tetraphenyl- and octaethylporphyrin derivatives. PMID:27276239

  15. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  16. Uptake and incorporation of pyrimidines in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Wasternack, C H

    1976-08-01

    In photoorganotrophically grown cells of Euglena gracilis the uptake and incorporation degree of 12 different pyrimidines were tested. The rate of uptake of pyrimidines has distinct maxima in the late log phase and in the stationary phase of cell multiplication. The kinetics of uptake are linear in the first 2 h, do not show saturation at various concentrations and increase with the concetrations. No accumulation of the pyrimidines at various concentrations could be observed in the first 2 h of incubation. Membrane inhibitors as uranyl acetate inhibit the uptake of the reference substance alpha-AIB, which is wellknown transported by an active transport mechanism, but have no effect on uptake rate of uracil and cytosine. It could not be observed an energy requirement tested in temperature dependence and with electron transport inhibitors. Uptake of uridine, uracil, barbituric acid and alpha-AIB is inhibited by cycloheximide in a different manner after 5 - 10 min.

  17. 5-Bromo-N-methyl­pyrimidin-2-amine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Xu, Ning; Zhu, Kai; Lv, Xiaoping; Han, Ping-fang

    2012-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C5H6BrN3, the pyrimidine ring is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.007 Å. The Br and N atoms substituted to the pyrimidine ring are coplanar with the ring [displacements = 0.032 (1) and 0.009 (5) Å, respectively], while the methyl C atom lies 0.100 (15) Å from this plane with a dihedral angle between the pyrimidine ring and the methyl­amine group of 4.5 (3)°. In the crystal, C—H⋯N, C—H⋯Br and N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into a two-dimensional network in the (011) plane. PMID:22259398

  18. Significance and Biological Importance of Pyrimidine in the Microbial World

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vinita; Agarwal, Ajay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are unique creatures that adapt to varying lifestyles and environment resistance in extreme or adverse conditions. The genetic architecture of microbe may bear a significant signature not only in the sequences position, but also in the lifestyle to which it is adapted. It becomes a challenge for the society to find new chemical entities which can treat microbial infections. The present review aims to focus on account of important chemical moiety, that is, pyrimidine and its various derivatives as antimicrobial agents. In the current studies we represent more than 200 pyrimidines as antimicrobial agents with different mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrasubstituted classes along with in vitro antimicrobial activities of pyrimidines derivatives which can facilitate the development of more potent and effective antimicrobial agents. PMID:25383216

  19. Lethal Mutagenesis of Poliovirus Mediated by a Mutagenic Pyrimidine Analogue▿

    PubMed Central

    Graci, Jason D.; Harki, Daniel A.; Korneeva, Victoria S.; Edathil, Jocelyn P.; Too, Kathleen; Franco, David; Smidansky, Eric D.; Paul, Aniko V.; Peterson, Blake R.; Brown, Daniel M.; Loakes, David; Cameron, Craig E.

    2007-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is the mechanism of action of ribavirin against poliovirus (PV) and numerous other RNA viruses. However, there is still considerable debate regarding the mechanism of action of ribavirin against a variety of RNA viruses. Here we show by using T7 RNA polymerase-mediated production of PV genomic RNA, PV polymerase-catalyzed primer extension, and cell-free PV synthesis that a pyrimidine ribonucleoside triphosphate analogue (rPTP) with ambiguous base-pairing capacity is an efficient mutagen of the PV genome. The in vitro incorporation properties of rPTP are superior to ribavirin triphosphate. We observed a log-linear relationship between virus titer reduction and the number of rPMP molecules incorporated. A PV genome encoding a high-fidelity polymerase was more sensitive to rPMP incorporation, consistent with diminished mutational robustness of high-fidelity PV. The nucleoside (rP) did not exhibit antiviral activity in cell culture, owing to the inability of rP to be converted to rPMP by cellular nucleotide kinases. rP was also a poor substrate for herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. The block to nucleoside phosphorylation could be bypassed by treatment with the P nucleobase, which exhibited both antiviral activity and mutagenesis, presumably a reflection of rP nucleotide formation by a nucleotide salvage pathway. These studies provide additional support for lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, suggest that rPMP prodrugs may be highly efficacious antiviral agents, and provide a new tool to determine the sensitivity of RNA virus genomes to mutagenesis as well as interrogation of the impact of mutational load on the population dynamics of these viruses. PMID:17686844

  20. Irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ice with high-energy ultraviolet photons.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Chen, Yu-Jung; Hu, Wei-Jie; Qiu, Jun-Ming; Wu, Shang-Ruei; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chu, Ching-Chi; Yih, Tai-Sone; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wu, C-Y Robert

    2014-02-01

    The detection of nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, in several meteorites suggests that these compounds of biological interest were formed via astrophysical, abiotic processes. This hypothesis is in agreement with recent laboratory studies of irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ices with vacuum UV photons emitted by an H2-discharge lamp in the 6.9-11.3 eV (110-180 nm) range at low temperature, shown to lead to the abiotic formation of several compounds including the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we irradiated H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures under astrophysically relevant conditions (14 K, ≤10(-9) torr) with high-energy UV photons provided by a synchrotron source in three different ranges: the 0(th) order light (4.1-49.6 eV, 25-300 nm), the He i line (21.2 eV, 58.4 nm), and the He ii line (40.8 eV, 30.4 nm). The photodestruction of pyrimidine was monitored with IR spectroscopy, and the samples recovered at room temperature were analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone were found in all samples, with absolute and relative abundances varying significantly from one sample to another. These results support a scenario in which compounds of biological interest can be formed and survive in environments subjected to high-energy UV radiation fields. PMID:24512484

  1. Irradiation of Pyrimidine in Pure H2O Ice with High-Energy Ultraviolet Photons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Jung; Hu, Wei-Jie; Qiu, Jun-Ming; Wu, Shang-Ruei; Fung, Hok-Sum; Chu, Ching-Chi; Yih, Tai-Sone; Ip, Wing-Huen; Wu, C.-Y. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The detection of nucleobases, the informational subunits of DNA and RNA, in several meteorites suggests that these compounds of biological interest were formed via astrophysical, abiotic processes. This hypothesis is in agreement with recent laboratory studies of irradiation of pyrimidine in H2O-rich ices with vacuum UV photons emitted by an H2-discharge lamp in the 6.9–11.3 eV (110–180 nm) range at low temperature, shown to lead to the abiotic formation of several compounds including the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine. In this work, we irradiated H2O:pyrimidine ice mixtures under astrophysically relevant conditions (14 K, ≤10−9 torr) with high-energy UV photons provided by a synchrotron source in three different ranges: the 0th order light (4.1–49.6 eV, 25–300 nm), the He i line (21.2 eV, 58.4 nm), and the He ii line (40.8 eV, 30.4 nm). The photodestruction of pyrimidine was monitored with IR spectroscopy, and the samples recovered at room temperature were analyzed with liquid and gas chromatographies. Uracil and its precursor 4(3H)-pyrimidone were found in all samples, with absolute and relative abundances varying significantly from one sample to another. These results support a scenario in which compounds of biological interest can be formed and survive in environments subjected to high-energy UV radiation fields. Key Words: Pyrimidine—Nucleobases—Interstellar ices—Cometary ices—High-energy photons—Molecular processes—Prebiotic chemistry. Astrobiology 14, 119–131. PMID:24512484

  2. A model for triplet mutation formation based on error-prone translesional DNA synthesis opposite UV photolesions.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Ono, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Todo, Takeshi

    2007-05-01

    A triplet mutation is defined as multiple base substitutions or frameshifts within a three-nucleotide sequence which includes a dipyrimidine sequence. Triplet mutations have recently been identified as a new type of UV-specific mutation, although the mechanism of their formation is unknown. A total of 163 triplet mutations were identified through an extensive search of previously published data on UV-induced mutations, including mutations from skin, skin cancer, and cultured mammalian cells. Seven common patterns of sequence changes were found: Type I, NTC-->TTT; Type IIa, NCC-->PyTT or PyCT (Py, pyrimidine); Type IIb, TCC-->PuTT or PuCT (Pu, purine); Type III, NCC-->NAT or NTA; Type IV, NTT-->AAT; Type Va, NCT-->NTX; and Type Vb, PuCT-->XTT (N and X, independent anonymous bases). Furthermore, it is suggested that the type of UV lesion responsible for each of these triplet mutation classes are (a) pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts for Types I, IIb, III, IV and Vb, (b) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers for Type Va, and (c) Dewar valence isomers for Types IIa and IIb. These estimations are based primarily on results from previous studies using photolyases specific for each type of UV lesion. A model is proposed to explain the formation of each type of triplet mutation, based on error-prone translesional DNA synthesis opposite UV-specific photolesions. The model is largely consistent with the 'A-rule', and predicts error-prone insertions not only opposite photolesions but also opposite the undamaged template base one-nucleotide downstream from the lesions.

  3. Electronic structure of alloxan and its dimers: QM/QD simulations and quantum chemical topology analysis.

    PubMed

    Allehyani, Basmah H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Aziz, Saadalluh G; Hilal, Rifaat H

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the origin of the extra stability of alloxan, a biologically active pyrimidine. To achieve this goal, detailed DFT computations and quantum dynamics simulations have been performed to establish the most stable conformation and the global minimum structure on the alloxan potential energy surface. The effects of the solvent, basis set, and DFT method have been examined to validate the theoretical model adopted throughout the work. Two non-covalent intermolecular dimers of alloxan, the H-bonded and dipolar dimers, have been investigated at the ωB97X-D and M06-2X levels of theory using the triple zeta 6-311++G** to establish their relative stability. Quantum chemical topology features and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) have been performed to identify and characterize the forces that govern the structures and underlie the extra stability of alloxan.

  4. Mechanism for the abiotic synthesis of uracil via UV-induced oxidation of pyrimidine in pure H{sub 2}O ices under astrophysical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, Partha P.; Nuevo, Michel; Sandford, Scott A.; Lee, Timothy J.; Milam, Stefanie N.

    2010-09-14

    The UV photoirradiation of pyrimidine in pure H{sub 2}O ices has been explored using second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory methods, and compared with experimental results. Mechanisms studied include those starting with neutral pyrimidine or cationic pyrimidine radicals, and reacting with OH radical. The ab initio calculations reveal that the formation of some key species, including the nucleobase uracil, is energetically favored over others. The presence of one or several water molecules is necessary in order to abstract a proton which leads to the final products. Formation of many of the photoproducts in UV-irradiated H{sub 2}O:pyrimidine=20:1 ice mixtures was established in a previous experimental study. Among all the products, uracil is predicted by quantum chemical calculations to be the most favored, and has been identified in experimental samples by two independent chromatography techniques. The results of the present study strongly support the scenario in which prebiotic molecules, such as the nucleobase uracil, can be formed under abiotic processes in astrophysically relevant environments, namely in condensed phase on the surface of icy, cold grains before being delivered to the telluric planets, like Earth.

  5. Chemical applications of neural networks: aromaticity of pyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Mercedes; Miranda, Carlos; Martín, Nazario; Herradón, Bernardo

    2011-12-14

    Neural networks are computational tools able to apprehend non-linear relationships between different parameters, having the capacity to order a large amount of input data and transform them into a graphical pattern of output data. We have previously reported their use for the quantification of the aromaticity through the Euclidean distance between neurons. In this article, we apply the method to a variety of pyrimidine derivatives with electron-donor and electron-withdrawing groups as substituents, with capacity to produce push-pull compounds. We have calculated the aromaticity of benzene (as a reference molecule), parent pyrimidine and other 11 pyrimidine derivatives having amino, dimethylamino and tricyanovinyl substitution. The neural network has been generated using ASE, Λ, NICS(zz)(1) and HOMA as aromaticity descriptors, since our previous work showed that the combination of these indices provided the best performance of the network. On studying the influence of the substituent on the aromaticity of the molecule, we have found that, opposite to benzene derivatives, all the substituents decrease the aromaticity of the ring. The interplay between aromaticity, planarity and push-pull properties of all the substituted pyrimidines has also been addressed. An interesting feature of the neural network to quantify aromaticity is that the importance of the reference reaction used to evaluate energy stabilization and magnetic susceptibility exaltation is minimized.

  6. Crystal structure of (E)-13-(pyrimidin-5-yl)parthenolide.

    PubMed

    Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Penthala, Narsimha R; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, C19H22N2O3, {systematic name (1aR,4E,7aS,8E,10aS,10bR)-1a,5-dimethyl-8-[(pyrimidin-5-yl)-methylid-ene]-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octa-hydro-oxireno[2',3':9,10]cyclo-deca-[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH)-one} was obtained from the reaction of parthenolide [systematic name (1aR,7aS,10aS,10bR,E)-1a,5-dimethyl-8-methyl-ene-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octa-hydro-oxireno[2',3':9,10]cyclodeca-[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH)-one] with 5-bromo-pyrimidine under Heck reaction conditions, and was identified as an E isomer. The mol-ecule possesses ten-, five- (lactone) and three-membered (epoxide) rings with a pyrimidine group as a substituent. The ten-membered ring displays an approximate chair-chair conformation, while the lactone ring shows a flattened envelope-type conformation. The dihedral angle between the pyrimidine moiety and the lactone ring system is 29.43 (7)°. PMID:26870423

  7. Crystal structure of (E)-13-(pyrimidin-5-yl)parthenolide

    PubMed Central

    Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C19H22N2O3, {systematic name (1aR,4E,7aS,8E,10aS,10bR)-1a,5-dimethyl-8-[(pyrimidin-5-yl)­methylid­ene]-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octa­hydro­oxireno[2′,3′:9,10]cyclo­deca­[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH)-one} was obtained from the reaction of parthenolide [systematic name (1aR,7aS,10aS,10bR,E)-1a,5-dimethyl-8-methyl­ene-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octa­hydro­oxireno[2′,3′:9,10]cyclodeca­[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH)-one] with 5-bromo­pyrimidine under Heck reaction conditions, and was identified as an E isomer. The mol­ecule possesses ten-, five- (lactone) and three-membered (epoxide) rings with a pyrimidine group as a substituent. The ten-membered ring displays an approximate chair–chair conformation, while the lactone ring shows a flattened envelope-type conformation. The dihedral angle between the pyrimidine moiety and the lactone ring system is 29.43 (7)°. PMID:26870423

  8. Final report on the amended safety assessment of diisopropyl dimer dilinoleate, dicetearyl dimer dilinoleate, diisostearyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyl dimer dilinoleate, dioctyldodecyl dimer dilinoleate, and ditridecyl dimer dilinoleate.

    PubMed

    Fiume, Monice Zondlo

    2003-01-01

    Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dicetearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Diisostearyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyl Dimer Dilinoleate, Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate, and Ditridecyl Dimer Dilinoleate are diesters of their respective alcohols and dilinoleic acid. They function as skin-conditioning agents in a variety of cosmetic products at concentrations around 10%, but may be used at concentrations up to 53% in lipsticks. These ingredients do not absorb radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) UVA or UVB range and the only impurities expected are <0.5% dilinoleic acid, <0.1% isopropyl alcohol or <1% isostearyl alcohol, and/or small amounts of dilinoleic acid and cetearyl alcohol or octyldodecanol, depending on which diester is used. The potential skin penetration of these ingredients was evaluated using an estimate of the octanol/water partition coefficient (logP of 17.7) based on the structure of Diisopropyl Dimer Dilinoleate. This is consistent with the insolubility of these ingredients in water. Safety test data on dilinoleic acid (no adverse effects) were considered relevant because dilinoleic acid is a component of these diesters and a likely breakdown product. The acute oral and dermal LD(50) values for rats of Diisopropyl, Diisostearyl, and Dioctyldodecyl Dimer Dilinoleate were >5.0 g/kg. In a subchronic feeding study, macrophage aggregation was seen in the mesenteric lymph node at the lowest dose level (0.1% in the diet). These ingredients did not produce skin or ocular irritation in animal tests, nor were they comedogenic. Ames testing, clastogenesis in human lymphocytes in culture, and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutations were all negative, indicating no dilinoleic acid genotoxicity. No carcinogenicity or reproductive/developmental toxicity data were available; however, structural alerts that would suggest a mutagenic or carcinogenic risk are absent. Significant reproductive/developmental toxicity or other systemic toxicity is not expected with these ingredients

  9. Mechanisms for kinase-mediated dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chafen; Mi, Li-Zhi; Schürpf, Thomas; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A

    2012-11-01

    We study a mechanism by which dimerization of the EGF receptor (EGFR) cytoplasmic domain is transmitted to the ectodomain. Therapeutic and other small molecule antagonists to the kinase domain that stabilize its active conformation, but not those that stabilize an inactive conformation, stabilize ectodomain dimerization. Inhibitor-induced dimerization requires an asymmetric kinase domain interface associated with activation. EGF and kinase inhibitors stimulate formation of identical dimer interfaces in the EGFR transmembrane domain, as shown by disulfide cross-linking. Disulfide cross-linking at an interface in domain IV in the ectodomain was also stimulated similarly; however, EGF but not inhibitors stimulated cross-linking in domain II. Inhibitors similarly induced noncovalent dimerization in nearly full-length, detergent-solubilized EGFR as shown by gel filtration. EGFR ectodomain deletion resulted in spontaneous dimerization, whereas deletion of exons 2-7, in which extracellular domains III and IV are retained, did not. In EM, kinase inhibitor-induced dimers lacked any well defined orientation between the ectodomain monomers. Fab of the therapeutic antibody cetuximab to domain III confirmed a variable position and orientation of this domain in inhibitor-induced dimers but suggested that the C termini of domain IV of the two monomers were in close proximity, consistent with dimerization in the transmembrane domains. The results provide insights into the relative energetics of intracellular and extracellular dimerization in EGFR and have significance for physiologic dimerization through the asymmetric kinase interface, bidirectional signal transmission in EGFR, and mechanism of action of therapeutics.

  10. Structural basis of pyrimidine specificity in the MS2 RNA hairpin-coat-protein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Grahn, E; Moss, T; Helgstrand, C; Fridborg, K; Sundaram, M; Tars, K; Lago, H; Stonehouse, N J; Davis, D R; Stockley, P G; Liljas, L

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the X-ray structures of six MS2 RNA hairpin-coat-protein complexes having five different substitutions at the hairpin loop base -5. This is a uracil in the wild-type hairpin and contacts the coat protein both by stacking on to a tyrosine side chain and by hydrogen bonding to an asparagine side chain. The RNA consensus sequence derived from coat protein binding studies with natural sequence variants suggested that the -5 base needs to be a pyrimidine for strong binding. The five -5 substituents used in this study were 5-bromouracil, pyrimidin-2-one, 2-thiouracil, adenine, and guanine. The structure of the 5-bromouracil complex was determined to 2.2 A resolution, which is the highest to date for any MS2 RNA-protein complex. All the complexes presented here show very similar conformations, despite variation in affinity in solution. The results suggest that the stacking of the -5 base on to the tyrosine side chain is the most important driving force for complex formation. A number of hydrogen bonds that are present in the wild-type complex are not crucial for binding, as they are missing in one or more of the complexes. The results also reveal the flexibility of this RNA-protein interface, with respect to functional group variation, and may be generally applicable to other RNA-protein complexes. PMID:11720290

  11. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  12. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  13. Intermolecular dimerization with pillared layered clay templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G. P.; Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Seifert, S.; Chemistry

    2001-11-19

    Solutions of pyrene in the presence of a pillared, layered montmorillonite clay produce hybrid organic-inorganic materials with substantial molecular loading in the gallery regions between the clay layers. The results are in sharp contrast to other aromatics, such as benzene, naphthalene, or perylene, which show minimal incorporation of the molecules into the gallery regions of the clay. We present evidence that the unusual affinity for pyrene to form intermolecular dimers is the reason for the high loading. Pyrene monomers are easily introduced to the layers. Through steric hindrance, subsequent intermolecular dimer formation is allowed, and they are captured by the pillared, layered structure. CW and time-resolved emission spectra strongly indicate the presence of face-to-face intermolecular dimers (excimers) within the clay galleries. The combination of the ease of high molecular loading into an inorganic, high aspect ratio template and the collective optical properties of the organic layer may be useful as a new means to create hybrid structures.

  14. Multi-Component Protein - Protein Docking Based Protocol with External Scoring for Modeling Dimers of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Guixà-González, Ramon; Carrió, Pau; Poso, Antti; Dove, Stefan; Pastor, Manuel; Selent, Jana

    2015-04-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to GPCR complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure. For this purpose, a multi-component protocol was derived based on protein-protein docking which generates populations of dimers compatible with membrane integration, considering all reasonable interfaces. At the next stage, we applied a scoring procedure based on up to eleven different parameters including shape or electrostatics complementarity. Two methods of consensus scoring were performed: (i) average scores of 100 best scored dimers with respect to each interface, and (ii) frequencies of interfaces among 100 best scored dimers. In general, our multi-component protocol gives correct indications for dimer interfaces that have been observed in X-ray crystal structures of GPCR dimers (opsin dimer, chemokine CXCR4 and CCR5 dimers, κ opioid receptor dimer, β1 adrenergic receptor dimer and smoothened receptor dimer) but also suggests alternative dimerization interfaces. Interestingly, at times these alternative interfaces are scored higher than the experimentally observed ones suggesting them to be also relevant in the life cycle of studied GPCR dimers. Further results indicate that GPCR dimer and higher-order oligomer formation may involve transmembrane helices (TMs) TM1-TM2-TM7, TM3-TM4-TM5 or TM4-TM5-TM6 but not TM1-TM2-TM3 or TM2-TM3-TM4 which is in general agreement with available experimental and computational data.

  15. Mechanism of dimerization of the human melanocortin 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zanna, Paola T.; Sanchez-Laorden, Berta L.; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Turpin, Maria C.; Herraiz, Cecilia; Jimenez-Cervantes, Celia; Garcia-Borron, Jose C.

    2008-04-04

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a dimeric G protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, where it regulates the amount and type of melanins produced and determines the tanning response to ultraviolet radiation. We have studied the mechanisms of MC1R dimerization. Normal dimerization of a deleted mutant lacking the seventh transmembrane fragment and the C-terminal cytosolic extension excluded coiled-coil interactions as the basis of dimerization. Conversely, the electrophoretic pattern of wild type receptor and several Cys {yields} Ala mutants showed that four disulfide bonds are established between the monomers. Disruption of any of these bonds abolished MC1R function, but only the one involving Cys35 was essential for traffic to the plasma membrane. A quadruple Cys35-267-273-275Ala mutant migrating as a monomer in SDS-PAGE in the absence of reducing agents was able to dimerize with WT, suggesting that in addition to disulfide bond formation, dimerization involves non-covalent interactions, likely of domain swap type.

  16. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  17. The Renaissance of Metal-Pyrimidine Nucleobase Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Bernhard; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J

    2016-08-16

    The significance of metal ions for the function and properties of DNA and RNA, long seen primarily under biological aspects and medicinal uses, has recently gained a renewed momentum. This is a consequence of the advent of novel applications in the fields of materials science, biotechnology, and analytical sensor chemistry that relate to the designed incorporation of transition metal ions into nucleic acid base pairs. Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ions, binding to pyrimidine (pym) nucleobases, represent major players in this development. Interestingly, these metal ions were the ones that some 60 years ago started the field! At the same time, the mentioned metal ions had demonstrated a "special relationship" with the pym nucleobases cytosine, thymine, and uracil! Parallel work conducted with oligonucleotides and model nucleobases fostered numerous significant details of these interactions, in particular when X-ray crystallography was involved, correcting earlier views occasionally. Our own activities during the past three to four decades have focused on, among others, the coordination chemistry of transition and main-group metal ions with pym model nucleobases, with an emphasis on Pt(II) and Pd(II). It has always been our goal to deduce, if possible, the potential relevance of our findings for biological processes. It is interesting to put our data, in particular for trans-a2Pt(II) (a = NH3 or amine), into perspective with those of other metal ions, notably Ag(+) and Hg(2+). Irrespective of major differences in kinetics and lability/inertness between d(8) and d(10) metal ions, there is also a lot of similarity in structural aspects as a result of the preferred linear coordination geometry of these species. Moreover, the apparent clustering of metal ions to the pym nucleobases, which is presumably essential for the formation of nanoclusters on oligonucleotide scaffolds, is impressively reflected in model systems, as are reasons for inter-nucleobase cross-links containing more

  18. Nucleobases and prebiotic molecules in organic residues produced from the ultraviolet photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in NH(3) and H(2)O+NH(3) ices.

    PubMed

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N; Sandford, Scott A

    2012-04-01

    Although not yet identified in the interstellar medium (ISM), N-heterocycles including nucleobases-the information subunits of DNA and RNA-are present in carbonaceous chondrites, which indicates that molecules of biological interest can be formed in non-terrestrial environments via abiotic pathways. Recent laboratory experiments and ab initio calculations have already shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H(2)O ices leads to the formation of a suite of oxidized pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. In the present work, NH(3):pyrimidine and H(2)O:NH(3):pyrimidine ice mixtures with different relative proportions were irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. Liquid- and gas-chromatography analysis of the resulting organic residues has led to the detection of the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and small amino acids. The presence of these molecules in organic residues formed under abiotic conditions supports scenarios in which extraterrestrial organics that formed in space and were subsequently delivered to telluric planets via comets and meteorites could have contributed to the inventory of molecules that triggered the first biological reactions on their surfaces. PMID:22519971

  19. Nucleobases and Prebiotic Molecules in Organic Residues Produced from the Ultraviolet Photo-Irradiation of Pyrimidine in NH3 and H2O+NH3 Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuevo, Michel; Milam, Stefanie N.; Sandford, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Although not yet identified in the interstellar medium (ISM), N-heterocycles including nucleobases the information subunits of DNA and RNA are present in carbonaceous chondrites, which indicates that molecules of biological interest can be formed in non-terrestrial environments via abiotic pathways. Recent laboratory experiments and ab-initio calculations have already shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in pure H2O ices leads to the formation of a suite of oxidized pyrimidine derivatives, including the nucleobase uracil. In the present work, NH3:pyrimidine and H2O:NH3:pyrimidine ice mixtures with different relative proportions were irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. Liquid- and gas-chromatography analysis of the resulting organic residues has led to the detection of the nucleobases uracil and cytosine, as well as other species of prebiotic interest such as urea and small amino acids. The presence of these molecules in organic residues formed under abiotic conditions supports scenarios in which extraterrestrial organics that formed in space and were subsequently delivered to telluric planets via comets and meteorites could have contributed to the inventory of molecules that triggered the first biological reactions on their surfaces.

  20. Oxidation of the dihydrochalcone aspalathin leads to dimerization.

    PubMed

    Krafczyk, Nicole; Heinrich, Theres; Porzel, Andrea; Glomb, Marcus A

    2009-08-12

    Aspalathin and nothofagin are typical ingredients of unfermented rooibos (Krafczyk, N.; Glomb, M. A. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2008, 56, 3368). During oxidation these dihydrochalcones were degraded to higher molecular weight browning products under aerated and nonenzymatic conditions. In the early stages of browning reactions aspalathin formed two dimers. These two compounds were unequivocally established as atropisomers stemming from oxidative A to B ring coupling. Multilayer countercurrent chromatography (MLCCC) and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were applied to obtain pure substances. The purity and identity of isolated dimers were confirmed by different NMR experiments, HPLC-DAD-MS, and HR-MS. In parallel to the formation of chromophores during the fermentation of black tea, the formation of aspalathin dimers implies an important mechanistic channel for the generation of color during the processing of rooibos. PMID:19601579

  1. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basile, B.; Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyramidines are surveyed. Topics examined include the synthesis of purines from HCN via 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivatives in aqueous solutions or liquid NH3, simultaneous formation of amino acids and purines by electron irradiation of CH4-NH3-H2O mixtures, synthesis of pyrimadines from cynoacetylene, energetics, formation of bases under anhydrous or concentrated conditions, formation of bases under dilute conditions, Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, and the role of activated intermediates. It is pointed out that the precursor compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, on Titan, and in other solar-system bodies, and that solar-nebula HCN concentrations of the order of 1-10 mM have been estimated on the basis of meteorite measurements.

  2. Plasmon hybridization in nanoparticle dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlander, Peter; Prodan, Emil; Oubre, Chris

    2004-03-01

    We apply the recently developed plasmon hybridization method (Science 302(2003)419-422) to solid sphere and nanoshell dimers. The results provide a simple and intuitive description of how the energy and excitation cross sections of the dimer plasmons depend on nanoparticle separation, D. We show that the dimer plasmons can be viewed as bonding and antibonding combinations, i.e. hybridization of the individual nanoparticle plasmons. For large D, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons essentially follow the interaction energy between two classical dipoles (1/D^3). As D becomes smaller, the shifts of the dipolar dimer plasmons becomes much stronger and varies much faster with D due to the interaction of the dipolar plasmon of an individual particle with higher energy multipolar plasmons of the other particle. For the heterodimer, the hybridization between the individual nanoparticle plasmons on the different particles result in dimer plasmons whose energies as a function of D exhibit avoided crossings and other interesting effects. The results are compared with FDTD calculations. Work supported by ARO, TATP and the Robert A. Welch Foundation

  3. Re-utilization of pyrimidine nucleotides during rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Nikolov, E N; Dabeva, M D

    1985-01-01

    The changes in the specific radioactivities of the pool of total acid-soluble uridine nucleotides and of uridine and cytidine components of total cellular and nuclear RNA were monitored in regenerating rat liver for 12 days after partial hepatectomy. Evidence is presented for the re-utilization of pyrimidine nucleotides derived from cytoplasmic RNA degradation for the synthesis of new RNA. The extent of recycling was assessed and the true rate of rRNA turnover determined more accurately. The reutilization of the uridine components of RNA was 7.0%/day during the proliferative and 3.2%/day during the post-proliferative phase, whereas that of the cytidine nucleotides was more pronounced (9.6%/day and 18.1%/day respectively). The results reveal the existence of partial compartmentalization of pyrimidine ribonucleoside triphosphate pools in the nucleus and cytoplasm of rat liver cells. PMID:2408609

  4. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolute total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.

  5. Electron- and proton-induced ionization of pyrimidine

    DOE PAGES

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele; Weck, Philippe F

    2015-03-27

    This present work describes a quantum-mechanically based model of the electron- and proton-induced ionization of isolated pyrimidine molecules. The impact energies range from the target ionization threshold up to ~1 keV for electrons and from 10 keV up to 10 MeV for protons. The cross-section calculations are performed within the 1st Born approximation in which the ejected electron is described by a Coulomb wave whereas the incident and the scattered projectiles are both described by plane waves. The pyrimidine target is described using the Gaussian 09 software package. Furthermore, our theoretical predictions obtained are in good agreement with experimental absolutemore » total cross sections, while large discrepancies are observed between existing semi-empirical models and the present calculations.« less

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  7. 5-Benzothiazole substituted pyrimidine derivatives as HCV replication (replicase) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Girijavallabhan, Vinay; Huang, Yuhua; Huelgas, Regina; Alvarez, Carmen; Chen, Lei; Gavalas, Stephen; Kim, Seong-Heon; Kosinski, Aneta; Pinto, Patrick; Rizvi, Razia; Rossman, Randall; Shankar, Bandarpalle; Tong, Ling; Velazquez, Francisco; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Verma, Vishal A; Kozlowski, Joseph; Shih, Neng-Yang; Piwinski, John J; MacCoss, Malcolm; Kwong, Cecil D; Clark, Jeremy L; Fowler, Anita T; Geng, Feng; Kezar, Hollis S; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Reynolds, Robert C; Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Secrist, John A; Li, Cheng; Chase, Robert; Curry, Stephanie; Huang, Hsueh-Cheng; Tong, Xiao; Njoroge, F George

    2012-05-01

    Based on a previously identified HCV replication (replicase) inhibitor 1, SAR efforts were conducted around the pyrimidine core to improve the potency and pharmacokinetic profile of the inhibitors. A benzothiazole moiety was found to be the optimal substituent at the pyrimidine 5-position. Due to potential reactivity concern, the 4-chloro residue was replaced by a methyl group with some loss in potency and enhanced rat in vivo profile. Extensive investigations at the C-2 position resulted in identification of compound 16 that demonstrated very good replicon potency, selectivity and rodent plasma/target organ concentration. Inhibitor 16 also demonstrated good plasma levels and oral bioavailability in dogs, while monkey exposure was rather low. Chemistry optimization towards a practical route to install the benzothiazole moiety resulted in an efficient direct C-H arylation protocol.

  8. [Pharmacological and biochemical investigation of intracavital fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shibata, H; Aiba, K; Mihara, H; Ito, Y; Takahashi, S; Horikoshi, N; Kasumi, F; Ohta, H; Takahashi, T

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the biochemical and molecular pharmacological parameters of fluorinated pyrimidines using malignant cells in pleural effusion or ascites from patients with malignant disease both before and after fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapy, either systemically or intravesically. In four out of fifteen cancer patients, we could analyze the alteration of thymidylate synthase (TS) catalytic activity both before and after the treatment, showing that there was a decrease ranging 28% through 96.9%. We also analyzed a level of TS messenger RNA and TS protein using molecular biotechniques. None of these mutual correlations has so far been demonstrated, indicating that the data were analyzed through samples from patients not responding to the fluorinated pyrimidines. In a responding patient with advanced breast cancer, pre-treatment total TS protein was 130 fmol/mg and the TS activity was 3.27 pmol/mg/min. After intrapleural instillation of a combination of 5-FU 250 mg and leucovorin 3 mg, the total amount and the catalytic activity of TS could be measured. On the 11th day of treatment, the TS protein level decreased to 26 fmol/mg and the TS catalytic activity also decreased to 0.1 pmol/mg/min resulting in a TS inhibition rate of 92.3 percent. On the 17th day, the patient's malignant pleural effusion disappeared almost completely, suggesting that substantial TS inhibition may reflect the clinical evidence. This particular data showed that it would be predictable for clinical outcome to evaluate these parameters before and after fluorinated pyrimidine chemotherapy. Further study is warranted to evaluate the exact role of analyzing these parameters in clinical practice.

  9. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  10. Synthesis of a distinct water dimer inside fullerene C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Murata, Michihisa; Aharen, Tomoko; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Murata, Yasujiro

    2016-05-01

    The water dimer is an ideal chemical species with which to study hydrogen bonds. Owing to the equilibrium between the monomer and oligomer structure, however, selective generation and separation of a genuine water dimer has not yet been achieved. Here, we report a synthetic strategy that leads to the successful encapsulation of one or two water molecules inside fullerene C70. These endohedral C70 compounds offer the opportunity to study the intrinsic properties of a single water molecule without any hydrogen bonding, as well as an isolated water dimer with a single hydrogen bond between the two molecules. The unambiguously determined off-centre position of water in (H2O)2@C70 by X-ray diffraction provides insights into the formation of (H2O)2@C70. Subsequently, the 1H NMR spectroscopic measurements for (H2O)2@C70 confirmed the formation of a single hydrogen bond rapidly interchanging between the encapsulated water dimer. Our theoretical calculations revealed a peculiar cis-linear conformation of the dimer resulting from confinement effects inside C70.

  11. High-Pressure Effects in Benzoic Acid Dimers: Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuchuan; Dreger, Zbigniew; Gupta, Yogendra

    2013-06-01

    To understand pressure effects on dimer structure stability, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy were used to examine changes in hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid crystals up to 31 GPa. Raman measurements indicated a phase transition around 7-8 GPa. It is proposed that this transition is caused by a rearrangement of molecules within the dimer leading to a symmetry change from C2h to likely C2 or Cs. This change was reversible upon pressure release from 15 GPa. Pressures above 15 GPa, induced gradual changes in luminescence and a color change in the crystal from white to brownish. FTIR measurements at 31 GPa revealed the formation of a new broad band centered around 3250 cm-1, which was attributed to the stretching vibrations of the O -H bond. It is proposed that hydrogen bonded dimers of benzoic acid transform partially to a covalently bonded compound composed of benzoic anhydride-like molecules and H2O. This study demonstrates that application of high pressure can lead to significant changes in the H-bonded dimer structure, including formation of chemical bonding. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and ONR/MURI.

  12. Complex self-assembly of pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine nucleoside supramolecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Guo, Xiurong; He, Shiliang; Zeng, Xin; Zhou, Xinglong; Zhang, Chaoliang; Hu, Jing; Wu, Xiaohua; Xing, Zhihua; Chu, Liangyin; He, Yang; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly is not only one of the chemical roots of biological structure but is also drawing attention in different industrial fields. Here we study the mechanism of the formation of a complex flower-shaped supramolecular structure of pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine nucleosides by dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray analysis. Upon removing the hydroxyl group of sugars, different flower-shaped superstructures can be produced. These works demonstrate that complex self-assembly can indeed be attained through hierarchical non-covalent interactions of single molecules. Furthermore, chimerical structures built from molecular recognition by these monomers indicate their potential in other fields if combined with other chemical entities.

  13. Theoretical Study of Carborane:Pyridine and Carborane:Pyrimidine Aggregates and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Han, Zhong-Kang; Shao, Nan; Mei, Wai-Ning

    The carboranes are cross-linked by the pyridines and pyrimidines to form aggregates and polymers. Their geometries and electronic structures are studied by the first-principle calculations. Our results show different connections influence the orientations of the aromatic rings of pyridines and pyrimidines, which would highly affect the electronic structures of carborane:pyridine and carborane:pyrimidine aggregates and polymers. This study might be helpful for the future design of new class of semiconducting boron carbides.

  14. Spectral and photophysical studies of inclusion complexes of 2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine with beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    El-Kemary, M A; El-Gezawy, H S; El-Baradie, H Y; Issa, R M

    2002-02-01

    The interaction of 2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine (ADMP) with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) has been studied by means of UV absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. Spectral characteristics, bandwidths and photophysical parameters indicating that ADMP experience two different environments in aqueous solutions: bulk water and 1:1 (ADMP:beta-CD) inclusion complexation. The size restriction of the upper rim of beta-CD partially include ADMP and prevent the possibility of formation of 1:2 complex. The effective polarity of the cyclodextrin cavity experienced by the induced ADMP is equivalent with the polarity of an 80:20 methanol-water mixture.

  15. Spectral and photophysical studies of inclusion complexes of 2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine with β-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kemary, M. A.; El-Gezawy, H. S.; El-Baradie, H. Y.; Issa, R. M.

    2002-02-01

    The interaction of 2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine (ADMP) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) has been studied by means of UV absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. Spectral characteristics, bandwidths and photophysical parameters indicating that ADMP experience two different environments in aqueous solutions: bulk water and 1:1 (ADMP:β-CD) inclusion complexation. The size restriction of the upper rim of β-CD partially include ADMP and prevent the possibility of formation of 1:2 complex. The effective polarity of the cyclodextrin cavity experienced by the induced ADMP is equivalent with the polarity of an 80:20 methanol-water mixture.

  16. Ethyl 2-{N-[N-(4-chloro-6-methoxy-pyrimidin-2-yl)carbamo-yl]sulfamo-yl}benzoate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chui; Li, Fang-Shi; Yu, Da-Sheng; Yao, Wei; Liu, Yin-Hong

    2008-06-13

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(15)H(15)ClN(4)O(6)S, contains two independent mol-ecules, in which the pyrimidine and benzene rings are oriented at dihedral angles of 75.21 (3) and 86.00 (3)°. Intra-molecular N-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of two five- and two six-membered rings. The six-membered rings have flattened-boat conformations, while the five-membered rings adopt envelope conformations. In the crystal structure, inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules.

  17. EDEM1 targets misfolded HLA-B27 dimers for endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Guiliano, David B.; Fussell, Helen; Lenart, Izabela; Tsao, Edward; Nesbeth, Darren; Fletcher, Adam J.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Yousaf, Nasim; Williams, Sarah; Santos, Susana; Cameron, Amy; Towers, Greg J.; Kellam, Paul; Hebert, Daniel N.; Gould, Keith; Powis, Simon J.; Antoniou, Antony N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HLA-B27 forms misfolded heavy chain dimers, which may predispose individuals to inflammatory arthritis by inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). We wanted to define the role of the UPR induced ER associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in the disposal of HLA-B27 dimeric conformers. Methods HeLa cell lines expressing only two copies of a carboxy terminally Sv5 tagged HLA-B27 were generated. The ER stress induced EDEM1 protein was over expressed by transfection and dimer levels monitored by immunoblotting. EDEM1, the UPR associated transcription factor XBP-1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, the degradation associated derlin 1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by either short hairpin RNA or dominant negative mutants. The UPR associated ERAD of HLA-B27 was confirmed using ER stress inducing pharamacological agents in kinetic and pulse chase assays. Results We demonstrate that UPR induced machinery can target HLA-B27 dimers, and that dimer formation can be controlled by alterations to expression levels of components of the UPR induced ERAD pathway. HLA-B27 dimers and misfolded MHC class I monomeric molecules were detected bound to EDEM1, with overexpression of EDEM1 inhibiting HLA-B27 dimer formation. EDEM1 inhibition resulted in upregulation of HLA-B27 dimers, whilst UPR induced ERAD of dimers was prevented in the absence of EDEM1. HLA-B27 dimer formation was also enhanced in the absence of XBP-1, HRD1 and derlin1/2. Conclusion The UPR ERAD pathway as described here can dispose of HLA-B27 dimers and presents a potential novel therapeutic target for the modulation of HLA-B27 associated inflammatory disease. PMID:25132672

  18. The Ammonia Dimer Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, Richard; Van Der Avoird, Ad

    2012-06-01

    The conclusion from microwave spectra by Nelson, Fraser, and Klemperer that the ammonia dimer has a nearly cyclic structure led to much debate about the issue of whether (NH_3)_2 is hydrogen bonded. This structure was surprising because most {ab initio} calculations led to a classical, nearly linear, hydrogen-bonded structure. An obvious explanation of the discrepancy between the outcome of these calculations and the microwave data which led Nelson {et al.} to their ``surprising structure'' might be the effect of vibrational averaging: the electronic structure calculations focus on finding the minimum of the intermolecular potential, the experiment gives a vibrationally averaged structure. Isotope substitution studies seemed to indicate, however, that the complex is nearly rigid. Additional data became available from high-resolution molecular beam far-infrared spectroscopy in the Saykally group. These spectra, displaying large tunneling splittings, indicate that the complex is very floppy. The seemingly contradictory experimental data were explained when it became possible to calculate the vibration-rotation-tunneling (VRT) states of the complex on a six-dimensional intermolecular potential surface. The potential used was a simple model potential, with parameters fitted to the far-infrared data. Now, for the first time, a six-dimensional potential was computed by high level {ab initio} methods and this potential will be used in calculations of the VRT states of (NH_3)_2 and (ND_3)_2. So, we will finally be able to answer the question whether the conclusions from the model calculations are indeed a valid explanation of the experimental data. D. Nelson, G. T. Fraser, and W. Klemperer J. Chem. Phys. 83 6201 (1985) J. G. Loeser, C. A. Schmuttenmaer, R. C. Cohen, M. J. Elrod, D. W. Steyert, R. J. Saykally, R. E. Bumgarner, and G. A. Blake J. Chem. Phys. 97 4727 (1992) E. H. T. Olthof, A. van der Avoird, and P. E. S. Wormer J. Chem. Phys. 101 8430 (1994) E. H. T. Olthof

  19. Methyl 5-(4-acet­oxy­phen­yl)-2-(2-bromo­benzyl­idine)-7-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-di­hydro-5H-1,3-thia­zolo[3,2-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Fathima, Nikhath; Nagarajaiah, H.; Begum, Noor Shahina

    2013-01-01

    In the title mol­ecule, C24H19BrN2O5S, the pyrimidine ring is in a flattened half-chair conformation and the 4-acet­oxy­phenyl group is substituted axially to this ring. The thia­zole ring is essentially planar [with a maximum deviation of 0.012 (2) Å for the N atom] and forms dihedral angles of 17.65 (13) and 88.95 (11)° with the bromo- and acet­oxy-substituted benzene rings, respectively. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 81.84 (13) Å. In the crystal, pairs of weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds lead to the formation of inversion dimers. A weak C—H⋯π inter­action and π–π stacking inter­actions with centroid–centroid distances of 3.5903 (14) Å are observed. PMID:24109346

  20. 7-Chloro-5-(2-ethoxy­phen­yl)-1-methyl-3-propyl-2,6-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Qiu; Zhu, Kai; Lv, Xiao-Ping; Han, Ping-Fang; Wei, Ping

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C17H21ClN4O, the benzene ring is oriented at dihedral angles of 1.59 (3) and 1.27 (3)° with respect to the pyrimidine and pyrazole rings, while the dihedral angle between the pyrimidine and pyrazole rings is 0.83 (3)°. An intra­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond results in the formation of a planar (r.m.s. deviation 0.004 Å) six-membered ring. PMID:21577789

  1. Dimerization in Highly Concentrated Solutions of Phosphoimidazolide Activated Mononucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1997-01-01

    Phosphoimidazolide activated ribomononucleotides (*pN) are useful substrates for the non-enzymatic synthesis of polynucleotides. However, dilute neutral aqueous solutions of *pN typically yield small amounts of dimers and traces of polymers; most of *pN hydrolyzes to yield nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. Here we report the self-condensation of nucleoside 5'-phosphate 2- methylimidazolide (2-MeImpN with N = cytidine, uridine or guanosine) in the presence of Mg2(+) in concentrated solutions, such as might have been found in an evaporating lagoon on prebiotic Earth. The product distribution indicates that oligomerization is favored at the expense of hydrolysis. At 1.0 M, 2-MelmpU and 2-MelmpC produce about 65% of oligomers including 4% of the 3',5'-Iinked dimer. Examination of the product distribution of the three isomeric dimers in a self-condensation allows identification of reaction pathways that lead to dimer formation. Condensations in a concentrated mixture of all three nucleotides (U,C,G mixtures) is made possible by the enhanced solubility of 2-MeImpG in such mixtures. Although percent yield of intemucleotide linked dimers is enhanced as a function of initial monomer concentration, pyrophosphate dimer yields remain practically unchanged at about 20% for 2-MelmpU, 16% for 2-MeImpC and 25% of the total pyrophosphate in the U,C,G mixtures. The efficiency by which oligomers are produced in these concentrated solutions makes the evaporating lagoon scenario a potentially interesting medium for the prebiotic synthesis of dimers and short RNAs.

  2. Adventures in Holographic Dimer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kachru, Shamit; Karch, Andreas; Yaida, Sho; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    We abstract the essential features of holographic dimer models, and develop several new applications of these models. Firstly, semi-holographically coupling free band fermions to holographic dimers, we uncover novel phase transitions between conventional Fermi liquids and non-Fermi liquids, accompanied by a change in the structure of the Fermi surface. Secondly, we make dimer vibrations propagate through the whole crystal by way of double trace deformations, obtaining nontrivial band structure. In a simple toy model, the topology of the band structure experiences an interesting reorganization as we vary the strength of the double trace deformations. Finally, we develop tools that would allow one to build, in a bottom-up fashion, a holographic avatar of the Hubbard model.

  3. Self-deactivation of water vapor - Role of the dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological multiple-relaxation theory of the deactivation rate constant for the nu-2 (1 - 0) bending mode of water vapor is presented which incorporates the role not only of the excited monomer but also of the bound molecular complex, in particular the dimer. The deactivation takes place by means of three parallel processes: (1) collisional deexcitation of the excited monomer, (2) a two-step reaction involving association and spontaneous redissociation of an H2O collision complex, and (3) spontaneous dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer. Oxygen, but not nitrogen or argon, serves as an effective chaperon for the formation of the activated complex. This observation explains the impurity dependence of the self-deactivation rate constant of water vapor. Analysis of an ultrasonic absorption peak based on the third process yields values for the standard entropy and enthalpy of dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer.

  4. Benchmarking of Optical Dimerizer Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein–protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  5. Benchmarking of optical dimerizer systems.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Strickland, Devin; Vrana, Justin D; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-11-21

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein-protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  6. Chemistry of the CO dimer at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Roux, E. T.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers conducted a series of experiments on the chlorine-catalyzed photodecomposition of O sub 3 both in the gas and in inert solvents such as CF sub 4 and CO sub 2 in the temperature range about 190 to 225 K. The liquid medium was chosen in order to minimize possible surface loss of long-lived ClO dimer, and to aid in the stabilization of transient excited intermediates. The mechanism of dimer formation was as follows: (1) Cl sub 2 + hv yields Cl + Cl; (2) Cl + O sub 3 yields ClO + O sub 2; (3) ClO + ClO yields Cl sub 2 O sub 2. The experiments were done in cooled low temperature cells, with irradiation from an Osram high pressure mercury arc, filtered to remove radiation below 325 nm. Spectral analysis was by means of a Cary Model 2200 UV spectrometer. The principal objectives were: (1) to determine the lifetime of the dimer as a function of temperature; (2) to observe spectral changes in the mixtures which could be attributed to dimer or related products; and (3) to observe chemical or photochemical reactions of the dimer.

  7. Synthesis of new pyrimidine derivatives with evaluation of their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.

    PubMed

    Nofal, Zienab M; Fahmy, Hoda H; Zarea, Eman S; El-Eraky, Wafaa

    2011-01-01

    5-Formyl-6-aminopyrimidine-2,4-(1H, 3H)-dione (2) has been previously prepared fromcompound 1. Cyclocondensation reaction of compound 2 with cyanoacetamide gave substituted pyridopyrimidine 3. Also, compound 2 was condensed with p-amino acetophenone and hydrazine derivatives to give 5-([(4-acetylphenyl)imino]methyl)-6-aminopyrimidine (4) and 5-substituted carboaldehyde-6-amino pyrimidine derivatives (5a-d), respectively. Moreover, cyclocondensation reaction of compound 2 with thiosemcarbazide and semicarbazide hydrochloride gave 5-(5-thioxo or oxo-triazol-3-yl)-6-amino pyrimidine (6) and (7), respectively. Cyclocondensation reaction of compound 2 with thiourea and ethyl acetoacetate led to the formation of substituted ethyl bipyrimidine-5-carboxylate 8. Also, compound 2 was reacted with acetoacetic acid hydrazide and 2-cyanoacetohydrazide to give 5-(acetylpyrazol-6-aminopyrimidine 9 and 3-(6-aminopyrimidine-5-yl) pyrazole-4-carboxamide 10, respectively. Furthermore, compound 1 was diazotized to afford the diazonium salt 11. Its coupling with ethyl acetoacetate, ethyl cyanoacetate, acetylacetone, malononitrile, cyanoacetamide, diethylmalonate, in sodium acetate buffered solution afforded substituted hydrazonopyrimidines: ethylhydrazono-3-oxobutanoate 12, ethylhydrazono-3-oxopropanoate 13, pentane-2,3,4-trione hydrazone 14, cyanohydrazonoacetamide 15, diazenyl malonamide 16 and diethylhydrazonomalonate 17, respectively. Moreover, substituted pyrazolediazenylpyrimidine derivatives 18a,b, 19a,b, 20, 21a-c, 22 were synthesized by the cyclization of substituted hydrazonopyrimidines 12, 17, 15, 14 and 13, respectively. The analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of some of the synthesized compounds were evaluated. Compounds C18a, C20, C21b and C22 showed the most significant analgesic effects among synthesized moieties. All tested compounds, nonetheless, C18b showed significant anti-inflammatory effect in carrageenan induced paw edema model.

  8. Dynamic properties of molecular tweezers with a bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)pyrimidine backbone.

    PubMed

    Tsuchido, Yoshitaka; Suzaki, Yuji; Ide, Tomohito; Osakada, Kohtaro

    2014-04-14

    4,6-Bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-alkylpyrimidines with two anthryl or 9-ethylnylanthryl substituents at the positions para to the OH groups prefer a U-shaped conformation supported by two intramolecular OH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bonds in the solid state and in CDCl3 solution. The compound with a hexyl substituent on the pyrimidine group and two 9-ethynylanthryl arms at the hydroxyphenyl groups forms a 1:1 complex with 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. Its association constant K(a) was estimated to be 2100 M(-1) at 298 K, which is larger than those of other molecular tweezers (K(a) < 1000 M(-1)). DFT calculations suggested that the complex adopts a stable conformation supported by intramolecular hydrogen bonds among the OH groups and the pyrimidine ring as well as by intermolecular π-π interaction between the anthryl groups and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. Addition of nBu4NF to a solution of the molecular tweezers or their complexes causes the cleavage of one or two OH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bonds, formation of new O⋅⋅⋅HF hydrogen bonds, and changes in the molecular conformation. The resulting structure of the molecular tweezers contains nonparallel anthryl groups, which do not bind the guest molecule. Photochemical measurements on 4,6-bis(2-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methylpyrimidine with two anthryl substituents showed negligible luminescence (quantum yield ϕ<0.01), owing to photoinduced electron transfer of the molecule with a U-shaped structure. However, the O-hexylated compound exhibits emission from the anthryl groups with ϕ=0.39.

  9. Covalent intermolecular interaction of the nitric oxide dimer (NO)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Gui-Li; Lv, Gang; Geng, Yi-Zhao; Ji, Qing

    2015-09-01

    Covalent bonds arise from the overlap of the electronic clouds in the internucleus region, which is a pure quantum effect and cannot be obtained in any classical way. If the intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, the result from direct applications of classical simulation methods to the molecular system would be questionable. Here, we analyze the special intermolecular interaction between two NO molecules based on quantum chemical calculation. This weak intermolecular interaction, which is of covalent character, is responsible for the formation of the NO dimer, (NO)2, in its most stable conformation, a cis conformation. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis gives an intuitive illustration of the formation of the dimer bonding and antibonding orbitals concomitant with the breaking of the π bonds with bond order 0.5 of the monomers. The dimer bonding is counteracted by partially filling the antibonding dimer orbital and the repulsion between those fully or nearly fully occupied nonbonding dimer orbitals that make the dimer binding rather weak. The direct molecular mechanics (MM) calculation with the UFF force fields predicts a trans conformation as the most stable state, which contradicts the result of quantum mechanics (QM). The lesson from the investigation of this special system is that for the case where intermolecular interaction is of covalent character, a specific modification of the force fields of the molecular simulation method is necessary. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 90403007 and 10975044), the Key Subject Construction Project of Hebei Provincial Universities, China, the Research Project of Hebei Education Department, China (Grant Nos. Z2012067 and Z2011133), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11147103), and the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y5

  10. Helical arrays of U-shaped ATP synthase dimers form tubular cristae in ciliate mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Mühleip, Alexander W; Joos, Friederike; Wigge, Christoph; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M

    2016-07-26

    F1Fo-ATP synthases are universal energy-converting membrane protein complexes that synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. In mitochondria of yeast and mammals, the ATP synthase forms V-shaped dimers, which assemble into rows along the highly curved ridges of lamellar cristae. Using electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging, we have determined the in situ structure and organization of the mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. The ATP synthase forms U-shaped dimers with parallel monomers. Each complex has a prominent intracrista domain, which links the c-ring of one monomer to the peripheral stalk of the other. Close interaction of intracrista domains in adjacent dimers results in the formation of helical ATP synthase dimer arrays, which differ from the loose dimer rows in all other organisms observed so far. The parameters of the helical arrays match those of the cristae tubes, suggesting the unique features of the P. tetraurelia ATP synthase are directly responsible for generating the helical tubular cristae. We conclude that despite major structural differences between ATP synthase dimers of ciliates and other eukaryotes, the formation of ATP synthase dimer rows is a universal feature of mitochondria and a fundamental determinant of cristae morphology. PMID:27402755

  11. Helical arrays of U-shaped ATP synthase dimers form tubular cristae in ciliate mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mühleip, Alexander W.; Joos, Friederike; Wigge, Christoph; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    F1Fo-ATP synthases are universal energy-converting membrane protein complexes that synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. In mitochondria of yeast and mammals, the ATP synthase forms V-shaped dimers, which assemble into rows along the highly curved ridges of lamellar cristae. Using electron cryotomography and subtomogram averaging, we have determined the in situ structure and organization of the mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. The ATP synthase forms U-shaped dimers with parallel monomers. Each complex has a prominent intracrista domain, which links the c-ring of one monomer to the peripheral stalk of the other. Close interaction of intracrista domains in adjacent dimers results in the formation of helical ATP synthase dimer arrays, which differ from the loose dimer rows in all other organisms observed so far. The parameters of the helical arrays match those of the cristae tubes, suggesting the unique features of the P. tetraurelia ATP synthase are directly responsible for generating the helical tubular cristae. We conclude that despite major structural differences between ATP synthase dimers of ciliates and other eukaryotes, the formation of ATP synthase dimer rows is a universal feature of mitochondria and a fundamental determinant of cristae morphology. PMID:27402755

  12. Monoclonal antibodies with equal specificity to D-dimer and high-molecular-weight fibrin degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Alexander E.; Mukharyamova, Kadriya S.; Bereznikova, Anastasia V.; Filatov, Vladimir L.; Koshkina, Ekaterina V.; Bloshchitsyna, Marina N.; Katrukha, Alexey G.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrin degradation results in the formation of fibrin degradation products (FDPs) of different molecular weights, which include D-dimer. Commercial D-dimer assays recognize multiple forms of FDP with different specificity. As a result, the absence of an international D-dimer standard and the marked discrepancy in the D-dimer values in the same samples measured by assays from different manufacturers have become the primary problems that clinicians face in the D-dimer determination. We consider that an assay with equal specificity to all FDP forms regardless of their molecular weights could help to solve these problems. We aimed to produce mAbs that could equally recognize high-molecular-weight FDP (HMW FDP) and D-dimer. mAbs against D-dimer were produced. The HMW FDP/D-dimer ratios in plasma samples were analyzed following protein separation by gel filtration using the developed fluoroimmunoassay. A sandwich immunoassay with equal specificity to HMW FDP and D-dimer was developed and applied to determine HMW FDP/D-dimer ratios in patients with different diseases. Although the HMW FDP levels prevailed in thrombotic patients, the FDP and D-dimer levels were comparable in septic patients. Meanwhile, the D-dimer levels often exceeded the HMW FDP levels in patients who had undergone surgery. The ‘D-dimer’ levels that were detected by different assays also varied greatly depending on the assay specificities to FDP and D-dimer. Our findings show that the introduction of assays with equal specificities to FDP and D-dimer in clinical practice is a possible way of standardizing D-dimer measurements. PMID:26656897

  13. Ferrocene-pyrimidine conjugates: Synthesis, electrochemistry, physicochemical properties and antiplasmodial activities.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rakesh; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter; Chibale, Kelly; Singh, Kamaljit

    2015-07-15

    The promise of hybrid antimalarial agents and the precedence set by the antimalarial drug ferroquine prompted us to design ferrocene-pyrimidine conjugates. Herein, we report the synthesis, electrochemistry and anti-plasmodial evaluation of ferrocenyl-pyrimidine conjugates against chloroquine susceptible NF54 strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Also their physicochemical properties have been studied.

  14. Fused pyrimidines. Synthesis of new derivatives of potential diuretic activity.

    PubMed

    Eisa, H M; el-Ashmawy, M B; Tayel, M M; el-Magd, S A; el-Kashef, H A

    1996-11-01

    Certain derivatives of quinazoline and its bioisostere pyridopyrimidine carrying important structural features that contribute to diuretic activity, such as sulfonamido, morpholino and chlorophenyl, were prepared as potential diuretic agents. Likewise, some tricyclic 1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-b]quinazolines and pyrido[3,2-d][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-alpha] pyrimidines with the same features were reported. Nine compounds were tested for the diuretic activity in rats and the results showed that the active compound is 7-chloro-2-methyl-3-phthalimido-4(3H)-quinazoline (4).

  15. Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of novel pyrimidine deoxyapiothionucleosides.

    PubMed

    Kotoulas, Stefanos S; Kojić, Vesna V; Bogdanović, Gordana M; Koumbis, Alexandros E

    2013-06-01

    The synthesis of novel pyrimidine deoxyapiothionucleosides of D- and L-series was realized following application of a versatile and high-yielding scheme, which utilized inexpensive L- and D-arabinose as starting materials, respectively, and which makes use of a regio- and stereo-selective Pummerer rearrangement reaction for the coupling of the nucleobase with the thiosugar moiety. Some of the targeted compounds have shown selective cytotoxic effects (with IC50<10 μM) against specific cancer cell lines. All of the tested compounds had no cytotoxic effect on the normal cell line tested.

  16. First-principles prediction of the effects of temperature and solvent selection on the dimerization of benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hieu H; Taylor, Christopher D; Henson, Neil J

    2013-01-24

    We introduce a procedure of quantum chemical calculations (B3P86/6-31G**) to study carboxylic acid dimerization and its correlation with temperature and properties of the solvent. Benzoic acid is chosen as a model system for studying dimerization via hydrogen bonding. Organic solvents are simulated using the self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) method with the polarized continuum model (PCM). The cyclic dimer is the most stable structure both in gas phase and solution. Dimer mono- and dihydrates could be found in the gas phase if acid molecules are in contact with water vapor. However, the formation of these hydrated conformers is very limited and cyclic dimer is the principal conformer to coexist with monomer acid in solution. Solvation of the cyclic dimer is more favorable compared to other complexes, partially due to the diminishing of hydrogen bonding capability and annihilation of dipole moments. Solvents have a strong effect on inducing dimer dissociation and this dependence is more pronounced at low dielectric constants. By accounting for selected terms in the total free energy of solvation, the solvation entropy could be incorporated to predict the dimer behavior at elevated temperatures. The temperature dependence of benzoic acid dimerization obtained by this technique is in good agreement with available experimental measurements, in which a tendency of dimer to dissociate is observed with increased temperatures. In addition, dimer breakup is more sensitive to temperature in low dielectric environments rather than in solvents with a higher dielectric constant.

  17. Dimeric uranyl complexes with bridging perrhenates.

    PubMed

    John, Gordon H; May, Iain; Sarsfield, Mark J; Collison, David; Helliwell, Madeleine

    2007-04-28

    The reaction between [UO2(ReO4)2.H(2)O] and two equivalents of either tri-n-butyl phosphine oxide (TBPO) or tri-iso-butyl phosphate (TiBP) results in the formation of [UO2(mu2-ReO4)(ReO4)(TBPO)2]2 (1) and [UO2(mu2-ReO4)(ReO4)(TiBP)2]2 (2) respectively. Both complexes crystallise as two structurally similar centrosymmetric dimers, the cores containing two uranyl moieties linked by bridging perrhenates. Two P=O donor ligands and one monodenatate perrhenate complete the pentagonal bipyramidal coordination sphere at each metal centre. Both complexes have also been characterised in the solid state by vibrational and absorption spectroscopy. Solution spectroscopic characterisation indicates that both perrhenate and phosphine oxide (1) or phosphate (2) remain coordinated, although it is not possible to state conclusively that the dimeric species remain intact. A low resolution structural study of a minor product from the reaction that yielded revealed a monomeric complex with only monodentate perrhenate coordination, [UO2(ReO4)2(H2O)(TiBP)2] (2'). These results represent the first structural evidence for the bridging coordination mode of perrhenate on coordination to an actinide and yields further insight into the possible solvent phase pertechnetate complexes that may exist in PUREX process phosphate rich solvent.

  18. Crystal structure of ethyl 6-(chloro­meth­yl)-4-(4-chloro­phen­yl)-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetra­hydro­pyrimidine-5-carboxyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    Bharanidharan, S.; Saleem, H.; Gunasekaran, B.; Padusha, M. Syed Ali; Suresh, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C14H14Cl2N2O3, the chloro­phenyl ring makes a dihedral angle of 87.08 (9)° with the tetra­hydro­pyrimidine ring. There is a short intra­molecular C—H⋯O contact present. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked via pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 2(8) ring motif. The dimers are linked via a second pair of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, this time enclosing an R 4 4(20) ring motif, forming ribbons along [100]. The ribbons are linked via C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming sheets lying parallel to (001). The terminal ethyl group is disordered over two positions with an occupancy ratio of 0.654 (17):0.346 (17). PMID:25484820

  19. Synthesis and Applications of Non-spherical Dimer Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kisun

    Colloids are promising building blocks in material synthesis because of their controllability of size and surface properties. The synthesis of chemically and/or geometrically anisotropic colloidal particles has received attentions with the expectation of building blocks for complex structures. However, the synthesis of anisotropic colloidal particles is by far more difficult than the synthesis of spherical colloidal particles. Lack of monodispersity and productivity of many anisotropic particles often limits their applications as a building block for complex structures. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop methods which can produce a large amount of monodisperse non-spherical particles with controllable asymmetric surface properties. This dissertation details the work for developing such a method. The major result of this dissertation is a synthetic method to produce monodisperse non-spherical colloids with anisotropic surface property in a large quantity. The anisotropic colloid, which we call it as Dimer particle, has two fused lobes like a dumbbell and each lobe's size can be independently controlled. We present a novel method to synthesize sub-micron size Dimer particles. This method can produce a large amount of submicron-sized Dimer particles with good monodispersity and well-controlled shape. Submicron-sized Dimer particles have been highly desired since they can be used as a building block for self assembly using Brownian motion, colloidal surfactant for Pickering emulsion, and photonic materials. To fully take advantage of the anisotropy of the particles, we develop a facile method to tailor the surface property of each lobe independently by asymmetrically coating the particles with gold nanoparticles. This method doesn't need the arrangement of particles onto any type of interfaces. Asymmetric coating of gold nanoparticles can be carried out simply by mixing Dimer particles with gold nanoparticles. The formation mechanism of the submicron-sized Dimer

  20. Pyrimidine Salvage in Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Forms and the Trypanocidal Action of Halogenated Pyrimidiness

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Juma A. M.; Creek, Darren J.; Burgess, Karl; Allison, Harriet C.; Field, Mark C.; Mäser, Pascal; De Koning, Harry P.

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes are capable of both pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of preformed pyrimidines from the host. However, uptake of pyrimidines in bloodstream form trypanosomes has not been investigated, making it difficult to judge the relative importance of salvage and synthesis or to design a pyrimidine-based chemotherapy. Detailed characterization of pyrimidine transport activities in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei found that these cells express a high-affinity uracil transporter (designated TbU3) that is clearly distinct from the procyclic pyrimidine transporters. This transporter had low affinity for uridine and 2′deoxyuridine and was the sole pyrimidine transporter expressed in these cells. In addition, thymidine was taken up inefficiently through a P1-type nucleoside transporter. Of importance, the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil was an excellent substrate for TbU3, and several 5-fluoropyrimidine analogs were investigated for uptake and trypanocidal activity; 5F-orotic acid, 5F-2′deoxyuridine displayed activity in the low micromolar range. The metabolism and mode of action of these analogs was determined using metabolomic assessments of T. brucei clonal lines adapted to high levels of these pyrimidine analogs, and of the sensitive parental strains. The analysis showed that 5-fluorouracil is incorporated into a large number of metabolites but likely exerts toxicity through incorporation into RNA. 5F-2′dUrd and 5F-2′dCtd are not incorporated into nucleic acids but act as prodrugs by inhibiting thymidylate synthase as 5F-dUMP. We present the most complete model of pyrimidine salvage in T. brucei to date, supported by genome-wide profiling of the predicted pyrimidine biosynthesis and conversion enzymes. PMID:23188714

  1. Theoretical comparison of ketene dimerization in the gas and liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro; Ziegler, Tom

    2008-04-10

    We present the first theoretical comparison between ketene dimerization in gas phase and ketene dimerization in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the ketene dimerization were carried out considering the following product dimers: diketene (d-I), 1,3-cyclobutanedione (d-II), 2,4-dimethylene-1,3-dioxetane (d-III), and 2-methyleneoxetan-3-one (d-IV). All structures were optimized at the PW86x+PBEc/DZP level of theory. Based on these geometries, a total of 58 meta and hybrid functionals were used to evaluate the heat of dimerization. The MPW1K functional was found to fit the experimental data best and subsequently used in the final analyses for all energy calculations. It was found on both kinetic and thermodynamic grounds that only d-I and d-II are formed during ketene dimerization in gas phase and solution. In gas phase, d-I is favored over d-II by 2 kcal/mol. However, the dimerization barrier for d-I is 1 kcal/mol higher than for d-II. Solvation makes dimerization more favorable. On the enthalpic surface this is due to a favorable interaction between the dimer dipole moment and solvent molecules. The dimer is stabilized further on the Gibbs energy surface by an increase of the dimerization entropy in solution compared to gas phase. The species d-I remains the most stable dimer in solution by 1 kcal/mol. Kinetically, the dimerization barriers for the relevant species d-I and d-II are cut in half by solvation, due to both favorable dimer-dipole/solvent interactions (DeltaH++, DeltaG++) and an increase in the activation entropies (DeltaS++). While the dimerization barrier for d-II is lowest for the gas phase and toluene, the barrier for d-I formation becomes lowest for the more polar solvent acetone by 1 kcal/mol as d-I dimerization has the most polar transition state.

  2. Repair of non-dimer DNA damages in ICB 2A frog cells exposed to solar-ultraviolet radiation in the UVB (290-320 nm) range

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, C.C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the research described in this dissertation was to investigate the repair and cellular consequences of non-dimer DNA damages induced by solar-UV irradiation of cultured I CR 2A (Rana pipiens) frog cells. Because this cell line is proficient in enzymatic photoreactivation, it was possible to induce a relatively pure population of non-dimer DNA photoproducts by exposure of cells to the Mylar-filtered solar-UV wavelengths produced by a fluorescent sunlamp followed by treatment with photoreactivating light. With a modification of bromodeoxyuridine photolysis assay, it was found that the solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA damages were repaired by a short-patch repair mechanism in which less than 20 nucleotides were inserted into a repaired region. Similar results were also obtained for ..gamma..-irradiated cells. In contrast, excision repair of 254 nm-induced dimers was accomplished by a long-patch process in which an average of about 180 nucleotides were inserted into the repaired sites. A mutant cell line, DRP 36, hypersensitive to non-dimer DNA damages, was isolated from I CR 2A cells. It was found that the DRP 36 cells performed a significantly lower level of excision repair following the induction of non-dimer DNA damages. The results are consistent with the conclusion that the DRP 36 cells are deficient in the repair of at least one type of solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA lesion. These experiments indicate that solar-UV-induced non-dimer DNA photoproducts behave more like the photoproducts of ..gamma..-rays than those of far-UV radiation, which are primarily pyrimidine dimers.

  3. Misinsertion and bypass of thymine-thymine dimers by human DNA polymerase iota.

    PubMed

    Tissier, A; Frank, E G; McDonald, J P; Iwai, S; Hanaoka, F; Woodgate, R

    2000-10-01

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol(iota)) is a recently discovered enzyme that exhibits extremely low fidelity on undamaged DNA templates. Here, we show that poliota is able to facilitate limited translesion replication of a thymine-thymine cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD). More importantly, however, the bypass event is highly erroneous. Gel kinetic assays reveal that pol(iota) misinserts T or G opposite the 3' T of the CPD approximately 1.5 times more frequently than the correct base, A. While pol(iota) is unable to extend the T.T mispair significantly, the G.T mispair is extended and the lesion completely bypassed, with the same efficiency as that of the correctly paired A. T base pair. By comparison, pol(iota) readily misinserts two bases opposite a 6-4 thymine-thymine pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproduct (6-4PP), but complete lesion bypass is only a fraction of that observed with the CPD. Our data indicate, therefore, that poliota possesses the ability to insert nucleotides opposite UV photoproducts as well as to perform unassisted translesion replication that is likely to be highly mutagenic.

  4. Lie Markov models with purine/pyrimidine symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Jesús; Sumner, Jeremy G; Jarvis, Peter D; Woodhams, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Continuous-time Markov chains are a standard tool in phylogenetic inference. If homogeneity is assumed, the chain is formulated by specifying time-independent rates of substitutions between states in the chain. In applications, there are usually extra constraints on the rates, depending on the situation. If a model is formulated in this way, it is possible to generalise it and allow for an inhomogeneous process, with time-dependent rates satisfying the same constraints. It is then useful to require that, under some time restrictions, there exists a homogeneous average of this inhomogeneous process within the same model. This leads to the definition of "Lie Markov models" which, as we will show, are precisely the class of models where such an average exists. These models form Lie algebras and hence concepts from Lie group theory are central to their derivation. In this paper, we concentrate on applications to phylogenetics and nucleotide evolution, and derive the complete hierarchy of Lie Markov models that respect the grouping of nucleotides into purines and pyrimidines-that is, models with purine/pyrimidine symmetry. We also discuss how to handle the subtleties of applying Lie group methods, most naturally defined over the complex field, to the stochastic case of a Markov process, where parameter values are restricted to be real and positive. In particular, we explore the geometric embedding of the cone of stochastic rate matrices within the ambient space of the associated complex Lie algebra.

  5. Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine angiotensin II antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ellingboe, J W; Antane, M; Nguyen, T T; Collini, M D; Antane, S; Bender, R; Hartupee, D; White, V; McCallum, J; Park, C H

    1994-02-18

    A series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine angiotensin II (A II) antagonists was synthesized and tested for antagonism of A II. Compounds with a biphenylyltetrazole pharmacophore and small alkyl groups at the 2- and 4-positions of the pyridopyrimidine ring were found to be the most potent in an AT1 receptor binding assay and in blocking the A II pressor response in anesthetized, ganglion-blocked A II-infused rats. 5,8-Dihydro-2,4-dimethyl-8-[(2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl) [1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)methyl]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7(6H)-one (4a) was one of the more potent compounds in the binding assay and was the most efficacious compound in the A II-infused rat model. Further study of 4a in Goldblatt (2K-1C) rats showed the compound to have oral bioavailability and to be an efficacious and potent compound in a high renin form of hypertension.

  6. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth's prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines'. These compounds play a major role in terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. In this study we developed a new extraction technique using sublimation in order to isolate purines and pyrimidines from Murchison2, which is cleaner and more time efficient that traditional methods3. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine and xanthine were positively identified by high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet absorption detection in our Murchison extracts. The purines detected in Murchison do not correlate with the distribution of nucleobases found in geological environments on Earth4. Moreover, the abundance of extraterrestrial amino acids and the low level of terrestrial amino acid contaminants found in Murchison', support the idea that the purines in t h s meteorite are extraterrestrial in origin.

  7. Class A Plexins Are Organized as Preformed Inactive Dimers on the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Marita, Morgan; Wang, Yuxiao; Kaliszewski, Megan J; Skinner, Kevin C; Comar, William D; Shi, Xiaojun; Dasari, Pranathi; Zhang, Xuewu; Smith, Adam W

    2015-11-01

    Plexins are single-pass transmembrane receptors that bind the axon guidance molecules semaphorins. Single-pass transmembrane proteins are an important class of receptors that display a wide variety of activation mechanisms, often involving ligand-dependent dimerization or conformational changes. Resolving the activation mechanism and dimerization state of these receptors is extremely challenging, especially in a live-cell environment. Here, we report on the dimerization state of PlexinA4 and its response to activation by semaphorin binding. Semaphorins are dimeric molecules that activate plexin by binding two copies of plexin simultaneously and inducing formation of a specific active dimer of plexin. An open question is whether there are preexisting plexin dimers that could act as autoinhibitory complexes. We address these questions with pulsed interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). PIE-FCCS is a two-color fluorescence microscopy method that is directly sensitive to protein dimerization in a live-cell environment. With PIE-FCCS, we show that inactive PlexinA4 is dimerized in the live-cell plasma membrane. By comparing the cross correlation of full-length PlexinA4 to control proteins and plexin mutants, we show that dimerization of inactive PlexinA4 requires the Sema domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain. Ligand stimulation with Sema6A does not change the degree of cross correlation, indicating that plexin activation does not lead to higher-order oligomerization. Together, the results suggest that semaphorin activates plexin by disrupting an inhibitory plexin dimer and inducing the active dimer. PMID:26536270

  8. Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V. M.; Jarmola, A.; Windes, D.; Corsini, E.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Karaulanov, T.; Auzinsh, M.; Rangwala, S. A.; Kimball, D. F. Jackson; Budker, D.

    2010-08-01

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 °C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 107 cm- 3. With 1 min integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 106 cm- 3 was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density between the cells was observed.

  9. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  10. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K.; Piao, S. H.; Choi, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I -N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions.

  11. Dimerization of postsynaptic neuroligin drives synaptic assembly via transsynaptic clustering of neurexin.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nicoll, Roger A

    2012-11-20

    The transsynaptic complex of neuroligin (NLGN) and neurexin forms a physical connection between pre- and postsynaptic neurons that occurs early in the course of new synapse assembly. Both neuroligin and neurexin have, indeed, been proposed to exhibit active, instructive roles in the formation of synapses. However, the process by which these instructive roles play out during synaptogenesis is not well understood. Here, we examine one aspect of postsynaptic neuroligin with regard to its synaptogenic properties: its basal state as a constitutive dimer. We show that dimerization is required for the synaptogenic properties of neuroligin and likely serves to induce presynaptic differentiation via a transsynaptic clustering of neurexin. Further, we introduce chemically inducible, exogenous dimerization domains to the neuroligin molecule, effectively bestowing chemical control of neuroligin dimerization. This allows us to identify the acute requirements of neuroligin dimerization by chemically manipulating the monomeric-to-dimeric conversion of neuroligin. Based on the results of the inducible dimerization experiments, we propose a model in which dimerized neuroligin induces the mechanical clustering of presynaptic molecules as part of a requisite step in the coordinated assembly of a chemical synapse.

  12. A Model for Dimerization of the SOX Group E Transcription Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Ramsook, Sarah N.; Ni, Joyce; Shahangian, Shokofeh; Vakiloroayaei, Ana; Khan, Naveen; Kwan, Jamie J.

    2016-01-01

    Group E members of the SOX transcription factor family include SOX8, SOX9, and SOX10. Preceding the high mobility group (HMG) domain in each of these proteins is a thirty-eight amino acid region that supports the formation of dimers on promoters containing tandemly inverted sites. The purpose of this study was to obtain new structural insights into how the dimerization region functions with the HMG domain. From a mutagenic scan of the dimerization region, the most essential amino acids of the dimerization region were clustered on the hydrophobic face of a single, predicted amphipathic helix. Consistent with our hypothesis that the dimerization region directly contacts the HMG domain, a peptide corresponding to the dimerization region bound a preassembled HMG-DNA complex. Sequence conservation among Group E members served as a basis to identify two surface exposed amino acids in the HMG domain of SOX9 that were necessary for dimerization. These data were combined to make a molecular model that places the dimerization region of one SOX9 protein onto the HMG domain of another SOX9 protein situated at the opposing site of a tandem promoter. The model provides a detailed foundation for assessing the impact of mutations on SOX Group E transcription factors. PMID:27532129

  13. Evidence for the dimerization-mediated catalysis of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Clostridium oremlandii.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kitaik; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Park, Yeon Seung; Lee, Kong-Joo; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium oremlandii MsrA (CoMsrA) is a natively selenocysteine-containing methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase and classified into a 1-Cys type MsrA. CoMsrA exists as a monomer in solution. Herein, we report evidence that CoMsrA can undergo homodimerization during catalysis. The monomeric CoMsrA dimerizes in the presence of its substrate methionine sulfoxide via an intermolecular disulfide bond between catalytic Cys16 residues. The dimeric CoMsrA is resolved by the reductant glutaredoxin, suggesting the relevance of dimerization in catalysis. The dimerization reaction occurs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the occurrence of homodimer formation in the native selenoprotein CoMsrA is confirmed. We also determine the crystal structure of the dimeric CoMsrA, having the dimer interface around the two catalytic Cys16 residues. A central cone-shaped hole is present in the surface model of dimeric structure, and the two Cys16 residues constitute the base of the hole. Collectively, our biochemical and structural analyses suggest a novel dimerization-mediated mechanism for CoMsrA catalysis that is additionally involved in CoMsrA regeneration by glutaredoxin.

  14. Pyrimidine-5-carbonitriles II: synthesis and antimicrobial activity of novel 6-alkyl-2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine-5-carbonitriles.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdullah, E S; Al-Turkistani, A A; Al-Deeb, O A; El-Brollosy, N R; Habib, E E; El-Emam, A A

    2014-01-01

    New series of 6-alkyl-2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine-5-carbonitriles namely, 6-alkyl-2-thiouracil-5-carbonitriles 4c,d, 6-alkyl-2-arylmethylsulfanyl-3,4-dihydro-4-oxopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles 5a-p, 6-alkyl-2-(2-methoxyethylsulfanyl)-3,4-dihydro-4-oxopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles 6a-d, 6-alkyl-2-benzyloxymethylsulfanyl-3,4-dihydro-4-oxopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles 7a-c, 6-alkyl-2-(5-nitrofuran-2-ylmethylsulfanyl)-3,4-dihydro-4-oxopyrimidine-5-carbonitriles 8a-d, 6-alkyl-4-arylthio-2-(benzylsulfanyl)pyrimidine-5-carbonitriles 10a, b and 2-benzylsulfanyl-4-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-6-pentylpyrimidine-5-carbonitrile 11, were synthesized and tested for in vitro activities against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the yeast-like pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Compounds 4d, 5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f, 5g, 5h, 5i, 5j, 5k, 5 l, 5p, 7a, 7b, 7c, 8a, 8b, 8c, 8d and 11 -displayed marked antibacterial activity particularly against the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Meanwhile, none of these compounds were proved to be active against Candida albicans.

  15. Dimerization, trimerization and quantum pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaiming

    2014-03-01

    We study one-dimensional topological models with dimerization and trimerization and show that these models can be generated using interaction or optical superlattice. The topological properties of these models are demonstrated by the appearance of edge states and the mechanism of dimerization and trimerization is analyzed. Then we show that a quantum pumping process can be constructed based on each one-dimensional topological model. The quantum pumping process is explicitly demonstrated by the instantaneous energy spectrum and local current. The result shows that the pumping is assisted by the gapless states connecting the bands and one charge is pumped during a cycle, which also defines a nonzero Chern number. Our study systematically shows the connection of one-dimensional topological models and quantum pumping, and is useful for the experimental studies on topological phases in optical lattices and photonic quasicrystals.

  16. Dimeric guaianolides from Artemisia absinthium.

    PubMed

    Turak, Ablajan; Shi, She-Po; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Five dimeric guaianolides, absinthins A-E, and seven known dimeric guaianolides were isolated from Artemisia absinthium. Their structures were elucidated based on 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments, including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY, and through HRESIMS data analysis. The absolute configuration of the known compound, anabsinthin, was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The isolated compounds were tested to assess their inhibitory activities on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 cells; absinthin C and isoanabsinthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values of 1.52 and 1.98μM, respectively.

  17. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  18. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  19. Dimerize ethylene to butene-1

    SciTech Connect

    Commereuc, D.; Andrews, J.; Chauvin, Y.; Gillard, J.; Leonard, J.

    1984-11-01

    Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) has developed a new process, Alphabutol, to dimerize selectively ethylene to butene-1. The Alphabutol process uses a homogeneous catalyst which means that reactants, products and catalyst are all soluble in the same liquid phase. The new catalytic system used in the Alphabutol process avoids isomerization of butene-1 to butene-2. Therefore, there is no need for product superfractionation.

  20. Structure and function of nucleoside hydrolases from Physcomitrella patens and maize catalyzing the hydrolysis of purine, pyrimidine, and cytokinin ribosides.

    PubMed

    Kopecná, Martina; Blaschke, Hanna; Kopecny, David; Vigouroux, Armelle; Koncitíková, Radka; Novák, Ondrej; Kotland, Ondrej; Strnad, Miroslav; Moréra, Solange; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the nucleoside N-ribohydrolase (NRH) family in two model plants, Physcomitrella patens (PpNRH) and maize (Zea mays; ZmNRH), using in vitro and in planta approaches. We identified two NRH subclasses in the plant kingdom; one preferentially targets the purine ribosides inosine and xanthosine, while the other is more active toward uridine and xanthosine. Both subclasses can hydrolyze plant hormones such as cytokinin ribosides. We also solved the crystal structures of two purine NRHs, PpNRH1 and ZmNRH3. Structural analyses, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and phylogenetic studies were conducted to identify the residues responsible for the observed differences in substrate specificity between the NRH isoforms. The presence of a tyrosine at position 249 (PpNRH1 numbering) confers high hydrolase activity for purine ribosides, while an aspartate residue in this position confers high activity for uridine. Bud formation is delayed by knocking out single NRH genes in P. patens, and under conditions of nitrogen shortage, PpNRH1-deficient plants cannot salvage adenosine-bound nitrogen. All PpNRH knockout plants display elevated levels of certain purine and pyrimidine ribosides and cytokinins that reflect the substrate preferences of the knocked out enzymes. NRH enzymes thus have functions in cytokinin conversion and activation as well as in purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  1. A redox-dependent dimerization switch regulates activity and tolerance for reactive oxygen species of barley seed glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Navrot, Nicolas; Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per

    2015-05-01

    Monomeric and dimeric forms of recombinant barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) glutathione peroxidase 2 (HvGpx2) are demonstrated to display distinctly different functional properties in vitro. Monomeric HvGpx2 thus has five fold higher catalytic efficiency than the dimer towards tert-butyl hydroperoxide, but is more sensitive to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide. Treatment of the monomer with hydrogen peroxide results in dimer formation. This observed new behavior of a plant glutathione peroxidase suggests a mechanism involving a switch from a highly catalytically competent monomer to a less active, but more oxidation-resistant dimer. PMID:25796076

  2. Crystal structures of two 6-(2-hy-droxy-benzo-yl)-5H-thia-zolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ones.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia R; Low, John Nicolson; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2015-07-01

    The title compounds, 6-(2-hy-droxy-benz-yl)-5H-thia-zolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-one, C13H8N2O3S, (1), and 6-(2-hy-droxy-benz-yl)-3-methyl-5H-thia-zolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-one, C14H10N2O3S, (2), were synthesized when a chromone-3-carb-oxy-lic acid, activated with (benzotriazol-1-yl-oxy)tripyrrolidinyl-phospho-nium hexa-fluorido-phosphate (PyBOP), was reacted with a primary heteromamine. Instead of the expected amidation, the unusual title thia-zolo-pyrimidine-5-one derivatives were obtained serendipitously and a mechanism of formation is proposed. Both compounds present an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond, which generates an S(6) ring. The dihedral angles between the heterocyclic moiety and the 2-hydroxybenzoyl ring are 55.22 (5) and 46.83 (6)° for (1) and (2), respectively. In the crystals, the mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking inter-actions. PMID:26279863

  3. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  4. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  5. Relative stabilities and the spectral signatures of stacked and hydrogen-bonded dimers of serotonin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Giri, K.; Majumder, M.; Sathyamurthy, N.

    2015-10-01

    The O-HṡṡṡN hydrogen-bonded dimer of serotonin is shown to be more stable than the stacked dimer in its ground electronic state, by using the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2) and the 6-31g** basis set. The vertical excitation energy for the lowest π → π* transition for the monomer as well as the dimer is predicted by time-dependent density functional theory. The experimentally observed red shift of excitation wavelength on oligomerisation is explained in terms of the change in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap due to complex formation. The impact of dimer formation on the proton magnetic resonance spectrum of serotonin monomer is also examined.

  6. Trisubstituted Pyrimidines as Efficacious and Fast-Acting Antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Norcross, Neil R; Baragaña, Beatriz; Wilson, Caroline; Hallyburton, Irene; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Norval, Suzanne; Riley, Jennifer; Stojanovski, Laste; Simeons, Frederick R C; Porzelle, Achim; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Meister, Stephan; Sanz, Laura; Jiménez-Díaz, Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Frearson, Julie A; Gray, David W; Fairlamb, Alan H; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Waterson, David; Campbell, Simon F; Willis, Paul; Read, Kevin D; Gilbert, Ian H

    2016-07-14

    In this paper we describe the optimization of a phenotypic hit against Plasmodium falciparum, based on a trisubstituted pyrimidine scaffold. This led to compounds with good pharmacokinetics and oral activity in a P. berghei mouse model of malaria. The most promising compound (13) showed a reduction in parasitemia of 96% when dosed at 30 mg/kg orally once a day for 4 days in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria. It also demonstrated a rapid rate of clearance of the erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum in the SCID mouse model with an ED90 of 11.7 mg/kg when dosed orally. Unfortunately, the compound is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes, probably due to a 4-pyridyl substituent. Nevertheless, this is a lead molecule with a potentially useful antimalarial profile, which could either be further optimized or be used for target hunting. PMID:27314305

  7. Double functionalization of carbon nanotubes with purine and pyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Battigelli, Alessia; Toma, Francesca Maria; Raya, Jesus; Kumar, Jitendra; Nidamanuri, Nagapradeep; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Herein, we have developed a synthetic strategy for the covalent double functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a combination of purine-pyrimidine and purine-purine nucleobase systems. The nucleobases were introduced on the sidewall of oxidized SWCNTs through 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and by amidation of the carboxylic acids located at the tips and defect sites of the nanotubes. The new nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, and Kaiser test. The nucleobase/SWCNT conjugates can be envisaged for the modulation of the interactions with nucleic acids by means of base pairing, thereby opening new possibilities in the development of DNA/CNT nanobioconjugates. PMID:23703975

  8. Trisubstituted Pyrimidines as Efficacious and Fast-Acting Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the optimization of a phenotypic hit against Plasmodium falciparum, based on a trisubstituted pyrimidine scaffold. This led to compounds with good pharmacokinetics and oral activity in a P. berghei mouse model of malaria. The most promising compound (13) showed a reduction in parasitemia of 96% when dosed at 30 mg/kg orally once a day for 4 days in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria. It also demonstrated a rapid rate of clearance of the erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum in the SCID mouse model with an ED90 of 11.7 mg/kg when dosed orally. Unfortunately, the compound is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes, probably due to a 4-pyridyl substituent. Nevertheless, this is a lead molecule with a potentially useful antimalarial profile, which could either be further optimized or be used for target hunting. PMID:27314305

  9. Dimerization of Matrix Protein Is Required for Budding of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Andreas; Maertens, Goedele N.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    mechanism of RSV assembly is still poorly understood. Here we show that the RSV matrix protein forms dimers in solution and in crystals; the dimer is essential for formation of higher-order oligomers. Destabilizing the dimer interface resulted in the loss of RSV filament formation and a lack of budding of virus-like particles. Importantly, our findings can potentially lead to new structure-based RSV inhibitors targeting the assembly process. PMID:25673702

  10. Cytomegalovirus-mediated activation of pyrimidine biosynthesis drives UDP–sugar synthesis to support viral protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    DeVito, Stefanie Renee; Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Munger, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces numerous changes to the host metabolic network that are critical for high-titer viral replication. We find that HCMV infection substantially induces de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic flux. This activation is important for HCMV replication because inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes substantially decreases the production of infectious virus, which can be rescued through medium supplementation with pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolomic analysis revealed that pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition considerably reduces the levels of various UDP–sugar metabolites in HCMV-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. Further, UDP–sugar biosynthesis, which provides the sugar substrates required for glycosylation reactions, was found to be induced during HCMV infection. Pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition also attenuated the glycosylation of the envelope glycoprotein B (gB). Both glycosylation of gB and viral growth were restored by medium supplementation with either UDP–sugar metabolites or pyrimidine precursors. These results indicate that HCMV drives de novo-synthesized pyrimidines to UDP–sugar biosynthesis to support virion protein glycosylation. The importance of this link between pyrimidine biosynthesis and UDP–sugars appears to be partially shared among diverse virus families, because UDP–sugar metabolites rescued the growth attenuation associated with pyrimidine biosynthetic inhibition during influenza A and vesicular stomatitis virus infection, but not murine hepatitis virus infection. In total, our results indicate that viruses can specifically modulate pyrimidine metabolic flux to provide the glycosyl subunits required for protein glycosylation and production of high titers of infectious progeny. PMID:25472841

  11. De novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides; emerging interfaces with signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Graves, L M

    2003-02-01

    The de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides provides essential precursors for multiple growth-related events in higher eukaryotes. Assembled from ATP, bicarbonate and glutamine, the uracil and cytosine nucleotides are fuel for the synthesis of RNA, DNA, phospholipids, UDP sugars and glycogen. Over the past 2 decades considerable progress has been made in elucidating the mechanisms by which cellular pyrimidines are modulated to meet the needs of the cell. Recent studies demonstrate that CAD, a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines, is regulated through reversible phosphorylation, Myc-dependent transcriptional changes and caspase-mediated degradation. These studies point to increasing evidence for cooperation between key cell signaling pathways and basic elements of cellular metabolism, and suggest that these events have the potential to determine distinct cellular fates, including growth, differentiation and death. This review highlights some of the recent advances in the regulation of pyrimidine synthesis by growth-factor-stimulated signaling pathways. PMID:12678497

  12. Crystal structure of (S)-5,7-diphenyl-4,7-di­hydro­tetra­zolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ivy K.; Rougeot, Celine; Hein, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C16H13N5, was synthesized by coupling amino­tetra­zole with chalcone in the presence of an amine organocatalyst derived from chincona alkaloid. There are two mol­ecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. In mol­ecule A, the dihedral angles between the partly hydrogenated pyrimidine ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.056 Å) and the sp 2- and sp 3-bonded phenyl groups are 33.32 (11) and 86.53 (11)°, respectively. The equivalent data for mol­ecule B are 0.049 Å, and 27.05 (10) and 85.27 (11)°, respectively. In the crystal, A+B dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds generate R 2 2(8) loops. The dimers are linked by aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions [shortest centroid–centroid separation = 3.5367 (15) Å], which results in a three-dimensional network. PMID:26029423

  13. Monomer-dimer problem on some networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ruijuan; Yan, Weigen

    2016-09-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) obtained the exact formula for the number of all possible monomer-dimer arrangements and the asymptotic growth constant on a scale-free small-world network. In this note, we generalize this result and obtain the exact solution on the monomer-dimer model on many networks. Particularly, we prove that these networks have the same asymptotic growth constant of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements.

  14. CPU-12, a novel synthesized oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivative, showed superior anti-angiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiping; Deng, Ya-Hui; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yijuan; Lawali, Manzo; Sun, Li-Ping; Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis is a crucial requirement for malignant tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Tumor-derived factors stimulate formation of new blood vessels which actively support tumor growth and spread. Various of drugs have been applied to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. CPU-12, 4-chloro-N-(4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyloxazolo[5,4-d] pyrimidin-7-yl)amino)phenyl)benzamide, is a novel oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivative that showed potent activity in inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and ex-vivo. In cell toxicity experiments, CPU-12 significantly inhibited the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in a dose-dependent manner with a low IC50 value at 9.30 ± 1.24 μM. In vitro, CPU-12 remarkably inhibited HUVEC's migration, chemotactic invasion and capillary-like tube formation in a dose-dependent manner. In ex-vivo, CPU-12 effectively inhibited new microvessels sprouting from the rat aortic ring. In addition, the downstream signalings of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), including the phosphorylation of PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were effectively down-regulated by CPU-12. These evidences suggested that angiogenic response via the induction of VEGFR through distinct signal transduction pathways regulating proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by the novel small molecule compound CPU-12 in vitro and ex-vivo. In conclusion, CPU-12 showed superior anti-angiogenic activity in vitro.

  15. Vinculin Tail Dimerization and Paxillin Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sharon

    2006-03-01

    Vinculin is a highly conserved cytoskeletal protein that is essential for regulation of cell morphology and migration, and is a critical component of both cell-cell and cell-matrix complexes. The tail domain of vinculin (Vt) was crystallized as a homodimer and is believed to bind F-actin as a dimer. We have characterized Vt dimerization by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy and identified the dimer interface in solution by chemical shift perturbation. The Vt dimer interface in solution is similar to the crystallographic dimer interface. Interestingly, the Vt dimer interface determined by NMR partially overlaps the paxillin binding region previously defined coarsely by deletion mutagenesis and gel-blot assays. To further characterize the paxillin binding site in Vt and probe relationship between paxillin binding and dimerization, we conducted chemical shift perturbations experiments using a paxillin derived peptide, LD2. Our NMR experiments have confirmed that the paxillin binding site and the Vt dimerization site partially overlap, and we have further characterized both of these two binding interfaces. Information derived from these studies was used to identify mutations in Vt that selectively perturb paxillin binding and Vt self-association. These mutants are currently being characterized for their utility in structural and biological analyses to elucidate the role of paxillin binding and Vt dimerization in vinculin function.

  16. Enhanced Chiral Recognition by Cyclodextrin Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Voskuhl, Jens; Schaepe, Kira; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of multivalency in chiral recognition. To this end, we measured the host-guest interaction of a β-cyclodextrin dimer with divalent chiral guests. We report the synthesis of carbohydrate-based water soluble chiral guests functionalized with two borneol, menthol, or isopinocampheol units in either (+) or (−) configuration. We determined the interaction of these divalent guests with a β-cyclodextrin dimer using isothermal titration calorimetry. It was found that—in spite of a highly unfavorable conformation—the cyclodextrin dimer binds to guest dimers with an increased enantioselectivity, which clearly reflects the effect of multivalency. PMID:21845101

  17. Mechanisms of Monomeric and Dimeric Glycogenin Autoglucosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Issoglio, Federico M.; Carrizo, María E.; Romero, Jorge M.; Curtino, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Initiation of glucose polymerization by glycogenin autoglucosylation at Tyr-194 is required to prime de novo biosynthesis of glycogen. It has been proposed that the synthesis of the primer proceeds by intersubunit glucosylation of dimeric glycogenin, even though it has not been demonstrated that this mechanism is responsible for the described polymerization extent of 12 glucoses produced by the dimer. We reported previously the intramonomer glucosylation capability of glycogenin without determining the extent of autoglucopolymerization. Here, we show that the maximum specific autoglucosylation extent (MSAE) produced by the non-glucosylated glycogenin monomer is 13.3 ± 1.9 glucose units, similar to the 12.5 ± 1.4 glucose units measured for the dimer. The mechanism and capacity of the dimeric enzyme to carry out full glucopolymerization were also evaluated by construction of heterodimers able to glucosylate exclusively by intrasubunit or intersubunit reaction mechanisms. The MSAE of non-glucosylated glycogenin produced by dimer intrasubunit glucosylation was 16% of that produced by the monomer. However, partially glucosylated glycogenin was able to almost complete its autoglucosylation by the dimer intrasubunit mechanism. The MSAE produced by heterodimer intersubunit glucosylation was 60% of that produced by the wild-type dimer. We conclude that both intrasubunit and intersubunit reaction mechanisms are necessary for the dimeric enzyme to acquire maximum autoglucosylation. The full glucopolymerization capacity of monomeric glycogenin indicates that the enzyme is able to synthesize the glycogen primer without the need for prior dimerization. PMID:22128147

  18. Bovine leukemia virus matrix-associated protein MA(p15): further processing and formation of a specific complex with the dimer of the 5'-terminal genomic RNA fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, I; Kyushiki, H; Sakamoto, Y; Ikawa, Y; Yoshinaka, Y

    1991-01-01

    The retrovirus precursor protein has an arrangement of several characteristic domains with which it achieves selective and efficient packaging of the genome RNA during particle assembly. In this study, we analyzed the composition of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) gag proteins and examined their RNA-binding properties in gel mobility shift assays, using various genomic RNA probes synthesized in vitro. Results obtained in amino acid sequence and composition analyses indicate that the matrix-associated protein MA(p15) is further processed by the BLV protease (PR) to generate MA(p10), a short peptide of seven amino acid residues, and p4. The gag precursor is now mapped as NH2-MA(p10)-p4-CA(p24)-NC(p12)-COOH. MA(p15) formed a specific complex with the dimer RNA of the U5-5' gag region presumed to contain the BLV packaging signal but not with other RNAs. The NH2-terminal cleavage product, MA(p10), bound all RNA fragments tested, while the COOH-terminal peptides with a sequence common to mammalian type C retroviruses had little affinity for RNA. The nucleocapsid protein NC(p12) bound to RNAs nonspecifically and randomly in the presence or absence of zinc ions. These results suggest a possible interaction of the NH2 terminus of the gag precursor with the 5' terminus of the genomic RNA in an early phase of particle assembly, when the conserved structure between the MA and CA domains might be involved. Images PMID:1658378

  19. Evidence from CD spectra that d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrids are in different structural classes.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, S H; Yu, Q; Gray, D M; Ratliff, R L

    1994-01-01

    CD spectra and difference CD spectra of four d(oligopurine).r(oligopyrimidine) and four r(oligopurine).d(oligopyrimidine) hybrid duplexes containing mixed A.T(U) and G.C base pairs were compared with the spectra of four DNA.DNA and four RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes of similar repeating sequences. The 16 duplexes were formed by mixing oligomers that were 24 nucleotides long. The buffer was 0.05 M Na+ (phosphate), pH 7.0. DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes were used as reference B-form and A-form structures. We found that the CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from the CD spectra of either DNA.DNA or RNA.RNA duplexes. The data suggested that these hybrids have intermediate structures between A-form RNA and B-form DNA structures. The CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from each other, but the hybrids in each class had consistent CD spectra as indicated by nearest-neighbor comparisons. Thus, it appeared that the two types of hybrids belonged to different structural classes. The negative 210 nm band found in difference CD spectra was correlated with the presence of an r(purine) strand in the hybrid duplexes. The melting temperatures (Tm values) of these hybrids were compared with the Tm values of the DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes. The order of the thermal stability was: RNA.RNA duplex > r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid > DNA.DNA duplex > d(purine).r(pyrimidine) hybrid, when comparing analogous sequences. PMID:7937162

  20. Extracellular disulfide bridges stabilize TRPC5 dimerization, trafficking, and activity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Kwak, Misun; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Wie, Jinhong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-04-01

    Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in the modulation of protein activity via the modification of thiol (-SH) groups. Among these reactions, disulfide bonds (S-S) play a key role in the folding, stability, and activity of membrane proteins. However, the regulation of extracellular cysteines in classical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels remains controversial. Here, we examine the functional importance of the extracellular disulfide bond in TRPC5 in modulating channel gating and trafficking. Specifically, we investigated TRPC5 activity in transiently transfected HEK293 cells with wild-type (WT) or cysteine (C553 and C558) mutants in the pore loop. Using reducing agents, we determined that a disulfide linkage mediates the tetrameric formation of the TRPC5 channel. By measuring the TRPC5 current, we observed that C553S or C558S mutants completely lose channel activity induced by lanthanides or receptor stimulation. Co-expression of TRPC5 (WT) with mutants demonstrated a dominant-negative function in mutants, which inhibited the activity of TRPC5 (WT). We generated TRPC5-TRPC5 dimers and observed reduced activity of WT-mutant (C553S or C558S) dimers compared to WT-WT dimers. When pretreated with reducing agents for 12 h, the TRPC5 current decreased due to a reduction in membrane TRPC5 distribution. In addition, we identified a reduced expression of C553S mutant in plasma membrane. We analyzed a dimeric interaction of wild-type and mutant TRPC5 using co-immunoprecipitation and FRET method, indicating a weak interaction between dimeric partners. These results indicated that the disulfide bond between conserved extracellular cysteines, especially C553, is essential for functional TRPC5 activity by channel multimerization and trafficking.

  1. Repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase: relationships with enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Piérard, A; Glansdorff, N; Gigot, D; Crabeel, M; Halleux, P; Thiry, L

    1976-01-01

    Cumulative repression of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthase (CPSase; EC 2.7.2.9) by arginine and pyrimidine was analyzed in relation to control enzyme synthesis in the arginine and pyrimidine pathways. The expression of carA and carB, the adjacent genes that specify the two subunits of the enzyme, was estimated by means of an in vitro complementation assay. The synthesis of each gene product was found to be under repression control. Coordinate expression of the two genes was observed under most conditions investigated. They might thus form an operon. The preparation of strains blocked in the degradation of cytidine and harboring leaky mutations affecting several steps of pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis made it possible to distinguish between the effects of cytidine and uridine compounds in the repression of the pyrimidine pathway enzymes. The data obtained suggest that derivatives of both cytidine and uridine participate in the repression of CPSase. In addition, repression of CPSase by arginine did not appear to occur unless pyrimidines were present at a significant intracellular concentration. This observation, together with our previous report that argR mutations impair the cumulative repression of CPSase, suggests that this control is mediated through the concerted effects of regulatory elements specific for the arginine and pyrimidine pathways. PMID:179975

  2. Solution-Phase Parallel Synthesis of Acyclic Nucleoside Libraries of Purine, Pyrimidine, and Triazole Acetamides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity plays a pivotal role in modern drug discovery against phenotypic or enzyme-based targets using high throughput screening technology. Under the auspices of the Pilot Scale Library Program of the NIH Roadmap Initiative, we produced and report herein a diverse library of 181 purine, pyrimidine, and 1,2,4-triazole-N-acetamide analogues which were prepared in a parallel high throughput solution-phase reaction format. A set of assorted amines were reacted with several nucleic acid N-acetic acids utilizing HATU as the coupling reagent to produce diverse acyclic nucleoside N-acetamide analogues. These reactions were performed using 24 well reaction blocks and an automatic reagent-dispensing platform under inert atmosphere. The targeted compounds were purified on an automated purification system using solid sample loading prepacked cartridges and prepacked silica gel columns. All compounds were characterized by NMR and HRMS, and were analyzed for purity by HPLC before submission to the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) at NIH. Initial screening through the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) program, indicates that several analogues showed diverse and interesting biological activities. PMID:24933643

  3. Investigating the role of vibrational excitation in simulating charged-particle tracks in liquid pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunger, Michael J.; Ratnavelu, Kuru; Buckman, Stephen J.; Jones, Darryl B.; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    We report on our results of a study into the sensitivity of charged-particle (electron) track simulations in liquid pyrimidine, to the vibrational cross sections and vibrational energy loss distribution function employed in those simulations. We achieve this by repeating the earlier investigation of Fuss et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 214701 (2015)], but now incorporating more accurate data for the vibrational integral cross sections and the energy loss distribution function that have recently become available. We find that while changes in absorbed dose or particle range are quite minor, due to the energy transferred via vibrational excitations being low in comparison to that for other processes such as ionisation, at the very end of the tracks, where non-ionizing interactions dominate, the significantly large numbers of vibrational excitation processes increases the electrons' ability to induce other effects (e.g. sample heating, bond breaking and radical formation) that might cause damage. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  4. Immortal coils: conserved dimerization motifs of the Drosophila ovulation prohormone ovulin.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex; Christopher, Adam B; Buehner, Norene A; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2010-04-01

    Dimerization is an important feature of the function of some proteins, including prohormones. For proteins whose amino acid sequences evolve rapidly, it is unclear how such structural characteristics are retained biochemically. Here we address this question by focusing on ovulin, a prohormone that induces ovulation in Drosophila melanogaster females after mating. Ovulin is known to dimerize, and is one of the most rapidly evolving proteins encoded by the Drosophila genome. We show that residues within a previously hypothesized conserved dimerization domain (a coiled-coil) and a newly identified conserved dimerization domain (YxxxY) within ovulin are necessary for the formation of ovulin dimers. Moreover, dimerization is conserved in ovulin proteins from non-melanogaster species of Drosophila despite up to 80% sequence divergence. We show that heterospecific ovulin dimers can be formed in interspecies hybrid animals and in two-hybrid assays between ovulin proteins that are 15% diverged, indicating conservation of tertiary structure amidst a background of rapid sequence evolution. Our results suggest that because ovulin's self-interaction requires only small conserved domains, the rest of the molecule can be relatively tolerant to mutations. Consistent with this view, in comparisons of 8510 proteins across 6 species of Drosophila we find that rates of amino acid divergence are higher for proteins with coiled-coil protein-interaction domains than for non-coiled-coil proteins.

  5. Members of the DAN Family are BMP Antagonists that form Highly Stable Noncovalent Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Luedeke, David M.; Nolan, Kristof; Rankin, Scott A.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Signaling of BMP ligands is antagonized by a number of extracellular proteins, including noggin, follistatin and members of the DAN family. Structural studies on the DAN family member sclerostin (a weak BMP antagonist) have previously revealed that the protein is monomeric and consists of an 8-membered cystine knot motif with a fold similar to TGF-β ligands. In contrast to sclerostin, certain DAN family antagonists, including Protein related to DAN and Cerberus (PRDC), have an unpaired cysteine that is thought to function in covalent dimer assembly (analogous to TGF-β ligands). Through a combination of biophysical and biochemical studies, we determined that PRDC forms biologically active dimers that potently inhibit BMP ligands. Furthermore, we showed that PRDC dimers, surprisingly, are not covalently linked, as mutation of the unpaired cysteine does not inhibit dimer formation or biological activity. We further demonstrated that the noncovalent PRDC dimers are highly stable under both denaturing and reducing conditions. This study was extended to the founding family member DAN, which also forms noncovalent dimers that are highly stable. These results demonstrate that certain DAN family members can form both monomers and noncovalent dimers, implying that biological activity of DAN family members might be linked to their oligomeric state. PMID:23063586

  6. The role of the lattice oxygen of an oxide catalyst in the reaction of oxidative dimerization of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Voskresenskaya, E.N.; Kurteeva, L.I.; Tsygankova, S.I.; Anshits, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    The catalytic oxidative dimerization of methane is described. Catalysts investigated include bismuth oxides with additives of samarium, terbium, and erbium. The main products were ethane and carbon dioxide. The activation energy of formation for the above products is discussed.

  7. Theory and Simulations of Adhesion Receptor Dimerization on Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:23528081

  8. Intramolecular hydrophobic interactions are critical mediators of STAT5 dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Li, Jinyu; Ernst, Sabrina; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Chatain, Nicolas; Küster, Andrea; Koschmieder, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    STAT5 is an essential transcription factor in hematopoiesis, which is activated through tyrosine phosphorylation in response to cytokine stimulation. Constitutive activation of STAT5 is a hallmark of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, a model of the STAT5 phosphotyrosine-SH2 domain interface was generated providing first structural information on the activated STAT5 dimer including a sequence, for which no structural information is available for any of the STAT proteins. We identified a novel intramolecular interaction mediated through F706, adjacent to the phosphotyrosine motif, and a unique hydrophobic interface on the surface of the SH2 domain. Analysis of corresponding STAT5 mutants revealed that this interaction is dispensable for Epo receptor-mediated phosphorylation of STAT5 but essential for dimer formation and subsequent nuclear accumulation. Moreover, the herein presented model clarifies molecular mechanisms of recently discovered leukemic STAT5 mutants and will help to guide future drug development. PMID:27752093

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis using different colored dye dimer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmé, Nicole; Friedrich, Achim; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Knemeyer, Jens-Peter

    2006-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching by dye dimer formation has been utilized to develop hairpin-structured DNA probes for the detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the penicillin target gene pbp2x, which is implicated in the penicillin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We designed two specific DNA probes for the identification of the pbp2x genes from a penicillin susceptible strain R6 and a resistant strain Streptococcus mitis 661 using green-fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) and red-fluorescent DY-636, respectively. Hybridization of each of the probes to its respective target DNA sequence opened the DNA hairpin probes, consequently breaking the nonfluorescent dye dimers into fluorescent species. This hybridization of the target with the hairpin probe achieved single nucleotide specific detection at nanomolar concentrations via increased fluorescence.

  10. Bose and Mott glass phases in dimerized quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. J.; Krüger, F.

    2015-11-01

    We examine the effects of disorder on dimerized quantum antiferromagnets in a magnetic field, using the mapping to a lattice gas of hard-core bosons with finite-range interactions. Combining a strong-coupling expansion, the replica method, and a one-loop renormalization-group analysis, we investigate the nature of the glass phases formed. We find that away from the tips of the Mott lobes, the transition is from a Mott insulator to a compressible Bose glass, however the compressibility at the tips is strongly suppressed. We identify this finding with the presence of a rare Mott glass phase and demonstrate that the inclusion of replica symmetry breaking is vital to correctly describe the glassy phases. This result suggests that the formation of Bose and Mott glass phases is not simply a weak localization phenomenon but is indicative of much richer physics. We discuss our results in the context of both ultracold atomic gases and spin-dimer materials.

  11. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Dimerization of aminopeptidase N and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Danielsen, E.M. )

    1990-01-09

    The pig intestinal brush border enzymes aminopeptidase and lactase-phlorizin hydrolase are present in the microvilla membrane as homodimers. Dimethyl adipimidate was used to cross-link the two ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled brush border enzymes from cultured mucosal explants. For aminopeptidase N, dimerization did not begin until 5-10 min after synthesis, and maximal dimerization by cross-linking of the transient form of the enzyme required 1 h, whereas the mature form of aminopeptidase N cross-linked with unchanged efficiency from 45 min to 3 h of labeling. Formation of dimers of this enzyme therefore occurs prior to the Golgi-associated processing, and the slow rate of dimerization may be the rate-limiting step in the transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex. For lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, the posttranslational processing includes a proteolytic cleavage of its high molecular weight precursor. Since only the mature form and not the precursor of this enzyme could be cross-linked, formation of tightly associated dimers only takes place after transport out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Dimerization of the two brush border enzymes therefore seems to occur in different organelles of the enterocyte.

  12. Dimerization of Plant Defensin NaD1 Enhances Its Antifungal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fung T.; Mills, Grant D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Cowieson, Nathan P.; Kirby, Nigel; Baxter, Amy A.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The plant defensin, NaD1, from the flowers of Nicotiana alata, is a member of a family of cationic peptides that displays growth inhibitory activity against several filamentous fungi, including Fusarium oxysporum. The antifungal activity of NaD1 has been attributed to its ability to permeabilize membranes; however, the molecular basis of this function remains poorly defined. In this study, we have solved the structure of NaD1 from two crystal forms to high resolution (1.4 and 1.58 Å, respectively), both of which contain NaD1 in a dimeric configuration. Using protein cross-linking experiments as well as small angle x-ray scattering analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation, we show that NaD1 forms dimers in solution. The structural studies identified Lys4 as critical in formation of the NaD1 dimer. This was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis of Lys4 that resulted in substantially reduced dimer formation. Significantly, the reduced ability of the Lys4 mutant to dimerize correlated with diminished antifungal activity. These data demonstrate the importance of dimerization in NaD1 function and have implications for the use of defensins in agribiotechnology applications such as enhancing plant crop protection against fungal pathogens. PMID:22511788

  13. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  14. Presence of the propeptide on recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase controls both activation and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Iztok; Pain, Roger; Turk, Vito

    2007-01-01

    Lysosomal dipeptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis of dipeptides with unsubstituted terminals. It is a homodimer and binds zinc. Dimerization is an important issue in understanding the enzyme's function. In this study, we investigated the influence of the propeptide on the folding and dimerization of recombinant lysosomal dipeptidase. For this purpose, we separately cloned and overexpressed the mature protein and the proenzyme. The overexpressed proteins were localized exclusively to insoluble inclusion bodies. Refolding of the urea-solubilized inclusion bodies showed that only dipeptidase lacking the propeptide was dimeric. The soluble renatured proenzyme was a monomer, although circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra of the proenzyme indicated the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. The propeptide thus controls dimerization, as well as activation, of lysosomal dipeptidase.

  15. Structural basis for RNA recognition by a dimeric PPR-protein complex.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jiyuan; Chen, Run-Ze; Ban, Ting; Zhou, X Edward; Gu, Xin; Tan, M H Eileen; Chen, Chen; Kang, Yanyong; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2013-12-01

    Thylakoid assembly 8 (THA8) is a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA-binding protein required for the splicing of the transcript of ycf3, a gene involved in chloroplast thylakoid-membrane biogenesis. Here we report the identification of multiple THA8-binding sites in the ycf3 intron and present crystal structures of Brachypodium distachyon THA8 either free of RNA or bound to two of the identified RNA sites. The apostructure reveals a THA8 monomer with five tandem PPR repeats arranged in a planar fold. The complexes of THA8 bound to the two short RNA fragments surprisingly reveal asymmetric THA8 dimers with the bound RNAs at the dimeric interface. RNA binding induces THA8 dimerization, with a conserved G nucleotide of the bound RNAs making extensive contacts with both monomers. Together, these results establish a new model of RNA recognition by RNA-induced formation of an asymmetric dimer of a PPR protein.

  16. Oxidative dimers produced from protocatechuic and gallic esters in the DPPH radical scavenging reaction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Jun; Okamoto, Yasuko; Kodama, Asuka; Makimoto, Terumasa; Kasai, Takanori

    2002-09-11

    DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging reactions of protocatechuic and gallic acids, and their methyl esters, have been investigated by NMR. In acetone, methyl protocatechuate was gradually converted to a Diels-Alder adduct of two molecules of the intermediate quinone in the reaction with DPPH radical, whereas methyl gallate rapidly gave a symmetrical dimer via a putative quinone precursor. Both dimers are rather unstable and their structures have been deduced by in situ NMR measurements of the reaction mixtures. Gallic acid also gave a corresponding symmetrical dimer in the same reaction as methyl gallate, although protocatechuquinone produced from protocatechuic acid did not yield a Diels-Alder adduct, unlike its methyl ester. Interestingly, these dimer formations were not observed in methanol solution.

  17. An improved reversibly dimerizing mutant of the FK506-binding protein FKBP

    PubMed Central

    Barrero, Juan J.; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Casler, Jason C.; Day, Kasey J.; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FK506-binding protein (FKBP) is a monomer that binds to FK506, rapamycin, and related ligands. The F36M substitution, in which Phe36 in the ligand-binding pocket is changed to Met, leads to formation of antiparallel FKBP dimers, which can be dissociated into monomers by ligand binding. This FKBP(M) mutant has been employed in the mammalian secretory pathway to generate aggregates that can be dissolved by ligand addition to create cargo waves. However, when testing this approach in yeast, we found that dissolution of FKBP(M) aggregates was inefficient. An improved reversibly dimerizing FKBP formed aggregates that dissolved more readily. This FKBP(L,V) mutant carries the F36L mutation, which increases the affinity of ligand binding, and the I90V mutation, which accelerates ligand-induced dissociation of the dimers. The FKBP(L,V) mutant expands the utility of reversibly dimerizing FKBP.

  18. Methyl 4-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)-6-isopropyl-2-(methylsulfonyl)pyrimidine-5-carbox­ylate

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Sun, Hong-Shun; Ji, Chun-Xiang; Yang, Dong-Ling; Guo, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C16H17FN2O4S, contains three independent mol­ecules, in which the pyrimidine and benzene rings are oriented at dihedral angles of 41.72 (3)°, 26.21 (3)° and 36.49 (3)°. Intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of two six- and one seven-membered non-planar rings, which have have twist conformations. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules. PMID:21202638

  19. I2-Catalyzed Multicomponent Reactions for Accessing Densely Functionalized Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and Their Disulphenylated Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Qiu, Jiang-Kai; Jiang, Bo; Hao, Wen-Juan; Guo, Cheng; Tu, Shu-Jiang

    2016-04-15

    New I2-catalyzed multicomponent bicyclization reactions of β-ketonitriles with sulfonyl hydrazides have been established, providing a direct and metal-free access toward unreported pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-4-ium sulfonates. The latter could be quantitatively converted into densely functionalized pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines in the presence of bases. Using sulfonyl hydrazides as a sulfenylating agent, the resulting pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines enabled I2-catalyzed unprecedented disulphenylations to access fully substituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines through direct C(sp(2))-H bond bifunctionalization. PMID:26991413

  20. Free energy calculations of gramicidin dimer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wanasundara, Surajith N; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-11-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations, combined with umbrella sampling, is used to study how gramicidin A (gA) dimers dissociate in the lipid bilayer. The potential of mean force and intermolecular potential energy are computed as functions of the distance between center of masses of the two gA monomers in two directions of separation: parallel to the bilayer surface and parallel to the membrane normal. Results from this study show that the dissociation of gA dimers occurs via lateral displacement of gA monomers followed by tilting of dimers with respect to the lipid bilayer normal. It is found that the dissociation energy of gA dimers in the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer is 14 kcal mol(-1) (~22 kT), which is approximately equal to the energy of breaking six intermolecular hydrogen bonds that stabilize the gA channel dimer.

  1. Electronic transitions of palladium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yue; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, Zhihua; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2013-11-21

    The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) in the visible region between 480 and 700 nm has been observed and analyzed. The gas-phase Pd{sub 2} molecule was produced by laser ablation of palladium metal rod. Eleven vibrational bands were observed and assigned to the [17.1] {sup 3}II{sub g} - X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} transition system. The bond length (r{sub o}) and vibrational frequency (ΔG{sub 1/2}) of the ground X{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +} state were determined to be 2.47(4) Å and 211.4(5) cm{sup −1}, respectively. A molecular orbital energy level diagram was used to understand the observed ground and excited electronic states. This is the first gas-phase experimental investigation of the electronic transitions of Pd{sub 2}.

  2. Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Study of Dimerization in Prion Protein: Multiple Modes of Interaction and Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2016-08-01

    The pathological forms of prions are known to be a result of misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation of the cellular prion. While the mechanism of misfolding and aggregation in prions has been widely studied using both experimental and computational tools, the structural and energetic characterization of the dimer form have not garnered as much attention. On one hand dimerization can be the first step toward a nucleation-like pathway to aggregation, whereas on the other hand it may also increase the conformational stability preventing self-aggregation. In this work, we have used extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of both monomer and dimer forms of a mouse prion protein to understand the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic stability of dimeric prion as compared to the monomeric form. We show that prion proteins can dimerize spontaneously being stabilized by hydrophobic interactions as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and salt bridge formation. We have computed the conformational free energy landscapes for both monomer and dimer forms to compare the thermodynamic stability and misfolding pathways. We observe large conformational heterogeneity among the various modes of interactions between the monomers and the strong intermolecular interactions may lead to as high as 20% β-content. The hydrophobic regions in helix-2, surrounding coil regions, terminal regions along with the natively present β-sheet region appear to actively participate in prion-prion intermolecular interactions. Dimerization seems to considerably suppress the inherent dynamic instability observed in monomeric prions, particularly because the regions of structural frustration constitute the dimer interface. Further, we demonstrate an interesting reversible coupling between the Q160-G131 interaction (which leads to inhibition of β-sheet extension) and the G131-V161 H-bond formation. PMID:27390876

  3. Fenarimol, a Pyrimidine-Type Fungicide, Inhibits Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keimei; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yamagami, Ayumi; Hoshi, Tomoki; Nakano, Takeshi; Yoshizawa, Yuko

    2015-07-29

    The plant steroid hormone brassinosteroids (BRs) are important signal mediators that regulate broad aspects of plant growth and development. With the discovery of brassinoazole (Brz), the first specific inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, several triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitors have been developed. In this article, we report that fenarimol (FM), a pyrimidine-type fungicide, exhibits potent inhibitory activity against BR biosynthesis. FM induces dwarfism and the open cotyledon phenotype of Arabidopsis seedlings in the dark. The IC50 value for FM to inhibit stem elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark was approximately 1.8 ± 0.2 μM. FM-induced dwarfism of Arabidopsis seedlings could be restored by brassinolide (BL) but not by gibberellin (GA). Assessment of the target site of FM in BR biosynthesis by feeding BR biosynthesis intermediates indicated that FM interferes with the side chain hydroxylation of BR biosynthesis from campestanol to teasterone. Determination of the binding affinity of FM to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that FM induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the expression level of the BR responsive gene in Arabidopsis seedlings indicated that FM induces the BR deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  4. Reactivity of boranes with a titanium(IV) amine tris(phenolate) alkoxide complex; formation of a Ti(IV) tetrahydroborate complex, a Ti(III) dimer and a Ti(IV) hydroxide Lewis acid adduct.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew L; Davidson, Matthew G; Mahon, Mary F

    2007-12-14

    Treatment of the titanium(IV) alkoxide complex [Ti(Oi Pr)(OC6Me2H(2)CH2)3N] (2) with BH3.THF, as part of a study into the utility and reactivity of (2) in the metal mediated borane reduction of acetophenone, results in alkoxide-hydride exchange and formation of the structurally characterised titanium(iv) tetrahydroborate complex [Ti{BH4}(OC6Me2H2CH2)3N] (3). Complex (3) readily undergoes reduction to form the isolable titanium(III) species [Ti(OC6Me2H2CH2)3N]2 (4). Reaction of (2) with B(C6F5)3 results in formation of the Lewis acid adduct [Ti(OC6Me2H2CH2)3N][HO.B(C6F5)3] (5). In comparison, treatment of the less sterically encumbered alkoxide Ti(Oi Pr)4 with B(C6F5)3 results in alkoxide-aryl exchange and formation of the organometallic titanium complex [Ti(Oi Pr)3(C6F5)]2 (6). The molecular structures of 3, 4, 5 and 6 have been determined by X-ray diffraction.

  5. Purine and pyrimidine-specific repression of the Escherichia coli carAB operon are functionally and structurally coupled.

    PubMed

    Devroede, Neel; Thia-Toong, Thia-Lin; Gigot, Daniel; Maes, Dominique; Charlier, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Transcription of the carAB operon encoding the sole carbamoylphosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli proceeds from a tandem pair of promoters. P2, downstream, is repressed by arginine and the ArgR protein, whereas P1 is submitted to pyrimidine-specific regulation and as shown here to purine-specific control exerted by binding of the PurR protein to a PUR box sequence centered around nucleotide -128.5 with respect to the start of P1 transcription. In vivo analyses of the effects of trans and cis-acting mutations on the regulatory responses and single round in vitro transcription assays indicated that ligand-bound PurR is by itself unable to inhibit P1 promoter activity. To exert its effect PurR relies on the elaborated nucleoprotein complex that governs P1 activity in a pyrimidine-specific manner. Thus we reveal the existence of an unprecedented functional and structural coupling between the modulation of P1 activity by purine and pyrimidine residues that appears to result from the unique position of the PUR box in the carAB control region, far upstream of the promoter. Missing contact and premethylation binding interference studies revealed the importance of base-specific groups and of structural aspects of the PUR box sequence in complex formation. Permutation assays indicated that the overall PurR-induced bending of the carAB control region is slightly less pronounced than that of the purF operator. The PUR boxes of the carAB operon of E.coli and Salmonella typhimurium are unique in that they have a guanine residue at position eight. Interestingly, guanine at this position has been proposed to be extremely unfavorable on the basis of modeling and binding studies, as its exocyclic amino group would enter into a steric clash with the side-chain of lysine 55. To analyze the effect of guanine at position eight in the upstream half-site of the carAB operator we constructed the adenine derivative and assayed in vivo repressibility of P1 promoter activity and in vitro

  6. Smectic Phase Formed by DNA Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel; Dhont, Jan; Stiakakis, Emmanuel

    The rapidly expanding bio market is driving the development and characterization of new multifunctional materials. In particular, nucleic acids are under intense study for gene therapy, drug delivery and other bio-safe applications [1,2,3]. DNA is well-known to form a cholesteric nematic liquid crystal in its native form; however, much recent research has focused on self-assembly and mesomorphic behavior in concentrated solutions of short DNA helices [4]. Our work focuses on DNA dimers, consisting of 48 base-pair double-stranded helices connected by a 5 to 20 base flexible single strand, and suspended in a natural buffer. Depending on temperature, concentration and length of the flexible spacer, polarizing optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering reveal cholesteric nematic and, remarkably, smectic liquid crystalline phases. A model for smectic phase formation in this system will be presented. 1] J.-L. Lim et al., Int. J. of. Pharm. 490 (2015) 2652] D.-H. Kim et al., Nature Biotech. 23 (2005) 2223] K. Liu et al., Chem. Eur. J. 21 (2015) 48984] M. Nakata et al., Science 318 (2007) 1276 NSF DMR 1307674.

  7. Structural and spectral characteristics of the cross-linked dimer derived from electrooxidation of cyclic 1,N2-propanoguanosine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hiroya; Esaka, Yukihiro; Uno, Bunji

    2011-01-01

    The acetaldehyde-derived cyclic propano adduct of 2'-deoxyguanosine was easily oxidized electrochemically into the cross-linked dimer as an oxidative product. The structural and spectroscopic characteristics of the dimer were investigated by MS, (1)H and (13)C-NMR, UV, and DFT calculations. The dimer formation was inferred from a molecular ionic peak of m/z 705 ([(2M-2H)+H](+), M being the molecular weight of the monomer) on the ESI-MS spectra and the chemical formula as C(28)H(36)N(10)O(12) provided by the high-resolution ESI-MS results. The C2-N5 linkage between the two monomers in the dimer was deduced from the (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectral results. In addition, the correlations in the 2-dimensional NMR spectra (DQF-COSY and HMBC) were consistently explained by the structure of the C2-N5 cross-linked dimer. UV spectral measurements also support the C2-N5 linking in the dimer formation. The formation of the cross-link dimer as an oxidative lesion of the acetaldehyde-derived cyclic propano adduct of guanosine is expected to interfere with DNA replication and to contribute to acetaldehyde-mediated genotoxicity.

  8. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  9. Vibrational coupling in carboxylic acid dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Chayan K.; Hazra, Montu K.; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2005-09-01

    The vibrational level splitting in the ground electronic state of carboxylic acid dimers mediated by the doubly hydrogen-bonded networks are investigated using pure and mixed dimers of benzoic acid with formic acid as molecular prototypes. Within the 0-2000-cm-1 range, the frequencies for the fundamental and combination vibrations of the two dimers are experimentally measured by using dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy in a supersonic jet expansion. Density-functional-theory calculations predict that most of the dimer vibrations are essentially in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the monomer modes, and many of such combinations show significantly large splitting in vibrational frequencies. The infrared spectrum of the jet-cooled benzoic acid dimer, reported recently by Bakker et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11180 (2003)], has been used along with the dispersed fluorescence spectra to analyze the coupled g-u vibrational levels. Assignments of the dispersed fluorescence spectra of the mixed dimer are suggested by comparing the vibronic features with those in the homodimer spectrum and the predictions of density-functional-theory calculation. The fluorescence spectra measured by excitations of the low-lying single vibronic levels of the mixed dimer reveal that the hydrogen-bond vibrations are extensively mixed with the ring modes in the S1 surface.

  10. Vibrational coupling in carboxylic acid dimers.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Chayan K; Hazra, Montu K; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2005-09-22

    The vibrational level splitting in the ground electronic state of carboxylic acid dimers mediated by the doubly hydrogen-bonded networks are investigated using pure and mixed dimers of benzoic acid with formic acid as molecular prototypes. Within the 0-2000-cm(-1) range, the frequencies for the fundamental and combination vibrations of the two dimers are experimentally measured by using dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy in a supersonic jet expansion. Density-functional-theory calculations predict that most of the dimer vibrations are essentially in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the monomer modes, and many of such combinations show significantly large splitting in vibrational frequencies. The infrared spectrum of the jet-cooled benzoic acid dimer, reported recently by Bakker et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11180 (2003)], has been used along with the dispersed fluorescence spectra to analyze the coupled g-u vibrational levels. Assignments of the dispersed fluorescence spectra of the mixed dimer are suggested by comparing the vibronic features with those in the homodimer spectrum and the predictions of density-functional-theory calculation. The fluorescence spectra measured by excitations of the low-lying single vibronic levels of the mixed dimer reveal that the hydrogen-bond vibrations are extensively mixed with the ring modes in the S1 surface. PMID:16392485

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure, characterization and antifungal activity of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Peng, Ju-Fang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zun-Ting

    2016-09-01

    Under microwave radiation, isomers 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-yl)phenols (3) and 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenols (4) were simultaneously obtained by the condensation of chromones and 3-aminopyrazoles. These two isomers were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and HRMS. In addition, a representative product 5-chloro-2-(2-methyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-5-yl)phenol (3e) was further conformed by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The antifungal abilities of the obtained products 3 and 4 were evaluated against five phytopathogenic fungi (Cytospora sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani and Fusarium solani). The results revealed that 2-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-yl)phenol (3a) and 4-chloro-2-(2-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenol (4e) exhibited good antifungal abilities against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides with the IC50 values of 24.90 and 28.28 μg/mL, respectively.

  12. Synthesis, anticonvulsant and neurotoxicity evaluation of some new pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shaquiquzzaman, Mohammad; Khan, Suroor Ahmad; Amir, Mohammad; Alam, Mohammad Mumtaz

    2011-01-01

    A series of 2-[2-(substituted benzylidene) hydrazinyl]-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (3–16) were synthesized by refluxing 2-hydrazino-4-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (2) with different substituted aromatic aldehydes in glacial acetic acid and absolute alcohol mixture (8:2). The compounds were evaluated for their anticonvulsant and neurotoxicity effect. In MES test compounds 2-[2-(4-bromo-benzylidene)-hydrazinyl]-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (5), 2-[2-(4-hydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazinyl]-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (9), and 2-[2-(3-fluoro-benzylidene)-hydrazinyl]-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-pyrimidine-5-carbonitrile (16) were found to be highly active at a dose level of 30 mgkg−1 at 0.5 h time interval, indicating their ability to prevent seizure spread at a relatively low dose. PMID:23960786

  13. Entropy-Driven One-Step Formation of Phi29 pRNA 3WJ from Three RNA Fragments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of RNA nanotechnology necessitates creation of functional RNA nanoparticles but has been limited by particle instability. It has been shown that the three-way junction of bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA has unusual stability and can self-assemble from three fragments with high efficiency. It is generally believed that RNA and DNA folding is energy landscape-dependent, and the folding of RNA is driven by enthalpy. Here we examine the thermodynamic characteristics of the 3WJ components as 2′-fluoro RNA, DNA, and RNA. It was seen that the three fragments existed either in 3WJ complex or as monomers, with the intermediate of dimers almost undetectable. It seems that the three fragments can lead to the formation of the 3WJ complex efficiently within a rapid time. A low dissociation constant (apparent KD) of 11.4 nM was determined for RNA, inclusion of 2′-F pyrimidines strengthened the KD to 4.5 nM, and substitution of DNA weakened it to 47.7 nM. The ΔG°37, were −36, −28, and −15 kcal/mol for 3WJ2′-F, 3WJRNA, and 3WJDNA, respectively. It is found that the formation of the three-component complex was governed by entropy, instead of enthalpy, as usually found in RNA complexes. PMID:24694349

  14. Spin 3/2 dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel, S.

    2009-05-01

    We present a parent Hamiltonian for weakly dimerized valence bond solid states for arbitrary half-integral S. While the model reduces for S=1/2 to the Majumdar-Ghosh Hamiltonian, we discuss this model and its properties for S=3/2. Its degenerate ground state is the most popular toy model state for discussing dimerization in spin 3/2 chains. In particular, it describes the impurity-induced dimer phase in Cr8Ni as proposed recently. We point out that the explicit construction of the Hamiltonian and its main features apply to arbitrary half-integral spin S.

  15. Quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal

    PubMed Central

    Punk, Matthias; Allais, Andrea; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum dimer model for the metallic state of the hole-doped cuprates at low hole density, p. The Hilbert space is spanned by spinless, neutral, bosonic dimers and spin S=1/2, charge +e fermionic dimers. The model realizes a “fractionalized Fermi liquid” with no symmetry breaking and small hole pocket Fermi surfaces enclosing a total area determined by p. Exact diagonalization, on lattices of sizes up to 8×8, shows anisotropic quasiparticle residue around the pocket Fermi surfaces. We discuss the relationship to experiments. PMID:26195771

  16. High Molecular Weight Dimer Esters in α-Pinene Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Cui, Tianqu; Zhang, Haofei; Gold, Avram; Glasius, Marianne; Surratt, Jason D.

    2014-05-01

    Monoterpenes, such as α-pinene, constitute an important group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Once emitted into the atmosphere α-pinene is removed by oxidization by the hydroxyl radical (OH), reactions with ozone (O3), and with nitrate radicals (NO3) resulting in the formation of first-generation oxidation products, such as semi-volatile carboxylic acids. In addition, higher molecular weight dimer esters originating from the oxidation of α-pinene have been observed in both laboratory-generated and ambient secondary organic aerosols (SOA). While recent studies suggest that the dimers are formed through esterification between carboxylic acids in the particle phase, the formation mechanism of the dimer esters is still ambiguous. In this work, we present the results of a series of smog chamber experiments to assess the formation of dimer esters formed from the oxidation of α-pinene. Experiments were conducted in the University of North Carolina (UNC) dual outdoor smog chamber facility to investigate the effect of oxidant species (OH versus O3), relative humidity (RH), and seed aerosol acidity in order to obtain a better understanding of the conditions leading to the formation of the dimer esters and how these parameters may affect the formation and chemical composition of SOA. The chemical composition of α-pinene SOA was investigated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-Q-TOFMS), and a total of eight carboxylic acids and four dimer esters were identified, constituting between 8 and 12 % of the total α-pinene SOA mass.

  17. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  18. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  19. Coulomb bound states and resonances due to groups of Ca dimers adsorbed on suspended graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarzadeh, Alireza; Kirczenow, George

    2014-10-01

    The electronic bound states and resonances in the vicinity of the Dirac point energy due to the adsorption of calcium dimers on a suspended graphene monolayer are explored theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) and an improved extended Hückel model that includes electrostatic potentials. The Mulliken atomic charges and the electrostatic potentials are obtained from DFT calculations and reveal charge transfer from the Ca dimers to the graphene which is responsible for the emergence of resonant states in the electronic spectrum. The number of resonant states increases as the number of adsorbed dimers is increased. We find a bound "atomic-collapse" state in the graphene local density of states, as has been observed experimentally [Wang et al., Science 340, 734 (2013), 10.1126/science.1234320]. We find the formation of the atomic-collapse state and its population with electrons to require fewer adsorbed Ca dimers than in the experiment, possibly due to the different spacing between dimers and the dielectric screening by a boron nitride substrate in the experiment. We also predict the onset of filling of a second atomic-collapse state with electrons when six Ca dimers are adsorbed on the suspended graphene monolayer. Experiments testing these predictions would be of interest.

  20. Ras-GTP dimers activate the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li-Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors. PMID:26080442

  1. Elucidation of cladofulvin biosynthesis reveals a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase required for anthraquinone dimerization.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Scott; Mesarich, Carl H; Saccomanno, Benedetta; Vaisberg, Abraham; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Cox, Russell; Collemare, Jérôme

    2016-06-21

    Anthraquinones are a large family of secondary metabolites (SMs) that are extensively studied for their diverse biological activities. These activities are determined by functional group decorations and the formation of dimers from anthraquinone monomers. Despite their numerous medicinal qualities, very few anthraquinone biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated so far, including the enzymatic dimerization steps. In this study, we report the elucidation of the biosynthesis of cladofulvin, an asymmetrical homodimer of nataloe-emodin produced by the fungus Cladosporium fulvum A gene cluster of 10 genes controls cladofulvin biosynthesis, which begins with the production of atrochrysone carboxylic acid by the polyketide synthase ClaG and the β-lactamase ClaF. This compound is decarboxylated by ClaH to yield emodin, which is then converted to chrysophanol hydroquinone by the reductase ClaC and the dehydratase ClaB. We show that the predicted cytochrome P450 ClaM catalyzes the dimerization of nataloe-emodin to cladofulvin. Remarkably, such dimerization dramatically increases nataloe-emodin cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines. These findings shed light on the enzymatic mechanisms involved in anthraquinone dimerization. Future characterization of the ClaM enzyme should facilitate engineering the biosynthesis of novel, potent, dimeric anthraquinones and structurally related compound families.

  2. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  3. Elucidation of cladofulvin biosynthesis reveals a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase required for anthraquinone dimerization.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Scott; Mesarich, Carl H; Saccomanno, Benedetta; Vaisberg, Abraham; De Wit, Pierre J G M; Cox, Russell; Collemare, Jérôme

    2016-06-21

    Anthraquinones are a large family of secondary metabolites (SMs) that are extensively studied for their diverse biological activities. These activities are determined by functional group decorations and the formation of dimers from anthraquinone monomers. Despite their numerous medicinal qualities, very few anthraquinone biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated so far, including the enzymatic dimerization steps. In this study, we report the elucidation of the biosynthesis of cladofulvin, an asymmetrical homodimer of nataloe-emodin produced by the fungus Cladosporium fulvum A gene cluster of 10 genes controls cladofulvin biosynthesis, which begins with the production of atrochrysone carboxylic acid by the polyketide synthase ClaG and the β-lactamase ClaF. This compound is decarboxylated by ClaH to yield emodin, which is then converted to chrysophanol hydroquinone by the reductase ClaC and the dehydratase ClaB. We show that the predicted cytochrome P450 ClaM catalyzes the dimerization of nataloe-emodin to cladofulvin. Remarkably, such dimerization dramatically increases nataloe-emodin cytotoxicity against mammalian cell lines. These findings shed light on the enzymatic mechanisms involved in anthraquinone dimerization. Future characterization of the ClaM enzyme should facilitate engineering the biosynthesis of novel, potent, dimeric anthraquinones and structurally related compound families. PMID:27274078

  4. Substrate specificity of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases of NP-II family probed by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Prokofev, I. I.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, which are widely used in the biotechnological production of nucleosides, have different substrate specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. An interesting feature of these enzymes is that the three-dimensional structure of thymidine-specific nucleoside phosphorylase is similar to the structure of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase. The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium and nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complexes with a sulfate anion were determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography. An analysis of the structural differences between these enzymes demonstrated that Lys108, which is involved in the phosphate binding in pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, corresponds to Met111 in thymidine phosphorylases. This difference results in a decrease in the charge on one of the hydroxyl oxygens of the phosphate anion in thymidine phosphorylase and facilitates the catalysis through SN2 nucleophilic substitution. Based on the results of X-ray crystallography, the virtual screening was performed for identifying a potent inhibitor (anticancer agent) of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, which does not bind to thymidine phosphorylase. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable binding of the discovered compound—2-pyrimidin-2-yl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid—to the active site of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  5. Thymine and other prebiotic molecules produced from the ultraviolet photo-irradiation of pyrimidine in simple astrophysical ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Materese, Christopher K; Nuevo, Michel; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Sandford, Scott A

    2013-10-01

    The informational subunits of RNA or DNA consist of substituted N-heterocyclic compounds that fall into two groups: those based on purine (C₅H₄N₄) (adenine and guanine) and those based on pyrimidine (C₄H₄N₂) (uracil, cytosine, and thymine). Although not yet detected in the interstellar medium, N-heterocycles, including the nucleobase uracil, have been reported in carbonaceous chondrites. Recent laboratory experiments and ab initio calculations have shown that the irradiation of pyrimidine in ices containing H₂O, NH₃, or both leads to the abiotic production of substituted pyrimidines, including the nucleobases uracil and cytosine. In this work, we studied the methylation and oxidation of pyrimidine in CH₃OH:pyrimidine, H₂O:CH₃OH:pyrimidine, CH₄:pyrimidine, and H₂O:CH₄:pyrimidine ices irradiated with UV photons under astrophysically relevant conditions. The nucleobase thymine was detected in the residues from some of the mixtures. Our results suggest that the abundance of abiotic thymine produced by ice photolysis and delivered to the early Earth may have been significantly lower than that of uracil. Insofar as the delivery of extraterrestrial molecules was important for early biological chemistry on early Earth, these results suggest that there was more uracil than thymine available for emergent life, a scenario consistent with the RNA world hypothesis. PMID:24143868

  6. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  7. Lipid-directed vinculin dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Patil, Dipak N; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Rader, Christoph; Izard, Tina

    2015-05-01

    Vinculin localizes to cellular adhesions where it regulates motility, migration, development, wound healing, and response to force. Importantly, vinculin loss results in cancer phenotypes, cardiovascular disease, and embryonic lethality. At the plasma cell membrane, the most abundant phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), binds the vinculin tail domain, Vt, and triggers homotypic and heterotypic interactions that amplify binding of vinculin to the actin network. Binding of PIP2 to Vt is necessary for maintaining optimal focal adhesions, for organizing stress fibers, for cell migration and spreading, and for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover of focal adhesions. While the recently determined Vt/PIP2 crystal structure revealed the conformational changes occurring upon lipid binding and oligomerization, characterization of PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization has been challenging in the adhesion biology field. Here, via a series of novel biochemical assays not performed in previous studies that relied on chemical cross-linking, we characterize the PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization. Our results show that Vt/PIP2 forms a tight dimer with Vt or with the muscle-specific vinculin isoform, metavinculin, at sites of adhesion at the cell membrane. Insight into how PIP2 regulates clustering and into mechanisms that regulate cell adhesion allows the development for a more definite sensor for PIP2, and our developed techniques can be applied generally and thus open the door for the characterization of many other protein/PIP2 complexes under physiological conditions. PMID:25880222

  8. Lipid-directed vinculin dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Patil, Dipak N; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; Rader, Christoph; Izard, Tina

    2015-05-01

    Vinculin localizes to cellular adhesions where it regulates motility, migration, development, wound healing, and response to force. Importantly, vinculin loss results in cancer phenotypes, cardiovascular disease, and embryonic lethality. At the plasma cell membrane, the most abundant phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), binds the vinculin tail domain, Vt, and triggers homotypic and heterotypic interactions that amplify binding of vinculin to the actin network. Binding of PIP2 to Vt is necessary for maintaining optimal focal adhesions, for organizing stress fibers, for cell migration and spreading, and for the control of vinculin dynamics and turnover of focal adhesions. While the recently determined Vt/PIP2 crystal structure revealed the conformational changes occurring upon lipid binding and oligomerization, characterization of PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization has been challenging in the adhesion biology field. Here, via a series of novel biochemical assays not performed in previous studies that relied on chemical cross-linking, we characterize the PIP2-induced vinculin oligomerization. Our results show that Vt/PIP2 forms a tight dimer with Vt or with the muscle-specific vinculin isoform, metavinculin, at sites of adhesion at the cell membrane. Insight into how PIP2 regulates clustering and into mechanisms that regulate cell adhesion allows the development for a more definite sensor for PIP2, and our developed techniques can be applied generally and thus open the door for the characterization of many other protein/PIP2 complexes under physiological conditions.

  9. Molecular orbital analysis of the hydrogen bonded water dimer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xin; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2016-02-24

    As an essential interaction in nature, hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in many material formations and biological processes, requiring deeper understanding. Here, using density functional theory and post-Hartree-Fock methods, we reveal two hydrogen bonding molecular orbitals crossing the hydrogen-bond's O and H atoms in the water dimer. Energy decomposition analysis also shows a non-negligible contribution of the induction term. Our finding sheds light on the essential understanding of hydrogen bonding in ice, liquid water, functional materials and biological systems.

  10. Molecular orbital analysis of the hydrogen bonded water dimer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Jiang, Wanrun; Dai, Xin; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    As an essential interaction in nature, hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in many material formations and biological processes, requiring deeper understanding. Here, using density functional theory and post-Hartree-Fock methods, we reveal two hydrogen bonding molecular orbitals crossing the hydrogen-bond’s O and H atoms in the water dimer. Energy decomposition analysis also shows a non-negligible contribution of the induction term. Our finding sheds light on the essential understanding of hydrogen bonding in ice, liquid water, functional materials and biological systems. PMID:26905305

  11. Synchronized oscillations of dimers in biphasic charged fd-virus suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kang, K; Piao, S H; Choi, H J

    2016-08-01

    Micron-sized colloidal spheres that are dispersed in an isotropic-nematic biphasic host suspension of charged rods (fd-virus particles) are shown to spontaneously form dimers, which exhibit a synchronized oscillatory motion. Dimer formation is not observed in the monophase of isotropic and nematic suspensions. The synchronized oscillations of dimers are connected to the inhomogeneous state of the host suspension of charged rods (fd viruses) where nematic domains are in coexistence with isotropic regions. The synchronization of oscillations occurs in bulk states, in the absence of an external field. With a low field strength of an applied electric field, the synchronization is rather reduced, but it recovers again when the field is turned off. In this Rapid Communication, we report this observation as an example of the strange attractor, occurring in the mixture of PS (polystyrene) dimers in an isotropic-nematic coexistence biphasic fd-virus network. Furthermore, we highlight that the synchronization of PS-dimer oscillations is the result of a global bifurcation diagram, driven by a delicate balance between the short-attractive "twisted" interaction of PS dimers and long-ranged electrostatic repulsive interactions of charged fd rods. The interest is then in the local enhancement of "twist-nematic" elasticity in reorientation of the dimer oscillations. An analysis of image-time correlations is provided with the data movies and Fourier transforms of averaged orientations for the synchronized oscillations of dimers in the biphasic I-N coexistence concentration of charged fd-virus suspensions. PMID:27627230

  12. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Estrella, Priscilla; Portillo, Carmen; Cruces, María E.; Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Fattori, Juliana; Migliorini-Figueira, Ana C.; Lopez-Hidalgo, Marisol; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Lopez-Castillo, Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H.; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G.; Brieba, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM) are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A) is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding. PMID:26618356

  13. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Estrella, Priscilla; Portillo, Carmen; Cruces, María E; Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Fattori, Juliana; Migliorini-Figueira, Ana C; Lopez-Hidalgo, Marisol; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Lopez-Castillo, Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM) are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A) is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding.

  14. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  15. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  16. Classical calculation of the equilibrium constants for true bound dimers using complete potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Buryak, Ilya; Vigasin, Andrey A

    2015-12-21

    The present paper aims at deriving classical expressions which permit calculation of the equilibrium constant for weakly interacting molecular pairs using a complete multidimensional potential energy surface. The latter is often available nowadays as a result of the more and more sophisticated and accurate ab initio calculations. The water dimer formation is considered as an example. It is shown that even in case of a rather strongly bound dimer the suggested expression permits obtaining quite reliable estimate for the equilibrium constant. The reliability of our obtained water dimer equilibrium constant is briefly discussed by comparison with the available data based on experimental observations, quantum calculations, and the use of RRHO approximation, provided the latter is restricted to formation of true bound states only.

  17. Breakdown of the regulatory control of pyrimidine biosynthesis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Sigoillot, Severine M; Guy, Hedeel I

    2004-04-20

    The activity of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the MCF7 breast cancer cells was 4.4-fold higher than that in normal MCF10A breast cells. Moreover, while pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF10A was tightly regulated, increasing as the culture matured and subsequently down-regulated in confluency, the biosynthetic rate in MCF7 cells remained elevated and invariant in all growth phases. The flux through the pathway is regulated by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a component of the multifunctional protein, CAD. The intracellular CAD concentration was 3.5- to 4-fold higher in MCF7 cells, an observation that explains the high rate of pyrimidine biosynthesis but cannot account for the lack of growth-dependent regulation. In MCF10A cells, up-regulation of the pathway in the exponential growth phase resulted from MAP kinase phosphorylation of CAD Thr456. The pathway was subsequently down-regulated by dephosphorylation of P approximately Thr456 and the phosphorylation of CAD by PKA. In contrast, the CAD P approximately Thr456 was persistently phosphorylated in MCF7 cells, while the PKA site remained unphosphorylated and consequently the activity of the pathway was elevated in all growth phases. In support of this interpretation, inhibition of MAP kinase in MCF7 cells decreased CAD P approximately Thr456, increased PKA phosphorylation and decreased pyrimidine biosynthesis. Conversely, transfection of MCF10A with constructs that elevated MAP kinase activity increased CAD P approximately Thr456 and the pyrimidine biosynthetic rate. The differences in the CAD phosphorylation state responsible for unregulated pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF7 cells are likely to be a consequence of the elevated MAP kinase activity and the antagonism between MAP kinase- and PKA-mediated phosphorylations. PMID:14991569

  18. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example.

  19. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example. PMID:25789570

  20. Breakdown of the regulatory control of pyrimidine biosynthesis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sigoillot, Frederic D; Sigoillot, Severine M; Guy, Hedeel I

    2004-04-20

    The activity of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the MCF7 breast cancer cells was 4.4-fold higher than that in normal MCF10A breast cells. Moreover, while pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF10A was tightly regulated, increasing as the culture matured and subsequently down-regulated in confluency, the biosynthetic rate in MCF7 cells remained elevated and invariant in all growth phases. The flux through the pathway is regulated by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a component of the multifunctional protein, CAD. The intracellular CAD concentration was 3.5- to 4-fold higher in MCF7 cells, an observation that explains the high rate of pyrimidine biosynthesis but cannot account for the lack of growth-dependent regulation. In MCF10A cells, up-regulation of the pathway in the exponential growth phase resulted from MAP kinase phosphorylation of CAD Thr456. The pathway was subsequently down-regulated by dephosphorylation of P approximately Thr456 and the phosphorylation of CAD by PKA. In contrast, the CAD P approximately Thr456 was persistently phosphorylated in MCF7 cells, while the PKA site remained unphosphorylated and consequently the activity of the pathway was elevated in all growth phases. In support of this interpretation, inhibition of MAP kinase in MCF7 cells decreased CAD P approximately Thr456, increased PKA phosphorylation and decreased pyrimidine biosynthesis. Conversely, transfection of MCF10A with constructs that elevated MAP kinase activity increased CAD P approximately Thr456 and the pyrimidine biosynthetic rate. The differences in the CAD phosphorylation state responsible for unregulated pyrimidine biosynthesis in MCF7 cells are likely to be a consequence of the elevated MAP kinase activity and the antagonism between MAP kinase- and PKA-mediated phosphorylations.

  1. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  2. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers...

  3. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  4. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  5. 21 CFR 176.120 - Alkyl ketene dimers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkyl ketene dimers. 176.120 Section 176.120 Food... Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.120 Alkyl ketene dimers. Alkyl ketene dimers may... section. (a) The alkyl ketene dimers are manufactured by the dehydrohalogenation of the acyl...

  6. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  7. Regulation of Pyrimidine Biosynthetic Gene Expression in Bacteria: Repression without Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Turnbough, Charles L.; Switzer, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: DNA-binding repressor proteins that govern transcription initiation in response to end products generally regulate bacterial biosynthetic genes, but this is rarely true for the pyrimidine biosynthetic (pyr) genes. Instead, bacterial pyr gene regulation generally involves mechanisms that rely only on regulatory sequences embedded in the leader region of the operon, which cause premature transcription termination or translation inhibition in response to nucleotide signals. Studies with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis pyr genes reveal a variety of regulatory mechanisms. Transcription attenuation via UTP-sensitive coupled transcription and translation regulates expression of the pyrBI and pyrE operons in enteric bacteria, whereas nucleotide effects on binding of the PyrR protein to pyr mRNA attenuation sites control pyr operon expression in most gram-positive bacteria. Nucleotide-sensitive reiterative transcription underlies regulation of other pyr genes. With the E. coli pyrBI, carAB, codBA, and upp-uraA operons, UTP-sensitive reiterative transcription within the initially transcribed region (ITR) leads to nonproductive transcription initiation. CTP-sensitive reiterative transcription in the pyrG ITRs of gram-positive bacteria, which involves the addition of G residues, results in the formation of an antiterminator RNA hairpin and suppression of transcription attenuation. Some mechanisms involve regulation of translation rather than transcription. Expression of the pyrC and pyrD operons of enteric bacteria is controlled by nucleotide-sensitive transcription start switching that produces transcripts with different potentials for translation. In Mycobacterium smegmatis and other bacteria, PyrR modulates translation of pyr genes by binding to their ribosome binding site. Evidence supporting these conclusions, generalizations for other bacteria, and prospects for future research are presented. PMID:18535147

  8. Synthesis of N-substituted Cyclic Hydrocarbons, such as Pyrimidine, in The Ionosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, P. P.; Peverati, R.; Head-Gordon, M.; Lee, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    The instruments on board the CASSINI spacecraft observed large carbonaceous molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. How these large polyatomic molecules are synthesized in such exotic conditions is, thus far, unknown. Molecular ions, including positive and negative ions, are in relative abundance in the ionosphere of Titan. Hence, barrierless ion-molecule interactions may play a major role in guiding molecules towards each other and initiating reactions. We study these condensation pathways to determine whether they are a viable means of forming large pure hydrocarbon molecules, and nitrogen-containing carbonaceous chains, stacks, and even cyclic compounds. By employing accurate quantum chemical methods we have investigated the processes of growth, structures, nature of bonding, mechanisms, and spectroscopic properties of the ensuing ionic products after pairing small carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen-containing molecules with major ions observed in the upper atmosphere of Titan, e.g. C2H5+ and HCNH+. We have also studied the ion-neutral association pathways involving pure-carbon molecules e.g. acetylene, ethylene and other hydrocarbons, and their dissociation fragments in a plasma discharge. We have investigated how nitrogen atoms are incorporated into the carbon ring during growth. Specifically, we explored the mechanisms by which the synthesis of pyrimidine will be feasible in the atmosphere of Titan in conjunction with ion-mobility experiments. We have used accurate ab initio coupled cluster theory, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, density functional theory, and coupled cluster theory quantum chemical methods together with large correlation consistent basis sets in these investigations. We found that a series of hydrocarbons with a specific stoichiometric composition prefers cyclic molecule formation rather than chains. Some of the association products we investigated have large oscillator strengths for charge-transfer type electronic excitations in the

  9. Oxidative Dimerization of Silylallenes via Activation of the Allenic C(sp(2))-H Bond Catalyzed by Copper(I) Chloride and N-Hydroxyphthalimide.

    PubMed

    Sabbasani, Venkata R; Lee, Daesung

    2015-10-01

    Novel oxidative dimerization of silylallenes is described. Treatment of silylallenes with a catalytic amount of copper(I) chloride, a substoichiometric amount of N-hydroxyphthalamide, and a stoichiometric amount of a terminal oxidant diacetoxyiodobenzene afforded head-to-head dimers as the main products. Silyallenes containing a small ring afforded only dimers, whereas as the ring size increased 1,3-enynes became more favorable products. For silylallenes containing an acyclic substituent, dimer formation is a norm with exceptions where N-hydroxyphthalimide reacts at the propargylic center to generate the corresponding aminoxy ethers. PMID:26402150

  10. Pyrazolo-Pyrimidines: A Novel Heterocyclic Scaffold for Potent and Selective p38alpha Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Das,J.; Moquin, R.; Pitt, S.; Zhang, R.; Shen, D.; McIntyre, K.; Gillooly, K.; Doweyko, A.; Sack, J.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of p38a MAP kinase inhibitors based on a pyrazolo-pyrimidine scaffold are described. These studies led to the identification of compound 2x as a potent and selective inhibitor of p38a MAP kinase with excellent cellular potency toward the inhibition of TNFa production. Compound 2x was highly efficacious in vivo in inhibiting TNFa production in an acute murine model of TNFa production. X-ray co-crystallography of a pyrazolo-pyrimidine analog 2b bound to unphosphorylated p38a is also disclosed.

  11. An expeditious four-component domino protocol for the synthesis of novel thiazolo[3,2-a]thiochromeno[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives as antibacterial and antibiofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Lingala; Sagar Vijay Kumar, P; Poornachandra, Y; Ganesh Kumar, C; Babu, Nanubolu Jagadeesh; Chandramouli, G V P

    2016-08-15

    An efficient domino protocol has been developed for the synthesis of new pyrimidine scaffolds, through a one-pot four-component cascade transformation via [Bmim]HSO4 ionic liquid mediated reaction, using an equimolar mixture of thiochroman-4-one, benzaldehyde, thiourea and 3-bromo-1-phenylpropan-1-one leading to the formation of a double electrophilic pyrimidine-2(5H)-thione intermediate. The intermediate regioselectively undergoes cyclization through intramolecular NH bond activation followed by CS bond formation leading to highly functionalized thiazolo[3,2-a]thiochromeno[4,3-d]pyrimidines. The ionic liquid operates efficiently under mild conditions. The recyclability and scope for recovery of the ionic liquid makes this protocol environmentally benign. Further, the compounds 5d, 5g and 5k showed promising antimicrobial activity against the tested Gram-positive bacterial strains. Among them, the compound 5d was identified as a lead molecule exhibiting promising anti-biofilm activity towards Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121, Staphylococcus aureus MLS16 MTCC 2940 and Micrococcus luteus MTCC 2470 with IC50 values of 2.1, 1.9, 2.4 and 5.3μg/mL, respectively. Further, the compound 5d showed increased levels of intracellular ROS accumulation in Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96 suggesting that oxidative stress resulted in bacterial cell lysis and death. PMID:27344213

  12. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M.; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W.; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  13. Stabilization of sulfuric acid dimers by ammonia, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2014-06-01

    This study experimentally explores how ammonia (NH3), methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and trimethylamine (TMA) affect the chemical formation mechanisms of electrically neutral clusters that contain two sulfuric acid molecules (dimers). Dimers may also contain undetectable compounds, such as water or bases, that evaporate upon ionization and sampling. Measurements were conducted using a glass flow reactor which contained a steady flow of humidified nitrogen with sulfuric acid concentrations of 107 to 109 cm-3. A known molar flow rate of a basic gas was injected into the flow reactor. The University of Minnesota Cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer was used to measure the resulting sulfuric acid vapor and cluster concentrations. It was found that, for a given concentration of sulfuric acid vapor, the dimer concentration increases with increasing concentration of the basic gas, eventually reaching a plateau. The base concentrations at which the dimer concentrations saturate suggest NH3 < MA < TMA ≲ DMA in forming stabilized sulfuric acid dimers. Two heuristic models for cluster formation by acid-base reactions are developed to interpret the data. The models provide ranges of evaporation rate constants that are consistent with observations and leads to an analytic expression for nucleation rates that is consistent with atmospheric observations.

  14. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Mashanov, Gregory I; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  15. 3D nanostar dimers with a sub-10-nm gap for single-/few-molecule surface-enhanced raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Toma, Andrea; Gopalakrishnan, Anisha; Das, Gobind; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti; Krahne, Roman; Rondanina, Eliana; Leoncini, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-04-16

    Plasmonic nanostar-dimers, decoupled from the substrate, have been fabricated by combining electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching techniques. The 3D architecture, the sharp tips of the nanostars and the sub-10 nm gap size promote the formation of giant electric-field in highly localized hot-spots. The single/few molecule detection capability of the 3D nanostar-dimers has been demonstrated by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

  16. Concerted action of two subunits of the functional dimer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase derived from a comparison of the C212S mutant and the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Safonova, T N; Mordkovich, N N; Veiko, V P; Okorokova, N A; Manuvera, V A; Dorovatovskii, P V; Popov, V O; Polyakov, K M

    2016-02-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The structure of the C212S mutant of uridine phosphorylase from the facultatively aerobic Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was determined at 1.68 Å resolution. A comparison of the structures of the mutant and the wild-type enzyme showed that one dimer in the mutant hexamer differs from all other dimers in the mutant and wild-type SoUP (both in the free form and in complex with uridine). The key difference is the `maximum open' state of one of the subunits comprising this dimer, which has not been observed previously for uridine phosphorylases. Some conformational features of the SoUP dimer that provide access of the substrate into the active site are revealed. The binding of the substrate was shown to require the concerted action of two subunits of the dimer. The changes in the three-dimensional structure induced by the C212S mutation account for the lower affinity of the mutant for inorganic phosphate, while the affinity for uridine remains unchanged.

  17. Conversion of stable RNA hairpin to a metastable dimer in frozen solution

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xueguang; Li, J. Michael; Wartell, Roger M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies employing a 79-nucleotide (nt) RNA indicated that this RNA could form two bands in a native polyacrylamide gel while one band was observed in a denaturing gel. This report describes an investigation on the nature of the two corresponding structures and the segment responsible for forming the slower mobility band. Sedimentation equilibrium of the 79-nt RNA was consistent with the two gel bands corresponding to monomer and dimer forms. The portion of the RNA required for dimer formation was explored using a secondary structure prediction algorithm of two 79-nt RNAs linked in a head-to-tail fashion. The predicted structure suggested that the first 21-nt at the 5′ end of each RNA formed a self-complementary duplex. A ribonuclease H assay carried out with RNA prepared as monomer (M), or a mixture of monomer and dimer (M/D), gave results consistent with the predicted M and D structures. Gel mobility experiments on 5′ and 3′ segments of the 79-nt RNA also indicated that dimer formation was due to the 21-nt 5′ end. Studies on the 21-nt RNA molecule and sequence variants showed that this sequence can form a hairpin and a dimer complex. Unexpectedly, the hairpin to dimer conversion was shown to occur at high efficiency in frozen solution, although little or no conversion was observed above 0°C. The results indicate that a freezing environment can promote formation of intermolecular RNA complexes from stable RNA hairpins, supporting the notion that this environment could have played a role in the evolution of RNA complexity. PMID:17925345

  18. Pyrimidine Pathway-Dependent and -Independent Functions of the Toxoplasma gondii Mitochondrial Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Cajiao Herrera, Daniela; Zimmermann, Barbara H; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2016-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) mediates the fourth step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis and is a proven drug target for inducing immunosuppression in therapy of human disease as well as a rapidly emerging drug target for treatment of malaria. In Toxoplasma gondii, disruption of the first, fifth, or sixth step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis induced uracil auxotrophy. However, previous attempts to generate uracil auxotrophy by genetically deleting the mitochondrion-associated DHODH of T. gondii (TgDHODH) failed. To further address the essentiality of TgDHODH, mutant gene alleles deficient in TgDHODH activity were designed to ablate the enzyme activity. Replacement of the endogenous DHODH gene with catalytically deficient DHODH gene alleles induced uracil auxotrophy. Catalytically deficient TgDHODH localized to the mitochondria, and parasites retained mitochondrial membrane potential. These results show that TgDHODH is essential for the synthesis of pyrimidines and suggest that TgDHODH is required for a second essential function independent of its role in pyrimidine biosynthesis. PMID:27481247

  19. Novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth based on modified pyrimidine nucleosides and their analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmalenyuk, E. R.; Kochetkov, S. N.; Alexandrova, L. A.

    2013-09-01

    The review summarizes data on the synthesis and antituberculosis activity of pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives and their analogues. Enzymes from M. tuberculosis as promising targets for prototypes of new-generation drugs are considered. Nucleosides as inhibitors of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains are characterized. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  20. 76 FR 80955 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Methanocarba Analogues of Purine and Pyrimidine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... treat and/or prevent cardiac diseases in humans.'' Upon the expiration or termination of the exclusive... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Methanocarba Analogues of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides and Nucleotides to Treat or Prevent Cardiac Diseases...

  1. Rapid and efficient synthesis of fused heterocyclic pyrimidines under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mosslemin, Mohammad Hossein; Nateghi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    Some fused heterocyclic pyrimidines have been synthesized in high yields using ultrasound irradiation in a one-pot, three-component and efficient process by condensation reaction of barbituric acids, aldehydes and a series of enamines in water. Prominent among the advantages of this new method are operational simplicity, good yields in short reaction times and easy work-up procedures employed.

  2. A solid phase approach to substituted pyrimidines and their conversion into condensed heterocycles for potential use in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S K; Haq, W; Chauhan, P M

    1999-02-01

    A novel general synthesis of substituted pyrimidine 3 has been carried out on solid support. The C-atoms carring the cyano, amino, carboxamido, as well as anchoring site have exploited to generate libraries of compounds 6-8, 10, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25 and 27. A novel strategy to cleave the resin to resin-site unsubstituted system has been developed and it provides 5,6-disubstituted pyrimidines 6-8. In addition, synthesis of 2,5,6-trisubstituted pyrimidines of prototype 10 were carried out by nucleophilic displacement of the anchor by various amines. Further investigations were directed toward the solid phase synthesis of pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidines 12, 16, 20 and 24 in which C-atoms carring the oxo, thio, amino, anchoring site as well as NH could be introduced as center of diversity to generate libraries of compounds for potential use. 4-Aminopyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidines 13 and 17 were obtained from fusion of 3a with urea or thiourea followed by cleavage of support while 3-phenylpyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidines 21 and 27 were synthesized from cyclisation of 4 with phenyl isocyanate or isothiocyanate followed by release of resin. 7-substituted pyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidines 15, 19, 23 and 27 were obtained by oxidation of 12, 16, 20 and 24 followed by aminolytic cleavage of support.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and in silico biological activity of some 2-(N,N-dimethyl guanidinyl)-4,6-diaryl pyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Kumarachari, Rajasekhar Komarla; Peta, Sivakumar; Surur, Abdrrahman Shemsu; Mekonnen, Yenus Tadesse

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: As pyrimidine is a basic nucleus in DNA and RNA, it has been found to be associated with diverse biological activities. Pyrimidine derivatives were reported to possess anticonvulsant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antihistaminic. Recently, our team reported the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial evaluation of some pyrimidines. Objective: To synthesize, predict and evaluate biological activity of some 2-(N,N-dimethyl guanidinyl)-4,6-diaryl pyrimidines. Experimental: seven new pyrimidines were synthesized by following the standard procedures using substituted aromatic aldehydes, methyl ketones and metformin. After the biological activity was predicted using PASS, Molinspiration and Osiris property explorer, their anthelmintic activity was evaluated using Pheretima posthuma. The structural assignment of the title compounds (P1-7) has been made on the basis of elemental analysis, infrared, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Mass spectral studies. Results: All the synthesized compounds were found to obey Lipinski's rule. All the synthesized compounds scored good bioactivity values as GPCR ligands and kinase inhibitors. Among the test compounds, P5 was found to be more potent anthelmintic inducing paralysis in 36-48 minutes and death in 40-51 minutes. Conclusion and Recommendation: The synthesized compound (P5) possessing methoxy group at position-4 of the benzene ring located at position-4 of pyrimidine exhibited good anthelmintic activity. The study revealed the necessity of synthesizing many more compounds with other substituents at position-4 of the benzene ring located at position-4 of pyrimidine. PMID:27413345

  4. The dominant mutation Suppressor of black indicates that de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis is involved in the Drosophila tan pigmentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Piskur, J; Kolbak, D; Søndergaard, L; Pedersen, M B

    1993-11-01

    A deficiency in the production of beta-alanine causes the black (b) phenotype of Drosophila melanogaster. This phenotype is normalized by a semi-dominant mutant gene Su(b) shown previously to be located adjacent to or within the rudimentary (r) locus. The r gene codes for three enzyme activities involved in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Pyrimidines are known to give rise to beta-alanine. However, until recently it has been unclear whether de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis is directly coupled to beta-alanine synthesis during the tanning process. In this report we show that flies carrying Su(b) can exhibit an additional phenotype, resistance to toxic pyrimidine analogs (5-fluorouracil, 6-azathymine and 6-azauracil). Our interpretation of this observation is that the pyrimidine pool is elevated in the mutant flies. However, enzyme assays indicate that r enzyme activities are not increased in Su(b) flies. Genetic mapping of the Su(b) gene now places the mutation within the r gene, possibly in the carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSase) domain. The kinetics of CPSase activity in crude extracts has been studied in the presence of uridine triphosphate (UTP). While CPSase from wild-type flies was strongly inhibited by the end-product, UTP, CPSase from Su(b) was inhibited to a lesser extent. We propose that diminished end-product inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in Su(b) flies increases available pyrimidine and consequently the beta-alanine pool. Normalization of the black phenotype results.

  5. Characterisation of the single copy trefoil peptides intestinal trefoil factor and pS2 and their ability to form covalent dimers.

    PubMed

    Chinery, R; Bates, P A; De, A; Freemont, P S

    1995-01-01

    A bacterial recombinant expression system was established to produce biologically active rat Intestinal Trefoil Factor (rITF). Characterisation of purified rITF shows that both monomers and dimers can be observed under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis studies show that Cys57 is necessary for rITF dimer formation. Samples of human gastrointestinal tissue following biopsy also demonstrated the presence of reducible human pS2 and ITF covalent dimers. Three-dimensional models for pS2 and ITF support the hypothesis that both pS2 and ITF can exist as disulphide-linked dimers in vivo and that any proposed function for these peptides must take dimer formation into account.

  6. The Diamagnetic Susceptibility of the Tubulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Torbet, James; Diakun, Gregory P.; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.; Diaz, J. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχdimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α-helices and β-sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a) using the value for the Δχα for an α-helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979) and (b) using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχdimer ≈ 4 × 10−27 JT−2 obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer = (1.41 ± 0.03) × 10−8 T−2cm2mg−1, is consistent with the above estimate for Δχdimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well. PMID:24701206

  7. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  8. A Parallel-Displaced Directly Linked 21-Carba-23-Thiaporphyrin Dimer Incorporating a Dihydrofulvalene Motif.

    PubMed

    Berlicka, Anna; Białek, Michał J; Latos-Grażyński, Lechosław

    2016-09-01

    In the search of porphyrin arrays with a unique geometry, the efficient synthesis of a directly linked 21-carba-23-thiaporphyrin dimer with the distinctive dihydrofulvalene bridging motif has been developed. This compound acquires an uncommon parallel-displaced arrangement of two carbaporphyrin planes. The dimer undergoes an acid-triggered cleavage to create of the asymmetric carbathiaporphyrin-carbathiachlorin dyad or 2,3-dihalo-21-carba-23-thiachlorin depending on choice of acid. A formation of a reactive carbocation intermediate is postulated to account for mechanism of cleavage. PMID:27530897

  9. Structure and dimerization of translation initiation factor aIF5B in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Louise Caroe Vohlander; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Byron, Olwyn; Jensen, Janni Mosgaard; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Sperling-Petersen, Hans Uffe; Mortensen, Kim Kusk

    2011-12-09

    and a maximum dimension of {approx}130 A. The effects of glycerol on the formation of dimers are discussed. This new model of aIF5B in solution shows that there are universal structural differences between aIF5B and the homologous protein IF2 from Escherichia coli.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of electron transfer between purines and pyrimidines, their dinucleotides and polynucleotides after reaction with hydrated electrons; a pulse radiolysis study.

    PubMed

    Visscher, K J; Spoelder, H J; Loman, H; Hummel, A; Hom, M L

    1988-11-01

    The radical spectra of mixtures of thymidine 5'-monophosphate (TMP) or uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) with adenine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) after hydrated electron attack, measured from 5 to 3000 microsecond after pulse radiolysis, can only be described in terms of the radical spectra of the nucleotides if an electron transfer is taken into account from the purine radical anion to the pyrimidine, resulting in the formation of a pyrimidine radical anion. From analysis of the spectra of the dinucleoside phosphates ApU, dApT and dCpdA after eaq- attack it follows that the electron-donating species is the purine radical anion (A-.) rather than the protonated purine radical. The electron transfer competes with the fast protonation of the purine radical anion: A-. + py----A + py.- and A-. + H2O in equilibrium AH. respectively. The electron transfer is found to have a diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant of approximately 1.2 X 10(10) for TMP and 3.5 X 10(9) dm3 mol-1 s-1 for UMP.

  11. Effect of pressure on heterocyclic compounds: Pyrimidine and s-triazine

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shourui; Li, Qian; Li, Wenbo; Cui, Wen; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo; Xiong, Lun; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing; Yang, Ke

    2014-09-21

    We have examined the high-pressure behaviors of six-membered heterocyclic compounds of pyrimidine and s-triazine up to 26 and 26.5 GPa, respectively. Pyrimidine crystallizes in Pna2{sub 1} symmetry (phase I) with the freezing pressure of 0.3 GPa, and transforms to another phase (phase II) at 1.1 GPa. Raman spectra of several compression-decompression cycles demonstrate there is a critical pressure of 15.5 GPa for pyrimidine. Pyrimidine returns back to its original liquid state as long as the highest pressure is below 15.1 GPa. Rupture of the aromatic ring is observed once pressure exceeds 15.5 GPa during a compression-decompression cycle, evidenced by the amorphous characteristics of the recovered sample. As for s-triazine, the phase transition from R-3c to C2/c is well reproduced at 0.6 GPa, in comparison with previous Raman data. Detailed Raman scattering experiments corroborate the critical pressure for s-triazine may locate at 14.5 GPa. That is, the compression is reversible below 14.3 GPa, whereas chemical reaction with ring opening is detected when the final pressure is above 14.5 GPa. During compression, the complete amorphization pressure for pyrimidine and s-triazine is identified as 22.4 and 15.2 GPa, respectively, based on disappearance of Raman lattice modes. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectra of recovered samples indicate the products in two cases comprise of extended nitrogen-rich amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H:N)

  12. Orphan nuclear receptor NGFI-B forms dimers with nonclassical interface.

    PubMed

    Calgaro, Marcos R; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Santos, Maria A M; Portugal, Rodrigo V; Guzzi, Carolina A; Saidemberg, Daniel M; Bleicher, Lucas; Vernal, Javier; Fernandez, Pablo; Terenzi, Hernán; Palma, Mario Sergio; Polikarpov, Igor

    2007-08-01

    The orphan receptor nerve growth factor-induced B (NGFI-B) is a member of the nuclear receptor's subfamily 4A (Nr4a). NGFI-B was shown to be capable of binding both as a monomer to an extended half-site containing a single AAAGGTCA motif and also as a homodimer to a widely separated everted repeat, as opposed to a large number of nuclear receptors that recognize and bind specific DNA sequences predominantly as homo- and/or heterodimers. To unveil the structural organization of NGFI-B in solution, we determined the quaternary structure of the NGFI-B LBD by a combination of ab initio procedures from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and hydrogen-deuterium exchange followed by mass spectrometry. Here we report that the protein forms dimers in solution with a radius of gyration of 2.9 nm and maximum dimension of 9.0 nm. We also show that the NGFI-B LBD dimer is V-shaped, with the opening angle significantly larger than that of classical dimer's exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) or retinoid X receptor (RXR). Surprisingly, NGFI-B dimers formation does not occur via the classical nuclear receptor dimerization interface exemplified by ER and RXR, but instead, involves an extended surface area composed of the loop between helices 3 and 4 and C-terminal fraction of the helix 3. Remarkably, the NGFI-B dimer interface is similar to the dimerization interface earlier revealed for glucocorticoid nuclear receptor (GR), which might be relevant to the recognition of cognate DNA response elements by NGFI-B and to antagonism of NGFI-B-dependent transcription exercised by GR in cells.

  13. Non-equivalent Role of Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Insulin Dimer Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Antolíková, Emília; Žáková, Lenka; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Watson, Christopher J.; Hančlová, Ivona; Šanda, Miloslav; Cooper, Alan; Kraus, Tomáš; Brzozowski, A. Marek; Jiráček, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Apart from its role in insulin receptor (IR) activation, the C terminus of the B-chain of insulin is also responsible for the formation of insulin dimers. The dimerization of insulin plays an important role in the endogenous delivery of the hormone and in the administration of insulin to patients. Here, we investigated insulin analogues with selective N-methylations of peptide bond amides at positions B24, B25, or B26 to delineate their structural and functional contribution to the dimer interface. All N-methylated analogues showed impaired binding affinities to IR, which suggests a direct IR-interacting role for the respective amide hydrogens. The dimerization capabilities of analogues were investigated by isothermal microcalorimetry. Selective N-methylations of B24, B25, or B26 amides resulted in reduced dimerization abilities compared with native insulin (Kd = 8.8 μm). Interestingly, although the N-methylation in [NMeTyrB26]-insulin or [NMePheB24]-insulin resulted in Kd values of 142 and 587 μm, respectively, the [NMePheB25]-insulin did not form dimers even at high concentrations. This effect may be attributed to the loss of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between NHB25 and COA19, which connects the B-chain β-strand to the core of the molecule. The release of the B-chain β-strand from this hydrogen bond lock may result in its higher mobility, thereby shifting solution equilibrium toward the monomeric state of the hormone. The study was complemented by analyses of two novel analogue crystal structures. All examined analogues crystallized only in the most stable R6 form of insulin oligomers (even if the dimer interface was totally disrupted), confirming the role of R6-specific intra/intermolecular interactions for hexamer stability. PMID:21880708

  14. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  15. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-28

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60 +/- 0.05 eV and 7.6 +/- 0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the protonated cytosine ion (CH(+)) signal at 9.20 +/- 0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH(+) appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  16. Structural plasticity in Ig superfamily domain 4 of ICAM-1 mediates cell surface dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuehui; Kim, Thomas Doohun; Carman, Christopher V.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Song, Gang; Springer, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    The Ig superfamily (IgSF) intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) equilibrates between monomeric and dimeric forms on the cell surface, and dimerization enhances cell adhesion. A crystal structure of ICAM-1 IgSF domains (D) 3–5 revealed a unique dimerization interface in which D4s of two protomers fuse through edge β-strands to form a single super β-sandwich domain. Here, we describe a crystal structure at 2.7-Å resolution of monomeric ICAM-1 D3–D5, stabilized by the monomer-specific Fab CA7. CA7 binds to D5 in a region that is buried in the dimeric interface and is distal from the dimerization site in D4. In monomeric ICAM-1 D3–D5, a 16-residue loop in D4 that is disordered in the dimeric structure could clearly be traced as a BC loop, a short C strand, and a CE meander with a cis-Pro followed by a solvent-exposed, flexible four-residue region. Deletions of 6 or 10 residues showed that the C-strand is essential for monomer stability, whereas a distinct six-residue deletion showed little contribution of the CE meander. Mutation of two inward-pointing Leu residues in edge β-strand E to Lys increased monomer stability, confirming the hypothesis that inward-pointing charged side chains on edge β-strands are an important design feature to prevent β-supersheet formation. Overall, the studies reveal that monomer–dimer transition is associated with a surprisingly large, physiologically relevant, IgSF domain rearrangement. PMID:17881562

  17. Cu(II) /TEMPO-promoted one-pot synthesis of highly substituted pyrimidines from amino acid esters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nini; Xie, Tao; Li, Zhongle; Xie, Zhixiang

    2014-12-22

    A novel, Cu(OAc)2/TEMPO promoted one-step approach for the preparation of fully substituted pyrimidines from readily available amino acid esters has been described. In this reaction, the amino acid esters act as the only N-C sources for the construction of corresponding pyrimidines. The mechanism of this process includes oxidative dehydrogenation, the generation of an imine radical, and a formal [3+3] cycloaddition. This methodology proves to be a high atom-economic and straightforward strategy for the synthesis of pyrimidines and diverse substrates which are substituted by various functional groups have been afforded in moderate to good yield. PMID:25377658

  18. Acyclic Nucleoside Bisphosphonates: Synthesis and Properties of Chiral 2-Amino-4,6-bis[(phosphonomethoxy)alkoxy]pyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Doláková, Petra; Dračínský, Martin; Masojídková, Milena; Šolínová, Veronika; Kašička, Václav; Holý, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    2-Amino-4,6-bis[(phosphonomethoxy)alkoxy]pyrimidines bearing two equal or different achiral or chiral phosphonoalkoxy chains have been prepared either by aromatic nucleophilic substitution of 2-amino-4,6-dichloropyrimidine or by alkylation of 4,6-dihydroxy-2-(methylsulfanyl)pyrimidine with appropriate phosphonate–bearing building block. Alkylation of 4,6-dihydroxy-2-(methylsulfanyl)pyrimidine proved to be the method of choice for efficient preparation of variety of bisphosphonates. The enantiomerical purity of selected compounds was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Antiviral activity of bisphosphonates is discussed. PMID:18992968

  19. ATP binding to two sites is necessary for dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains of ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Zoghbi, Maria E; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2014-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a functional unit formed by two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). ATP-bound NBDs dimerize in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides sandwiched at the dimer interface. Both NBDs contribute residues to each of the two nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs) in the dimer. In previous studies, we showed that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii forms ATP-bound dimers that dissociate completely following hydrolysis of one of the two bound ATP molecules. Since hydrolysis of ATP at one NBS is sufficient to drive dimer dissociation, it is unclear why all ABC proteins contain two NBSs. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) to study ATP-induced formation of NBD homodimers containing two NBSs competent for ATP binding, and NBD heterodimers with one active NBS and one binding-defective NBS. The results showed that binding of two ATP molecules is necessary for NBD dimerization. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dissociation, but two binding sites are required to form the ATP-sandwich NBD dimer necessary for hydrolysis.

  20. Promotion of triplex formation by 3'-amino-2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridged nucleic acid modification.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kiyomi; Rahman, S M Abdur; Sato, Norihiro; Obika, Satoshi; Imanishi, Takeshi; Torigoe, Hidetaka

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effect of 3'-amino-2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridged nucleic acid (3'-amino-2',4'-BNA) backbone modification of triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) on the pyrimidine motif triplex formation at neutral pH, a condition where pyrimidine motif triplexes are unstable. The melting temperature of the pyrimidine motif triplex at pH 6.8 with 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modified TFO was significantly higher than that observed with unmodified TFO. The 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modification of TFO increased the thermal stability of the pyrimidine motif triplex at neutral pH. The present results certainly support the idea that the 3'-amino-2',4'-BNA modification of TFO could be a key chemical modification and may eventually lead to progress in therapeutic applications of the antigene strategy in vivo. PMID:19749309

  1. Electromers of the benzene dimer radical cation.

    PubMed

    Błoch-Mechkour, Anna; Bally, Thomas

    2015-04-28

    The well-studied benzene dimer radical cation, which is prototypical for this class of species, has been reinvestigated computationally. Thereby it turned out that both the σ-hemibonded and the half-shifted sandwich structures of the benzene dimer cation, which had been independently proposed, represent stationary points on the B2PLYP-D potential energy surfaces. However, these structures belong to distinct electronic states, both of which are associated with potential surfaces that are very flat with regard to rotation of the two benzene rings in an opposite sense relative to each other. The surfaces of these two "electromers" of the benzene dimer cation are separated by only 3-4 kcal mol(-1) and do not intersect along the rotation coordinate, which represents a rather unique electronic structure situation. When moving on either of the two surfaces the title complex is an extremely fluxional species, in spite of its being bound by over 20 kcal mol(-1).

  2. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  3. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  4. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  5. Gas-phase intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans. II. Formation of anthracene and other polycyclic aromatic compounds in the pyrolysis of 1,5-bidenzocyclooctadienes and related compounds. III. Formation of 9-methylanthracene and anthracene in the pyrolysis of 5,6,11,12-tetrahydrodibenzo(A,E)cyclooctene and other related compounds. IV. Preparation of cyclopentadienones by flash vacuum pyrolysis and their dimerization and intramolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans have been investigated through the pyrolysis of 2-alkenyl-3-furylmethyl benzoates. Under flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) conditions each of the 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans can undergo an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction or 1,5-hydrogen shift to give the corresponding tricycles 4c,t, 5c,t, and 6c,t and 1,5-hydrogen shift products 36c,t and 37c,t. FVP of 1,5-dibenzocyclooctadienes containing heteroatoms and dibenzosuberanes gave the corresponding tricyclic compounds (benzodifuran (18), acridine (24), and anthracene) with exception of 6H, 11H-dibenzo(b,f)(1,4)-dioxocin (17). The FVP of 17 gave (2-hydroxybenzyl)-o-benzaldehyde (28) as a major product. A mechanistic study of the regiospecific formation of 9-methyl-anthracene from the sealed tube pyrolysis the (4 + 4) dimer of o-xylylene (1) is presented. This study was carried out by pyrolyzing several possible precursors for 9-methylanthracene (e.g., 5,6-dihydrodibenzo(a,e)cyclooctene, di-o-tolylethane, and 5-methyldibenzosuberane). Sealed tube pyrolyses of dibenzosuberanes and dibenzosuberones were also carried out. A new method of preparing cyclopentadienones by the pyrolysis of cyclic diethers is presented. Cyclopentadienones including inden-2-one have been utilized in the synthesis of polycyclic compounds. The transient existence of these intermediates has also been proven by the isolation of polycyclic compounds.

  6. A detailed MSn study for the molecular identification of a dimer formed from oxidation of pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Martin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Dimeric products formed in the oxidation of α- and β-pinene have been frequently observed in laboratory and field studies of biogenic SOA formation. While their existence is undoubted, their exact chemical structures remain unclear. This study uses a combined two step approach aiming on the molecular identification of the most important of the various dimers that have been observed in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, a dimer with the molecular weight 358 g mol-1. The first step is the application of a functional group derivatization technique (esterification) to quantify the number of carboxylic acid groups in the target molecule. Based on the detailed interpretation of the MSn spectra (up to n = 7) of the derivatized product further information about the exact structure of the compound of interest is compiled. To increase the intensity of precursor ions for the MSn-studies and especially to facilitate successive fragmentation of the target molecule, which yields structurally informative product spectra, cationization reagents (Li+, NH4+) are introduced. The results clearly point to the formation of a dimer containing three carboxylic acid groups and a structure containing a terpenylic acid building block and a pinic acid building block, strongly supporting a structure suggestion by Claeys and coworkers (Yasmeen et al., 2010).

  7. Molecular Design Principles Underlying beta-strand Swapping in the Adhesive Dimerization of Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    J Vendome; S Posy; X Jin; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; L Shapiro; B Honig

    2011-12-31

    Cell adhesion by classical cadherins is mediated by dimerization of their EC1 domains through the 'swapping' of N-terminal {beta}-strands. We use molecular simulations, measurements of binding affinities and X-ray crystallography to provide a detailed picture of the structural and energetic factors that control the adhesive dimerization of cadherins. We show that strand swapping in EC1 is driven by conformational strain in cadherin monomers that arises from the anchoring of their short N-terminal strand at one end by the conserved Trp2 and at the other by ligation to Ca{sup 2+} ions. We also demonstrate that a conserved proline-proline motif functions to avoid the formation of an overly tight interface where affinity differences between different cadherins, crucial at the cellular level, are lost. We use these findings to design site-directed mutations that transform a monomeric EC2-EC3 domain cadherin construct into a strand-swapped dimer.

  8. Dimer liquid state in the quantum dimer-pentamer model on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Owen; Herdman, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    We study the ground state of the quantum dimer-pentamer model (QDPM) on the square lattice. This model is a generalization of the square lattice quantum dimer model (QDM) as its configuration space comprises fully-packed hard-core dimer coverings as well as configurations containing pentamers, where four dimers touch a vertex. Thus in the QDPM, the fully-packed, hard-core constraint of the QDM is relaxed such that the local dimer number at each vertex is fixed modulo 3; correspondingly, the local U (1) gauge symmetry of the QDM Hilbert space is reduced to a local Z3 gauge symmetry in the QDPM. We construct a local Hamiltonian for which the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) state (the equal superposition of all configurations in a topological sector) is the exact ground state and has a 9-fold topological degeneracy on the torus. Using Monte Carlo calculations, we find no spontaneous symmetry breaking in the RK wavefunction and that its dimer-dimer correlation function decays exponentially. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of Z3 topological order in the ground state of the QDPM.

  9. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  10. Rescue of the Stargardt phenotype in Abca4 knockout mice through inhibition of vitamin A dimerization.

    PubMed

    Charbel Issa, Peter; Barnard, Alun R; Herrmann, Philipp; Washington, Ilyas; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Stargardt disease, an ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 4 (ABCA4)-related retinopathy, is a genetic condition characterized by the accelerated accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium, degeneration of the neuroretina, and loss of vision. No approved treatment exists. Here, using a murine model of Stargardt disease, we show that the propensity of vitamin A to dimerize is responsible for triggering the formation of the majority of lipofuscin and transcriptional dysregulation of genes associated with inflammation. Data further demonstrate that replacing vitamin A with vitamin A deuterated at the carbon 20 position (C20-D3-vitamin A) impedes the dimerization rate of vitamin A--by approximately fivefold for the vitamin A dimer A2E--and subsequent lipofuscinogenesis and normalizes the aberrant transcription of complement genes without impairing retinal function. Phenotypic rescue by C20-D3-vitamin A was also observed noninvasively by quantitative autofluorescence, an imaging technique used clinically, in as little as 3 months after the initiation of treatment, whereas upon interruption of treatment, the age-related increase in autofluorescence resumed. Data suggest that C20-D3-vitamin A is a clinically amiable tool to inhibit vitamin A dimerization, which can be used to determine whether slowing the dimerization of vitamin A can prevent vision loss caused by Stargardt disease and other retinopathies associated with the accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina.

  11. Dimerization kinetics and products of. alpha. -substituted o-quinodimethanes derived from benzene and furan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Man-kit.

    1992-07-20

    Effects of the {alpha}-substitutions on the termini of the reactive diene unit of o-quinodimethanes revealed a non-concerted mechanism for furan-based and benzene-based o-quinodimethane (o-QDM) dimerizations. In section one, the coexistence of the cisoid and transoid transition states in the diradical formation step is evidenced by the stereochemistry of the dimers. In view of the results of the furan-based o-QDM dimerizauons, it is believed that the regioselectivity in the diradical cyclization step is controlled mainly by the interaction between the active sites on the furan moieties in the diradical ring closure step, not by the intemal bond rotations of the carbon chain of the diradical intermediate. In section two, it was found that the trend of the regioselectivity. along the size of the {alpha}-substituents, of benzene-based o-QDM dimerizations is opposite to that of the Diels-Alder reactions. On the basis of the trends, it is suggested that the Diels-Alder reaction mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is concerted while the dimerization mechanism of benzene-based o-QDM's is stepwise. Because of their similar activation parameters, it is proposed that the parent o-xylylene and other o-xylylenes dimerize via a similar two step, diradical mechanism.

  12. Energy transfer analysis of Fos-Jun dimerization and DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, L R; Curran, T; Kerppola, T K

    1994-01-01

    The protooncogenes fos and jun encode proteins that bind to DNA as dimeric complexes and regulate gene expression. Protein dimerization is mediated by a leucine zipper and results in juxtaposition of regions of each protein rich in basic amino acids that comprise a bimolecular DNA binding domain. We have developed an approach based on resonance energy transfer for the quantitative analysis of dimerization and DNA binding by Fos and Jun in solution. Fos-(118-211) and Jun-(225-334) polypeptides were labeled with either 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein or rhodamine X iodoacetamide on unique cysteine residues located in their DNA binding domains. Formation of heterodimeric complexes between the labeled proteins allowed resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorescein and the acceptor rhodamine fluorophores. DNA binding induced a conformational transition that increased the efficiency of resonance energy transfer. This increase was consistent with a 3-A reduction in the distance between the fluorophores. Using this assay, we determined the affinity of the Fos-Jun interaction and examined the kinetics of dimerization and DNA binding as well as the rate of subunit exchange. Dimerization and DNA binding by Fos and Jun were rapid, with half-times of < 10 s. In the absence of DNA, Fos and Jun subunits exchanged rapidly, with a half-time of < 10 s. In contrast, in the presence of DNA, the complex was extremely stable. Thus, leucine zipper-containing transcription factors may exchange subunits readily when free in solution, but not when bound to DNA. Images PMID:8041795

  13. Dimerization of elongator protein 1 is essential for Elongator complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huisha; Lin, Zhijie; Li, Fengzhi; Diao, Wentao; Dong, Chunming; Zhou, Hao; Xie, Xingqiao; Wang, Zheng; Shen, Yuequan; Long, Jiafu

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Elongator complex, which is composed of six subunits elongator protein 1 (Elp1 to -6), plays vital roles in gene regulation. The molecular hallmark of familial dysautonomia (FD) is the splicing mutation of Elp1 [also known as IκB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP)] in the nervous system that is believed to be the primary cause of the devastating symptoms of this disease. Here, we demonstrate that disease-related mutations in Elp1 affect Elongator assembly, and we have determined the structure of the C-terminal portion of human Elp1 (Elp1-CT), which is sufficient for full-length Elp1 dimerization, as well as the structure of the cognate dimerization domain of yeast Elp1 (yElp1-DD). Our study reveals that the formation of the Elp1 dimer contributes to its stability in vitro and in vivo and is required for the assembly of both the human and yeast Elongator complexes. Functional studies suggest that Elp1 dimerization is essential for yeast viability. Collectively, our results identify the evolutionarily conserved dimerization domain of Elp1 and suggest that the pathological mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of Elp1 mutation-related disease may result from impaired Elongator activities. PMID:26261306

  14. Conformational Characterization of Aberrant Disulfide-linked HIV-1 gp120 Dimers Secreted from Overexpressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Andrés; Pacheco, Beatriz; Zeng, Xin; Do Kwon, Young; Kwong, Peter D.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) mediate viral entry and are also the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The gp160 envelope glycoprotein precursor undergoes proteolytic cleavage in the Golgi complex to produce the gp120 exterior glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein, which remain associated non-covalently in the trimeric Env complex. Monomeric soluble gp120 has been used extensively to investigate conformational states, structure, antigenicity and immunogenicity of the HIV-1 Env glycoproteins. Expression of gp120 alone (without gp41) leads to the accumulation not only of monomeric gp120 but also an aberrant dimeric form. The gp120 dimers were sensitive to reducing agents. The formation of gp120 dimers was disrupted by a single amino acid change in the inner domain, and was reduced by removal of the V1/V2 variable loops or the N and C termini. Epitopes on the gp120 inner domain and the chemokine receptor-binding surface were altered or occluded by gp120 dimerization. Awareness of the existence and properties of gp120 dimers should assist interpretation of studies of this key viral protein. PMID:20471426

  15. Conformationally constrained sequence designs to bias monomer-dimer equilibriums in TASP systems.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jon O; Sherman, John C

    2011-12-01

    We have designed template-assembled synthetic proteins (TASPs) with the intent of controlling their oligomeric state by stabilizing specific helical tertiary structures via histidine metal ion chelation or disulfide incorporation. In solution, cavitein Q4 was previously determined to interconvert between a four-helix bundle monomer and an eight-helix bundle dimer. In this paper, we show that judicious mutation of cavitein Q4 can stabilize either the monomeric parallel four-helix bundle or the dimeric antiparallel eight-helix bundle structure. Cavitein Q4-E3H, designed to be dimeric, is indeed biased toward dimerization as a result of incorporation of histidines. Moreover, the addition of nickel was found to further increase the association constant of dimerization. Similarly, a cavitein designed to stabilize the monomeric structure via histidine metal ion chelation (Q4-H) was found to favor a monomer in solution upon addition of nickel. Lastly, a cavitein intended to stabilize a monomeric structure via disulfide incorporation (Q4-C2) is reported. Surprisingly, this disulfide cavitein yielded two products upon oxidation suggesting disulfide formation both above the cavitand template and below may be possible. Nevertheless, the two disulfide caviteins were shown to exist as monomers as per their design. PMID:22095703

  16. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  17. Supramolecular hydrogels formed from poly(viologen) cross-linked with cyclodextrin dimers and their physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Yuting, Yang; Otsubo, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Supramolecular materials with noncovalent bonds have attracted much attention due to their exclusive properties differentiating them from materials formed solely by covalent bonds. Especially interesting are rotor molecules of topological complexes that shuttle along a polymer chain. The shuttling of these molecules should greatly improve the tension strength. Our research employs cyclodextrin (CD) as a host molecule, because CD effectively forms polyrotaxanes with polymers. Herein we report the formation of supramolecular hydrogels with an α-CD dimer (α,α-CD dimer) as a topological linker molecule, and a viologen polymer (VP) as the polymer chain. The supramolecular hydrogel of α,α-CD dimer/VP forms a self-standing gel, which does not relax (G' > G'') in the frequency range 0.01–10 rad·s−1. On the other hand, the supramolecular hydrogel decomposes upon addition of bispyridyl decamethylene (PyC10Py) as a competitive guest. Moreover, the β-CD dimer (β,β-CD dimer) with VP does not form a supramolecular hydrogel, indicating that complexation between the C10 unit of VP and the α-CD unit of the α,α-CD dimer plays an important role in the formation of supramolecular hydrogels. PMID:23209491

  18. Investigation of the Rotational Spectrum of Pyrimidine from 3 to 337 GHz: Molecular Structure, Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling, and Vibrational Satellites.

    PubMed

    Kisiel; Pszczólkowski; López; Alonso; Maris; Caminati

    1999-06-01

    A comprehensive reinvestigation of the rotational spectrum of pyrimidine was carried out by using several different spectrometers. All singly substituted 13C- and 15N-isotopic species of pyrimidine have been measured in natural abundance with millimeter-wave free jet and waveguide Fourier transform microwave techniques, and complete rs and r0 heavy atom geometries have been determined. The ground state rotational spectrum in the centimeter-wave region was measured at sub-Doppler resolution of the cavity Fourier transform spectrometer and all elements in the inertial and principal nuclear quadrupole-coupling tensors of the nitrogen nuclei in pyrimidine have been determined. The room-temperature spectrum was measured up to 337 GHz and J = 66 with BWO-based spectrometers and sextic level centrifugal distortion constants in the rotational Hamiltonian have been determined for the ground state and three lowest vibrational fundamentals of pyrimidine. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  20. Simple approach to thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidines as new scaffolds of antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Hend N; El-Gazzar, Abdel-Rhman B A; Zaki, Magdi E A

    2016-09-01

    6'-(4-Chlorophenyl)-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2'-thieno[3,2-d][1,3] oxazin]-4'(1'H)-one (1) was synthesized and used as a starting material for the synthesis of a novel series of spiro compounds having biologically active sulfonamide 2a-e and 3'-(4-acetylphenyl)-6'- (4-chlorophenyl)-1'H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2'-thieno[3,2-d] pyrimidine-4'(3'H)-one (3). Compound 2a was used as a key intermediate for the synthesis of sulfonyl carbothioamide derivatives 4a-c. Also, compound 3 was used as an intermediate for the synthesis of 3'H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2'-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin]-3'-yl] phenyl}-2-imino-4-(substituted phenyl and/or thienyl)-1,2-dihydropyridine- 3-carbonitrile derivatives 5a-e, 3'H-spiro[cyclohexane- 1,2'- thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin]-3'-yl]phenyl}-2-oxo-4-(substituted phenyl and/or thienyl)-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile derivatives 6a-e, and 4-[(2Z)-3-substituted-arylprop-2-enoyl] phenyl-1'H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2'-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives 7a-e. Cyclocondensation of 7a-e with hydrazine hydrate produced 6'-(4-chlorophenyl)-3'-[4-(5-substituted aryl-4,5-dihydro- 1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenyl]-1'H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,2'-thieno- [3,2-d]pyrimidin]-4'(3'H)-ones 8a-e but with hydroxylamine hydrochloride afforded the corresponding isoxazoline derivatives 9a-e. Also, cyclocondensation by thiourea afforded 2-thioxo-1,2- dihydropyrimidin-4-yl)-phenyl-spiro-{cyclohexanethieno[3,2-d] pyrimidin}-4-one derivatives 10a-e. The new compounds were investigated for antimicrobial activity. Compounds 2c, 8b,c, 9b and 10b were the most potent ones against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Compound 8c exhibited higher antifungal activity towards the examined fungi with MIC of 1-2 μmol mL-1 compared to ketoconazole (MIC 2-3 μmol mL-1 ). PMID:27383884

  1. A p-quinodimethane-bridged porphyrin dimer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wangdong; Ishida, Masatoshi; Lee, Sangsu; Sung, Young Mo; Zeng, Zebing; Ni, Yong; Chi, Chunyan; Kim, Dongho; Wu, Jishan

    2013-12-01

    A p-quinodimethane (p-QDM)-bridged porphyrin dimer 1 has been prepared for the first time. An unexpected Michael addition reaction took place when we attempted to synthesize compound 1 by reaction of the cross-conjugated keto-linked porphyrin dimers 8a and 8b with alkynyl/aryl Grignard reagents. Alternatively, compound 1 could be successfully prepared by intramolecular Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the diol-linked porphyrin dimer 14 with concomitant oxidation in air. Compound 1 shows intense one-photon absorption (OPA, λ(max)=955 nm, ε=45400 M(-1) cm(-1)) and a large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section (σ((2))(max)=2080 GM at 1800 nm) in the near-infrared (NIR) region due to its extended π-conjugation and quinoidal character. It also exhibits a short singlet excited-state lifetime of 25 ps. The cyclic voltammogram of 1 displays multiple redox waves with a small electrochemical energy gap of 0.86 eV. The ground-state geometry, electronic structure, and optical properties of 1 have been further studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared with those of the keto-linked dimer 8b. This research has revealed that incorporation of a p-QDM unit into the porphyrin framework had a significant impact on its optical and electronic properties, leading to a novel NIR OPA and TPA chromophore.

  2. Nonrandom behavior of amphiphilic dimers in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.-W.; Aranovich, G. L.; Donohue, M. D.

    2000-08-22

    A simple lattice theory is developed for amphiphilic dimers. An analytical solution is derived by taking into account the most important configurations of nearest neighbors. Numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to compare with analytical solutions. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  4. Hydrides and dimers of C(58) fullerenes: structures and stabilities.

    PubMed

    Bihlmeier, Angela; Klopper, Wim

    2009-02-21

    A density functional theory (DFT) study of fullerene hydrides C(58)H(2x) (2x = 2,4,...,34) is presented. We consider two relevant isomers, the most stable classical isomer C(58)-C(3v) and the energetically close non-classical isomer C(58)-C(s), which contains a heptagonal ring. Iterative pairwise addition of hydrogen atoms to only the energetically favoured products of the previous iteration yields a set of low energy structures for each composition. From these, low energy pathways are extracted. Analysis of the C-H binding energies along the reaction pathways is performed to identify particularly stable hydride compositions. These are 2x = 6,18,28,34 for C(58)-C(s) and 2x = 10,26,30 for C(58)-C(3v). We therefore suggest that these hydrides are preferably formed in hydrogenation experiments and that it should be possible to distinguish between the two C(58) isomers. We further investigate the dimer formation based on low energy C(58)H(2) addition patterns. All dimers show binding energies of more than 1 eV whereby dispersion interactions play a significant role. Both C(58) isomers can also undergo further aggregation. This leads us to the conclusion that in the absence of other reactant molecules C(58) will form intercage bonds and cannot be isolated in molecular form, which is in accordance with experimental results.

  5. Gene V protein dimerization and cooperativity of binding of poly(dA).

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, T C

    1996-12-24

    Gene V protein of bacteriophage f1 is a dimeric protein that binds cooperatively to single-stranded nucleic acids. In order to determine whether a monomer-dimer equilibrium has an appreciable effect upon the thermodynamics of gene V protein binding to nucleic acids, the dissociation constant for the protein dimer was investigated using size-exclusion chromatography. At concentrations ranging from 5 x 10(-10) to 1.2 x 10(-5) M, the Stokes radius of the protein was that expected of the dimer of the gene V protein. The Stokes radius of the protein was also independent of salt concentration from 0.2 to 1.0 M NaCl in a buffer containing 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, and 1 mM EDTA. The binding of the dimeric gene V protein to poly(dA) was studied using a simplified lattice model for protein-protein interactions adapted for use with a dimeric protein that binds simultaneously to two strands of nucleic acid. Interpretation of the salt dependence, C = [d log(Kint omega)]/[d log(NaCl)], of binding of such a dimeric protein to nucleic acid using the theory of Record et al. (Record, M. T., et al. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 107, 145-158) indicates that C is a function of the numbers of cations and anions released from protein and nucleic acid upon binding of the dimer, not of the monomer. Cooperativity of gene V protein binding to poly(dA) was studied with titration experiments that are sensitive to the degree of cooperativity of binding. The cooperativity factor omega, defined as the ratio of the binding constant for a site adjacent to a previously bound dimer to that for an isolated site, was found to be relatively insensitive to salt, with a value in the range of 2000-7000 for binding to poly(dA) at 3 degrees C and at 23 degrees C. This high cooperativity factor supports the suggestion that protein-protein contacts play a major role in the formation of the superhelical gene V protein-single-stranded nucleic acid complex.

  6. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-08-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin(+)Lrat(-/-)) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor's outer segment. In R-opsin's absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin's presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  7. Ultraviolet Spectrum And Chemical Reactivity Of CIO Dimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, William B.; Tschuikow-Roux, E.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of ultraviolet spectrum and chemical reactivity of dimer of chlorine monoxide (CIO). Objectives are to measure absorption cross sections of dimer at near-ultraviolet wavelengths; determine whether asymmetrical isomer (CIOCIO) exists at temperatures relevant to Antarctic stratosphere; and test for certain chemical reactions of dimer. Important in photochemistry of Antarctic stratosphere.

  8. N-site de-methylation in pyrimidine bases as studied by low energy electrons and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Almeida, D; Kinzel, D; Ferreira da Silva, F; Puschnigg, B; Gschliesser, D; Scheier, P; Denifl, S; García, G; González, L; Limão-Vieira, P

    2013-07-21

    Electron transfer and dissociative electron attachment to 3-methyluracil (3meU) and 1-methylthymine (1meT) yielding anion formation have been investigated in atom-molecule collision and electron attachment experiments, respectively. The former has been studied in the collision energy range 14-100 eV whereas the latter in the 0-15 eV incident electron energy range. In the present studies, emphasis is given to the reaction channel resulting in the loss of the methyl group from the N-sites with the extra charge located on the pyrimidine ring. This particular reaction channel has neither been approached in the context of dissociative electron attachment nor in atom-molecule collisions yet. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed in order to provide some insight into the dissociation mechanism involved along the N-CH3 bond reaction coordinate. The calculations provide support to the threshold value derived from the electron transfer measurements, allowing for a better understanding of the role of the potassium cation as a stabilising agent in the collision complex. The present comparative study gives insight into the dynamics of the decaying transient anion and more precisely into the competition between dissociation and auto-detachment.

  9. N-site de-methylation in pyrimidine bases as studied by low energy electrons and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Almeida, D; Kinzel, D; Ferreira da Silva, F; Puschnigg, B; Gschliesser, D; Scheier, P; Denifl, S; García, G; González, L; Limão-Vieira, P

    2013-07-21

    Electron transfer and dissociative electron attachment to 3-methyluracil (3meU) and 1-methylthymine (1meT) yielding anion formation have been investigated in atom-molecule collision and electron attachment experiments, respectively. The former has been studied in the collision energy range 14-100 eV whereas the latter in the 0-15 eV incident electron energy range. In the present studies, emphasis is given to the reaction channel resulting in the loss of the methyl group from the N-sites with the extra charge located on the pyrimidine ring. This particular reaction channel has neither been approached in the context of dissociative electron attachment nor in atom-molecule collisions yet. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed in order to provide some insight into the dissociation mechanism involved along the N-CH3 bond reaction coordinate. The calculations provide support to the threshold value derived from the electron transfer measurements, allowing for a better understanding of the role of the potassium cation as a stabilising agent in the collision complex. The present comparative study gives insight into the dynamics of the decaying transient anion and more precisely into the competition between dissociation and auto-detachment. PMID:23743926

  10. Experimental and theoretical studies on the coordination chemistry of the N1-hexyl substituted pyrimidines (uracil, 5-fluorouracil and cytosine).

    PubMed

    Barceló-Oliver, Miquel; Baquero, Beatriz Adriana; Bauzá, Antonio; García-Raso, Angel; Vich, Roberto; Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Terrón, Angel; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    N(1)-Hexyl substituted pyrimidines were shown to present solubility properties closer to the real bases than the commonly used methyl and ethyl derivatives, yielding bi-layered structures in the solid state. The study of their coordination capabilities, mainly with Ag(I) and Hg(II), is presented in order to prove their reactivity. A series of coordination complexes, namely, [Hg(N(1)-hexyl-5-fluorouracilate)2]4·6H2O (1), (Ag(+))·[Ag(N(1)-hexyl-5-fluorouracilate)2](-) (2), [Ag(NO3)(N(1)-hexyluracil-κO(4))4] (3), [ZnBr2(N(1)-hexylcytosine)2] (4), [CdBr2(N(1)-hexylcytosine)2] (5), [HgBr2(N(1)-hexylcytosine)2] (6) and [CoBr2(N(1)-hexylcytosine)2] (7), have been synthesized in good yields and X-ray characterized. The presence of the hexyl chains and the fluorine atoms causes the formation of interesting 3D architectures in the solid state. Their structures have been further characterized by infrared spectra (IR) and elemental analyses. In addition, DFT-D3 calculations are used to study interesting noncovalent interactions observed in the solid state, like fluorine-fluorine, fluorine-π and hydrophobic interactions.

  11. The definition of the toxicologically relevant applicability domain for the SNAr reaction for substituted pyridines and pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Enoch, S J; Cronin, M T D; Schultz, T W

    2013-01-01

    This study outlines how results from a glutathione reactivity assay (so-called in chemico data) can be used to define the applicability domain for the nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reaction for nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds. SNAr is one of the six mechanistic domains that have been shown to be important in toxicological endpoints in which the ability to bind covalently to a protein is a key molecular initiating event. This study has analysed experimental data (2 h RC50 values), allowing a clear and interpretable structure-activity relationship to be developed for pyridines and pyrimidines which reside within the SNAr domain. The in-ring nitrogen(s) act as activating groups in the SNAr reaction. The position(s) of the in-ring nitrogen(s) as well as other activating groups, especially in relationship to the leaving group, affect reactive potency. The experimentally defined applicability domain has resulted in a series of structural alerts. These results build on early work on the benzene derivatives residing in the SNAr domain. The definition of the applicability domain for the SNAr reaction and the resulting structural alerts are likely to be beneficial in the development of computational tools for category formation and read-across in hazard identification, and the development of adverse outcome pathways.

  12. Thermochemical properties and contribution groups for ketene dimers and related structures from theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro

    2009-07-30

    This research's main goals were to analyze ketene dimers' relative stability and expand group additivity value (GAV) methodology for estimating the thermochemical properties of high-weight ketene polymers (up to tetramers). The CBS-Q multilevel procedure and statistical thermodynamics were used for calculating the thermochemical properties of 20 cyclic structures, such as diketenes, cyclobutane-1,3-diones, cyclobut-2-enones and pyran-4-ones, as well as 57 acyclic base compounds organized into five groups. According to theoretical heat of formation predictions, diketene was found to be thermodynamically favored over cyclobutane-1,3-dione and its enol-tautomeric form (3-hydroxycyclobut-2-enone). This result did not agree with old combustion experiments. 3-Hydroxycyclobut-2-enone was found to be the least stable dimer and its reported experimental detection in solution may have been due to solvent effects. Substituted diketenes had lower stability than substituted cyclobutane-1,3-diones with an increased number of methyl substituents, suggesting that cyclobutane-1,3-dione type dimers are the major products because of thermodynamic control of alkylketene dimerization. Missing GAVs for the ketene dimers and related structures were calculated through linear regression on the 57 acyclic base compounds. Corrections for non next neighbor interactions (such as gauche, eclipses, and internal hydrogen bond) were needed for obtaining a highly accurate and precise regression model. To the best of our knowledge, the hydrogen bond correction for GAV methodology is the first reported in the literature; this correction was correlated to MP2/6-31Gdagger and HF/6-31Gdagger derived geometries to facilitate its application. GAVs assessed by the linear regression model were able to reproduce acyclic compounds' theoretical thermochemical properties and experimental heat of formation for acetylacetone. Ring formation and substituent position corrections were calculated by consecutively

  13. Thermochemical properties and contribution groups for ketene dimers and related structures from theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro

    2009-07-30

    This research's main goals were to analyze ketene dimers' relative stability and expand group additivity value (GAV) methodology for estimating the thermochemical properties of high-weight ketene polymers (up to tetramers). The CBS-Q multilevel procedure and statistical thermodynamics were used for calculating the thermochemical properties of 20 cyclic structures, such as diketenes, cyclobutane-1,3-diones, cyclobut-2-enones and pyran-4-ones, as well as 57 acyclic base compounds organized into five groups. According to theoretical heat of formation predictions, diketene was found to be thermodynamically favored over cyclobutane-1,3-dione and its enol-tautomeric form (3-hydroxycyclobut-2-enone). This result did not agree with old combustion experiments. 3-Hydroxycyclobut-2-enone was found to be the least stable dimer and its reported experimental detection in solution may have been due to solvent effects. Substituted diketenes had lower stability than substituted cyclobutane-1,3-diones with an increased number of methyl substituents, suggesting that cyclobutane-1,3-dione type dimers are the major products because of thermodynamic control of alkylketene dimerization. Missing GAVs for the ketene dimers and related structures were calculated through linear regression on the 57 acyclic base compounds. Corrections for non next neighbor interactions (such as gauche, eclipses, and internal hydrogen bond) were needed for obtaining a highly accurate and precise regression model. To the best of our knowledge, the hydrogen bond correction for GAV methodology is the first reported in the literature; this correction was correlated to MP2/6-31Gdagger and HF/6-31Gdagger derived geometries to facilitate its application. GAVs assessed by the linear regression model were able to reproduce acyclic compounds' theoretical thermochemical properties and experimental heat of formation for acetylacetone. Ring formation and substituent position corrections were calculated by consecutively

  14. Proton-bound dimers of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules: Substituent effects on the structures and binding energies of homodimers of diazine, triazine, and fluoropyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attah, Isaac K.; Platt, Sean P.; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; El-Shall, M. S.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-03-01

    The bonding energies of proton-bound homodimers BH+B were measured by ion mobility equilibrium studies and calculated at the DFT B3LYP/6-311++G** level, for a series of nitrogen heterocyclic molecules (B) with electron-withdrawing in-ring N and on-ring F substituents. The binding energies (ΔH°dissoc) of the proton-bound dimers (BH+B) vary significantly, from 29.7 to 18.1 kcal/mol, decreasing linearly with decreasing the proton affinity of the monomer (B). This trend differs significantly from the constant binding energies of most homodimers of other organic nitrogen and oxygen bases. The experimentally measured ΔH°dissoc for (1,3-diazine)2H+, i.e., (pyrimidine)2H+ and (3-F-pyridine)2H+ are 22.7 and 23.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The measured ΔH°dissoc for the pyrimidine.+(3-F-pyridine) radical cation dimer (19.2 kcal/mol) is signifcantly lower than that of the proton-bound homodimers of pyrimidine and 3-F-pyridine, reflecting the stronger interaction in the ionic H-bond of the protonated dimers. The calculated binding energies for (1,2-diazine)2H+, (pyridine)2H+, (2-F-pyridine)2H+, (3-F-pyridine)2H+, (2,6-di-F-pyridine)2H+, (4-F-pyridine)2H+, (1,3-diazine)2H+, (1,4-diazine)2H+, (1,3,5-triazine)2H+, and (pentafluoropyridine)2H+ are 29.7, 24.9, 24.8, 23.3, 23.2, 23.0, 22.4, 21.9, 19.3, and 18.1 kcal/mol, respectively. The electron-withdrawing substituents form internal dipoles whose electrostatic interactions contribute to both the decreased proton affinities of (B) and the decreased binding energies of the protonated dimers BH+B. The bonding energies also vary with rotation about the hydrogen bond, and they decrease in rotamers where the internal dipoles of the components are aligned efficiently for inter-ring repulsion. For compounds substituted at the 3 or 4 (meta or para) positions, the lowest energy rotamers are T-shaped with the planes of the two rings rotated by 90° about the hydrogen bond, while the planar rotamers are weakened by repulsion between the

  15. Antihypertensive activity of 6-arylpyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-amine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bennett, L R; Blankley, C J; Fleming, R W; Smith, R D; Tessman, D K

    1981-04-01

    A series of 51 6-arylpyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-amine derivatives was prepared and evaluated for antihypertensive activity in the conscious spontaneously hypertensive rat. A number of these compounds, notably 6-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-methylpyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-amine (36), lowered blood pressure in these rats in a gradual and sustained manner to normotensive levels at oral doses of 10-50 mg/kg. Normalized blood pressure levels could then be maintained by single daily oral doses. The effect of structural variation in the 6-aryl group and in the 2 and 4 positions of the pyridopyrimidine ring on activity is reported and discussed.

  16. Pyrimidine-based fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Ole; Kaur, Jatinder; Bhardwaj, Atul; Wuest, Frank R

    2016-07-26

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and mediates inflammatory processes that aid the growth and progression of malignancies. Three novel and selective fluorescent COX-2 inhibitors have been designed and synthesized on the basis of previously reported pyrimidine-based COX-2 inhibitors and the 7-nitrobenzofurazan fluorophore. In vitro evaluation of COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition identified N-(2-((7-nitro-benzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino)propyl)-4-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-6-(trifluoro-methyl)-pyrimidin-2-amine (6) as a novel potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 1.8 μM). Lead compound (6) was further evaluated for its ability to selectively visualize COX-2 isozyme in COX-2 expressing human colon cancer cell line HCA-7 using confocal microscopy experiments. PMID:27383140

  17. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  18. New 1,6-heptadienes with pyrimidine bases attached: Syntheses and spectroscopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; Ghannoum, Amer M.; Fares, Fares A.; Abramian, Lara K.; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2008-06-01

    A simple, high yielding synthesis leading to the functionalization of some pyrimidine bases with a 1,6-heptadienyl moiety spaced from the N - 1 position by a methylene group is described. A key step in this synthesis involves a Mitsunobu reaction by coupling 3N-benzoyluracil and 3N-benzoylthymine to 2-allyl-pent-4-en-1-ol followed by alkaline hydrolysis of the 3N-benzoyl protecting groups. This protocol should eventually lend itself to the synthesis of a host of N-alkylated nucleoside analogs. The absorption and emission properties of these pyrimidine derivatives ( 3- 6) were studied in solvents of different physical properties. Computerized analysis and multiple regression techniques were applied to calculate the regression and correlation coefficients based on the equation that relates peak position λmax to the solvent parameters that depend on the H-bonding ability, refractive index, and dielectric constant of solvents.

  19. Synthesis, and Fluorescence Properties of Coumarin and Benzocoumarin Derivatives Conjugated Pyrimidine Scaffolds for Biological Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Al-Masoudi, Najim A; Al-Salihi, Niran J; Marich, Yossra A; Markus, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Series of coumarin and 5,6-benzomcomarin substituted pyrimidine derivatives 11-15 and 22-25 were synthesized, aiming to develop new imaging fluorescent agents. Analogously, treatment of 4-chloropyrimidine analog 16 with coumarin 3-carbohyrazide 5 under MWI condition followed by boiling with NH4OAc in HOAc furnished coumarin-1,2,4-triazolo-pyrimidine analog 18. The fluorescence property was investigated spectrophotometrically in MeOH with Rhodamine 6G as standard dye. All the compounds showed emission in the region between 331 and 495 nm. The quantum yield of all the compounds were found to be weak, except methyl benzocoumarin 3-carboxylate 22 which showed (ΦF = 0.98) in comparison to Rhodamine 6G as standard (ΦF = 0.95).

  20. Quinolinyl Pyrimidines: Potent Inhibitors of NDH-2 as a Novel Class of Anti-TB Agents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    NDH-2 is an essential respiratory enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which plays an important role in the physiology of Mtb. Herein, we present a target-based effort to identify a new structural class of inhibitors for NDH-2. High-throughput screening of the AstraZeneca corporate collection resulted in the identification of quinolinyl pyrimidines as the most promising class of NDH-2 inhibitors. Structure–activity relationship studies showed improved enzyme inhibition (IC50) against the NDH-2 target, which in turn translated into cellular activity against Mtb. Thus, the compounds in this class show a good correlation between enzyme inhibition and cellular potency. Furthermore, early ADME profiling of the best compounds showed promising results and highlighted the quinolinyl pyrimidine class as a potential lead for further development. PMID:24900541

  1. N-Benzyl­thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-amine

    PubMed Central

    Štarha, Pavel; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C13H11N3S, crystallizes with two independent mol­ecules in the asymmetric unit. The two mol­ecules are geometrically very similar and differ mainly in a spatial orientation of the benzene and thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine ring systems [dihedral angles = 69.49 (4) and 79.05 (3)°]. The nine-membered thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine moieties have a planar conformation (r.m.s. deviations = 0.020 and 0.012 Å). In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked through N—H⋯N, N—H⋯C and C—H⋯π non-covalent contacts into chains along the c axis, while neighbouring chains are connected via C—H⋯N inter­actions. PMID:23723854

  2. N-Benzyl-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-amine.

    PubMed

    Starha, Pavel; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-05-01

    The title compound, C13H11N3S, crystallizes with two independent mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. The two mol-ecules are geometrically very similar and differ mainly in a spatial orientation of the benzene and thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine ring systems [dihedral angles = 69.49 (4) and 79.05 (3)°]. The nine-membered thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidine moieties have a planar conformation (r.m.s. deviations = 0.020 and 0.012 Å). In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked through N-H⋯N, N-H⋯C and C-H⋯π non-covalent contacts into chains along the c axis, while neighbouring chains are connected via C-H⋯N inter-actions. PMID:23723854

  3. Mixed-valence copper(I,II) complexes with 4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-R-pyrimidines: from ionic structures to coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Katerina A; Krivopalov, Viktor P; Nikolaenkova, Elena B; Pervukhina, Natalia V; Naumov, Dmitrii Yu; Boguslavsky, Evgenii G; Bushuev, Mark B

    2016-01-14

    Two pyrimidine-based ligands, 4-(3,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-(morpholino)pyrimidine () and 4-(3,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-phenoxypyrimidine (), and a series of mixed-valence copper(i,ii) halide complexes, [Cu(L(2))2Br]2[Cu2Br4] (), [Cu(L(2))2Cl][CuCl2] (), and [Cu2L(3)Br3]n (), have been synthesized. The complex [Cu(L(2))2Br]2[Cu2Br4] was prepared by the reaction of with CuBr2 in a 1 : 1 molar ratio in MeCN. Its chlorido-analogue, the complex [Cu(L(2))2Cl][CuCl2], was synthesized by the reaction between , CuCl2 and CuCl in a 2 : 1 : 1 molar ratio in MeCN. The ligand acts as a chelating one. In the structures of the complexes [Cu(L(2))2Br]2[Cu2Br4] and [Cu(L(2))2Cl][CuCl2] the Cu(2+) ion is in the cationic part of the complex whereas the Cu(+) ion is located in the anionic part. The best way to synthesize the mixed-valence 1D coordination polymer [Cu2L(3)Br3]n is to react CuBr2 with in a 2 : 1 molar ratio in the MeCN/CHCl3 mixture on heating. In the structure of [Cu2L(3)Br3]n the ligand shows chelating/bridging tridentate coordination. This is the first example of the tridentate coordination of 4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-R-pyrimidines. The striking difference between the coordination behavior of and (chelating bidentate vs. chelating/bridging coordination) is related with the possibility of rotation of the 6-phenoxy group around the C-O bond which makes the N(1) pyrimidine atom less sterically hindered, enabling it to participate in metal ion binding. Importantly, all copper ions in [Cu2L(3)Br3]n show similar tetrahedral environments, CuNBr3 and CuN2Br2, which is extremely rare for mixed-valence copper(i,ii) compounds. The ligands and show blue emission which is quenched upon their coordination to copper ions. The 1D coordination polymer [Cu2L(3)Br3]n shows high thermal stability and unusual solvent-occlusion properties. The role of the substituents favoring the formation of the mixed-valence copper(i,ii) complexes with 4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-R-pyrimidines

  4. DFT study of small fullerene dimer complexes C20-Nm@Cn (m = 1-6 and n = 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Sharma, Amrish; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-05-01

    First principle calculations based on density functional theory were performed to calculate the structural and electronic properties of C20-Nm@Cn dimer complexes. The calculated binding energies of the complexes formed are comparable to C60 dimer which ensures their stability. The bond lengths of these dimer complexes were found to be nearly same as pure complexes C20-Cn. Further, nitrogen (N) atoms were encapsulated inside the secondary cage (Cn) of dimer complexes and the number of N atoms depends on diameter of the cage. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of new proposed complexes indicate the increase in gap as compared to pure complexes. Mulliken charge analysis of these complexes has been studied which shows the significant charge transfer from the N atoms to the secondary cage of these complexes. The study propose the formation of the new dimer complexes which are stable and are able to encapsulate atoms which are otherwise reactive in free space.

  5. Recognition of Damaged DNA for Nucleotide Excision Repair: A Correlated Motion Mechanism with a Mismatched cis-syn Thymine Dimer Lesion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair requires lesion recognition by XPC, whose detailed binding mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we have delineated the dynamic molecular pathway and energetics of lesion-specific and productive binding by the Rad4/yeast XPC lesion recognition factor, as it forms the open complex [Min, J. H., and Pavletich, N. P. (2007) Nature 449, 570–575; Chen, X., et al. (2015) Nat. Commun. 6, 5849] that is required for excision. We investigated extensively a cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in mismatched duplex DNA, using high-level computational approaches. Our results delineate a preferred correlated motion mechanism, which provides for the first time an atomistic description of the sequence of events as Rad4 productively binds to the damaged DNA. PMID:26270861

  6. Diversion of aspartate in ASS1-deficient tumours fosters de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Adler, Lital; Yizhak, Keren; Sarver, Alona; Silberman, Alon; Agron, Shani; Stettner, Noa; Sun, Qin; Brandis, Alexander; Helbling, Daniel; Korman, Stanley; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Dimmock, David; Ulitsky, Igor; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Ruppin, Eytan; Erez, Ayelet

    2015-11-19

    Cancer cells hijack and remodel existing metabolic pathways for their benefit. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) is a urea cycle enzyme that is essential in the conversion of nitrogen from ammonia and aspartate to urea. A decrease in nitrogen flux through ASS1 in the liver causes the urea cycle disorder citrullinaemia. In contrast to the well-studied consequences of loss of ASS1 activity on ureagenesis, the purpose of its somatic silencing in multiple cancers is largely unknown. Here we show that decreased activity of ASS1 in cancers supports proliferation by facilitating pyrimidine synthesis via CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase complex) activation. Our studies were initiated by delineating the consequences of loss of ASS1 activity in humans with two types of citrullinaemia. We find that in citrullinaemia type I (CTLN I), which is caused by deficiency of ASS1, there is increased pyrimidine synthesis and proliferation compared with citrullinaemia type II (CTLN II), in which there is decreased substrate availability for ASS1 caused by deficiency of the aspartate transporter citrin. Building on these results, we demonstrate that ASS1 deficiency in cancer increases cytosolic aspartate levels, which increases CAD activation by upregulating its substrate availability and by increasing its phosphorylation by S6K1 through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Decreasing CAD activity by blocking citrin, the mTOR signalling, or pyrimidine synthesis decreases proliferation and thus may serve as a therapeutic strategy in multiple cancers where ASS1 is downregulated. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 downregulation is a novel mechanism supporting cancerous proliferation, and they provide a metabolic link between the urea cycle enzymes and pyrimidine synthesis.

  7. Diversion of aspartate in ASS1-deficient tumours fosters de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Adler, Lital; Yizhak, Keren; Sarver, Alona; Silberman, Alon; Agron, Shani; Stettner, Noa; Sun, Qin; Brandis, Alexander; Helbling, Daniel; Korman, Stanley; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Dimmock, David; Ulitsky, Igor; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Ruppin, Eytan; Erez, Ayelet

    2015-11-19

    Cancer cells hijack and remodel existing metabolic pathways for their benefit. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) is a urea cycle enzyme that is essential in the conversion of nitrogen from ammonia and aspartate to urea. A decrease in nitrogen flux through ASS1 in the liver causes the urea cycle disorder citrullinaemia. In contrast to the well-studied consequences of loss of ASS1 activity on ureagenesis, the purpose of its somatic silencing in multiple cancers is largely unknown. Here we show that decreased activity of ASS1 in cancers supports proliferation by facilitating pyrimidine synthesis via CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase complex) activation. Our studies were initiated by delineating the consequences of loss of ASS1 activity in humans with two types of citrullinaemia. We find that in citrullinaemia type I (CTLN I), which is caused by deficiency of ASS1, there is increased pyrimidine synthesis and proliferation compared with citrullinaemia type II (CTLN II), in which there is decreased substrate availability for ASS1 caused by deficiency of the aspartate transporter citrin. Building on these results, we demonstrate that ASS1 deficiency in cancer increases cytosolic aspartate levels, which increases CAD activation by upregulating its substrate availability and by increasing its phosphorylation by S6K1 through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Decreasing CAD activity by blocking citrin, the mTOR signalling, or pyrimidine synthesis decreases proliferation and thus may serve as a therapeutic strategy in multiple cancers where ASS1 is downregulated. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 downregulation is a novel mechanism supporting cancerous proliferation, and they provide a metabolic link between the urea cycle enzymes and pyrimidine synthesis. PMID:26560030

  8. Enantioselective Intermolecular Cyclopropanations for the Synthesis of Chiral Pyrimidine Carbocyclic Nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming-Sheng; Zhou, Peng; Niu, Hong-Ying; Qu, Gui-Rong; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2016-09-01

    A direct route to chiral cyclopropylpyrimidine carbocyclic nucleoside analogues has been reported via highly enantioselective intermolecular cyclopropanation reactions of N1-vinylpyrimidines with α-diazoesters. With chiral ruthenium(II)-phenyloxazoline complex (2 mol %) as the catalyst, cyclopropyl pyrimidine nucleoside analogues could be obtained in good yields (71-96% yields) with high levels of diastereo- and enantioselectivities (10:1 to >20:1 dr and 96-99% ee) in 1 min. PMID:27526779

  9. Ethyl 2-{N-[N-(4-chloro-6-methoxy­pyrimidin-2-yl)carbamo­yl]sulfamo­yl}benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chui; Li, Fang-Shi; Yu, Da-Sheng; Yao, Wei; Liu, Yin-Hong

    2008-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H15ClN4O6S, contains two independent mol­ecules, in which the pyrimidine and benzene rings are oriented at dihedral angles of 75.21 (3) and 86.00 (3)°. Intra­molecular N—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of two five- and two six-membered rings. The six-membered rings have flattened-boat conformations, while the five-membered rings adopt envelope conformations. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules. PMID:21202882

  10. Methyl 4-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)-6-isopropyl-2-[N-methyl-N-(methylsulfonyl)amino]­pyrimidine-5-carboxyl­ate

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Yang, Dong-Ling; Cui, Yong-Tao; Xu, Ye-Ming; Guo, Cheng

    2008-01-01

    In the mol­ecule of the title compound, C17H20FN3O4S, the pyrimidine and benzene rings are oriented at a dihedral angle of 35.59 (3)°. Intra­molecular C—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds result in the formation of one five- and two six-membered non-planar rings. One of the six-membered rings adopts a chair conformation, while the other six-membered ring and the five-membered ring exhibit envelope conformations with O and N atoms displaced by 0.837 (3) and 0.152 (3) Å, respectively from the planes of the other ring atoms. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular C—H⋯F hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into infinite chains. PMID:21202637

  11. Internal energy selection in vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of ethanol and ethanol dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Andras

    2013-10-01

    Internal energy selected ethanol monomer and ethanol dimer ions were prepared by threshold photoionization of a supersonic molecular beam seeded with ethanol. The dissociative photoionization processes of the monomer, the lowest-energy CH3-loss channel of the dimer, and the fragmentation of larger clusters were found to be disjunct from the ionization onset to about 12 eV, which made it possible to determine the 0 K appearance energy of C-C bond breaking in the H-donor unit of the ethanol dimer cation as 9.719 ± 0.004 eV. This reaction energy is used together with ab initio calculations in a thermochemical cycle to determine the binding energy change from the neutral ethanol dimer to a protonated ethanol-formaldehyde adduct. The cycle also shows general agreement between experiment, theory, and previously published enthalpies of formation. The role of the initial ionization site, or rather the initial photoion state, is also discussed based on the dimer breakdown diagram and excited state calculations. There is no evidence for isolated state behavior, and the ethanol dimer dissociative photoionization processes appear to be governed by statistical theory and the ground electronic state of the ion. In the monomer breakdown diagram, the smoothly changing branching ratio between H and CH3 loss is at odds with rate theory predictions, and shows that none of the currently employed few-parameter rate models, appropriate for experimental rate curve fitting, yields a correct description for this process in the experimental energy range.

  12. Glutamate Racemase Dimerization Inhibits Dynamic Conformational Flexibility and Reduces Catalytic Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mehboob, Shahila; Guo, Liang; Fu, Wentao; Mittal, Anuradha; Yau, Tiffany; Truong, Kent; Johlfs, Mary; Long, Fei; Fung, Leslie W.-M.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Glutamate racemase (RacE) is a bacterial enzyme that converts L-glutamate to D-glutamate, an essential precursor for peptidoglycan synthesis. In prior work, we have shown that both isoforms cocrystallize with D-glutamate as dimers, and the enzyme is in a closed conformation with limited access to the active site [May, M., et al. (2007) J. Mol. Biol. 371, 1219-1237]. The active site of RacE2 is especially restricted. We utilize several computational and experimental approaches to understand the overall conformational dynamics involved during catalysis when the ligand enters and the product exits the active site. Our steered molecular dynamics simulations and normal-mode analysis results indicate that the monomeric form of the enzyme is more flexible than the native dimeric form. These results suggest that the monomeric enzyme might be more active than the dimeric form. We thus generated site-specific mutations that disrupt dimerization and find that the mutants exhibit significantly higher catalytic rates in the D-Glu to L-Glu reaction direction than the native enzyme. Low-resolution models restored from solution X-ray scattering studies correlate well with the first six normal modes of the dimeric form of the enzyme, obtained from NMA. Thus, along with the local active site residues, global domain motions appear to be implicated in the catalytically relevant structural dynamics of this enzyme and suggest that increased flexibility may accelerate catalysis. This is a novel observation that residues distant from the catalytic site restrain catalytic activity through formation of the dimer structure.

  13. A density functional theory study of dimers of hydrophosphoryl compounds and proton transfer in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Yu. V.; Prisyazhnyuk, A. V.; Ustynyuk, Yu. A.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of dimers of several types of dimethylphosphinous acid (CH3)2POH and dimethylphosphine oxide (CH3)2P(O)H and dimers of the corresponding perfluorinated derivatives (CF3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H were studied in detail by density functional theory with the PBE gradient-corrected functional and the TZ2 p basis set. Fairly strong dimeric associates (2.50-10.5 kcal/mol) were shown to form thanks to O-H···O, O-H···P, and C-H···O H-bonds and dipole-dipole interactions of polar phosphoryl groups P → O of two monomer molecules. The existence of C-H···O and the absence of P-H···O H-bonds in (CH3)2P(O)H dimers was substantiated by an AIM (atoms in molecules) analysis of their structures according to Bader. The reaction coordinates were calculated for synchronous transfer of two protons in (CH3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H dimers. Both rearrangements were shown to occur via symmetrical six-membered planar transition states with activation barriers of less than 20 kcal/mol, which was much lower than for intramolecular transfer in the corresponding monomers (47 kcal/mol for the (CH3)2P(O)H → (CH3)2POH pair). The tautomeric transitions between the phosphinous acid and phosphine oxide forms observed experimentally in nonpolar media under mild conditions in the absence of molecules that could act as proton carriers were shown to proceed as bimolecular reactions with the intermediate formation of the corresponding dimers.

  14. Targeting the cis-dimerization of LINGO-1 with low MW compounds affects its downstream signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cobret, L; De Tauzia, M L; Ferent, J; Traiffort, E; Hénaoui, I; Godin, F; Kellenberger, E; Rognan, D; Pantel, J; Bénédetti, H; Morisset-Lopez, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The transmembrane protein LINGO-1 is a negative regulator in the nervous system mainly affecting axonal regeneration, neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating its functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation and the role of LINGO-1 cis-dimers in the regulation of its biological activity. Experimental Approach LINGO-1 homodimers were identified in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and BRET saturation analysis. We performed a hypothesis-driven screen for identification of small-molecule protein–protein interaction modulators of LINGO-1 using a BRET-based assay, adapted for screening. The compound identified was further assessed for effects on LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways using Western blotting analysis and AlphaScreen technology. Key Results LINGO-1 was present as homodimers in primary neuronal cultures. LINGO-1 interacted homotypically in cis-orientation and LINGO-1 cis-dimers were formed early during LINGO-1 biosynthesis. A BRET-based assay allowed us to identify phenoxybenzamine as the first conformational modulator of LINGO-1 dimers. In HEK-293 cells, phenoxybenzamine was a positive modulator of LINGO-1 function, increasing the LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor signalling and Erk phosphorylation. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that LINGO-1 forms constitutive cis-dimers at the plasma membrane and that low MW compounds affecting the conformational state of these dimers can regulate LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways. We propose that targeting the LINGO-1 dimerization interface opens a new pharmacological approach to the modulation of its function and provides a new strategy for drug discovery. PMID:25257685

  15. Blocking Estrogen Signaling After the Hormone: Pyrimidine-Core Inhibitors of Estrogen Receptor-Coactivator Binding

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Alexander A.; Gunther, Jillian R.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative approach to blocking estrogen action, we have developed small molecules that directly disrupt the key estrogen receptor (ER)/coactivator interaction necessary for gene activation. The more direct, protein-protein nature of this disruption might be effective even in hormone-refractory breast cancer. We have synthesized a pyrimidine-core library of moderate size, members of which act as α-helix mimics to block ERα/coactivator interaction. Structure- activity relationships have been explored with various C, N, O and S-substituents on the pyrimidine core. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer and cell-based reporter gene assays show that the most active members inhibit the ERα/steroid receptor coactivator interaction with Ki’s in the low micromolar range. Through these studies, we have obtained a refined pharmacophore model for activity in this pyrimidine series. Furthermore, the favorable activities of several of these compounds support the feasibility that this coactivator binding inhibition mechanism for blocking estrogen action might provide a potential alternative approach to endocrine therapy. PMID:18785725

  16. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  17. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  18. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D. B.; Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G.; Nixon, K. L.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  19. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27262062

  20. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria.