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Sample records for pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

  1. Ketonic diet in the management of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Falk, R E; Cederbaum, S D; Blass, J P; Gibson, G E; Kark, R A; Carrel, R E

    1976-11-01

    Two brothers, aged 11 years 6 months and 2 years 3 months, with psychomotor and growth retardation, episodes of weakness, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and elevated levels of blood pyruvate were shown to have a deficiency in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). When they ate a diet high enough in fats to cause ketonemia but not acidosis, there was a fall in blood pyruvate levels, a decrease in the frequency and severity of the episodes of neurological deterioration, an increased rate of growth and development in the younger brother, and increased strength and endurance in the older one. The possibility of dietary treatment makes the early diagnosis of PDH deficiency more important. Determination of blood pyruvate and lactate levels following a standard glucose meal (glucose-pyruvate test) appears to be the most reliable screening test for this condition.

  2. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  4. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  5. Energy substrate metabolism in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stenlid, Maria Halldin; Ahlsson, Fredrik; Forslund, Anders; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in lactic acidosis and neurological dysfunction. In order to provide energy for the brain, a ketogenic diet has been tried. Both the disorder and the ketogenic therapy may influence energy production. The aim of the study was to assess hepatic glucose production, lipolysis and resting energy expenditure (REE) in an infant, given a ketogenic diet due to neonatal onset of the disease. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined for two consecutive time periods by constant-rate infusions of [1,1,2,3,3-²H₅]-glycerol and [6,6-²H²]-glucose. The boy had been fasting for 2.5 h at the start of the sampling periods. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were increased compared with those of term neonates. REE corresponded to 60% of normal values. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was increased, indicating a predominance of glucose oxidation. Blood lactate was within the normal range. Several mechanisms may underlie the increased rates of glucose production and lipolysis. A ketogenic diet will result in a low insulin secretion and reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, leading to increased production of glucose and decreased peripheral glucose uptake. Surprisingly, RQ was high, indicating active glucose oxidation, which may reflect a residual enzyme activity, sufficient during rest. Considering this, a strict ketogenic diet might not be the optimal choice for patients with PDH deficiency. We propose an individualised diet for this group of patients aiming at the highest glucose intake that each patient will tolerate without elevated lactate levels.

  6. Reconciling diabetes management and the ketogenic diet in a child with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Maria J; Thornton, Paul S; Preis, Christina M; Chee, Clare; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-05-01

    A 4-year-old girl with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, static encephalopathy, and seizure disorder treated with the ketogenic diet presented in severe diabetic ketoacidosis. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency is a rare genetic defect of mitochondrial energy metabolism that leads to inefficient glucose use and lactic acidosis. The ketogenic diet provides the brain with an alternate fuel source, but its implementation opposes traditional diabetes management. Faced with this therapeutic dilemma, we aimed to maintain ketosis without compromising safety to optimize neurologic function and quality of life. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of a child simultaneously treated with the ketogenic diet and exogenous insulin. A 28-month follow-up revealed excellent glycemic control, improved activity level, significant developmental achievements, and, perhaps most striking, catch-up linear growth from < 5th percentile to the 50th percentile. Her progress to date indicates that diabetes does not preclude use of the ketogenic diet.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency in neonatal jaundice cases in egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel Fattah, Mohammed; Abdel Ghany, Eman; Adel, Alia; Mosallam, Dalia; Kamal, Shahira

    2010-05-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can lead to acute hemolytic anemia, chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, and neonatal jaundice. Neonatal red cell pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency may cause clinical patterns, ranging from extremely severe hemolytic anemia to moderate jaundice. The authors aimed at studying the prevalence of G6PD and PK deficiency among Egyptian neonates with pathological indirect hyperbilirubinemia in Cairo. This case-series study included 69 newborns with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. All were subjected to clinical history, laboratory investigations, e.g., complete blood counts, reticulocytic counts, direct and indirect serum bilirubin levels, Coombs tests, qualitative assay of G6PD activity by methemoglobin reduction test, and measurement of erythrocytic PK levels. The study detected 10 neonates with G6PD deficiency, which means that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Egyptian neonates with hyperbilirubinemia is 14.4% (21.2% of males). G6PD deficiency was significantly higher in males than females (P = .01). The authors detected 2 cases with PK deficiency, making the prevalence of its deficiency 2.8%. These data demonstrate that G6PD deficiency is an important cause for neonatal jaundice in Egyptians. Neonatal screening for its deficiency is recommended. PK deficiency is not a common cause of neonatal jaundice. However, this needs further investigation on a larger scale.

  8. The Spectrum of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency: Clinical, Biochemical and Genetic Features in 371 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O'Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970-2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 Binding Protein of the complex. Data Sources and Extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio ≤20. PMID:22079328

  9. The spectrum of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency: Clinical, biochemical and genetic features in 371 patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kavi P.; O’Brien, Thomas W.; Subramony, Sankarasubramon H.; Shuster, Jonathan; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Context Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disorder commonly associated with lactic acidosis, progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration and, usually, death during childhood. There has been no recent comprehensive analysis of the natural history and clinical course of this disease. Objective We reviewed 371 cases of PDC deficiency, published between 1970 and 2010, that involved defects in subunits E1α and E1β and components E1, E2, E3 and the E3 binding protein of the complex. Data sources and extraction English language peer-reviewed publications were identified, primarily by using PubMed and Google Scholar search engines. Results Neurodevelopmental delay and hypotonia were the commonest clinical signs of PDC deficiency. Structural brain abnormalities frequently included ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and neuroimaging findings typical of Leigh syndrome. Neither gender nor any clinical or neuroimaging feature differentiated the various biochemical etiologies of the disease. Patients who died were younger, presented clinically earlier and had higher blood lactate levels and lower residual enzyme activities than subjects who were still alive at the time of reporting. Survival bore no relationship to the underlying biochemical or genetic abnormality or to gender. Conclusions Although the clinical spectrum of PDC deficiency is broad, the dominant clinical phenotype includes presentation during the first year of life; neurological and neuromuscular degeneration; structural lesions revealed by neuroimaging; lactic acidosis and a blood lactate:pyruvate ratio≤20. PMID:22896851

  10. Cerebral Developmental Abnormalities in a Mouse with Systemic Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Lioudmila; Hausknecht, Kathryn A.; Stachowiak, Michal K.; Dlugos, Cynthia A.; Richards, Jerry B.; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) deficiency is an inborn error of pyruvate metabolism causing a variety of neurologic manifestations. Systematic analyses of development of affected brain structures and the cellular processes responsible for their impairment have not been performed due to the lack of an animal model for PDC deficiency. METHODS: In the present study we investigated a murine model of systemic PDC deficiency by interrupting the X-linked Pdha1 gene encoding the α subunit of PDH to study its role on brain development and behavioral studies. RESULTS: Male embryos died prenatally but heterozygous females were born. PDC activity was reduced in the brain and other tissues in female progeny compared to age-matched control females. Immunohistochemical analysis of several brain regions showed that approximately 40% of cells were PDH−. The oxidation of glucose to CO2 and incorporation of glucose-carbon into fatty acids were reduced in brain slices from 15 day-old PDC-deficient females. Histological analyses showed alterations in several structures in white and gray matters in 35 day-old PDC-deficient females. Reduction in total cell number and reduced dendritic arbors in Purkinje neurons were observed in PDC-deficient females. Furthermore, cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into neurons by newly generated cells were reduced in the affected females during pre- and postnatal periods. PDC-deficient mice had normal locomotor activity in a novel environment but displayed decreased startle responses to loud noises and there was evidence of abnormal pre-pulse inhibition of the startle reflex. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that a reduction in glucose metabolism resulting in deficit in energy production and fatty acid biosynthesis impairs cellular differentiation and brain development in PDC-deficient mice. PMID:23840713

  11. Neonatal pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency due to a R302H mutation in the PDHA1 gene: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Soares-Fernandes, João P; Teixeira-Gomes, Roseli; Cruz, Romeu; Ribeiro, Manuel; Magalhães, Zita; Rocha, Jaime F; Leijser, Lara M

    2008-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is one of the most common causes of congenital lactic acidosis. Correlations between the genetic defect and neuroimaging findings are lacking. We present conventional and diffusion-weighted MRI findings in a 7-day-old male neonate with PDH deficiency due to a mosaicism for the R302H mutation in the PDHA1 gene. Corpus callosum dysgenesis, widespread increased diffusion in the white matter, and bilateral subependymal cysts were the main features. Although confirmation of PDH deficiency depends on specialized biochemical analyses, neonatal MRI plays a role in evaluating the pattern and extent of brain damage, and potentially in early diagnosis and clinical decision making.

  12. Pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the second most common cause, after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency . PKD is found in people ... Read More Anemia Autosomal recessive Enzyme Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemolytic anemia Review Date 10/27/ ...

  13. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 deficiency attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Joo; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Choi, Young-Keun; Park, Sungmi; Choe, Mi Sun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Lee, Sun Joo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Harris, Robert A; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Clinical prescription of cisplatin, one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents, is limited by its side effects, particularly tubular injury-associated nephrotoxicity. Since details of the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, we investigated the role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Among the PDK isoforms, PDK4 mRNA and protein levels were markedly increased in the kidneys of mice treated with cisplatin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation was involved in cisplatin-induced renal PDK4 expression. Treatment with the PDK inhibitor sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) or genetic knockout of PDK4 attenuated the signs of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, including apoptotic morphology of the kidney tubules along with numbers of TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase-3, and renal tubular injury markers. Cisplatin-induced suppression of the mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption rate, expression of electron transport chain components, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and disruption of mitochondrial morphology were noticeably improved in the kidneys of DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Additionally, levels of the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species were attenuated, whereas superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression and glutathione synthetase and glutathione levels were recovered in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Interestingly, lipid accumulation was considerably attenuated in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice via recovered expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and coactivator PGC-1α, which was accompanied by recovery of mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, PDK4 mediates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, suggesting that PDK4 might be a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

  14. Detection of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha-subunit deficiencies in females by immunohistochemical demonstration of mosaicism in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lib, Margarita Y; Brown, Ruth M; Brown, Garry K; Marusich, Michael F; Capaldi, Roderick A

    2002-07-01

    Deficiency of the E1 alpha-subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is an X-linked inborn error of metabolism and one of the major causes of lactic acidosis in children. Although most heterozygous females manifest symptoms of the disease, it is often difficult to establish the diagnosis as results based on measurement of total PDH activity, and E1 alpha-immunoreactive protein in patient fibroblasts may be ambiguous because of the variability in the pattern of X chromosome inactivation. We report the development of a set of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to four subunits of the PDH complex that can be used for detection of PDH E1 alpha deficiency. We also show that anti-E1 alpha and anti-E2 MAbs, when used in immunocytochemical analysis, can detect mosaicism in cell cultures from female patients in which as few as 2-5% of cells express the deficiency. This immunocytochemical approach, which is fast, reliable, and quantitative, will be particularly useful in identifying females with PDH E1 alpha-subunit deficiency as a precursor to mutation analysis.

  15. Lethal neonatal case and review of primary short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency associated with secondary lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bedoyan, Jirair K; Yang, Samuel P; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jack, Rhona M; Miron, Alexander; Grahame, George; DeBrosse, Suzanne D; Hoppel, Charles L; Kerr, Douglas S; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in ECHS1 result in short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (SCEH) deficiency which mainly affects the catabolism of various amino acids, particularly valine. We describe a case compound heterozygous for ECHS1 mutations c.836T>C (novel) and c.8C>A identified by whole exome sequencing of proband and parents. SCEH deficiency was confirmed with very low SCEH activity in fibroblasts and nearly absent immunoreactivity of SCEH. The patient had a severe neonatal course with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid lactate and pyruvate concentrations, high plasma alanine and slightly low plasma cystine. 2-Methyl-2,3-dihydroxybutyric acid was markedly elevated as were metabolites of the three branched-chain α-ketoacids on urine organic acids analysis. These urine metabolites notably decreased when lactic acidosis decreased in blood. Lymphocyte pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity was deficient, but PDC and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex activities in cultured fibroblasts were normal. Oxidative phosphorylation analysis on intact digitonin-permeabilized fibroblasts was suggestive of slightly reduced PDC activity relative to control range in mitochondria. We reviewed 16 other cases with mutations in ECHS1 where PDC activity was also assayed in order to determine how common and generalized secondary PDC deficiency is associated with primary SCEH deficiency. For reasons that remain unexplained, we find that about half of cases with primary SCEH deficiency also exhibit secondary PDC deficiency. The patient died on day-of-life 39, prior to establishing his diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early and rapid neonatal diagnosis because of possible adverse effects of certain therapeutic interventions, such as administration of ketogenic diet, in this disorder. There is a need for better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and phenotypic variability in this relatively recently discovered disorder.

  16. Comparative 13C metabolic flux analysis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient, L-valine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Blombach, Bastian; Lang, Siegmund; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    L-Valine can be formed successfully using C. glutamicum strains missing an active pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC). Wild-type C. glutamicum and four PDHC-deficient strains were compared by (13)C metabolic flux analysis, especially focusing on the split ratio between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Compared to the wild type, showing a carbon flux of 69% ± 14% through the PPP, a strong increase in the PPP flux was observed in PDHC-deficient strains with a maximum of 113% ± 22%. The shift in the split ratio can be explained by an increased demand of NADPH for l-valine formation. In accordance, the introduction of the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase PntAB, catalyzing the reversible conversion of NADH to NADPH, into an L-valine-producing C. glutamicum strain caused the PPP flux to decrease to 57% ± 6%, which is below the wild-type split ratio. Hence, transhydrogenase activity offers an alternative perspective for sufficient NADPH supply, which is relevant for most amino acid production systems. Moreover, as demonstrated for L-valine, this bypass leads to a significant increase of product yield due to a concurrent reduction in carbon dioxide formation via the PPP.

  17. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Deficiency Results in Expedited Cellular Proliferation through E2F1-Mediated Increase of Cyclins.

    PubMed

    Choiniere, Jonathan; Wu, Jianguo; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common form of cancer with prevalence worldwide. There are many factors that lead to the development and progression of HCC. This study aimed to identify potential new tumor suppressors, examine their function as cell cycle modulators, and investigate their impact on the cyclin family of proteins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). In this study, the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4 gene was shown to have potential tumor suppressor characteristics. PDK4 expression was significantly downregulated in human HCC. Pdk4(-/-) mouse liver exhibited a consistent increase in cell cycle regulator proteins, including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, cyclin A2, some associated CDKs, and transcription factor E2F1. PDK4-knockdown HCC cells also progressed faster through the cell cycle, which concurrently expressed high levels of cyclins and E2F1 as seen in the Pdk4(-/-) mice. Interestingly, the induced cyclin E1 and cyclin A2 caused by Pdk4 deficiency was repressed by arsenic treatment in mouse liver and in HCC cells. E2f1 deficiency in E2f1(-/-) mouse liver or knockdown E2F1 using small hairpin RNAs in HCC cells significantly decreased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. In contrast, inhibition of PDK4 activity in HCC cells increased cyclin E1, cyclin A2, and E2F1 proteins. These findings demonstrate that PDK4 is a critical regulator of hepatocyte proliferation via E2F1-mediated regulation of cyclins. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Mutational study in the PDHA1 gene of 40 patients suspected of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Quintana, E; Gort, L; Busquets, C; Navarro-Sastre, A; Lissens, W; Moliner, S; Lluch, M; Vilaseca, M A; De Meirleir, L; Ribes, A; Briones, P

    2010-05-01

    We screened for PDHA1 mutations in 40 patients with biochemically demonstrated PDHc deficiency or strong clinical suspicion, and found changes with probable pathological significance in 20. Five patients presented new mutations: p.A169V, c.932_938del, c.1143_1144 ins24, c.1146_1159dup and c.510-30G> A, this latter is a new undescribed cause of exon 6 skipping. Another four mutations have been found, and previously reported, in our patients: p.H113D, p.P172L, p.Y243del and p.Y369Q. Eleven patients presented seven known mutations: p.R127Q, p.I166I, p.A198T, p.R263G, p.R302C, p.R378C and c.1142_1145dup. The latter three were found in more than one unrelated patient: p.R302C was detected in a heterozygous girl and a mosaic male, p.R378C in two males and finally, c.1142_1145dup in three females; only one in 20 mothers was found to be a carrier (p.R263G). Apart from those 20 patients, the only alteration detected in one girl with clear PDHc and PDH-E1 deficiency was the silent change c.396A> C (p.R132R), and other eight PDHc deficient patients carry combinations of known infrequent polymorphisms that are overrepresented among our 20 unsolved patients. The importance of these changes on PDH activity is unclear. Investigations in the other PDHc genes are in course in order to elucidate the genetic defect in the unresolved patients.

  19. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  20. Enhancement of 1,3-propanediol production by expression of pyruvate decarboxylase and aldehyde dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis in the acetolactate-synthase-deficient mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Mok; Hong, Won-Kyung; Heo, Sun-Yeon; Park, Jang Min; Jung, You Ree; Oh, Baek-Rock; Joe, Min-Ho; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho

    2014-08-01

    The acetolactate synthase (als)-deficient mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae fails to produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) or 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD), and is defective in glycerol metabolism. In an effort to recover production of the industrially valuable 1,3-PD, we introduced the Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (aldB) genes into the als-deficient mutant to activate the conversion of pyruvate to ethanol. Heterologous expression of pdc and aldB efficiently recovered glycerol metabolism in the 2,3-BD synthesis-defective mutant, enhancing the production of 1,3-PD by preventing the accumulation of pyruvate. Production of 1,3-PD in the pdc- and aldB-expressing als-deficient mutant was further enhanced by increasing the aeration rate. This system uses metabolic engineering to produce 1,3-PD while minimizing the generation of 2,3-BD, offering a breakthrough for the industrial production of 1,3-PD from crude glycerol.

  1. Metabolic Analysis of Wild-type Escherichia coli and a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDHC)-deficient Derivative Reveals the Role of PDHC in the Fermentative Metabolism of Glucose*

    PubMed Central

    Murarka, Abhishek; Clomburg, James M.; Moran, Sean; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate is located at a metabolic junction of assimilatory and dissimilatory pathways and represents a switch point between respiratory and fermentative metabolism. In Escherichia coli, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and pyruvate formate-lyase are considered the primary routes of pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA for aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation, respectively. During glucose fermentation, the in vivo activity of PDHC has been reported as either very low or undetectable, and the role of this enzyme remains unknown. In this study, a comprehensive characterization of wild-type E. coli MG1655 and a PDHC-deficient derivative (Pdh) led to the identification of the role of PDHC in the anaerobic fermentation of glucose. The metabolism of these strains was investigated by using a mixture of 13C-labeled and -unlabeled glucose followed by the analysis of the labeling pattern in protein-bound amino acids via two-dimensional 13C,1H NMR spectroscopy. Metabolite balancing, biosynthetic 13C labeling of proteinogenic amino acids, and isotopomer balancing all indicated a large increase in the flux of the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (ox-PPP) in response to the PDHC deficiency. Because both ox-PPP and PDHC generate CO2 and the calculated CO2 evolution rate was significantly reduced in Pdh, it was hypothesized that the role of PDHC is to provide CO2 for cell growth. The similarly negative impact of either PDHC or ox-PPP deficiencies, and an even more pronounced impairment of cell growth in a strain lacking both ox-PPP and PDHC, provided further support for this hypothesis. The three strains exhibited similar phenotypes in the presence of an external source of CO2, thus confirming the role of PDHC. Activation of formate hydrogen-lyase (which converts formate to CO2 and H2) rendered the PDHC deficiency silent, but its negative impact reappeared in a strain lacking both PDHC and formate hydrogen-lyase. A stoichiometric analysis of CO2

  2. Case report: pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J M

    1995-09-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. Despite a paucity of reports, splenectomy resulted in successful outcomes for two siblings with this disorder. The sisters were diagnosed at birth with profound jaundice and congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

  3. Pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α deficiency presenting as recurrent acute proximal muscle weakness of upper and lower extremities in an 8-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Kara, Bülent; Genç, Hülya Maraş; Uyur-Yalçın, Emek; Sakarya-Güneş, Ayfer; Topçu, Uğur; Mülayim, Serap; Ceylaner, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) plays an important role in aerobic energy metabolism and acid-base equilibrium. PDHC contains of 5 enzymes, 3 catalytic (E1, E2, E3) and 2 regulatory, as well as 3 cofactors and an additional protein (E3-binding protein) encoded by nuclear genes. The clinical presentation of PDHC deficiency ranges from fatal neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurologic dysfunction without lactic acidosis. Paroxysmal neurologic problems such as intermittent ataxia, episodic weakness, exercise-induced dystonia and recurrent demyelination may also be seen although they are rare. Here, we present an 8-year-old boy complaining of acute proximal muscle weakness of upper and lower extremities with normal mental status. He had a history of Guillain-Barré-like syndrome at the age of 2 years. Electrophysiologic studies showed sensorial polyneuropathy findings in the first attack and sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy findings in the last attack. The genetic analysis revealed a previously reported hemizygote novel mutation of the PDHA1 gene (p.A353T/c.1057G > A), which encodes the E1α subunit of PDHC. Thiamine was ordered (15 mg/kg/day), dietary carbohydrates were restricted and clinical findings improved in a few weeks. This rare phenotype of PDHC deficiency is discussed.

  4. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  5. Application of a Genetically Encoded Biosensor for Live Cell Imaging of L-Valine Production in Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex-Deficient Corynebacterium glutamicum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Regina; Helfrich, Stefan; Nöh, Katharina; Blombach, Bastian; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Frunzke, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biotechnologically relevant metabolites do not impart a conspicuous phenotype to the producing cell. Consequently, the analysis of microbial metabolite production is still dominated by bulk techniques, which may obscure significant variation at the single-cell level. In this study, we have applied the recently developed Lrp-biosensor for monitoring of amino acid production in single cells of gradually engineered L-valine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strains based on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-deficient (PDHC) strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Online monitoring of the sensor output (eYFP fluorescence) during batch cultivation proved the sensor's suitability for visualizing different production levels. In the following, we conducted live cell imaging studies on C. glutamicum sensor strains using microfluidic chip devices. As expected, the sensor output was higher in microcolonies of high-yield producers in comparison to the basic strain C. glutamicum ΔaceE. Microfluidic cultivation in minimal medium revealed a typical Gaussian distribution of single cell fluorescence during the production phase. Remarkably, low amounts of complex nutrients completely changed the observed phenotypic pattern of all strains, resulting in a phenotypic split of the population. Whereas some cells stopped growing and initiated L-valine production, others continued to grow or showed a delayed transition to production. Depending on the cultivation conditions, a considerable fraction of non-fluorescent cells was observed, suggesting a loss of metabolic activity. These studies demonstrate that genetically encoded biosensors are a valuable tool for monitoring single cell productivity and to study the phenotypic pattern of microbial production strains. PMID:24465669

  6. Fetal anaemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Gilsanz, F; Vega, M A; Gómez-Castillo, E; Ruiz-Balda, J A; Omeñaca, F

    1993-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency was diagnosed in an infant by umbilical vessel sampling at 30 weeks' gestation. Although three previous hydropic siblings had been stillborn or died in the neonatal period, this infant survived with transfusion dependent haemolytic anaemia. Prompt fetal diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency is feasible and allows better management of hydrops fetalis due to this disorder. PMID:8285758

  7. Metabolic Connection of Inflammatory Pain: Pivotal Role of a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Lactic Acid Axis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Song, Gyun Jee; Lee, Maan Gee; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2015-10-21

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK1-4) are mitochondrial metabolic regulators that serve as decision makers via modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity to convert pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA or anaerobically to lactate. Metabolic dysregulation and inflammatory processes are two sides of the same coin in several pathophysiological conditions. The lactic acid surge associated with the metabolic shift has been implicated in diverse painful states. In this study, we investigated the role of PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory pain. Deficiency of Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced pain hypersensitivities. Likewise, Pdk2/4 deficiency attenuated the localized lactic acid surge along with hallmarks of peripheral and central inflammation following intraplantar administration of CFA. In vitro studies supported the role of PDK2/4 as promoters of classical proinflammatory activation of macrophages. Moreover, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs or lactic acid production diminished CFA-induced inflammation and pain hypersensitivities. Thus, a PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis seems to mediate inflammation-driven chronic pain, establishing a connection between metabolism and inflammatory pain. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) and their substrate PDH orchestrate the conversion of pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA or anaerobically to lactate. Lactate, the predominant end product of glycolysis, has recently been identified as a signaling molecule for neuron-glia interactions and neuronal plasticity. Pathological metabolic shift and subsequent lactic acid production are thought to play an important role in diverse painful states; however, their contribution to inflammation-driven pain is still to be comprehended. Here, we report that the PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis constitutes a key component of inflammatory pain pathogenesis. Our findings establish an

  8. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  9. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  10. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  11. Metabolic control analysis of eucaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Modak, Jayant; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Zeng, An-Ping

    2002-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis (MCA) of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme (PDH) complex of eucaryotic cells has been carried out using both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic models. Flux control coefficients (FCC) for the sensitivity of pyruvate decarboxylation rate to activities of various PDH complex reactions are determined. FCCs are shown to be strong functions of both pyruvate levels and various components of PDH complex. With the in vitro model, FCCs are shown to be sensitive to only the E1 component of the PDH complex at low pyruvate concentrations. At high pyruvate concentrations, the control is shared by all of the components, with E1 having a negative influence while the other three components, E2, X, and K, exert a positive control over the pyruvate decarboxylation rate. An unusual behavior of deactivation of the E1 component leading to higher net PDH activity is shown to be linked to the combined effect of protein X acylation and E1 deactivation. The steady-state analysis of the in vivo model reveals multiple steady state behavior of pyruvate metabolism with two stable and one unstable steady-states branches. FCCs also display multiplicity, showing completely different control distribution exerted by pyruvate and PDH components on three branches. At low pyruvate concentrations, pyruvate supply dominates the decarboxylation rate and PDH components do not exert any significant control. Reverse control distribution is observed at high pyruvate concentration. The effect of dilution due to cell growth on pyruvate metabolism is investigated in detail. While pyruvate dilution effects are shown to be negligible under all conditions, significant PDH complex dilution effects are observed under certain conditions. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo models shows that PDH components exert different degrees of control outside and inside the cells. At high pyruvate levels, PDH components are shown to exert a higher degree of control when reactions are taking place inside

  12. Mechanism of pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by increased cardiac work.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Neely, J R

    1983-06-01

    The effects of increased cardiac work, pyruvate and insulin on the state of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation and rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in the isolated perfused rat heart. At low levels of cardiac work, 61% of PDH was present in the active form when glucose was the only substrate provided. The actual rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was only 5% of the available capacity calculated from the percent of active PDH. Under this condition, the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was restricted by the slow rate of pyruvate production from glycolysis. Increasing cardiac work accelerated glycolysis, but production of pyruvate remained rate limiting for pyruvate oxidation and only 40% of the maximal active PDH capacity was used. Addition of insulin along with glucose reduced the percent of active PDH to 16% of the total at low cardiac work. This effect of insulin was associated with increased mitochondria NADH/NAD and acetyl CoA/CoA ratios. With both glucose and insulin the calculated maximum capacity of active PDH was about the same as measured rates of pyruvate oxidation indicating that pyruvate oxidation was limited by the activation state of PDH. In this case, raising the level of cardiac work increased the active PDH to 85% and although pyruvate oxidation was accelerated, measured flux through PDH was only 73% of the maximal activity of active PDH. With pyruvate as added exogenous substrate, PDH was 82% of active at low cardiac work probably due to pyruvate inhibition of PDH kinase. In this case, the measured rate of pyruvate oxidation was 64% of the capacity of active PDH. However, increased cardiac work still caused further activation of PDH to 96% active. Thus, actual rates of pyruvate oxidation in the intact tissue were determined by (1) the supply of pyruvate in hearts receiving glucose alone, (2) by the percent of active PDH in hearts receiving both glucose and insulin at low work and (3) by end-product inhibition in hearts receiving

  13. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Bernex, Florence; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-09-27

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC.

  14. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC. PMID:27621446

  15. A mimic of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanyu; Breslow, Ronald

    2010-10-15

    Pyruvic acid undergo decarboxylation catalyzed by a hydrophobic thiazolium salt and reacts with a hydrophobic analog of lipoic acid to form a hydrophobic acylthioester that reacts with aniline to form acetanilide in water, but only in the presence of a hydrophobically modified polyaziridine that acts to gather the reactants just as the enzyme complex does.

  16. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M; Swift, Luther M; Posnack, Nikki G; Kay, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48 ± 0.03 to 1.03 ± 0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75 ± 0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4 ± 2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4 ± 6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs.

  17. Distribution of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The somewhat surprising report that storage proteins and oil are non-uniformly distributed in the cotyledons of developing soybeans prompted us to determine the spatial distribution of the mitochondrial and plastidial forms of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). It has been proposed that pla...

  18. Sequences and expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rae, J L; Cutfield, J F; Lamont, I L

    1997-01-01

    A mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, OT2100, which appeared to be defective in the production of the fluorescent yellow-green siderophore pyoverdine had been isolated previously following transposon mutagenesis (T. R. Merriman and I. L. Lamont, Gene 126:17-23, 1993). DNA from either side of the transposon insertion site was cloned, and the sequence was determined. The mutated gene had strong identity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (E2) components of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) from other bacterial species. Enzyme assays revealed that the mutant was defective in the E2 subunit of PDH, preventing assembly of a functional complex. PDH activity in OT2100 cell extracts was restored when extract from an E1 mutant was added. On the basis of this evidence, OT2100 was identified as an aceB or E2 mutant. A second gene, aceA, which is likely to encode the E1 component of PDH, was identified upstream from aceB. Transcriptional analysis revealed that aceA and aceB are expressed as a 5-kb polycistronic transcript from a promoter upstream of aceA. An intergenic region of 146 bp was located between aceA and aceB, and a 2-kb aceB transcript that originated from a promoter in the intergenic region was identified. DNA fragments upstream of aceA and aceB were shown to have promoter activities in P. aeruginosa, although only the aceA promoter was active in Escherichia coli. It is likely that the apparent pyoverdine-deficient phenotype of mutant OT2100 is a consequence of acidification of the growth medium due to accumulation of pyruvic acid in the absence of functional PDH. PMID:9171401

  19. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  20. An amino acid substitution in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} gene, affecting mitochondrial import of the precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Takakubo, F.; Thorburn, D.R.; Dahl, H.H.M.

    1995-10-01

    A mutation in the mitochondrial targeting sequence was characterized in a male patient with X chromosome-linked pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} deficiency. The mutation was a base substitution of G by C at nucleotide 134 in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the PDHA1 gene, resulting in an arginine-to-proline substitution at codon 10 (R10P). Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was 28% of the control value, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decreased level of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha}immunoreactivity. Chimeric constructs in which the normal and mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} targeting sequences were attached to the mitochondrial matrix protein ornithine transcarbamylase were synthesized in a cell free translation system, and mitochondrial import of normal and mutant proteins was compared in vitro. The results show that ornithine transcarbamylase targeted by the mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} sequence was translocated into the mitochondrial matrix at a reduced rate, suggesting that defective import is responsible for the reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase level in mitochondria. The mutation was also present in an affected brother and the mildly affected mother. The clinical presentations of this X chromosome-linked disorder in affected family members are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amino acid substitution in a mitochondrial targeting sequence resulting in a human genetic disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  2. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  3. Inhibition effects of furfural on alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Modig, Tobias; Lidén, Gunnar; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of furfural inhibition of the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; EC 1.1.1.1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AlDH; EC 1.2.1.5) and the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were studied in vitro. At a concentration of less than 2 mM furfural was found to decrease the activity of both PDH and AlDH by more than 90%, whereas the ADH activity decreased by less than 20% at the same concentration. Furfural inhibition of ADH and AlDH activities could be described well by a competitive inhibition model, whereas the inhibition of PDH was best described as non-competitive. The estimated K(m) value of AlDH for furfural was found to be about 5 microM, which was lower than that for acetaldehyde (10 microM). For ADH, however, the estimated K(m) value for furfural (1.2 mM) was higher than that for acetaldehyde (0.4 mM). The inhibition of the three enzymes by 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was also measured. The inhibition caused by HMF of ADH was very similar to that caused by furfural. However, HMF did not inhibit either AlDH or PDH as severely as furfural. The inhibition effects on the three enzymes could well explain previously reported in vivo effects caused by furfural and HMF on the overall metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting a critical role of these enzymes in the observed inhibition. PMID:11964178

  4. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to enzyme "substrate" interactions: (i) which form of the substrate system serves as the preferential substrate and (ii) which form acts to inhibit the enzyme? Thus the relative concentrations of the forms of these substrate systems (keto, hydrated, enol) may provide a form of metabolic control. In this light, the present article considers the reduction of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADH. This reaction is inhibited by relatively high concentrations of pyruvate and the physiological significance of this inhibition has been a subject of controversy for many years. Summarized in this article are data from the literature pertaining to the interactions of keto, hydrated, and enol pyruvate with lactate dehydrogenase. Biochemistry instructors and their students are invited to review such pertinent articles so that they also may evaluate the possibility that the "substrate" inhibition of the isoenzymes in the heart muscle may be, under certain conditions, relevant as a form of metabolic control.

  5. A novel Y243S mutation in the pyruvate dehydrogenase El alpha gene subunit: correlation with thiamine pyrophosphate interaction.

    PubMed

    Benelli, C; Fouque, F; Redonnet-Vernhet, I; Malgat, M; Fontan, D; Marsac, C; Dey, R

    2002-08-01

    We identified a new Y243S mutation in the X-linked E1 alpha-PDH gene in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) deficiency. The activity in cultured fibroblasts was very low even in the presence of high thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) concentrations, indicating that the defect could be due to decreased affinity of PDHc for TPP.

  6. Tyr-301 Phosphorylation Inhibits Pyruvate Dehydrogenase by Blocking Substrate Binding and Promotes the Warburg Effect*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect. PMID:25104357

  7. Tyr-301 phosphorylation inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase by blocking substrate binding and promotes the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Shan, Changliang; Elf, Shannon; Lin, Ruiting; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Boggon, Titus J; Kang, Sumin; Chen, Jing

    2014-09-19

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a crucial role in regulation of glucose homoeostasis in mammalian cells. PDC flux depends on catalytic activity of the most important enzyme component pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). PDH kinase inactivates PDC by phosphorylating PDH at specific serine residues, including Ser-293, whereas dephosphorylation of PDH by PDH phosphatase restores PDC activity. The current understanding suggests that Ser-293 phosphorylation of PDH impedes active site accessibility to its substrate pyruvate. Here, we report that phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue Tyr-301 also inhibits PDH α 1 (PDHA1) by blocking pyruvate binding through a novel mechanism in addition to Ser-293 phosphorylation. In addition, we found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylate PDHA1 at Tyr-301, and Tyr-301 phosphorylation of PDHA1 is common in EGF-stimulated cells as well as diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from human patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDHA1 Y301F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at distinct serine and tyrosine residues inhibits PDHA1 through distinct mechanisms to impact active site accessibility, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect.

  8. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  9. Thiamin deficiency effects on rat leukocyte pyruvate decarboxylation rates.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, J N

    1978-02-01

    Thiamin status usually is assessed by urinary excretion of thiamin or by exogenous thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) stimulation of erythrocyte transketolase activity. Because of the possible great utility of a biologically and chemically sensitive alternative method for thiamin status assessment, studies were made of rat leukocyte pyruvate decarboxylation activity in thiamin deficiency. Pyruvate decarboxylation rates were determined by assaying 14CO2 produced by leukocytes from 1-14C-pyruvic acid in vitro. Reaction conditions were 5 mumoles pyruvic acid, 2.2 X 10(4) DPM 1-14C-pyruvic acid, leukocytes from 5 ml whole blood, 50 mumoles NaH2PO4, 5 mumoles MgSO4, and 1 mumole MnSO4 at pH 7.4 in 1 ml reaction volume at 25 C. Four weeks of thiamin deficiency decreased leukocyte pyruvate decarboxylation rates and markedly increased the TPP effect on this reaction. Dual weekly assays in the same rats showed that 21 days of thiamin deficiency significantly increased the TPP effect on leukocyte pyruvate decarboxylation rates. In contrast, the TPP effect on erythrocyte transketolase activity was significantly increased after only 7 days of thiamin deficiency. Erythrocyte transketolase is more sensitive than leukocyte pyruvate decarboxylation rate to early thiamin deficiency in rats.

  10. The effect of fatty acids on the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Scholz, R; Olson, M S; Schwab, A J; Schwabe, U; Noell, C; Braun, W

    1978-05-16

    The effect of fatty acids on the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in perfused livers from fed rats. The production of 14CO2 from infused [1-14C]pyruvate was employed as a monitor of the flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. A correction for other decarboxylation reactions was made using kinetic analyses. Fatty acid (octanoate or oleate) infusion caused a stimulation of pyruvate decarboxylation at pyruvate concentrations in the perfusate below 1 mM (up to 3-fold at 0.05 mM pyruvate) but decreased the rate to one-third of control rates at pyruvate concentrations near 5 mM. These effects were half-maximal at fatty acid concentrations below 0.1 mM. Infusion of 3-hydroxybutyrate also caused a marked stimulation of pyruvate decarboxylation at low pyruvate concentrations. The data suggest that the mechanism by which fatty acids stimulate the flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction in perfused liver at low (limiting) pyruvate concentrations involves an acceleration of pyruvate transport into the mitochondrial compartment due to an exchange with acetoacetate. Furthermore, it is proposed that a relationship exists between ketogenesis and the regulation of pyruvate oxidation at pyruvate concentrations approximating conditions in vivo.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2002 Jan 22. Citation on PubMed Chun K, MacKay N, Petrova-Benedict R, Federico A, Fois A, ... 2011 Aug 18. Citation on PubMed Maj MC, MacKay N, Levandovskiy V, Addis J, Baumgartner ER, Baumgartner ...

  12. Suicidal dephosphorylation of thiamine pyrophosphate coupled with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Czerniecki, Jan; Tylicki, Adam

    2004-12-01

    Earlier it was noted that purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) produced by "Sigma" usually contains almost saturating amounts of thiamine pyrophosphate (ThPP). In this communication we present the observation that the endogenous ThPP coupled to PDC is dephosphorylated while staying at -10 degrees C, because in the enzyme preparation thiamine monophosphate and un-phosphorylated thiamine appear (HPLC determination). Under the same conditions exogenous ThPP is not dephosphorylated despite contact with the PDC preparation. This may suggest that interactions of some active groups of the enzyme with molecules of endogenous ThPP leads to break-up of the phosphoesters bonds, and destruction of the coenzyme. Decrease of PDC activity during storage is not in proportion with the degree of ThPP dephosphorylation. However the observed instability of PDC activity may be a consequence of the spontaneous process of its coenzyme autodestruction.

  13. Sirtuin 4 is a lipoamidase regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Greco, Todd M.; Oberstein, Adam; Budayeva, Hanna G.; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Kang, Yibin; Shenk, Thomas; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins (SIRTs) are critical enzymes that govern genome regulation, metabolism, and aging. Despite conserved deacetylase domains, mitochondrial SIRT4 and SIRT5 have little to no deacetylase activity, and a robust catalytic activity for SIRT4 has been elusive. Here, we establish SIRT4 as a cellular lipoamidase that regulates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Importantly, SIRT4 catalytic efficiency for lipoyl- and biotinyl-lysine modifications is superior to its deacetylation activity. PDH, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, has been known to be primarily regulated by phosphorylation of its E1 component. We determine that SIRT4 enzymatically hydrolyzes the lipoamide cofactors from the E2 component dihydrolipoyllysine acetyltransferase (DLAT), diminishing PDH activity. We demonstrate SIRT4-mediated regulation of DLAT lipoyl levels and PDH activity in cells and in vivo, in mouse liver. Furthermore, metabolic flux switching via glutamine stimulation induces SIRT4 lipoamidase activity to inhibit PDH, highlighting SIRT4 as a guardian of cellular metabolism. PMID:25525879

  14. Role of pyruvate transporter in the regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex in perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Zwiebel, F M; Schwabe, U; Olson, M S; Scholz, R

    1982-01-19

    Metabolic substrates such as octanoate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and alpha-ketoisocaproate which produce acetoacetate stimulate the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation in perfused livers from fed rats at perfusate pyruvate concentrations in the physiological range (below 0.2 mM). A quantitative relationship between pyruvate oxidation (14CO2 production from [1-14C]pyruvate) and ketogenesis (production of acetoacetate or total ketone bodies) was observed with all ketogenic substrates when studied over a wide range of concentrations. The ratio of extra pyruvate decarboxylated to extra acetoacetate produced was greater than 1 with octanoate and alpha-ketoisocaproate, but it was less than 1 with beta-hydroxybutyrate. The stimulatory effect of beta-hydroxybutyrate on pyruvate decarboxylation was abolished completely in the presence of 0.1 mM alpha-cyanocinnamate, an inhibitor of the pyruvate transporting system in the mitochondrial membrane. The data suggest that the mechanism by which the flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction is stimulated in liver under ketogenic conditions involves an acceleration of the net rate of pyruvate transport into the mitochondria compartment due to an exchange with acetoacetate and/or acetoacetate plus beta-hydroxybutyrate.

  15. Metabolic flux control at the pyruvate node in an anaerobic Escherichia coli strain with an active pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ou, Mark S; Kim, Y; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2010-04-01

    During anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli, pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) channel pyruvate toward a mixture of fermentation products. We have introduced a third branch at the pyruvate node in a mutant of E. coli with a mutation in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH*) that renders the enzyme less sensitive to inhibition by NADH. The key starting enzymes of the three branches at the pyruvate node in such a mutant, PDH*, PFL, and LDH, have different metabolic potentials and kinetic properties. In such a mutant (strain QZ2), pyruvate flux through LDH was about 30%, with the remainder of the flux occurring through PFL, indicating that LDH is a preferred route of pyruvate conversion over PDH*. In a pfl mutant (strain YK167) with both PDH* and LDH activities, flux through PDH* was about 33% of the total, confirming the ability of LDH to outcompete the PDH pathway for pyruvate in vivo. Only in the absence of LDH (strain QZ3) was pyruvate carbon equally distributed between the PDH* and PFL pathways. A pfl mutant with LDH and PDH* activities, as well as a pfl ldh double mutant with PDH* activity, had a surprisingly low cell yield per mole of ATP (Y(ATP)) (about 7.0 g of cells per mol of ATP) compared to 10.9 g of cells per mol of ATP for the wild type. The lower Y(ATP) suggests the operation of a futile energy cycle in the absence of PFL in this strain. An understanding of the controls at the pyruvate node during anaerobic growth is expected to provide unique insights into rational metabolic engineering of E. coli and related bacteria for the production of various biobased products at high rates and yields.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... glucose is broken down to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the cell's main energy source. PKLR gene mutations ... pyruvate kinase enzyme function, causing a shortage of ATP in red blood cells and increased levels of ...

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  18. Tyr-94 Phosphorylation Inhibits Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Phosphatase 1 and Promotes Tumor Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Changliang; Kang, Hee-Bum; Elf, Shannon; Xie, Jianxin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Aguiar, Mike; Lonning, Scott; Hitosugi, Taro; Chung, Tae-Wook; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Boggon, Titus J.; Fan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Many cancer cells rely more on aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and catabolize glucose at a high rate. Such a metabolic switch is suggested to be due in part to functional attenuation of mitochondria in cancer cells. However, how oncogenic signals attenuate mitochondrial function and promote the switch to glycolysis remains unclear. We previously reported that tyrosine phosphorylation activates and inhibits mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and phosphatase (PDP), respectively, leading to enhanced inhibitory serine phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and consequently inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in cancer cells. In particular, Tyr-381 phosphorylation of PDP1 dissociates deacetylase SIRT3 and recruits acetyltransferase ACAT1 to PDC, resulting in increased inhibitory lysine acetylation of PDHA1 and PDP1. Here we report that phosphorylation at another tyrosine residue, Tyr-94, inhibits PDP1 by reducing the binding ability of PDP1 to lipoic acid, which is covalently attached to the L2 domain of dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2) to recruit PDP1 to PDC. We found that multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases directly phosphorylated PDP1 at Tyr-94, and Tyr-94 phosphorylation of PDP1 was common in diverse human cancer cells and primary leukemia cells from patients. Moreover, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient PDP1 Y94F mutant in cancer cells resulted in increased oxidative phosphorylation, decreased cell proliferation under hypoxia, and reduced tumor growth in mice. Together, our findings suggest that phosphorylation at different tyrosine residues inhibits PDP1 through independent mechanisms, which act in concert to regulate PDC activity and promote the Warburg effect. PMID:24962578

  19. Nutrient deprivation induces the Warburg effect through ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-An; Chao, Yee; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2013-05-01

    The Warburg effect is known to be crucial for cancer cells to acquire energy. Nutrient deficiencies are an important phenomenon in solid tumors, but the effect on cancer cell metabolism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrate that starvation of HeLa cells by incubation with Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS) induced cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Notably, HBSS starvation increased lactate production, cytoplasmic pyruvate content and decreased oxygen consumption, but failed to change the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or the glucose uptake. We found that HBSS starvation rapidly induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) activation and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation, both of which were inhibited by compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), NAC (a ROS scavenger), and the dominant negative mutant of AMPK. Our data further revealed the involvement of ROS production in AMPK activation. Moreover, DCA (a PDK inhibitor), NAC, and compound C all significantly decreased HBSS starvation-induced lactate production accompanied by enhancement of HBSS starvation-induced cell apoptosis. Not only in HeLa cells, HBSS-induced lactate production and PDH phosphorylation were also observed in CL1.5, A431 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, we for the first time demonstrated that a low-nutrient condition drives cancer cells to utilize glycolysis to produce ATP, and this increases the Warburg effect through a novel mechanism involving ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of PDK. Such an event contributes to protecting cells from apoptosis upon nutrient deprivation.

  20. Antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase in primary biliary cirrhosis: correlation with histology.

    PubMed

    Kisand, K E; Kisand, K V; Karvonen, A L; Vuoristo, M; Mattila, J; Mäkinen, J; Uibo, R

    1998-09-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase are the hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis. Their pathogenic role has not been proven, although antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase are bound to biliary epithelium. The aim of this study was to characterize serum IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and to evaluate their response to different treatment regimens. We also compared the level of antibodies with severity of histological lesions and the data of biochemical liver tests. Serum samples were collected at baseline and after 24 months from 61 primary biliary cirrhosis patients, whereas 23 patients were treated with ursodeoxycholic acid, 20 with colchicine, and 18 with placebo. ELISA was used to detect antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase. IgA and IgG were separated with jacalin and protein-A, respectively. Capacity of immunoglobulins to inhibit enzymatic activity was detected by spectrophotometric observation of the rate of enzyme reaction. 49 (80.3%) of the 61 patients possessed IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase. Significant decrease in IgA antibodies was observed only in the ursodeoxycholic acid group (p<0.05). 15 of 18 IgA preparations and all 24 IgG preparations of patients' sera were inhibitory towards pyruvate dehydrogenase (mean inhibitory percent +/-SD: 42+/-33.4% and 79+/-22.4%, respectively, at a protein concentration of 100 microg/ml). The level of serum antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase correlated with several histological parameters (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltrate), but not with biochemical parameters. Our data reveal that IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibit enzyme function. The correlation between antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and histological parameters might suggest the pathogenic role of these antibodies.

  1. Structural Basis for "Flip-Flop" Action of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a component enzyme of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex that plays a major role in directing energy metabolism in the cell. This cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. In alpha(sub 2)beta(sub 2)-tetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, there are two cofactor binding sites, each of them being a center of independently conducted, although highly coordinated enzymatic reactions. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites can now be understood based on the recently determined crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95A resolution. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase was determined using a combination of MAD phasing and molecular replacement followed by rounds of torsion-angles molecular-dynamics simulated-annealing refinement. The final pyruvate dehydrogenase structure included coordinates for all protein amino acids two cofactor molecules, two magnesium and two potassium ions, and 742 water molecules. The structure was refined to R = 0.202 and R(sub free) = 0.244. Our structural analysis of the enzyme folding and domain assembly identified a simple mechanism of this protein motion required for the conduct of catalytic action.

  2. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  3. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  4. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  5. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  6. Pyruvate carboxylation enables growth of SDH-deficient cells by supporting aspartate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Zheng, Liang; MacKay, Gillian; van den Broek, Niels J F; MacKenzie, Elaine D; Nixon, Colin; Stevenson, David; Tumanov, Sergey; Bulusu, Vinay; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Vazquez, Alexei; Fleming, Stewart; Schiavi, Francesca; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Strathdee, Douglas; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric nuclear-encoded complex responsible for the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes are associated with cancer formation. However, the impact of SDH loss on cell metabolism and the mechanisms enabling growth of SDH-defective cells are largely unknown. Here, we generated Sdhb-ablated kidney mouse cells and used comparative metabolomics and stable-isotope-labelling approaches to identify nutritional requirements and metabolic adaptations to SDH loss. We found that lack of SDH activity commits cells to consume extracellular pyruvate, which sustains Warburg-like bioenergetic features. We further demonstrated that pyruvate carboxylation diverts glucose-derived carbons into aspartate biosynthesis, thus sustaining cell growth. By identifying pyruvate carboxylase as essential for the proliferation and tumorigenic capacity of SDH-deficient cells, this study revealed a metabolic vulnerability for potential future treatment of SDH-associated malignancies.

  7. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, trichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate, 2,2′-dichloropropionate and 3-chloropropionate were inhibitors of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Dichloroacetate was also shown to inhibit rat heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. The inhibition was mainly non-competitive with respect to ATP. The concentration required for 50% inhibition was approx. 100μm for the three chloroacetates, difluoroacetate and 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate. Dichloroacetamide was not inhibitory. 2. Dichloroacetate had no significant effect on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase when this was maximally activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. 3. Dichloroacetate did not increase the catalytic activity of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Dichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate increased the proportion of the active (dephosphorylated) form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria with 2-oxoglutarate and malate as respiratory substrates. Similar effects of dichloroacetate were shown with kidney and fat-cell mitochondria. Glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and dichloroacetamide were inactive. 5. Dichloroacetate increased the proportion of active pyruvate dehydrogenase in the perfused rat heart, isolated rat diaphragm and rat epididymal fat-pads. Difluoroacetate and dichloroacetamide were also active in the perfused heart, but glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and trichloroacetate were inactive. 6. Injection of dichloroacetate into rats starved overnight led within 60 min to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in extracts from heart, psoas muscle, adipose tissue, kidney and liver. The blood concentration of lactate fell within 15 min to reach a minimum after 60 min. The blood concentration of glucose fell after 90 min and reached a minimum after 120 min. There was no significant change in plasma glycerol concentration. 7. In epididymal fatpads

  8. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kung, Charles; Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-09-14

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. AG-348 enhances pyruvate kinase activity in red blood cells from patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hixon, Jeff; Kosinski, Penelope A.; Cianchetta, Giovanni; Histen, Gavin; Chen, Yue; Hill, Collin; Gross, Stefan; Si, Yaguang; Johnson, Kendall; DeLaBarre, Byron; Luo, Zhiyong; Gu, Zhiwei; Yao, Gui; Tang, Huachun; Fang, Cheng; Xu, Yingxia; Lv, Xiaobing; Biller, Scott; Su, Shin-San Michael; Yang, Hua; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Salituro, Francesco; Silverman, Lee; Dang, Lenny

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is a rare genetic disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. There are currently no targeted therapies for PK deficiency. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of AG-348, an allosteric activator of PK that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of PK deficiency. We demonstrate that AG-348 can increase the activity of wild-type and mutant PK enzymes in biochemical assays and in patient red blood cells treated ex vivo. These data illustrate the potential for AG-348 to restore the glycolytic pathway activity in patients with PK deficiency and ultimately lead to clinical benefit. PMID:28760888

  10. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase activity results in dependency on pyruvate carboxylation for cellular anabolism.

    PubMed

    Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte; Hollinshead, Kate E R; Ludwig, Christian; Menara, Mélanie; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Parker, Seth J; Janin, Maxime; Martinelli, Cosimo; Ottolenghi, Chris; Metallo, Christian; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith; Tennant, Daniel A

    2015-11-02

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway responsible for supplying reducing potential for oxidative phosphorylation and anabolic substrates for cell growth, repair and proliferation. As such it thought to be essential for cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis. However, since the initial report of an inactivating mutation in the TCA cycle enzyme complex, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in paraganglioma (PGL), it has become clear that some cells and tissues are not only able to survive with a truncated TCA cycle, but that they are also able of supporting proliferative phenotype observed in tumours. Here, we show that loss of SDH activity leads to changes in the metabolism of non-essential amino acids. In particular, we demonstrate that pyruvate carboxylase is essential to re-supply the depleted pool of aspartate in SDH-deficient cells. Our results demonstrate that the loss of SDH reduces the metabolic plasticity of cells, suggesting vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.

  11. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Corynebacterium glutamicum: an attractive target for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Blombach, Bastian

    2014-12-20

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) catalyzes the oxidative thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2. Since pyruvate is a key metabolite of the central metabolism and also the precursor for several relevant biotechnological products, metabolic engineering of this multienzyme complex is a promising strategy to improve microbial production processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge and achievements on metabolic engineering approaches to tailor the PDHC of Corynebacterium glutamicum for the bio-based production of l-valine, 2-ketosiovalerate, pyruvate, succinate and isobutanol and to improve l-lysine production.

  12. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  13. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of human pyruvate dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, E.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Hong, Y. S.; Joachimiak, A.; Patel, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvic acid and the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. E1 is an alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer ( approximately 154 kDa). Crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown in polyethylene glycol 3350 using a vapor-diffusion method at 295 K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 64.2, b = 126.9, c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(2)beta(2) tetrameric E1 assembly; self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two alphabeta dimers.

  14. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Bernex, Florence; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Herault, Yann; Sitbon, Marc; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-09-27

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis.

  15. E4F1-mediated control of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is essential for skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Sutter, Anne; Delpech, Hélène; Linares, Laetitia Karine; Riscal, Romain; Repond, Cendrine; Rodier, Geneviève; Touhami, Jawida; Noel, Jean; Vincent, Charles; Pirot, Nelly; Herault, Yann; Pellerin, Luc; Sardet, Claude; Lacroix, Matthieu; Le Cam, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional protein E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1) is an essential regulator of epidermal stem cell (ESC) maintenance. Here, we found that E4F1 transcriptionally regulates a metabolic program involved in pyruvate metabolism that is required to maintain skin homeostasis. E4F1 deficiency in basal keratinocytes resulted in deregulated expression of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (Dlat), a gene encoding the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Accordingly, E4f1 knock-out (KO) keratinocytes exhibited impaired PDH activity and a redirection of the glycolytic flux toward lactate production. The metabolic reprogramming of E4f1 KO keratinocytes associated with remodeling of their microenvironment and alterations of the basement membrane, led to ESC mislocalization and exhaustion of the ESC pool. ShRNA-mediated depletion of Dlat in primary keratinocytes recapitulated defects observed upon E4f1 inactivation, including increased lactate secretion, enhanced activity of extracellular matrix remodeling enzymes, and impaired clonogenic potential. Altogether, our data reveal a central role for Dlat in the metabolic program regulated by E4F1 in basal keratinocytes and illustrate the importance of PDH activity in skin homeostasis. PMID:27621431

  16. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity from pig kidney cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelczyk, T; Olson, M S

    1992-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase in the purified PDH complex from pig kidney is sensitive to changes in ionic strength. The enzyme has optimum activity within a small range of ionic strength (0.03-0.05 M). An increase in ionic strength from 0.04 M to 0.2 M lowers the activity of PDH kinase by 32% and decreases the Km for ATP from 25 microM to 10 microM. At constant ionic strength (0.15 M) the enzyme has optimum activity over a broad pH range (7.2-8.0). The PDH kinase is stimulated 2.2-fold by 20 mM-K+, whereas Na+ even at high concentration (80 mM) has no effect on the enzyme activity. The stimulation of PDH kinase by K+ is not dependent on pH and ionic strength. PDH kinase is inhibited by HPO4(2-) in the presence of K+, whereas HPO4(2-) has no effect on the activity of this enzyme in the absence of K+. HPO4(2-) at concentrations of 2 and 10 mM inhibits PDH kinase by 28% and 55% respectively. The magnitude of this inhibition is not dependent on the ATP/ADP ratio. Inhibition by HPO4(2-) in the concentration range 0-10 mM is non-competitive with respect to ATP, and becomes mixed-type at concentrations over 10 mM. The Ki for HPO4(2-) is 10 mM. When HPO4(2-) is replaced by SO4(2-), the same effects on the activity of PDH kinase are observed. PDH kinase is also inhibited by Cl-. In the presence of 80 mM-Cl- the PDH kinase is inhibited by 40%. The inhibition by Cl- is not dependent on K+. In conclusion, we postulate that changes in phosphate concentrations may play a significant role in the regulation of PDH kinase activity in vivo. PMID:1463442

  17. Interaction of thiamin diphosphate with phosphorylated and dephosphorylated mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Bisswanger, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Kinetic and binding studies were carried out on substrate and cofactor interaction with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine heart. Fluoropyruvate and pyruvamide, previously described as irreversible and allosteric inhibitors, respectively, are strong competitive inhibitors with respect to pyruvate. Binding of thiamin diphosphate was used to study differences between the active dephosphorylated and inactive phosphorylated enzyme states by spectroscopic methods. The change in both the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and the fluorescence of the 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene-labelled enzyme complex produced on addition of the cofactor showed similar binding behaviour for both enzyme forms, with slightly higher affinity for the phosphorylated form. Changes in the CD spectrum, especially the negative Cotton effect at 330 nm as a function of cofactor concentration, both in the absence and presence of pyruvate, also revealed no drastic differences between the two enzyme forms. Thus, inactivation of the enzyme activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is not caused by impeding the binding of substrate or cofactor.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  19. Geldanamycin Prevents Hemorrhage-Induced ATP Loss by Overexpressing Inducible HSP70 and Activating Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    levels were determined using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay Kit HS II (Roche; Mannheim, Germany). Luminescence was measured with a TD-20/20...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehydrogenase Juliann G. Kiang,1,2,3...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehy- drogenase. Am J Physiol Gastrointest

  20. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-02-19

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases.

  1. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C.; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26679997

  2. Inactivation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 2 by Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Collins, Yvonne; Abakumova, Irina; Chouchani, Edward T.; Baranowski, Bartlomiej; Fearnley, Ian M.; Prime, Tracy A.; Murphy, Michael P.; James, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are byproducts of mitochondrial respiration and thus potential regulators of mitochondrial function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDHK2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, thereby regulating entry of carbohydrates into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that PDHK2 activity is inhibited by low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the respiratory chain. This occurs via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues 45 and 392 on PDHK2 and results in increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. H2O2 derives from superoxide (O2˙̄), and we show that conditions that inhibit PDHK2 also inactivate the TCA cycle enzyme, aconitase. These findings suggest that under conditions of high mitochondrial O2˙̄ production, such as may occur under nutrient excess and low ATP demand, the increase in O2˙̄ and H2O2 may provide feedback signals to modulate mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:22910903

  3. Molecular properties of pyruvate bound to lactate dehydrogenase: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, H; Zheng, J; Burgner, J; Callender, R

    1989-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) catalyzes the addition of pyruvate to the four position of the nicotinamide ring of bound NAD+; this NAD-pyruvate adduct is bound tightly to the enzyme. We have used the adduct as a model for pyruvate in a competent ternary complex by comparing the Raman spectrum of the bound adduct with that for unliganded pyruvate. To understand the observed normal modes of pyruvate both as the bound adduct and in water, we have taken the Raman spectra of a series of 13C- and 18O-labeled pyruvates. We find that the carboxylate COO- moiety of pyruvate remains unprotonated at LDH's active site and forms an ion pair complex. The frequency of pyruvate's carbonyl C = O moiety shifts from 1710 cm-1 in water downward 34 cm-1 when pyruvate binds to LDH. This frequency shift corresponds to a ca. 34% polarization of the carbonyl bond, indicates a substantial interaction between the C = O group and enzyme, and is direct evidence for and is a measure of enzyme-induced electronic perturbation of the substrate needed for catalysis. This bond polarization is likely brought about by electrostatic interactions between the carbonyl moiety and the protonated imidazole group of His-195 and the guanidino group from Arg-109. We discuss how the data bear on the enzymatic chemistry of LDH. PMID:2543979

  4. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity measurement of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Lib, Margarita; Rodriguez-Mari, Adriana; Marusich, Michael F; Capaldi, Roderick A

    2003-03-01

    Altered pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) functioning occurs in primary PDH deficiencies and in diabetes, starvation, sepsis, and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Currently, the activity of the enzyme complex is difficult to measure in a rapid high-throughput format. Here we describe the use of a monoclonal antibody raised against the E2 subunit to immunocapture the intact PDH complex still active when bound to 96-well plates. Enzyme turnover was measured by following NADH production spectrophotometrically or by a fluorescence assay on mitochondrial protein preparations in the range of 0.4 to 5.0 micro g per well. Activity is sensitive to known PDH inhibitors and remains regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation after immunopurification because of the presence of bound PDH kinase(s) and phosphatase(s). It is shown that the immunocapture assay can be used to detect PDH deficiency in cell extracts of cultured fibroblasts from patients, making it useful in patient screens, as well as in the high-throughput format for discovery of new modulators of PDH functioning.

  5. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  6. Enzymatic evidence for an involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the anaerobic glycerol metabolism of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Menzel, K; Zeng, A P; Deckwer, W D

    1997-08-11

    Stoichiometric analysis of pathways involved in anaerobic bioconversion of glycerol by Klebsiella pneumoniae revealed that enzyme(s) in addition to pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) must be involved in pyruvate decarboxylation. In this work, enzymatic evidence is presented that confirmed a simultaneous involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) and excluded the presence of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase in this anaerobic bioprocess. The in vitro PDH activity of cell extract from continuous culture was found to be strongly affected by the substrate (glycerol) concentration in medium and cell growth rate (dilution rate). It increases with increasing glycerol concentration and correlates well with the specific substrate uptake rate at different dilution rates in a kind of saturation function. At a similar substrate uptake rate, it decreases with cell growth rate. The in vitro activity of PDH is much higher than its in vivo activity calculated from the pathway stoichiometry but comparable to the calculated in vivo activity of PFL.

  7. The effect of 2-oxoglutarate or 3-hydroxybutyrate on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in isolated cerebrocortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lai, J C; Sheu, K F

    1987-08-01

    The oxidation of pyruvate is mediated by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC; EC 1.2.4.1, EC 2.3.1.12 and EC 1.6.4.3) whose catalytic activity is influenced by phosphorylation and by product inhibition. 2-Oxoglutarate and 3-hydroxybutyrate are readily utilized by brain mitochondria and inhibit pyruvate oxidation. To further elucidate the regulatory behavior of brain PDHC, the effects of 2-oxoglutarate and 3-hydroxybutyrate on the flux of PDHC (as determined by [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation) and the activation (phosphorylation) state of PDHC were determined in isolated, non-synaptic cerebro-cortical mitochondria in the presence or absence of added adenine nucleotides (ADP or ATP). [1-14C]Pyruvate decarboxylation by these mitochondria is consistently depressed by either 3-hydroxybutyrate or 2-oxoglutarate in the presence of ADP when mitochondrial respiration is stimulated. In the presence of exogenous ADP, 3-hydroxybutyrate inhibits pyruvate oxidation mainly through the phosphorylation of PDHC, since the reduction of the PDHC flux parallels the depression of PDHC activation state under these conditions. On the other hand, in addition to the phosphorylation of PDHC, 2-oxoglutarate may also regulate pyruvate oxidation by product inhibition of PDHC in the presence of 0.5 mM pyruvate plus ADP or 5 mM pyruvate alone. This conclusion is based upon the observation that 2-oxoglutarate inhibits [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation to a much greater extent than that predicted from the PDHC activation state (i.e. catalytic capacity) alone. In conjunction with the results from our previous study (Lai, J. C. K. and Sheu, K.-F. R. (1985) J. Neurochem. 45, 1861-1868), the data of the present study are consistent with the notion that the relative importance of the various mechanisms that regulate brain and peripheral tissue PDHCs shows interesting differences.

  8. The effects of alpha-adrenergic stimulation on the regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R A; Tanabe, S; Buxton, D B; Olson, M S

    1985-08-05

    The regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex was investigated during alpha-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine in the isolated perfused rat liver. The metabolic flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was monitored by measuring the production of 14CO2 from infused [1-14C] pyruvate. In livers from fed animals perfused with a low concentration of pyruvate (0.05 mM), phenylephrine infusion significantly inhibited the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation without affecting the amount of pyruvate dehydrogenase in its active form. Also, phenylephrine caused no significant effect on tissue NADH/NAD+ and acetyl-CoA/CoASH ratios or on the kinetics of pyruvate decarboxylation in 14CO2 washout experiments. Phenylephrine inhibition of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was, however, closely associated with a decrease in the specific radioactivity of perfusate lactate, suggesting that the pyruvate decarboxylation response simply reflected dilution of the labeled pyruvate pool due to phenylephrine-stimulated glycogenolysis. This suggestion was confirmed in additional experiments which showed that the alpha-adrenergic-mediated inhibitory effect on pyruvate decarboxylation was reduced in livers perfused with a high concentration of pyruvate (1 mM) and was absent in livers from starved rats. Thus, alpha-adrenergic agonists do not exert short term regulatory effects on pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver. Furthermore, the results suggest either that the rat liver pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is insensitive to changes in mitochondrial calcium or that changes in intramitochondrial calcium levels as a result of alpha-adrenergic stimulation are considerably less than suggested by others.

  9. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Miguel E.; Molina, Roberto C.; Diaz, Waldo A.; Pradenas, Gonzalo A.; Vasquez, Claudio C.

    2009-02-27

    Potassium tellurite (K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  10. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and quantity decreases after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Teng J.; Giberson, Tyler A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key gatekeeper enzyme in aerobic metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to determine if PDH activity is affected by major stress in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) which has previously been used as a model of critical illness. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing CABG at an urban, tertiary care hospital. We included adult patients undergoing CABG with or without concomitant valve surgery. Measurements of PDH activity and quantity and thiamine were obtained prior to surgery, at the completion of surgery, and 6 hours post-surgery. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled (age: 67 ± 10 years, 21 % female). Study subjects had a mean 41.7 % (SD: 27.7) reduction in PDH activity after surgery and a mean 32.0% (SD: 31.4) reduction 6 hours after surgery (p < 0.001). Eight patients were thiamine deficient (≤ 7 nmol/L) after surgery compared to none prior to surgery (p = 0.002). Thiamine level was a significantly associated with PDH quantity at all time points (p = 0.01). Post-surgery lactate levels were inversely correlated with post-surgery thiamine levels (r = −0.58 and p = 0.04). Conclusion The stress of major surgery causes decreased PDH activity and quantity, and depletion of thiamine levels. PMID:25526377

  11. Severe encephalopathy associated to pyruvate dehydrogenase mutations and unbalanced coenzyme Q10 content

    PubMed Central

    Asencio, Claudio; Rodríguez-Hernandez, María A; Briones, Paz; Montoya, Julio; Cortés, Ana; Emperador, Sonia; Gavilán, Angela; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Yubero, Dèlia; Montero, Raquel; Pineda, Mercedes; O'Callaghan, María M; Alcázar-Fabra, María; Salviati, Leonardo; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is associated to a variety of clinical phenotypes including neuromuscular and nephrotic disorders. We report two unrelated boys presenting encephalopathy, ataxia, and lactic acidosis, who died with necrotic lesions in different areas of brain. Levels of CoQ10 and complex II+III activity were increased in both skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, but it was a consequence of higher mitochondria mass measured as citrate synthase. In fibroblasts, oxygen consumption was also increased, whereas steady state ATP levels were decreased. Antioxidant enzymes such as NQO1 and MnSOD and mitochondrial marker VDAC were overexpressed. Mitochondria recycling markers Fis1 and mitofusin, and mtDNA regulatory Tfam were reduced. Exome sequencing showed mutations in PDHA1 in the first patient and in PDHB in the second. These genes encode subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) that could explain the compensatory increase of CoQ10 and a defect of mitochondrial homeostasis. These two cases describe, for the first time, a mitochondrial disease caused by PDH defects associated with unbalanced of both CoQ10 content and mitochondria homeostasis, which severely affects the brain. Both CoQ10 and mitochondria homeostasis appears as new markers for PDH associated mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26014431

  12. Severe encephalopathy associated to pyruvate dehydrogenase mutations and unbalanced coenzyme Q10 content.

    PubMed

    Asencio, Claudio; Rodríguez-Hernandez, María A; Briones, Paz; Montoya, Julio; Cortés, Ana; Emperador, Sonia; Gavilán, Angela; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Yubero, Dèlia; Montero, Raquel; Pineda, Mercedes; O'Callaghan, María M; Alcázar-Fabra, María; Salviati, Leonardo; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido

    2016-03-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is associated to a variety of clinical phenotypes including neuromuscular and nephrotic disorders. We report two unrelated boys presenting encephalopathy, ataxia, and lactic acidosis, who died with necrotic lesions in different areas of brain. Levels of CoQ10 and complex II+III activity were increased in both skeletal muscle and fibroblasts, but it was a consequence of higher mitochondria mass measured as citrate synthase. In fibroblasts, oxygen consumption was also increased, whereas steady state ATP levels were decreased. Antioxidant enzymes such as NQO1 and MnSOD and mitochondrial marker VDAC were overexpressed. Mitochondria recycling markers Fis1 and mitofusin, and mtDNA regulatory Tfam were reduced. Exome sequencing showed mutations in PDHA1 in the first patient and in PDHB in the second. These genes encode subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) that could explain the compensatory increase of CoQ10 and a defect of mitochondrial homeostasis. These two cases describe, for the first time, a mitochondrial disease caused by PDH defects associated with unbalanced of both CoQ10 content and mitochondria homeostasis, which severely affects the brain. Both CoQ10 and mitochondria homeostasis appears as new markers for PDH associated mitochondrial disorders.

  13. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  14. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852

  15. p53 negatively regulates transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase Pdk2.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tanupriya; Harris, Chris R

    2012-01-15

    In cancer cells, the aberrant conversion of pyruvate into lactate instead of acetyl-CoA in the presence of oxygen is known as the Warburg effect. The consequences and mechanisms of this metabolic peculiarity are incompletely understood. Here we report that p53 status is a key determinant of the Warburg effect. Wild-type p53 expression decreased levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 (Pdk2) and the product of its activity, the inactive form of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (P-Pdc), both of which are key regulators of pyruvate metabolism. Decreased levels of Pdk2 and P-Pdc in turn promoted conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA instead of lactate. Thus, wild-type p53 limited lactate production in cancer cells unless Pdk2 could be elevated. Together, our results established that wild-type p53 prevents manifestation of the Warburg effect by controlling Pdk2. These findings elucidate a new mechanism by which p53 suppresses tumorigenesis acting at the level of cancer cell metabolism.

  16. Crystallization and Initial X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Hong, Young-Soo; Joachimiak, Andrzj; Patel, Mulchand S.; Rose, M. Franklin

    2000-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate followed by a reductive acetylation of lipoyl groups of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. El is an alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric assembly of an approximate molecular mass of 154 kDa. The crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown from polyethylene glycol 3350 using vapor diffusion method at 295K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(sub 1)2(sub 1)2(sub 1), with cell parameters of a = 64.2, b = 126.9 and c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d-spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric El assembly, and self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers.

  17. Protein S-glutathionylation alters superoxide/hydrogen peroxide emission from pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Marisa; Chalker, Julia; Slade, Liam; Gardiner, Danielle; Mailloux, Ryan J

    2017-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) is a vital source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several different tissues. Pdh has also been suggested to serve as a mitochondrial redox sensor. Here, we report that O2(•-)/ H2O2 emission from pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) is altered by S-glutathionylation. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) amplified O2(•-)/ H2O2 production by purified Pdh during reverse electron transfer (RET) from NADH. Thiol oxidoreductase glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) reversed these effects confirming that Pdh is a target for S-glutathionylation. S-glutathionylation had the opposite effect during forward electron transfer (FET) from pyruvate to NAD(+) lowering O2(•-)/ H2O2 production. Immunoblotting for protein glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) following diamide treatment confirmed that purified Pdh can be S-glutathionylated. Similar observations were made with mouse liver mitochondria. S-glutathionylation catalysts diamide and disulfiram significantly reduced pyruvate or 2-oxoglutarate driven O2(•-)/ H2O2 production in liver mitochondria, results that were confirmed using various Pdh, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh), and respiratory chain inhibitors. Immunoprecipitation of Pdh and Ogdh confirmed that either protein can be S-glutathionylated by diamide and disulfiram. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the S -glutathionylation of Pdh alters the amount of ROS formed by the enzyme complex. We also confirmed that Ogdh is controlled in a similar manner. Taken together, our results indicate that the redox sensing and ROS forming properties of Pdh and Ogdh are linked to S-glutathionylation.

  18. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 (PDK4) gene expression by glucocorticoids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Sara; Chowdhury, Farhana; Attia, Ramy R; Song, Shulan; Zhang, Yi; Elam, Marshall B; Cook, George A; Park, Edwards A

    2010-02-05

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) inhibits its activity. The expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene is increased in fasting and other conditions associated with the switch from the utilization of glucose to fatty acids as an energy source. Transcription of the PDK4 gene is elevated by glucocorticoids and inhibited by insulin. In this study, we have investigated the factors involved in the regulation of the PDK4 gene by these hormones. Glucocorticoids stimulate PDK4 through two glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding sites located more than 6000 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site. Insulin inhibits the glucocorticoid induction in part by causing dissociation of the GR from the promoter. Previously, we found that the estrogen related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here, we determined that one of the ERRalpha binding sites contributes to the insulin inhibition of PDK4. A binding site for the forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) is adjacent to the ERRalpha binding sites. FoxO1 participates in the glucocorticoid induction of PDK4 and the regulation of this gene by insulin. Our data demonstrate that glucocorticoids and insulin each modulate PDK4 gene expression through complex hormone response units that contain multiple factors.

  19. Crystallization and Initial X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Hong, Young-Soo; Joachimiak, Andrzj; Patel, Mulchand S.; Rose, M. Franklin

    2000-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) is a component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvate followed by a reductive acetylation of lipoyl groups of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. El is an alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric assembly of an approximate molecular mass of 154 kDa. The crystals of this recombinant enzyme have been grown from polyethylene glycol 3350 using vapor diffusion method at 295K. The crystals are characterized as orthorhombic, space group P2(sub 1)2(sub 1)2(sub 1), with cell parameters of a = 64.2, b = 126.9 and c = 190.2 A. Crystals diffracted to a minimum d-spacing of 2.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains one alpha(sub 2)Beta(sub 2) tetrameric El assembly, and self-rotation function analysis showed a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers.

  20. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  1. Effects of pyruvate dehydrogenase subunits overexpression on the α-ketoglutarate production in Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica WSH-Z06 harbours a promising capability to oversynthesize α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Its wide utilization is hampered by the formation of high concentrations of pyruvate. In this study, a metabolic strategy for the overexpression of the α and β subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, E2 and E3 components was designed to reduce the accumulation of pyruvate. Elevated expression level of α subunit of E1 component improved the α-KG production and reduced the pyruvate accumulation. Due to a reduction in the acetyl-CoA supply, neither the growth of cells nor the synthesis of α-KG was restrained by the overexpression of β subunit of E1, E2 and E3 components. Furthermore, via the overexpression of these thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-binding subunits, the dependency of pyruvate dehydrogenase on thiamine was diminished in strains T1 and T2, in which α and β subunits of E1 component were separately overexpressed. In these two recombinant strains, the accumulation of pyruvate was insensitive to variations in exogenous thiamine. The results suggest that α-KG production can be enhanced by altering the dependence on TPP of pyruvate dehydrogenase and that the competition for the cofactor can be switched to ketoglutarate dehydrogenase via separate overexpression of the TPP-binding subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase. The results presented here provided new clue to improve α-KG production.

  2. Pyruvate carboxylation enables growth of SDH-deficient cells by supporting aspartate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cardaci, Simone; Zheng, Liang; MacKay, Gillian; van den Broek, Niels J.F.; MacKenzie, Elaine D.; Nixon, Colin; Stevenson, David; Tumanov, Sergey; Bulusu, Vinay; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei; Fleming, Stewart; Schiavi, Francesca; Kalna, Gabriela; Blyth, Karen; Strathdee, Douglas; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a hetero-tetrameric nuclear-encoded complex responsible for the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes are associated with cancer formation. However, the impact of SDH loss on cell metabolism and the mechanisms enabling growth of SDH-defective cells are largely unknown. Here, we generated Sdhb-ablated kidney mouse cells and employed comparative metabolomics and stable isotope-labelling approaches to identify nutritional requirements and metabolic adaptations to SDH loss. We found that lack of SDH activity commits cells to consume extracellular pyruvate, which sustains Warburg-like bioenergetic features. We further demonstrated that pyruvate carboxylation diverts glucose-derived carbons into aspartate biosynthesis, thus sustaining cell growth. By identifying pyruvate carboxylase as an essential gene for the proliferation and tumorigenic capacity of SDH-deficient cells, this study revealed a metabolic vulnerability for potential future treatment of SDH-associated malignancies. PMID:26302408

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of eucaryotic pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex: decarboxylation rate, oscillations, and multiplicity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, An-Ping; Modak, Jayant; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter

    2002-01-01

    Pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA by the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) multienzyme complex is known as a key node in affecting the metabolic fluxes of animal cell culture. However, its possible role in causing possible nonlinear dynamic behavior such as oscillations and multiplicity of animal cells has received little attention. In this work, the kinetic and dynamic behavior of PDH of eucaryotic cells has been analyzed by using both in vitro and simplified in vivo models. With the in vitro model the overall reaction rate (nu(1)) of PDH is shown to be a nonlinear function of pyruvate concentration, leading to oscillations under certain conditions. All enzyme components affect nu(1) and the nonlinearity of PDH significantly, the protein X and the core enzyme dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) being mostly predominant. By considering the synthesis rates of pyruvate and PDH components the in vitro model is expanded to emulate in vivo conditions. Analysis using the in vivo model reveals another interesting kinetic feature of the PDH system, namely, multiple steady states. Depending on the pyruvate and enzyme levels or the operation mode, either a steady state with high pyruvate decarboxylation rate or a steady state with significantly lower decarboxylation rate can be achieved under otherwise identical conditions. In general, the more efficient steady state is associated with a lower pyruvate concentration. A possible time delay in the substrate supply and enzyme synthesis can also affect the steady state to be achieved and leads to oscillations under certain conditions. Overall, the predictions of multiplicity for the PDH system agree qualitatively well with recent experimental observations in animal cell cultures. The model analysis gives some hints for improving pyruvate metabolism in animal cell culture.

  4. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27323896

  5. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase expression by the farnesoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Savkur, Rajesh S.; Bramlett, Kelli S.; Michael, Laura F.; Burris, Thomas P. . E-mail: burris_thomas_p@lilly.com

    2005-04-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) functions as an important junction in intermediary metabolism by influencing the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate as a source of fuel. Activation of PDC is achieved by phosphatases, whereas, inactivation is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). The expression of PDK4 is highly regulated by the glucocorticoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. We demonstrate that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), which regulates a variety of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, also regulates the expression of PDK4. Treatment of rat hepatoma cells as well as human primary hepatocytes with FXR agonists stimulates the expression of PDK4 to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoids. In addition, treatment of mice with an FXR agonist significantly increased hepatic PDK4 expression, while concomitantly decreasing plasma triglyceride levels. Thus, activation of FXR may suppress glycolysis and enhance oxidation of fatty acids via inactivation of the PDC by increasing PDK4 expression.

  6. Pro-haloacetate Nanoparticles for Efficient Cancer Therapy via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Ye, Mao; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-06-01

    Anticancer agents based on haloacetic acids are developed for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), an enzyme responsible for reversing the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Through molecular docking studies mono- and dihaloacetates are identified as potent PDK2 binders and matched their efficiency with dichloroacetic acid. In silico screening directed their conversion to phospholipid prodrugs, which were subsequently self-assembled to pro-haloacetate nanoparticles. Following a thorough physico-chemical characterization, the functional activity of these novel agents was established in wide ranges of human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in rodents. Results indicated that the newly explored PDK modulators can act as efficient agent for cancer regression. A Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) assay mechanistically confirmed that these agents trigger their activity through the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  7. SIRT3 DEACETYLATES AND INCREASES PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Song, Ha Yong; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R.; Gius, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (PDHE1α or PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321) and a PDHA1 mutant, mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1K321R) increases in PDH activity, as compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1K321Q) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1K321Q exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype as compared to PDHA1K321R. These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyl-lysine suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration. PMID:25152236

  8. SIRT3 deacetylates and increases pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Wagner, Brett A; Yong Song, Ha; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R; Gius, David

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α (PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321), and a PDHA1 mutant mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1(K321R)) increases PDH activity, compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1(K321Q)) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1(K321Q) exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype compared to PDHA1(K321R). These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyllysine, suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration.

  9. Structure-guided Development of Specific Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Owens, Kyle R.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Williams, Noelle S.; Tambar, Uttam K.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 1–4) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 μm for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  10. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  11. A Patient With Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency and Nemaline Rods on Muscle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Unal, Ozlem; Orhan, Diclehan; Ostergaard, Elsebet; Tokatli, Aysegul; Dursun, Ali; Ozturk-Hismi, Burcu; Coskun, Turgay; Wibrand, Flemming; Kalkanoglu-Sivri, H Serap

    2013-11-01

    Nemaline rods are the pathologic hallmark of nemaline myopathy, but they have also been described as a secondary phenomenon in a variety of other disorders. Nemaline rods have not been reported in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency before. Here we present a patient with pyruvate carboxylase deficiency and nemaline rods detected on muscle biopsy. The nemaline rods may be due to cellular energy shortage and altered energy metabolism in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, similar to that in the previously reported patients. The mechanism of nemaline rod formation may be associated with the role of pyruvate carboxylase in cellular energy pathways.

  12. Impact of high pyruvate concentration on kinetics of rabbit muscle lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Matthew Warren; Byrne, Mark E; Chambers, Robert P

    2011-09-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of L: -lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from rabbit muscle as a regenerative catalyst of the biologically important cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), the kinetics over broad concentrations were studied to develop a suitable kinetic rate expression. Despite robust literature describing the intricate complexations, the mammalian rabbit muscle LDH lacks a quantitative kinetic rate expression accounting for simultaneous inhibition parameters, specifically at high pyruvate concentrations. Product inhibition by L: -lactate was observed to reduce activity at concentrations greater than 25 mM, while expected substrate inhibition by pyruvate was significant above 4.3 mM concentration. The combined effect of ternary and binary complexes of pyruvate and the coenzymes led to experimental rates as little as a third of expected activity. The convenience of the statistical software package JMP allowed for effective determination of experimental kinetic constants and simplification to a suitable rate expression: [formula: see text] where the last three terms represent the inhibition complex terms for lactate, pyruvate, and pyruvate-NAD, respectively. The corresponding values of K (I-Lac), K (I-Pyr), and K (I-Pyr-NAD) for rabbit muscle LDH are 487.33 mM(-1) and 29.91 mM and 97.47 mM at 22 °C and pH 7.8.

  13. A possible role for the chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in plant glycolate and glyoxylate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Blume, Christian; Behrens, Christof; Eubel, Holger; Braun, Hans-Peter; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Glyoxylate is a peroxisomal intermediate of photorespiration, the recycling pathway for 2-phosphoglycolate (2-PG) produced by the oxygenase activity of Rubisco. Under hot and dry growth conditions, photorespiratory intermediates can accumulate and must be detoxified by alternative pathways, including plastidal reactions. Moreover, there is evidence that chloroplasts are capable of actively producing glyoxylate from glycolate. Further metabolic steps are unknown, but probably include a CO2 release step. Here, we report that CO2 production from glycolate and glyoxylate in isolated tobacco chloroplasts can be inhibited by pyruvate, but not related compounds. We isolated a protein fraction that was enriched for the chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). The fraction contained a protein complex of several MDa in size that included all predicted subunits of the chloroplast PDC and a so far unidentified HSP93-V/ClpC1 heat shock protein. Glyoxylate competitively inhibited NADH formation from pyruvate in this fraction. The Km for pyruvate and the Ki for glyoxylate were 330 and 270 μM, respectively. Glyoxylate decarboxylation was also enriched in this fraction and could be in turn inhibited by pyruvate. Based on these data, we suggest that the chloroplast PDC might be part of a pathway for glycolate and/or glyoxylate oxidation in chloroplasts.

  14. Phosphorylation of serine 264 impedes active site accessibility in the E1 component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Franziska; Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Golbik, Ralph; Spinka, Michael; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Brauer, Johanna; Patel, Mulchand S; Tittmann, Kai

    2007-05-29

    At the junction of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle in cellular metabolism, the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In mammals, PDHc is tightly regulated by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of three serine residues in the thiamin-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) component. In vivo, inactivation of human PDHc correlates mostly with phosphorylation of serine 264, which is located at the entrance of the substrate channel leading to the active site of E1. Despite intense investigations, the molecular mechanism of this inactivation has remained enigmatic. Here, a detailed analysis of microscopic steps of catalysis in human wild-type PDHc-E1 and pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu elucidates how phosphorylation of Ser264 affects catalysis. Whereas the intrinsic reactivity of the active site in catalysis of pyruvate decarboxylation remains nearly unaltered, the preceding binding of substrate to the enzyme's active site via the substrate channel and the subsequent reductive acetylation of the E2 component are severely slowed in the phosphorylation variant. The structure of pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu determined by X-ray crystallography reveals no differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the phosphorylation loop or of the active site, when compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the channel leading to the active site is partially obstructed by the side chain of residue 264 in the variant. By analogy, a similar obstruction of the substrate channel can be anticipated to result from a phosphorylation of Ser264. The kinetic and thermodynamic results in conjunction with the structure of Ser264Glu suggest that phosphorylation blocks access to the active site by imposing a steric and electrostatic barrier for substrate binding and active site coupling with the E2 component. As a Ser264Gln variant, which carries no charge at position 264, is also selectively

  15. Functional Reconstitution of a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through Lipoylation Machinery Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-07-15

    Acetyl-CoA is a key precursor for the biosynthesis of a wide range of fuels, chemicals, and value-added compounds, whose biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and is energy intensive. Previous studies have demonstrated that functional expression of a pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) could fully replace the endogenous ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis in an ATP-independent manner. However, the requirement for lipoic acid (LA) supplementation hinders its wide industrial applications. In the present study, we focus on the engineering of a de novo synthetic lipoylation machinery for reconstitution of a functional PDH in the cytosol of yeast. First, a LA auxotrophic yeast strain was constructed through the expression of the Escherichia coli PDH structural genes and a lipoate-protein ligase gene in an ACS deficient (acs1Δ acs2Δ) strain, based on which an in vivo acetyl-CoA reporter was developed for following studies. Then the de novo lipoylation pathway was reconstituted in the cytosol of yeast by coexpressing the yeast mitochondrial lipoylation machinery genes and the E. coli type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes. Alternatively, an unnatural de novo synthetic lipoylation pathway was constructed by combining the reversed β-oxidation pathway with an acyl-ACP synthetase gene. To the best of our knowledge, reconstitution of natural and unnatural de novo synthetic lipoylation pathways for functional expression of a PDH in the cytosol of yeast has never been reported. Our study has laid a solid foundation for the construction and further optimization of acetyl-CoA overproducing yeast strains.

  16. Starvation increases the amount of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in several mammalian tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, P; Blair, P V; Sato, J; Jaskiewicz, J; Popov, K M; Harris, R A

    2000-09-01

    Covalent modification of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the disposal of glucose and other compounds metabolized to pyruvate. Regulation of the complex by this mechanism is achieved in part by tissue-specific expression of the genes encoding isoenzymes of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Starvation is known from our previous work to increase PDK activity of heart and skeletal muscle by increasing the amount of PDK isoenzyme 4 (PDK4) present in these tissues. This study demonstrates that increased expression of both PDK4 and PDK2 occurs in rat liver, kidney, and lactating mammary gland in response to starvation. PDK4 and PDK2 message levels were also increased by starvation in the two tissues examined (liver and kidney), suggesting enhancement of gene transcription. Changes in PDK2 message and protein were of similar magnitude, but changes in PDK4 message were greater than those in PDK4 protein, suggesting regulation at the level of translation. In contrast to these tissues, starvation had little or no effect on PDK2 and PDK4 protein in brain, white adipose tissue, and brown adipose tissue. Nevertheless, PDK4 message levels were significantly increased in brain and white adipose tissue by starvation. The findings of this study indicate that increased expression of PDK isoenzymes is an important mechanism for bringing about inactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex during starvation in many but not all tissues of the body. The absence of this mechanism preserves the capacity of neuronal tissue to utilize glucose for energy during starvation.

  17. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate, is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production. In alpha (sub 2) beta (sub 2)-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha) -C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites has not yet been understood. To understand the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95-Angstrom resolution. We propose a model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through a concerted approximately 2-Angstrom shuttle-like motion of its heterodimers. Similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase with functionally related enzymes suggests that this newly defined shuttle-like motion of domains is common to the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  18. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1, thiamin pyrophosphate, is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production. In alpha (sub 2) beta (sub 2)-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha) -C(=O) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites has not yet been understood. To understand the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holo-form of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.95-Angstrom resolution. We propose a model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through a concerted approximately 2-Angstrom shuttle-like motion of its heterodimers. Similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase with functionally related enzymes suggests that this newly defined shuttle-like motion of domains is common to the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  19. Effects of recombinant monokines on hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, lipogenesis de novo and plasma triacylglycerols. Abolition by prior fasting.

    PubMed Central

    Blackham, M; Cesar, D; Park, O J; Vary, T C; Wu, K; Kaempfer, S; Shackleton, C H; Hellerstein, M K

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and murine interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1) on the activation state of the hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHa), the activity of mitochondrial PDH kinase, hepatic lipogenesis de novo and plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentrations were studied. 2. Monokine effects depended upon prior nutritional state. In rats fasted for 20 h or 45 h before monokine administration and refeeding (orally or with intravenous glucose), PDHa, TG and hepatic lipogenesis were not increased. In rats fed ad libitum, treatment with TNF plus IL-1 increased the contribution of hepatic lipogenesis to circulating TG to 550% of control values (P = 0.03) and plasma TG concentrations to 159% (P = 0.02), whereas PDHa increased slightly to 120% (P = 0.02) and liver glycogen content fell to 45.8% (P = 0.05) of control values. 3. Intrinsic hepatic PDH kinase activity was not changed by monokine treatment in rats fed ad libitum. 4. The increased lipogenesis de novo showed no correlation (r2 = 0.05, not significant) with hepatic PDHa in individual animals fed ad libitum. 5. In conclusion, these results suggest that monokines increase pyruvate flux through hepatic PDH in vivo in rats fed ad libitum primarily by mechanisms other than covalent modification of PDH. Prior nutritional status exerts a permissive effect for monokine stimulation of PDHa and lipogenesis, consistent with a substrate-mediated action, but the mechanism of this permissive effect remains uncertain. PMID:1599392

  20. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex precedes HIF-1-mediated effects and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 upregulation during the first hours of hypoxic treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Andreas David; Walbrecq, Geoffroy; Kozar, Ines; Behrmann, Iris; Haan, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is an important gatekeeper enzyme connecting glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Thereby, it has a strong impact on the glycolytic flux as well as the metabolic phenotype of a cell. PDC activity is regulated via reversible phosphorylation of three serine residues on the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) E1α subunit. Phosphorylation of any of these residues by the PDH kinases (PDKs) leads to a strong decrease in PDC activity. Under hypoxia, the inactivation of the PDC has been described to be dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)-induced PDK1 protein upregulation. In this study, we show in two hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2 and JHH-4) that, during the adaptation to hypoxia, PDH is already phosphorylated at time points preceding HIF-1-mediated transcriptional events and PDK1 protein upregulation. Using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor approaches, we show that this inactivation of PDC is independent of HIF-1α expression but that the PDKs need to be expressed and active. Furthermore, we show that reactive oxygen species might be important for the induction of this PDH phosphorylation since it correlates with the appearance of an altered redox state in the mitochondria and is also inducible by H2O2 treatment under normoxic conditions. Overall, these results show that neither HIF-1 expression nor PDK1 upregulation is necessary for the phosphorylation of PDH during the first hours of the adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27800515

  1. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression.

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. C.; Lai, Michael P. Y.; Leung, Kevin S. N.

    1968-01-01

    In a Chinese population 1,000 full-term male neonates and a further 117 jaundiced neonates of both sexes were studied in an investigation of the frequency of deficiency of erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). This enzyme was found to be deficient in 3·6% of male neonates. Correlation of the results with the birthplace of the 602 mothers who were known to come from Kwangtung province showed no significant differences in the frequency of the deficiency between certain parts of the province. The deficiency of G6PD in hemizygous males is profound but it is not associated with erythrocyte acid monophosphoesterase deficiency in Chinese in Hong Kong. The G6PD deficiency accounts for 15·4% of all the 117 cases of neonatal jaundice. The relative importance of G6PD deficiency as a cause of neonatal jaundice does not differ materially in male and female mutants. Neonatal jaundice can occur in all genotypes of G6PD mutation in Chinese. PMID:5697334

  3. Regulatory effect of thiamin pyrophosphate on pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S; Czerniecki, J; Dobrzyn, P

    1999-03-16

    The kinetic behavior of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) containing bound endogenous thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) was affected by exogenous TPP. In the absence of exogenous TPP, a lag phase of the PDC reaction was observed. TPP added to the PDC reaction medium containing Mg2+ led to a disappearance of the lag phase, inducing strong reduction of the Km value for pyruvate (from 76.7 to 19.0 microM) but a more moderate decrease of Km for CoA (from 12.2 to 4.3 microM) and Km for NAD+ (from 70.2 to 33.6 microM), with no considerable change in the maximum reaction rate. Likewise, thiamin monophosphate (TMP) decreased the Km value of PDC for pyruvate, but to a lesser extent (from 76.7 to 57.9 microM) than TPP. At the unsaturating level of pyruvate, the A50 values for TPP and TMP were 0.2 microM and 0.3 mM, respectively. This could mean that the effect of TPP on PDC was more specific. In addition, exogenous TPP changed the UV spectrum and lowered the fluorescence emission of the PDC containing bound endogenous TPP in its active sites. The data obtained suggest that TPP plays, in addition to its catalytic function, the important role of positive regulatory effector of pig heart PDC.

  4. The elementary reactions of the pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. A study of the inhibition by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D A; Cooper, R H; Denton, R M; Bridges, B J; Randle, P J

    1976-07-01

    1. A method was devised for preparing pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), permitting studies of the binding of [35S]TPP to pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate. The Kd of TPP for pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 6.2-8.2 muM, whereas that for pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was approximately 15 muM; both forms of the complex contained about the same total number of binding sites (500 pmol/unit of enzyme). EDTA completely inhibited binding of TPP; sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and GTP, which are inhibitors (competitive with TPP) of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, did not appreciably affect TPP binding. 2. Initial-velocity patterns of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction obtained with varying TPP, CoA and NAD+ concentrations at a fixed pyruvate concentration were consistent with a sequential three-site Ping Pong mechanism; in the presence of oxaloacetate and citrate synthase to remove acetyl-CoA (an inhibitor of the overall reaction) the values of Km for NAD+ and CoA were 53+/- 5 muM and 1.9+/-0.2 muM respectively. Initial-velocity patterns observed with varying TPP concentrations at various fixed concentrations of pyruvate were indicative of either a compulsory order of addition of substrates to form a ternary complex (pyruvate-Enz-TPP) or a random-sequence mechanism in which interconversion of ternary intermediates is rate-limiting; values of Km for pyruvate and TPP were 25+/-4 muM and 50+/-10 nM respectively. The Kia-TPP (the dissociation constant for Enz-TPP complex calculated from kinetic plots) was close to the value of Kd-TPP (determined by direct binding studies). 3. Inhibition of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction by pyrophosphate was mixed non-competitive versus pyruvate and competitive versus TPP; however, pyrophosphate did not alter the calculated value for Kia-TPP, consistent with the lack of effect of pyrophosphate on the Kd for TPP. 4

  5. Specific inhibition by synthetic analogs of pyruvate reveals that the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction is essential for metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunik, Victoria I.; Artiukhov, Artem; Kazantsev, Alexey; Goncalves, Renata; Daloso, Danilo; Oppermann, Henry; Kulakovskaya, Elena; Lukashev, Nikolay; Fernie, Alisdair; Brand, Martin; Gaunitz, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and its phosphorylation are considered essential for oncotransformation, but it is unclear whether cancer cells require PDHC to be functional or silenced. We used specific inhibition of PDHC by synthetic structural analogs of pyruvate to resolve this question. With isolated and intramitochondrial PDHC, acetyl phosphinate (AcPH, KiAcPH = 0.1 μM) was a much more potent competitive inhibitor than the methyl ester of acetyl phosphonate (AcPMe, KiAcPMe = 40 μM). When preincubated with the complex, AcPH also irreversibly inactivated PDHC. Pyruvate prevented, but did not reverse the inactivation. The pyruvate analogs did not significantly inhibit other 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases. Different cell lines were exposed to the inhibitors and a membrane-permeable precursor of AcPMe, dimethyl acetyl phosphonate, which did not inhibit isolated PDHC. Using an ATP-based assay, dependence of cellular viability on the concentration of the pyruvate analogs was followed. The highest toxicity of the membrane-permeable precursor suggested that the cellular action of charged AcPH and AcPMe requires monocarboxylate transporters. The relevant cell-specific transcripts extracted from Gene Expression Omnibus database indicated that cell lines with higher expression of monocarboxylate transporters and PDHC components were more sensitive to the PDHC inhibitors. Prior to a detectable antiproliferative action, AcPH significantly changed metabolic profiles of the investigated glioblastoma cell lines. We conclude that catalytic transformation of pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase is essential for the metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cell lines, although metabolic heterogeneity causes different cellular sensitivities and/or abilities to cope with PDHC inhibition. PMID:26503465

  6. Specific inhibition by synthetic analogs of pyruvate reveals that the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction is essential for metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria I; Artiukhov, Artem; Kazantsev, Alexey; Goncalves, Renata; Daloso, Danilo; Oppermann, Henry; Kulakovskaya, Elena; Lukashev, Nikolay; Fernie, Alisdair; Brand, Martin; Gaunitz, Frank

    2015-11-24

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and its phosphorylation are considered essential for oncotransformation, but it is unclear whether cancer cells require PDHC to be functional or silenced. We used specific inhibition of PDHC by synthetic structural analogs of pyruvate to resolve this question. With isolated and intramitochondrial PDHC, acetyl phosphinate (AcPH, KiAcPH = 0.1 μM) was a much more potent competitive inhibitor than the methyl ester of acetyl phosphonate (AcPMe, KiAcPMe = 40 μM). When preincubated with the complex, AcPH also irreversibly inactivated PDHC. Pyruvate prevented, but did not reverse the inactivation. The pyruvate analogs did not significantly inhibit other 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases. Different cell lines were exposed to the inhibitors and a membrane-permeable precursor of AcPMe, dimethyl acetyl phosphonate, which did not inhibit isolated PDHC. Using an ATP-based assay, dependence of cellular viability on the concentration of the pyruvate analogs was followed. The highest toxicity of the membrane-permeable precursor suggested that the cellular action of charged AcPH and AcPMe requires monocarboxylate transporters. The relevant cell-specific transcripts extracted from Gene Expression Omnibus database indicated that cell lines with higher expression of monocarboxylate transporters and PDHC components were more sensitive to the PDHC inhibitors. Prior to a detectable antiproliferative action, AcPH significantly changed metabolic profiles of the investigated glioblastoma cell lines. We conclude that catalytic transformation of pyruvate by pyruvate dehydrogenase is essential for the metabolism and viability of glioblastoma cell lines, although metabolic heterogeneity causes different cellular sensitivities and/or abilities to cope with PDHC inhibition.

  7. Ciprofloxacin Therapy Results in Mitigation of ATP Loss after Irradiation Combined with Wound Trauma: Preservation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Inhibition of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Smith, Joan T; Kiang, Juliann G

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure combined with wound injury increases animal mortalities than ionizing radiation exposure alone. Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is in the fluroquinolone family of synthetic antibiotic that are available from the strategic national stockpile for emergency use and is known to inhibit bacterial sepsis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ciprofloxacin as a countermeasure to combined injury mortality and determine the signaling proteins involved in energy machinery. B6D2F1/J female mice were randomly assigned to receive either 9.75 Gy irradiation with Co-60 gamma rays followed by skin wounding (combined injury; CI) or sham procedure (sham). Either ciprofloxacin (90 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (VEH) (water) was administered orally to these mice 2 h after wounding and thereafter daily for 10 days. Determination of tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was conducted, and immunoblotting for signaling proteins involved in ATP machinery was performed. Combined injury resulted in 60% survival after 10 days compared to 100% survival in the sham group. Furthermore, combined injury caused significant reductions of ATP concentrations in ileum, pancreas, brain, spleen, kidney and lung (-25% to -95%) compared to the sham group. Ciprofloxacin administration after combined injury resulted in 100% survival and inhibited reductions in ileum and kidney ATP production. Ileum protein levels of heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP-70, a chaperone protein involved in ATP synthesis) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, an enzyme complex crucial to conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA for entrance into TCA cycle) were significantly lower in the CI group (vs. sham group). Using immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, HSP-70-PDH complex was found to be present in the ileum tissue of CI mice treated with ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, phosphorylation of serine residues of PDH resulting in inactivating PDH enzymatic activity, which occurred after combined injury, was inhibited

  8. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 in skeletal muscle during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Neufer, P Darrell

    2004-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) has a key position in skeletal muscle metabolism as it represents the entry of carbohydrate-derived fuel into the mitochondria for oxidation. PDC is regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) phosphorylates and inactivates the complex. PDK exists in four isoforms, of which the PDK4 isoform is predominantly expressed in skeletal and heart muscle. PDK4 transcription and PDK4 mRNA are markedly increased in human skeletal muscle during prolonged exercise and after both short-term high-intensity and prolonged low-intensity exercise. The exercise-induced transcriptional response of PDK4 is enhanced when muscle glycogen is lowered before the exercise, and intake of a low-carbohydrate high-fat diet during recovery from exercise results in increased transcription and mRNA content of PDK4 when compared with intake of a high-carbohydrate diet. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is increased during the first 2 h of low-intensity exercise, followed by a decrease towards resting levels, which is in line with the possibility that the increased PDK4 expressed influences the PDH activity already during prolonged exercise. PDK4 expression is also increased in response to fasting and a high-fat diet. Thus, increased PDK4 expression when carbohydrate availability is low seems to contribute to the sparing of carbohydrates by preventing carbohydrate oxidation. The impact of substrate availability on PDK4 expression during recovery from exercise also underlines the high metabolic priority given to replenishing muscle glycogen stores and re-establishing intracellular homeostasis after exercise.

  10. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  11. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  12. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  13. Novel Binding Motif and New Flexibility Revealed by Structural Analyses of a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Dihydrolipoyl Acetyltransferase Subcomplex from the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Multienzyme Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  14. Safe and Efficient Gene Therapy for Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Maria; Calabria, Andrea; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Kosinski, Penelope; López-Manzaneda, Sergio; Hill, Collin; del Mar Mañu-Pereira, María; Martín, Miguel A; Orman, Israel; Vives-Corrons, Joan-LLuis; Kung, Charles; Schambach, Axel; Jin, Shengfang; Bueren, Juan A; Montini, Eugenio; Navarro, Susana; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a monogenic metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene that leads to hemolytic anemia of variable symptomatology and that can be fatal during the neonatal period. PKD recessive inheritance trait and its curative treatment by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation provide an ideal scenario for developing gene therapy approaches. Here, we provide a preclinical gene therapy for PKD based on a lentiviral vector harboring the hPGK eukaryotic promoter that drives the expression of the PKLR cDNA. This therapeutic vector was used to transduce mouse PKD hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that were subsequently transplanted into myeloablated PKD mice. Ectopic RPK expression normalized the erythroid compartment correcting the hematological phenotype and reverting organ pathology. Metabolomic studies demonstrated functional correction of the glycolytic pathway in RBCs derived from genetically corrected PKD HSCs, with no metabolic disturbances in leukocytes. The analysis of the lentiviral insertion sites in the genome of transplanted hematopoietic cells demonstrated no evidence of genotoxicity in any of the transplanted animals. Overall, our results underscore the therapeutic potential of the hPGK-coRPK lentiviral vector and provide high expectations toward the gene therapy of PKD and other erythroid metabolic genetic disorders. PMID:27138040

  15. Safe and Efficient Gene Therapy for Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Maria; Calabria, Andrea; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Kosinski, Penelope; López-Manzaneda, Sergio; Hill, Collin; Del Mar Mañu-Pereira, María; Martín, Miguel A; Orman, Israel; Vives-Corrons, Joan-LLuis; Kung, Charles; Schambach, Axel; Jin, Shengfang; Bueren, Juan A; Montini, Eugenio; Navarro, Susana; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a monogenic metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene that leads to hemolytic anemia of variable symptomatology and that can be fatal during the neonatal period. PKD recessive inheritance trait and its curative treatment by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation provide an ideal scenario for developing gene therapy approaches. Here, we provide a preclinical gene therapy for PKD based on a lentiviral vector harboring the hPGK eukaryotic promoter that drives the expression of the PKLR cDNA. This therapeutic vector was used to transduce mouse PKD hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that were subsequently transplanted into myeloablated PKD mice. Ectopic RPK expression normalized the erythroid compartment correcting the hematological phenotype and reverting organ pathology. Metabolomic studies demonstrated functional correction of the glycolytic pathway in RBCs derived from genetically corrected PKD HSCs, with no metabolic disturbances in leukocytes. The analysis of the lentiviral insertion sites in the genome of transplanted hematopoietic cells demonstrated no evidence of genotoxicity in any of the transplanted animals. Overall, our results underscore the therapeutic potential of the hPGK-coRPK lentiviral vector and provide high expectations toward the gene therapy of PKD and other erythroid metabolic genetic disorders.

  16. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex: Metabolic Link to Ischemic Brain Injury and Target of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erica; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme complex (greater than 7 million Daltons) that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to form acetyl CoA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (the reduced form, NADH), and CO2. This reaction constitutes the bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity are lost in selectively vulnerable neurons after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Evidence from experiments carried out in vitro suggests that reperfusion-dependent loss of activity is caused by oxidative protein modifications. Impaired enzyme activity may explain the reduced cerebral glucose and oxygen consumption that occurs after cerebral ischemia. This hypothesis is supported by the hyperoxidation of mitochondrial electron transport chain components and NAD(H) that occurs during reperfusion, indicating that NADH production, rather than utilization, is rate limiting. Additional support comes from the findings that immediate postischemic administration of acetyl-l-carnitine both reduces brain lactate/pyruvate ratios and improves neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest in animals. As acetyl-l-carnitine is converted to acetyl CoA, the product of the PDHC reaction, it follows that impaired production of NADH is due to reduced activity of either PDHC or one or more steps in glycolysis. Impaired cerebral energy metabolism and PDHC activity are associated also with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, suggesting that this enzyme is an important link in the pathophysiology of both acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:15562436

  17. Potential dysregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by bacterial toxins and insulin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory W; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta Sue; Craun, Michael L; Bar-Or, David

    2009-09-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl CoA, effectively controlling the entrance of glycolysis products into aerobic metabolism. Because hyperlactatemia is one of the hallmarks of sepsis, we hyphothesized that gram-positive and negative bacterial toxin treatment will interfere with mRNA levels of regulatory enzymes of the PDC and overall enzyme activity in hepatocytes. HEP G2 hepatocarcinoma cells were incubated for 24 hours in the presence of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid. Total RNA was then isolated and message RNA levels for both pyruvate dehydrogense kinase 4 and phosphatase 2 were determined by RTPCR. Amplified DNA fragments were visualized by ethidium bromide in agarose gels and densitometry of the bands was performed. Data were then normalized to the housekeeping gene, GAPDH. Enzyme activity was then determined by capturing intact PDC on nitrocellulose membranes then determining PDC-dependent production of NADH. LPS treatment led to a time dependent increase in PDK4 message while decreasing PDP2 levels. Enzyme activity, in these cells, also significantly decreased 24 hours after exposure to LPS. Cells cultured in the presence of lipoteichoic acid and insulin exhibited differing message ratios and activity levels when evaluated at 4 hours, but at 24 hours shifted to mimic those observed in LPS treated cells. This data may indicate that exposure to bacterial cell wall components and insulin could create cellular environments that result in a build-up of lactate.

  18. Cloning and functions analysis of a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Jun; Hu, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Hua-Shan; Zhan, Gao-Miao; Wang, Han-Zhong; Hua, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is a negative regulator of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC), which plays a key role in intermediary metabolism. In this study, a 1,490-bp PDK in Brassica napus (BnPDK1) was isolated and cloned from Brassica cDNA library. BnPDK1 has an 1,104 open reading frame encoding 367 amino acids. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis result indicated that BnPDK1 is a multi-copy gene. RNA gel blot analysis and RNA in situ hybridization were used to determine the expression of BnPDK1 in different organs. BnPDK1 gene was ubiquitously expressed in almost all the tissues tested, having the highest expression in the stamen and the young silique. Over-expression of BnPDK1 in transgenic Arabidopsis lines would repress the PDC activity, and resulted in the decrease of seed oil content and leaf photosynthesis. These results implied that BnPDK1 was involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in developing seeds.

  19. Involvement of Candida albicans pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1) in filamentation

    PubMed Central

    F.Vellucci, Vincent; Gygax, Scott; Hostetter, Margaret K.

    2007-01-01

    For 50 years, physiologic studies in Candida albicans have associated fermentation with filamentation and respiration with yeast morphology. Analysis of the mitochondrial proteome of a C. albicans NDH51 mutant, known to be defective in filamentation, identified increased expression of several proteins in the respiratory pathway. Most notable was a 15-fold increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex protein X (Pdx1), an essential component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In basal salts medium with 100 mM glucose as carbon source, two independent pdx1 mutants displayed a filamentation defect identical to ndh51; reintegration of one PDX1 allele restored filamentation. Concentrations of glucose ≤100 mM did not correct the filamentation defect. Expanding on previous work, these studies suggest that increased expression of proteins extraneous to the electron transport chain compensates for defects in the respiratory pathway to maintain yeast morphology. Mitochondrial proteomics can aid in the identification of C. albicans genes not previously implicated in filamentation. PMID:17254815

  20. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Promotes Vascular Calcification via SMAD1/5/8 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Joo; Jeong, Ji Yun; Oh, Chang Joo; Park, Sungmi; Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Doo Kim, Nam; Choi, Young-Keun; Do, Ji-Yeon; Go, Younghoon; Ha, Chae-Myung; Choi, Je-Yong; Huh, Seung; Ho Jeoung, Nam; Lee, Ki-Up; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Wang, Yu; Park, Keun-Gyu; Harris, Robert A.; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification, a pathologic response to defective calcium and phosphate homeostasis, is strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. In this study, we have observed that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) is upregulated and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex phosphorylation is increased in calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and in calcified vessels of patients with atherosclerosis, suggesting that PDK4 plays an important role in vascular calcification. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of PDK4 ameliorated the calcification in phosphate-treated VSMCs and aortic rings and in vitamin D3-treated mice. PDK4 augmented the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs by phosphorylating SMAD1/5/8 via direct interaction, which enhances BMP2 signaling. Furthermore, increased expression of PDK4 in phosphate-treated VSMCs induced mitochondrial dysfunction followed by apoptosis. Taken together, our results show that upregulation of PDK4 promotes vascular calcification by increasing osteogenic markers with no adverse effect on bone formation, demonstrating that PDK4 is a therapeutic target for vascular calcification. PMID:26560812

  1. Neutrophil pyruvate kinase deficiency with recurrent staphylococcal infections: first reported case.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, P S; Johnson, W S; Hayward, A R

    1976-01-01

    A woman with an intracellular killing defect in the neutrophils had neutrophil pyruvate kinase deficiency. She had had recurrent staphylococcal infections throughout her life. The enzyme present was unstable and its kinetics were abnormal. PMID:4193

  2. Dichloroacetate, the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex and the Modulation of mESC Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Sofia; Correia, Marcelo; Gomes, Andreia; Pereira, Sandro L.; Perestrelo, Tânia; Sousa, Maria Inês; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is localized in the mitochondrial matrix catalyzing the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and NADH. For proper complex regulation the E1-α subunit functions as an on/off switch regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. In different cell types one of the four-pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDHK1-4) can phosphorylate this subunit leading to PDH inactivation. Our previous results with human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC), suggested that PDHK could be a key regulator in the metabolic profile of pluripotent cells, as it is upregulated in pluripotent stem cells. Therefore, we wondered if metabolic modulation, via inexpensive pharmacological inhibition of PDHK, could impact metabolism and pluripotency. Methods/Results In order to assess the importance of the PDH cycle in mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESC), we incubated cells with the PDHK inhibitor dichloroacetate (DCA) and observed that in its presence ESC started to differentiate. Changes in mitochondrial function and proliferation potential were also found and protein levels for PDH (both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated) and PDHK1 were monitored. Interestingly, we were also able to describe a possible pathway that involves Hif-1α and p53 during DCA-induced loss of pluripotency. Results with ESCs treated with DCA were comparable to those obtained for cells grown without Leukemia Inhibitor Factor (LIF), used in this case as a positive control for differentiation. Conclusions DCA negatively affects ESC pluripotency by changing cell metabolism and elements related to the PDH cycle, suggesting that PDHK could function as a possible metabolic gatekeeper in ESC, and may be a good target to modulate metabolism and differentiation. Although further molecular biology-based experiments are required, our data suggests that inactive PDH favors pluripotency and that ESC have similar strategies as cancer cells to maintain a glycolytic

  3. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  4. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  5. A 'random steady-state' model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdi, T. S.; Hatfield, G. W.; Mjolsness, E. D.

    2010-03-01

    The multienzyme complexes, pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, involved in the central metabolism of Escherichia coli consist of multiple copies of three different enzymes, E1, E2 and E3, that cooperate to channel substrate intermediates between their active sites. The E2 components form the core of the complex, while a mixture of E1 and E3 components binds to the core. We present a random steady-state model to describe catalysis by such multienzyme complexes. At a fast time scale, the model describes the enzyme catalytic mechanisms of substrate channeling at a steady state, by polynomially approximating the analytic solution of a biochemical master equation. At a slower time scale, the structural organization of the different enzymes in the complex and their random binding/unbinding to the core is modeled using methods from equilibrium statistical mechanics. Biologically, the model describes the optimization of catalytic activity by substrate sharing over the entire enzyme complex. The resulting enzymatic models illustrate the random steady state (RSS) for modeling multienzyme complexes in metabolic pathways.

  6. “Scanning mutagenesis” of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1alpha subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated...

  7. [Selective inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the liver and heart of mice by triphosphate esters of thiochrome and tetrahydrothiamine].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, Iu M; Zabrodskaia, S V; Zimatkina, T I; Oparin, D A

    1983-06-01

    In experiments with white mice it was shown that in contrast to hydroxythiamine and other known vitamin B1 antagonists, triphosphate esters of thiochrome and tetrahydrothiamine possess a selective anticoenzyme activity with respect to the only one of the thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes, i.e. pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  8. Equilibrium concentrations for pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle at specified concentrations of certain coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2004-04-01

    It is of interest to calculate equilibrium compositions of systems of biochemical reactions at specified concentrations of coenzymes because these reactants tend to be in steady states. Thermodynamic calculations under these conditions require the definition of a further transformed Gibbs energy G" by use of a Legendre transform. These calculations are applied to the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction plus the citric acid cycle, but steady-state concentrations of CoA, acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA cannot be specified because they are involved in the conservation of carbon atoms. These calculations require the use of linear algebra to obtain further transformed Gibbs energies of formation of reactants and computer programs to calculate equilibrium compositions. At specified temperature, pH, ionic strength and specified concentrations of several coenzymes, the equilibrium composition depends on the specified concentrations of the coenzymes and the initial amounts of reactants.

  9. [Interaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from the heart muscle with thiamine diphosphate and its derivatives].

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S A; Kiselevskiĭ, Iu V; Taranda, N I; Zabrodskaia, S V; Oparin, D A

    1989-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of 23 thiamin derivatives on the bovine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) were studied. Oxythiamin diphosphate and tetrahydroxythiamin diphosphate exhibited the most pronounced effect on the PDC activity, affecting the complex by a competitive type of inhibition for thiamin diphosphate (TDP). The apparent affinity of TDP and the anticoenzyme derivatives for apo PDC depended on presence of phosphate and divalent metal ions. Phosphate considerably increased the Km values for TDP (up to 0.17 microM) and the Ki values for oxythiamin diphosphate (0.40 microM) as well as for tetrahydroxythiamin diphosphate (0.23 microM). In presence of Mn2+, Km value for TDP was 3.5-fold lower as compared with Mg2+ containing medium.

  10. Pea leaf mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is inactivated in vivo in a light-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Budde, R J; Randall, D D

    1990-01-01

    We examined the effect of light on the activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mt-PDC) by using intact green pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. Upon illumination there is an initial drop in mtPDC activity followed by oscillations that dampen during the initial period of photosynthesis to a steady-state level of one-fourth or less of the mtPDC activity measured in the dark. The initial light-dependent decrease in mtPDC activity is inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (an inhibitor of photosystem II of photosynthesis) and does not occur in etiolated seedlings. Therefore, the effect of light is indirect and most likely associated with photosynthesis and/or photorespiration. Conditions that would be unfavorable for photorespiration also inhibited the light-dependent decrease in mtPDC activity. PMID:11607058

  11. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in the rat cerebral cortex following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Koide, T; Wieloch, T

    1989-06-01

    The effect of cerebral ischemia on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex following 15 min of bilateral common carotid occlusion ischemia and following 15 min, 60 min, and 6 h of recirculation after 15 min of ischemia. In frozen cortical tissue from the same animals, the levels of labile phosphate compounds, glucose, glycogen, lactate, and pyruvate was determined. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1(-14)C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 9.6 +/- 0.5 nmol CO2/(min-mg protein) or 40% of the total PDHC activity. This fraction increased to 89% at the end of 15 min of ischemia. At 15 min of recirculation following 15 min of ischemia, the PDHC activity decreased to 50% of control levels and was depressed for up to 6 h post ischemia. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in total PDHC activity. Apart from a reduction in ATP levels, the acute changes in the levels of energy metabolites were essentially normalized at 6 h of recovery. Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of PDH kinase, given to rats at 250 mg/kg i.p. four times over 2 h, significantly decreased blood glucose levels from 7.4 +/- 0.6 to 5.1 +/- 0.3 mmol/L and fully activated PDHC. In animals in which the plasma glucose level was maintained at control levels of 8.3 +/- 0.5 mumol/g by intravenous infusion of glucose, the active portion of PDHC increased to 95 +/- 4%. In contrast, the depressed PDHC activity at 15 min following ischemia was not affected by the DCA treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity during and following severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cardell, M; Siesjö, B K; Wieloch, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of severe insulin-induced hypoglycemia on the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) was investigated in homogenates of frozen rat cerebral cortex during burst suppression EEG, after 10, 30, and 60 min of isoelectric EEG, and after 30 and 180 min and 24 h of recovery following 30 min of hypoglycemic coma. Changes in PDHC activity were correlated to levels of labile organic phosphates and glycolytic metabolites. In cortex from control animals, the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation was 7.1 +/- 1.3 U/mg of protein, or 35% of the total PDHC activity. The activity was unchanged during burst suppression EEG whereas the active fraction increased to 81-87% during hypoglycemic coma. Thirty minutes after glucose-induced recovery, the PDHC activity had decreased by 33% compared to control levels, and remained significantly depressed after 3 h of recovery. This decrease in activity was not due to a decrease in the total PDHC activity. At 24 h of recovery, PDHC activity had returned to control levels. We conclude that the activation of PDHC during hypoglycemic coma is probably the result of an increased PDH phosphatase activity following depolarization and calcium influx, and allosteric inhibition of PDH kinase due to increased ADP/ATP ratio. The depression of PDHC activity following hypoglycemic coma is probably due to an increased phosphorylation of the enzyme, as a consequence of an imbalance between PDH phosphatase and kinase activities. Since some reduction of the ATP/ADP ratio persisted and since the lactate/pyruvate ratio had normalized by 3 h of recovery, the depression of PDHC most likely reflects a decrease in PDH phosphatase activity, probably due to a decrease in intramitochondrial Ca2+.

  13. Src drives the Warburg effect and therapy resistance by inactivating pyruvate dehydrogenase through tyrosine-289 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Anitha K.; Lim, Sangbin; Zhang, Ying; Charles, Steve; Tarrash, Miriam; Fu, Xueqi; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Trevino, Jose G.; Tan, Ming; Lu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect, which reflects cancer cells' preference for aerobic glycolysis over glucose oxidation, contributes to tumor growth, progression and therapy resistance. The restraint on pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in cancer cells is in part attributed to the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Src is a prominent oncogenic non-receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance to conventional and targeted therapies. However, the potential role of Src in tumor metabolism remained unclear. Here we report that activation of Src attenuated PDH activity and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, Src inhibitors activated PDH and increased cellular ROS levels. Src inactivated PDH through direct phosphorylation of tyrosine-289 of PDH E1α subunit (PDHA1). Indeed, Src was the main kinase responsible for PDHA1 tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Expression of a tyrosine-289 non-phosphorable PDHA1 mutant in Src-hyperactivated cancer cells restored PDH activity, increased mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress, decreased experimental metastasis, and sensitized cancer cells to pro-oxidant treatment. The results suggest that Src contributes to the Warburg phenotype by inactivating PDH through tyrosine phosphorylation, and the metabolic effect of Src is essential for Src-driven malignancy and therapy resistance. Combination therapies consisting of both Src inhibitors and pro-oxidants may improve anticancer efficacy. PMID:26848621

  14. Function of Several Critical Amino Acids in Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Revealed by Its Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Ciszak, E.; Patel, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and reductive acetylation of lipoyl moieties of the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The roles of beta W135, alpha P188, alpha M181, alpha H15 and alpha R349 of E1 determined by kinetic analysis were reassessed by analyzing the three-dimensional structure of human E1. The residues identified above are found to play a structural role rather than being directly involved in catalysis: beta W135 is the center residue in the hydrophobic interaction between beta and beta' subunits; alpha P188 and alpha M181 are critical for the conformation of the TPP-binding motif and interaction between alpha and beta subunits; alpha H15, is necessary for the organization of the N-terminus of alpha and alpha'; subunits and alpha R349 supports the interaction of the C-terminus of the alpha subunits with the beta subunits. Analysis of several critical E1 residues confirms the importance of residues distant from the active site for subunit interactions and enzyme function.

  15. Erk regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase flux through PDK4 modulates cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Metallo, Christian M; Coloff, Jonathan L; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Brugge, Joan S

    2011-08-15

    Loss of extracellular matrix (ECM) attachment leads to metabolic impairments that limit cellular energy production. Characterization of the metabolic alterations induced by ECM detachment revealed a dramatic decrease in uptake of glucose, glutamine, and pyruvate, and a consequent decrease in flux through glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is disproportionally decreased, concomitant with increased expression of the PDH inhibitory kinase, PDH kinase 4 (PDK4), and increased carbon secretion. Overexpression of ErbB2 maintains PDH flux by suppressing PDK4 expression in an Erk-dependent manner, and Erk signaling also regulates PDH flux in ECM-attached cells. Additionally, epidermal growth factor (EGF), a potent inducer of Erk, positively regulates PDH flux through decreased PDK4 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of PDK4 in ECM-detached cells suppresses the ErbB2-mediated rescue of ATP levels, and in attached cells, PDK4 overexpression decreases PDH flux, de novo lipogenesis, and cell proliferation. Mining of microarray data from human tumor data sets revealed that PDK4 mRNA is commonly down-regulated in tumors compared with their tissues of origin. These results identify a novel mechanism by which ECM attachment, growth factors, and oncogenes modulate the metabolic fate of glucose by controlling PDK4 expression and PDH flux to influence proliferation.

  16. Metabolic reprogramming by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-lactic acid axis: Linking metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that there is a complex interplay between metabolism and chronic disorders in the nervous system. In particular, the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase (PDK)-lactic acid axis is a critical link that connects metabolic reprogramming and the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. PDKs, via regulation of PDH complex activity, orchestrate the conversion of pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA, or anaerobically to lactate. The kinases are also involved in neurometabolic dysregulation under pathological conditions. Lactate, an energy substrate for neurons, is also a recently acknowledged signaling molecule involved in neuronal plasticity, neuron-glia interactions, neuroimmune communication, and nociception. More recently, the PDK-lactic acid axis has been recognized to modulate neuronal and glial phenotypes and activities, contributing to the pathophysiologies of diverse neurological disorders. This review covers the recent advances that implicate the PDK-lactic acid axis as a novel linker of metabolism and diverse neuropathophysiologies. We finally explore the possibilities of employing the PDK-lactic acid axis and its downstream mediators as putative future therapeutic strategies aimed at prevention or treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computational Study on New Natural Compound Inhibitors of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Yu, Shanshan; Su, Jing; Sun, Liankun

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) are key enzymes in glucose metabolism, negatively regulating pyruvate dehyrogenase complex (PDC) activity through phosphorylation. Inhibiting PDKs could upregulate PDC activity and drive cells into more aerobic metabolism. Therefore, PDKs are potential targets for metabolism related diseases, such as cancers and diabetes. In this study, a series of computer-aided virtual screening techniques were utilized to discover potential inhibitors of PDKs. Structure-based screening using Libdock was carried out following by ADME (adsorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) and toxicity prediction. Molecular docking was used to analyze the binding mechanism between these compounds and PDKs. Molecular dynamic simulation was utilized to confirm the stability of potential compound binding. From the computational results, two novel natural coumarins compounds (ZINC12296427 and ZINC12389251) from the ZINC database were found binding to PDKs with favorable interaction energy and predicted to be non-toxic. Our study provide valuable information of PDK-coumarins binding mechanisms in PDK inhibitor-based drug discovery. PMID:26959013

  18. Age-related compensatory activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Régis; Heath, Shi-Hua D; Doneanu, Catalin E; Harris, Robert A; Hagen, Tory M

    2004-12-03

    Mitochondrial uptake and beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids are markedly impaired in the aging rat heart. While these alterations would be expected to adversely affect overall pyridine nucleotides, NADH levels do not change significantly with age. This conundrum suggests that specific compensatory mechanisms occur in the aging heart. The comparison of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) kinetics in 4- and 24- to 28-month-old F344 rats revealed a 60% significant increase in V(max) with no change in PDC expression, and a 1.6-fold decrease in the Michaelis constant (K(m)) in old compared to young rats. The observed kinetic adjustments were selective to PDC, as neither the V(max) nor K(m) of citrate synthase changed with age. PDC kinase-4 mRNA levels decreased by 57% in old vs young rat hearts and correlated with a 45% decrease in PDC phosphorylation. We conclude that PDC from old rat hearts catabolizes pyruvate more efficiently due to an adaptive change in phosphorylation.

  19. Determining the in vivo regulation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase based on label flux from hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Marie A; Atherton, Helen J; Heather, Lisa C; Griffin, Julian L; Clarke, Kieran; Radda, George K; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key regulator of cardiac substrate selection and is regulated by both pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-mediated phosphorylation and feedback inhibition. The extent to which chronic upregulation of PDK protein levels, acutely increased PDK activity and acute feedback inhibition limit PDH flux remains unclear because existing in vitro assessment methods inherently disrupt the regulation of the enzyme complex. We have demonstrated previously that hyperpolarised (13)C-labelled metabolic tracers coupled with MRS can monitor flux through PDH in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of acute and chronic changes in PDK and PDH activities to in vivo myocardial PDH flux. We examined both fed and fasted rats with either hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate alone or hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate co-infused with malate [to modulate mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH/NAD(+)) and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)/CoA ratios, which alter both PDH activity and flux]. To confirm the metabolic fate of infused malate, we performed in vitro (1)H NMR spectroscopy on cardiac tissue extracts. We observed that, in fed rats, where PDH activity was high, the presence of malate increased PDH flux by 27%, whereas, in the fasted state, malate infusion had no effect on PDH flux. These observations suggest that pyruvate oxidation is limited by feedback inhibition from acetyl-CoA only when PDH activity is high. Therefore, in the case of PDH, and potentially other enzymes, hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to assess noninvasively enzymatic regulation.

  20. Disorders of pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    De Meirleir, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency are the most common disorders in pyruvate metabolism. Diagnosis is made by enzymatic and DNA analysis after basic biochemical tests in plasma, urine, and CSF. Pyruvate dehydrogenase has three main subunits, an additional E3-binding protein and two complex regulatory enzymes. Most frequent are deficiencies in PDH-E1α. There is a spectrum of clinical presentations in E1α deficiency, ranging in boys from severe neonatal lactic acidosis, Leigh encephalopathy, to later onset of neurological disease such as intermittent ataxia or dystonia. Females tend to have a more uniform presentation resembling nonprogressive cerebral palsy. Neuroradiological abnormalities such as corpus callosum agenesis are seen more frequently in girls, basal ganglia and midbrain disturbances in boys. Deficiencies in the other subunits have also been described, but in a smaller number of patients. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency has three clinical phenotypes. The infantile type is characterized mainly by severe developmental delay, failure to thrive, and seizures. The second type is characterized by neonatal onset of severe lactic acidosis with rigidity and hypokinesia. A third form is rarer with intermittent episodes of lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis. Neuroradiological findings such as cystic periventricular leukomalacia have been described.

  1. Mutations in PDX1, the human lipoyl-containing component X of the pyruvate dehydrogenase-complex gene on chromosome 11p1, in congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Aral, B; Benelli, C; Ait-Ghezala, G; Amessou, M; Fouque, F; Maunoury, C; Créau, N; Kamoun, P; Marsac, C

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced a cDNA that encodes an apparent human orthologue of a yeast protein-X component (ScPDX1) of pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. The new human cDNA that has been referred to as "HsPDX1" cDNA was cloned by use of the "database cloning" strategy and had a 1,506-bp open reading frame. The amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the cDNA was 20% identical with that encoded by the yeast PDX1 gene and 40% identical with that encoded by the lipoate acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and included a lipoyl-bearing domain that is conserved in some dehydrogenase enzyme complexes. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the major HsPDX1 mRNA was 2.5 kb in length and was expressed mainly in human skeletal and cardiac muscles but was also present, at low levels, in other tissues. FISH analysis performed with a P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC)-containing HsPDX1 gene sublocalized the gene to 11p1.3. Molecular investigation of PDX1 deficiency in four patients with neonatal lactic acidemias revealed mutations 78del85 and 965del59 in a homozygous state, and one other patient had no PDX1 mRNA expression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9399911

  2. Inhibiting Sperm Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex and Its E3 Subunit, Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Affects Fertilization in Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Sailasree, Purnima; Singh, Durgesh K.; Kameshwari, Duvurri B.; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The importance of sperm capacitation for mammalian fertilization has been confirmed in the present study via sperm metabolism. Involvement of the metabolic enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) in hamster in vitro fertilization (IVF) via in vitro sperm capacitation is being proposed through regulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium. Methodology and Principal Findings Capacitated hamster spermatozoa were allowed to fertilize hamster oocytes in vitro which were then assessed for fertilization, microscopically. PDHc/DLD was inhibited by the use of the specific DLD-inhibitor, MICA (5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid). Oocytes fertilized with MICA-treated (MT) [and thus PDHc/DLD-inhibited] spermatozoa showed defective fertilization where 2nd polar body release and pronuclei formation were not observed. Defective fertilization was attributable to capacitation failure owing to high lactate and low intracellular pH and calcium in MT-spermatozoa during capacitation. Moreover, this defect could be overcome by alkalinizing spermatozoa, before fertilization. Increasing intracellular calcium in spermatozoa pre-IVF and in defectively-fertilized oocytes, post-fertilization rescued the arrest seen, suggesting the role of intracellular calcium from either of the gametes in fertilization. Parallel experiments carried out with control spermatozoa capacitated in medium with low extracellular pH or high lactate substantiated the necessity of optimal sperm intracellular lactate levels, intracellular pH and calcium during sperm capacitation, for proper fertilization. Conclusions This study confirms the importance of pyruvate/lactate metabolism in capacitating spermatozoa for successful fertilization, besides revealing for the first time the importance of sperm PDHc/ DLD in fertilization, via the modulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium during capacitation. In addition, the

  3. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  4. A NEW LEVEL OF ARCHITECTURAL COMPLEXITY IN THE HUMAN PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Michaela; Prior, Alison Elizabeth; Brown, Audrey Elaine; Cooper, Alan; Byron, Olwyn; Lindsay, John Gordon

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase multi-enzyme complex (PDC) is a key metabolic assembly comprising a 60- meric pentagonal dodecahedral E2 core attached to which are 30 E1 heterotetramers and 6 E3 homodimers at maximal occupancy. Stable E3 integration is mediated by an accessory E3 binding protein (E3BP) located on each of the 12 E2 icosahedral faces. Here, we present evidence for a novel subunit organisation in which dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) and E3BP form subcomplexes with a 1:2 stoichiometry implying the existence of a network of E3 ‘cross-bridges’ linking pairs of E3BPs across the surface of the E2 core assembly. We have also determined a low resolution structure for a truncated E3BP/E3 subcomplex using small angle xray scattering showing one of the E3BP lipoyl domains docked into the E3 active site. This new level of architectural complexity in mammalian PDC contrasts with the recently published crystal structure of human E3 complexed with its cognate subunit binding domain and provides important new insights into subunit organisation, its catalytic mechanism and regulation by the intrinsic PDC kinase. PMID:16679318

  5. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  6. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  7. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  8. Altered fermentative metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants lacking pyruvate formate lyase and both pyruvate formate lyase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H(2) production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H(2) production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  9. Rapid inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase: an initiating event in high dietary fat-induced loss of metabolic flexibility in the heart.

    PubMed

    Crewe, Clair; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac function depends on the ability to switch between fatty acid and glucose oxidation for energy production in response to changes in substrate availability and energetic stress. In obese and diabetic individuals, increased reliance on fatty acids and reduced metabolic flexibility are thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which cardiac mitochondria contribute to diet-induced metabolic inflexibility were investigated. Mice were fed a high fat or low fat diet for 1 d, 1 wk, and 20 wk. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice fed a high fat diet displayed a diminished ability to utilize the glycolytically derived substrate pyruvate. This response was rapid, occurring within the first day on the diet, and persisted for up to 20 wk. A selective increase in the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase are responsible for the rapid suppression of pyruvate utilization. An important consequence is that pyruvate dehydrogenase is sensitized to inhibition when mitochondria respire in the presence of fatty acids. Additionally, increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 preceded any observed diet-induced reductions in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 and glycolytic enzymes and, as judged by Akt phosphorylation, insulin signaling. Importantly, diminished insulin signaling evident at 1 wk on the high fat diet did not occur in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 knockout mice. Dietary intervention leads to a rapid decline in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 levels and recovery of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicating an additional form of regulation. Finally, an overnight fast elicits a metabolic response similar to that induced by high dietary fat obscuring diet-induced metabolic changes. Thus, our data indicate that diet-induced inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase may be an initiating event in decreased oxidation of glucose and increased reliance of the heart on

  10. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  11. [Isoenzyme spectrum and kinetic properties of pyruvate kinase from the liver of thiamine-deficient rats].

    PubMed

    Konovalenko, O V; Maglysh, S S; Gorbach, Z V

    1990-01-01

    Thiamine-deficiency in animals induced by everyday subcutaneous administration of oxythiamine in a dose of 4, 40 and 100 mg/kg of weight for 10 days results in a decrease of the total activity of pyruvate kinase in the liver tissue and does not affect the mentioned index in the kidney and heart tissues. It is shown that as a result of the enzyme fractionation in the column with DEAE-cellulose the total activity of pyruvate kinase in the liver tissue of rats with thiamine-deficiency decreases due to L-isoform while the content of M-isoform remains unchanged. Thiamine deficiency does not affect kinetic characteristics of the L-isoform, extracted from the liver and this shows the absence of changes in the degree of phosphorylation of pyruvate kinase L-isoform under these conditions.

  12. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during infusion of fatty acids of varying chain lengths in the perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Latipää, P M; Peuhkurinen, K J; Hiltunen, J K; Hassinen, I E

    1985-12-01

    The effects of a homologous series of fatty acids with a chain length of two to eight on the rate of pyruvate oxidation and covalent interconversions of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) were studied in isolated perfused rat hearts. In the Langendorff-perfused heart beating at 5 Hz against an aortic pressure of 59 mmHg (7.85 kPa), a positive linear correlation was found between the fraction of PDH existing in the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHa) and the pyruvate oxidation rate until the PDHa fraction increased to 48%. This value resulted in a saturation of the citric acid cycle and further activation did not increase the metabolic flux. The PDHa content of the tissue was higher during infusion of odd carbon number fatty acids than during infusion of even carbon number fatty acids. Propionate caused an almost maximal (93%) activation of PDH. A negative correlation was found between the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and the PDHa content. A negative correlation was also found between the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio and the tissue PDHa content. The rate of labelled CO2 production, the specific radioactivity of tissue alanine and the metabolic balance sheet demonstrated that the alanine aminotransferase reaction in the total tissue does not reach equilibrium with the mitochondrial pyruvate pool during propionate oxidation, but the equilibrium is reached during the oxidation of even-number carbon fatty acids. This suggests that pyruvate is formed from propionate-derived metabolites also in the cytosol, although the primary metabolism of propionate occurs in the mitochondria. The results indicate that the rate of pyruvate oxidation in the myocardium is mainly regulated by covalent interconversion of PDH. During propionate oxidation the PDHa content in the tissue can increase beyond the point of saturation of the citric acid cycle and this indicates that feedback inhibition of the enzyme is rate-determining under these conditions.

  13. The relationship between human skeletal muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase activity and muscle aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Love, Lorenzo K; LeBlanc, Paul J; Inglis, J Greig; Bradley, Nicolette S; Choptiany, Jon; Heigenhauser, George J F; Peters, Sandra J

    2011-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for regulating the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA for use in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PDH is regulated through phosphorylation and inactivation by PDH kinase (PDK) and dephosphorylation and activation by PDH phosphatase (PDP). The effect of endurance training on PDK in humans has been investigated; however, to date no study has examined the effect of endurance training on PDP in humans. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in PDP activity and PDP1 protein content in human skeletal muscle across a range of muscle aerobic capacities. This association is important as higher PDP activity and protein content will allow for increased activation of PDH, and carbohydrate oxidation. The main findings of this study were that 1) PDP activity (r(2) = 0.399, P = 0.001) and PDP1 protein expression (r(2) = 0.153, P = 0.039) were positively correlated with citrate synthase (CS) activity as a marker for muscle aerobic capacity; 2) E1α (r(2) = 0.310, P = 0.002) and PDK2 protein (r(2) = 0.229, P =0.012) are positively correlated with muscle CS activity; and 3) although it is the most abundant isoform, PDP1 protein content only explained ∼ 18% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.184, P = 0.033). In addition, PDP1 in combination with E1α explained ∼ 38% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.383, P = 0.005), suggesting that there may be alternative regulatory mechanisms of this enzyme other than protein content. These data suggest that with higher muscle aerobic capacity (CS activity) there is a greater capacity for carbohydrate oxidation (E1α), in concert with higher potential for PDH activation (PDP activity).

  14. Global view of cognate kinase activation by the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Elena L.; Yang, Luying; Birkaya, Barbara; Zhou, Jieyu; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Patel, Mulchand S.; Jordan, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) comprises four multidomain components, E1, E3, E2 and an E3-binding protein (E3BP), the latter two forming the core as E2·E3BP sub-complex. Pyruvate flux through PDC is regulated via phosphorylation (inactivation) at E1 by four PDC kinases (PDKs), and reactivation by two PDC phosphatases. Up-regulation of PDK isoform gene expression is reported in several forms of cancer, while PDKs may be further activated by PDC by binding to the E2·E3BP core. Hence, the PDK: E2·E3BP interaction provides new therapeutic targets. We carried out both functional kinetic and thermodynamic studies to demonstrate significant differences in the activation of PDK isoforms by binding to the E2·E3BP core: (i) PDK2 needs no activation by E2·E3BP for efficient functioning, while PDK4 was the least effective of the four isoforms, and could not be activated by E2·E3BP. Hence, development of inhibitors to the interaction of PDK2 and PDK4 with E2·E3BP is not promising; (ii) Design of inhibitors to interfere with interaction of E2·E3BP with PDK1 and PDK3 is promising. PDK3 needs E2·E3BP core for activation, an activation best achieved by synergistic combination of E2-derived catalytic domain and tridomain. PMID:28230160

  15. Structure-Derived Proton-Transfer Mechanism of Action Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1 thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1p) that is involved in decarboxylation of pyruvate followed by reductive acetylation of lipoic acid covalently bound to a lysine residue of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The structure of E1p recently determined in our laboratory revealed patterns of association of foul subunits and specifics of two TPP binding sites. The mechanism of action in part includes a conserved hydrogen bond between the N1' atom of the aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor and the carboxylate group of Glu59 from the beta subunits, and a V-conformation of the cofactor that brings the N4' atom of the aminopyrimidine ring to the distance of the intramolecular hydrogen bond formed with the C2-atom of the thiazolium moiety. The carboxylate group of Glu59 is the local proton acceptor that enables proton translocation within the aminopyrimidine ring and stabilization of the rare N4' - iminopyrimidine tautomer. Based on the analysis of E1p structure, we postulate that the protein environment drives N4' - amino/N4' - imino dynamics resulting in a concerted shuttle-like movement of the subunits. We also propose that this movement of the subunits is strictly coordinated with the two enzymatic reactions carried out in E1p by each of the two cofactor sites. It is proposed that these reactions are in alternating phases such that when one active site is involved in decarboxylation, the other is involved in acetylation of lipoyl noiety.

  16. Global view of cognate kinase activation by the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Elena L; Yang, Luying; Birkaya, Barbara; Zhou, Jieyu; Nemeria, Natalia S; Patel, Mulchand S; Jordan, Frank

    2017-02-23

    The human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) comprises four multidomain components, E1, E3, E2 and an E3-binding protein (E3BP), the latter two forming the core as E2·E3BP sub-complex. Pyruvate flux through PDC is regulated via phosphorylation (inactivation) at E1 by four PDC kinases (PDKs), and reactivation by two PDC phosphatases. Up-regulation of PDK isoform gene expression is reported in several forms of cancer, while PDKs may be further activated by PDC by binding to the E2·E3BP core. Hence, the PDK: E2·E3BP interaction provides new therapeutic targets. We carried out both functional kinetic and thermodynamic studies to demonstrate significant differences in the activation of PDK isoforms by binding to the E2·E3BP core: (i) PDK2 needs no activation by E2·E3BP for efficient functioning, while PDK4 was the least effective of the four isoforms, and could not be activated by E2·E3BP. Hence, development of inhibitors to the interaction of PDK2 and PDK4 with E2·E3BP is not promising; (ii) Design of inhibitors to interfere with interaction of E2·E3BP with PDK1 and PDK3 is promising. PDK3 needs E2·E3BP core for activation, an activation best achieved by synergistic combination of E2-derived catalytic domain and tridomain.

  17. Structure-Derived Proton-Transfer Mechanism of Action Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1 thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is a cofactor of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1p) that is involved in decarboxylation of pyruvate followed by reductive acetylation of lipoic acid covalently bound to a lysine residue of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The structure of E1p recently determined in our laboratory revealed patterns of association of foul subunits and specifics of two TPP binding sites. The mechanism of action in part includes a conserved hydrogen bond between the N1' atom of the aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor and the carboxylate group of Glu59 from the beta subunits, and a V-conformation of the cofactor that brings the N4' atom of the aminopyrimidine ring to the distance of the intramolecular hydrogen bond formed with the C2-atom of the thiazolium moiety. The carboxylate group of Glu59 is the local proton acceptor that enables proton translocation within the aminopyrimidine ring and stabilization of the rare N4' - iminopyrimidine tautomer. Based on the analysis of E1p structure, we postulate that the protein environment drives N4' - amino/N4' - imino dynamics resulting in a concerted shuttle-like movement of the subunits. We also propose that this movement of the subunits is strictly coordinated with the two enzymatic reactions carried out in E1p by each of the two cofactor sites. It is proposed that these reactions are in alternating phases such that when one active site is involved in decarboxylation, the other is involved in acetylation of lipoyl noiety.

  18. Adrenaline increases skeletal muscle glycogenolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase activation and carbohydrate oxidation during moderate exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Matthew J; Howlett, Kirsten F; Febbraio, Mark A; Spriet, Lawrence L; Hargreaves, Mark

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of adrenaline in regulating carbohydrate metabolism during moderate exercise, 10 moderately trained men completed two 20 min exercise bouts at 58 ± 2 % peak pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2,peak). On one occasion saline was infused (CON), and on the other adrenaline was infused intravenously for 5 min prior to and throughout exercise (ADR). Glucose kinetics were measured by a primed, continuous infusion of 6,6-[2H]glucose and muscle samples were obtained prior to and at 1 and 20 min of exercise. The infusion of adrenaline elevated (P < 0.01) plasma adrenaline concentrations at rest (pre-infusion, 0.28 ± 0.09; post-infusion, 1.70 ± 0.45 nmol l−1; means ±s.e.m.) and this effect was maintained throughout exercise. Total carbohydrate oxidation increased by 18 % and this effect was due to greater skeletal muscle glycogenolysis (P < 0.05) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation (P < 0.05, treatment effect). Glucose rate of appearance was not different between trials, but the infusion of adrenaline decreased (P < 0.05, treatment effect) skeletal muscle glucose uptake in ADR. During exercise muscle glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) (P = 0.055, treatment effect) and lactate (P < 0.05) were elevated in ADR compared with CON and no changes were observed for pyruvate, creatine, phosphocreatine, ATP and the calculated free concentrations of ADP and AMP. The data demonstrate that elevated plasma adrenaline levels during moderate exercise in untrained men increase skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown and PDH activation, which results in greater carbohydrate oxidation. The greater muscle glycogenolysis appears to be due to increased glycogen phosphorylase transformation whilst the increased PDH activity cannot be readily explained. Finally, the decreased glucose uptake observed during exercise in ADR is likely to be due to the increased intracellular G-6-P and a subsequent decrease in glucose phosphorylation. PMID:11433007

  19. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-11

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  20. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A.; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26769971

  1. On the Unique Structural Organization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Stoops, James K.; Cheng, R. Holland; Yazdi, Mohammed A.; Maeng, Cheol-Young; Schroeter, John P.; Klueppelberg, Uwe; Kolodziej, Steven J.; Baker, Timothy S.; Reed, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2), a catalytic and structural component of the three functional classes of multienzyme complexes that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of α-keto acids, forms the central core to which the other components attach. We have determined the structures of the truncated 60-mer core dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase (tE2) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and complexes of the tE2 core associated with a truncated binding protein (tBP), intact binding protein (BP), and the BP associated with its dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (BP·E3). The tE2 core is a pentagonal dodecahedron consisting of 20 cone-shaped trimers interconnected by 30 bridges. Previous studies have given rise to the generally accepted belief that the other components are bound on the outside of the E2 scaffold. However, this investigation shows that the 12 large openings in the tE2 core permit the entrance of tBP, BP, and BP·E3 into a large central cavity where the BP component apparently binds near the tip of the tE2 trimer. The bone-shaped E3 molecule is anchored inside the central cavity through its interaction with BP. One end of E3 has its catalytic site within the surface of the scaffold for interaction with other external catalytic domains. Though tE2 has 60 potential binding sites, it binds only about 30 copies of tBP, 15 of BP, and 12 of BP·E3. Thus, E2 is unusual in that the stoichiometry and arrangement of the tBP, BP, and E3·BP components are determined by the geometric constraints of the underlying scaffold. PMID:9038189

  2. Reconstitution of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes: analysis of protein X involvement and interaction of homologous and heterologous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, S J; Khan, S S; McCartney, R G; Miller, C; Lindsay, J G

    1996-01-01

    Optimal conditions for rapid and efficient reconstitution of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity are demonstrated by using an improved method for the dissociation of the multienzyme complex into its constituent E1 (substrate-specific 2-oxoacid decarboxylase) and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) components and isolated E2/X (where E2 is dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase) core assembly. Selective cleavage of the protein X component of the purified E2/X core with the proteinase arg C decreases the activity of the reconstituted complex to residual levels (i.e. 8-12%); however, significant recovery of reconstitution is achieved on addition of a large excess (i.e. 50-fold) of parent E3. N-terminal sequence analysis of the truncated 35,000-M(r) protein X fragment locates the site of cleavage by arg C at the extreme N-terminal boundary of a putative E3-binding domain and corresponds to the release of a 15,000-M(r) N-terminal fragment comprising both the lipoyl and linker sequences. In native PDC this region of protein X is shown to be partly protected from proteolytic attack by the presence of E3. Recovery of complex activity in the presence of excess E3 after arg C treatment is thought to result from low-affinity interactions with the partly disrupted subunit-binding domain on X and/or the intact analogous subunit binding domain on E2. Contrasting recoveries for arg C-modified E2/X/E1 core, and untreated E2/E1 core of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, reconstituted with excess bovine heart E3, pig heart E3 or yeast E3 point to subtle differences in subunit interactions with heterologous E3s and offer an explanation for the inability of previous investigators to achieve restoration of PDC function after selective proteolysis of the protein X component. PMID:8870656

  3. Cooperation of divalent ions and thiamin diphosphate in regulation of the function of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Czerniecki, J; Czygier, M

    2001-12-01

    The role of Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ in regulation of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) containing endogenous thiamin diphosphate (TDP) was studied. It was found that the effects of the cations depended on the presence of exogenous TDP. In the absence of added TDP, the divalent cations led to a shortening of a lag phase of the PDC reaction and a strong reduction of the Km value for pyruvate. The relative efficiency of the three types of ions are presented as follows: Mn2+>Ca2+>Mg2+. The other sources claim that in the presence of exogenous TDP, which alone strongly increased the affinity of PDC for pyruvate, any significant additional effects of the cations were not observed. However, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ decreased the Km value for CoA in both cases, the absence and presence of exogenous TDP, in approximately a similar extent (about twofold). The affinity of PDC for NAD+ seems to be not sensitive to the presence of the divalent cations. The data obtained suggest that Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ can cooperate with TDP as positive regulatory effectors of pig heart PDC on the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase and lipoamide acetyltransferase components of the complex.

  4. Stimulation of bovine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase by. cap alpha. -ketoisovalerate in the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.G.; Barron, L.L.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    Purified bovine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was used to study pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDH kinase) regulation. Previously, they showed that KCl and NH4Cl stimulate PDH kinase, and that thiamin pyrophosphate over the range of 1-80 ..mu..M completely blocks PDH kinase stimulation by 20 mM KCl, whereas thiamin pyrophosphate has very little inhibitory effect in the absence of KCl. Under inhibitory conditions, 100 ..mu..M thiamin pyrophosphate and 20 mM KCl, addition of 1 mM ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate stimulated PDH kinase activity 1.5-fold. Addition of 1 mM ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate had a similar stimulatory effect in the presence of 1 mM NH4Cl and 100 ..mu..M thiamin pyrophosphate. Half-maximal stimulation occurred at about 200 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate in both cases. Inhibition by thiamin pyrophosphate was uncompetitive, and the effect of ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate on thiamin pyrophosphate inhibition was to shift both Vm and Km toward control values without changing the slope of the reciprocal plot. After incubation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex with ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 to remove ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate, PDH kinase activity remained stimulated relative to controls incubated with only buffer. In bovine heart mitochondria solubilized in 0.2% Triton X-100 and incubated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, ..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate stimulated PDH phosphorylation in the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate, as detected by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The results indicate that acylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex results in PDH kinase stimulation, but only in the presence of monovalent cation and thiamin pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the results also suggest that this effect may be relevant under more in vivo conditions.

  5. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: nutrient control and the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sugden, M C; Orfali, K A; Holness, M J

    1995-06-01

    This review examines the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate competition between glucose and lipid in starvation and in insulin-resistant states. We demonstrate that lipid-derived substrates are oxidized in preference to glucose by skeletal muscle in vivo during prolonged starvation. An accelerated and exaggerated lipolytic and ketogenic response to starvation in late pregnancy is associated with more rapid suppression of glucose oxidation by the maternal skeletal-muscle mass. These benign adaptations to changes in lipid availability (which occur secondarily to changes in carbohydrate supply and demand) contrast with the well-documented detrimental effects to health of an inappropriately high supply of dietary lipid. We present results that indicate that the prolonged consumption of a diet high in saturated fat is associated with a stable enhancement of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity at least in two oxidative tissues--liver and heart. This long-term enhancement of PDH kinase activity is concomitant with the development of whole-body insulin resistance and adds a new dimension to the potential role of dietary composition in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  6. Succinate-dependent energy generation and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in isolated Ascaris suum mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Body wall muscle from the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, contain unique anaerobic mitochondria that preferentially utilize fumarate and branched-chain enoyl CoA's as terminal electron acceptors instead of oxygen. While electron transport in these organelles is well characterized, the role of oxygen in succinate-dependent phosphorylation is still not clearly defined. Therefore, the present study was designed to more fully characterize succinate metabolism in these organelles as well as the in vitro regulation of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). In the absence of added adenine nucleotides, incubations in succinate resulted in substantial elevations in intramitochrondrial ATP levels, but ATP/ADP ratios were considerably higher in incubations with malate. The stimulation of phosphorylation in aerobic incubations with succinate was rotenone sensitive and appears to be Site I dependent. Increase substrate level phosphorylation, coupled to propionate formation, or additional sites of electron-transport associated ATP synthesis were not significant. Under aerobic conditions, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution from 1,4-({sup 14}C)succinate was stimulated and NADH/NAD{sup +} ratios were elevated, but the formation of {sup 14}C propionate was unchanged.

  7. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy-consuming redox circuit.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E; Reese, Lauren R; Gilliam, Laura A A; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Smith, Cody D; Muoio, Deborah M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2015-04-15

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+/NADH) and anabolic (NADP+/NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homoeostasis, however, is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm)-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced, however, is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyses the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of ΔΨm. The net effect is an automatic fine-tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy-expenditure rates, consistent with their well-known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homoeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance.

  8. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E.; Reese, Lauren R.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Smith, Cody D.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced however is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyzes the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The net effect is an automatic fine tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy expenditure rates, consistent with their well known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance. PMID:25643703

  9. Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor (Ryr2)-mediated Calcium Signals Specifically Promote Glucose Oxidation via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bround, Michael J; Wambolt, Rich; Cen, Haoning; Asghari, Parisa; Albu, Razvan F; Han, Jun; McAfee, Donald; Pourrier, Marc; Scott, Nichollas E; Bohunek, Lubos; Kulpa, Jerzy E; Chen, S R Wayne; Fedida, David; Brownsey, Roger W; Borchers, Christoph H; Foster, Leonard J; Mayor, Thibault; Moore, Edwin D W; Allard, Michael F; Johnson, James D

    2016-11-04

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (Ryr2) Ca(2+) release channels and cellular metabolism are both disrupted in heart disease. Recently, we demonstrated that total loss of Ryr2 leads to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction, arrhythmia, and reduced heart rate. Acute total Ryr2 ablation also impaired metabolism, but it was not clear whether this was a cause or consequence of heart failure. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Ca(2+) flux into the mitochondria helps pace oxidative metabolism, but there is limited in vivo evidence supporting this concept. Here, we studied heart-specific, inducible Ryr2 haploinsufficient (cRyr2Δ50) mice with a stable 50% reduction in Ryr2 protein. This manipulation decreased the amplitude and frequency of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals in isolated cardiomyocytes, without changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Remarkably, in the context of well preserved contractile function in perfused hearts, we observed decreased glucose oxidation, but not fat oxidation, with increased glycolysis. cRyr2Δ50 hearts exhibited hyperphosphorylation and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the key Ca(2+)-sensitive gatekeeper to glucose oxidation. Metabolomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic analyses revealed additional functional networks associated with altered metabolism in this model. These results demonstrate that Ryr2 controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics and plays a specific, critical role in promoting glucose oxidation in cardiomyocytes. Our findings indicate that partial RYR2 loss is sufficient to cause metabolic abnormalities seen in heart disease.

  10. First Description of Reduced Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Enzyme Activity Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH)

    PubMed Central

    Lilla, Nadine; Füllgraf, Hannah; Stetter, Christian; Köhler, Stefan; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Westermaier, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Object: Several previous studies reported metabolic derangements and an accumulation of metabolic products in the early phase of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), which may contribute to secondary brain damage. This may be a result of deranged oxygen utilization due to enzymatic dysfunction in aerobic glucose metabolism. This study was performed to investigate, if pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme (PDH) is affected in its activity giving further hints for a derangement of oxidative metabolism. Methods: Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups (n = 9): (1) SAH induced by the endovascular filament model and (2) sham-operated controls. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), intracranial pressure (ICP), and local cerebral blood flow (LCBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) were continuously monitored from 30 min before until 3 h after SAH. Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and PDH activity was measured by ELISA. Results: PDH activity was significantly reduced in animals subjected to SAH compared to controls. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate for the first time a reduction of PDH activity following SAH, independent of supply of substrates and may be an independent factor contributing to a derangement of oxidative metabolism, failure of oxygen utilization, and secondary brain damage. PMID:28261039

  11. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  12. In vitro synthesis of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components of Ascaris suum mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, S.; Ruff, V.; DuBrul, E.F.; Komuniecki, R.W.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) plays a pivotal role in the anaerobic metabolism of Ascaris suum mitochondria. They have initiated a series of studies on the in vitro synthesis and mitochondrial import of PDC. PDC has been purified from adult Ascaris body wall muscle, fully phosphorylated in vitro, and separated into its component subunits on SDS/PAGE. The individual components were electroeluted from the gels and used to immunize rabbits. IgG's to the individual subunits were prepared from antisera and their specificities were verified by immuno-blotting. Each IgG identified a single specific band at the appropriate location in extracts of adult Ascaris body wall muscle mitochondria. Poly A/sup +/-RNA was prepared from body wall muscle and translated in a reticylocyte lysate system using /sup 35/S-methionine. Translation products were immunoprecipitated with specific IgG's, electrophoresed, and fluorographed. Each immunoprecipitation gave rise to a single radioactive polypeptide that was slightly larger than the specific PDC subunit isolated from the adult mitochondria. This system has demonstrated its feasibility for the study of mitochondrial import of a multienzyme complex that is critical for the anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism of Ascaris suum.

  13. Oral Tolerance and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase in Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayako; van de Water, Judy; Gershwin, M. Eric; Jorgensen, Roberta; Angulo, Paul; Lindor, Keith

    2002-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by the immunological destruction of intralobular bile ducts and serum anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA). Based upon previous work of oral tolerance and autoimmunity, we hypothesized that feeding the mitochondrial autoantigens of PBC would alter the clinical course and the level of antimitochondrial antibodies. The bovine pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified and 5 mg fed in gelatin capsules to 6 patients with early stage PBC for 6 months. Antimitochondrial antibodies and liver biochemistries were measured at every 3 months for 12 months. The clinical trial was completed for all patients except for 1 who showed deterioration of pre-existing skin rash during treatment, which disappeared within 2 weeks after treatment was discontinued. However, after 1 year, neither the titers of AMAs nor liver biochemistries were significantly changed by this treatment. This is the first trial to test the efficacy of oral tolerance induction in PBC. However, the data, which limited in scope, did not demonstrate efficacy and further highlights the difficulties in showing continuing evidence of tolerance induction in autoimmunity. PMID:12739782

  14. Coexpression of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase genes in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siqing; Dien, Bruce S; Nichols, Nancy N; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hughes, Stephen R; Cotta, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Lactobacillus brevis ATCC367 was engineered to express pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes in order to increase ethanol fermentation from biomass-derived residues. First, a Gram-positive Sarcina ventriculi PDC gene (Svpdc) was introduced into L. brevis ATCC 367 to obtain L. brevis bbc03. The SvPDC was detected by immunoblot using an SvPDC oligo peptide antiserum, but no increased ethanol was detected in L. brevis bbc03. Then, an ADH gene from L. brevis (Bradh) was cloned behind the Svpdc gene that generated a pdc/adh-coupled ethanol cassette pBBC04. The pBBC04 restored anaerobic growth and conferred ethanol production of Escheirichia coli NZN111 (a fermentative defective strain incapable of growing anaerobically). Approximately 58 kDa (SvPDC) and 28 kDa (BrADH) recombinant proteins were observed in L. brevis bbc04. These results indicated that the Gram-positive ethanol production genes can be expressed in L. brevis using a Gram-positive promoter and pTRKH2 shuttle vector. This work provides evidence that expressing Gram-positive ethanol genes in pentose utilizing L. brevis will further aid manipulation of this microbe toward biomass to ethanol production.

  15. Structural Model for the Flip-Flop Action in Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2003-01-01

    The derivative of vitamin B1 thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) is a cofactor of enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production, including (i) decarboxylation of alpha-keto acids followed by (ii) transketolation. These enzymes have shown a common mechanism of TPP activation by imposing an active V-conformation of this coenzyme that brings the N4 atom of the aminopyrimidine ring to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H N hydrogen-bonding with the C2- atom of the thiazolium ring. The reactive C2 atom of TPP is the nucleophile that attacks the carbonyl carbon of different substrates used by the TPP-dependent enzymes. The structure of the heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase (Elp) recently determined in our laboratory (1) revealed the association pattern of the subunits and the specifics of two chemically equivalent cofactor binding sites. Dynamic nonequivalence of these two cofactor sites directs the flip-flop action of this enzyme, depending upon which two active sites effect each other (2). The crystal structure derived from the holo-form of Elp provided the basis for the model of the flip-flop action of Elp in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the two cofactor sites at any given moment, where these steps are governed by the concerted shuttle-like motion of the subunits. It is further proposed that balancing a hydrogen-bond network and related cofactor geometry determine the continuity of catalytic events.

  16. Integrative proteomics and biochemical analyses define Ptc6p as the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao; Niemi, Natalie M; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2017-07-14

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is the primary metabolic checkpoint connecting glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and is important for maintaining cellular and organismal glucose homeostasis. Phosphorylation of the PDC E1 subunit was identified as a key inhibitory modification in bovine tissue ∼50 years ago, and this regulatory process is now known to be conserved throughout evolution. Although Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a pervasive model organism for investigating cellular metabolism and its regulation by signaling processes, the phosphatase(s) responsible for activating the PDC in S. cerevisiae has not been conclusively defined. Here, using comparative mitochondrial phosphoproteomics, analyses of protein-protein interactions by affinity enrichment-mass spectrometry, and in vitro biochemistry, we define Ptc6p as the primary PDC phosphatase in S. cerevisiae Our analyses further suggest additional substrates for related S. cerevisiae phosphatases and describe the overall phosphoproteomic changes that accompany mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction. In summary, our quantitative proteomics and biochemical analyses have identified Ptc6p as the primary-and likely sole-S. cerevisiae PDC phosphatase, closing a key knowledge gap about the regulation of yeast mitochondrial metabolism. Our findings highlight the power of integrative omics and biochemical analyses for annotating the functions of poorly characterized signaling proteins. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Metabolic profiling indicates impaired pyruvate dehydrogenase function in myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fluge, Øystein; Mella, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Dyrstad, Sissel E; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid G; Sapkota, Dipak; Røsland, Gro V; Fosså, Alexander; Ktoridou-Valen, Irini; Lunde, Sigrid; Sørland, Kari; Lien, Katarina; Herder, Ingrid; Thürmer, Hanne; Gotaas, Merete E; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Bohnen, Louis M L J; Schäfer, Christoph; McCann, Adrian; Sommerfelt, Kristian; Helgeland, Lars; Ueland, Per M; Dahl, Olav; Tronstad, Karl J

    2016-12-22

    Myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating disease of unknown etiology, with hallmark symptoms including postexertional malaise and poor recovery. Metabolic dysfunction is a plausible contributing factor. We hypothesized that changes in serum amino acids may disclose specific defects in energy metabolism in ME/CFS. Analysis in 200 ME/CFS patients and 102 healthy individuals showed a specific reduction of amino acids that fuel oxidative metabolism via the TCA cycle, mainly in female ME/CFS patients. Serum 3-methylhistidine, a marker of endogenous protein catabolism, was significantly increased in male patients. The amino acid pattern suggested functional impairment of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), supported by increased mRNA expression of the inhibitory PDH kinases 1, 2, and 4; sirtuin 4; and PPARδ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from both sexes. Myoblasts grown in presence of serum from patients with severe ME/CFS showed metabolic adaptations, including increased mitochondrial respiration and excessive lactate secretion. The amino acid changes could not be explained by symptom severity, disease duration, age, BMI, or physical activity level among patients. These findings are in agreement with the clinical disease presentation of ME/CFS, with inadequate ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and excessive lactate generation upon exertion.

  18. Metabolic profiling indicates impaired pyruvate dehydrogenase function in myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mella, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Dyrstad, Sissel E.; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid G.; Sapkota, Dipak; Røsland, Gro V.; Fosså, Alexander; Ktoridou-Valen, Irini; Lunde, Sigrid; Sørland, Kari; Lien, Katarina; Herder, Ingrid; Thürmer, Hanne; Gotaas, Merete E.; Baranowska, Katarzyna A.; Bohnen, Louis M.L.J.; Schäfer, Christoph; McCann, Adrian; Sommerfelt, Kristian; Helgeland, Lars; Ueland, Per M.; Dahl, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating disease of unknown etiology, with hallmark symptoms including postexertional malaise and poor recovery. Metabolic dysfunction is a plausible contributing factor. We hypothesized that changes in serum amino acids may disclose specific defects in energy metabolism in ME/CFS. Analysis in 200 ME/CFS patients and 102 healthy individuals showed a specific reduction of amino acids that fuel oxidative metabolism via the TCA cycle, mainly in female ME/CFS patients. Serum 3-methylhistidine, a marker of endogenous protein catabolism, was significantly increased in male patients. The amino acid pattern suggested functional impairment of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), supported by increased mRNA expression of the inhibitory PDH kinases 1, 2, and 4; sirtuin 4; and PPARδ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from both sexes. Myoblasts grown in presence of serum from patients with severe ME/CFS showed metabolic adaptations, including increased mitochondrial respiration and excessive lactate secretion. The amino acid changes could not be explained by symptom severity, disease duration, age, BMI, or physical activity level among patients. These findings are in agreement with the clinical disease presentation of ME/CFS, with inadequate ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and excessive lactate generation upon exertion. PMID:28018972

  19. The E1 beta-subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase is surface-expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum and binds fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Vastano, Valeria; Salzillo, Marzia; Siciliano, Rosa A; Muscariello, Lidia; Sacco, Margherita; Marasco, Rosangela

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is among the species with a probiotic activity. Adhesion of probiotic bacteria to host tissues is an important principle for strain selection, because it represents a crucial step in the colonization process of either pathogens or commensals. Most bacterial adhesins are proteins, and a major target for them is fibronectin, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that PDHB, a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is a factor contributing to fibronectin-binding in L. plantarum LM3. By means of fibronectin overlay immunoblotting assay, we identified a L. plantarum LM3 surface protein with apparent molecular mass of 35 kDa. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that this protein is the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta-subunit (PDHB). The corresponding pdhB gene is located in a 4-gene cluster encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase. In LM3-B1, carrying a null mutation in pdhB, the 35 kDa adhesin was not anymore detectable by immunoblotting assay. Nevertheless, the pdhB null mutation did not abolish pdhA, pdhC, and pdhD transcription in LM3-B1. By adhesion assays, we show that LM3-B1 cells bind to immobilized fibronectin less efficiently than wild type cells. Moreover, we show that pdhB expression is negatively regulated by the CcpA protein and is induced by bile.

  20. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand

    2003-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of vitamin BI, is a cofactor of enzymes catalyzing reactions involving the cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond adjacent to an oxo group. TPP-dependent enzymes show a common mechanism of TPP activation by: (1) forming the ionic N-H...O(sup -) hydrogen bonding between the N1' atom of the aminopirymidine ring of the coenzyme and intrinsic gamma-carboxylate group of glutamate and (2) imposing an "active" V-conformation that brings the N4' atom of the aminopirymidine to the distance required for the intramolecular C-H.. .N hydrogen bonding with the thiazolium C2 atom. Within these two hydrogen bonds that rapidly exchange protons, protonation of the N1' atom is strictly coordinated with the deprotonation of the 4' -amino group and eventually abstraction of the proton from C2. The human pyruvate dehydrogenase Elp, component of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of the pyruvate followed by the reductive acetylation of the lipoyl group of dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase. Elp is alpha(sub 2)beta(sub2)-heterotetrameric with a molecular mass of I54 kDa, which has two catalytic sites, each providing TPP and magnesium ion as cofactors and each formed on the interface between the PP and PYR domains. The dynamic nonequivalence of two otherwise chemically equivalent catalytic sites has been observed and the flip-flop mechanism was suggested, according to which two active sites affect each other and in which different steps of the catalytic reaction are performed in each of the sites at any given moment. Based on specific futures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase including rigid and flexible connections between domains that bind the cofactor we propose a mechanistic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme. We postulate that the dynamic protein environment drives the exchange of tautomers in the 4' -aminopyrimidine ring of the cofactor through a concerted shuttl-like motion of

  1. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-06-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism.

  2. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-01-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism. PMID:3570471

  3. Solution Structure and Characterisation of the Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Core Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, S.; Kelly, S.M.; Gilbert, R.J.C.; Callow, P.; Bhella, D.; Forsyth, T.; Lindsay, J.G.; Byron, O.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a key multi-enzyme assembly that is responsible for glucose homeostasis maintenance and conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. It comprises a central pentagonal dodecahedral core consisting of two subunit types (E2 and E3BP) to which peripheral enzymes (E1 and E3) bind tightly but non-covalently. Currently, there are two conflicting models of PDC (E2 + E3BP) core organisation: the ‘addition’ model (60 + 12) and the ‘substitution’ model (48 + 12). Here we present the first ever low-resolution structures of human recombinant full-length PDC core (rE2/E3BP), truncated PDC core (tE2/E3BP) and native bovine heart PDC core (bE2/E3BP) obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. These structures, corroborated by negative-stain and cryo electron microscopy data, clearly reveal open pentagonal core faces, favouring the ‘substitution’ model of core organisation. The native and recombinant core structures are all similar to the truncated bacterial E2 core crystal structure obtained previously. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of rE2/E3BP and rE2/E3BP:E3 directly confirm that the core has open pentagonal faces, agree with scattering-derived models and show density extending outwards from their surfaces, which is much more structurally ordered in the presence of E3. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation characterisation of rE2/E3BP, rE2 (full-length recombinant E2-only) and tE2/E3BP supports the substitution model. Superimposition of the small-angle neutron scattering tE2/E3BP and truncated bacterial E2 crystal structures demonstrates conservation of the overall pentagonal dodecahedral morphology, despite evolutionary diversity. In addition, unfolding studies using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy show that the rE2/E3BP is less stable than its rE2 counterpart, indicative of a role for E3BP in core destabilisation. The architectural

  4. Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition in the development of hypertrophy in the hyperthyroid rat heart: a combined magnetic resonance imaging and hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Helen J; Dodd, Michael S; Heather, Lisa C; Schroeder, Marie A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-06-07

    Hyperthyroidism increases heart rate, contractility, cardiac output, and metabolic rate. It is also accompanied by alterations in the regulation of cardiac substrate use. Specifically, hyperthyroidism increases the ex vivo activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, thereby inhibiting glucose oxidation via pyruvate dehydrogenase. Cardiac hypertrophy is another effect of hyperthyroidism, with an increase in the abundance of mitochondria. Although the hypertrophy is initially beneficial, it can eventually lead to heart failure. The aim of this study was to use hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the rate and regulation of in vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in the hyperthyroid heart and to establish whether modulation of flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase would alter cardiac hypertrophy. Hyperthyroidism was induced in 18 male Wistar rats with 7 daily intraperitoneal injections of freshly prepared triiodothyronine (0.2 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)). In vivo pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, assessed with hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy, was reduced by 59% in hyperthyroid animals (0.0022 ± 0.0002 versus 0.0055 ± 0.0005 second(-1); P=0.0003), and this reduction was completely reversed by both short- and long-term delivery of dichloroacetic acid, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor. Hyperpolarized [2-(13)C]pyruvate was also used to evaluate Krebs cycle metabolism and demonstrated a unique marker of anaplerosis, the level of which was significantly increased in the hyperthyroid heart. Cine magnetic resonance imaging showed that long-term dichloroacetic acid treatment significantly reduced the hypertrophy observed in hyperthyroid animals (100 ± 20 versus 200 ± 30 mg; P=0.04) despite no change in the increase observed in cardiac output. This work has demonstrated that inhibition of glucose oxidation in the hyperthyroid heart in vivo is mediated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Relieving this inhibition can increase the metabolic

  5. Lack of Skeletal Muscle IL-6 Affects Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity at Rest and during Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren; Bertholdt, Lærke; Joensen, Ella; Knudsen, Jakob G.; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays a key role in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate utilization. IL-6 is produced in skeletal muscle during exercise in a duration dependent manner and has been reported to increase whole body fatty acid oxidation, muscle glucose uptake and decrease PDHa activity in skeletal muscle of fed mice. The aim of the present study was to examine whether muscle IL-6 contributes to exercise-induced PDH regulation in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice and floxed littermate controls (control) completed a single bout of treadmill exercise for 10, 60 or 120 min, with rested mice of each genotype serving as basal controls. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was overall higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice during the 120 min of treadmill exercise, while RER decreased during exercise independent of genotype. AMPK and ACC phosphorylation also increased with exercise independent of genotype. PDHa activity was in control mice higher (P<0.05) at 10 and 60 min of exercise than at rest but remained unchanged in IL-6 MKO mice. In addition, PDHa activity was higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice at rest and 60 min of exercise. Neither PDH phosphorylation nor acetylation could explain the genotype differences in PDHa activity. Together, this provides evidence that skeletal muscle IL-6 contributes to the regulation of PDH at rest and during prolonged exercise and suggests that muscle IL-6 normally dampens carbohydrate utilization during prolonged exercise via effects on PDH. PMID:27327080

  6. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-15

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with (14)C-glucose and (3)H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

  7. Rat liver insulin mediator which stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate contains galactosamine and D-chiroinositol.

    PubMed

    Larner, J; Huang, L C; Schwartz, C F; Oswald, A S; Shen, T Y; Kinter, M; Tang, G Z; Zeller, K

    1988-03-30

    It has been established that insulin treatment of cells, isolated plasma membranes, or whole animals leads to the generation of low molecular weight mediators which serve as intermediates in the signalling pathway. At least two distinct classes of mediator have been described, based on differences in apparent molecular weight, isoelectric point and biological activity (Cheng, K., and Larner, J. (1985) Ann. Rev. Physiol. 45, 407-424). Recently, Saltiel's (Saltiel, A.R., and Cuatrecasas, P. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 5793-5797) and Mato's (Mato, J.M., Kelly, K.L., Abler, A., and Jarett, L. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 2131-2137) laboratories have described an insulin "modulator" which was apparently derived from glycosylphosphoinositol linker, similar to those known to anchor proteins to the external surface of the cell membrane (Low, M.G. (1987) Bioch. J. 244, 1-13). In this paper, we report that highly purified preparations of the insulin mediator which stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase contain mannose, galactosamine, and D-chiroinositol. These determinations are based upon analyses using paper chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Nitrous acid deamination of the mediator resulted in release of inositol phosphate, indicating that the galactosamine and D-chiroinositol are linked. Although the presence of chiroinositol in modulator from H35 hepatoma cells has been recently reported (Mato, J.M., Kelly, K.L., Abler, A., Jarett, L., Corkey, B.E., Cashel, J.A., and Zopf, D. (1987) Bioch. Biophys. Res. Comm. 146, 764-770), the optical identity of the inositol remained unknown until the present report. Likewise, the presence of galactosamine rather than glucosamine in insulin mediator is a novel finding. These findings, coupled with those of Saltiel and Mato's groups, provide clear evidence for the existence of multiple forms of insulin mediators. Additionally, the results presented here afford further confirmation for the

  8. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-01

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with 14C-glucose and 3H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD+] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation. PMID:15550462

  9. Antisense inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1alpha subunit in anther tapetum causes male sterility.

    PubMed

    Yui, Rika; Iketani, Satoru; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2003-04-01

    We hypothesized that cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in sugar beet may be the consequence of mitochondrial dysfunctions affecting normal anther development. To test the hypothesis, we attempted to mimic the sugar beet CMS phenotype by inhibiting the expression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which is essential for the operation of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Screening with a cDNA library of sugar beet flower buds allowed the identification of two PDH E1alpha subunit genes (bvPDH_E1alpha-1 and bvPDH_E1alpha-2). bvPDH_E1alpha-1 was found to be highly expressed in tap roots, whereas bvPDH_E1alpha-2 was expressed most abundantly in flower buds. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion of bvPDH_E1alpha revealed mitochondrial targeting properties. A 300-bp bvPDH_E1alpha-1 cDNA sequence (from +620 to +926) was connected to a tapetum-specific promoter in the antisense orientation and then introduced into tobacco. Antisense expression of bvPDH_E1alpha-1 resulted in conspicuously decreased endogenous bvPDH_E1alpha-1 transcripts and male sterility. The tapetum in the male-sterile anthers showed swelling or abnormal vacuolation. It is also worth noting that in the sterile anthers, cell organelles, such as elaioplasts, tapetosomes and orbicules were poorly formed and microspores exhibited aberrant exine development. These features are shared by sugar beet CMS. The results thus clearly indicate that inhibition of PDH activity in anther tapetum is sufficient to cause male sterility, a phenocopy of the sugar beet CMS.

  10. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  11. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of ascites tumour. Activation by AMP and other properties of potential significance in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A; Sols, A

    1980-01-01

    1. AMP is an activator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of the Ehrlich--Lettré ascites tumour, increasing its V up to 2-fold, with Ka of 40 microM at pH 7.4. This activation appears to be an allosteric effect on the decarboxylase subunit of the complex. 2. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex has a Km for pyruvate within the range 17--36 microM depending on the pH, the optimum pH being approx. 7.4, with a V of approx. 0.1 unit/g of cells. The rate-limiting step is dependent on the transformation of the enzyme--substrate complex. The Km for CoA is 15 microM. The Km for NAD+ is 0.7 mM for both the complex and the lipoamide dehydrogenase. The complex is inhibited by acetyl-CoA competitively with CoA; the Ki is 60 microM. The lipoamide dehydrogenase is inhibited by NADH and NADPH competitively with NAD+, with Ki values of 80 and 90 microM respectively. In the reverse reaction the Km values for NADH and NADPH are essentially equal to their Ki values for the forward reaction, the V for the latter being 0.09 of that of the former. Hence the reaction rate of the complex in vivo is likely to be markedly affected by feedback isosteric inhibition by reduced nicotinamide nucleotides and possibly acetyl-CoA. PMID:7193456

  12. RNAi-mediated silencing of a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase enhances triacylglycerol biosynthesis in the oleaginous marine alga Nannochloropsis salina.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonian; Yao, Lina; Yang, Bo; Lee, Yuan Kun; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jin

    2017-09-13

    Oleaginous microalgae have been emerging as the third-generation feedstocks for biofuel production. Genetic manipulation for improving triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation represents a promising approach towards the economics of microalgal biofuels. Acetyl-CoA, the essential carbon precursor for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, can be derived from pyruvate catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is negatively regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). In the present study, we characterized a PDK gene (NsPDK) from Nannochloropsis salina. Subcellular localization assay assisted by green fluorescence protein (GFP) fusion indicated the localization of NsPDK in mitochondria of N. salina cells. NsPDK knockdown via RNA interference strategy attenuated NsPDK expression at the mRNA level and its enzymatic activity in vivo, leading to faster TAG accumulation without compromising cell growth under high light stress conditions. Interestingly, the TAG increase was accompanied by a decline in membrane polar lipids. NsPDK knockdown also altered fatty acid profile in N. salina. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis suggested that the carbon metabolic pathways might be influenced by NsPDK knockdown leading to diverted carbon flux towards TAG synthesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the role of NsPDK in regulating TAG accumulation and provide valuable insights into future manipulation of oleaginous microalgae for improving biofuel production.

  13. The anaerobic chytridiomycete fungus Piromyces sp. E2 produces ethanol via pyruvate:formate lyase and an alcohol dehydrogenase E.

    PubMed

    Boxma, Brigitte; Voncken, Frank; Jannink, Sander; van Alen, Theo; Akhmanova, Anna; van Weelden, Susanne W H; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Ricard, Guenola; Huynen, Martijn; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Hackstein, Johannes H P

    2004-03-01

    Anaerobic chytridiomycete fungi possess hydrogenosomes, which generate hydrogen and ATP, but also acetate and formate as end-products of a prokaryotic-type mixed-acid fermentation. Notably, the anaerobic chytrids Piromyces and Neocallimastix use pyruvate:formate lyase (PFL) for the catabolism of pyruvate, which is in marked contrast to the hydrogenosomal metabolism of the anaerobic parabasalian flagellates Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus, because these organisms decarboxylate pyruvate with the aid of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO). Here, we show that the chytrids Piromyces sp. E2 and Neocallimastix sp. L2 also possess an alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE) that makes them unique among hydrogenosome-bearing anaerobes. We demonstrate that Piromyces sp. E2 routes the final steps of its carbohydrate catabolism via PFL and ADHE: in axenic culture under standard conditions and in the presence of 0.3% fructose, 35% of the carbohydrates were degraded in the cytosol to the end-products ethanol, formate, lactate and succinate, whereas 65% were degraded via the hydrogenosomes to acetate and formate. These observations require a refinement of the previously published metabolic schemes. In particular, the importance of the hydrogenase in this type of hydrogenosome has to be revisited.

  14. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  15. The Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase in Fatty Acid Synthesis in Developing Arabidopsis Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jinshan; Behal, Robert H.; Back, Stephanie L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Oliver, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) formed within the plastid is the precursor for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and, through them, a range of important biomolecules. The source of acetyl-CoA in the plastid is not known, but two enzymes are thought to be involved: acetyl-CoA synthetase and plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To determine the importance of these two enzymes in synthesizing acetyl-CoA during lipid accumulation in developing Arabidopsis seeds, we isolated cDNA clones for acetyl-CoA synthetase and for the ptE1α- and ptE1β-subunits of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To our knowledge, this is the first reported acetyl-CoA synthetase sequence from a plant source. The Arabidopsis acetyl-CoA synthetase preprotein has a calculated mass of 76,678 D, an apparent plastid targeting sequence, and the mature protein is a monomer of 70 to 72 kD. During silique development, the spatial and temporal patterns of the ptE1β mRNA level are very similar to those of the mRNAs for the plastidic heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits. The pattern of ptE1β mRNA accumulation strongly correlates with the formation of lipid within the developing embryo. In contrast, the level of mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase does not correlate in time and space with lipid accumulation. The highest level of accumulation of the mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase during silique development is within the funiculus. These mRNA data suggest a predominant role for plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase in acetyl-CoA formation during lipid synthesis in seeds. PMID:10859180

  16. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  17. Decreased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 predicts an unfavorable prognosis in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqing; Huang, Ruixia; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoran; Yu, Dandan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jianguo; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 (PDHA1) serves as a gate-keeper enzyme link between glycolysis and the mitochondrial citric acid cycle. The inhibition of PDHA1 in cancer cells can result in an increased Warburg effect and a more aggressive phenotype in cancer cells. This study was conducted to investigate the expression of PDHA1 in ovarian cancer and the correlation between PDHA1 expression and the prognosis of patients. The PDHA1 protein expression in 3 ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3 and ES-2) and 248 surgically removed ovarian carcinoma samples was immunocytochemically examined. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the correlations between PDHA1 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of the patients as well as the predictive value of PDHA1. The results showed the presence of variable expression of PDHA1 in the three ovarian cancer cell lines. Of the 248 ovarian cancer tissue specimens, 45 cases (18.1%) were negative in tumor cells for PDHA1, 162 cases (65.3%) displayed a low expression level, and 41 cases (16.5%) had a relatively high PDHA1 staining. The expression of PDHA1 was associated with the histological subtype (P=0.004) and FIGO stage (P=0.002). The median OS time in the PDHA1 negative group, low expression group and high expression group were 0.939 years, 1.443 years and 9.900 years, respectively. The median PFS time in the above three groups were 0.287 years, 0.586 years and 9.900 years, respectively. Furthermore, the high expression of PDHA1 in ovarian carcinoma cells was significantly associated with better OS and PFS by statistical analyses. Multivariate analyses showed that PDHA1 expression was also an independent prognostic factor for higher OS in ovarian cancer patients (HR=0.705, 95% CI 0.541-0.918, P=0.01). Our study indicated that the decreased expression of PDHA1 might be an independent prognostic factor in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:27725912

  18. Reactive oxygen species are involved in arsenic trioxide inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Chen, Chien-Hung; Yih, Ling-Huei; Wang, Alexander S S; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chen, Tsen-Chien; Jan, Kun-Yan

    2003-03-01

    Arsenite was shown to inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity through binding to vicinal dithiols in pure enzyme and tissue extract. However, no data are available on how arsenite inhibits PDH activity in human cells. The IC(50) values for arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) to inhibit the PDH activity in porcine heart pure enzyme preparation and in human leukemia cell line HL60 cells were estimated to be 182 and 2 microM, respectively. Thus, As(2)O(3) inactivation of PDH activity was about 90 times more potent in HL60 cells than in purified enzyme preparation. The IC(50) values for As(2)O(3) and phenylarsine oxide to reduce the vicinal thiol content in HL60 cells were estimated to be 81.7 and 1.9 microM, respectively. Thus, As(2)O(3) is a potent PDH inhibitor but a weak vicinal thiol reacting agent in HL60 cells. Antioxidants but not dithiol compounds suppressed As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity in HL60 cells. Conversely, dithiol compounds but not antioxidants suppressed the inhibition of PDH activity by phenylarsine oxide. As(2)O(3) increased H(2)O(2) level in HL60 cells, but this was not observed for phenylarsine oxide. Mitochondrial respiration inhibitors suppressed the As(2)O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) production and As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity. Moreover, metal chelators ameliorated whereas Fenton metals aggravated As(2)O(3) inhibition of PDH activity. Treatment with H(2)O(2) plus Fenton metals also decreased the PDH activity in HL60 cells. Therefore, it seems that As(2)O(3) elevates H(2)O(2) production in mitochondria and this may produce hydroxyl through the Fenton reaction and result in oxidative damage to the protein of PDH. The present results suggest that arsenite may cause protein oxidation to inactivate an enzyme and this can occur at a much lower concentration than arsenite binding directly to the critical thiols.

  19. Modulation of Muscle Fiber Compositions in Response to Hypoxia via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-1

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Daniel D.; Kim, Gyuyoup; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber-type changes in hypoxic conditions in accordance with pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-1 and hypoxia inducible factor (Hif)-1α were investigated in rats. Hif-1α and its down-stream molecule Pdk-1 are well known for readily response to hypoxia. We questioned their roles in relation to changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition in skeletal muscles. We hypothesize that the level of Pdk-1 with respect to the level of Hif-1α determines MyHC composition of the muscle in rats in hypoxia. Young male rats were housed in a chamber maintained at 11.5% (for sustained hypoxia) or fluctuating between 11.5 and 20.8% (for intermittent hypoxia or IH) oxygen levels. Then, muscle tissues from the geniohyoid (GH), soleus, and anterior tibialis (TA) were obtained at the end of hypoxic conditionings. After both hypoxic conditionings, protein levels of Pdk-1 and Hif-1 increased in GH muscles. GH muscles in acute sustained hypoxia favor an anaerobic glycolytic pathway, resulting in an increase in glycolytic MyHC IIb protein-rich fibers while maintain original fatigue-resistant MyHC IIa protein in the fibers; thus, the numbers of IIa- and IIb MyHC co-expressing fibers increased. Exogenous Pdk-1 over-expression using plasmid vectors elevated not only the glycolytic MyHC IIb, but also IIx as well as IIa expressions in C2C12 myotubes in ambient air significantly. The increase of dual expression of IIa- and IIb MyHC proteins in fibers harvested from the geniohyoid muscle has a potential to improve endurance as shown in our fatigability tests. By increasing the Pdk-1/Hif-1 ratio, a mixed-type muscle could alter endurance within the innate characteristics of the muscle toward more fatigue resistant. We conclude that an increased Pdk-1 level in skeletal muscle helps maintain MyHC compositions to be a fatigue resistant mixed-type muscle. PMID:28018235

  20. Modulation of Muscle Fiber Compositions in Response to Hypoxia via Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Daniel D; Kim, Gyuyoup; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber-type changes in hypoxic conditions in accordance with pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (Pdk)-1 and hypoxia inducible factor (Hif)-1α were investigated in rats. Hif-1α and its down-stream molecule Pdk-1 are well known for readily response to hypoxia. We questioned their roles in relation to changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition in skeletal muscles. We hypothesize that the level of Pdk-1 with respect to the level of Hif-1α determines MyHC composition of the muscle in rats in hypoxia. Young male rats were housed in a chamber maintained at 11.5% (for sustained hypoxia) or fluctuating between 11.5 and 20.8% (for intermittent hypoxia or IH) oxygen levels. Then, muscle tissues from the geniohyoid (GH), soleus, and anterior tibialis (TA) were obtained at the end of hypoxic conditionings. After both hypoxic conditionings, protein levels of Pdk-1 and Hif-1 increased in GH muscles. GH muscles in acute sustained hypoxia favor an anaerobic glycolytic pathway, resulting in an increase in glycolytic MyHC IIb protein-rich fibers while maintain original fatigue-resistant MyHC IIa protein in the fibers; thus, the numbers of IIa- and IIb MyHC co-expressing fibers increased. Exogenous Pdk-1 over-expression using plasmid vectors elevated not only the glycolytic MyHC IIb, but also IIx as well as IIa expressions in C2C12 myotubes in ambient air significantly. The increase of dual expression of IIa- and IIb MyHC proteins in fibers harvested from the geniohyoid muscle has a potential to improve endurance as shown in our fatigability tests. By increasing the Pdk-1/Hif-1 ratio, a mixed-type muscle could alter endurance within the innate characteristics of the muscle toward more fatigue resistant. We conclude that an increased Pdk-1 level in skeletal muscle helps maintain MyHC compositions to be a fatigue resistant mixed-type muscle.

  1. Partial pyruvate kinase deficiency aggravates the phenotypic expression of band 3 deficiency in a family with hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, Rob; van Oirschot, Brigitte A; Veldthuis, Martijn; Dobbe, Johannes G; Streekstra, Geert J; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schutgens, Roger E G; van Wijk, Richard

    2015-03-01

    In a family with mild dominant spherocytosis, affected members showed partial band 3 deficiency. The index patient showed more severe clinical symptoms than his relatives, and his red blood cells displayed concomitant low pyruvate kinase activity. We investigated the contribution of partial PK deficiency to the phenotypic expression of mutant band 3 in this family. Pyruvate kinase deficiency and band 3 deficiency were characterized by DNA analysis. Results of red cell osmotic fragility testing, the results of cell deformability obtained by the Automated Rheoscope and Cell Analyzer and the results obtained by Osmotic Gradient Ektacytometry, which is a combination of these tests, were related to the red cell ATP content. Spherocytosis in this family was due to a novel heterozygous mutation in SLC4A1, the gene for band 3. Reduced PK activity of the index patient was attributed to a novel mutation in PKLR inherited from his mother, who was without clinical symptoms. Partial PK deficiency was associated with decreased red cell ATP content and markedly increased osmotic fragility. This suggests an aggravating effect of low ATP levels on the phenotypic expression of band 3 deficiency.

  2. Structure of D-lactate dehydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus complexed with NAD(+) and lactic acid (or pyruvate).

    PubMed

    Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Strange, Richard W; Ellis, Mark J; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Inoue, Yumiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hasnain, S Samar

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structure of D-lactate dehydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus (aq_727) was determined to 2.12 A resolution in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 90.94, b = 94.43, c = 188.85 A. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the coenzyme-binding domain of Lactobacillus helveticus D-lactate dehydrogenase and contained two homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Each subunit of the homodimer was found to be in a ;closed' conformation with the NADH cofactor bound to the coenzyme-binding domain and with a lactate (or pyruvate) molecule bound at the interdomain active-site cleft.

  3. 5'-AMP activated protein kinase α2 controls substrate metabolism during post-exercise recovery via regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Fritzen, Andreas Maechel; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Jeppesen, Jacob; Christiansen, Mette Landau Brabaek; Biensø, Rasmus; Dyck, Jason R B; Pilegaard, Henriette; Kiens, Bente

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that exercise has a major impact on substrate metabolism for many hours after exercise. However, the regulatory mechanisms increasing lipid oxidation and facilitating glycogen resynthesis in the post-exercise period are unknown. To address this, substrate oxidation was measured after prolonged exercise and during the following 6 h post-exercise in 5´-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 and α1 knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice with free access to food. Substrate oxidation was similar during exercise at the same relative intensity between genotypes. During post-exercise recovery, a lower lipid oxidation (P < 0.05) and higher glucose oxidation were observed in AMPKα2 KO (respiratory exchange ratio (RER) = 0.84 ± 0.02) than in WT and AMPKα1 KO (average RER = 0.80 ± 0.01) without genotype differences in muscle malonyl-CoA or free-carnitine concentrations. A similar increase in muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) mRNA expression in WT and AMPKα2 KO was observed following exercise, which is consistent with AMPKα2 deficiency not affecting the exercise-induced activation of the PDK4 transcriptional regulators HDAC4 and SIRT1. Interestingly, PDK4 protein content increased (63%, P < 0.001) in WT but remained unchanged in AMPKα2 KO. In accordance with the lack of increase in PDK4 protein content, lower (P < 0.01) inhibitory pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1α Ser(293) phosphorylation was observed in AMPKα2 KO muscle compared to WT. These findings indicate that AMPKα2 regulates muscle metabolism post-exercise through inhibition of the PDH complex and hence glucose oxidation, subsequently creating conditions for increased fatty acid oxidation. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  4. Disruption of the pdhB pyruvate dehydrogenase [corrected] gene affects colony morphology, in vitro growth and cell invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae.

  5. Pyruvate ameliorates the defect in ureogenesis from ammonia in citrin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Li, Meng Xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Sinasac, David S; Kannan, Yukiko; Iijima, Mikio; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Tanaka, Masashi; Nakamura, Yoichi; Saheki, Takeyori

    2006-05-01

    Mutations in SLC25A13, encoding the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier citrin, cause adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) in humans. We have previously reported that although citrin-knockout (Ctrn-/-) mice fail to display symptoms of CTLN2, liver perfusion revealed a deficit in ureogenesis from ammonia accompanied by an increase in the perfusate lactate-to-pyruvate (L/P) ratio. The present study explores the effects of pyruvate, aspartate and citrate on improving the abnormalities observed in the Ctrn-/- liver. We measured the rate of ureogenesis from ammonium chloride using the liver-perfusion system. Pyruvate infusion lowered the L/P ratio and corrected the deficit in ureogenesis in the Ctrn-/- liver. This effect was found to be dose-dependent in both instances. Phenazine methosulfate, a cytosolic oxidant, also improved the rate of ureogenesis in the Ctrn-/- liver and led to a fall in the L/P ratio. The addition of aspartate or citrate did not change either the rate of ureogenesis or the L/P ratio in the Ctrn-/- liver. Citrin deficiency disturbs urea synthesis primarily as a result of an elevated cytosolic NADH/NAD+ ratio owing to limited reoxidation of reducing equivalents. Clinically, pyruvate may have a therapeutic benefit for CTLN2 patients.

  6. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria.

  7. Complete knockout of the lactate dehydrogenase A gene is lethal in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, 3 down-regulated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Yip, Shirley S M; Zhou, Meixia; Joly, John; Snedecor, Bradley; Shen, Amy; Crawford, Yongping

    2014-09-01

    Accumulation of high level of lactate can negatively impact cell growth during fed-batch culture process. In this study, we attempted to knockout the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) gene in CHO cells in order to attenuate the lactate level. To prevent the potential deleterious effect of pyruvate accumulation, consequent to LDHA knockout, on cell culture, we chose a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, and 3 (PDHK1, 2, and 3) knockdown cell line in which to knock out LDHA alleles. Around 3,000 clones were screened to obtain 152 mutants. Only heterozygous mutants were identified. An attempt to knockout the remaining wild-type allele from one such heterozygote yielded only two mutants after screening 567 clones. One had an extra valine. Another evidenced a duplication event, possessing at lease one wild-type and two different frameshifted alleles. Both mutants still retained LDH activity. Together, our data strongly suggest that a complete knockout of LDHA is lethal in CHO cells, despite simultaneous down-regulation of PDHK1, 2, and 3.

  8. Principles of quasi-equivalence and Euclidean geometry govern the assembly of cubic and dodecahedral cores of pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Tina; Ævarsson, Arnthor; Allen, Mark D.; Westphal, Adrie H.; Perham, Richard N.; de Kok, Aart; Hol, Wim G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (Mr of 5–10 million) is assembled around a structural core formed of multiple copies of dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2p), which exhibits the shape of either a cube or a dodecahedron, depending on the source. The crystal structures of the 60-meric dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase cores of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes were determined and revealed a remarkably hollow dodecahedron with an outer diameter of ≈237 Å, 12 large openings of ≈52 Å diameter across the fivefold axes, and an inner cavity with a diameter of ≈118 Å. Comparison of cubic and dodecahedral E2p assemblies shows that combining the principles of quasi-equivalence formulated by Caspar and Klug [Caspar, D. L. & Klug, A. (1962) Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 27, 1–4] with strict Euclidean geometric considerations results in predictions of the major features of the E2p dodecahedron matching the observed features almost exactly. PMID:9990008

  9. Achromobacter denitrificans Strain YD35 Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Controls NADH Production To Allow Tolerance to Extremely High Nitrite Levels

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Yuki; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujita, Tomoya; Nakamura, Akira; Takizawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    We identified the extremely nitrite-tolerant bacterium Achromobacter denitrificans YD35 that can grow in complex medium containing 100 mM nitrite (NO2−) under aerobic conditions. Nitrite induced global proteomic changes and upregulated tricarboxylate (TCA) cycle enzymes as well as antioxidant proteins in YD35. Transposon mutagenesis generated NO2−-hypersensitive mutants of YD35 that had mutations at genes for aconitate hydratase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and a pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) E1 component, indicating the importance of TCA cycle metabolism to NO2− tolerance. A mutant in which the pdh gene cluster was disrupted (Δpdh mutant) could not grow in the presence of 100 mM NO2−. Nitrite decreased the cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and the cellular ATP level. These defects were more severe in the Δpdh mutant, indicating that Pdh contributes to upregulating cellular NADH and ATP and NO2−-tolerant growth. Exogenous acetate, which generates acetyl coenzyme A and then is metabolized by the TCA cycle, compensated for these defects caused by disruption of the pdh gene cluster and those caused by NO2−. These findings demonstrate a link between NO2− tolerance and pyruvate/acetate metabolism through the TCA cycle. The TCA cycle mechanism in YD35 enhances NADH production, and we consider that this contributes to a novel NO2−-tolerating mechanism in this strain. PMID:24413603

  10. Fusarium graminearum pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (FgPDK1) Is Critical for Conidiation, Mycelium Growth, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tao; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is an important mitochondrial enzyme that blocks the production of acetyl-CoA by selectively inhibiting the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) through phosphorylation. PDK is an effectively therapeutic target in cancer cells, but the physiological roles of PDK in phytopathogens are largely unknown. To address these gaps, a PDK gene (FgPDK1) was isolated from Fusarium graminearum that is an economically important pathogen infecting cereals. The deletion of FgPDK1 in F. graminearum resulted in the increase in PDH activity, coinciding with several phenotypic defects, such as growth retardation, failure in perithecia and conidia production, and increase in pigment formation. The ΔFgPDK1 mutants showed enhanced sensitivity to osmotic stress and cell membrane-damaging agent. Physiological detection indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and plasma membrane damage (indicated by PI staining, lipid peroxidation, and electrolyte leakage) occurred in ΔFgPDK1 mutants. The deletion of FgPDK1 also prohibited the production of deoxynivalenol (DON) and pathogenicity of F. graminearum, which may resulted from the decrease in the expression of Tri6. Taken together, this study firstly identified the vital roles of FgPDK1 in the development of phytopathogen F. graminearum, which may provide a potentially novel clue for target-directed development of agricultural fungicides. PMID:27341107

  11. “Scanning mutagenesis” of the amino acid sequences flanking phosphorylation site 1 of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Nagib; Swatek, Kirby N.; Zhang, Jingfen; Miernyk, Ján A.; Xu, Dong; Thelen, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC) is regulated by reversible seryl-phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by a dedicated, intrinsic kinase. The phospho-complex is reactivated when dephosphorylated by an intrinsic PP2C-type protein phosphatase. Both the position of the phosphorylated Ser-residue and the sequences of the flanking amino acids are highly conserved. We have used the synthetic peptide-based kinase client (KiC) assay plus recombinant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α and E1α-kinase to perform “scanning mutagenesis” of the residues flanking the site of phosphorylation. Consistent with the results from “phylogenetic analysis” of the flanking sequences, the direct peptide-based kinase assays tolerated very few changes. Even conservative changes such as Leu, Ile, or Val for Met, or Glu for Asp, gave very marked reductions in phosphorylation. Overall the results indicate that regulation of the mtPDC by reversible phosphorylation is an extreme example of multiple, interdependent instances of co-evolution. PMID:22811682

  12. Elementary steps in the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pig heart. Kinetics of thiamine diphosphate binding to the complex.

    PubMed

    Sümegi, B; Alkonyi, I

    1983-11-02

    In the progress curve of the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a lag phase was observed when the concentration of thiamin diphosphate was lower than usual (about 0.2-1 mM) in the enzyme assay. The length of the lag phase was dependent on thiamin diphosphate concentration, ranging from 0.2 min to 2 min as the thiamin diphosphate concentration varied from 800 nM to 22 nM. The lag phase was also observed in the elementary steps catalyzed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase component. A Km value of 107 nM was found for thiamin diphosphate with respect to the steady-state reaction rate following the lag phase. The pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that the resulting lag phase was the consequence of a slow holoenzyme formation from apoenzyme and thiamin diphosphate. The thiamin diphosphate can bind to the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the absence of pyruvate, but the presence of 2 mM pyruvate increases the rate constant of binding from 1.4 X 10(4) M-1 S-1 to 1.3 X 10(5) M-1 S-1 and decreases the rate constant of dissociation from 2.3 X 10(-2) S-1 to 4.1 X 10(-3) S-1. On the other hand, the effect of pyruvate on the thiamin diphosphate binding revealed the existence of a thiamin-diphosphate-independent pyruvate-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Direct evidence was also obtained with fluorescence techniques for the existence of this binding site and the dissociation constant of pyruvate was found to be 0.38 mM. On the basis of these data we have proposed a random mechanism for the binding of pyruvate and thiamin diphosphate to the complex. Binding of substrates to the enzyme complex caused an increase in the fluorescence of the dansylaziridine-labelled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, showing that binding of substrates to the complex is accompanied by structural changes.

  13. Biochemical and histologic pathology in an infant with cross-reacting material (negative) pyruvate carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wong, L T; Davidson, A G; Applegarth, D A; Dimmick, J E; Norman, M G; Toone, J R; Pirie, G; Wong, J

    1986-03-01

    An infant with the acute neonatal form of pyruvate carboxylase deficiency (cross-reacting material negative) presented with severe intractable lactic acidosis within 4 h after birth. He also had hyperammonemia, hypercitrullinemia, and hyperlysinemia. Plasma glutamine was not elevated. He had a rapidly deteriorating clinical course with severe liver dysfunction, repeated septicemia and seizures; he was comatose and was on a ventilator throughout; death occurred at 8 wk of age. Skin fibroblast study confirmed the enzyme deficiency. Detailed biochemical parameters and histopathology of the brain and liver are presented. The evidence from this infant suggests that disturbances of intracellular oxaloacetate levels as a result of the primary enzyme defect might also contribute to deficiency in ATP generation which may explain the various other biochemical changes and liver pathology.

  14. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  15. Expanding the clinical spectrum of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, L.; Klomp, L. W. J.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Spaapen, L. J. M.; Haagen, A. A. M.; Dorland, L.

    2010-01-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is considered to be a rare cause of congenital microcephaly, infantile onset of intractable seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we report for the first time a very mild form of genetically confirmed 3-PGDH deficiency in two siblings with juvenile onset of absence seizures and mild developmental delay. Amino acid analysis showed serine values in CSF and plasma identical to what is observed in the severe infantile form. Both patients responded favourably to relatively low dosages of serine supplementation with cessation of seizures, normalisation of their EEG abnormalities and improvement of well-being and behaviour. These cases illustrate that 3-PGDH deficiency can present with mild symptoms and should be considered as a treatable disorder in the differential diagnosis of mild developmental delay and seizures. Synopsis: we present a novel mild phenotype in patients with 3-PGDH deficiency. PMID:21113737

  16. Conjugated bilirubin in neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Hammerman, C; Vilei, M T; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Muraca, M

    1996-05-01

    We used a system capable of measuring conjugated bilirubin and its monoconjugated and diconjugated fractions in serum to assess bilirubin conjugation in 29 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient, term, male newborn infants and 35 control subjects; all had serum bilirubin levels > or = 256 mumol/L (15 mg/dI). The median value for diconjugated bilirubin was lower in the G6PD-deficient neonates than in control subjects (0.06 (range 0.00 to 1.84) vs 0.21 (range 0.00 to 1.02) mumol/L, p = 0.006). Diglucuronide was undetectable in 11 (38.9%) of the G6PD-deficient infants versus 3 (8.6%) of the control subjects (p = 0.015). These findings imply a partial defect of bilirubin conjugation not previously demonstrated in G6PD-deficient newborn infants.

  17. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-01-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  18. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  19. Stem Cell Selection In Vivo Using Foamy Vectors Cures Canine Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Robert A.; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Conclusions/Significance Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies. PMID:23028826

  20. Stem cell selection in vivo using foamy vectors cures canine pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Trobridge, Grant D; Beard, Brian C; Wu, Robert A; Ironside, Christina; Malik, Punam; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy has cured immunodeficiencies including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) and adenine deaminase deficiency (ADA). For these immunodeficiencies corrected cells have a selective advantage in vivo, and low numbers of gene-modified cells are sufficient to provide therapeutic benefit. Strategies to efficiently transduce and/or expand long-term repopulating cells in vivo are needed for treatment of diseases that require higher levels of corrected cells, such as hemoglobinopathies. Here we expanded corrected stem cells in vivo in a canine model of a severe erythroid disease, pyruvate kinase deficiency. We used a foamy virus (FV) vector expressing the P140K mutant of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMTP140K) for in vivo expansion of corrected hematopoietic repopulating cells. FV vectors are attractive gene transfer vectors for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy since they efficiently transduce repopulating cells and may be safer than more commonly used gammaretroviral vectors. Following transplantation with HSCs transduced ex vivo using a tri-cistronic FV vector that expressed EGFP, R-type pyruvate kinase, and MGMTP140K, we were able to increase marking from approximately 3.5% to 33% in myeloid long-term repopulating cells resulting in a functional cure. Here we describe in one affected dog a functional cure for a severe erythroid disease using stem cell selection in vivo. In addition to providing a potential cure for patients with pyruvate kinase deficiency, in vivo selection using foamy vectors with MGMTP140K has broad potential for several hematopoietic diseases including hemoglobinopathies.

  1. Plesiomonas shigelloides Septic Shock Leading to Death of Postsplenectomy Patient with Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Plesiomonas shigelloides, a water-borne bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family, usually causes self-limiting gastroenteritis with diarrhea, several cases of sepsis have been reported. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with hemochromatosis, pyruvate kinase deficiency, and asplenia via splenectomy who developed septic shock caused by P. shigelloides complicated by respiratory failure, renal failure, liver failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Early aggressive antimicrobial therapy and resuscitation measures were unsuccessful and the patient passed away. We kindly suggest clinicians to implement early diagnosis of septic shock, empirical coverage with antibiotics, and prompt volume resuscitation based on the high mortality rate of P. shigelloides bacteremia. PMID:27610253

  2. FoxO1 regulates myocardial glucose oxidation rates via transcriptional control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Keshav; Saleme, Bruno; Al Batran, Rami; Aburasayn, Hanin; Eshreif, Amina; Ho, Kim L; Ma, Wayne K; Almutairi, Malak; Eaton, Farah; Gandhi, Manoj; Park, Edwards A; Sutendra, Gopinath; Ussher, John R

    2017-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation and a critical regulator of metabolic flexibility during the fasting to feeding transition. PDH is regulated via both PDH kinases (PDHK) and PDH phosphatases, which phosphorylate/inactivate and dephosphorylate/activate PDH, respectively. Our goal was to determine whether the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates PDH activity and glucose oxidation in the heart via increasing the expression of Pdk4, the gene encoding PDHK4. To address this question, we differentiated H9c2 myoblasts into cardiac myocytes and modulated FoxO1 activity, after which Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and PDH phosphorylation/activity were assessed. We assessed binding of FoxO1 to the Pdk4 promoter in cardiac myocytes in conjunction with measuring the role of FoxO1 on glucose oxidation in the isolated working heart. Both pharmacological (1 µM AS1842856) and genetic (siRNA mediated) inhibition of FoxO1 decreased Pdk4/PDHK4 expression and subsequent PDH phosphorylation in H9c2 cardiac myocytes, whereas 10 µM dexamethasone-induced Pdk4/PDHK4 expression was abolished via pretreatment with 1 µM AS1842856. Furthermore, transfection of H9c2 cardiac myocytes with a vector expressing FoxO1 increased luciferase activity driven by a Pdk4 promoter construct containing the FoxO1 DNA-binding element region, but not in a Pdk4 promoter construct lacking this region. Finally, AS1842856 treatment in fasted mice enhanced glucose oxidation rates during aerobic isolated working heart perfusions. Taken together, FoxO1 directly regulates Pdk4 transcription in the heart, thereby controlling PDH activity and subsequent glucose oxidation rates.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although studies have shown an association between FoxO1 activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression, our study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 is a direct transcriptional target of FoxO1 (but not FoxO3/FoxO4) in the heart. Furthermore, we report

  3. The Pyruvate and α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complexes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyze Pyocyanin and Phenazine-1-carboxylic Acid Reduction via the Subunit Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Nathaniel R; Wang, Benjamin X; Hoy, Julie A; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-03-31

    Phenazines are a class of redox-active molecules produced by diverse bacteria and archaea. Many of the biological functions of phenazines, such as mediating signaling, iron acquisition, and redox homeostasis, derive from their redox activity. Although prior studies have focused on extracellular phenazine oxidation by oxygen and iron, here we report a search for reductants and catalysts of intracellular phenazine reduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enzymatic assays in cell-free lysate, together with crude fractionation and chemical inhibition, indicate that P. aeruginosa contains multiple enzymes that catalyze the reduction of the endogenous phenazines pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in both cytosolic and membrane fractions. We used chemical inhibitors to target general enzyme classes and found that an inhibitor of flavoproteins and heme-containing proteins, diphenyleneiodonium, effectively inhibited phenazine reduction in vitro, suggesting that most phenazine reduction derives from these enzymes. Using natively purified proteins, we demonstrate that the pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes directly catalyze phenazine reduction with pyruvate or α-ketoglutarate as electron donors. Both complexes transfer electrons to phenazines through the common subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, a flavoprotein encoded by the gene lpdG Although we were unable to co-crystallize LpdG with an endogenous phenazine, we report its X-ray crystal structure in the apo-form (refined to 1.35 Å), bound to NAD(+) (1.45 Å), and bound to NADH (1.79 Å). In contrast to the notion that phenazines support intracellular redox homeostasis by oxidizing NADH, our work suggests that phenazines may substitute for NAD(+) in LpdG and other enzymes, achieving the same end by a different mechanism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  5. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). RESULTS/METHODOLOGY: We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease.

  6. Component co-expression and purification of recombinant human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from baculovirus infected SF9 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Guofeng; Oza, Khyati; Myers, Linda; Holbert, Marc A; Sweitzer, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    The mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a multi-component mitochondrial enzyme that plays a key role in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA connecting glycolysis to the citric acid cycle. Recent studies indicate that targeting the regulation of PDC enzymatic activity might offer therapeutic opportunities by inhibiting cancer cell metabolism. To facilitate drug discovery in this area, a well defined PDC sample is needed. Here, we report a new method of producing functional, recombinant, high quality human PDC complex. All five components were co-expressed in the cytoplasm of baculovirus-infected SF9 cells by deletion of the mitochondrial localization signal sequences of all the components and E1a was FLAG-tagged to facilitate purification. The protein FLAG tagged E1a complex was purified using FLAG-M2 affinity resin, followed by Superdex 200 sizing chromatography. The E2 and E3BP components were then Lipoylated using an enzyme based in vitro process. The resulting PDC is over 90% pure and homogenous. This non-phosphorylated, lipoylated human PDC was demonstrated to produce a robust detection window when used to develop an enzyme coupled assay of PDHK.

  7. Production and phenotypic analysis of rice transgenics with altered levels of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase proteins.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sangeeta; Kapoor, Avnish; Lakshmi, O Satya; Grover, Anil

    2007-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) enzymes are responsible for the operation of ethanolic fermentation pathway that appears to correlate to an extent with anoxia tolerance in plants. This study was undertaken with the objective of (a) analysing the rice pdc gene family and (b) altering the efficacy of the ethanolic fermentation process, through production of transgenic rice plants over- and under-expressing pyruvate decarboxylase (employing Ospdc1 gene from rice) as well as over-expressing alcohol dehydrogenase (employing Ghadh2 gene from cotton) proteins. Correlations noted in this study between the pattern of expression of the Pdc alpha-subunit and Ospdc2 transcript as well as between the Pdc beta-subunit and Ospdc1 transcript suggest the possibility that alpha-subunit is encoded by Ospdc2 and that beta-subunit is encoded by Ospdc1. The fact that levels of Pdc beta-subunit were particularly high in pUH-sPdc1 (plasmid construct designed for over-expression of Ospdc1) seedlings while levels of beta-subunit levels were negligible or lower in pUH-asPdc1 (plasmid construct designed for under-expression of Ospdc1) seedlings also support these observations. Transgenics raised for over-expression of Pdc and Adh and under-expression of Pdc were confirmed for the transgene presence and effects by PCR, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Western blotting and isozyme assays. Pdc and Adh over-expressing rice transgenics at early seedling stage under unstressed control growth conditions showed slight, consistent advantage in root vigour as compared to that of wild-type seedlings.

  8. Hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivares, N; Medina, C; Sánchez-Corona, J; Rivas, F; Rivera, H; Hernández, A; Delgado, J L; Ibarra, B; Cantú, J M; Vaca, G; Martínez, C

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported concerning quantitation of glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity where in one of the members of a family a clinical diagnosis of acute hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency had been established. In the propositus, G6PD levels were found to be less than 10 per cent thus confirming diagnosis; the same enzymatic deficiency was identified in one of the siblings without a history of hematologic pathology and in a maternal cousin with a history of neonatal jaundice as well as two obliged carriers. Electrophoretical enzyme phenotype was similar to A variant in three affected males. Advantages of prevention and medical care possible with early diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are discussed.

  9. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency in an old-order Amish cohort: longitudinal risk and disease management.

    PubMed

    Rider, Nicholas L; Strauss, Kevin A; Brown, Krysta; Finkenstedt, Armin; Puffenberger, Erik G; Hendrickson, Christine L; Robinson, Donna L; Muenke, Nikolas; Tselepis, Chris; Saunders, Lauren; Zoller, Heinz; Morton, D Holmes

    2011-10-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a chronic illness with age specific consequences. Newborns suffer life-threatening hemolytic crisis and hyperbilirubinemia. Adults are at risk for infections because of asplenia, pregnancy-related morbidity, and may suffer organ damage because of systemic iron overload. We describe 27 Old Order Amish patients (ages 8 months-52 years) homozygous for c.1436G>A mutations in PKLR. Each subject had a predictable neonatal course requiring packed red blood cell transfusions (30 ± 5 mL/kg) to control hemolytic disease and intensive phototherapy to prevent kernicterus. Hemochromatosis affected 29% (n = 4) of adult patients, who had inappropriately normal serum hepcidin (34.5 ± 12.7 ng/mL) and GDF-15 (595 ± 335pg/mL) relative to hyperferritinemia (769 ± 595 mg/dL). A high prevalence of HFE gene mutations exists in this population and may contribute to iron-related morbidity. Based on our observations, we present a strategy for long-term management of pyruvate kinase deficiency. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Erythrocyte Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency mutation identified in multiple breeds of domestic cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency (PK deficiency) is an inherited hemolytic anemia that has been documented in the Abyssinian and Somali breeds as well as random bred domestic shorthair cats. The disease results from mutations in PKLR, the gene encoding the regulatory glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK). Multiple isozymes are produced by tissue-specific differential processing of PKLR mRNA. Perturbation of PK decreases erythrocyte longevity resulting in anemia. Additional signs include: severe lethargy, weakness, weight loss, jaundice, and abdominal enlargement. In domestic cats, PK deficiency has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with high variability in onset and severity of clinical symptoms. Results Sequence analysis of PKLR revealed an intron 5 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 304 concordant with the disease phenotype in Abyssinian and Somali cats. Located 53 nucleotides upstream of the exon 6 splice site, cats with this SNP produce liver and blood processed mRNA with a 13 bp deletion at the 3’ end of exon 5. The frame-shift mutation creates a stop codon at amino acid position 248 in exon 6. The frequency of the intronic SNP in 14,179 American and European cats representing 38 breeds, 76 western random bred cats and 111 cats of unknown breed is 6.31% and 9.35% when restricted to the 15 groups carrying the concordant SNP. Conclusions PK testing is recommended for Bengals, Egyptian Maus, La Perms, Maine Coon cats, Norwegian Forest cats, Savannahs, Siberians, and Singapuras, in addition to Abyssinians and Somalis as well an any new breeds using the afore mentioned breeds in out crossing or development programs. PMID:23110753

  11. Psychotic mania in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase-deficient subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been associated with acute psychosis, catatonic schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders by previous inconclusive reports. A particularly disproportionate rate of enzyme deficiency was found in manic schizoaffective patients from 662 lithium patients surveyed in Sardinia. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics which may be potentially associated with G6PD deficiency. Methods Characteristics of episodes, course of illness, family pattern of illness, laboratory tests, and treatment response of 29 G6PD-deficient subjects with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of manic schizoaffective disorder were abstracted from available records. Results The most peculiar pattern was that of acute recurrent psychotic manic episodes, mostly characterized by loosening of associations, agitation, catatonic symptoms, and/or transient confusion, concurrent hyperbilirubinemia, positive psychiatric family history, and partial response to long-term lithium treatment. Conclusions A relationship between psychiatric disorder and G6PD deficiency is to be searched in the bipolar spectrum, particularly among patients with a history of acute episodes with psychotic and/or catatonic symptoms or with transient confusion. PMID:12844366

  12. Natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency through adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Evan Cole; De Meulemeester, Christine; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Gibson, K. Michael; Torres, Carlos; Guberman, Alan; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Ali-Ridha, Andre; Parviz, Mahsa; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The natural history of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency in adulthood is unknown; we elucidate the clinical manifestations of the disease later in life. Methods: A 63-year-old man with long-standing intellectual disability was diagnosed with SSADH deficiency following hospitalization for progressive decline, escalating seizures, and prolonged periods of altered consciousness. We present a detailed review of his clinical course and reviewed our SSADH deficiency database adult cohort to derive natural history information. Results: Of 95 patients in the database for whom age at diagnosis is recorded, there are 40 individuals currently aged 18 years or older. Only 3 patients were diagnosed after age 18 years. Of 25 adults for whom data are available after age 18, 60% have a history of epilepsy. Predominant seizure types are generalized tonic-clonic, absence, and myoclonic. EEGs showed background slowing or generalized epileptiform discharges in two-thirds of adults for whom EEG data were collected. History of psychiatric symptoms was prominent, with frequent anxiety, sleep disturbances, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Conclusions: We identified patients older than 18 years with SSADH deficiency in our database following identification and review of a patient diagnosed in the seventh decade of life. The illness had a progressive course with escalating seizures in the index case, with fatality at age 63. Diagnosis in adulthood is rare. Epilepsy is more common in the adult than the pediatric SSADH deficiency cohort; neuropsychiatric morbidity remains prominent. PMID:26268900

  13. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  14. In vivo lability of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in GdA- and Gdmediterranean deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, Sergio; Corash, Laurence M.; Davenport, Deatra D.; Miraglia, Janet; Amorosi, Edward L.

    1968-01-01

    A decreased level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase might result from decreased rate of synthesis, synthesis of an enzyme of lower catalytic efficiency, increased lability, or a combined mechanism. To test the hypothesis of increased lability, the rate of decline of the enzyme in vivo was measured in three groups of individuals, controls, Gd(—),A-males, and Gd(—), Mediterranean males, by the slope of decline of activity in fractions containing erythrocytes of progressively increasing mean age. These fractions were obtained by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous density gradient of erythrocyte suspensions free of contaminating platelets and leukocytes. The rate of in vivo decline of pyruvate kinase (another age-dependent enzyme) was also measured and found very similar in the three groups. The in vivo decline of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was found to follow an exponential rate, with a half-life of 62 days for controls and 13 days for Gd(—),A- erythrocytes. The activity in normal reticulocytes was estimated at 9.7 U and in Gd(—),A- reticulocytes at 8.8 U. These estimates were confirmed by direct measurements in reticulocytes isolated from patients with extreme reticulocytosis. In Gd(—),Mediterranean erythrocytes activity could be demonstrated only in reticulocytes, which were estimated to average 1.4 U. The rate of decline is so extreme that no activity could be detected in mature erythrocytes. These data suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency of both the GdA- and the GdMediterranean variant results from different degrees of in vivo instability of the abnormal enzyme. PMID:5641629

  15. In situ nucleic acid hybridization of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 in primary biliary cirrhosis: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 messenger RNA is expressed in hepatocytes but not in biliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Van de Water, J; Leung, P S; Coppel, R L; Nakanuma, Y; Gershwin, M E

    1997-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2, or a cross-reactive molecule, has been shown by a variety of immunohistochemical methods to be present in increased amounts in biliary epithelial cells (BEC) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In this study, to further understand the nature of the immunoreactive molecule in BEC, we examined the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2) messenger RNA (mRNA) and PDC-E2 protein in sections of livers from patients and controls to help identify the molecule found in BEC. We performed in situ hybridization using an antisense probe against the major epitope of PDC-E2. The data were very striking and suggested that there was no increased production of PDC-E2 in BEC. For example, in livers from patients with PBC, PDC-E2 mRNA was found in periportal hepatocytes in 16 of 17 cases (94%). In contrast, interlobular bile ducts and septal bile ducts had detectable levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in only 1 of 17 (6%) and 3 of 8 (38%) cases, respectively. Interestingly, proliferating bile ductules contained detectable levels of mRNA in 12 of 15 cases (80%). In control liver, periportal hepatocytes were positive in 15 of 17 cases (88%). Interlobular bile ducts, septal bile ducts, and proliferating bile ductules expressed mRNA signals in 4 of 17 (24%), 2 of 10 (20%), and 14 of 16 (88%), respectively. When formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were examined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) C355.1, the interlobular bile ducts showed typical aberrant apical staining in all 10 PBC cases, but 0 of 9 liver controls. Periportal hepatocytes, proliferating bile ductules and infiltrating mononuclear cells stained with C355.1 but in a characteristic mitochondrial staining pattern. The presence of a PDC-E2-like molecule recognized by C355.1 is not reflected by the expression levels of PDC-E2 mRNA in the BEC of patients with PBC.

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  17. Cholestasis and Hepatic Failure in a Neonate: A Case Report of Severe Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivier, François; Wieckowska, Anna; Piedboeuf, Bruno; Alvarez, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Unexpected severe cholestasis is part of the presentation in some neonates with hemolytic anemia but is usually self-resolving. Here we report the case of a neonate with pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) who presented severe hemolytic anemia at birth, characterized by a rapidly progressive and severe cholestasis with normal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase level associated with hepatic failure. After an extensive investigation to rule out contributing conditions explaining the severity of this patient's clinical presentation, PKD has remained the sole identified etiology. The patient abruptly died of sepsis at 3 months of age before a planned splenectomy and ongoing evaluation for liver transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, only a few similar cases of severe neonatal presentation of PKD complicated with severe hepatic failure and cholestasis have been reported.

  18. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. Results The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. Conclusion In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene

  19. Starmerella bombicola influences the metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase level during mixed wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Milanovic, Vesna; Ciani, Maurizio; Oro, Lucia; Comitini, Francesca

    2012-02-03

    The use of a multistarter fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts has been proposed to simulate natural must fermentation and to confer greater complexity and specificity to wine. In this context, the combined use of S. cerevisiae and immobilized Starmerella bombicola cells (formerly Candida stellata) was assayed to enhance glycerol concentration, reduce ethanol content and to improve the analytical composition of wine. In order to investigate yeast metabolic interaction during controlled mixed fermentation and to evaluate the influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae, the gene expression and enzymatic activity of two key enzymes of the alcoholic fermentation pathway such as pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1) were studied. The presence of S. bombicola immobilized cells in a mixed fermentation trial confirmed an increase in fermentation rate, a combined consumption of glucose and fructose, an increase in glycerol and a reduction in the production of ethanol as well as a modification in the fermentation of by products. The alcoholic fermentation of S. cerevisiae was also influenced by S. bombicola immobilized cells. Indeed, Pdc1 activity in mixed fermentation was lower than that exhibited in pure culture while Adh1 activity showed an opposite behavior. The expression of both PDC1 and ADH1 genes was highly induced at the initial phase of fermentation. The expression level of PDC1 at the end of fermentation was much higher in pure culture while ADH1 level was similar in both pure and mixed fermentations. In mixed fermentation, S. bombicola immobilized cells greatly affected the fermentation behavior of S. cerevisiae and the analytical composition of wine. The influence of S. bombicola on S. cerevisiae was not limited to a simple additive contribution. Indeed, its presence caused metabolic modifications during S. cerevisiae fermentation causing variation in the gene expression and enzymatic

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) subunits moonlight as interaction partners of phosphorylated STAT5 in adipocytes and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Richard, Allison J; Hang, Hardy; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2017-10-05

    STAT5 proteins play a role in adipocyte development and function, but their specific functions are largely unknown. To this end, we used an unbiased MS-based approach to identify novel STAT5-interacting proteins. We observed that STAT5A bound the E1β and E2 subunits of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Whereas STAT5A typically localizes to the cytosol or nucleus, PDC normally resides within the mitochondrial matrix where it converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. We employed affinity purification and immunoblotting to validate the interaction between STAT5A and PDC subunits in murine and human cultured adipocytes, as well as in adipose tissue. We found that multiple PDC subunits interact with hormone-activated STAT5A in a dose- and time-dependent manner that coincides with tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5. Using subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy, we observed that PDC-E2 is present within the adipocyte nucleus where it associates with STAT5A. Since STAT5A is a transcription factor, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to assess PDC's ability to interact with STAT5 DNA-binding sites. These analyses revealed that PDC-E2 is bound to a STAT5-binding site in the promoter of the STAT5 target gene cish (cytokine inducible SH2 containing protein). We have demonstrated a compelling interaction between STAT5A and PDC subunits in adipocytes under physiological conditions. There is previous evidence that PDC localizes to cancer cell nuclei where it plays a role in histone acetylation. On the basis of our ChIP data and these previous findings, we hypothesize that PDC may modulate STAT5's ability to regulate gene expression by controlling histone or STAT5 acetylation. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Flux as a Treatment for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: A Combined 13C Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance and Echocardiography Study.

    PubMed

    Le Page, Lydia M; Rider, Oliver J; Lewis, Andrew J; Ball, Vicky; Clarke, Kieran; Johansson, Edvin; Carr, Carolyn A; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2015-08-01

    Although diabetic cardiomyopathy is widely recognized, there are no specific treatments available. Altered myocardial substrate selection has emerged as a candidate mechanism behind the development of cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. As pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity appears central to the balance of substrate use, we aimed to investigate the relationship between PDH flux and myocardial function in a rodent model of type 2 diabetes and to explore whether or not increasing PDH flux, with dichloroacetate, would restore the balance of substrate use and improve cardiac function. All animals underwent in vivo hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopy and echocardiography to assess cardiac PDH flux and function, respectively. Diabetic animals showed significantly higher blood glucose levels (10.8 ± 0.7 vs. 8.4 ± 0.5 mmol/L), lower PDH flux (0.005 ± 0.001 vs. 0.017 ± 0.002 s(-1)), and significantly impaired diastolic function (transmitral early diastolic peak velocity/early diastolic myocardial velocity ratio [E/E'] 12.2 ± 0.8 vs. 20 ± 2), which are in keeping with early diabetic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-eight days of treatment with dichloroacetate restored PDH flux to normal levels (0.018 ± 0.002 s(-1)), reversed diastolic dysfunction (E/E' 14 ± 1), and normalized blood glucose levels (7.5 ± 0.7 mmol/L). The treatment of diabetes with dichloroacetate therefore restored the balance of myocardial substrate selection, reversed diastolic dysfunction, and normalized blood glucose levels. This suggests that PDH modulation could be a novel therapy for the treatment and/or prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  2. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-10-21

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  3. alpha-Ketobutyrate metabolism in perfused rat liver: regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation and effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, D S; Olson, M S

    1985-11-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate were studied using perfused livers from fasted rats. The production of 14CO2 from alpha-keto-[1-14C]butyrate increased monotonically while the production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate was biphasic as the perfusate concentration of alpha-ketobutyrate was increased. The biphasic gluconeogenic response using alpha-ketobutyrate as the gluconeogenic precursor was similar to that observed with propionate. The decarboxylation of alpha-ketobutyrate was found to be exquisitely sensitive to the effects of the monocarboxylate transport inhibitor, alpha-cyanocinnamate. Infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate caused a substantial inhibition of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation while dichloroacetate, a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor, did not stimulate the metabolism of alpha-ketobutyrate but was inhibitory. The effects of alpha-ketobutyrate infusion on pyruvate decarboxylation were tested and it was found that at low perfusate pyruvate concentrations (ca. 0.25 mM) increasing alpha-ketobutyrate led to increasing inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation, while at high perfusate pyruvate concentrations (ca. 2.5 mM) an initial inhibition was apparent which did not increase substantially with increasing alpha-ketobutyrate concentrations. The results obtained indicate that the regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate metabolism by oxidative decarboxylation differs significantly from that of pyruvate. In addition, while the rate of gluconeogenesis using alpha-ketobutyrate as a precursor was remarkably similar to that using propionate as a gluconeogenic precursor, the effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate were qualitatively different from the effects of propionate on pyruvate metabolism.

  4. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) gene deletion boosts glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli under oxygen-limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Soya; Shimizu, Kumiko; Kihira, Chie; Iwabu, Yuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Sugimoto, Makoto; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) is a transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates formation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), NADH dehydrogenase (NDH)-2, and cytochrome bo3 oxidase in Escherichia coli. To investigate the effects of a PdhR defect on glucose metabolism, a pdhR deletion mutant was derived from the wild-type E. coli W1485 strain by λ Red-mediated recombination. While no difference in the fermentation profiles was observed between the two strains under oxygen-sufficient conditions, under oxygen-limited conditions, the growth level of the wild-type strain was significantly decreased with retarded glucose consumption accompanied by by-production of substantial amounts of pyruvic acid and acetic acid. In contrast, the mutant grew and consumed glucose more efficiently than did the wild-type strain with enhanced respiration, little by-production of pyruvic acid, less production yield and rates of acetic acid, thus displaying robust metabolic activity. As expected, increased activities of PDHc and NDH-2 were observed in the mutant. The increased activity of PDHc may explain the loss of pyruvic acid by-production, probably leading to decreased acetic acid formation, and the increased activity of NDH-2 may explain the enhanced respiration. Measurement of the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio in the mutant revealed more oxidative or more reductive intracellular environments than those in the wild-type strain under oxygen-sufficient and -limited conditions, respectively, suggesting another role of PdhR: maintaining redox balance in E. coli. The overall results demonstrate the biotechnological advantages of pdhR deletion in boosting glucose metabolism and also improve our understanding of the role of PdhR in bacterial physiology.

  5. Enzymological and physiological consequences of restructuring the lipoyl domain content of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Attwood, M M; Machado, R S; Matqi, K Y; Shaw, J E; Turner, S L

    1997-02-01

    The core-forming lipoate acetyltransferase (E2p) subunits of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex of Escherichia coli contain three tandemly repeated lipoyl domains although one lipoyl domain is apparently sufficient for full catalytic activity in vitro. Plasmids containing IPTG-inducible aceEF-IpdA operons which express multilip-PDH complexes bearing one N-terminal lipoyl domain and up to seven unlipoylated (mutant) domains per E2p chain, were constructed. Each plasmid restored the nutritional lesion of a strain lacking the PDH complex and expressed a sedimentable PDH complex, although the catalytic activities declined significantly as the number of unlipoylated domains increased above four per E2p chain. It was concluded that the extra domains protrude from the 24-meric E2p core without affecting assembly of the E1p and E3 subunits, and that the lipoyl cofactor bound to the outermost domain can participate successfully at each of the three types of active site in the assembled complex. Physiological studies with two series of isogenic strains expressing multilip-PDH complexes from modified chromosomal pdh operons (pdhR-aceEF-IpdA) showed that three lipoyl domains per E2p chain is optimal and that only the outermost domain need be lipoylated for optimal activity. It is concluded that the reason for retaining three lipoyl domains is to extend the reach of the outermost lipoyl cofactor rather than to provide extra cofactors for catalysis.

  6. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: mRNA and protein expression patterns of E1α subunit genes in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Silva, Maria João; Graça, Inês; Silva, Joaquina; Sá, Rosália; Sousa, Mário; Barros, Alberto; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Rivera, Isabel

    2012-09-10

    During spermatogenesis, germ cells undergo a complex process of cell differentiation and morphological restructuring, which depends on the coordinated expression of different genes. Some vital examples are those involved in cell energy metabolism, namely the genes encoding the E1α subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: the somatic PDHA1 (X-linked) and the testis-specific PDHA2 (autosomal). There are no data related to the study at the RNA and protein levels of PDHA genes during human spermatogenesis. The present study aimed to describe the mRNA and protein expression patterns of the human PDHA genes during spermatogenesis. Expression profiles of the PDHA1 and PDHA2 genes were characterized using different human tissues and cells. Diploid and haploid germ cells fractions were obtained from testis tissues. The mRNA profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, whereas the protein profiles were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Expression of the PDHA1 gene was found in all somatic cells, whereas expression of PDHA2 gene was restricted to germ cells. The switch from X-linked to autosomic gene expression occurred in spermatocytes. Data suggest the activation of PDHA2 gene expression is most probably a mechanism to ensure the continued expression of the protein, thus allowing germ cell viability and functionality.

  7. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  8. Bcl-2–dependent oxidation of pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2, a primary biliary cirrhosis autoantigen, during apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Odin, Joseph A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; LaRusso, Nicholas F.; Rosen, Antony

    2001-01-01

    The close association between autoantibodies against pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2 (PDC-E2), a ubiquitous mitochondrial protein, and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is unexplained. Many autoantigens are selectively modified during apoptosis, which has focused attention on apoptotic cells as a potential source of “neo-antigens” responsible for activating autoreactive lymphocytes. Since increased apoptosis of bile duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) is evident in patients with PBC, we evaluated the effect of apoptosis on PDC-E2. Autoantibody recognition of PDC-E2 by immunofluorescence persisted in apoptotic cholangiocytes and appeared unchanged by immunoblot analysis. PDC-E2 was neither cleaved by caspases nor concentrated into surface blebs in apoptotic cells. In other cell types, autoantibody recognition of PDC-E2, as assessed by immunofluorescence, was abrogated after apoptosis, although expression levels of PDC-E2 appeared unchanged when examined by immunoblot analysis. Both overexpression of Bcl-2 and depletion of glutathione before inducing apoptosis prevented this loss of autoantibody recognition, suggesting that glutathiolation, rather than degradation or loss, of PDC-E2 was responsible for the loss of immunofluorescence signal. We postulate that apoptotic cholangiocytes, unlike other apoptotic cell types, are a potential source of immunogenic PDC-E2 in patients with PBC. PMID:11457875

  9. Metabolic preconditioning of mammalian cells: mimetic agents for hypoxia lack fidelity in promoting phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Induction of HIF-1α by oxygen limitation promotes increased phosphorylation and catalytic depression of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and an enhanced glycolytic poise in cells. Cobalt chloride and desferrioxamine are widely used as mimics for hypoxia because they increase the levels of HIF-1α. We evaluated the ability of these agents to elicit selected physiological responses to hypoxia as a means to metabolically precondition mammalian cells, but without the detrimental effects of hypoxia. We show that, while CoCl(2) does increase HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner, it unexpectedly and strikingly decreases PDH phosphorylation at E1α sites 1, 2, and 3 (Ser(293), Ser(300), and Ser(232), respectively) in HepG2 cells. This same effect is also observed for site 1 in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and J774 macrophages. CoCl(2) unexpectedly decreases the mRNA expression for PDH kinase-2 in HepG2 cells, which likely explains the dephosphorylation of PDH observed. And nor does desferrioxamine promote the expected increase in PDH phosphorylation. Dimethyloxaloylglycine (a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor) performs better in this regard, but failed to promote the stronger effects seen with hypoxia. Consequently, CoCl(2) and desferrioxamine are unreliable mimics of hypoxia for physiological events downstream of HIF-1α stabilization. Our study demonstrates that mimetic chemicals must be chosen with caution and evaluated thoroughly if bona fide cellular outcomes are to be promoted with fidelity.

  10. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and arsenite: LD(50) in hamsters and in vitro inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Petrick, J S; Jagadish, B; Mash, E A; Aposhian, H V

    2001-06-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a metabolite of inorganic arsenic, has received very little attention from investigators of arsenic metabolism in humans. MMA(III), like sodium arsenite, contains arsenic in the +3 oxidation state. Although we have previously demonstrated that it is more toxic than arsenite in cultured Chang human hepatocytes, there are no data showing in vivo toxicity of MMA(III). When MMA(III) or sodium arsenite was administered intraperitoneally to hamsters, the LD(50)s were 29.3 and 112.0 micromol/kg of body wt, respectively. In addition, inhibition of hamster kidney or purified porcine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by MMA(III) or arsenite was determined. To inhibit hamster kidney PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide, MMA(III) as diiodomethylarsine, and arsenite were 59.9 +/- 6.5, 62.0 +/- 1.8, and 115.7 +/- 2.3 microM, respectively. To inhibit activity of purified porcine heart PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide and arsenite were 17.6 +/- 4.1 and 106.1 +/- 19.8 microM, respectively. These data demonstrate that MMA(III) is more toxic than inorganic arsenite, both in vivo and in vitro, and call into question the hypothesis that methylation of inorganic arsenic is a detoxication process.

  11. Study of the molecular defects in pyruvate kinase deficient patients affected by nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Baronciani, L; Magalhães, I Q; Mahoney, D H; Westwood, B; Adekile, A D; Lappin, T R; Beutler, E

    1995-01-01

    We have examined DNA from fifteen unrelated pyruvate kinase deficient patients with hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (HNSHA) for the molecular alterations responsible for the enzyme deficiency. All but 3 of the 30 putative mutations were identified. Fourteen different mutations were found. Nine were missense mutations: 320 T-->C, 823 G-->C, 1276 C-->T, 1378 G-->A, 1484 C-->T, 1529 G-->A, 1654 G-->A, 1675 C-->G; three were nonsense mutations: 603 G-->A, 721 G-->T, 1501 C-->T; one was an insertion at 1574 GGG-->GGGG and the other a three nucleotide in-frame deletion 391-392-393 ATC. Eight of these mutations have not been previously described. We also investigated all of the patients for the C/A polymorphism at nt 1705 and the microsatellite ATT repeat in intron 11. All of the mutations that had previously been reported by us (391-393del, 721T, 1484T, 1529A) were found in the context of the same haplotype as the earlier cases, supporting the concept that each may have a single origin.

  12. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase[W

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism. PMID:22353371

  13. Structure and function of the catalytic domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component in Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaran, Sowmini; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Reynolds, Shelley; Calero, Guillermo; Brukh, Roman; Kakalis, Lazaros; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-05-30

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) catalyzing conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA comprises three components: E1p, E2p, and E3. The E2p is the five-domain core component, consisting of three tandem lipoyl domains (LDs), a peripheral subunit binding domain (PSBD), and a catalytic domain (E2pCD). Herein are reported the following. 1) The x-ray structure of E2pCD revealed both intra- and intertrimer interactions, similar to those reported for other E2pCDs. 2) Reconstitution of recombinant LD and E2pCD with E1p and E3p into PDHc could maintain at least 6.4% activity (NADH production), confirming the functional competence of the E2pCD and active center coupling among E1p, LD, E2pCD, and E3 even in the absence of PSBD and of a covalent link between domains within E2p. 3) Direct acetyl transfer between LD and coenzyme A catalyzed by E2pCD was observed with a rate constant of 199 s(-1), comparable with the rate of NADH production in the PDHc reaction. Hence, neither reductive acetylation of E2p nor acetyl transfer within E2p is rate-limiting. 4) An unprecedented finding is that although no interaction could be detected between E1p and E2pCD by itself, a domain-induced interaction was identified on E1p active centers upon assembly with E2p and C-terminally truncated E2p proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. The inclusion of each additional domain of E2p strengthened the interaction with E1p, and the interaction was strongest with intact E2p. E2p domain-induced changes at the E1p active site were also manifested by the appearance of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the canonical 4'-aminopyrimidine tautomer of bound thiamin diphosphate (AP).

  14. Incidence and Geographic Distribution of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Attri, Savita Verma; Singhi, Pratibha; Wiwattanadittakul, Natrujee; Goswami, Jyotindra N; Sankhyan, Naveen; Salomons, Gajja S; Roullett, Jean-Baptiste; Hodgeman, Ryan; Parviz, Mahsa; Gibson, K Michael; Pearl, Phillip L

    2016-11-05

    The incidence of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of GABA degradation, is unknown. Upon a recent diagnosis of a new family of affected fraternal twins from the Punjabi ethnic group of India, case ascertainment from the literature and our database was done to determine the number of confirmed cases along with their geographic distribution. The probands presented with global developmental delay, infantile onset epilepsy, and a persistent neurodevelopmental disorder upon diagnosis at 10 years of age with intellectual disability, expressive aphasia, and behavioral problems most prominent for hyperactivity. Gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria and homozygous ALDH5A1 c.608C>T; p.Pro203Leu mutations were confirmed. Identification of all available individual cases with clinical details available including geographic or ethnic origin revealed 182 patients from 40 countries, with the largest number of patients reported from the USA (24%), Turkey (10%), China (7%), Saudi Arabia (6%), and Germany (5%). This study provides an accounting of all published cases of confirmed SSADH deficiency and provides data useful in planning further studies of this rare inborn error of metabolism.

  15. The catalytic requirements for reduction and acetylation of protein X and the related regulation of various forms of resolved pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Rahmatullah, M; Roche, T E

    1987-07-25

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase consists of a catalytic subunit (Kc) and a basic subunit (Kb) which appear to be anchored to the dihydrolipoyl transacetylase core component (E2) by another subunit, referred to as protein X (Rahmatullah, M., Jilka, J. M., Radke, G. A., and Roche, T. E. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 6515-6523). We determined the catalytic requirements for reduction and acetylation of the lipoyl moiety in protein X and linked those changes in protein X to regulatory effects on kinase activity. Using fractions prepared by resolution and proteolytic treatments, we evaluated which subunits are required for regulatory effects on kinase activity. With X-KcKb fraction (treated to remove the mercurial agent used in its preparation), we found that the resolved pyruvate dehydrogenase component, the isolated inner domain of E2 (lacking the lipoyl-bearing region of E2), and the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase component directly utilize protein X as a substrate. The resulting reduction and acetylation of protein X occurs in association with enhancement of kinase activity. Following tryptic cleavage of E2 and protein X into subdomains, full acetylation of the lipoyl-bearing subdomains of these proteins is retained along with the capacity of acetylating substrates to stimulate kinase activity. All kinase-containing fractions, including those in which the Kb subunit was digested, were inhibited by pyruvate or ADP, alone, and synergistically by the combination suggesting that pyruvate and ADP bind to Kc. Our results suggest that the Kb subunit of the kinase does not contribute to the observed regulatory effects. A dynamic role of protein X in attenuating kinase activity based on changes in the mitochondrial redox and acetylating potentials is considered.

  16. Biliary epithelial expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis: an immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Kono, N; Hoso, M; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported recently that there is a unique distribution of the E2 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2) on biliary epithelial cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) but not primary sclerosing cholangitis. This distribution has been demonstrated using a mouse monoclonal antibody, coined C355.1. The epitope recognized by C355.1 is near the lipoic acid binding site of PDC-E2. C355.1 inhibits PDC-E2 activity in vitro and, unlike a panel of other monoclonal antibodies against different regions of PDC-E2, appears to bind not only to mitochondria but also to a unique antigen expressed predominantly on the luminal side of biliary epithelial cells in PBC. We have extended these observations by studying the subcellular reactivity of C355.1 using postembedding immunoelectron microscopy on the intrahepatic small bile ducts of PBC livers, extrahepatic biliary obstruction (EBO) livers, and normal livers. We report that the reactivity of C355.1 can be classified into two categories. The first category is characterized by small foci of reaction products that were randomly dispersed in cytoplasm, particularly in supranuclear areas; the ultrastructural characterization of these foci was impossible to define but was similar in PBC and EBO. However, of particular interest was the second category of reactivity, which was characterized by deposition of reaction products around the biliary lumen, including microvilli and adjacent subluminal ectoplasm and secretory substances in the biliary lumen. This staining pattern was frequent in PBC livers, only occasionally evident in EBO livers, and not found in normal livers. These data further define and highlight the unique subcellular distribution of PDC-E2 around the biliary lumen in PBC livers and suggest that this abnormality is related to the pathogenesis of bile duct lesions.

  17. Random phage mimotopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2).

    PubMed

    Cha, S; Leung, P S; Van de Water, J; Tsuneyama, K; Joplin, R E; Ansari, A A; Nakanuma, Y; Schatz, P J; Cwirla, S; Fabris, L E; Neuberger, J M; Gershwin, M E; Coppel, R L

    1996-10-01

    Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), is the autoantigen most commonly recognized by autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We identified a peptide mimotope(s) of PDC-E2 by screening a phage-epitope library expressing random dodecapeptides in the pIII coat protein of fd phage using C355.1, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope in the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2 and uniquely stains the apical region of bile duct epithelium (BDE) only in patients with PBC. Eight different sequences were identified in 36 phage clones. WMSYPDRTLRTS was present in 29 clones; WESYPFRVGTSL, APKTYVSVSGMV, LTYVSLQGRQGH, LDYVPLKHRHRH, AALWGVKVRHVS, KVLNRIMAGVRH and GNVALVSSRVNA were singly represented. Three common amino acid motifs (W-SYP, TYVS, and VRH) were shared among all peptide sequences. Competitive inhibition of the immunohistochemical staining of PBC BDE was performed by incubating the peptides WMSYPDRTLRTS, WESYPDRTLRTS, APKTYVSVSGMV, and AALWGVKVRHVS with either C355.1 or a second PDC-E2-specific mAb, C150.1. Both mAbs were originally generated to PDC-E2 but map to distinct regions of PDC-E2. Two of the peptides, although selected by reaction with C355.1, strongly inhibited the staining of BDE by C150.1, whereas the peptide APKTYVSVSGMV consistently inhibited the staining of C355.1 on biliary duct epithelium more strongly than the typical mitochondrial staining of hepatocytes. Rabbit sera raised against the peptide WMSYPDRTLRTS stained BDE of livers and isolated bile duct epithelial cells of PBC patients more intensively than controls. The rabbit sera stained all size ducts in normals, but only small/medium-sized ductules in PBC livers. These studies provide evidence that the antigen present in BDE is a molecular mimic of PDC-E2, and not PDC-E2 itself.

  18. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S W M; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival.

  19. Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Supply: Functional Expression of a Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Barbara U.; van Rossum, Harmen M.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R.; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs+ reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. PMID:25336454

  20. Effects of high carbohydrate and high fat diets on rat adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase responses to concanavalin A and spermine.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1982-11-01

    Rats were fed a high lard diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal and Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated epididymal fat pad pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities were decreased in fat diet-adapted rats compared to those fed the glucose diet. When adipocyte plasma membranes and mitochondria were coincubated with and without Con A, it was found that the lectin stimulation of PDH activity was lower in preparations from fat-fed rats. These results are comparable to our earlier observations with insulin on adipose tissue PDH. Spermine also stimulated PDH in whole adipose tissue pieces in both the absence and presence (0.5 mM) of medium glucose. The spermine stimulation of PDH in adipose tissue was decreased in fat-fed rats. In contrast to Con A, spermine failed to stimulate PDH in a cell-free system. This suggests that spermine activation of PDH in adipose tissue does not involve the generation of the second messenger responsible for the effects of insulin and Con A. The hypothesis was further substantiated by the findings that (1) the insulin and spermine effects were additive in whole adipose tissue and also in adipocytes, and (2) the spermine effect on fat cells was not significantly inhibited by protease inhibitors, which abolish the effects of insulin on fat cell PDH. The fat-induced decreases in response to Con A and spermine involve not only an adaptive change in the ability of the plasma membrane to generate the chemical modulator of PDH but are also related to postreceptor events.

  1. VER-246608, a novel pan-isoform ATP competitive inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, disrupts Warburg metabolism and induces context-dependent cytostasis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Terence; D'Alessandro, Jalanie; Davis, Ben; Surgenor, Alan; Baker, Lisa; Matassova, Natalia; Murray, James; Macias, Alba; Brough, Paul; Wood, Mike; Mahon, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is a pivotal enzyme in cellular energy metabolism that has previously been implicated in cancer through both RNAi based studies and clinical correlations with poor prognosis in several cancer types. Here, we report the discovery of a novel and selective ATP competitive pan-isoform inhibitor of PDK, VER-246608. Consistent with a PDK mediated MOA, VER-246608 increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity, oxygen consumption and attenuated glycolytic activity. However, these effects were only observed under D-glucose-depleted conditions and required almost complete ablation of PDC E1α subunit phosphorylation. VER-246608 was weakly anti-proliferative to cancer cells in standard culture media; however, depletion of either serum or combined D-glucose/L-glutamine resulted in enhanced cellular potency. Furthermore, this condition-selective cytostatic effect correlated with reduced intracellular pyruvate levels and an attenuated compensatory response involving deamination of L-alanine. In addition, VER-246608 was found to potentiate the activity of doxorubicin. In contrast, the lipoamide site inhibitor, Nov3r, demonstrated sub-maximal inhibition of PDK activity and no evidence of cellular activity. These studies suggest that PDK inhibition may be effective under the nutrient-depleted conditions found in the tumour microenvironment and that combination treatments should be explored to reveal the full potential of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:25404640

  2. Circulating tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolite levels in citrin-deficient children with metabolic adaptation, with and without sodium pyruvate treatment.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Nakacho, Mariko; Morioka, Ichiro; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Kaji, Shunsaku; Hirayama, Satoshi; Miida, Takashi; Kondou, Hiroki; Ihara, Kenji; Yagi, Mariko; Kizaki, Zenro; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Kodama, Takahiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saheki, Takeyori; Yorifuji, Tohru; Honda, Akira

    2017-03-01

    Citrin deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN-2), which later manifests as severe liver steatosis and life-threatening encephalopathy. Long-standing energy deficit of the liver and brain may predispose ones to CTLN-2. Here, we compared the energy-driving tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid β-oxidation cycle between 22 citrin-deficient children (age, 3-13years) with normal liver functions and 37 healthy controls (age, 5-13years). TCA cycle analysis showed that basal plasma citrate and α-ketoglutarate levels were significantly higher in the affected than the control group (p<0.01). Conversely, basal plasma fumarate and malate levels were significantly lower than those for the control (p<0.001). The plasma level of 3-OH-butyrate derived from fatty acid β-oxidation was significantly higher in the affected group (p<0.01). Ten patients underwent sodium pyruvate therapy. However, this therapy did not correct or attenuate such deviations in both cycles. Sodium pyruvate therapy significantly increased fasting insulin secretion (p<0.01); the fasting sugar level remained unchanged. Our results suggest that citrin-deficient children show considerable deviations of TCA cycle metabolite profiles that are resistant to sodium pyruvate treatment. Thus, long-standing and considerable TCA cycle dysfunction might be a pivotal metabolic background of CTLN-2 development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Riboflavin-responsive glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Ronald A; Bain, Murray D; Zschocke, Johannes

    2006-05-01

    We report here riboflavin responsiveness in a patient with glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) deficiency, compound heterozygous for the S139L and P248L mutations and with 20% residual GCDH enzyme activity in vitro. Our results suggest the mitochondrial GCDH homotetramer remains intact with one of these mutations associated with the binding site of the single FAD cofactor and that pharmacological doses of the cofactor precursor may be sufficient to induce an increase in activity in the mutant GCDH enzyme, although not sufficient to normalise urinary organic acid excretion. Serine139 is one of nine conserved amino acid residues that line the binding site of the protein and is in close proximity to both substrate and FAD cofactor. It is possible that steric alterations caused by substitution of serine with leucine at this position may be overcome with high cofactor concentrations. P248L is also associated with some residual GCDH activity in other patients and the unique combination of S139L with P248L may also explain the results in our patient. Responsiveness to riboflavin in our patient has been compared with two other patients with glutaric aciduria type 1 and minimal residual GCDH activity, one with homozygosity for the R257Q mutation and one with heterozygosity for the G354S mutation and a novel G156V mutation. A low lysine diet reduced glutaric acid excretion in our riboflavin-responsive GCDH-deficient patient almost to control values. She is now 21 years of age and clinically and neurologically normal.

  4. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  5. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: the added value of cytology.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Marie; Dossier, Claire; Fenneteau, Odile; Couque, Nathalie; Da Costa, Lydie

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 2 year-old boy hospitalized into the emergency room for influenza pneumonia infection. The evolution was marked by a respiratory distress syndrome, a severe hemolytic anemia, associated with thrombocytopenia and kidney failure. First, a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been judiciously suggested due to the classical triad: kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. But, strikingly, blood smears do not exhibit schizocytes, but instead ghosts and hemighosts, some characteristic features of a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Our hypothesis has been confirmed by enzymatic dosage and molecular biology. The unusual initial aplastic feature of this anemia could be the result of a transient erythroblastopenia due to the viral agent, at the origin of the G6PD crisis on a background of a major erythrocyte anti-oxydant enzyme defect. This case of G6PD defect points out the continuously importance of the cytology, which was able to redirect the diagnosis by the hemighost and ghost detection.

  6. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: lessons from mice and men.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Cortez, M A; Wu, Y; Carter Snead, O; Knerr, I; Forester, K; Pettiford, J M; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W H

    2009-06-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, a disorder of GABA degradation with subsequent elevations in brain GABA and GHB, is a neurometabolic disorder with intellectual disability, epilepsy, hypotonia, ataxia, sleep disorders, and psychiatric disturbances. Neuroimaging reveals increased T2-weighted MRI signal usually affecting the globus pallidus, cerebellar dentate nucleus, and subthalamic nucleus, and often cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. EEG abnormalities are usually generalized spike-wave, consistent with a predilection for generalized epilepsy. The murine phenotype is characterized by failure-to-thrive, progressive ataxia, and a transition from generalized absence to tonic-clonic to ultimately fatal convulsive status epilepticus. Binding and electrophysiological studies demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) and (B) receptors in the mutant mouse. Translational human studies similarly reveal downregulation of GABAergic activity in patients, utilizing flumazenil-PET and transcranial magnetic stimulation for GABA(A) and (B) activity, respectively. Sleep studies reveal decreased stage REM with prolonged REM latencies and diminished percentage of stage REM. An ad libitum ketogenic diet was reported as effective in the mouse model, with unclear applicability to the human condition. Acute application of SGS-742, a GABA(B) antagonist, leads to improvement in epileptiform activity on electrocorticography. Promising mouse data using compounds available for clinical use, including taurine and SGS-742, form the framework for human trials.

  7. The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: preparation and characterization of its binding to the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Hipps, D S; Packman, L C; Allen, M D; Fuller, C; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Perham, R N

    1994-01-01

    The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase polypeptide chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was released by limited proteolysis from a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus binding domain) encoded by a subgene over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The domain was characterized by N-terminal sequence analysis, electrospray m.s. and c.d. spectroscopy. It was found to be identical in all respects to a chemically synthesized peptide of the same sequence. The association of the di-domain and binding domain (both natural and synthetic) with dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was analysed in detail and a tight binding was demonstrated. As judged by several different techniques, it was found that only one peripheral subunit-binding domain is bound to one dimer of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, implying that the association is highly anti-cooperative. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8280091

  8. The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: preparation and characterization of its binding to the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase component.

    PubMed

    Hipps, D S; Packman, L C; Allen, M D; Fuller, C; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Perham, R N

    1994-01-01

    The peripheral subunit-binding domain of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase polypeptide chain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus was released by limited proteolysis from a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus binding domain) encoded by a subgene over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The domain was characterized by N-terminal sequence analysis, electrospray m.s. and c.d. spectroscopy. It was found to be identical in all respects to a chemically synthesized peptide of the same sequence. The association of the di-domain and binding domain (both natural and synthetic) with dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was analysed in detail and a tight binding was demonstrated. As judged by several different techniques, it was found that only one peripheral subunit-binding domain is bound to one dimer of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, implying that the association is highly anti-cooperative.

  9. An X-ray structural study of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase: A eukaryotic serine kinase with a prokaryotic histidine-kinase fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steussy, Calvin Nicklaus, Jr.

    2001-07-01

    Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase is an enzyme that controls the flow of glucose through the eukaryotic cell and contributes to the pathology of diabetes mellitus. Early work on this kinase demonstrated that it has an amino acid sequence much like bacterial histidine kinases, but an activity similar to that of modern serine/threonine kinases. This project utilized the techniques of X-ray crystallography to determine molecular structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isozyme 2. The structure was phased using selenium substituted for sulfur in methionine residues, and data at multiple wavelengths was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratories. PDK 2 was found to fold into a two-domain monomer that forms a dimer through two beta sheets in the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is an alpha-helical bundle while the C-terminal domain is an alpha/beta sandwich. The fold of the C-terminal domain is very similar to that of the prokaryotic histidine kinases, indicating that they share a common ancestor. The catalytic mechanism, however, has evolved to use general base catalysis to activate the serine substrate, rather than the direct nucleophilic attack by the imidazole sidechain used in the prokaryotic kinases. Thus, the structure of the protein echoes its prokaryotic ancestor, while the chemical mechanism has adapted to a serine substrate. The electrostatic surface of PDK2 leads to the suggestion that the lipoyl domain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, an important associated structure, may bind in the cleft formed between the N- and C-terminal domains. In addition, a network of hydrogen bonds directly connects the nucleotide binding pocket to the dimer interface, suggesting that there may be some interaction between dimer formation and ATP binding or ADP release.

  10. Citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice recapitulate features of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Iijima, Mikio; Li, Meng Xian; Kobayashi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Ushikai, Miharu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Meng, Xiao Jian; Inoue, Ituro; Tajima, Atsushi; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Tsuji, Mihoko; Okano, Akira; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-08-24

    Citrin is the liver-type mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier that participates in urea, protein, and nucleotide biosynthetic pathways by supplying aspartate from mitochondria to the cytosol. Citrin also plays a role in transporting cytosolic NADH reducing equivalents into mitochondria as a component of the malate-aspartate shuttle. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in the SLC25A13 gene encoding citrin cause both adult-onset type II citrullinemia and neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis, collectively referred to as human citrin deficiency. Citrin knock-out mice fail to display features of human citrin deficiency. Based on the hypothesis that an enhanced glycerol phosphate shuttle activity may be compensating for the loss of citrin function in the mouse, we have generated mice with a combined disruption of the genes for citrin and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The resulting double knock-out mice demonstrated citrullinemia, hyperammonemia that was further elevated by oral sucrose administration, hypoglycemia, and a fatty liver, all features of human citrin deficiency. An increased hepatic lactate/pyruvate ratio in the double knock-out mice compared with controls was also further elevated by the oral sucrose administration, suggesting that an altered cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio is closely associated with the hyperammonemia observed. Microarray analyses identified over 100 genes that were differentially expressed in the double knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls, revealing genes potentially involved in compensatory or downstream effects of the combined mutations. Together, our data indicate that the more severe phenotype present in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double knock-out mice represents a more accurate model of human citrin deficiency than citrin knock-out mice.

  11. A mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit allows survival of Escherichia coli strains defective in 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Urós, Eva María; Ibáñez, Ester; Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2006-02-06

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway has been proposed as a promising target to develop new antimicrobial agents. However, spontaneous mutations in Escherichia coli were observed to rescue the otherwise lethal loss of the first two enzymes of the pathway, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS) and DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), with a relatively high frequency. A mutation in the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was shown to be sufficient to rescue the lack of DXS but not DXR in vivo, suggesting that the mutant enzyme likely allows the synthesis of DXP or an alternative substrate for DXR.

  12. Random phage mimotopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 (PDC-E2).

    PubMed Central

    Cha, S; Leung, P S; Van de Water, J; Tsuneyama, K; Joplin, R E; Ansari, A A; Nakanuma, Y; Schatz, P J; Cwirla, S; Fabris, L E; Neuberger, J M; Gershwin, M E; Coppel, R L

    1996-01-01

    Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), is the autoantigen most commonly recognized by autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We identified a peptide mimotope(s) of PDC-E2 by screening a phage-epitope library expressing random dodecapeptides in the pIII coat protein of fd phage using C355.1, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope in the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2 and uniquely stains the apical region of bile duct epithelium (BDE) only in patients with PBC. Eight different sequences were identified in 36 phage clones. WMSYPDRTLRTS was present in 29 clones; WESYPFRVGTSL, APKTYVSVSGMV, LTYVSLQGRQGH, LDYVPLKHRHRH, AALWGVKVRHVS, KVLNRIMAGVRH and GNVALVSSRVNA were singly represented. Three common amino acid motifs (W-SYP, TYVS, and VRH) were shared among all peptide sequences. Competitive inhibition of the immunohistochemical staining of PBC BDE was performed by incubating the peptides WMSYPDRTLRTS, WESYPDRTLRTS, APKTYVSVSGMV, and AALWGVKVRHVS with either C355.1 or a second PDC-E2-specific mAb, C150.1. Both mAbs were originally generated to PDC-E2 but map to distinct regions of PDC-E2. Two of the peptides, although selected by reaction with C355.1, strongly inhibited the staining of BDE by C150.1, whereas the peptide APKTYVSVSGMV consistently inhibited the staining of C355.1 on biliary duct epithelium more strongly than the typical mitochondrial staining of hepatocytes. Rabbit sera raised against the peptide WMSYPDRTLRTS stained BDE of livers and isolated bile duct epithelial cells of PBC patients more intensively than controls. The rabbit sera stained all size ducts in normals, but only small/medium-sized ductules in PBC livers. These studies provide evidence that the antigen present in BDE is a molecular mimic of PDC-E2, and not PDC-E2 itself. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855289

  13. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 is essential for transplantable mouse bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor function

    PubMed Central

    Halvarsson, Camilla; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that hypoxic areas in the bone marrow are crucial for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by supporting a quiescent state of cell cycle and regulating the transplantation capacity of long-term (LT)-HSCs. In addition, HSCs seem to express a metabolic profile of energy production away from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in favor of glycolysis. At oxygen deprivation, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is known to induce glycolytic enzymes as well as suppressing mitochondrial energy production by inducing pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (Pdk1) in most cell types. It has not been established whether PDK1 is essential for HSC function and mediates hypoxia-adapting functions in HSCs. While the Pdk gene family contains four members (Pdk1-4), it was recently shown that Pdk2 and Pdk4 have an important role in regulating LT-HSCs. Principle findings Here we demonstrate that PDK1 activity is crucial for transplantable HSC function. Whereas Pdkl, Pdk2, and Pdk3 transcripts were expressed at higher levels in different subtypes of HSCs compared to differentiated cells, we could not detect any major differences in expression between LT-HSCs and more short-term HSCs and multipotent progenitors. When studying HIF-1α-mediated regulation of Pdk activity in vitro, Pdk1 was the most robust target regulated by hypoxia, whereas Pdk2, Pdk3, and Pdk4 were not affected. Contrary, genetic ablation in a cre-inducible Hif-1α knockout mouse did not support a link between HIF-1α and Pdk1. Silencing of Pdk1 by shRNA lentiviral gene transfer partially impaired progenitor colony formation in vitro and had a strong negative effect on both long-term and short-term engraftment in mice. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that PDK1 has broad effects in hematopoiesis and is a critical factor for engraftment of both HSCs and multipotent progenitors upon transplantation to recipient mice. While Pdk1 was a robust hypoxia-inducible gene

  14. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-12-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess 'moonlighting' activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca(2+), ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  15. Formation of reactive oxygen species by human and bacterial pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes reconstituted from recombinant components

    PubMed Central

    Ambrus, Attila; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Torocsik, Beata; Tretter, Laszlo; Nilsson, Mattias; Jordan, Frank; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Individual recombinant components of pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (PDHc, OGDHc) of human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) origin were expressed and purified from E. coli with optimized protocols. The four multienzyme complexes were each reconstituted under optimal conditions at different stoichiometric ratios. Binding stoichiometries for the highest catalytic efficiency were determined from the rate of NADH generation by the complexes at physiological pH. Since some of these complexes were shown to possess ‘moonlighting’ activities under pathological conditions often accompanied by acidosis, activities were also determined at pH 6.3. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the E3 component of hOGDHc is a pathologically relevant feature, superoxide generation by the complexes with optimal stoichiometry was measured by the acetylated cytochrome c reduction method in both the forward and the reverse catalytic directions. Various known affectors of physiological activity and ROS production, including Ca2+, ADP, lipoylation status or pH, were investigated. The human complexes were also reconstituted with the most prevalent human pathological mutant of the E3 component, G194C and characterized; isolated human E3 with the G194C substitution was previously reported to have an enhanced ROS generating capacity. It is demonstrated that: i. PDHc, similarly to OGDHc, is able to generate ROS and this feature is displayed by both the E. coli and human complexes, ii. Reconstituted hPDHc generates ROS at a significantly higher rate as compared to hOGDHc in both the forward and the reverse reactions when ROS generation is calculated for unit mass of their common E3 component, iii. The E1 component or E1-E2 subcomplex generates significant amount of ROS only in hOGDHc; iv. Incorporation of the G194C variant of hE3, the result of a disease-causing mutation, into reconstituted hOGDHc and hPDHc indeed leads to a decreased activity of both

  16. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs are characterized by IGF1R overexpression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Angela; Chen, Jason; Clarkson, Adele; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Hugh, Thomas J; Gill, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) demonstrate unique pathological and clinical features, including the absence of activating mutations of KIT and PDGFRA, and primary resistance to imatinib. They arise exclusively in the stomach and account for 5-7.5% of all adult stomach GISTs and the great majority of these tumors in childhood. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) overexpression has been associated with wild-type and pediatric GISTs. We propose that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs as a group. We assessed succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit B (SDHB) and IGF1R expression by immunohistochemistry in eight known succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs, three GISTs arising in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome and 40 unselected GISTs. Selected KIT and PDGFRA exons were amplified and sequenced from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples. All eight succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA, succinate dehydrogenase B negative and demonstrated IGF1R overexpression. The three neurofibromatosis-related tumors were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. Of the 40 unselected upper GISTs, five were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA in the selected exons. Two of the wild-type GISTs were succinate dehydrogenase B negative and showed IGF1R overexpression and three were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. We conclude that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase deficient GIST as a group, rather than pediatric or wild-type GIST per se. Therefore, IGF1R inhibition represents a potential rational therapeutic approach in this recently recognized subgroup of GIST.

  17. Diabetes and the control of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria by concentration ratios of adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate, of reduced/oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide and of acetyl-coenzyme A/coenzyme A.

    PubMed Central

    Kerbey, A L; Radcliffe, P M; Randle, P J

    1977-01-01

    1. The proportion of active (dephosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria was correlated with total concentration ratios of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and acetyl-CoA/CoA. These metabolites were measured with ATP-dependent and NADH-dependent luciferases. 2. Increase in the concentration ratio of NADH/NAD+ at constant [ATP]/[ADP] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA] was associated with increased phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. This was based on comparison between mitochondria incubated with 0.4mM- or 1mM-succinate and mitochondria incubated with 0.4mM-succinate+/-rotenone. 3. Increase in the concentration ratio acetyl-CoA/CoA at constant [ATP]/[ADP] and [NADH][NAD+] was associated with increased phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. This was based on comparison between incubations in 50 micrometer-palmitotoyl-L-carnitine and in 250 micrometer-2-oxoglutarate +50 micrometer-L-malate. 4. These findings are consistent with activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction by high ratios of [NADH]/[NAD+] and of [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA]. 5. Comparison between mitochondria from hearts of diabetic and non-diabetic rats shows that phosphorylation and inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase is enhanced in alloxan-diabetes by some factor other than concentration ratios of ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ or acetyl-CoA/CoA. PMID:196589

  18. Characterization of Arabidopsis lines deficient in GAPC-1, a cytosolic NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rius, Sebastián P; Casati, Paula; Iglesias, Alberto A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2008-11-01

    Phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (GAPC-1) is a highly conserved cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-P to 1,3-bis-phosphoglycerate; besides its participation in glycolysis, it is thought to be involved in additional cellular functions. To reach an integrative view on the many roles played by this enzyme, we characterized a homozygous gapc-1 null mutant and an as-GAPC1 line of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both mutant plant lines show a delay in growth, morphological alterations in siliques, and low seed number. Embryo development was altered, showing abortions and empty embryonic sacs in basal and apical siliques, respectively. The gapc-1 line shows a decrease in ATP levels and reduced respiratory rate. Furthermore, both lines exhibit a decrease in the expression and activity of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase and reduced levels of pyruvate and several Krebs cycle intermediates, as well as increased reactive oxygen species levels. Transcriptome analysis of the gapc-1 mutants unveils a differential accumulation of transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in carbon partitioning. According to these studies, some enzymes involved in carbon flux decreased (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, NAD-malic enzyme, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase) or increased (NAD-malate dehydrogenase) their activities compared to the wild-type line. Taken together, our data indicate that a deficiency in the cytosolic GAPC activity results in modifications of carbon flux and mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to an alteration of plant and embryo development with decreased number of seeds, indicating that GAPC-1 is essential for normal fertility in Arabidopsis plants.

  19. [Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: contribution of molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Cartier, N; Lepetit, N; Rocchiccioli, F; Bougnères, P F

    1994-03-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is the most frequent cause of defective congenital fatty acid oxidation. Its molecular characterization is now possible. Case n. 1. A girl, 15 month-old, was admitted because she suffered from fever and vomiting, requiring the administration of aspirin. One day later, she showed signs of drowsiness and hypotonia; her blood glucose concentration was 0.3 g/l. She was given intravenous glucose and this episode rapidly passed. Case n. 2. A boy, brother of the preceding patient, was routinely investigated; he was never symptomatic. Case n. 3. A boy, sibling of the two preceding children, was admitted at the age of 18 months because he had gone into a coma during a febrile episode. His blood glucose concentration was 0.15 g/l. This episode was rapidly resolved by a glucose infusion. His fasting blood concentrations of glucose, non esterified fatty acids. beta-hydroxybutyrate, lactate and pyruvate were normal as were his blood carnitine and ammonia, but he showed elevated urinary excretion of dicarboxylic acids. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of the three sibs and their parents. The A-->G mutation at nucleotide 985 of the MCAD gene was detected by amplification and creation of a restriction site (ACRS). The implicated segment of this gene was amplified by PCR. ACRS showed that the symptomatic children were homozygous for the A-->G mutation, whereas their parents were heterozygous. The third asymptomatic child did not carry the mutation. Molecular biology techniques are appropriate for diagnosing this potentially lethal disease and their use for screening is important for disease prevention.

  20. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Diego E.; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Magdesian, K. Gary; Hanna, Paul E.; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor. PMID:26538673

  1. Acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and marked selenium deficiency causing severe rhabdomyolysis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Diego E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Magdesian, K Gary; Hanna, Paul E; Lofstedt, Jeanne

    2015-11-01

    This report describes a case of severe rhabdomyolysis in a pregnant mare associated with histopathologic and biochemical features of both selenium deficiency and acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) due to seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM). This case highlights the importance of assessing plasma selenium levels in horses with clinical signs of pasture myopathy as this deficiency may be a contributing or exacerbating factor.

  2. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... trigger, is removed. In rare cases, G6PD deficiency leads to chronic anemia . With the right precautions, a child with G6PD deficiency can lead a healthy and active life. About G6PD Deficiency ...

  3. Riboflavin responsive mitochondrial myopathy is a new phenotype of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency. The chaperon-like effect of vitamin B2.

    PubMed

    Carrozzo, Rosalba; Torraco, Alessandra; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Martinelli, Diego; Di Nottia, Michela; Rizza, Teresa; Vozza, Angelo; Verrigni, Daniela; Diodato, Daria; Parisi, Giovanni; Maiorana, Arianna; Rizzo, Cristiano; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Zucano, Stefania; Piemonte, Fiorella; Bertini, Enrico; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, E3) is a flavoprotein common to pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenases. We found two novel DLD mutations (p.I40Lfs*4; p.G461E) in a 19 year-old patient with lactic acidosis and a complex amino- and organic aciduria consistent with DLD deficiency, manifesting progressive exertional fatigue. Muscle biopsy showed mitochondrial proliferation and lack of DLD cross-reacting material. Riboflavin supplementation determined the complete resolution of exercise intolerance with the partial restoration of the DLD protein and disappearance of mitochondrial proliferation in the muscle. Morphological and functional studies support the riboflavin chaperon-like role in stabilizing DLD protein with rescue of its expression in the muscle. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Alpha and beta subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 from the microsporidian Nosema locustae: mitochondrion-derived carbon metabolism in microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Fast, N M; Keeling, P J

    2001-10-01

    Microsporidia are highly adapted eukaryotic intracellular parasites that infect a variety of animals. Microsporidia contain no recognisable mitochondrion, but recently have been shown to have evolved from fungi and to possess heat shock protein genes derived from mitochondria. These findings make it clear that microsporidian ancestors were mitochondrial, yet it remains unknown whether they still contain the organelle, and if so what its role in microsporidian metabolism might be. Here we have characterised genes encoding the alpha and beta subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 (PDH, EC 1.2.4.1) from the microsporidian Nosema locustae. All other amitochondriate eukaryotes studied to date have lost the PDH complex and replaced it with pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). Nevertheless, molecular phylogeny shows that these Nosema enzymes are most closely related to mitochondrial PDH from other eukaryotes, demonstrating that elements of mitochondrial metabolism have been retained in microsporidia, and that PDH has not been wholly lost. However, there is still no evidence for a mitochondrion in microsporidia, and neither PDH subunit is predicted to encode an amino terminal leader sequence that could function as a mitochondrion-targeting transit peptide, raising questions as to whether these proteins function in a relic organelle or in the cytosol. Moreover, it is also unclear whether these proteins remain part of the PDH complex, or whether they have been retained for another purpose. We propose that microsporidia may utilise a unique pyruvate decarboxylation pathway involving PDH, demonstrating once again the diversity of core metabolism in amitochondriate eukaryotes.

  5. In vivo measurement of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 activity in rat liver ethanol model using dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Josan, Sonal; Xu, Tao; Yen, Yi-Fen; Hurd, Ralph; Ferreira, Julio; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Mayer, Dirk; Spielman, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    To date, measurements of the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), a critical mitochondrial enzyme for the elimination of certain cytotoxic aldehydes in the body and a promising target for drug development, have been largely limited to in vitro methods. Recent advancements in MRS of hyperpolarized (13) C-labeled substrates have provided a method to detect and image in vivo metabolic pathways with signal-to-noise ratio gains greater than 10 000-fold over conventional MRS techniques. However aldehydes, because of their toxicity and short T1 relaxation times, are generally poor targets for such (13) C-labeled studies. In this work, we show that dynamic MRSI of hyperpolarized [1-(13) C]pyruvate and its conversion to [1-(13) C]lactate can provide an indirect in vivo measurement of ALDH2 activity via the concentration of NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form), a co-factor common to both the reduction of pyruvate to lactate and the oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. Results from a rat liver ethanol model (n = 9) show that changes in (13) C-lactate labeling following the bolus injection of hyperpolarized pyruvate are highly correlated with changes in ALDH2 activity (R(2) = 0.76).

  6. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: Chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.; Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1991-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high levels of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose to ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA).

  7. Interaction of component enzymes with the peripheral subunit-binding domain of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex of Bacillus stearothermophilus: stoichiometry and specificity in self-assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, I A; Perham, R N

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the pyruvate decarboxylase (E1) component and a di-domain (lipoyl domain plus peripheral subunit-binding domain) from the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2) component of the Bacillus stearothermophilus pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex was investigated. Only 1 mol of di-domain (binding domain) was bound to 1 mol of heterotetrameric E1 (alpha 2 beta 2) and the binding was without effect on the kinetic activity of E1. Similarly, the di-domain bound to separate E1 beta subunits at a maximal polypeptide chain ratio of 1:2, but no detectable interaction was found with the E1 alpha subunit. However, addition of the monomeric E1 alpha subunit to an E1 beta-di-domain complex generated a fully functional E1 (alpha 2 beta 2)-di-domain complex, indicating that the E1 beta subunit plays the critical part in binding the E1 component to the di-domain and suggesting that no chaperonin is needed in vitro to promote the assembly of the three separate proteins. Mixing the E1 and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3) components in the presence of di-domain revealed that E1 and E3 cannot bind simultaneously to the same molecule of di-domain, a new feature of the assembly pathway and an important factor in determining the ultimate structure of the assembled enzyme complex. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7702567

  8. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and sulfadimidin acetylation phenotypes in Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Hussein, L; Yamamah, G; Saleh, A

    1992-04-01

    Screening of 1315 males from two Egyptian oases for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G-6PD) found an incidence of 5.9%. The rate of acetylation of sulfadimidin was also studied, and a bimodal distribution was found with 73% rapid acetylators. There is a correlation between high frequency of G-6PD deficiency and high frequency of slow acetylation rate.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). Signs and symptoms of SCAD deficiency may ...

  10. The effect of a high fat diet on pyruvate decarboxylase deficiency without central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Kodama, S; Yagi, R; Ninomiya, M; Goji, K; Takahashi, T; Morishita, Y; Matsuo, T

    1983-01-01

    A nine-year-old Japanese boy with low pyruvate decarboxylase activity in fibroblasts showed no central nervous symptoms except for muscle fatigue. The pyruvate decarboxylase activities in fibroblasts of the patient and two control subjects were 0.407 +/- 0.083, 1.029 +/- 0.137 and 1.607 +/- 0.096 mumoles/g protein/30 min, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was the same in the patient and controls. There was no inhibitor of pyruvate decarboxylase in the patient's fibroblasts. A high fat diet has been given to the patient for five years. At present he does not complain of any kind of muscle fatigue, except after severe exercise. Mental and physiological development of the patient are within the normal ranges. However, trials of orally administered thiamine hydrochloride or thiamine hydrochloride combined with lipoamide did not improve his muscle fatigue.

  11. The measurement of propionyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase activity in hair roots: its use in the diagnosis of inherited biotin-dependent enzyme deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Raetz, H

    1983-05-09

    Two mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzymes, propionyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase, are measurable in hair roots. A third biotin-dependent enzyme, beta-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, was barely detectable in hair roots. The diagnosis of isolated propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency was confirmed in hair roots of a known affected patient. This method should be a rapid and accurate method for the diagnoses of the various carboxylase deficiencies, particularly isolated pyruvate carboxylase deficiency in individuals with lactic acidosis, as well as for the assessment of biotin responsiveness in these patients.

  12. Formate Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of Anaerobic Metabolism, Is Induced by Iron Deficiency in Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itai, Reiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko-Kishi; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Mori, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    To identify the proteins induced by Fe deficiency, we have compared the proteins of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Peptide sequence analysis of induced proteins revealed that formate dehydrogenase (FDH), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the Ids3 gene product (for Fe deficiency-specific) increased in Fe-deficient roots. FDH enzyme activity was detected in Fe-deficient roots but not in Fe-sufficient roots. A cDNA encoding FDH (Fdh) was cloned and sequenced. Fdh expression was induced by Fe deficiency. Fdh was also expressed under anaerobic stress and its expression was more rapid than that induced by Fe deficiency. Thus, the expression of Fdh observed in Fe-deficient barley roots appeared to be a secondary effect caused by oxygen deficiency in Fe-deficient plants. PMID:9489019

  13. G6PD Deficiency (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are high-risk areas for the infectious disease malaria . Researchers have found evidence that the parasite that ... deficiency may have developed as a protection against malaria. continue G6PD Deficiency Symptom Triggers Kids with G6PD ...

  14. Effects of zinc deficiency on ethanol metabolism and alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Das, I; Burch, R E; Hahn, H K

    1984-10-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase, low Km and high Km mitochondrial and microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase, and in vivo ethanol elimination rates were determined in five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats given liquid diets, as follows: control (C), control plus 5% ethanol (CE), pair-fed control and zinc-deficient (PC-ZnD), zinc-deficient (ZnD), and zinc-deficient plus 5% ethanol (ZnDE). Rats fed CE had decreased liver and serum zinc content. The animals given ZnD diets had an even more dramatic decrease in their tissue zinc concentrations and displayed marked growth retardation. The in vivo blood ethanol elimination rate was increased in animals fed ethanol, and this increase was accompanied by increased alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. There was a significant decrease in the ethanol elimination rate in rats given ZnD and ZnDE diets. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities in rats with deficient zinc levels also were decreased, and there were no changes in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde is impaired in zinc deficiency, but acetaldehyde to acetate conversion appears normal.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  17. Long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency: a molecular and biochemical review.

    PubMed

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Bennett, Michael J; Rogers, Beverly B

    2002-07-01

    Since the first report of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency a little more than a decade ago, its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity in individuals homozygous for the enzyme defect has become more and more evident. Even more interesting is its association with pregnancy-specific disorders, including preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets), hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and maternal floor infarct of the placenta. In this review we discuss the biochemical and molecular basis, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of long-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.

  18. Deficiency of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase due to two mutant alleles (E340K and G101del). Analysis of a family and prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y S; Kerr, D S; Liu, T C; Lusk, M; Powell, B R; Patel, M S

    1997-12-31

    A male child with metabolic acidosis was diagnosed as having dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) deficiency. E3 activity of the proband's cultured fibroblasts and blood lymphocytes was 3-9% of normal, while in the parent's lymphocytes it was about 60% of normal. The proband's pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex activities from cultured skin fibroblasts were 12% and 6% of normal, respectively. PDC activity in the parents cultured fibroblasts was 25-31% of normal. Western and Northern blot analyses showed similar quantities of E3 protein and mRNA in cultured fibroblasts from the proband and his parents. DNA sequencing of cloned full-length E3 cDNAs, from the proband and the parents, showed two mutations on different alleles of proband were inherited from the parents. One mutation is a three nucleotide (AGG) deletion, from the mother, resulting in deletion of Gly101 in the FAD binding domain. The other mutation is a nucleotide substitution (G to A), from the father, leading to substitution of Lys for Glu340 in the central domain. The same deletion mutation was found in E3 cDNA from a chorionic villus sample and cultured fibroblasts obtained from the mother's subsequent offspring. This finding illustrates the possibility of successful prenatal diagnosis of E3 deficiency utilizing mutations characterized prior to initiation of pregnancy.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: not exclusively in males.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Leonie; Heylen, Evelien; van den Akker, Machiel

    2016-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect, often presenting with neonatal jaundice and/or acute hemolytic anemia, triggered by oxidizing agents. G6PD deficiency is an X-linked, hereditary disease, mainly affecting men, but should also be considered in females with an oxidative hemolysis.

  20. Mitochondrial glutathione depletion reveals a novel role for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a key H2O2 emitting source under conditions of nutrient overload

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Once regarded as “byproducts” of aerobic metabolism, the production of superoxide/H2O2 is now understood to be a highly specialized and extensively regulated process responsible for exerting control over a vast number of thiol-containing proteins, collectively referred to as the redox-sensitive proteome. Although disruptions within this process, secondary to elevated peroxide exposure, have been linked to disease, delineation of the sources and mechanisms regulating increased peroxide burden remain poorly defined and as such difficult to target using pharmacotherapy. Here we identify the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) as a key source of H2O2 within skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions of depressed glutathione redox buffering integrity. Treatment of permeabilized myofibers with varying concentrations of the glutathione depleting agent 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) led to a dose-dependent increase in pyruvate-supported JH2O2 emission, with emission rates eventually rising to exceed those of all substrate combinations tested. This striking sensitivity to glutathione depletion was observed in permeabilized fibers prepared from multiple species and was specific to PDC. Physiological oxidation of the cellular glutathione pool following high fat feeding in rodents was found to elevate PDC JH2O2 emission, as well as increase the sensitivity of the complex to GSH depletion. These findings reveal PDC as a potential major site of H2O2 production that is extremely sensitive to mitochondrial glutathione redox status. PMID:24056031

  1. Diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, a novel pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 inhibitor, as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders and multiorgan failure in severe influenza.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kazuhiko; Indalao, Irene L; Chida, Junji; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Hanawa, Masaaki; Kido, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by cytokine storm and multiorgan failure with metabolic energy disorders and vascular hyperpermeability. In the regulation of energy homeostasis, the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex plays an important role by catalyzing oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, linking glycolysis to the tricarboxylic acid cycle and fatty acid synthesis, and thus its activity is linked to energy homeostasis. The present study tested the effects of diisopropylamine dichloroacetate (DADA), a new PDH kinase 4 (PDK4) inhibitor, in mice with severe influenza. Infection of mice with influenza A PR/8/34(H1N1) virus resulted in marked down-regulation of PDH activity and ATP level, with selective up-regulation of PDK4 in the skeletal muscles, heart, liver and lungs. Oral administration of DADA at 12-h intervals for 14 days starting immediately after infection significantly restored PDH activity and ATP level in various organs, and ameliorated disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism in the blood, together with marked improvement of survival and suppression of cytokine storm, trypsin up-regulation and viral replication. These results indicate that through PDK4 inhibition, DADA effectively suppresses the host metabolic disorder-cytokine cycle, which is closely linked to the influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin cycle, resulting in prevention of multiorgan failure in severe influenza.

  2. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  3. Engineering the α-ketoglutarate overproduction from raw glycerol by overexpression of the genes encoding NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yovkova, Venelina; Otto, Christina; Aurich, Andreas; Mauersberger, Stephan; Barth, Gerold

    2014-03-01

    To establish and develop a biotechnological process of α-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) production by Yarrowia lipolytica, it is necessary to increase the KGA productivity and to reduce the amounts of by-products, e.g. pyruvic acid (PA) as major by-product and fumarate, malate and succinate as minor by-products. The aim of this study was the improvement of KGA overproduction with Y. lipolytica by a gene dose-dependent overexpression of genes encoding NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDP1) and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC1) under KGA production conditions from the renewable carbon source raw glycerol. Recombinant Y. lipolytica strains were constructed, which harbour multiple copies of the respective IDP1, PYC1 or IDP1 and PYC1 genes together. We demonstrated that a selective increase in IDP activity in IDP1 multicopy transformants changes the produced amount of KGA. Overexpression of the gene IDP1 in combination with PYC1 had the strongest effect on increasing the amount of secreted KGA. About 19% more KGA compared to strain H355 was produced in bioreactor experiments with raw glycerol as carbon source. The applied cultivation conditions with this strain significantly reduced the main by-product PA and increased the KGA selectivity to more than 95% producing up to 186 g l(-1) KGA. This proved the high potential of this multicopy transformant for developing a biotechnological KGA production process.

  4. Inactivation of the Kluyveromyces lactis KlPDA1 gene leads to loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, impairs growth on glucose and triggers aerobic alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, A M; Luttik, M A; Thiele, C; van Dijken, J P; Pronk, J T; Steensma, H Y

    1998-12-01

    The KlPDA1 gene, encoding the E1alpha subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex was isolated from a Kluyveromyces lactis genomic library by screening with a 1.1 kb internal fragment of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDA1 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by KlPDA1 showed 87% similarity and 79% identity to its S. cerevisiae counterpart. Disruption of KIPDA1 resulted in complete absence of PDH activity in cell extracts. The maximum specific growth rate on glucose of null mutants was 3.5-fold lower than that of the wild-type, whereas growth on ethanol was unaffected. Wild-type K. lactis CBS 2359 exhibits a Crabtree-negative phenotype, i.e. no ethanol was produced in aerobic batch cultures grown on glucose. In contrast, substantial amounts of ethanol and acetaldehyde were produced in aerobic cultures of an isogenic Klpda1 null mutant. A wild-type specific growth rate was restored after introduction of an intact KlPDA1 gene but not, as previously found for S. cerevisiae pda1 mutants, by cultivation in the presence of leucine. The occurrence of aerobic fermentation and slow growth of the Klpda1 null mutant indicate that, although present, the enzymes of the PDH bypass (pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA synthetase) could not efficiently replace the PDH complex during batch cultivation on glucose. Only at relatively low growth rates (D = 0.10 h(-1)) in aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures, could the PDH bypass completely replace the PDH complex, thus allowing fully respiratory growth. This resulted in a lower biomass yield [g biomass (g glucose)-1] than in the wild-type due to a higher consumption of ATP in the PDH bypass compared to the formation of acetyl-CoA via the PDH complex.

  5. Pharmacological activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces statin-mediated upregulation of FOXO gene targets and protects against statin myopathy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, Joanne E; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Glaves, Philip D; Martin, Elizabeth A; Davies, Wendy J; Westwood, F Russell; Sidaway, James E; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2012-12-15

    We previously reported that statin myopathy is associated with impaired carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation in fast-twitch rodent skeletal muscle, which we hypothesised occurred as a result of forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) mediated upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) gene transcription. Upregulation of FOXO gene targets known to regulate proteasomal and lysosomal muscle protein breakdown was also evident. We hypothesised that increasing CHO oxidation in vivo, using the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activator, dichloroacetate (DCA), would blunt activation of FOXO gene targets and reduce statin myopathy. Female Wistar Hanover rats were dosed daily for 12 days (oral gavage) with either vehicle (control, 0.5% w/v hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose 0.1% w/v polysorbate-80; n = 9), 88 mg( )kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin (n = 8), 88 mg( )kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin + 30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) DCA (n = 9) or 88 mg kg(-1) day(-1) simvastatin + 40 mg kg(-1) day(-1) DCA (n = 9). Compared with control, simvastatin reduced body mass gain and food intake, increased muscle fibre necrosis, plasma creatine kinase levels, muscle PDK4, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx) and cathepsin-L mRNA expression, increased PDK4 protein expression, and proteasome and cathepsin-L activity, and reduced muscle PDC activity. Simvastatin with DCA maintained body mass gain and food intake, abrogated the myopathy, decreased muscle PDK4 mRNA and protein, MAFbx and cathepsin-L mRNA, increased activity of PDC and reduced proteasome activity compared with simvastatin. PDC activation abolished statin myopathy in rodent skeletal muscle, which occurred at least in part via inhibition of FOXO-mediated transcription of genes regulating muscle CHO utilisation and protein breakdown.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... from food are broken down into parts called amino acids . Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... an enzyme that helps break down a particular amino acid called valine. Most people with IBD deficiency are ...

  7. Characteristics of butanol metabolism in alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deermice.

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, J A; Kato, S; Lieber, C S

    1989-01-01

    Deermice lacking the low-Km alcohol dehydrogenase eliminated butan-1-ol, a substrate for microsomal oxidation but not for catalase, at 117 mumol/min per kg body wt. Microsomal fractions and hepatocytes metabolized butan-1-ol also (Vmax. = 6.7 nmol/min per nmol of cytochrome P-450, Km = 0.85 mM; Vmax. = 5.3 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, Km = 0.71 mM respectively). These results are consistent with alcohol oxidation by the microsomal system in these deermice. PMID:2930472

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals hepatic metabolite perturbations in citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mice, a model of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Ono, Hiromi; Tushima, Anmi; Katsura, Natsumi; Yokogawa, Mana; Yoshidumi, Yukari; Kuhara, Tomiko; Ohse, Morimasa; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2011-12-01

    The citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse displays phenotypic attributes of both neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis and adult-onset type II citrullinemia, making it a suitable model of human citrin deficiency. In the present study, we investigated metabolic disturbances in the livers of wild-type, citrin (Ctrn) knockout, mGPD knockout, and Ctrn/mGPD double-knockout mice following oral sucrose versus saline administration using metabolomic approaches. By using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, we found three general groupings of metabolite changes in the livers of the double-knockout mice following sucrose administration that were subsequently confirmed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or enzymatic methods: a marked increase of hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate, a generalized decrease of hepatic tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and alterations of hepatic amino acid levels related to the urea cycle or lysine catabolism including marked increases in citrulline and lysine. Furthermore, concurrent oral administration of sodium pyruvate with sucrose ameliorated the hyperammonemia induced by sucrose, as had been shown previously, as well as almost completely normalizing the hepatic metabolite perturbations found. Overall, we have identified additional metabolic disturbances in double-KO mice following oral sucrose administration, and provided further evidence for the therapeutic use of sodium pyruvate in our mouse model of citrin deficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pyruvate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pronk, J T; Yde Steensma, H; Van Dijken, J P

    1996-12-01

    In yeasts, pyruvate is located at a major junction of assimilatory and dissimilatory reactions as well as at the branch-point between respiratory dissimilation of sugars and alcoholic fermentation. This review deals with the enzymology, physiological function and regulation of three key reactions occurring at the pyruvate branch-point in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (i) the direct oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, catalysed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, (ii) decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde, catalysed by pyruvate decarboxylase, and (iii) the anaplerotic carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase. Special attention is devoted to physiological studies on S. cerevisiae strains in which structural genes encoding these key enzymes have been inactivated by gene disruption.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: an unusual cause of acute jaundice after paracetamol overdose.

    PubMed

    Phillpotts, Simon; Tash, Elliot; Sen, Sambit

    2014-11-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest human enzyme defect causing haemolytic anaemia after exposure to specific triggers. Paracetamol-induced haemolysis in G6PD deficiency is a rare complication and mostly reported in children. We report the first case (to the best of our knowledge) of acute jaundice without overt clinical features of a haemolytic crisis, in an otherwise healthy adult female following paracetamol overdose, due to previously undiagnosed G6PD deficiency. It is important that clinicians consider this condition when a patient presents following a paracetamol overdose with significant and disproportionate jaundice, without transaminitis or coagulopathy.

  11. Ischaemic Priapism and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Mechanism of Increased Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed

    Morrison, B F; Thompson, E B; Shah, S D; Wharfe, G H

    2014-07-03

    Ischaemic priapism is a devastating urological condition that has the potential to cause permanent erectile dysfunction. The disorder has been associated with numerous medical conditions and the use of pharmacotherapeutic agents. The aetiology is idiopathic in a number of cases. There are two prior case reports of the association of ischaemic priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We report on a third case of priapism associated with G6PD deficiency and review recently described molecular mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of ischaemic priapism. The case report of a 32-year old Afro-Caribbean male with his first episode of major ischaemic priapism is described. Screening for common causes of ischaemic priapism, including sickle cell disease was negative. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was discovered on evaluation for priapism. Penile aspiration was performed and erectile function was good post treatment.Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a cause for ischaemic priapism and should be a part of the screening process in idiopathic causes of the disorder. Increased oxidative stress occurs in G6PD deficiency and may lead to priapism.

  12. [Leigh syndrome and leukodystrophy due to partial succinate dehydrogenase deficiency: regression with riboflavin].

    PubMed

    Pinard, J M; Marsac, C; Barkaoui, E; Desguerre, I; Birch-Machin, M; Reinert, P; Ponsot, G

    1999-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency is rare. Clinical manifestations can appear in infancy with a marked impairment of psychomotor development with pyramidal signs and extrapyramidal rigidity. A 10-month-old boy developed severe neurological features, evoking a Leigh syndrome; magnetic resonance imaging showed features of leukodystrophy. A deficiency in the complex II respiratory chain (succinate dehydrogenase [SDH]) was shown. The course was remarkable by the regression of neurological impairment under treatment by riboflavin. The delay of psychomotor development, mainly involving language, was moderate at the age of 5 years. The relatively good prognosis of this patient, despite severe initial neurological impairment, may be due to the partial enzyme deficiency and/or riboflavin administration.

  13. Expression and regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms in the developing rat heart and in adulthood: role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, M C; Langdown, M L; Harris, R A; Holness, M J

    2000-01-01

    Activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDHC) promotes glucose disposal, whereas inactivation conserves glucose. The PDH kinases (PDHKs) regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of PDHC. The adult rat heart contains three PDHK isoforms PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4. Using Western-blot analysis, with specific antibodies raised against individual recombinant PDHK1, PDHK2 and PDHK4, the present study investigated PDHK isoform expression in the developing rat heart and adulthood. We identified clear differences in the patterns of protein expression of each of these PDHK isoforms during the first 3 weeks of post-natal development, with most marked up-regulation of isoforms PDHK1 and PDHK4. Distinctions between the three cardiac PDHK isoforms were also demonstrated with respect to post-neonatal maturational up-regulation; with greatest up-regulation of PDHK1 and least up-regulation of PDHK4 from the post-neonatal period until maturity. The study also examined the role of thyroid hormone status and lipid supply on PDHK isoform expression. We observed marked selective increases in the amount of PDHK4 protein present relative to total cardiac protein in both hyperthyroidism and high-fat feeding. Overall, our data identify PDHK isoform PDHK1 as being of more potential regulatory importance for glucose oxidation in the adult compared with the neonatal heart, and cardiac PDHK4 as a PDHK isoform whose expression is specifically responsive to changes in lipid supply, suggesting that its up-regulation during early post-natal life may be the perinatal switch to use fatty acids as the energy source. We also identify regulation of pyruvate sensitivity of cardiac PDHK as a physiological variable, a change in which requires factors in addition to a change in lipid supply. PMID:11104680

  14. Mitochondrial glutathione depletion reveals a novel role for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a key H2O2-emitting source under conditions of nutrient overload.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Gilliam, Laura A A; Lin, Chien-Te; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-12-01

    Once regarded as a "by-product" of aerobic metabolism, the production of superoxide/H2O2 is now understood to be a highly specialized and extensively regulated process responsible for exerting control over a vast number of thiol-containing proteins, collectively referred to as the redox-sensitive proteome. Although disruptions within this process, secondary to elevated peroxide exposure, have been linked to disease, the sources and mechanisms regulating increased peroxide burden remain poorly defined and as such are difficult to target using pharmacotherapy. Here we identify the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) as a key source of H2O2 within skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions of depressed glutathione redox buffering integrity. Treatment of permeabilized myofibers with varying concentrations of the glutathione-depleting agent 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene led to a dose-dependent increase in pyruvate-supported JH2O2 emission (the flux of H2O2 diffusing out of the mitochondrial matrix into the surrounding assay medium), with emission rates eventually rising to exceed those of all substrate combinations tested. This striking sensitivity to glutathione depletion was observed in permeabilized fibers prepared from multiple species and was specific to PDC. Physiological oxidation of the cellular glutathione pool after high-fat feeding in rodents was found to elevate PDC JH2O2 emission, as well as increasing the sensitivity of the complex to GSH depletion. These findings reveal PDC as a potential major site of H2O2 production that is extremely sensitive to mitochondrial glutathione redox status. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Two protein kinase C isoforms, δ and ε, regulate energy homeostasis in mitochondria by transmitting opposing signals to the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Hoyos, Beatrice; Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Vinogradov, Valerie; Shabrova, Elena; Zhao, Feng; Leitges, Michael; Fischman, Donald; Manfredi, Giovanni; Hammerling, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Energy production in mitochondria is a multistep process that requires coordination of several subsystems. While reversible phosphorylation is emerging as the principal tool, it is still unclear how this signal network senses the workloads of processes as different as fuel procurement, catabolism in the Krebs cycle, and stepwise oxidation of reducing equivalents in the electron transfer chain. We previously proposed that mitochondria use oxidized cytochrome c in concert with retinol to activate protein kinase Cδ, thereby linking a prominent kinase network to the redox balance of the ETC. Here, we show that activation of PKCε in mitochondria also requires retinol as a cofactor, implying a redox–mechanism. Whereas activated PKCδ transmits a stimulatory signal to the pyruvate dehdyrogenase complex (PDHC), PKCε opposes this signal and inhibits the PDHC. Our results suggest that the balance between PKCδ and ε is of paramount importance not only for flux of fuel entering the Krebs cycle but for overall energy homeostasis. We observed that the synthetic retinoid fenretinide substituted for the retinol cofactor function but, on chronic use, distorted this signal balance, leading to predominance of PKCε over PKCδ. The suppression of the PDHC might explain the proapoptotic effect of fenretinide on tumor cells, as well as the diminished adiposity observed in experimental animals and humans. Furthermore, a disturbed balance between PKCδ and PKCε might underlie the injury inflicted on the ischemic myocardium during reperfusion.—Gong, J., Hoyos, B., Acin-Perez, R., Vinogradov, V., Shabrova, E., Zhao, F., Leitges, M., Fischman, D., Manfredi, G., Hammerling, U. Two protein kinase C isoforms, δ and ε, regulate energy homeostasis in mitochondria by transmitting opposing signals to the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. PMID:22573912

  16. Strategies for Correcting Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Tenopoulou, Margarita; Chen, Jie; Bastin, Jean; Bennett, Michael J.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Very long acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a genetic pediatric disorder presenting with a spectrum of phenotypes that remains for the most part untreatable. Here, we present a novel strategy for the correction of VLCAD deficiency by increasing mutant VLCAD enzymatic activity. Treatment of VLCAD-deficient fibroblasts, which express distinct mutant VLCAD protein and exhibit deficient fatty acid β-oxidation, with S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine induced site-specific S-nitrosylation of VLCAD mutants at cysteine residue 237. Cysteine 237 S-nitrosylation was associated with an 8–17-fold increase in VLCAD-specific activity and concomitant correction of acylcarnitine profile and β-oxidation capacity, two hallmarks of the disorder. Overall, this study provides biochemical evidence for a potential therapeutic modality to correct β-oxidation deficiencies. PMID:25737446

  17. Platform Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum with Reduced Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity for Improved Production of l-Lysine, l-Valine, and 2-Ketoisovalerate

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Jens; Schwentner, Andreas; Brunnenkan, Britta; Gabris, Christina; Grimm, Simon; Gerstmeir, Robert; Takors, Ralf; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.

    2013-01-01

    Exchange of the native Corynebacterium glutamicum promoter of the aceE gene, encoding the E1p subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC), with mutated dapA promoter variants led to a series of C. glutamicum strains with gradually reduced growth rates and PDHC activities. Upon overexpression of the l-valine biosynthetic genes ilvBNCE, all strains produced l-valine. Among these strains, C. glutamicum aceE A16 (pJC4 ilvBNCE) showed the highest biomass and product yields, and thus it was further improved by additional deletion of the pqo and ppc genes, encoding pyruvate:quinone oxidoreductase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, respectively. In fed-batch fermentations at high cell densities, C. glutamicum aceE A16 Δpqo Δppc (pJC4 ilvBNCE) produced up to 738 mM (i.e., 86.5 g/liter) l-valine with an overall yield (YP/S) of 0.36 mol per mol of glucose and a volumetric productivity (QP) of 13.6 mM per h [1.6 g/(liter × h)]. Additional inactivation of the transaminase B gene (ilvE) and overexpression of ilvBNCD instead of ilvBNCE transformed the l-valine-producing strain into a 2-ketoisovalerate producer, excreting up to 303 mM (35 g/liter) 2-ketoisovalerate with a YP/S of 0.24 mol per mol of glucose and a QP of 6.9 mM per h [0.8 g/(liter × h)]. The replacement of the aceE promoter by the dapA-A16 promoter in the two C. glutamicum l-lysine producers DM1800 and DM1933 improved the production by 100% and 44%, respectively. These results demonstrate that C. glutamicum strains with reduced PDHC activity are an excellent platform for the production of pyruvate-derived products. PMID:23835179

  18. Pyruvate kinase deficiency confers susceptibility to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marie-France; Riendeau, Noémie; Bédard, Christian; Hélie, Pierre; Min-Oo, Gundula; Turcotte, Karine; Gros, Philippe; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Malo, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The mouse response to acute Salmonella typhimurium infection is complex, and it is under the influence of several genes, as well as environmental factors. In a previous study, we identified two novel Salmonella susceptibility loci, Ity4 and Ity5, in a (AcB61 × 129S6)F2 cross. The peak logarithm of odds score associated with Ity4 maps to the region of the liver and red blood cell (RBC)–specific pyruvate kinase (Pklr) gene, which was previously shown to be mutated in AcB61. During Plasmodium chabaudi infection, the Pklr mutation protects the mice against this parasite, as indicated by improved survival and lower peak parasitemia. Given that RBC defects have previously been associated with resistance to malaria and susceptibility to Salmonella, we hypothesized that Pklr is the gene underlying Ity4 and that it confers susceptibility to acute S. typhimurium infection in mice. Using a fine mapping approach combined with complementation studies, comparative studies, and functional analysis, we show that Pklr is the gene underlying Ity4 and that it confers susceptibility to acute S. typhimurium infection in mice through its effect on the RBC turnover and iron metabolism. PMID:17998386

  19. A Cluster of Four Homologous Small RNAs Modulates C1 Metabolism and the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under Various Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1–4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1–4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1–4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. IMPORTANCE Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a

  20. Engineering of Serine-Deamination pathway, Entner-Doudoroff pathway and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex to improve poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Zhenquan; Liu, Qiaojie; Li, Yifan; Wang, Zhiwen; Ma, Hongwu; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Xueming

    2014-12-16

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a biodegradable bio-plastic, is one of the most common homopolymer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHB is synthesized by a variety of microorganisms as intracellular carbon and energy storage compounds in response to environmental stresses. Bio-based production of PHB from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to the petroleum-based chemical synthesis of plastics. In this study, a novel strategy was applied to improve the PHB biosynthesis from different carbon sources. In this research, we have constructed E. coli strains to produce PHB by engineering the Serine-Deamination (SD) pathway, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, and the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Firstly, co-overexpression of sdaA (encodes L-serine deaminase), L-serine biosynthesis genes and pgk (encodes phosphoglycerate kinase) activated the SD Pathway, and the resulting strain SD02 (pBHR68), harboring the PHB biosynthesis genes from Ralstonia eutropha, produced 4.86 g/L PHB using glucose as the sole carbon source, representing a 2.34-fold increase compared to the reference strain. In addition, activating the ED pathway together with overexpressing the PDH complex further increased the PHB production to 5.54 g/L with content of 81.1% CDW. The intracellular acetyl-CoA concentration and the [NADPH]/[NADP(+)] ratio were enhanced after the modification of SD pathway, ED pathway and the PDH complex. Meanwhile, these engineering strains also had a significant increase in PHB concentration and content when xylose or glycerol was used as carbon source. Significant levels of PHB biosynthesis from different kinds of carbon sources can be achieved by engineering the Serine-Deamination pathway, Entner-Doudoroff pathway and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in E. coli JM109 harboring the PHB biosynthesis genes from Ralstonia eutropha. This work demonstrates a novel strategy for improving PHB production in E. coli. The strategy reported here should be

  1. A cluster of four homologous small RNAs modulates C1 metabolism and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in Rhodobacter sphaeroides under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Billenkamp, Fabian; Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-05-01

    In bacteria, regulatory RNAs play an important role in the regulation and balancing of many cellular processes and stress responses. Among these regulatory RNAs, trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) are of particular interest since one sRNA can lead to the regulation of multiple target mRNAs. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, several sRNAs are induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we focused on the functional characterization of four homologous sRNAs that are cotranscribed with the gene for the conserved hypothetical protein RSP_6037, a genetic arrangement described for only a few sRNAs until now. Each of the four sRNAs is characterized by two stem-loops that carry CCUCCUCCC motifs in their loops. They are induced under oxidative stress, as well as by various other stress conditions, and were therefore renamed here sRNAs CcsR1 to CcsR4 (CcsR1-4) for conserved CCUCCUCCC motif stress-induced RNAs 1 to 4. Increased CcsR1-4 expression decreases the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism or encoding components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex either directly by binding to their target mRNAs or indirectly. One of the CcsR1-4 target mRNAs encodes the transcriptional regulator FlhR, an activator of glutathione-dependent methanol/formaldehyde metabolism. Downregulation of this glutathione-dependent pathway increases the pool of glutathione, which helps to counteract oxidative stress. The FlhR-dependent downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex reduces a primary target of reactive oxygen species and reduces aerobic electron transport, a main source of reactive oxygen species. Our findings reveal a previously unknown strategy used by bacteria to counteract oxidative stress. Phototrophic organisms have to cope with photo-oxidative stress due to the function of chlorophylls as photosensitizers for the formation of singlet oxygen. Our study assigns an important role in photo-oxidative stress resistance to a cluster of four homologous s

  2. Regulation of pyruvate metabolism and human disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lawrence R; Tompkins, Sean C; Taylor, Eric B

    2014-07-01

    Pyruvate is a keystone molecule critical for numerous aspects of eukaryotic and human metabolism. Pyruvate is the end-product of glycolysis, is derived from additional sources in the cellular cytoplasm, and is ultimately destined for transport into mitochondria as a master fuel input undergirding citric acid cycle carbon flux. In mitochondria, pyruvate drives ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation and multiple biosynthetic pathways intersecting the citric acid cycle. Mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism is regulated by many enzymes, including the recently discovered mitochondria pyruvate carrier, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate carboxylase, to modulate overall pyruvate carbon flux. Mutations in any of the genes encoding for proteins regulating pyruvate metabolism may lead to disease. Numerous cases have been described. Aberrant pyruvate metabolism plays an especially prominent role in cancer, heart failure, and neurodegeneration. Because most major diseases involve aberrant metabolism, understanding and exploiting pyruvate carbon flux may yield novel treatments that enhance human health.

  3. Patient with toxoplasmosis and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Altacílio A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic protozoal disease caused by toxoplasma gondii, is prevalent throughout the world, affecting a large proportion of persons who usually have no symptoms. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, an X-linked inherited disorder, is present in over 400 million people world wide. It is more common in tropical and subtropical countries and is one of the important causes of hemolytic anemia. Case presentation This case report relates the occurrence of the two diseases simultaneously in a child of five years old. Conclusion Patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency are more susceptible to toxoplasmosis and this case report, reinforce the findings of this propensity and alert us for such possibility, what it is important, therefore, the treatment of toxoplasmosis can cause serious hemolysis in these patients. PMID:19918404

  4. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  5. Is glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency more prevalent in Carrion's disease endemic areas in Latin America?

    PubMed

    Mazulis, Fernando; Weilg, Claudia; Alva-Urcia, Carlos; Pons, Maria J; Del Valle Mendoza, Juana

    2015-12-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a cytoplasmic enzyme with an important function in cell oxidative damage prevention. Erythrocytes have a predisposition towards oxidized environments due to their lack of mitochondria, giving G6PD a major role in its stability. G6PD deficiency (G6PDd) is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans; it affects approximately 400 million individuals worldwide. The overall G6PDd allele frequency across malaria endemic countries is estimated to be 8%, corresponding to approximately 220 million males and 133 million females. However, there are no reports on the prevalence of G6PDd in Andean communities where bartonellosis is prevalent.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the Greek population of Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Bonafede, R P; Botha, M C; Beighton, P

    1984-04-07

    A sample of 250 unrelated members of the Greek community of Cape Town was studied in order to establish the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in the community. A gene frequency of 0,067 in males and a prevalence of 6,7% are estimated for this group. It is recommended that persons with G-6-PD deficiency should have access to a list of medicinal agents which have the potential for precipitating acute haemolytic crises and that they should wear Medic-Alert discs bearing information concerning the disorder.

  7. Should we screen newborns for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the United States?

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Kaplan, M; Stark, A R; Stevenson, D K; Bhutani, V K

    2013-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, a common X-linked enzymopathy can lead to severe hyperbilirubinemia, acute bilirubin encephalopathy and kernicterus in the United States. Neonatal testing for G6PD deficiency is not yet routine and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing only in jaundiced newborns who are receiving phototherapy whose family history, ethnicity, or geographic origin suggest risk for the condition, or for infants whose response to phototherapy is poor. Screening tests for G6PD deficiency are available, are suitable for use in newborns and have been used in birth hospitals. However, US birth hospitals experience is limited and no national consensus has emerged regarding the need for newborn G6PD testing, its effectiveness or the best approach. Our review of current state of G6PD deficiency screening highlights research gaps and informs specific operational challenges to implement universal newborn G6PD testing concurrent to bilirubin screening in the United States.

  8. 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 deficiency in a male pseudohermaphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Mains, Lindsay M.; Vakili, Babak; Lacassie, Yves; Andersson, Stefan; Lindqvist, Annika; Rock, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of a male pseudohermaphrodite due to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17beta-HSD3) deficiency. Design Case report. Setting University teaching hospital Gynecology practice Patient(s) A 15-year-old black American male pseudohermaphrodite with 17beta-HSD3 deficiency. Intervention(s) Laboratory evaluation, genetic mutation analysis, bilateral gonadectomy, hormone replacement. Main Outcome Measure(s) Endocrinologic evaluation and genetic analysis. Result(s) A diagnosis of 17beta-HSD3 deficiency made on the basis of hormone evaluation was confirmed through genetic mutation analysis of the HSD17B3 gene. Female phenotype was attained after gonadectomy, passive vaginal dilatation, and hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) 17beta-HSD3 deficiency was diagnosed in this patient based on endocrinologic evaluation and confirmed with genetic mutation analysis. The patient was able to retain her female sexual identity after surgical and medical treatment. PMID:17509588

  9. Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Two Malaysian Siblings with Abnormal MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bee Chin; Mohd Rawi, Rowani; Meinsma, Rutger; Meijer, Judith; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; van Kuilenburg, André B.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of the pyrimidine metabolism. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to an accumulation of thymine and uracil and a deficiency of metabolites distal to the catabolic enzyme. The disorder presents with a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from asymptomatic to severe neurological manifestations, including intellectual disability, seizures, microcephaly, autistic behavior, and eye abnormalities. Here, we report on an 11-year-old Malaysian girl and her 6-year-old brother with DPD deficiency who presented with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and hypotonia. Brain MRI scans showed generalized cerebral and cerebellar atrophy and callosal body dysgenesis in the boy. Urine analysis showed strongly elevated levels of uracil in the girl and boy (571 and 578 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively) and thymine (425 and 427 mmol/mol creatinine, respectively). Sequence analysis of the DPYD gene showed that both siblings were homozygous for the mutation c.1651G>A (pAla551Thr). PMID:25565930

  10. Cryptic antigenic determinants on the extracellular pyruvate dehydrogenase complex/mimeotope found in primary biliary cirrhosis. A probe by affinity mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yip, T T; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E; Coppel, R L; Hutchens, T W

    1996-12-20

    Affinity mass spectrometry (AMS) was used to evaluate the structural diversity of the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) in normal and diseased liver cells, including those from patients with the autoimmune disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Two different antibodies to PDC-E2, the immunodominant mitochondrial autoantigen in patients with PBC, were used. AMS was performed directly on frozen liver sections and purified bile duct epithelial cells. Mass spectrometric signals associated with the molecular recognition of PBC-specific antigenic determinants were enhanced by an in situ enzyme-linked signal amplification process. Samples from patients with PBC gave strong positive signals for the antigen(s) recognized by the monoclonal antibody C355.1. Conversely, tissues from normal and disease controls showed only a minimal signal. AMS was used to identify specific antigenic determinants within the E2 component of PDC for comparison with unknown antigenic determinants observed by affinity capture with C355.1 monoclonal antibody from PBC samples. PDC components bound to C355.1 were mapped and identified by mass before dissociation from the E2 component. A similar approach was used to identify unknown antigenic determinants associated with PBC. We believe AMS may be an important new approach with wide application to the identification of molecules associated with a number of disease states.

  11. Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Pyruvate Decarboxylase Activity in Leaves and Roots of Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) and Soybean (Glycine max L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) are responsible for the anaerobic production of acetaldehyde and ethanol in higher plants. In developing soybean embryos, ADH activity increased upon imbibition and then declined exponentially with development, and was undetectable in leaves by 30 days after imbibition. PDC was not detectable in soybean leaves. In contrast, ADH activity remained high in developing cottonwood seedlings, with no decline in activity during development. ADH activity in the first fully expanded leaf of cottonwood was 230 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight, and increased with leaf age. Maximal PDC activity of cottonwood leaves was 10 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight. ADH activity in cottonwood roots was induced by anaerobic stress, increasing from 58 to 205 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in intact plants in 48 hours, and from 38 to 246 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in detached roots in 48 hours. Leaf ADH activity increased by 10 to 20% on exposure to anaerobic conditions. Crude leaf enzyme extracts with high ADH activity reduced little or no NADH when other aldehydes, such as trans-2-hexenal, were provided as substrate. ADH and PDC are constitutive enzyme in cottonwood leaves, but their metabolic role is not known. PMID:16665586

  12. α-(Substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonates: synthesis, herbicidal activity, inhibition on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), and application as postemergent herbicide against broadleaf weeds.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Wu; Peng, Hao; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chubei; Yuan, Jun-Lin; Chen, Ting; He, Junbo; Tan, Xiaosong

    2013-03-13

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc) is the site of action of a new class of herbicides. On the basis of the previous work for O,O'-dimethyl α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)alkylphosphonates (I), further synthetic modifications were made by introducing a fural and a thienyl group to structure I. A series of α-(substituted-phenoxyacetoxy)-α-heterocyclylmethylphosphonate derivatives (II) were synthesized as potential inhibitors of PDHc. The postemergent activity of the title compounds II was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The in vitro efficacy of II against PDHc was also examined. Compounds II with fural as R(3) and 2,4-dichloro as X and Y showed significant herbicidal activity and effective inhibition against PDHc from plants. O,O'-Dimethyl α-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetoxy)-α-(furan-2-yl)methylphosphonate II-17 had higher inhibitory potency against PDHc from Pisum sativum than against PDHc from Oryza sativa in vitro and was most effective against broadleaf weeds at 50 and 300 ai g/ha. II-17 was safe for maize and rice even at the dose of 900-1200 ai g/ha. Field trials at different regions in China showed that II-17 (HWS) could control a broad spectrum of broad-leaved and sedge weeds at the rate of 225-375 ai g/ha for postemergent applications in maize fields. II-17 (HWS) displayed potential utility as a selective herbicide.

  13. ATP6AP2/(Pro)renin Receptor Contributes to Glucose Metabolism via Stabilizing the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase E1 β Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Noda, Kousuke; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glucose metabolism is indispensable for metabolically active cells; however, the regulatory mechanism of efficient energy generation in the highly evolved mammalian retina remains incompletely understood. Here, we revealed an unsuspected role for (pro)renin receptor, also known as ATP6AP2, in energy metabolism. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses identified the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex as Atp6ap2-interacting proteins in the mouse retina. Yeast two-hybrid assays demonstrated direct molecular binding between ATP6AP2 and the PDH E1 β subunit (PDHB). Pdhb immunoreactivity co-localized with Atp6ap2 in multiple retinal layers including the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). ATP6AP2 knockdown in RPE cells reduced PDH activity, showing a predilection to anaerobic glycolysis. ATP6AP2 protected PDHB from phosphorylation, thus controlling its protein stability. Down-regulated PDH activity due to ATP6AP2 knockdown inhibited glucose-stimulated oxidative stress in RPE cells. Our present data unraveled the novel function of ATP6AP2/(P)RR as a PDHB stabilizer, contributing to aerobic glucose metabolism together with oxidative stress. PMID:25720494

  14. Macromolecular crowding effect upon in vitro enzyme kinetics: mixed activation-diffusion control of the oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Cristina; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; Madurga, Sergio; Cascante, Marta; Mas, Francesc

    2014-04-17

    Enzyme kinetics studies have been usually designed as dilute solution experiments, which differ substantially from in vivo conditions. However, cell cytosol is crowded with a high concentration of molecules having different shapes and sizes. The consequences of such crowding in enzymatic reactions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to understand the effect of macromolecular crowding produced by dextran of different sizes and at diverse concentrations in the well-known reaction of oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Our results indicate that the reaction rate is determined by both the occupied volume and the relative size of dextran obstacles with respect to the enzyme present in the reaction. Moreover, we analyzed the influence of macromolecular crowding on the Michaelis-Menten constants, vmax and Km. The obtained results show that only high concentrations and large sizes of dextran reduce both constants suggesting a mixed activation-diffusion control of this enzymatic reaction due to the dextran crowding action. From our knowledge, this is the first experimental study that depicts mixed activation-diffusion control in an enzymatic reaction due to the effect of crowding.

  15. Effect of high fat and high carbohydrate diets on adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase and its activation by a plasma membrane-enriched fraction and insulin.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1982-06-01

    Rats were fed a high lard diet or a high glucose diet for 5--7 days. Basal and insulin-stimulated epididymal fat pad pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities were decreased in fat diet-adapted rats compared to those fed the glucose diet. When adipocyte plasma membranes and mitochondria were incubated together with and without insulin, it was found that the insulin stimulation of PDH activity was lower in preparations from fat-fed rats on both an absolute and percentage basis. Supernatant fractions from insulin-stimulated glucose-fed rat plasma membranes activated mitochondrial PDH to a greater extent than those from lard-fed rat preparations. There was no difference in the response of mitochondria from the two groups when they were stimulated by insulin-treated plasma membranes from stock diet-fed rat adipose tissue. These experiments suggest that fat feeding results in adaptive changes in adipocyte plasma membranes which are involved in the generation of the insulin-stimulated chemical activator of PDH. This adaptive change is in addition to those described earlier.

  16. The design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel thiamin diphosphate analog inhibitors against the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lingling; He, Junbo; He, Haifeng; Zhao, Lulu; Deng, Lingfu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Lin; Ren, Yanliang; Wan, Jian; He, Hongwu

    2014-11-28

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex E1 (PDHc E1) is a potential target enzyme when looking for inhibitors to combat microbial disease. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of novel thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) analogs with triazole ring and oxime ether moieties as potential inhibitors of PDHc E1. Their inhibitory activities against PDHc E1 were examined both in vitro and in vivo. Most of the tested compounds exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against PDHc E1 (IC50 = 6.1-75.5 μM). The potent inhibitors 4g, 4h and 4j, had strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 6.7, 6.9 and 6.1 μM against PDHc E1 in vitro and with inhibition rates of 35%, 50% and 33% at 100 μg mL(-1) against Gibberella zeae in vivo, respectively. The binding mode of 4j to PDHc E1 was analyzed by a molecular docking method. Furthermore, the possible interactions of the important residues of PDHc E1 with compound 4j were examined by site-directed mutagenesis, enzymatic assays and spectral fluorescence studies. The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement and suggest that compound 4j could be used as a lead compound for further optimization, and may have potential as a new microbicide.

  17. Isolated isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: an unrecognized defect in human valine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roe, C R; Cederbaum, S D; Roe, D S; Mardach, R; Galindo, A; Sweetman, L

    1998-12-01

    A 2-year-old female was well until 12 months of age when she was found to be anemic and had dilated cardiomyopathy. Total plasma carnitine was 6 microM and acylcarnitine analysis while receiving carnitine supplement revealed an increase in the four-carbon species. Urine organic acids were normal. In vitro analysis of the mitochondrial pathways for beta oxidation, and leucine, valine, and isoleucine metabolism was performed in fibroblasts using stable isotope-labeled precursors to these pathways followed by acylcarnitine analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. 16-2H3-palmitate was metabolized normally down to the level of butyryl-CoA thus excluding SCAD deficiency. 13C6-leucine and 13C6-isoleucine were also metabolized normally. 13C5-valine incubation revealed a significant increase in 13C4-isobutyrylcarnitine without any incorporation into propionylcarnitine as is observed normally. These same precursors were also evaluated in fibroblasts with proven ETF-QO deficiency in which acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies in each of these pathways was clearly identified. These results indicate that in the human, there is an isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase which exists as a separate enzyme serving only the valine pathway in addition to the 2-methyl branched-chain dehydrogenase which serves both the valine and the isoleucine pathways in both rat and human.

  18. Anemia in patients with coinherited thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pornprasert, Sakorn; Phanthong, Siratcha

    2013-01-01

    Thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency are genetic disorders that cause hemolytic anemia. In areas with high frequencies of both hematological disorders, coinheritance of G-6-PD deficiency with thalassemia can be found. Whether G-6-PD deficiency, coinherited with thalassemia, enhances severe anemia is still unclear. Hematological parameters between thalassemia carriers with G-6-PD deficiency and those without G-6-PD deficiency were compared. The G-6-PD deficiency was diagnosed in 410 blood samples from thalassemia patients using a fluorescent spot test. The levels of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and Hb A2/Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys; HBB: c.79G>A] were measured using an automated blood counter and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The G-6-PD deficiency was found in 37 samples (9.02%). Mean levels of Hb, PCV, MCV and Hb A2/E were similar between the two groups. Thus, G-6-PD deficiency did not enhance red blood cell pathology or induce more anemic severity in thalassemia patients.

  19. Effects of high fat and high carbohydrate diets on liver pyruvate dehydrogenase and its activation by a chemical mediator released from insulin-treated liver particulate fraction: effect of neuraminidase treatment on the chemical mediator activity.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1983-01-01

    Rats were fed a high fat diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity (both the active form and the total enzyme activity) was decreased in liver homogenates from fat diet-adapted rats as compared to those fed the glucose diet. Supernatants from insulin-exposed liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased stimulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity as compared to those from glucose-fed rats. There was no difference in the response of the mitochondria from the two groups when they were stimulated by supernatants from insulin-treated liver particulate fractions from stock diet-fed rats. Liver particulate fractions from fat-fed rats showed decreased generation of the chemical activator in response to Concanavalin A and trypsin stimulation. This suggests that fat feeding results in a decrease in membrane protease substrate availability. Treatment of the insulin mediator with neuraminidase and beta-D-galactosidase resulted in inactivation of the mediator. Presence of exogenous enzyme substrates during enzyme digestion protected the mediator from inactivation, suggesting that carbohydrate residues are important in the action of the insulin mediator. This fat diet-induced decrease in the generation of a chemical mediator of insulin action may result from 1) a decrease in insulin binding, shown earlier; 2) a decrease in the amount of protease substrate; and 3) an alteration in its carbohydrate composition, which is important in its ability to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase.

  20. Decreased GABA-A binding on FMZ-PET in succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, P L.; Gibson, K M.; Quezado, Z; Dustin, I; Taylor, J; Trzcinski, S; Schreiber, J; Forester, K; Reeves-Tyer, P; Liew, C; Shamim, S; Herscovitch, P; Carson, R; Butman, J; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of GABA metabolism characterized by elevated levels of GABA and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Clinical findings include intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, hallucinations, autistic behaviors, and seizures. Autoradiographic labeling and slice electrophysiology studies in the murine model demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) receptors. We studied GABA(A) receptor activity in human SSADH deficiency utilizing [11C]-flumazenil (FMZ)-PET. Methods: FMZ binding was measured in 7 patients, 10 unaffected parents, and 8 healthy controls. Data analysis was performed using a reference region compartmental model, with time-activity curve from pons as the input function. Relative parametric binding potential (BPND) was derived, with MRI-based pixel by pixel partial volume correction, in regions of interest drawn on coregistered MRI. Results: In amygdala, hippocampus, cerebellar vermis, frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex, patients with SSADH deficiency had significant reductions in FMZ BPND compared to parents and controls. Mean cortical values were 6.96 ± 0.79 (controls), 6.89 ± 0.71 (parents), and 4.88 ± 0.77 (patients) (F ratio 16.1; p < 0.001). There were no differences between controls and parents in any cortical region. Conclusions: Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficient patients show widespread reduction in BZPR binding on [11C]-flumazenil-PET. Our results suggest that high endogenous brain GABA levels in SSADH deficiency downregulate GABA(A)-BZPR binding site availability. This finding suggests a potential mechanism for neurologic dysfunction in a serious neurodevelopmental disorder, and suggests that PET may be useful to translate studies in animal models to human disease. GLOSSARY FMZ = flumazenil; MRS = magnetic resonance spectroscopy; PVC = partial volume correction; ROI = region of interest; SPGR = spoiled gradient

  1. Renal cortical pyruvate depletion during AKI.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Becker, Kirsten

    2014-05-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediary in energy metabolism and can exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the fate of pyruvate during AKI remains unknown. Here, we assessed renal cortical pyruvate and its major determinants (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDH], and H2O2 levels) in mice subjected to unilateral ischemia (15-60 minutes; 0-18 hours of vascular reflow) or glycerol-induced ARF. The fate of postischemic lactate, which can be converted back to pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase, was also addressed. Ischemia and glycerol each induced persistent pyruvate depletion. During ischemia, decreasing pyruvate levels correlated with increasing lactate levels. During early reperfusion, pyruvate levels remained depressed, but lactate levels fell below control levels, likely as a result of rapid renal lactate efflux. During late reperfusion and glycerol-induced AKI, pyruvate depletion corresponded with increased gluconeogenesis (pyruvate consumption). This finding was underscored by observations that pyruvate injection increased renal cortical glucose content in AKI but not normal kidneys. AKI decreased PDH levels, potentially limiting pyruvate to acetyl CoA conversion. Notably, pyruvate therapy mitigated the severity of AKI. This renoprotection corresponded with increases in cytoprotective heme oxygenase 1 and IL-10 mRNAs, selective reductions in proinflammatory mRNAs (e.g., MCP-1 and TNF-α), and improved tissue ATP levels. Paradoxically, pyruvate increased cortical H2O2 levels. We conclude that AKI induces a profound and persistent depletion of renal cortical pyruvate, which may induce additional injury.

  2. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency: diagnosis by acylcarnitine analysis in blood.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, J L; Zhang, W; Kahler, S G; Roe, C R; Chen, Y T; Terada, N; Chace, D H; Iafolla, A K; Ding, J H; Millington, D S

    1993-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a disorder of fatty acid catabolism, with autosomal recessive inheritance. The disease is characterized by episodic illness associated with potentially fatal hypoglycemia and has a relatively high frequency. A rapid and reliable method for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency is highly desirable. Analysis of specific acylcarnitines was performed by isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry on plasma or whole blood samples from 62 patients with MCAD deficiency. Acylcarnitines were also analyzed in 42 unaffected relatives of patients with MCAD deficiency and in other groups of patients having elevated plasma C8 acylcarnitine, consisting of 32 receiving valproic acid, 9 receiving medium-chain triglyceride supplement, 4 having multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, and 8 others with various etiologies. Criteria for the unequivocal diagnosis of MCAD deficiency by acylcarnitine analysis are an elevated C8-acylcarnitine concentration (> 0.3 microM), a ratio of C8/C10 acylcarnitines of > 5, and lack of elevated species of chain length > C10. These criteria were not influenced by clinical state, carnitine treatment, or underlying genetic mutation, and no false-positive or false-negative results were obtained. The same criteria were also successfully applied to profiles from neonatal blood spots retrieved from the original Guthrie cards of eight patients. Diagnosis of MCAD deficiency can therefore be made reliably through the analysis of acylcarnitines in blood, including presymptomatic neonatal recognition. Tandem mass spectrometry is a convenient method for fast and accurate determination of all relevant acylcarnitine species. PMID:8488845

  3. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficiency in Transfusion Medicine: The Unknown Risks

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard O.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Pham, Huy P.; Hod, Eldad A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing hemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage, and mechanisms of hemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed. PMID:23815264

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) as a risk factor of male neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Far, Z; Ghadiri, K; Rostami-Far, M; Shaveisi-Zadeh, F; Amiri, A; Rahimian Zarif, B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction.Neonatal sepsis is a disease process, which represents the systemic response of bacteria entering the bloodstream during the first 28 days of life. The prevalence of sepsis is higher in male infants than in females, but the exact cause is unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to the production of NADPH. NADPH is required for the respiratory burst reaction in white blood cells (WBCs) to destroy microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis. Materials and methods.This study was performed on 76 neonates with sepsis and 1214 normal neonates from February 2012 to November 2014 in the west of Iran. The G6PD deficiency status was determined by fluorescent spot test. WBCs number and neutrophils percentages were measured and compared in patients with and without G6PD deficiency. Results.The prevalence of the G6PD deficiency in neonates with sepsis was significantly higher compared to the control group (p=0.03). WBCs number and neutrophils percentages in G6PD deficient patients compared with patients without G6PD deficiency were decreased, but were not statistically significant (p=0.77 and p=0.86 respectively). Conclusions.G6PD deficiency is a risk factor of neonatal sepsis and also a justification for more male involvement in this disease. Therefore, newborn screening for this disorder is recommended.

  5. Prevalence and molecular characterization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Tantiprabha, Watcharee; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Phusua, Arunee; Sanguansermsri, Torpong

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common inherited enzymopathies in endemic areas of malaria including Southeast Asia. The molecular features of G6PD deficiency are similar among Southeast Asian population, with differences in the type of the prominent variants in each region. This study determined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of G6PD deficiency in northern Thailand. Quantitative assay of G6PD activity was conducted in 566 neonatal cord blood samples and 6 common G6PD mutations were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism method on G6PD complete and intermediate deficiency samples. Ninety newborns had G6PD deficiency, with prevalence in male newborns of 17% and that of female newborns having an intermediate and complete deficiency of 13% and 2%, respectively. From 95 G6PD alleles tested, G6PD Mahidol, G6PD Kaiping, G6PD Canton, G6PD Viangchan, G6PD Union, and G6PD Chinese-5 was detected in 19, 17, 15, 13, 7, and 2 alleles, respectively. Our study shows that the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in northern Thai population is high and combination of the common Chinese mutations is the majority, a distribution different from central and southern Thailand where G6PD Viangchan is the prominent variant. These findings suggest a higher proportion of assimilated Chinese ethnic group in the northern Thai population.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in transfusion medicine: the unknown risks.

    PubMed

    Francis, R O; Jhang, J S; Pham, H P; Hod, E A; Zimring, J C; Spitalnik, S L

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce haemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing haemolysis and other adverse events. In addition, some patient populations may be more at risk for complications associated with transfusions of G6PD-deficient RBCs because they receive RBCs from donors who are more likely to have G6PD deficiency. This review discusses G6PD deficiency, its importance in transfusion medicine, changes in the RBC antioxidant system (of which G6PD is essential) during refrigerated storage and mechanisms of haemolysis. In addition, as yet unanswered questions that could be addressed by translational and clinical studies are identified and discussed.

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and Alzheimer's disease: Partners in crime? The hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, N Nuray

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifaceted brain disorder which involves various coupled irreversible, progressive biochemical reactions that significantly reduce quality of life as well as the actual life expectancy. Aging, genetic predispositions, head trauma, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, deficiencies in insulin signaling, dysfunction of mitochondria-associated membranes, cerebrovascular changes, high cholesterol level, increased oxidative stress and free radical formation, DNA damage, disturbed energy metabolism, and synaptic dysfunction, high blood pressure, obesity, dietary habits, exercise, social engagement, and mental stress are noted among the risk factors of this disease. In this hypothesis review I would like to draw the attention on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and its relationship with Alzheimer's disease. This enzymopathy is the most common human congenital defect of metabolism and defined by decrease in NADPH+H(+) and reduced form of glutathione concentration and that might in turn, amplify oxidative stress due to essentiality of the enzyme. This most common enzymopathy may manifest itself in severe forms, however most of the individuals with this deficiency are not essentially symptomatic. To understand the sporadic Alzheimer's disease, the writer of this paper thinks that, looking into a crystal ball might not yield much of a benefit but glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could effortlessly give some clues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Overexpression of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A in Nerve Cells Confers Resistance to Amyloid β and Other Toxins by Decreasing Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Jordan T.; Rappon, Tim; Albers, Shawn; Wong, Daisy Y.; Rylett, R. Jane; Cumming, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nerve cell lines selected for resistance to amyloid β (Aβ) peptide exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis in part due to increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA). Here, we show that overexpression of either PDK1 or LDHA in a rat CNS cell line (B12) confers resistance to Aβ and other neurotoxins. Treatment of Aβ-sensitive cells with various toxins resulted in mitochondrial hyperpolarization, immediately followed by rapid depolarization and cell death, events accompanied by increased production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, cells expressing either PDK1 or LDHA maintained a lower mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ROS production with or without exposure to toxins. Additionally, PDK1- and LDHA-overexpressing cells exhibited decreased oxygen consumption but maintained levels of ATP under both normal culture conditions and following Aβ treatment. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis of wild type mouse primary cortical neurons treated with Aβ or cortical tissue extracts from 12-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice showed decreased expression of LDHA and PDK1 when compared with controls. Additionally, post-mortem brain extracts from patients with Alzheimer disease exhibited a decrease in PDK1 expression compared with nondemented patients. Collectively, these findings indicate that key Warburg effect enzymes play a central role in mediating neuronal resistance to Αβ or other neurotoxins by decreasing mitochondrial activity and subsequent ROS production. Maintenance of PDK1 or LDHA expression in certain regions of the brain may explain why some individuals tolerate high levels of Aβ deposition without developing Alzheimer disease. PMID:22948140

  9. Screening for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency using electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P.; Doig, M.; Ghafari, S.; Meaney, C.; Taylor, C.; Leonard, J.; Morris, M.; Johnson, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To establish criteria for the diagnosis of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency in the UK population using a method in which carnitine species eluted from blood spots are butylated and analysed by electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS).
DESIGN—Four groups were studied: (1) 35 children, aged 4 days to 16.2 years, with proven MCAD deficiency (mostly homozygous for the A985G mutation, none receiving carnitine supplements); (2) 2168control children; (3) 482 neonates; and (4) 15 MCAD heterozygotes.
RESULTS—All patients with MCAD deficiency had an octanoylcarnitine concentration ([C8-Cn]) > 0.38 µM and no accumulation of carnitine species > C10 or < C6. Among the patients with MCAD deficiency, the [C8-Cn] was significantly lower in children > 10 weeks old and in children with carnitine depletion (free carnitine < 20 µM). Neonatal blood spots from patients with MCAD deficiency had a [C8-Cn] > 1.5 µM, whereas in heterozygotes and other normal neonates the [C8-Cn] was < 1.0 µM. In contrast, the blood spot [C8-Cn] in eight of 27 patients with MCAD deficiency > 10 weeks old fell within the same range as five of 15 MCAD heterozygotes (0.38-1.0 µM). However, the free carnitine concentrations were reduced (< 20 µM) in the patients with MCAD deficiency but normal in the heterozygotes.
CONCLUSIONS—Criteria for the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency using ESI-MS/MS must take account of age and carnitine depletion. If screening is undertaken at 7-10 days, the number of false positive and negative results should be negligible. Because there have been no instances of death or neurological damage following diagnosis of MCAD deficiency in our patient group, a strong case can be made for neonatal screening for MCAD deficiency in the UK.

 PMID:9797589

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and risk of diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yin Key; Lai, Nai Ming; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey

    2017-05-01

    Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may have a higher risk of developing diabetes. The aim of the review was to synthesise the evidence on the association between G6PD deficiency and diabetes. A systematic search on Medline, EMBASE, AMED and CENTRAL databases for studies published between January 1966 and September 2016 that assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and diabetes was conducted. This was supplemented by a review of the reference list of retrieved articles. We extracted data on study characteristics, outcomes and performed an assessment on the methodological quality of the studies. A random-effects model was used to compute the summary risk estimates. Fifteen relevant publications involving 949,260 participants were identified, from which seven studies contributed to the meta-analysis. G6PD deficiency was associated with a higher odd of diabetes (odds ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.73). The odds ratio of diabetes among men was higher (2.22, 1.31-3.75) compared to women (1.87, 1.12-3.12). This association was broadly consistent in the sensitivity analysis. Current evidence suggests that G6PD deficiency may be a risk factor for diabetes, with higher odds among men compared to women. Further research is needed to determine how G6PD deficiency moderates diabetes.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in northern Mexico and description of a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    García-Magallanes, N; Luque-Ortega, F; Aguilar-Medina, E M; Ramos-Payán, R; Galaviz-Hernández, C; Romero-Quintana, J G; Del Pozo-Yauner, L; Rangel-Villalobos, H; Arámbula-Meraz, E

    2014-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) is the most common enzyme pathology in humans; it is X-linked inherited and causes neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia, chronic nonspherocytic haemolytic anaemia and drug-induced acute haemolytic anaemia. G6PD deficiency has scarcely been studied in the northern region of Mexico, which is important because of the genetic heterogeneity described in Mexican population. Therefore, samples from the northern Mexico were biochemically screened for G6PD deficiency, and PCR-RFLPs, and DNA sequencing used to identify mutations in positive samples. The frequency of G6PD deficiency in the population was 0.95% (n = 1993); the mutations in 86% of these samples were G6PD A(-202A/376G), G6PDA(-376G/968C) and G6PD Santamaria(376G/542T). Contrary to previous reports, we demonstrated that G6PD deficiency distribution is relatively homogenous throughout the country (P = 0.48336), and the unique exception with high frequency of G6PD deficiency does not involve a coastal population (Chihuahua: 2.4%). Analysis of eight polymorphic sites showed only 10 haplotypes. In one individual we identified a new G6PD mutation named Mexico DF(193A>G) (rs199474830), which probably results in a damaging functional effect, according to PolyPhen analysis. Proteomic impact of the mutation is also described.

  12. Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A

    2013-10-22

    Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations.

  13. Humanized mouse model of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency for in vivo assessment of hemolytic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rochford, Rosemary; Ohrt, Colin; Baresel, Paul C.; Campo, Brice; Sampath, Aruna; Magill, Alan J.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Walker, Larry A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for the development of hemolytic anemia when given 8-aminoquinolines (8-AQs), an important class of antimalarial/antiinfective therapeutics. However, there is no suitable animal model that can predict the clinical hemolytic potential of drugs. We developed and validated a human (hu)RBC-SCID mouse model by giving nonobese diabetic/SCID mice daily transfusions of huRBCs from G6PD-deficient donors. Treatment of SCID mice engrafted with G6PD-deficient huRBCs with primaquine, an 8-AQ, resulted in a dose-dependent selective loss of huRBCs. To validate the specificity of this model, we tested known nonhemolytic antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, chloroquine, doxycycline, and pyrimethamine. No significant loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs was observed. Treatment with drugs known to cause hemolytic toxicity (pamaquine, sitamaquine, tafenoquine, and dapsone) resulted in loss of G6PD-deficient huRBCs comparable to primaquine. This mouse model provides an important tool to test drugs for their potential to cause hemolytic toxicity in G6PD-deficient populations. PMID:24101478

  14. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in jaundiced Egyptian neonates.

    PubMed

    M Abo El Fotoh, Wafaa Moustafa; Rizk, Mohammed Soliman

    2016-12-01

    The enzyme, Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), deficiency leads to impaired production of reduced glutathione and predisposes the red cells to be damaged by oxidative metabolites, causing hemolysis. Deficient neonates may manifest clinically as hyperbilirubinemia or even kernicterus. This study was carried out to detect erythrocyte G6PD deficiency in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. To determine the frequency and effect of G6PD deficiency, this study was conducted on 202 neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia. All term and preterm babies up to 13 day of age admitted with clinically evident jaundice were taken for the study. G6PD activity is measured by the UV-Kinetic Method using cellular enzyme determination reagents by spectrophotometry according to manufacturer's instructions. A total of 202 babies were enrolled in this study. Male babies outnumbered the female (71.3% versus 28.7%). Mean age of the study newborns was 3.75 ± 2.5 days. Eighteen neonates (8.9%) had G6PD deficiency, all are males. One case had combined G6PD deficiency and RH incompatibility. Mean serum total bilirubin was 17.2 ± 4.4 in G6PD deficient cases. There was significant positive correlation between the time of appearance of jaundice in days and G6PD levels in G6PD deficient cases. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with various clinical comorbidities. G6PD deficiency is found to one important cause of neonatal jaundice developing on day 2 onwards.

  15. Diversity in expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in females.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazzaq, Y M; Micallef, R; Qureshi, M; Dawodu, A; Ahmed, I; Khidr, A; Bastaki, S M; Al-Khayat, A; Bayoumi, R A

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), to describe the different mutations in the population, to determine its prevalence, and to study inheritance patterns in families of G6PD-deficient individuals. All infants born at Tawam Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE from January 1994 to September 1996 were screened at birth for their G6PD status. In addition, those attending well-baby clinics during the period were also screened for the disorder. Families of 40 known G6PD-deficient individuals, selected randomly from the records of three hospitals in the country, were assessed for G6PD deficiency. Where appropriate, this was followed by definition of G6PD mutations. Of 8198 infants, 746 (9.1%), comprising 15% of males and 5% of females tested, were found to be G6PD deficient. A total of 27 families were further assessed: of these, all but one family had the nt563 Mediterranean mutation. In one family, two individuals had the nt202 African mutation. The high manifestation of G6PD deficiency in women may be due to the preferential expression of the G6PD-deficient gene and X-inactivation of the normal gene, and/or to the presence of an 'enhancer' gene that makes the expression of the G6PD deficiency more likely. The high level of consanguinity which, theoretically, should result in a high proportion of homozygotes and consequently a higher proportion of females with the deficiency, was not found to be a significant factor.

  16. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Peter A.; Leopold, Jane A.; Gupte, Sachin A.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the rate-determining step in the pentose phosphate pathway and produces NADPH to fuel glutathione recycling. G6PD deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans and affects over 400 million people worldwide; however, its impact on cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. The glutathione pathway is paramount to antioxidant defense, and G6PD-deficient cells do not cope well with oxidative damage. Limited clinical evidence indicates that G6PD deficiency may be associated with hypertension. However, there are also data to support a protective role of G6PD deficiency in decreasing the risk of heart disease and cardiovascular-associated deaths, perhaps through a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. Studies in G6PD-deficient (G6PDX) mice are mixed and provide evidence for both protective and deleterious effects. G6PD deficiency may provide a protective effect through decreasing cholesterol synthesis, superoxide production, and reductive stress. However, recent studies indicate that G6PDX mice are moderately more susceptible to ventricular dilation in response to myocardial infarction or pressure overload-induced heart failure. Furthermore, G6PDX hearts do not recover as well as nondeficient mice when faced with ischemia-reperfusion injury, and G6PDX mice are susceptible to the development of age-associated cardiac hypertrophy. Overall, the limited available data indicate a complex interplay in which adverse effects of G6PD deficiency may outweigh potential protective effects in the face of cardiac stress. Definitive clinical studies in large populations are needed to determine the effects of G6PD deficiency on the development of cardiovascular disease and subsequent outcomes. PMID:23241320

  17. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number and the activities of electron transport chain complexes and pyruvate dehydrogenase in the frontal cortex from subjects with autism.

    PubMed

    Gu, F; Chauhan, V; Kaur, K; Brown, W T; LaFauci, G; Wegiel, J; Chauhan, A

    2013-09-03

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with social deficits and behavioral abnormalities. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may contribute to the etiology of autism. This is the first study to compare the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes (I-V) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), as well as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in the frontal cortex tissues from autistic and age-matched control subjects. The activities of complexes I, V and PDH were most affected in autism (n=14) being significantly reduced by 31%, 36% and 35%, respectively. When 99% confidence interval (CI) of control group was taken as a reference range, impaired activities of complexes I, III and V were observed in 43%, 29% and 43% of autistic subjects, respectively. Reduced activities of all five ETC complexes were observed in 14% of autistic cases, and the activities of multiple complexes were decreased in 29% of autistic subjects. These results suggest that defects in complexes I and III (sites of mitochondrial free radical generation) and complex V (adenosine triphosphate synthase) are more prevalent in autism. PDH activity was also reduced in 57% of autistic subjects. The ratios of mtDNA of three mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4 and Cyt B (that encode for subunits of complexes I and III) to nuclear DNA were significantly increased in autism, suggesting a higher mtDNA copy number in autism. Compared with the 95% CI of the control group, 44% of autistic children showed higher copy numbers of all three mitochondrial genes examined. Furthermore, ND4 and Cyt B deletions were observed in 44% and 33% of autistic children, respectively. This study indicates that autism is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain.

  18. Heterogeneity of autoreactive T cell clones specific for the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The extraordinary specificity of bile duct destruction in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and the presence of T cell infiltrates in the portal tracts have suggested that biliary epithelial cells are the targets of an autoimmune response. The immunodominant antimitochondrial response in patients with PBC is directed against the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDC-E2). Hitherto, there have only been limited reports on the characterization and V beta usage of PDC-E2-specific cloned T cell lines. In this study, we examined peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for their reactivity to the entire PDC complex as well as to the E1- and E2-specific components. We also examined the phenotype, lymphokine profile, and V beta usage of PDC-specific T cell clones isolated from cellular infiltrates from the livers of PBC patients. We report that PBMC from 16/19 patients with PBC, but not 12 control patients, respond to the PDC-E2 subunit. Interestingly, this response was directed to the inner and/or the outer lipoyl domains, despite the serologic observation that the autoantibody response is directed predominantly to the inner lipoyl domain. Additionally, lymphokine analysis of interleukin (IL) 2/IL-4/interferon gamma production from individual liver-derived autoantigen-specific T cell clones suggests that both T helper cell Th1- and Th2-like clones are present in the liver. Moreover, there was considerable heterogeneity in the T cell receptor for antigen (TCR) V beta usage of these antigen- specific autoreactive T cell clones. This is in contrast to murine studies in which animals are induced to develop autoimmunity by specific immunization and have an extremely limited T cell V beta repertoire. Thus, our data suggest that in human organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as PBC, the TCR V beta repertoire is heterogenous. PMID:7836925

  19. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins from Mycoplasma bovis and Establishment of an Indirect ELISA Based on Recombinant E1 Beta Subunit of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuewei; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Fei; Liu, Xu; Xu, Wei; Wu, Wenxue

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is a major cause of respiratory disease, mastitis, and arthritis in cattle. Screening the key immunogenic proteins and updating rapid diagnostic techniques are necessary to the prevention and control of M. bovis infection. In this study, 19 highly immunogenic proteins from M. bovis strain PD were identified using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these 19 proteins, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component beta subunit (PDHB) showed excellent immune reactivity and repeatability. PDHB was found to be conserved in different M. bovis isolates, as indicated by Western blot analysis. On the basis of these results, a rPDHB-based indirect ELISA (iELISA) was established for the detection of serum antibodies using prokaryotically expressed recombinant PDHB protein as the coating antigen. The specificity analysis result showed that rPDHB-based iELISA did not react with other pathogens assessed in our study except M. agalactiae (which infects sheep and goats). Moreover, 358 serum samples from several disease-affected cattle feedlots were tested using this iELISA system and a commercial kit, which gave positive rates of 50.8% and 39.9%, respectively. The estimated Kappa agreement coefficient between the two methods was 0.783. Notably, 39 positive serum samples that had been missed by the commercial kit were all found to be positive by Western blot analysis. The detection rate of rPDHB-based iELISA was significantly higher than that of the commercial kit at a serum dilution ratio of 1∶5120 to 1∶10,240 (P<0.05). Taken together, these results provide important information regarding the novel immunogenic proteins of M. bovis. The established rPDHB-based iELISA may be suitable for use as a new method of antibody detection in M. bovis. PMID:24520369

  20. Coimmunopurification of phosphorylated bacterial- and plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases with the plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from developing castor oil seeds.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; O'Leary, Brendan; Spang, H Elizabeth; MacDonald, Justin A; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2008-03-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) interactome of developing castor oil seed (COS; Ricinus communis) endosperm was assessed using coimmunopurification (co-IP) followed by proteomic analysis. Earlier studies suggested that immunologically unrelated 107-kD plant-type PEPCs (p107/PTPC) and 118-kD bacterial-type PEPCs (p118/BTPC) are subunits of an unusual 910-kD hetero-octameric class 2 PEPC complex of developing COS. The current results confirm that a tight physical interaction occurs between p118 and p107 because p118 quantitatively coimmunopurified with p107 following elution of COS extracts through an anti-p107-IgG immunoaffinity column. No PEPC activity or immunoreactive PEPC polypeptides were detected in the corresponding flow-through fractions. Although BTPCs lack the N-terminal phosphorylation motif characteristic of PTPCs, Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining, immunoblotting with phospho-serine (Ser)/threonine Akt substrate IgG, and phosphate-affinity PAGE established that coimmunopurified p118 was multiphosphorylated at unique Ser and/or threonine residues. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of an endoproteinase Lys-C p118 peptide digest demonstrated that Ser-425 is subject to in vivo proline-directed phosphorylation. The co-IP of p118 with p107 did not appear to be influenced by their phosphorylation status. Because p118 phosphorylation was unchanged 48 h following elimination of photosynthate supply due to COS depodding, the signaling mechanisms responsible for photosynthate-dependent p107 phosphorylation differ from those controlling p118's in vivo phosphorylation. A 110-kD PTPC coimmunopurified with p118 and p107 when depodded COS was used. The plastidial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC(pl)) was identified as a novel PEPC interactor. Thus, a putative metabolon involving PEPC and PDC(pl) could function to channel carbon from phosphoenolpyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A and/or to recycle CO(2) from PDC(pl) to PEPC.

  1. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-09

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  2. Acetyl-CoA deficit in brain mitochondria in experimental thiamine deficiency encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Kulawy, Agnieszka; Bielarczyk, Hanna; Pawełczyk, Tadeusz; Wróblewska, Małgorzata; Szutowicz, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    Several pathologic conditions are known to cause thiamine deficiency, which induce energy shortages in all tissues, due to impairment of pyruvate decarboxylation. Brain is particularly susceptible to these conditions due to its high rate of glucose to pyruvate-driven energy metabolism. However, cellular compartmentalization of a key energy metabolite, acetyl-CoA, in this pathology remains unknown. Pyrithiamine-evoked thiamine deficiency caused no significant alteration in pyruvate dehydrogenase and 30% inhibition of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activities in rat whole forebrain mitochondria. It also caused 50% reduction of the metabolic flux of pyruvate through pyruvate dehydrogenase, 78% inhibition of its flux through α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase steps, and nearly 60% decrease of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA content, irrespective of the metabolic state. State 3 caused a decrease in citrate and an increase in α-ketoglutarate accumulation. These alterations were more evident in thiamine-deficient mitochondria. Simultaneously thiamine deficiency caused no alteration of relative, state 3-induced increases in metabolic fluxes through pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase steps. These data indicate that a shortage of acetyl-CoA in the mitochondrial compartment may be a primary signal inducing impairment of neuronal and glial cell functions and viability in the thiamine-deficient brain.

  3. Decreased GABA-A binding on FMZ-PET in succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pearl, P L; Gibson, K M; Quezado, Z; Dustin, I; Taylor, J; Trzcinski, S; Schreiber, J; Forester, K; Reeves-Tyer, P; Liew, C; Shamim, S; Herscovitch, P; Carson, R; Butman, J; Jakobs, C; Theodore, W

    2009-08-11

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of GABA metabolism characterized by elevated levels of GABA and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid. Clinical findings include intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hyporeflexia, hallucinations, autistic behaviors, and seizures. Autoradiographic labeling and slice electrophysiology studies in the murine model demonstrate use-dependent downregulation of GABA(A) receptors. We studied GABA(A) receptor activity in human SSADH deficiency utilizing [(11)C]-flumazenil (FMZ)-PET. FMZ binding was measured in 7 patients, 10 unaffected parents, and 8 healthy controls. Data analysis was performed using a reference region compartmental model, with time-activity curve from pons as the input function. Relative parametric binding potential (BP(ND)) was derived, with MRI-based pixel by pixel partial volume correction, in regions of interest drawn on coregistered MRI. In amygdala, hippocampus, cerebellar vermis, frontal, parietal, and occipital cortex, patients with SSADH deficiency had significant reductions in FMZ BP(ND) compared to parents and controls. Mean cortical values were 6.96 +/- 0.79 (controls), 6.89 +/- 0.71 (parents), and 4.88 +/- 0.77 (patients) (F ratio 16.1; p < 0.001). There were no differences between controls and parents in any cortical region. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficient patients show widespread reduction in BZPR binding on [(11)C]-flumazenil-PET. Our results suggest that high endogenous brain GABA levels in SSADH deficiency downregulate GABA(A)-BZPR binding site availability. This finding suggests a potential mechanism for neurologic dysfunction in a serious neurodevelopmental disorder, and suggests that PET may be useful to translate studies in animal models to human disease.

  4. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency aggravates energy metabolism disturbance and diastolic dysfunction in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Fan, Fan; Cao, Quan; Shen, Cheng; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Xiaona; Sun, Xiaolei; Dong, Zhen; Ma, Xin; Liu, Xiangwei; Han, Shasha; Wu, Chaoneng; Zou, Yunzeng; Hu, Kai; Ge, Junbo; Sun, Aijun

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes causes energy metabolism disturbance and may lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects cardiac function from myocardial damage. Therefore, understanding of its roles in diabetic heart is critical for developing new therapeutics targeting ALDH2 and mitochondrial function for diabetic hearts. This study investigated the impact of ALDH2 deficiency on diastolic function and energy metabolism in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced in ALDH2 knockout and wild-type mice by streptozotocin. Cardiac function was determined by echocardiography. Glucose uptake, energy status, and metabolic profiles were used to evaluate cardiac energy metabolism. The association between ALDH2 polymorphism and diabetes was also analyzed in patients. Echocardiography revealed preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic function in diabetic ALDH2-deficient mice. Energy reserves (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate ratio) were reduced in the diabetic mutants and were associated with diastolic dysfunction. Western blot analysis showed that diabetes induces accumulated lipid peroxidation products and escalated AMP-activated protein kinase-LKB1 pathway. Further, ALDH2 deficiency exacerbated the diabetes-induced deficient myocardial glucose uptake and other perturbations of metabolic profiles. Finally, ALDH2 mutations were associated with worse diastolic dysfunction in diabetic patients. Together, our results demonstrate that ALDH2 deficiency and resulting energy metabolism disturbance is a part of pathology of diastolic dysfunction of diabetic hearts, and suggest that patients with ALDH2 mutations are vulnerable to diabetic damage. ALDH2 deficiency exacerbates diastolic dysfunction in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency triggers decompensation of metabolic reserves and energy metabolism disturbances in early diabetic hearts. ALDH2 deficiency potentiates oxidative stress and AMPK phosphorylation induced by diabetes via post

  5. A severe genotype with favourable outcome in very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Touma, E; Rashed, M; Vianey-Saban, C; Sakr, A; Divry, P; Gregersen, N; Andresen, B

    2001-01-01

    A patient with very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is reported. He had a severe neonatal presentation and cardiomyopathy. He was found to be homozygous for a severe mutation with no residual enzyme activity. Tandem mass spectrometry on dried blood spots revealed increased long chain acylcarnitines. VLCAD enzyme activity was severely decreased to 2% of control levels. Dietary management consisted of skimmed milk supplemented with medium chain triglycerides and L-carnitine. Outcome was good and there was no acute recurrence.

 PMID:11124787

  6. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 deficiency alters the gut microbiome response to Western diet

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jethro S; Opiyo, Monica N; Thomson, Marian; Gharbi, Karim; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) interconverts active glucocorticoids and their intrinsically inert 11-keto forms. The type 1 isozyme, 11β-HSD1, predominantly reactivates glucocorticoids in vivo and can also metabolise bile acids. 11β-HSD1-deficient mice show altered inflammatory responses and are protected against the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. However, the impact of 11β-HSD1 on the composition of the gut microbiome has not previously been investigated. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to characterise the gut microbiome of 11β-HSD1-deficient and C57Bl/6 control mice, fed either a standard chow diet or a cholesterol- and fat-enriched ‘Western’ diet. 11β-HSD1 deficiency significantly altered the composition of the gut microbiome, and did so in a diet-specific manner. On a Western diet, 11β-HSD1 deficiency increased the relative abundance of the family Bacteroidaceae, and on a chow diet, it altered relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae. Our results demonstrate that (i) genetic effects on host–microbiome interactions can depend upon diet and (ii) that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome may contribute to the aspects of the metabolic and/or inflammatory phenotype observed with 11β-HSD1 deficiency. PMID:27885053

  7. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 deficiency alters the gut microbiome response to Western diet.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jethro S; Opiyo, Monica N; Thomson, Marian; Gharbi, Karim; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heger, Andreas; Chapman, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    The enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) interconverts active glucocorticoids and their intrinsically inert 11-keto forms. The type 1 isozyme, 11β-HSD1, predominantly reactivates glucocorticoids in vivo and can also metabolise bile acids. 11β-HSD1-deficient mice show altered inflammatory responses and are protected against the adverse metabolic effects of a high-fat diet. However, the impact of 11β-HSD1 on the composition of the gut microbiome has not previously been investigated. We used high-throughput 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing to characterise the gut microbiome of 11β-HSD1-deficient and C57Bl/6 control mice, fed either a standard chow diet or a cholesterol- and fat-enriched 'Western' diet. 11β-HSD1 deficiency significantly altered the composition of the gut microbiome, and did so in a diet-specific manner. On a Western diet, 11β-HSD1 deficiency increased the relative abundance of the family Bacteroidaceae, and on a chow diet, it altered relative abundance of the family Prevotellaceae Our results demonstrate that (i) genetic effects on host-microbiome interactions can depend upon diet and (ii) that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiome may contribute to the aspects of the metabolic and/or inflammatory phenotype observed with 11β-HSD1 deficiency. © 2017 The authors.

  8. Eye Findings on Vigabatrin and Taurine Treatment in Two Patients with Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella-Ana; Hukin, Juliette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia G; Aroichane, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    We describe for the first time two patients with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency, who were found to have abnormal electroretinogram (ERG) examinations at baseline, or 6 months after vigabatrin treatment was started. This was somewhat reversible with L-taurine treatment, or minimally progressive. The mechanism of injury to the retina may be induced by elevations of γ-aminobutyric acid causing peripheral photoreceptor and ganglion cell damage, and this can be exacerbated by the use of vigabatrin. The use of taurine supplementation in tandem with vigabatrin may allow reversal of retinopathy and mitigate or slow down further deterioration. Further prospective clinical trials are required to evaluate this further. We recommend starting L-taurine therapy together with vigabatrin if a trial of vigabatrin is commenced in a patient with SSADH deficiency. Close monitoring of visual fields or ERG is also recommended at baseline and during vigabatrin therapy.

  9. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Physical and Mental Health until Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Man Ki; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C. Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency with adolescent physical and mental health, as effects of G6PD deficiency on health are rarely reported. Methods In a population-representative Chinese birth cohort: “Children of 1997” (n = 8,327), we estimated the adjusted associations of G6PD deficiency with growth using generalized estimating equations, with pubertal onset using interval censored regression, with hospitalization using Cox proportional hazards regression and with size, blood pressure, pubertal maturation and mental health using linear regression with multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting. Results Among 5,520 screened adolescents (66% follow-up), 4.8% boys and 0.5% girls had G6PD deficiency. G6PD-deficiency was not associated with birth weight-for-gestational age or length/height gain into adolescence, but was associated with lower childhood body mass index (BMI) gain (-0.38 z-score, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.57, -0.20), adjusted for sex and parental education, and later onset of pubic hair development (time ratio = 1.029, 95% CI 1.007, 1.050). G6PD deficiency was not associated with blood pressure, height, BMI or mental health in adolescence, nor with serious infectious morbidity until adolescence. Conclusions G6PD deficient adolescents had broadly similar physical and mental health indicators, but transiently lower BMI gain and later pubic hair development, whose long-term implications warrant investigation. PMID:27824927

  10. Contribution of haemolysis to jaundice in Sephardic Jewish glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient neonates.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Vreman, H J; Hammerman, C; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Stevenson, D K

    1996-06-01

    We determined the contribution of haemolysis to the development of hyperbilirubinaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficient neonates and G-6-PD normal controls. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb), sampled on the third day of life, was measured by gas chromatography, corrected for inhaled carbon monoxide (COHbC), and expressed as a percentage of total haemoglobin concentration (Hb). Serum bilirubin was tested as clinically necessary. 37 non-jaundiced (peak serum total bilirubin (PSTB) < or = 255 mumol/l) and 20 jaundiced (PSTB > or = 257 mumol/l) G-6-PD-deficient neonates were compared to 31 non-jaundiced and 24 jaundiced controls with comparable PSTB values, respectively. COHbC values for the entire G-6-PD deficient group were higher than in the controls (0.75 +/- 0.17% v 0.62 +/- 0.19%, P < 0.001). COHbC and PSTB values did not correlate in the G-6-PD-deficient group (r = 0.15, P > 0.05) but did in the controls (r = 0.58, P < 0.001). COHbC values were increased to a similar extent in the G-6-PD-deficient, non-jaundiced (0.72 +/- 0.16%), the G-6-PD-deficient, jaundiced (0.80 +/- 0.19%) and the control, jaundiced (0.75 +/- 0.18%) subgroups, compared to the control, non-jaundiced subgroup (0.53 +/- 0.13%) (P < 0.05). Although present in G-6-PD deficient neonates, increased haemolysis was not directly related to the PSTB.

  11. Therapeutic intervention in mice deficient for succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh; Greven, Rachel; Jansen, Erwin E W; Jakobs, Cornelis; Hogema, Boris M; Froestl, Wolfgang; Snead, O Carter; Bartels, Hilke; Grompe, Markus; Gibson, K Michael

    2002-07-01

    Therapeutic intervention for human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) has been limited to vigabatrin (VGB). Pharmacologically, VGB should be highly effective due to 4-aminobutyrate-transaminase (GABA-transaminase) inhibition, lowering succinic semialdehyde and, thereby, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) levels. Unfortunately, clinical efficacy has been limited. Because GHB possesses a number of potential receptor interactions, we addressed the hypothesis that antagonism of these interactions in mice with SSADH deficiency could lead to the development of novel treatment strategies for human patients. SSADH-deficient mice have significantly elevated tissue GHB levels, are neurologically impaired, and die within 4 weeks postnatally. In the current report, we compared oral versus intraperitoneal administration of VGB, CGP 35348 [3-aminopropyl(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist], and the nonprotein amino acid taurine in rescue of SSADH-deficient mice from early death. In addition, we assessed the efficacy of the specific GHB receptor antagonist NCS-382 (6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-[H]benzocycloheptene-5-ol-6-ylideneacetic acid) using i.p. administration. All interventions led to significant lifespan extension (22-61%), with NCS-382 being most effective (50-61% survival). To explore the limited human clinical efficacy of VGB, we measured brain GHB and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in SSADH-deficient mice receiving VGB. Whereas high-dose VGB led to the expected elevation of brain GABA, we found no parallel decrease in GHB levels. Our data indicate that, at a minimum, GHB and GABA(B) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of SSADH deficiency. We conclude that taurine and NCS-382 may have therapeutic relevance in human SSADH deficiency and that the poor clinical efficacy of VGB in this disease may relate to an inability to decrease brain GHB concentrations.

  12. Evaluation of the blue formazan spot test for screening glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pujades, A; Lewis, M; Salvati, A M; Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Zarza, R; Alvarez, R; Rull, E; Corrons, J L

    1999-06-01

    Several screening tests for glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency have been reported thus far, and a standardized method of testing was proposed by the International Council for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH). The screening test used in any particular laboratory depends upon a number of factors such as cost, time required, temperature, humidity, and availability of reagents. In this study, a direct comparison between three different G6PD screening methods has been undertaken. In 71 cases (50 hematologically normal volunteers, 9 hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, and 12 heterozygous deficient females), the blue formazan spot test (BFST) was compared with the conventional methemoglobin reduction test (HiRT) and the ICSH-recommended fluorescent spot test (FST-ICSH). In all cases, the results obtained with the three screening tests were correlated with the enzyme activity assayed spectrophotometrically. In hemizygous G6PD-deficient males, all cases were equally detected with the three methods: BFST (4.7-6.64, controls: 11.1-13.4), BMRT (score +3 in all 9 cases), and FST (no fluorescence in 9 cases). In heterozygous G6PD-deficient females, two methods detected 7 out of 12 cases (BFST: 8.71-11.75, controls: 11.1-13.4; and BMRT: score +3 in 7 cases), whereas the FST-ICSH missed all 12 cases that presented a variable degree of fluorescence. Although the sensitivity for G6PD-deficient carrier detection is the same for the BMRT and the BFST, the latter has the advantage of being semiquantitative and not merely qualitative. Unfortunately, none of the three screening tests compared here allowed the detection of the 100% heterozygote carrier state of G6PD deficiency.

  13. The Pathogenesis of Alcohol-Induced Airflow Limitation in Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Matsuse, Hiroto; Asai, Sadahiro; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    In Japanese patients, alcohol-induced asthma is attributed to elevated plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde following alcohol consumption because of an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) polymorphism. The resulting increase in plasma histamine concentrations seems to trigger the onset of asthma symptoms. However, the specific pathogenic mechanism underlying this response remains unclear. ALDH2-deficient mice were therefore generated to investigate the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma. ALDH2-deficient mice were generated using embryonic stem cells that were derived from C57BL/6 mice. The resulting mice were backcrossed into the BALB/c mice background. Exon 1 of ALDH2 was replaced with the Neo cassette. Pure ethanol was orally administered to ALDH2-deficient and wild-type mice, and the plasma concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and histamine, in addition to enhanced pause (Penh) values, were determined and compared between the 2 groups. We established an ALDH2-deficient mouse line to compare responses between wild-type and ALDH2-deficient mice receiving orally administered ethanol. The results showed that the plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde (p < 0.0001) and histamine (p < 0.005) were significantly higher, and the Penh values (p < 0.01) were significantly greater in the ALDH2-deficient mice, although plasma ethanol levels were not different. We studied the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma using ALDH2-deficient mice. The results demonstrated that alcohol intake resulted in an increase in acetaldehyde levels, and a subsequent increase in histamine levels, which induced airway constriction. Alcohol consumption is known to be an important factor that exacerbates bronchial asthma, and studies investigating this factor are useful for the treatment of patients with alcohol-induced asthma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Engineering of the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the cytosolic Mg(2+) and mitochondrial K(+) acetaldehyde dehydrogenases Ald6p and Ald4p in acetate formation during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Remize, F; Andrieu, E; Dequin, S

    2000-08-01

    Acetic acid plays a crucial role in the organoleptic balance of many fermented products. We have investigated the factors controlling the production of acetate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation by metabolic engineering of the enzymatic steps involved in its formation and its utilization. The impact of reduced pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), limited acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ACDH), or increased acetoacetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) levels in a strain derived from a wine yeast strain was studied during alcoholic fermentation. In the strain with the PDC1 gene deleted exhibiting 25% of the PDC activity of the wild type, no significant differences were observed in the acetate yield or in the amounts of secondary metabolites formed. A strain overexpressing ACS2 and displaying a four- to sevenfold increase in ACS activity did not produce reduced acetate levels. In contrast, strains with one or two disrupted copies of ALD6, encoding the cytosolic Mg(2+)-activated NADP-dependent ACDH and exhibiting 60 and 30% of wild-type ACDH activity, showed a substantial decrease in acetate yield (the acetate production was 75 and 40% of wild-type production, respectively). This decrease was associated with a rerouting of carbon flux towards the formation of glycerol, succinate, and butanediol. The deletion of ALD4, encoding the mitochondrial K(+)-activated NAD(P)-linked ACDH, had no effect on the amount of acetate formed. In contrast, a strain lacking both Ald6p and Ald4p exhibited a long delay in growth and acetate production, suggesting that Ald4p can partially replace the Ald6p isoform. Moreover, the ald6 ald4 double mutant was still able to ferment large amounts of sugar and to produce acetate, suggesting the contribution of another member(s) of the ALD family.

  15. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F.; Gibson, Gary E.; Beal, M. Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20–48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ∼30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST+/− or DLD+/− littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on “in-house” mitochondrial ATP reserves.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Doczi, J., Starkov, A. A., Kawamata, H., Manfredi, G., Zhang, S. F., Gibson, G. E., Beal, M. F., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID:23475850

  16. alpha-Ketobutyrate metabolism in perfused rat liver: regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate decarboxylation and effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Olson, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    The oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate were studied using perfused livers from fasted rats. The production of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from alpha-keto-(1-/sup 14/C)butyrate increased monotonically while the production of glucose from alpha-ketobutyrate was biphasic as the perfusate concentration of alpha-ketobutyrate was increased. The biphasic gluconeogenic response using alpha-ketobutyrate as the gluconeogenic precursor was similar to that observed with propionate. The effects of alpha-ketobutyrate infusion on pyruvate decarboxylation were tested and it was found that at low perfusate pyruvate concentrations increasing alpha-ketobutyrate led to increasing inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation, while at high perfusate pyruvate concentrations an initial inhibition was apparent which did not increase substantially with increasing alpha-ketobutyrate concentrations. The results obtained indicate that the regulation of alpha-ketobutyrate metabolism by oxidative decarboxylation differs significantly from that of pyruvate. In addition, while the rate of gluconeogenesis using alpha-ketobutyrate as a precursor was remarkably similar to that using propionate as a gluconeogenic precursor, the effects of alpha-ketobutyrate on the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate were qualitatively different from the effects of propionate on pyruvate metabolism.

  17. Environmental stresses of field growth allow cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient Nicotiana attenuata plants to compensate for their structural deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harleen; Shaker, Kamel; Heinzel, Nicolas; Ralph, John; Gális, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T

    2012-08-01

    The organized lignocellulosic assemblies of cell walls provide the structural integrity required for the large statures of terrestrial plants. Silencing two CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) genes in Nicotiana attenuata produced plants (ir-CAD) with thin, red-pigmented stems, low CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity, low lignin contents, and rubbery, structurally unstable stems when grown in the glasshouse (GH). However, when planted into their native desert habitat, ir-CAD plants produced robust stems that survived wind storms as well as the wild-type plants. Despite efficient silencing of NaCAD transcripts and enzymatic activity, field-grown ir-CAD plants had delayed and restricted spread of red stem pigmentation, a color change reflecting blocked lignification by CAD silencing, and attained wild-type-comparable total lignin contents. The rubbery GH phenotype was largely restored when field-grown ir-CAD plants were protected from wind, herbivore attack, and ultraviolet B exposure and grown in restricted rooting volumes; conversely, it was lost when ir-CAD plants were experimentally exposed to wind, ultraviolet B, and grown in large pots in growth chambers. Transcript and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight analysis revealed that these environmental stresses enhanced the accumulation of various phenylpropanoids in stems of field-grown plants; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the lignin of field-grown ir-CAD plants had GH-grown comparable levels of sinapaldehyde and syringaldehyde cross-linked into their lignins. Additionally, field-grown ir-CAD plants had short, thick stems with normal xylem element traits, which collectively enabled field-grown ir-CAD plants to compensate for the structural deficiencies associated with CAD silencing. Environmental stresses play an essential role in regulating lignin biosynthesis in lignin-deficient plants.

  18. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kipari, Tiina; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Iqbal, Javaid; Man, Tak-Yung; Miller, Eileen; Coutinho, Agnes E; Zhang, Zhenguang; Sullivan, Katie M; Mitic, Tijana; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Schrecker, Christopher; Samuel, Kay; White, Christopher I; Bouhlel, M Amine; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R; Savill, John S; Chapman, Karen E; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2013-04-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 (11β-HSD1) converts inert cortisone into active cortisol, amplifying intracellular glucocorticoid action. 11β-HSD1 deficiency improves cardiovascular risk factors in obesity but exacerbates acute inflammation. To determine the effects of 11β-HSD1 deficiency on atherosclerosis and its inflammation, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mice were treated with a selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor or crossed with 11β-HSD1-KO mice to generate double knockouts (DKOs) and challenged with an atherogenic Western diet. 11β-HSD1 inhibition or deficiency attenuated atherosclerosis (74-76%) without deleterious effects on plaque structure. This occurred without affecting plasma lipids or glucose, suggesting independence from classical metabolic risk factors. KO plaques were not more inflamed and indeed had 36% less T-cell infiltration, associated with 38% reduced circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and 36% lower lesional vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Bone marrow (BM) cells are key to the atheroprotection, since transplantation of DKO BM to irradiated ApoE-KO mice reduced atherosclerosis by 51%. 11β-HSD1-null macrophages show 76% enhanced cholesterol ester export. Thus, 11β-HSD1 deficiency reduces atherosclerosis without exaggerated lesional inflammation independent of metabolic risk factors. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitors promise novel antiatherosclerosis effects over and above their benefits for metabolic risk factors via effects on BM cells, plausibly macrophages.

  19. Molecular characterization of a German variant of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD Aachen).

    PubMed

    Efferth, T; Osieka, R; Beutler, E

    2000-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-chromosome-linked hereditary disorder. Clinically, patients with G6PD deficiency often present with drug- or food-induced hemolytic crises or neonatal jaundice. G6PD is involved in the generation of NADPH and reduced glutathione. In contrast to American, Mediterranean, and African ancestries, only few variants are known from Middle and Northern Europe. We describe the molecular characterization of a distinct variant from the northwestern area of Germany, G6PD Aachen. The sequence of the G6PD gene from three afflicted males was found to be hemizygous at cDNA residue 1089 for a C-->G mutation with a predicted amino acid change of Asn363Lys. The 1089 C-->G point mutation is unique, but produces the identical amino acid change found in a Mexican variant of G6PD deficiency, G6PD Loma Linda. This G6PD-deficient variant is caused by a 1089 C-->A mutation. The 363-amino-acid replacement is located outside a known mutation cluster region between amino acid residues 380 and 450, but may disrupt or weaken dimer interactions of G6PD enzyme subunits.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among tribal populations of India - Country scenario.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Malay B; Colah, Roshan B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    It is believed that the tribal people, who constitute 8.6 per cent of the total population (2011 census of India), are the original inhabitants of India. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked genetic defect, affecting around 400 million people worldwide and is characterized by considerable biochemical and molecular heterogeneity. Deficiency of this enzyme is highly polymorphic in those areas where malaria is/has been endemic. G6PD deficiency was reported from India more than 50 years ago. t0 he prevalence varies from 2.3 to 27.0 per cent with an overall prevalence of 7.7 per cent in different tribal groups. Since the tribal populations live in remote areas where malaria is/has been endemic, irrational use of antimalarial drugs could result in an increased number of cases with drug induced haemolysis. Therefore, before giving antimalarial therapy, routine screening for G6PD deficiency should be undertaken in those tribal communities where its prevalence is high.

  1. Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: biochemical versus genetic technologies.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy

    2011-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, a commonly occurring genetic condition, is associated in neonates with severe hemolytic episodes, extreme hyperbilirubinemia, and bilirubin encephalopathy. Neonatal screening programs for the condition should increase parental and caretaker awareness, thereby facilitating early access to treatment with resultant diminished mortality and morbidity. However, screening for G-6-PD deficiency is not widely performed. Although G-6-PD-deficient males may be accurately identified, females are more difficult to categorize because many in this group may be heterozygotes with phenotype overlap between normal homozygotes, heterozygotes, and deficient homozygotes. Screening methodologies include biochemical qualitative assays, quantitative enzymatic activity measurements and DNA-based polymerase chain reaction molecular screening. The appropriateness of any of these technologies for any particular population group or geographic area must be assessed before setting up a screening program. The pros and cons of each method, including ease of testing, cost, need for sophisticated laboratory equipment and degree of personnel training, as well as the ability to identify females, are discussed.

  2. Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency at the China-Myanmar Border.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Yang, Fang; Liu, Rong; Luo, Lan; Yang, Yuling; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Huaie; Zhang, Wen; Fan, Zhixiang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang; He, Yongshu

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked hereditary disease that predisposes red blood cells to oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is particularly prevalent in historically malaria-endemic areas. Use of primaquine for malaria treatment may result in severe hemolysis in G6PD deficient patients. In this study, we systematically evaluated the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the Kachin (Jingpo) ethnic group along the China-Myanmar border and determined the underlying G6PD genotypes. We surveyed G6PD deficiency in 1770 adult individuals (671 males and 1099 females) of the Kachin ethnicity using a G6PD fluorescent spot test. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency in the study population was 29.6% (523/1770), among which 27.9% and 30.6% were males and females, respectively. From these G6PD deficient samples, 198 unrelated individuals (147 females and 51 males) were selected for genotyping at 11 known G6PD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Southeast Asia (ten in exons and one in intron 11) using a multiplex SNaPshot assay. Mutations with known association to a deficient phenotype were detected in 43.9% (87/198) of cases, intronic and synonymous mutations were detected alone in 34.8% (69/198) cases and no mutation were found in 21.2% (42/198) cases. Five non-synonymous mutations, Mahidol 487G>A, Kaiping 1388G>A, Canton 1376G>T, Chinese 4 392G>T, and Viangchan 871G>A were detected. Of the 87 cases with known deficient mutations, the Mahidol variant was the most common (89.7%; 78/87), followed by the Kaiping (8.0%; 7/87) and the Viangchan (2.2%; 2/87) variants. The Canton and Chinese 4 variants were found in 1.1% of these 87 cases. Among them, two females carried the Mahidol/Viangchan and Mahidol/Kaiping double mutations, respectively. Interestingly, the silent SNPs 1311C>T and IVS11nt93T>C both occurred in the same 95 subjects with frequencies at 56.4% and 23.5% in tested females and males, respectively (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that 24

  3. Serum Reactivity Against Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase: Increasing the Specificity of Anti-Mitochondrial Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Selmi, Carlo; Hosoya, Naomi; Mataki, Norikazu; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Kato, Takashi; Arai, Junya; Goto, Toshihiro; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2006-01-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are the serum hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). However, AMA-positivity can be found in non-PBC sera when lower dilutions are used, thus raising issues about the specificity and sensitivity of the test. AMA reacts primarily with the lipoylated domains of pyruvate dehydrogenase-E2 (PDC-E2) which is highly conserved across species, including bacteria. We studied 77 serum samples, including 24 from patients with anti-PDC-E2-positive PBC and 53 controls (16 with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), 10 with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and 27 healthy individuals) for their reactivities at serial dilutions (1:10, 1:20 and 1:40) against Escherichia coli DH5 alpha lysate overexpressing human PDC-E2 using immunoblotting (IB). A murine anti-human PDC-E2 monoclonal antibody (mAB) was used as control. We further studied positive sera using adsorption with a synthetic E. coli peptide sharing similarity with human PDC-E2. Finally, we verified whether a unique buffer for E. coli preparation could reduce non-specific serum reactivity. Results demonstrated that 100% of anti-PDC-E2-positive PBC and up to 38% of control sera at 1:10 dilution recognized E. coli PDC-E2 at IB while dilution tests indicated that the overall potency of PBC reactivity was 100-fold higher compared to controls. In fact, a subgroup (20-38%) of non-PBC sera were positive at low titers but lost the reactivity when absorbed with the synthetic E. coli peptide. Finally, our unique buffer reduced the reactivity of non-PBC sera as measured by ELISA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that weak cross-reactivity with E. coli PDC-E2 occurs in non-PBC sera at lower dilutions and that such reactivity is not due to AMA-positivity. The use of a specific buffer might avoid the risk of false positive AMA determinations when E. coli-expressed recombinant antigens are used. PMID:17162370

  4. Antimalarial NADPH-Consuming Redox-Cyclers As Superior Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Copycats

    PubMed Central

    Bielitza, Max; Belorgey, Didier; Ehrhardt, Katharina; Johann, Laure; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Mohring, Franziska; Jortzik, Esther; Williams, David L.; Becker, Katja; Arese, Paolo; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Early phagocytosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum were shown to protect G6PD-deficient populations from severe malaria. Here, we investigated the mechanism of a novel antimalarial series, namely 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, to understand whether these NADPH-consuming redox-cyclers, which induce oxidative stress, mimic the natural protection of G6PD deficiency. Results: We demonstrated that the key benzoylmenadione metabolite of the lead compound acts as an efficient redox-cycler in NADPH-dependent methaemoglobin reduction, leading to the continuous formation of reactive oxygen species, ferrylhaemoglobin, and subsequent haemichrome precipitation. Structure–activity relationships evidenced that both drug metabolites and haemoglobin catabolites contribute to potentiate drug effects and inhibit parasite development. Disruption of redox homeostasis by the lead benzylmenadione was specifically induced in Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes and not in non-infected cells, and was visualized via changes in the glutathione redox potential of living parasite cytosols. Furthermore, the redox-cycler shows additive and synergistic effects in combination with compounds affecting the NADPH flux in vivo. Innovation: The lead benzylmenadione 1c is the first example of a novel redox-active agent that mimics the behavior of a falciparum parasite developing inside a G6PD-deficient red blood cell (RBC) giving rise to malaria protection, and it exerts specific additive effects that are inhibitory to parasite development, without harm for non-infected G6PD-sufficient or -deficient RBCs. Conclusion: This strategy offers an innovative perspective for the development of future antimalarial drugs for G6PD-sufficient and -deficient populations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1337–1351. PMID:25714942

  5. Screening and prevention of neonatal glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Li, B; Cao, W; Jiang, X; Jia, X; Chen, Q; Wu, J

    2014-06-09

    We aimed to summarize the results of screening protocol and prevention of neonatal glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency during a 22-year-long period to provide a basis of reference for the screening of this disease. About 1,705,569 newborn subjects in Guangzhou City were screened for this deficiency. Specimens were collected according to the conventional method of specimen acquisition for "newborn dried bloodspot screening", preserved, and inspected. The specimens were studied with fluorescent spot test and quantitative fluorescence assay. Diagnosis was performed using the modified NBTG6PD/6PGD ratio method. Bloodspot filter paper specimens were sent to the laboratory within 24 h via EMS Express, and the G6PD test was performed on the same day. The G6PD deficiency-positive rate was 4.2% in the samples screened using the fluorescent spot test, while it was 5% in case of the quantitative fluorescence assay. Neonatal screening for G6PD deficiency for 11,437 cases (6117 boys and 5320 girls) showed positive results in 481 cases. About 420 cases (318 boys and 102 girls) of G6PD deficiency were confirmed with the modified Duchenne NBT ratio method. The total detection rate was 3.7:5.2% for boys and 1.9% for girls. Quantitative fluorescence assay improved the sensitivity and detection rate. Accelerating the speed of sample delivery by using Internet network systems and ensuring online availability of screening results can aid the screening and diagnosis of this deficiency within 1 week of birth.

  6. Generation of a High Number of Healthy Erythroid Cells from Gene-Edited Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garate, Zita; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Crane, Ana M.; Olivier, Emmanuel; Poirot, Laurent; Galetto, Roman; Kosinski, Penelope; Hill, Collin; Kung, Charles; Agirre, Xabi; Orman, Israel; Cerrato, Laura; Alberquilla, Omaira; Rodriguez-Fornes, Fatima; Fusaki, Noemi; Garcia-Sanchez, Felix; Maia, Tabita M.; Ribeiro, Maria L.; Sevilla, Julian; Prosper, Felipe; Jin, Shengfang; Mountford, Joanne; Guenechea, Guillermo; Gouble, Agnes; Bueren, Juan A.; Davis, Brian R.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a rare erythroid metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene. Erythrocytes from PKD patients show an energetic imbalance causing chronic non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, as pyruvate kinase defects impair ATP production in erythrocytes. We generated PKD induced pluripotent stem cells (PKDiPSCs) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs) of PKD patients by non-integrative Sendai viral vectors. PKDiPSCs were gene edited to integrate a partial codon-optimized R-type pyruvate kinase cDNA in the second intron of the PKLR gene by TALEN-mediated homologous recombination (HR). Notably, we found allele specificity of HR led by the presence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism. High numbers of erythroid cells derived from gene-edited PKDiPSCs showed correction of the energetic imbalance, providing an approach to correct metabolic erythroid diseases and demonstrating the practicality of this approach to generate the large cell numbers required for comprehensive biochemical and metabolic erythroid analyses. PMID:26549847

  7. Optimal dietary therapy of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gillingham, Melanie B.; Connor, William E.; Matern, Dietrich; Rinaldo, Piero; Burlingame, Terry; Meeuws, Kaatje; Harding, Cary O.

    2009-01-01

    Current dietary therapy for long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency consists of fasting avoidance, and limiting long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) intake. This study reports the relationship of dietary intake and metabolic control as measured by plasma acylcarnitine and organic acid profiles in 10 children with LCHAD or TFP deficiency followed for 1 year. Subjects consumed an average of 11% of caloric intake as dietary LCFA, 11% as MCT, 12% as protein, and 66% as carbohydrate. Plasma levels of hydroxypalmitoleic acid, hydroxyoleic, and hydroxylinoleic carnitine esters positively correlated with total LCFA intake and negatively correlated with MCT intake suggesting that as dietary intake of LCFA decreases and MCT intake increases, there is a corresponding decrease in plasma hydroxyacylcarnitines. There was no correlation between plasma acylcarnitines and level of carnitine supplementation. Dietary intake of fat-soluble vitamins E and K was deficient. Dietary intake and plasma levels of essential fatty acids, linoleic and linolenic acid, were deficient. On this dietary regimen, the majority of subjects were healthy with no episodes of metabolic decompensation. Our data suggest that an LCHAD or TFP-deficient patient should adhere to a diet providing age-appropriate protein and limited LCFA intake (10% of total energy) while providing 10–20% of energy as MCT and a daily multi-vitamin and mineral (MVM) supplement that includes all of the fat-soluble vitamins. The diet should be supplemented with vegetable oils as part of the 10% total LCFA intake to provide essential fatty acids. PMID:12809642

  8. Association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and malaria: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Ahmed, Ali Mahmoud; Titouna, Afaf; Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Phuoc Long, Nguyen; Hoang Anh, Nguyen; Diem Nghi, Tran; The Hung, Bui; Van Hieu, Mai; Ky Anh, Nguyen; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency overlaps with malaria endemicity although it predisposes carriers to hemolysis. This fact supports the protection hypothesis against malaria. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the presence and the extent of protective association between G6PD deficiency and malaria. Thirteen databases were searched for papers reporting any G6PD alteration in malaria patients. Twenty-eight of the included 30 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Results showed absence of negative association between G6PD deficiency and uncomplicated falciparum malaria (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59–1.02; p = 0.07). However, this negative association happened in Africa (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.40–0.86; p = 0.007) but not in Asia (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.96–1.61; p = 0.10), and in the heterozygotes (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57–0.87; p = 0.001) but not the homo/hemizygous (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46–1.07; p = 0.10). There was no association between G6PD deficiency and total severe malaria (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.61–1.11; p = 0.20). Similarly, there was no association with other malaria species. G6PD deficiency can potentially protect against uncomplicated malaria in African countries, but not severe malaria. Interestingly, this protection was mainly in heterozygous, being x-linked thus related to gender. PMID:28382932

  9. A new paper-based analytical device for detection of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaewarsa, Phuritat; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Palasuwan, Attakorn; Palasuwan, Duangdao

    2017-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic haemolytic disorder. Most persons with G6PD deficiency are asymptomatic, but exposure to oxidant drugs, such as the anti-malarial drug primaquine, may induce haemolysis, which is commonly found in Asian countries. A reliable test is necessary for diagnosing the deficiency to prevent an acute haemolytic crisis. This study proposes a novel quantitative method to detect G6PD deficiency using paper-based analytical devices (G6PDD-PAD). Wax printing was utilized for fabricating circular reaction zone patterns in paper. The colorimetric assay is based on the formation of formazan via a reduction of tetra-nitro blue tetrazolium (TNBT) by the G6PD enzyme on G6PDD-PAD. Detection was achieved by capturing the colour using a desktop scanner and the colour intensity was analysed with Adobe Photoshop C56. The results showed that the G6PD activity analysed by G6PDD-PAD was highly correlated with the standard biochemical assay (SBA) (r(2)=0.87, p<0.01). Moreover, good agreement by Bland-Altman bias plot was demonstrated between G6PDD-PAD and the SBA (mean bias 1.4 IU/gHb). The detection limit was 0 IU/gHb of G6PD activity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using G6PDD-PAD. This simple, low-cost test ($0.1/test) should be useful for diagnosing G6PD deficiency in resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and malaria: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mbanefo, Evaristus Chibunna; Ahmed, Ali Mahmoud; Titouna, Afaf; Elmaraezy, Ahmed; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Phuoc Long, Nguyen; Hoang Anh, Nguyen; Diem Nghi, Tran; The Hung, Bui; Van Hieu, Mai; Ky Anh, Nguyen; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-04-06

    Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency overlaps with malaria endemicity although it predisposes carriers to hemolysis. This fact supports the protection hypothesis against malaria. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the presence and the extent of protective association between G6PD deficiency and malaria. Thirteen databases were searched for papers reporting any G6PD alteration in malaria patients. Twenty-eight of the included 30 studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Results showed absence of negative association between G6PD deficiency and uncomplicated falciparum malaria (odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.02; p = 0.07). However, this negative association happened in Africa (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.40-0.86; p = 0.007) but not in Asia (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.96-1.61; p = 0.10), and in the heterozygotes (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57-0.87; p = 0.001) but not the homo/hemizygous (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.46-1.07; p = 0.10). There was no association between G6PD deficiency and total severe malaria (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.61-1.11; p = 0.20). Similarly, there was no association with other malaria species. G6PD deficiency can potentially protect against uncomplicated malaria in African countries, but not severe malaria. Interestingly, this protection was mainly in heterozygous, being x-linked thus related to gender.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Tunisia: molecular data and phenotype-genotype association.

    PubMed

    Laouini, N; Bibi, A; Ammar, H; Kazdaghli, K; Ouali, F; Othmani, R; Amdouni, S; Haloui, S; Sahli, C A; Jouini, L; Hadj Fredj, S; Siala, H; Ben Romdhane, N; Toumi, N E; Fattoum, S; Messsaoud, T

    2013-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect. In this study, we aimed to perform a molecular investigation of G6PD deficiency in Tunisia and to associate clinical manifestations and the degree of deficiency with the genotype. A total of 161 Tunisian subjects of both sexes were screened by spectrophotometric assay for enzyme activity. Out of these, 54 unrelated subjects were selected for screening of the most frequent mutations in Tunisia by PCR/RFLP, followed by size-based separation of double-stranded fragments under non-denaturing conditions on a denaturing high performance liquid chromatography system. Of the 56 altered chromosomes examined, 75 % had the GdA(-) mutation, 14.28 % showed the GdB(-) mutation and no mutations were identified in 10.72 % of cases. Hemizygous males with GdA(-) mutation were mostly of class III, while those with GdB(-) mutation were mainly of class II. The principal clinical manifestation encountered was favism. Acute hemolytic crises induced by drugs or infections and neonatal jaundice were also noted. Less severe clinical features such as low back pain were present in heterozygous females and in one homozygous female. Asymptomatic individuals were in majority heterozygote females and strangely one hemizygous male. The spectrum of mutations seems to be homogeneous and similar to that of Mediterranean countries; nevertheless 10.72 % of cases remain with undetermined mutation thus suggesting a potential heterogeneity of the deficiency at the molecular level. On the other hand, we note a better association of the molecular defects with the severity of the deficiency than with clinical manifestations.

  12. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency enhances germ cell apoptosis and causes defective embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, H-C; Chen, T-L; Wu, Y-H; Cheng, K-P; Lin, Y-H; Cheng, M-L; Ho, H-Y; Lo, S J; Chiu, D T-Y

    2013-05-02

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, known as favism, is classically manifested by hemolytic anemia in human. More recently, it has been shown that mild G6PD deficiency moderately affects cardiac function, whereas severe G6PD deficiency leads to embryonic lethality in mice. How G6PD deficiency affects organisms has not been fully elucidated due to the lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans was established by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown to delineate the role of G6PD in animal physiology. Upon G6PD RNAi knockdown, G6PD activity was significantly hampered in C. elegans in parallel with increased oxidative stress and DNA oxidative damage. Phenotypically, G6PD-knockdown enhanced germ cell apoptosis (2-fold increase), reduced egg production (65% of mock), and hatching (10% of mock). To determine whether oxidative stress is associated with G6PD knockdown-induced reproduction defects, C. elegans was challenged with a short-term hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The early phase egg production of both mock and G6PD-knockdown C. elegans were significantly affected by H2O2. However, H2O2-induced germ cell apoptosis was more dramatic in mock than that in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. To investigate the signaling pathways involved in defective oogenesis and embryogenesis caused by G6PD knockdown, mutants of p53 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were examined. Despite the upregulation of CEP-1 (p53), cep-1 mutation did not affect egg production and hatching in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Neither pmk-1 nor mek-1 mutation significantly affected egg production, whereas sek-1 mutation further decreased egg production in G6PD-deficient C. elegans. Intriguingly, loss of function of sek-1 or mek-1 dramatically rescued defective hatching (8.3- and 9.6-fold increase, respectively) induced by G6PD knockdown. Taken together, these findings show that G6PD knockdown reduces egg production and hatching in C. elegans

  13. Detection of Occult Acute Kidney Injury in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hakeem, Gehan Lotfy; Abdel Naeem, Emad Allam; Swelam, Salwa Hussein; El Morsi Aboul Fotoh, Laila; El Mazary, Abdel Azeem Mohamed; Abdel Fadil, Ashraf Mohamed; Abdel Hafez, Asmaa Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency anemia is associated with intravascular hemolysis. The freely filtered hemoglobin can damage the kidney. We aimed to assess any subclinical renal injury in G6PD children. Methods Sixty children were included. Thirty G6PD deficiency anemia children were enrolled during the acute hemolytic crisis and after the hemolytic episode had elapsed. Another thirty healthy children were included as controls. Serum cystatin C, creatinine levels, and urinary albumin/creatinine (A/C) ratio were measured, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated. Results Significantly higher urinary A/C ratio (p=0.001,0.002 respectively) and lower GFR (p=0.001 for both) were found during hemolysis and after the hemolytic episode compared to the controls. Also, significant higher serum cystatin C (p=0.001), creatinine (p=0.05) and A/C (p= 0.001) ratio and insignificant lower GFR (p=0.3) during acute hemolytic crisis compared to the same children after the hemolytic episode subsided. Conclusions G6PD deficiency anemia is associated with a variable degree of acute renal injury during acute hemolytic episodes which may persist after elapsing of the hemolytic crises. PMID:27648201

  14. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Keihanian, F; Basirjafari, S; Darbandi, B; Saeidinia, A; Jafroodi, M; Sharafi, R; Shakiba, M

    2017-06-01

    Considering the high prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among newborns, different screening methods have been established in various countries. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among newborns in Rasht, Iran, and compare G6PD activity in cord blood samples, using quantitative and qualitative tests. This cross-sectional, prospective study was performed at five largest hospitals in Rasht, Guilan Province, Iran. The screening tests were performed for all the newborns, referred to these hospitals. Specimens were characterized in terms of G6PD activity under ultraviolet light, using the kinetic method and the qualitative fluorescent spot test (FST). We also determined the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of the qualitative assay. Blood samples were collected from 1474 newborns. Overall, 757 (51.4%) subjects were male. As the findings revealed, 1376 (93.4%) newborns showed normal G6PD activity, while 98 (6.6%) had G6PD deficiency. There was a significant difference in the mean G6PD level between males and females (P = 0.0001). Also, a significant relationship was detected between FST results and the mean values obtained in the quantitative test (P < 0.0001). According to the present study, FST showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity for G6PD activity, although it appeared inefficient for diagnostic purposes in some cases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD): a curable cause of genetic muscular lipidosis].

    PubMed

    Maillart, E; Acquaviva-Bourdain, C; Rigal, O; Brivet, M; Jardel, C; Lombès, A; Eymard, B; Vianey-Saban, C; Laforêt, P

    2010-03-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a rare genetic disease involving fatty acid oxidation. It is due to the deficiency of one of the two electron transporters: electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxydoreductase (ETF-QO). Symptoms begin more often in childhood or in young adulthood with a multisystemic disease with encephalopathy or muscular weakness. We report here two adult cases with ETF-QO deficiency, confirmed by mutation analysis (ETFDH gene), revealed by a muscular weakness associated with muscle lipidosis. One of our patients presented an acute encephalopathy with vomiting ten years before the onset of muscular symptoms. The second patient exhibited a slowly progressive pelvic girdle muscle weakness. Diagnosis was established by characteristic abnormalities of acylcarnitine profile by tandem mass spectrometry. For both patients, a dramatic clinical improvement was observed under treatment with riboflavine and L-carnitine. Since it is a treatable disorder, this diagnosis must be considered by performing an acylcarnitine profile in all patients presenting with an unexplained muscular weakness. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a protection against malaria and a risk for hemolytic accidents].

    PubMed

    Wajcman, Henri; Galactéros, Frédéric

    2004-08-01

    Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyses the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway, which in the RBC leads to the formation of NADPH, essential to prevent the cell from an oxidative stress. Worldwide, more than 400 million people (90% being males) are affected by G6PD deficiency, in regions that are, or have been, endemic for malaria and in populations originating from these regions. RBCs with low G6PD activity offer a hostile environment to parasite growth and thus an advantage to G6PD deficiency carriers. The counterpart of this protective effect is an increased susceptibility to oxidants such as some foods (fava beans), drugs (anti-malarial or sulphonamides), or various chemicals. In the case of G6PD deficiency, the hypothesis of a convergent evolution between parasite, protecting mutation, and cultural traditions (food, skin painting...) has been proposed. Near to 150 different G6PD variants have been described, which are classified into four types, according to their clinical effects. Several variants, such as the G6PD A- or the Mediterranean variant, reach the polymorphism level in endemic regions. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme allows one to explain now the mechanisms of the disorders in terms of structure-function relationship.

  17. Comparison of quantitative and qualitative tests for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Nicole; Kahn, Maria; Murray, Marjorie; Leader, Brandon T; Bansil, Pooja; McGray, Sarah; Kalnoky, Michael; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Huiqiang; Jiang, Hui; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2014-10-01

    A barrier to eliminating Plasmodium vivax malaria is inadequate treatment of infected patients. 8-Aminoquinoline-based drugs clear the parasite; however, people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are at risk for hemolysis from these drugs. Understanding the performance of G6PD deficiency tests is critical for patient safety. Two quantitative assays and two qualitative tests were evaluated. The comparison of quantitative assays gave a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.7585 with significant difference in mean G6PD activity, highlighting the need to adhere to a single reference assay. Both qualitative tests had high sensitivity and negative predictive value at a cutoff G6PD value of 40% of normal activity if interpreted conservatively and performed under laboratory conditions. The performance of both tests dropped at a cutoff level of 45%. Cytochemical staining of specimens confirmed that heterozygous females with > 50% G6PD-deficient cells can seem normal by phenotypic tests. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Pharmacologic rescue of lethal seizures in mice deficient in succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hogema, B M; Gupta, M; Senephansiri, H; Burlingame, T G; Taylor, M; Jakobs, C; Schutgens, R B; Froestl, W; Snead, O C; Diaz-Arrastia, R; Bottiglieri, T; Grompe, M; Gibson, K M

    2001-10-01

    Succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH5A1, encoding SSADH deficiency is a defect of 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) degradation that manifests in humans as 4-hydroxybutyric (gamma-hydroxybutyric, GHB) aciduria. It is characterized by a non-specific neurological disorder including psychomotor retardation, language delay, seizures, hypotonia and ataxia. The current therapy, vigabatrin (VGB), is not uniformly successful. Here we report the development of Aldh5a1-deficient mice. At postnatal day 16-22 Aldh5a1-/- mice display ataxia and develop generalized seizures leading to rapid death. We observed increased amounts of GHB and total GABA in urine, brain and liver homogenates and detected significant gliosis in the hippocampus of Aldh5a1-/- mice. We found therapeutic intervention with phenobarbital or phenytoin ineffective, whereas intervention with vigabatrin or the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (ref. 2) prevented tonic-clonic convulsions and significantly enhanced survival of the mutant mice. Because neurologic deterioration coincided with weaning, we hypothesized the presence of a protective compound in breast milk. Indeed, treatment of mutant mice with the amino acid taurine rescued Aldh5a1-/- mice. These findings provide insight into pathomechanisms and may have therapeutic relevance for the human SSADH deficiency disease and GHB overdose and toxicity.

  19. Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus for pyruvate production at elevated temperature with simultaneous consumption of xylose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Zhu, Yelin; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2017-01-01

    Xylose and glucose from lignocellulose are sustainable sources for production of pyruvate, which is the starting material for the synthesis of many drugs and agrochemicals. In this study, the pyruvate decarboxylase gene (KmPDC1) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (KmGPD1) of Kluyveromyces marxianus YZJ051 were disrupted to prevent ethanol and glycerol accumulation. The deficient growth of PDC disruption was rescued by overexpressing mutant KmMTH1-ΔT. Then pentose phosphate pathway and xylitol dehydrogenase SsXYL2-ARS genes were overexpressed to obtain strain YZB053 which produced pyruvate with xylose other than glucose. It produced 24.62g/L pyruvate from 80g/L xylose with productivity of 0.51g/L/h at 42°C. Then, xylose-specific transporter ScGAL2-N376F was overexpressed to obtain strain YZB058, which simultaneously consumed 40g/L glucose and 20g/L xylose and produced 29.21g/L pyruvate with productivity of 0.81g/L/h at 42°C. Therefore, a platform for pyruvate production from glucose and xylose at elevated temperature was developed.

  20. Effect of diet and triiodothyronine on the activity of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and on the metabolism of glucose and pyruvate by adipose tissue of obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Bray, G. A.; Mothon, Stella; Cohen, Andrea

    1969-01-01

    Lipogenesis and the metabolism of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate were studied in 23 fat biopsies from eight grossly obese patients. The first biopsy was obtained after a minimum of 12 days on a 3500 cal diet, the second biopsy after 2 wk on a 900 cal diet, and the third biopsy after an additional 2 wk on 900 cal supplemented with thiiodothyronine, 250 μg/day. Oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient declined during caloric restriction. Oxygen consumption was restored to the initial level during treatment with triiodothyronine, and the respiratory quotient rose somewhat. Lipogenesis from glucose and pyruvate was demonstrated in fat obtained from the first biopsy but could not be detected in the other biopsies. The incorporation of radioactivity from pyruvate into fatty acids was stimulated by the addition of glucose. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis in pieces of fat from the first biopsy, but isolated fat cells were unaffected by insulin. After caloric restriction no effects of insulin could be detected. The activity of both the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of adipose tissue declined with caloric restriction. Treatment with triiodothyronine enhanced the activity of the mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase but did not affect the cytoplasmic enzyme. PMID:5796353

  1. The negative impact of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex deficiency on matrix substrate-level phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Doczi, Judit; Starkov, Anatoly A; Kawamata, Hibiki; Manfredi, Giovanni; Zhang, Steven F; Gibson, Gary E; Beal, M Flint; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-06-01

    A decline in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. Provision of succinyl-CoA by KGDHC is essential for generation of matrix ATP (or GTP) by substrate-level phosphorylation catalyzed by succinyl-CoA ligase. Here, we demonstrate ATP consumption in respiration-impaired isolated and in situ neuronal somal mitochondria from transgenic mice with a deficiency of either dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (DLST) or dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD) that exhibit a 20-48% decrease in KGDHC activity. Import of ATP into the mitochondrial matrix of transgenic mice was attributed to a shift in the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase toward more negative values due to diminished matrix substrate-level phosphorylation, which causes the translocase to reverse prematurely. Immunoreactivity of all three subunits of succinyl-CoA ligase and maximal enzymatic activity were unaffected in transgenic mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Therefore, decreased matrix substrate-level phosphorylation was due to diminished provision of succinyl-CoA. These results were corroborated further by the finding that mitochondria from wild-type mice respiring on substrates supporting substrate-level phosphorylation exhibited ~30% higher ADP-ATP exchange rates compared to those obtained from DLST(+/-) or DLD(+/-) littermates. We propose that KGDHC-associated pathologies are a consequence of the inability of respiration-impaired mitochondria to rely on "in-house" mitochondrial ATP reserves.

  2. Hereditary Xerocytosis due to Mutations in PIEZO1 Gene Associated with Heterozygous Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Beta-Thalassemia Trait in Two Unrelated Families

    PubMed Central

    Vercellati, Cristina; Marcello, Anna Paola; Zaninoni, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Mirra, Nadia; Curcio, Cristina; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma; Bianchi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary xerocytosis (HX) is a rare disorder caused by defects of RBC permeability, associated with haemolytic anaemia of variable degree and iron overload. It is sometimes misdiagnosed as hereditary spherocytosis or other congenital haemolytic anaemia. Splenectomy is contraindicated due to increased risk of thromboembolic complications. We report the clinical, haematological, and molecular characteristics of four patients from two unrelated Italian families affected by HX, associated with beta-thalassemia trait and heterozygous pyruvate kinase deficiency, respectively. Two patients had been splenectomised and displayed thrombotic episodes. All patients had iron overload in the absence of transfusion, two of them requiring iron chelation. The diagnosis of HX was confirmed by LoRRca Osmoscan analysis showing a left-shifted curve. PIEZO1 gene sequencing revealed the presence of mutation p.E2496ELE, showing that this is one of the most frequent mutations in this disease. The concomitant defects did not aggravate the clinical phenotype; however, in one patient, the initial diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency delayed the correct diagnosis of HX for many years and resulted in splenectomy followed by thrombotic complications. The study underlines the importance of a precise diagnosis in HX, particularly in view of splenectomy, and the need of a molecular confirmation of suspected RBC enzymopathy. PMID:28367341

  3. Hereditary Xerocytosis due to Mutations in PIEZO1 Gene Associated with Heterozygous Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency and Beta-Thalassemia Trait in Two Unrelated Families.

    PubMed

    Fermo, Elisa; Vercellati, Cristina; Marcello, Anna Paola; Zaninoni, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Mirra, Nadia; Curcio, Cristina; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma; Bianchi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary xerocytosis (HX) is a rare disorder caused by defects of RBC permeability, associated with haemolytic anaemia of variable degree and iron overload. It is sometimes misdiagnosed as hereditary spherocytosis or other congenital haemolytic anaemia. Splenectomy is contraindicated due to increased risk of thromboembolic complications. We report the clinical, haematological, and molecular characteristics of four patients from two unrelated Italian families affected by HX, associated with beta-thalassemia trait and heterozygous pyruvate kinase deficiency, respectively. Two patients had been splenectomised and displayed thrombotic episodes. All patients had iron overload in the absence of transfusion, two of them requiring iron chelation. The diagnosis of HX was confirmed by LoRRca Osmoscan analysis showing a left-shifted curve. PIEZO1 gene sequencing revealed the presence of mutation p.E2496ELE, showing that this is one of the most frequent mutations in this disease. The concomitant defects did not aggravate the clinical phenotype; however, in one patient, the initial diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency delayed the correct diagnosis of HX for many years and resulted in splenectomy followed by thrombotic complications. The study underlines the importance of a precise diagnosis in HX, particularly in view of splenectomy, and the need of a molecular confirmation of suspected RBC enzymopathy.

  4. Apert syndrome with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tosun, G; Sener, Y

    2006-05-01

    Apert syndrome is characterized by midface hypoplasia, syndactyly of the hands and feet, proptosis of eyes, steep and flat frontal bones, and premature union of cranial sutures. Maxillary hypoplasia, deep palatal vault, anterior open bite, crowding of the dental arch, severely delayed tooth eruption, and dental malocclusion are the main oral manifestations of this syndrome. In this report, a case of Apert syndrome with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G(6)PD) deficiency is presented. The patient, a 4-year-old male and the fourth child of healthy parents, was admitted to our department because of delayed tooth eruption. He had all the cardinal symptoms of the Apert syndrome. Clinical examination revealed that primary centrals, canines and first molars erupted; however, primary second molars and laterals had not erupted. The patient had no dental caries. Preventive treatments were applied, and subsequently, the patient was taken to long-term follow up.

  5. A pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid and oxidative stress in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency?

    PubMed

    van Kuilenburg, A B P; Stroomer, A E M; Abeling, N G G M; van Gennip, A H

    2006-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolised to beta-alanine and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIB), respectively. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approximately 5- to 8-fold lower in urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared to age-matched controls. Comparable levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were present in urine from controls and DPD patients at the age <2 year. In contrast, slightly elevated levels of 8-OHdG were detected in urine from DPD patients with an age >2 year, suggesting the presence of increased oxidative stress.

  6. [Novel nutritional management regimen for very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hiroyo; Kawai, Motoharu; Ogasawara, Jun-Ichi; Koga, Michiaki; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    We report a novel regimen of nutritional management in 22-year-old woman with myopathic form of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. This regimen is based on avoidance of fasting by frequent intake of carbohydrates and substitution of medium chain triglyceride for long- and very long-chain fatty acids. Oral intake of medium amount of long-chain fatty acid (300 kcal daily) was allowed, to facilitate compliance and to escape pigmentary retinopathy. After this nutritional management and lifestyle guidance about prevention of fatigue and starvation, the patient was free from severe rhabdomyolysis for more than three years, which had forced her to hospital management nine times in seven years.

  7. Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient Renal Carcinoma: A Morphologically Distinct Entity

    PubMed Central

    Hes, Ondrej; Papathomas, Thomas; Šedivcová, Monika; Tan, Puay Hoon; Agaimy, Abbas; Andresen, Per Arne; Kedziora, Andrew; Clarkson, Adele; Toon, Christopher W.; Sioson, Loretta; Watson, Nicole; Chou, Angela; Paik, Julie; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J.; Robinson, Bruce G.; Benn, Diana E.; Hills, Kirsten; Maclean, Fiona; Niemeijer, Nicolasine D.; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Hartmann, Arndt; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Przybycin, Christopher; McKenney, Jesse K.; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Yilmaz, Asli; Yu, Darryl; Nicoll, Katherine D.; Yong, Jim L.; Sibony, Mathilde; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Fleming, Stewart; Chow, Chung W.; Miettinen, Markku; Michal, Michal; Trpkov, Kiril

    2014-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient renal carcinoma has been accepted as a provisional entity in the 2013 International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification. To further define its morphologic and clinical features, we studied a multi-institutional cohort of 36 SDH-deficient renal carcinomas from 27 patients, including 21 previously unreported cases. We estimate that 0.05% to 0.2% of all renal carcinomas are SDH deficient. Mean patient age at presentation was 37 years (range, 14 to 76 y), with a slight male predominance (M:F=1.7:1). Bilateral tumors were observed in 26% of patients. Thirty-four (94%) tumors demonstrated the previously reported morphology at least focally, which included: solid or focally cystic growth, uniform cytology with eosinophilic flocculent cytoplasm, intracytoplasmic vacuolations and inclusions, and round to oval low-grade nuclei. All 17 patients who underwent genetic testing for mutation in the SDH subunits demonstrated germline mutations (16 in SDHB and 1 in SDHC). Nine of 27 (33%) patients developed metastatic disease, 2 of them after prolonged follow-up (5.5 and 30 y). Seven of 10 patients (70%) with high-grade nuclei metastasized as did all 4 patients with coagulative necrosis. Two of 17 (12%) patients with low-grade nuclei metastasized, and both had unbiopsied contralateral tumors, which may have been the origin of the metastatic disease. In conclusion, SDH-deficient renal carcinoma is a rare and unique type of renal carcinoma, exhibiting stereotypical morphologic features in the great majority of cases and showing a strong relationship with SDH germline mutation. Although this tumor may undergo dedifferentiation and metastasize, sometimes after a prolonged delay, metastatic disease is rare in the absence of high-grade nuclear atypia or coagulative necrosis. PMID:25025441

  8. New insights in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: a pivotal role for beta-aminoisobutyric acid?

    PubMed

    Van Kuilenburg, André B P; Stroomer, Alida E M; Van Lenthe, Henk; Abeling, Nico G G M; Van Gennip, Albert H

    2004-04-01

    DPD (dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase) constitutes the first step of the pyrimidine degradation pathway, in which the pyrimidine bases uracil and thymine are catabolized to beta-alanine and the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB (beta-aminoisobutyric acid) respectively. The S-enantiomer of beta-AIB is predominantly derived from the catabolism of valine. It has been suggested that an altered homoeostasis of beta-alanine underlies some of the clinical abnormalities encountered in patients with a DPD deficiency. In the present study, we demonstrated that only a slightly decreased concentration of beta-alanine was present in the urine and plasma, whereas normal levels of beta-alanine were present in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a DPD deficiency. Therefore the metabolism of beta-alanine-containing peptides, such as carnosine, may be an important factor involved in the homoeostasis of beta-alanine in patients with DPD deficiency. The mean concentration of beta-AIB was approx. 2-3-fold lower in cerebrospinal fluid and urine of patients with a DPD deficiency, when compared with controls. In contrast, strongly decreased levels (10-fold) of beta-AIB were present in the plasma of DPD patients. Our results demonstrate that, under pathological conditions, the catabolism of valine can result in the production of significant amounts of beta-AIB. Furthermore, the observation that the R-enantiomer of beta-AIB is abundantly present in the urine of DPD patients suggests that significant cross-over exists between the thymine and valine catabolic pathways.

  9. Organization of the cores of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex formed by E2 and E2 plus the E3-binding protein and their capacities to bind the E1 and E3 components.

    PubMed

    Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Aso, Yoichi; Roche, Thomas E

    2004-02-20

    The subunits of the dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase (E2) component of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex can form a 60-mer via association of the C-terminal I domain of E2 at the vertices of a dodecahedron. Exterior to this inner core structure, E2 has a pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1)-binding domain followed by two lipoyl domains, all connected by mobile linker regions. The assembled core structure of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex also includes the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3)-binding protein (E3BP) that binds the I domain of E2 by its C-terminal I' domain. E3BP similarly has linker regions connecting an E3-binding domain and a lipoyl domain. The composition of E2.E3BP was thought to be 60 E2 plus approximately 12 E3BP. We have prepared homogenous human components. E2 and E2.E3BP have s(20,w) values of 36 S and 31.8 S, respectively. Equilibrium sedimentation and small angle x-ray scattering studies indicate that E2.E3BP has lower total mass than E2, and small angle x-ray scattering showed that E3 binds to E2.E3BP outside the central dodecahedron. In the presence of saturating levels of E1, E2 bound approximately 60 E1 and maximally sedimented 64.4 +/- 1.5 S faster than E2, whereas E1-saturated E2.E3BP maximally sedimented 49.5 +/- 1.4 S faster than E2.E3BP. Based on the impact on sedimentation rates by bound E1, we estimate fewer E1 (approximately 12) were bound by E2.E3BP than by E2. The findings of a smaller E2.E3BP mass and a lower capacity to bind E1 support the smaller E3BP substituting for E2 subunits rather than adding to the 60-mer. We describe a substitution model in which 12 I' domains of E3BP replace 12 I domains of E2 by forming 6 dimer edges that are symmetrically located in the dodecahedron structure. Twelve E3 dimers were bound per E248.E3BP12 mass, which is consistent with this model.

  10. Differences and similarities in binding of pyruvate and L-lactate in the active site of M4 and H4 isoforms of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present QM/MM calculations that show differences in geometries of active sites of M(4) and H(4) isoforms of human LDH ligated with oxamate, pyruvate or L-lactate. As the consequence of these differences, binding isotope effects of the methyl hydrogen atoms of pyruvate and l-lactate may be used to experimentally distinguish these isoforms. Based on the FEP calculations we argue that L-lactate is a better candidate for the experimental studies. Our calculations of energies of interactions of ligands with the active site residues provide explanation for the observed experimentally sensitivity to inhibition of the M(4) isoenzyme isoform and pinpoint the differences to interactions of the ligand with the histidine residue. We conclude that pyruvate interacts much stronger in the active site of H(4) than M(4) isoform and that the latter interactions are weaker than with water molecules in the aqueous solution.

  11. Prior heavy exercise elevates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and speeds O2 uptake kinetics during subsequent moderate-intensity exercise in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gurd, B J; Peters, S J; Heigenhauser, G J F; LeBlanc, P J; Doherty, T J; Paterson, D H; Kowalchuk, J M

    2006-01-01

    The adaptation of pulmonary oxygen uptake V˙O2 during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise (Mod) is faster following a prior bout of heavy-intensity exercise. In the present study we examined the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHa) during Mod both with and without prior heavy-intensity exercise. Subjects (n = 9) performed a Mod1–heavy-intensity–Mod2 exercise protocol preceded by 20 W baseline. Breath-by-breath V˙O2 kinetics and near-infrared spectroscopy-derived muscle oxygenation were measured continuously, and muscle biopsy samples were taken at specific times during the transition to Mod. In Mod1, PDHa increased from baseline (1.08 ± 0.2 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1) to 30 s (2.05 ± 0.2 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1), with no additional change at 6 min exercise (2.07 ± 0.3 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1). In Mod2, PDHa was already elevated at baseline (1.88 ± 0.3 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1) and was greater than in Mod1, and did not change at 30 s (1.96 ± 0.2 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1) but increased at 6 min exercise (2.70 ± 0.3 mmol min−1 (kg wet wt)−1). The time constant of V˙O2 was lower in Mod2 (19 ± 2 s) than Mod1 (24 ± 3 s). Phosphocreatine (PCr) breakdown from baseline to 30 s was greater (P < 0.05) in Mod1 (13.6 ± 6.7 mmol (kg dry wt)−1) than Mod2 (6.5 ± 6.2 mmol (kg dry wt)−1) but total PCr breakdown was similar between conditions (Mod1, 14.8 ± 7.4 mmol (kg dry wt)−1; Mod2, 20.1 ± 8.0 mmol (kg dry wt)−1). Both oxyhaemoglobin and total haemoglobin were elevated prior to and throughout Mod2 compared with Mod1. In conclusion, the greater PDHa at baseline prior to Mod2 compared with Mod1 may have contributed in part to the faster V˙O2 kinetics in Mod2. That oxyhaemoglobin and total haemoglobin were elevated prior to Mod2 suggests that greater muscle perfusion may also have contributed to the observed faster V˙O2 kinetics. These findings are consistent with metabolic inertia, via delayed activation of PDH

  12. The temporal relationship between glycogen phosphorylase and activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex during adrenaline infusion in resting canine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Paul A; Loxham, Susan J G; Poucher, Simon M; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of adrenaline infusion on the activation status of glycogen phosphorylase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and on the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) and acetylcarnitine in resting canine skeletal muscle. The study was performed in an effort to gain some insight into the temporal relationship between glycogen phosphorylase and PDC activation in vivo in skeletal muscle, which is currently unresolved. Multiple muscle samples were obtained from canine brachial muscle (n = 10) before and during (1, 3, 7 and 15 min) adrenaline infusion (0.14 μg (kg body mass)−1 min−1, i.v.). Adrenaline infusion increased glycogen phosphorylase ‘a’ by > 2-fold above basal levels after 3 min (pre-infusion = 9.2 ± 1.1 vs. 3 min = 22.3 ± 4.0 mmol glucosyl units (kg dry muscle)−1 min−1, P < 0.05). The concentration of G-6-P increased transiently from its basal concentration at 1 min (pre-infusion = 1.5 ± 0.2 vs. 1 min = 4.4 ± 0.9 mmol kg dry muscle)−1, P < 0.01), declined to its pre-infusion concentration at 3 min (P < 0.05), and then increased again after 7 min of infusion (P < 0.05). The PDC was activated following 7 min of adrenaline infusion (pre-infusion = 0.22 ± 0.04 vs. 7 min = 1.04 ± 0.15 mmol acetyl-CoA (kg wet muscle)−1 min−1, P < 0.01), and this degree of activation was maintained for the duration of infusion. During the first 3 min of infusion, the concentration of acetylcarnitine declined (pre-infusion = 3.8 ± 0.3 vs. 3 min = 1.6 ± 0.2 mmol (kg dry muscle)−1, P < 0.05), before transiently increasing at 7 min above the 3 min concentration (3 min = 1.6 ± 0.2 vs. 7 min = 5.1 ± 1.0 mmol (kg dry muscle)−1, P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate that adrenaline can indirectly activate the PDC in skeletal muscle in vivo at rest. The results demonstrate that adrenaline increased glycogen phosphorylase activation and glycolytic flux within 3 min of infusion, but took several more

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among malaria suspects attending Gambella hospital, southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tsegaye, Arega; Golassa, Lemu; Mamo, Hassen; Erko, Berhanu

    2014-11-18

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) is widespread across malaria endemic regions. G6PD-deficient individuals are at risk of haemolysis when exposed, among other agents, to primaquine and tafenoquine, which are capable of blocking malaria transmission by killing Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and preventing Plasmodium vivax relapses by targeting hypnozoites. It is evident that no measures are currently in place to ensure safe delivery of these drugs within the context of G6PDd risk. Thus, determining G6PDd prevalence in malarious areas would contribute towards avoiding possible complications in malaria elimination using the drugs. This study, therefore, was aimed at determining G6PDd prevalence in Gambella hospital, southwest Ethiopia, using CareStart™ G6PDd fluorescence spot test. Venous blood samples were collected from febrile patients (n = 449) attending Gambella hospital in November-December 2013. Malaria was diagnosed using blood films and G6PDd was screened using CareStart™ G6PDd screening test (Access Bio, New Jersey, USA). Haematological parameters were also measured. The association of G6PD phenotype with sex, ethnic group and malaria smear positivity was tested. Malaria prevalence was 59.2% (96.6% of the cases being P. falciparum mono infections). Totally 33 participants (7.3%) were G6PD-deficient with no significant difference between the sexes. The chance of being G6PD-deficient was significantly higher for the native ethnic groups (Anuak and Nuer) compared to the 'highlanders'/settlers (odds ratio (OD) = 3.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.481-31.418 for Anuak vs 'highlanders'; OD = 4.9, 95% CI 0.635-38.00 for Nuer vs 'highlanders'). G6PDd prevalence among the Nuer (14.3%) was significantly higher than that for the Anuak (12.0%). G6PDd prevalence in the area is substantial with 30 (90.9%) of the 33 deficient individuals having malaria suggesting the non-protective role of the disorder at least from clinical malaria

  14. Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice with Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCAD) or Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Keith B.; Liu, Jian; Tian, Liqun; Barnes, Stephen; Yang, Qinglin; Wood, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common finding in human patients with inborn errors of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Mice with either very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCAD−/−) or long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCAD−/−) develop cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy, initially measured using heart/body weight ratios, was manifested most severely in LCAD−/− male mice. VLCAD−/− mice, as a group, showed a mild increase in normalized cardiac mass (8.8% hypertrophy compared to all wild-type [WT] mice). In contrast, LCAD−/− mice as a group showed more severe cardiac hypertrophy (32.2% increase compared to all WT mice). Based on a clear male predilection, we investigated the role of dietary plant estrogenic compounds commonly found in mouse diets due to soy or alfalfa components providing natural phytoestrogens or isoflavones in cardioprotection of LCAD−/− mice. Male LCAD−/− mice fed an isoflavone-free test diet had more severe cardiac hypertrophy (58.1% hypertrophy compared to WT mice fed the same diet. There were no significant differences in the female groups fed any of the diets. Echocardiography measurement performed on male LCAD deficient mice fed a standard diet at ~3 months of age confirmed the substantial cardiac hypertrophy in these mice compared with WT controls. Left ventricular wall thickness of interventricular septum and posterior wall was remarkably increased in LCAD−/− mice compared with that of WT controls. Accordingly, the calculated LV mass after normalization to body weight was increased about 40% in the LCAD−/− mice compared with WT mice. In summary, we found that metabolic cardiomyopathy, expressed as hypertrophy, developed in mice due to either VLCAD deficiency or LCAD deficiency; however, LCAD deficiency was the most profound and appeared to be attenuated either by endogenous estrogen in females or phytoestrogens in the diet as isoflavones in males. PMID:19736549

  15. A hemolysis trigger in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Vicia sativa (Vetch).

    PubMed

    Bicakci, Zafer

    2009-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme, playing an important role in the redox metabolism of all aerobic cells. It was reported that certain medications, fava beans, and infections can trigger acute hemolytic anemia in patients with G6PD deficiency. An 8-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with blood in the urine, headache, dizziness, fatigue, loss of appetite, and jaundice in the eyes, 24 hours after eating large amounts of fresh, vetch grains. Laboratory investigation revealed hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and G6PD deficiency. Approximately 0.5% of fava bean seeds have 2 pyrimidine beta-glycosides called, vicine and convicine. Vetch has 0.731% vicine, 0.081% convicine, and 0.530% beta cyanoalanine glycosides. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the importance of vetch seeds as a cause for hemolytic crisis in our country, where approximately one million tons of vetch is produced per year, especially in the agricultural regions.

  16. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-07-01

    Cultured astrocytes treated with siRNA to knock down glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were used to investigate whether this enzyme is important for the utilization of glutamate as an energy substrate. By incubation of these cells in media containing different concentrations of glutamate (range 100-500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels of extracellular glutamate independently of the GDH expression level. Moreover, increased intracellular glutamate content was observed in the GDH-deficient cells after a 2-hr incubation in the presence of 100 µM glutamate. It is significant that GDH-deficient cells exhibited an increased utilization of glucose in the presence of 250 and 500 µM glutamate, monitored as an increase in the accumulation of tritiated 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. These findings underscore the importance of the expression level of GDH for the ability to utilize glutamate as an energy source fueling its own energy-requiring uptake.

  17. The Preterm Infant: A High-Risk Situation for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    Prematurity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The 2 conditions may interact additively or synergistically, contributing to extreme hyperbilirubinemia, with the potential for bilirubin neurotoxicity. This hyperbilirubinemia is the result of sudden, unpredictable, and acute episodes of hemolysis in combination with immaturity of bilirubin elimination, primarily of conjugation. Avoidance of contact with known triggers of hemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals will prevent some, but not all, episodes of hemolysis. All preterm infants with G6PD deficiency should be vigilantly observed for the development of jaundice both in hospital and after discharge home.

  18. Effects of chronic ethanol ingestion and folate deficiency on the activity of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyesun; Im, Eun-Sun; Seo, Jung-Sook; Mun, Ju Ae; Burri, Betty J

    2005-12-01

    We recently observed that ethanol feeding impairs 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-FTHF) dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.1.6.) and 10-FTHF hydrolase activity in rats. In the present study, we explored the effects of folate deficiency or sufficiency combined with alcoholic intake on 10-FTHF and possible mechanisms by which chronic ethanol ingestion produces folate deficiency. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either folate-sufficient (FS) or folate-deficient (FD) diets; with or without ethanol (E) for four weeks. Hepatic 10-FTHF dehydrogenase and hydrolase activity, plasma folate and homocysteine were measured at baseline and after feeding experimental diets. Liver weight increased slightly with either folate deficiency or ethanol consumption. In rats fed the folate-sufficient diet with ethanol (FSE), plasma folate was decreased slightly (p<0.05) and plasma homocysteine elevated compared to rats fed the FS diet without ethanol. Ethanol did not affect plasma folate and plasma homocysteine in FD rats. Red-blood cell (RBC) folate was increased similarly in rats by ethanol feeding (FSE and FDE>FS and FD). Feeding folate deficient or ethanol (FSE, FD and FDE) diets depressed hepatic activities of 10-FTHF dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the oxidative deformylation of 10-FTHF to tetrahydrofolate (THF) and carbon dioxide. Rats consuming the FDE diet had the lowest enzyme activities of the experimental groups, implying that folate deficiency and ethanol consumption each affect enzyme activity. We confirm that ethanol decreases hepatic 10-FTHF dehydrogenase activity and show that this decrease occurs irrespective of folate status. This shows that modulation of 10-FTHF is one possible mechanism by which ethanol intake decreases folate status and affects one-carbon metabolism.

  19. Disturbed hepatic carbohydrate management during high metabolic demand in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Herrema, Hilde; Derks, Terry G J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bloks, Vincent W; Gerding, Albert; Havinga, Rick; Tietge, Uwe J F; Müller, Michael; Smit, G Peter A; Kuipers, Folkert; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan

    2008-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase (MCAD) catalyzes crucial steps in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, a process that is of key relevance for maintenance of energy homeostasis, especially during high metabolic demand. To gain insight into the metabolic consequences of MCAD deficiency under these conditions, we compared hepatic carbohydrate metabolism in vivo in wild-type and MCAD(-/-) mice during fasting and during a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase response (APR). MCAD(-/-) mice did not become more hypoglycemic on fasting or during the APR than wild-type mice did. Nevertheless, microarray analyses revealed increased hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (Pgc-1alpha) and decreased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppar alpha) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4) expression in MCAD(-/-) mice in both conditions, suggesting altered control of hepatic glucose metabolism. Quantitative flux measurements revealed that the de novo synthesis of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was not affected on fasting in MCAD(-/-) mice. During the APR, however, this flux was significantly decreased (-20%) in MCAD(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. Remarkably, newly formed G6P was preferentially directed toward glycogen in MCAD(-/-) mice under both conditions. Together with diminished de novo synthesis of G6P, this led to a decreased hepatic glucose output during the APR in MCAD(-/-) mice; de novo synthesis of G6P and hepatic glucose output were maintained in wild-type mice under both conditions. APR-associated hypoglycemia, which was observed in wild-type mice as well as MCAD(-/-) mice, was mainly due to enhanced peripheral glucose uptake. Our data demonstrate that MCAD deficiency in mice leads to specific changes in hepatic carbohydrate management on exposure to metabolic stress. This deficiency, however, does not lead to reduced de novo synthesis of G6P during fasting alone, which may be due to the

  20. Congenital 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia in a Spanish family.

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Colomer, D; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Aymerich, M; Merino, A; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and metabolic studies were performed in four members of a Spanish family with partial (50%) 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency. In all cases the activities of 6 phosphogluconolactone (6PGL) and glutathione reductase (GR) were normal, and the molecular characterization performed in the partially purified 6PGD from the propositus showed normal kinetic and electrophoretic patterns. Two females (the propositus and her sister) suffered from a well-compensated chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) and exhibited decreased RBC glutathione (GSH) stability with increased oxidative susceptibility, defined by enhanced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation "in vitro." The other two members of the family (the propositus's mother and brother) were clinically asymptomatic. In the propositus and her sister, RBC metabolism exhibited a markedly abnormal concentration of glycolytic intermediates, mainly characterized by striking increases in fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (50-fold), dihydroxiacetone-phosphate (20-fold) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (tenfold). Although the precise mechanism of the hemolysis in the two patients is unknown, the enhanced oxidative threat observed in their RBCs may interfere in some way with the glycolytic pathway function, leading to a marked increase in certain metabolic intermediates located before the glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) step. Since it seems that GA3PD half-life is modulated by fluctuations of the cytosolic redox status, an "in situ" approach was simulated by using permeabilized RBCs. In these conditions, GA3PD activity was significantly lower in the propositus