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Sample records for qcd mass spectrum

  1. Analysis of the QCD spectrum and chiral symmetry breaking with varying quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2013-04-15

    The meson spectrum of QCD is studied in the framework of nonperturbative QCD as a function of varying quark masses m{sub q}. It is shown that the total spectrum consists of two branches: 1) the standard one, which may be called the flux-tube spectrum, depending approximately linearly on m{sub q}, and 2) the chiral symmetry breaking (CSB) spectrum for pseudoscalar (PS) flavor nonsinglet mesons with mass dependence {radical}m{sub q}. The formalism for PS mesons is derived from the QCD Lagrangian with m{sub q} corrections, and a unified form of the PS propagator was derived. It is shown that the CSB branch of PS mesons joins to the flux-tube branch at around m{sub q} = 200 MeV. All these results are in close correspondence with recent numerical data on large lattices.

  2. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32{sup 3} {times} 64 lattice volume at {beta} = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the {triangle} masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  3. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyong.

    1992-12-01

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 32[sup 3] [times] 64 lattice volume at [beta] = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the [triangle] masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion.

  4. Broken valence chiral symmetry and chiral polarization of Dirac spectrum in Nf=12 QCD at small quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Horváth, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The validity of recently proposed equivalence between valence spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking (vSChSB) and chiral polarization of low energy Dirac spectrum (ChP) in SU(3) gauge theory, is examined for the case of twelve mass-degenerate fundamental quark flavors. We find that the vSChSB-ChP correspondence holds for regularized systems studied. Moreover, our results suggest that vSChSB occurs in two qualitatively different circumstances: there is a quark mass mc such that for m > mc the mode condensing Dirac spectrum exhibits standard monotonically increasing density, while for mch < m < mc the peak around zero separates from the bulk of the spectrum, with density showing a pronounced depletion at intermediate scales. Valence chiral symmetry restoration may occur at yet smaller masses m < mch, but this has not yet been seen by overlap valence probe, leaving the mch = 0 possibility open. The latter option could place massless Nf=12 theory outside of conformal window. Anomalous behavior of overlap Dirac spectrum for mch < m < mc is qualitatively similar to one observed previously in zero and few-flavor theories as an effect of thermal agitation.

  5. Large N{sub c} QCD and the Hagedorn Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Thomas D.

    2010-11-12

    This talk discusses a general argument that QCD in the large N{sub c} limit must have a Hagedorn spectrum--that is, a spectrum where the number of hadrons grows exponentially with the mass of the hadron. The derivation of the Hagedorn spectrum is based on a study of correlation functions of composite operators and exploits a tension between well-established features of QCD: asympotic freedom and confinement. The derivation depends on certain standard technical assumptions about the validity of perturbation theory at short distances. A key to the derivation is the fact the number of local operators with fixed dimension grows exponentially with the dimension of the operator. The argument gives some insight into the picture of large N{sub c} QCD becoming an effective string theory for highly excited states and the nature of confinement.

  6. QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Datta, Saumen; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Sugar, Robert

    2001-09-01

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks -- two light and one strange -- and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a by-product we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0{sup ++} (a{sub 0}) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  7. First results from 2+1-Flavor Domain Wall QCD: Mass Spectrum, Topology Change and Chiral Symmetry with $L_s=8$

    SciTech Connect

    D. J. Antonio; T. Blum; K. C. Bowler; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; S. D. Cohen; M. A. Clark; C. Dawson; A. Hart; K. Hashimoto; T. Izubuchi; B. Joó; C. Jung; A. D. Kennedy; R. D. Kenway; S. Li; H. W. Lin; M.F. Lin; R. D. Mawhinney; C.M. Maynard; J. Noaki; S. Ohta; S. Sasaki; A. Soni; R. J. Tweedie; A. Yamaguchi

    2007-06-01

    We present results for the static interquark potential, light meson and baryon masses, and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants obtained from simulations of domain wall QCD with one dynamical flavour approximating the $s$ quark, and two degenerate dynamical flavours with input bare masses ranging from $m_s$ to $m_s/4$ approximating the $u$ and $d$ quarks. We compare these quantities obtained using the Iwasaki and DBW2 improved gauge actions, and actions with larger rectangle coefficients, on $16^3\\times32$ lattices. We seek parameter values at which both the chiral symmetry breaking residual mass due to the finite lattice extent in the fifth dimension and the Monte Carlo time history for topological charge are acceptable for this set of quark masses at lattice spacings above 0.1 fm. We find that the Iwasaki gauge action is best, demonstrating the feasibility of using QCDOC to generate ensembles which are good representations of the QCD path integral on lattices of up to 3 fm in spatial extent with lattice spacings in the range 0.09-0.13 fm. Despite large residual masses and a limited number of sea quark mass values with which to perform chiral extrapolations, our results for light hadronic physics scale and agree with experimental measurements within our statistical uncertainties.

  8. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  9. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore » as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.« less

  10. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  11. Toward the excited meson spectrum of dynamical QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Peardon, Michael J.; Richards, David G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2010-08-01

    We present a detailed description of the extraction of the highly excited isovector meson spectrum on dynamical anisotropic lattices using a new quark-field construction algorithm and a large variational basis of operators. With careful operator construction, the combination of these techniques is used to identify the continuum spin of extracted states reliably, overcoming the reduced rotational symmetry of the cubic lattice. Excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0+-, 1-+ and 2+-) and states of high spin are resolved, including, for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation, spin-four states. The determinations of the spectrum of isovector mesons and kaons are performed on dynamical lattices with two volumes and with pion masses down to ~ 400 MeV, with statistical precision typically at or below 1% even for highly excited states.

  12. Heavy quark masses from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, Andrew T.

    2016-07-01

    Progress in quark mass determinations from lattice QCD is reviewed, focusing on results for charm and bottom mass. These are of particular interest for precision Higgs studies. Recent determinations have achieved percent-level uncertainties with controlled systematics. Future prospects for these calculations are also discussed.

  13. Glueball and Meson Spectrum in Large-N QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In the proceedings of HADRON 2015 we outlined a proposal for a string solution of large-N QCD, that is a candidate to satisfy fundamental properties such as the asymptotic freedom of the QCD S-matrix. Here we examine in more detail the implications for the large-N glueball and meson spectrum, that we compare with Particle Data Group (2015) and lattice gauge-theory computations at large N.

  14. Glueball and Meson Spectrum in Large- N QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, Marco

    2016-06-01

    In the proceedings of HADRON 2015 we outlined a proposal for a string solution of large- N QCD, that is a candidate to satisfy fundamental properties such as the asymptotic freedom of the QCD S-matrix. Here we examine in more detail the implications for the large- N glueball and meson spectrum, that we compare with Particle Data Group (2015) and lattice gauge-theory computations at large N.

  15. Hadronic Spectrum of a Holographic Dual of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Teramond, Guy F. de; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2005-05-27

    We compute the spectrum of light hadrons in a holographic dual of QCD defined on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} which has conformal behavior at short distances and confinement at large interquark separation. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state. Higher orbital excitations are matched quanta to quanta with fluctuations about the AdS background. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {lambda}{sub QCD}, is used, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of delta to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions.

  16. Determination of the chiral condensate from QCD Dirac spectrum on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fukaya, H.; Onogi, T.; Aoki, S.; Chiu, T. W.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Noaki, J.

    2011-04-01

    We calculate the chiral condensate of QCD with 2, 2+1, and 3 flavors of sea quarks. Lattice QCD simulations are performed employing dynamical overlap fermions with up- and down-quark masses covering a range between 3 and 100 MeV. On L{approx}1.8-1.9 fm lattices at a lattice spacing {approx}0.11 fm, we calculate the eigenvalue spectrum of the overlap-Dirac operator. By matching the lattice data with the analytical prediction from chiral perturbation theory at the next-to-leading order, the chiral condensate in the massless limit of up and down quarks is determined.

  17. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  18. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Boyle, P. A.; Christ, N. H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R. J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R. D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R. D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D. J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Rbc; Ukqcd Collaborations

    2016-04-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities (fπ , fK, BK, mu d, ms, t01 /2, w0) obtained from simulations of 2 +1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O (3 )%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum "global fit" with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of mπ, mK and mΩ to determine the two quark masses and the scale—all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with subpercent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including fπ=130.2 (9 ) MeV ; fK=155.5 (8 ) MeV ; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK, in the renormalization group invariant scheme, 0.750(15) and the MS ¯ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

  19. Estimate of the charmed 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum from quenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Luo Xiangqian

    2006-03-01

    We compute from quenched lattice QCD the ground state masses of the charmed hybrid mesons ccg, with exotic quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup -+}, 0{sup +-} and 0{sup --}. The 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum has never been provided by lattice simulations due to the difficulties to extract high gluonic excitations from noise. We employ improved gauge and fermion actions on the anisotropic lattice, which reduce greatly the lattice artifacts, and lead to very good signals. The data are extrapolated to the continuum limit, with finite size effects under well control. For 1{sup -+} and 0{sup +-} hybrid mesons, the ground state masses are 4.405(38) GeV and 4.714(52) GeV. We predict for the first time from lattice QCD, the ground state mass of 0{sup --} to be 5.883(146) GeV.

  20. Complex spectrum of finite-density lattice QCD with static quarks at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hiromichi; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Pangeni, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the spectrum of transfer matrix eigenvalues associated with Polyakov loops in finite-density lattice QCD with static quarks. These eigenvalues determine the spatial behavior of Polyakov loop correlation functions. Our results are valid for all values of the gauge coupling in 1 +1 dimensions and in the strong-coupling region for any number of dimensions. When the quark chemical potential μ is nonzero, the spatial transfer matrix Ts is non-Hermitian. The appearance of complex eigenvalues in Ts is a manifestation of the sign problem in finite-density QCD. The invariance of finite-density QCD under the combined action of charge conjugation C and complex conjugation K implies that the eigenvalues of Ts are either real or part of a complex pair. Calculation of the spectrum confirms the existence of complex pairs in much of the temperature-chemical potential plane. Many features of the spectrum for static quarks are determined by a particle-hole symmetry. For μ that is small compared to the quark mass M , we typically find real eigenvalues for the lowest-lying states. At somewhat larger values of μ , pairs of eigenvalues may form complex-conjugate pairs, leading to damped oscillatory behavior in Polyakov loop correlation functions. However, near μ =M , the low-lying spectrum becomes real again. This is a direct consequence of the approximate particle-hole symmetry at μ =M for heavy quarks. This behavior of the eigenvalues should be observable in lattice simulations and can be used as a test of lattice algorithms. Our results provide independent confirmation of results we have previously obtained in Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models using complex saddle points.

  1. On the Hadronic Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    We argue that the sole requirement of a self-consistent bootstrap including all hadrons up to infinite mass leads to asymptotically exponential laws for the hadron mass spectrum, for momentum distributions, and for form factors (and to a highest temperature).

  2. Bottomonium spectrum from lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Meinel, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Recently, realistic lattice QCD calculations with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions and the Iwasaki gauge action have been performed by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. Here, results for the bottomonium spectrum computed on their gauge configurations of size 24{sup 3}x64 with a lattice spacing of approximately 0.11 fm and four different values for the light quark mass are presented. Improved lattice nonrelativistic QCD is used to treat the b quarks inside the bottomonium. The results for the radial and orbital energy splittings are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements, indicating that systematic errors are small. The calculation of the {upsilon}(2S)-{upsilon}(1S) energy splitting provides an independent determination of the lattice spacing. For the most physical ensemble it is found to be a{sup -1}=1.740(25)(19) GeV, where the first error is statistical/fitting and the second error is an estimate of the systematic errors due to the lattice nonrelativistic QCD action.

  3. QCD Phase Diagram and the Constant Mass Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Ayala, A.; Bashir, A.; Gutiérrez, E.; Raya, A.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical generation of quark masses in the infrared region of QCD plays an important role to understand the peculiar nature of the physics of hadrons. As it is known, the solution of QCD gap equation for the quark mass function is flat for low momentum, but smoothly evolves to the perturbative behavior at high momentum. In this work, we use an effective truncation of QCD gap equation valid up to 1 GeV, and implement it at finite temperature and chemical potential to understand the QCD phase diagram for chiral symmetry breaking-chiral symmetry restoration, and confinement-deconfinement phase transitions from the Schwinger-Dysin equations point of view. Our effective kernel contains a gluon dressing function with two light quark flavors Nf = 2, with current quark mass 0.0035 GeV. An effective coupling, adjusted to reproduce the behavior of the chiral condensate at finite T complements our truncation. We find the critical end point of the phase diagram located at the temperature TE = 0.1245 GeV and the baryonic chemical potential μEB = 0.211 GeV.

  4. Resource Letter QCD-1: Quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Quigg, Chris

    2010-11-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the relativistic quantum field theory of the strong interactions. Journal articles, books, and other documents are cited for the following topics: Quarks and color, the parton model, Yang-Mills theory, experimental evidence for color, QCD as a color gauge theory, asymptotic freedom, QCD for heavy hadrons, QCD on the lattice, the QCD vacuum, pictures of quark confinement, early and modern applications of perturbative QCD, the determination of the strong coupling and quark masses, QCD and the hadron spectrum, hadron decays, the quark-gluon plasma, the strong nuclear interaction, and QCD's role in nuclear physics.

  5. Diquark mass differences from unquenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yujiang; Cai, Hao; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Zhaofeng; Qiao, Hao-Xue; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-07-01

    We calculate diquark correlation functions in the Landau gauge on the lattice using overlap valence quarks and 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. Quark masses are extracted from the scalar part of quark propagators in the Landau gauge. The scalar diquark quark mass difference and axial vector scalar diquark mass difference are obtained for diquarks composed of two light quarks and of a strange and a light quark. The light sea quark mass dependence of the results is examined. Two lattice spacings are used to check the discretization effects. The coarse and fine lattices are of sizes 243 × 64 and 323 × 64 with inverse spacings 1/a = 1.75(4) GeV and 2.33(5) GeV, respectively. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11575197, 10835002, 11405178, 11335001), joint funds of NSFC (U1232109), MG and ZL are partially supported by the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS (2015013, 2011013), YC and ZL acknowledge support of NSFC and DFG (CRC110)

  6. Fundamental Interactions, Nuclear Masses, Astrophysics, and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    During his long and varied career, Robert Tribble has made important contributions in many areas of nuclear physics. He has set new limits on the existence of second-class currents, lepton-flavor violation, and right-handed interactions. He optimized the use of the (4He,8He) reaction to determine nuclear masses and study charge-dependent effects in nuclei. He has developed a new indirect procedure to determine astrophysical reaction rates and applied it to study important nuclear reactions that occur in our sun, in massive stars, and in novae. He has explored anti-quark distributions in nucleons and nuclei, and the polarization of gluons in the nucleon. A brief overview of Bob Tribble's many accomplishments is presented.

  7. QCD hadron spectrum and the chiral limit with domain wall fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingling

    We present the QCD hadron spectrum for the cases of both quenched and dynamical domain wall fermions. Quenched simulations at the lattice spacing a-1 ˜ 1--2 GeV with the Wilson gauge action demonstrate that the small induced effects of chiral symmetry breaking inherent in this formulation can be described by a residual mass ( mres) whose size decreases as the separation between the domain walls (Ls) is increased. However, at stronger couplings much larger values of Ls are required to achieve a given physical value of mres. Important effects of topological near-zero modes which should afflict an accurate quenched calculation are easily visible in the pion propagator. These effects can be controlled by working at an appropriately large volume. A non-linear behavior of m2p in the limit of small quark mass suggests the presence of additional infrared subtlety in the quenched approximation. In support of the thermodynamics studies, zero temperature dynamical simulations with the Wilson gauge action are performed to set the scale. The heavy pion mass obtained indicates the needs for much larger values of Ls to study the order of the transition. Simulations with the renormalization group improved gauge action exhibits an improved chiral behavior in our quenched study, nevertheless, this is not true for the dynamical case.

  8. Singly and Doubly Charmed $J=1/2$ Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu; Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-05-01

    We compute the masses of the singly and doubly charmed baryons in full QCD using the relativistic Fermilab action for the charm quark. For the light quarks we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We use the low-lying charmonium spectrum to tune our heavy-quark action and as a guide to understanding the discretization errors associated with the heavy quark. Our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematicss, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we predict the isospin averaged mass to be $M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 3665 \\pm17 \\pm14\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV} (here the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third an estimate of lattice discretization errors). In addition, we predict the splitting of the (isospin averaged) spin-1/2 $\\O_{cc}$ with the $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $M_{\\O_{cc}} - M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 98 \\pm9 \\pm22$~{MeV} (in this mass splitting, the leading discretization errors cancel). This corresponds to a prediction of $M_{\\O_{cc}} = 3763\\pm9\\pm44\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV}.

  9. Light hadron spectroscopy in two-flavor QCD with small sea quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Namekawa, Y.; Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Lesk, V. I.; Umeda, T.; Okawa, M.

    2004-10-01

    We extend the study of the light hadron spectrum and the quark mass in two-flavor QCD to smaller sea quark mass, corresponding to m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.60-0.35. Numerical simulations are carried out using the RG-improved gauge action and the meanfield-improved clover quark action at {beta}=1.8 (a=0.2 fm from {rho} meson mass). We observe that the light hadron spectrum for small sea quark mass does not follow the expectation from chiral extrapolations with quadratic functions made from the region of m{sub PS}/m{sub V}=0.80-0.55. Whereas fits with either polynomial or continuum chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) fail, the Wilson ChPT (WChPT) that includes a{sup 2} effects associated with explicit chiral symmetry breaking successfully fits the whole data: In particular, WChPT correctly predicts the light quark mass spectrum from simulations for medium heavy quark mass, such as m{sub PS}/m{sub V} > or approx. 0.5. Reanalyzing the previous data with the use of WChPT, we find the mean up and down quark mass being smaller than the previous result from quadratic chiral extrapolation by approximately 10%, m{sub ud}{sup MS-bar}({mu}=2 GeV)=3.11(17) [MeV] in the continuum limit.

  10. An asymptotic solution of Large-N QCD, for the glueball and meson spectrum and the collinear S-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Employing a new class of string theories we construct a family of S -matrix amplitudes that factorize over linear Regge trajectories, and that are good candidates to be asymptotically free, i.e. to lead to asymptotically-free correlation functions working out the LS Z formulae the other way around. In particular, we propose a candidate for a string solution of QCD with NF massless quarks in the large-N 't Hooft limit, for the glueball and meson spectrum, and for certain S-matrix amplitudes in the collinear limit. The solution extends to massive quarks of equal mass.

  11. Bottomonium spectrum at order v{sup 6} from domain-wall lattice QCD: Precise results for hyperfine splittings

    SciTech Connect

    Meinel, Stefan

    2010-12-01

    The bottomonium spectrum is computed in dynamical 2+1 flavor lattice QCD, using nonrelativistic QCD for the b quarks. The main calculations in this work are based on gauge field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations with the Iwasaki action for the gluons and a domain-wall action for the sea quarks. Lattice spacing values of approximately 0.08 fm and 0.11 fm are used, and simultaneous chiral extrapolations to the physical pion mass are performed. As a test for gluon-discretization errors, the calculations are repeated on two ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with the Luescher-Weisz gauge action. Gluon-discretization errors are also studied in a lattice potential model using perturbation theory for four different gauge actions. The nonperturbative lattice QCD results for the radial and orbital bottomonium energy splittings obtained from the RBC/UKQCD ensembles are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment. To get accurate results for spin splittings, the spin-dependent order-v{sup 6} terms are included in the nonrelativistic QCD action, and suitable ratios are calculated such that most of the unknown radiative corrections cancel. The cancellation of radiative corrections is verified explicitly by repeating the calculations with different values of the couplings in the nonrelativistic QCD action. Using the lattice ratios of the S-wave hyperfine and the 1P tensor splitting, and the experimental result for the 1P tensor splitting, the 1S hyperfine splitting is found to be 60.3{+-}5.5{sub stat{+-}}5.0{sub syst{+-}}2.1{sub exp} MeV, and the 2S hyperfine splitting is predicted to be 23.5{+-}4.1{sub stat{+-}}2.1{sub syst{+-}}0.8{sub exp} MeV.

  12. QCD phase transition with chiral quarks and physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Buchoff, Michael I; Christ, Norman H; Ding, H-T; Gupta, Rajan; Jung, Chulwoo; Karsch, F; Lin, Zhongjie; Mawhinney, R D; McGlynn, Greg; Mukherjee, Swagato; Murphy, David; Petreczky, P; Renfrew, Dwight; Schroeder, Chris; Soltz, R A; Vranas, P M; Yin, Hantao

    2014-08-22

    We report on the first lattice calculation of the QCD phase transition using chiral fermions with physical quark masses. This calculation uses 2+1 quark flavors, spatial volumes between (4 fm)(3) and (11 fm)(3) and temperatures between 139 and 196 MeV. Each temperature is calculated at a single lattice spacing corresponding to a temporal Euclidean extent of N(t) = 8. The disconnected chiral susceptibility, χ(disc) shows a pronounced peak whose position and height depend sensitively on the quark mass. We find no metastability near the peak and a peak height which does not change when a 5 fm spatial extent is increased to 10 fm. Each result is strong evidence that the QCD "phase transition" is not first order but a continuous crossover for m(π) = 135 MeV. The peak location determines a pseudocritical temperature T(c) = 155(1)(8) MeV, in agreement with earlier staggered fermion results. However, the peak height is 50% greater than that suggested by previous staggered results. Chiral SU(2)(L) × SU(2)(R) symmetry is fully restored above 164 MeV, but anomalous U(1)(A) symmetry breaking is nonzero above T(c) and vanishes as T is increased to 196 MeV. PMID:25192088

  13. Hadron Spectra and Quark Mass Dependence in Holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.

    Hadron masses and their quark-mass dependence are imporatant observablesin strongly coupled QCD. We apply holography, a string theory technique, to this problem, and find a qualitative coincidence with observed data of baryon spectra. This talk, presented on 9th Feruary 2010 in ``NFQCD'' workshop at YITP, is based on three papers written with my collaborators [K.~Hashimoto, T.~Hirayama, F.~L.~Lin and H.~U.~Yee, J. High Energy Phys. 07 (2008), 089, arXiv:0803.4192. K.~Hashimoto, T.~Hirayama and D.~K.~Hong, Phys. Rev. D 81 (2010), 045016, arXiv:0906.0402. K.~Hashimoto, N.~Iizuka, T.~Ishii and D.~Kadoh, Phys. Lett. B 691 (2010), 65, arXiv:0910.1179.

  14. Highly excited and exotic meson spectrum from dynamical lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Christopher Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Using a new quark-field construction algorithm and a large variational basis of operators, we extract a highly excited isovector meson spectrum on dynamical anisotropic lattices. We show how carefully constructed operators can be used to identify the continuum spin of extracted states. This method allows us to extract, with confidence, excited states, states of high spin and states with exotic quantum numbers, including, for the first time, spin-four states.

  15. The Excited-state Spectrum of QCD through Lattice Gauge Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2012-12-01

    I describe recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of QCD through lattice gauge calculations. I begin by outlining the evolution of the lattice effort at JLab. I detail the impact of recent lattice calculations on the present and upcoming experimental programs, and in particular that of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Laboratory. I conclude with the prospect for future calculations.

  16. Charmonium Spectrum from Quenched QCD with Overlap Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    S. Tamhankar; A. Alexandru; Y. Chen; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; J.B. Zhang

    2005-07-20

    We present the first study of the charmonium spectrum using overlap fermions, on quenched configurations. Simulations are performed on 16{sup 3} x 72 lattices, with Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6.3345. We demonstrate that we have discretization errors under control at about 5%. We obtain 88(4) MeV for hyperfine splitting using the {sub 0} scale, and 121(6) MeV using the (1{bar P}-1{bar S}) scale. This paper raises the possibility that the discrepancy between the lattice results and the experimental value for charmonium hyperfine splitting can be resolved using overlap fermions to simulate the charm quark on lattice.

  17. Improvement of Wilson fermions and twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2005-11-01

    In order for Wilson fermions to be a competitive option to use in lattice QCD (LQCD) simulations, the large inherent discretization errors starting at O(a) (a being the lattice spacing) have to be removed. This can be accomplished through the Symanizk improvement program, where improvement terms have to be added to both the action and the operators of interest with coefficients appropriately chosen so that the rate of convergence to the continuum limit is quadratic in a. For this to be applicable to numerical simulations, improvement coefficients have to be determined non-perturbatively. A program for doing so has been pioneered by the Alpha collaboration. In this work, an extension of that program is made to improve all bilinear operators in QCD with two, three, and four flavours of non-degenerate quarks. With even numbers of quark flavours, an alternative approach is afforded by twisted mass LQCD (tmLQCD), where O(a) improvement in physical quantities can be achieved automatically at maximal twist. In this work, the features and utilities of tmLQCD are studied in detail in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (chiPT). By matching onto an effective chiral theory, the phase structure of tmLQCD and the properties of the mesons (pions) in the theory has been investigated. Pionic quantities easy to calculate in numerical simulations and useful for probing the symmetry breaking effects of tmLQCD have been calculated, and conditions under which automatic O(a) improvement holds at maximal twist has been carefully studied. The resulting twisted mass chiPT has also been extended to study the baryons in this work, which has not been done before. This allows one to probe tmLQCD with more quantities, and in particular, quantities that do not involve quark-disconnected diagrams and so are much easier to calculate in numerical simulations. A major part of this dissertation has already appeared in published form. Chapters 3 through 5 are based on Refs. [1--5].

  18. QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Sean

    In this talk I review recent experimental and theoretical results in QCD. Since the topic is too vast to cover within given time constraints I choose to highlight some of the subjects that I find particularly exciting. On the experimental side I focus on measurements made at the Tevatron. Specifically jet production rates, and the cross section for B meson production. In addition I discuss an interesting measurement made by the Belle collaboration of double exclusive charmonium production. On the theory side I quickly review recent advances in computing hadronic cross sections at subleading order in perturbation theory. I then move on to soft-collinear effective theory. After a lightning review of the formalism I discuss recently published results on color-suppressed B → D decays.

  19. D K scattering and the D$_s$ spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Daniel; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Prelovsek, Sasa; Woloshyn, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying charmed-strange meson spectrum using two types of Clover-Wilson lattices. In addition to quark-antiquark interpolating fields we also consider meson-meson interpolators corresponding to D-meson kaon scattering states. To calculate the all-to-all propagation necessary for the backtracking loops we use the (stochastic) distillation technique. For the charm quark we use the Fermilab method. Results for the $J^P=0^+$ $D_{s0}^*(2317)$ charmed-strange meson are presented.

  20. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  1. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  2. Updated axial meson spectrum and scalar-glueball mixing in AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, Sean; Rollag, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    AdS/QCD is a proposed duality between strongly-coupled quantum chromodynamics and weakly-coupled 5D gravity that can offer new insight to hadronic physics. Previous work accurately models confinement and chiral symmetry breaking in the light hadron spectrum. We improve this model by incorporating new experimental data and making predictions for the scalar glueball sector. Recent COMPASS results indicate a new light axial-vector resonance between the ground state and the currently-accepted value for the first excited state. Incorporating this data lessens the model's dependence on unphysical short length scales. In addition, we analyze the mixing between scalar mesons and glueball by computing to first approximation the radial excitation spectra of these particles. We find good experimental agreement for the scalar mesons and show that predictions for the excited glueball spectrum differ from lattice results.

  3. The mass spectrum of interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, John M.; Garwood, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    The abundances of diffuse clouds and molecular clouds in the inner Galaxy and at the solar circle are compared. Using results of recent low-latitude 21 cm absorption studies, the number of diffuse clouds per kiloparsec along the line of sight is derived as a function of the cloud column density, under two assumptions relating cloud densities and temperatures. The density of clouds is derived as a function of cloud mass. The results are consistent with a single, continuous mass spectrum for interstellar clouds from less than 1 solar mass to 1,000,000 solar masses, with perhaps a change of slope at masses where the atomic and molecular mass fractions are roughly equal.

  4. SU(3)-symmetry breaking effects and mass splitting in scalar and pseudoscalar D mesons from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Zhu-Feng; Steele, T. G.

    2010-03-01

    Motivated by the similar mass splitting in light-light and heavy-light JP=0- and JP=0+ mesons, the SU(3)-symmetry breaking effects splitting the masses in the 0- and 0+ channels of the D meson are analyzed in the framework of QCD sum rules with an underlying cq¯ structure. We take into account operator mixing to obtain an infrared stable operator-product expansion method including complete nonperturbative and perturbative O(mq) corrections to the correlation function. With the same threshold for both channels, the mass splitting arising from the sum rules has the same behavior as the observed spectrum. In particular, we obtain mDs-mDd˜35MeV in the 0- channel and mDd-mDs˜12MeV in the 0+ channel at a renormalization scale μ=1GeV. The splitting can be attributed to the different roles of mass effects and the parity-dependent “force” induced from nonperturbative QCD vacuum. Further analysis shows that due to this parity-dependent force it is natural that the mass gap of the two states in the 0- channel is larger than the 0+ channel. When we increase the renormalization scale to μ=1.3GeV the splitting remains unchanged which demonstrates a correct scale invariance. Combined with heavy quark effective theory, generalizations to other channels of charmed mesons and b-systems are briefly discussed.

  5. An analysis of the nucleon spectrum from lattice partially-quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    W. Armour; Allton, C. R.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2010-09-01

    The chiral extrapolation of the nucleon mass, Mn, is investigated using data coming from 2-flavour partially-quenched lattice simulations. The leading one-loop corrections to the nucleon mass are derived for partially-quenched QCD. A large sample of lattice results from the CP-PACS Collaboration is analysed, with explicit corrections for finite lattice spacing artifacts. The extrapolation is studied using finite range regularised chiral perturbation theory. The analysis also provides a quantitative estimate of the leading finite volume corrections. It is found that the discretisation, finite-volume and partial quenching effects can all be very well described in this framework, producing an extrapolated value of Mn in agreement with experiment. This procedure is also compared with extrapolations based on polynomial forms, where the results are less encouraging.

  6. Quantum properties of QCD string fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova-Nová, Šárka

    2016-07-01

    A simple quantization concept for a 3-dim QCD string is used to derive properties of QCD flux tube from the mass spectrum of light mesons and to predict observable quantum effects in correlations between adjacent hadrons. The quantized fragmentation model is presented and compared with experimental observations.

  7. Ghost-gluon coupling, power corrections, and {Lambda}{sub MS} from twisted-mass lattice QCD at N{sub f}=2

    SciTech Connect

    Blossier, B.; Boucaud, Ph.; Gravina, M.; Pene, O.; De soto, F.; Morenas, V.

    2010-08-01

    We present results concerning the nonperturbative evaluation of the ghost-gluon running QCD coupling constant from N{sub f}=2 twisted-mass lattice calculations. A novel method for calibrating the lattice spacing, independent of the string tension and hadron spectrum, is presented with results in agreement with previous estimates. The value of {Lambda}{sub MS} is computed from the running of the QCD coupling only after extrapolating to zero dynamical quark mass and after removing a nonperturbative operator-product expansion contribution that is assumed to be dominated by the dimension-two gluon condensate. The effect due to the dynamical quark mass in the determination of {Lambda}{sub MS} is discussed.

  8. QCD analogy for quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdom, Bob; Ren, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Quadratic gravity presents us with a renormalizable, asymptotically free theory of quantum gravity. When its couplings grow strong at some scale, as in QCD, then this strong scale sets the Planck mass. QCD has a gluon that does not appear in the physical spectrum. Quadratic gravity has a spin-2 ghost that we conjecture does not appear in the physical spectrum. We discuss how the QCD analogy leads to this conjecture and to the possible emergence of general relativity. Certain aspects of the QCD path integral and its measure are also similar for quadratic gravity. With the addition of the Einstein-Hilbert term, quadratic gravity has a dimensionful parameter that seems to control a quantum phase transition and the size of a mass gap in the strong phase.

  9. The dijet mass spectrum at D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    We present preliminary results from an analysis of jet data collected during the 1994-95 Tevatron Collider run with an integrated luminosity of 93 pb{sup -1}. Measurements of dijet mass spectra in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV are compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations.

  10. The Nc dependencies of baryon masses: Analysis with Lattice QCD and Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Calle Cordon, Alvaro C.; DeGrand, Thomas A.; Goity, Jose L.

    2014-07-01

    Baryon masses at varying values of Nc and light quark masses are studied with Lattice QCD and the results are analyzed in a low energy effective theory based on a combined framework of the 1/Nc and Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory expansions. Lattice QCD results for Nc=3, 5 and 7 obtained in quenched calculations, as well as results for unquenched calculations for Nc=3, are used for the analysis. The results are consistent with a previous analysis of Nc=3 LQCD results, and in addition permit the determination of sub-leading in 1/Nc effects in the spin-flavor singlet component of the baryon masses as well as in the hyperfine splittings.

  11. The Mass Spectrum of the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Hajime; Hasegawa, Kenji; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M ⊙ <~ M <~ 300 M ⊙, peaking at several× 10 M ⊙. Most of the very massive stars of >~ 140 M ⊙ are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of <~ 1 M ⊙ that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ~50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  12. The mass spectrum of the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, Hajime; Tominaga, Nozomu; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 300 M {sub ☉}, peaking at several× 10 M {sub ☉}. Most of the very massive stars of ≳ 140 M {sub ☉} are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ∼50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  13. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  14. The First Two Fermion Generations in Twisted Mass Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Karl

    2011-05-24

    An account of the status of simulations from the European Twisted Mass Collaboration is given. We show selected results from computations with two mass degenerate quarks, in particular values for the low energy constants of the chiral Lagrangian, the I = 2 scattering length and the {rho}-meson resonance parameters. We also provide first results from simulations where the strange and the charm quarks are included as dynamical degree of freedom in the simulation.

  15. Leading order hadronic contribution to g-2 from twisted mass QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment using twisted mass lattice QCD. The pion masses range from 330 MeV to 650 MeV. We use two lattice spacings, a=0.079 fm and 0.063 fm, to study lattice artifacts. Finite-size effects are studied for two values of the pion mass, and we calculate the disconnected contributions for four ensembles. Particular attention is paid to the dominant contributions of the vector mesons, both phenomenologically and from our lattice calculation.

  16. Up- and down-quark masses from finite-energy QCD sum rules to five loops

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, C. A.; Nasrallah, N. F.; Roentsch, R. H.; Schilcher, K.

    2009-01-01

    The up- and down-quark masses are determined from an optimized QCD finite-energy sum rule involving the correlator of axial-vector divergences, to five-loop order in perturbative QCD, and including leading nonperturbative QCD and higher order quark-mass corrections. This finite-energy sum rule is designed to reduce considerably the systematic uncertainties arising from the (unmeasured) hadronic resonance sector, which in this framework contributes less than 3-4% to the quark mass. This is achieved by introducing an integration kernel in the form of a second degree polynomial, restricted to vanish at the peak of the two lowest lying resonances. The driving hadronic contribution is then the pion pole, with parameters well known from experiment. The determination is done in the framework of contour improved perturbation theory, which exhibits a very good convergence, leading to a remarkably stable result in the unusually wide window s{sub 0}=1.0-4.0 GeV{sup 2}, where s{sub 0} is the radius of the integration contour in the complex energy (squared) plane. The results are m{sub u}(Q=2 GeV)=2.9{+-}0.2 MeV, m{sub d}(Q=2 GeV)=5.3{+-}0.4 MeV, and (m{sub u}+m{sub d})/2=4.1{+-}0.2 MeV (at a scale Q=2 GeV)

  17. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  18. Progress Report on Computing Excited-State Hadron Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, C.; Bell, A.; Lenkner, D.; Wong, C. H.; Bulava, J.; Foley, J.; Juge, K. J.

    2011-10-21

    Our progress in computing the spectrum of excited baryons and mesons in lattice QCD is described. Sets of spatially-extended hadron operators with a variety of different momenta are used. A new method of stochastically estimating the low-lying effects of quark propagation is utilized which allows reliable determinations of temporal correlations of both single-hadron and multi-hadron operators. The method is tested on the isoscalar mesons in the scalar, pseudoscalar, and vector channels, and on the two-pion system of total isospin I = 0,1,2.

  19. Renormalization constants for 2-twist operators in twisted mass QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, C.; Constantinou, M.; Panagopoulos, H.; Stylianou, F.; Korzec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Perturbative and nonperturbative results on the renormalization constants of the fermion field and the twist-2 fermion bilinears are presented with emphasis on the nonperturbative evaluation of the one-derivative twist-2 vector and axial-vector operators. Nonperturbative results are obtained using the twisted mass Wilson fermion formulation employing two degenerate dynamical quarks and the tree-level Symanzik improved gluon action. The simulations have been performed for pion masses in the range of about 450-260 MeV and at three values of the lattice spacing a corresponding to {beta}=3.9, 4.05, 4.20. Subtraction of O(a{sup 2}) terms is carried out by performing the perturbative evaluation of these operators at 1-loop and up to O(a{sup 2}). The renormalization conditions are defined in the RI{sup '}-MOM scheme, for both perturbative and nonperturbative results. The renormalization factors, obtained for different values of the renormalization scale, are evolved perturbatively to a reference scale set by the inverse of the lattice spacing. In addition, they are translated to MS at 2 GeV using 3-loop perturbative results for the conversion factors.

  20. New Physics Search in Dijet Mass Spectrum with Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Chiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Many extensions of the SM predict the existence of new massive objects that couple to quarks and gluons and result in resonances in the dijet mass spectrum. In this thesis we present a search for narrow resonances in the dijet mass spectrum using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a proton-proton collision energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$. %This dijet analysis is searching for new particles in the dijet mass spectrum decaying to dijets. These new particles are predicted by new physics beyond Standard Model. This thesis presents a dijet analysis performed at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$ for an integrated luminosities of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass distribution of two leading jets is measured and compared to QCD predictions, simulated by PYTHIA with the CMS detector simulation. We select events which have two leading jets with $\\mid \\Delta\\eta \\mid < 1.3$ and $\\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.5$. We fit the dijet mass spectrum with QCD parameters. Since no evidence of new physics was found, we set upper limits at 95\\% CL on the resonance cross section and compare to the theoretical prediction for several models of new particles: string resonances, axigluons, colorons, excited quarks, $E_{6}$ diquarks, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, W' and Z'. We exclude at 95\\% CL string resonances in the mass range $1.0 < M(S) < 4.00$ TeV, excited quarks in the mass range $1.0mass range $1.0mass range $1.0mass range $1.0

  1. Quark-mass dependence of the three-flavor QCD phase diagram at zero and imaginary chemical potential: Model prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    We draw the three-flavor phase diagram as a function of light- and strange-quark masses for both zero and imaginary quark-number chemical potential, using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with an effective four-quark vertex depending on the Polyakov loop. The model prediction is qualitatively consistent with 2+1 flavor lattice QCD prediction at zero chemical potential and with degenerate three-flavor lattice QCD prediction at imaginary chemical potential.

  2. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD: The Spectrum, Structure and Interactions of Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards; Colin Morningstar; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Martin Savage

    2007-02-09

    The importance of lattice QCD to our understanding of the structure, spectroscopy, and interaction of hadrons is decribed. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas is outlined, and the opportunities emerging with increasing computational power are identified. Milestones at the 10 Tflops-years, 100 Tflops-years and Petaflops-years scales are presented.

  3. Mass of the B(c) meson in three-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Ian F.; Davies, Christine T.H.; Gray, Alan; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Mackenzie, Paul B.; Simone, James N.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The authors use lattice QCD to predict the mass of the B{sub c} meson. They use the MILC Collaborations publicly available ensembles of lattice gauge fields, which have a quark sea with two flavors (up and down) much lighter than a third (strange). The final result is m{sub B{sub c}} = 6304 {+-} 12{sub -0}{sup +18} MeV. The first error bar is a sum in quadrature of statistical and systematic uncertainties, and the second is an estimate of heavy-quark discretization effects.

  4. Temperature Dependence of Decuplet Baryon Masses from Thermal QCD Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Liu, Yong-Lu; Huang, Ming-Qiu

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the masses of the decuplet baryons at finite temperature are investigated using thermal QCD sum rules. Making use of the quark propagator at finite temperature, we calculate the spectral functions to T8 order, and find that there are no contributions to the spectral functions at T8 order and the temperature corrections mainly come from that containing T4 ones. The calculations show very little temperature dependence of the masses below T = 0.11 GeV. While above that value, the masses decrease with increasing temperature. The results indicate that the hadron-quark phase transition temperature may be Tc >= 0.11 GeV for the decuplet bayons.

  5. Two-loop QCD corrections to the MSSM Higgs masses beyond the effective-potential approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrassi, G.; Di Vita, S.; Slavich, P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, including the effect of non-vanishing external momenta in the self-energies. We obtain corrections of and , i.e., all two-loop corrections that involve the strong gauge coupling when the only non-vanishing Yukawa coupling is the top one. We adopt either the renormalization scheme or a mixed on-shell (OS)- scheme where the top/stop parameters are renormalized on-shell. We compare our results with those of earlier calculations, pointing out an inconsistency in a recent result obtained in the mixed OS- scheme. The numerical impact of the new corrections on the prediction for the lightest-scalar mass is moderate, but already comparable to the accuracy of the Higgs-mass measurement at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Up, down, strange and charm quark masses with Nf=2+1+1 twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, N.; Deuzeman, A.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Giménez, V.; Herdoiza, G.; Lami, P.; Lubicz, V.; Palao, D.; Picca, E.; Reker, S.; Riggio, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Sanfilippo, F.; Scorzato, L.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; Urbach, C.; Wenger, U.

    2014-10-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the up, down, strange and charm quark masses performed using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2+1+1 dynamical quarks, which include in the sea, besides two light mass degenerate quarks, also the strange and charm quarks with masses close to their physical values. The simulations are based on a unitary setup for the two light quarks and on a mixed action approach for the strange and charm quarks. The analysis uses data at three values of the lattice spacing and pion masses in the range 210-450 MeV, allowing for accurate continuum limit and controlled chiral extrapolation. The quark mass renormalization is carried out non-perturbatively using the RI‧-MOM method. The results for the quark masses converted to the MSbar scheme are: mud(2 GeV)=3.70(17) MeV, ms(2 GeV)=99.6(4.3) MeV and mc(mc)=1.348(46) GeV. We obtain also the quark mass ratios ms/mud=26.66(32) and mc/ms=11.62(16). By studying the mass splitting between the neutral and charged kaons and using available lattice results for the electromagnetic contributions, we evaluate mu/md=0.470(56), leading to mu=2.36(24) MeV and md=5.03(26) MeV.

  7. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.

  8. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors from lattice QCD using a nearly physical pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. R.; Negele, J. W.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.; Engelhardt, M.; Krieg, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present lattice QCD calculations of nucleon electromagnetic form factors using pion masses mπ=149, 202, and 254 MeV and an action with clover-improved Wilson quarks coupled to smeared gauge fields, as used by the Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal Collaboration. Particular attention is given to the removal of the effects of excited-state contamination by calculations at three source-sink separations and the use of the summation and generalized pencil-of-function methods. The combination of a calculation at the nearly physical mass mπ=149 MeV in a large spatial volume (mπLs=4.2) and the removal of excited-state effects yields agreement with experiment for the electric and magnetic form factors GE(Q2) and GM(Q2) up to Q2=0.5 GeV2.

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrum Identification via Cascaded Search.

    PubMed

    Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Keich, Uri; Noble, William Stafford

    2015-08-01

    Accurate assignment of peptide sequences to observed fragmentation spectra is hindered by the large number of hypotheses that must be considered for each observed spectrum. A high score assigned to a particular peptide-spectrum match (PSM) may not end up being statistically significant after multiple testing correction. Researchers can mitigate this problem by controlling the hypothesis space in various ways: considering only peptides resulting from enzymatic cleavages, ignoring possible post-translational modifications or single nucleotide variants, etc. However, these strategies sacrifice identifications of spectra generated by rarer types of peptides. In this work, we introduce a statistical testing framework, cascade search, that directly addresses this problem. The method requires that the user specify a priori a statistical confidence threshold as well as a series of peptide databases. For instance, such a cascade of databases could include fully tryptic, semitryptic, and nonenzymatic peptides or peptides with increasing numbers of modifications. Cascaded search then gradually expands the list of candidate peptides from more likely peptides toward rare peptides, sequestering at each stage any spectrum that is identified with a specified statistical confidence. We compare cascade search to a standard procedure that lumps all of the peptides into a single database, as well as to a previously described group FDR procedure that computes the FDR separately within each database. We demonstrate, using simulated and real data, that cascade search identifies more spectra at a fixed FDR threshold than with either the ungrouped or grouped approach. Cascade search thus provides a general method for maximizing the number of identified spectra in a statistically rigorous fashion. PMID:26084232

  10. Tandem Mass Spectrum Identification via Cascaded Search

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assignment of peptide sequences to observed fragmentation spectra is hindered by the large number of hypotheses that must be considered for each observed spectrum. A high score assigned to a particular peptide–spectrum match (PSM) may not end up being statistically significant after multiple testing correction. Researchers can mitigate this problem by controlling the hypothesis space in various ways: considering only peptides resulting from enzymatic cleavages, ignoring possible post-translational modifications or single nucleotide variants, etc. However, these strategies sacrifice identifications of spectra generated by rarer types of peptides. In this work, we introduce a statistical testing framework, cascade search, that directly addresses this problem. The method requires that the user specify a priori a statistical confidence threshold as well as a series of peptide databases. For instance, such a cascade of databases could include fully tryptic, semitryptic, and nonenzymatic peptides or peptides with increasing numbers of modifications. Cascaded search then gradually expands the list of candidate peptides from more likely peptides toward rare peptides, sequestering at each stage any spectrum that is identified with a specified statistical confidence. We compare cascade search to a standard procedure that lumps all of the peptides into a single database, as well as to a previously described group FDR procedure that computes the FDR separately within each database. We demonstrate, using simulated and real data, that cascade search identifies more spectra at a fixed FDR threshold than with either the ungrouped or grouped approach. Cascade search thus provides a general method for maximizing the number of identified spectra in a statistically rigorous fashion. PMID:26084232

  11. QCD thermodynamics and missing hadron states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreczky, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Equation of State and fluctuations of conserved charges in hot strongly interacting matter are being calculated with increasing accuracy in lattice QCD, and continuum results at physical quark masses become available. At sufficiently low temperature the thermodynamic quantities can be understood in terms of hadron resonance gas model that includes known hadrons and hadronic resonances from Particle Data Book. However, for some quantities it is necessary to include undiscovered hadronic resonances (missing states) that are, however, predicted by quark model and lattice QCD study of hadron spectrum. Thus, QCD thermodynamics can provide indications for the existence of yet undiscovered hadron states.

  12. PDF and QCD effects in the precision measurement of the W boson mass at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A sample of W → ev (W → μν) and Z0 → e+e- (Z0 → μ+μ-) events recorded by the CDF detector for p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV are used to evaluate the systematic uncertainty in the determination of the W boson mass arising from uncertainties in the parton distribution functions and higher-order QCD effects. The systematic contribution of PDFs is determined to be 10 MeV/c2 for MSTW2008 NLO and 12 MeV/c2 for CTEQ6.6. The total systematic contribution arising from higher-order QCD effects in 9 MeV/c2. The Z0 events are used to extract improved estimates of the phenomenological parameters in the BLNY model that describes low transverse momentum.

  13. Nucleon Structure from 2+1 Flavor Domain Wall QCD at Nearly Physical Pion Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011-05-01

    The RBC and UKQCD collaborations have been investigating hadron physics in numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with (2+1) flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions (DWF) quarks that preserves continuum-like chiral and flavor symmetries. The strange quark mass is adjusted to physical value via reweighting and degenerate up and down quark masses are set as light as possible. In a recent study of nucleon structure we found a strong dependence on pion mass and lattice spatial extent in isovector axialvector-current form factors. This is likely the first credible evidence for the pion cloud surrounding nucleon. Here we report the status of nucleon structure calculations with a new (2+1)-flavor dynamical DWF ensembles with much lighter pion mass of 180 and 250 MeV and a much larger lattice spatial exent of 4.6 fm. A combination of the Iwasaki and dislocation-suppressing-determinant-ratio (I+DSDR) gauge action and DWF fermion action allows us to generate these ensembles at cutoff of about 1.4 GeV while keeping the residual breaking of chiral symmetry sufficiently small. Nucleon source Gaussian smearing has been optimized. Preliminary nucleon mass estimates are 0.98 and 1.05 GeV.

  14. Nucleon Structure from 2+1 Flavor Domain Wall QCD at Nearly Physical Pion Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2011-05-24

    The RBC and UKQCD collaborations have been investigating hadron physics in numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with (2+1) flavors of dynamical domain wall fermions (DWF) quarks that preserves continuum-like chiral and flavor symmetries. The strange quark mass is adjusted to physical value via reweighting and degenerate up and down quark masses are set as light as possible. In a recent study of nucleon structure we found a strong dependence on pion mass and lattice spatial extent in isovector axialvector-current form factors. This is likely the first credible evidence for the pion cloud surrounding nucleon. Here we report the status of nucleon structure calculations with a new (2+1)-flavor dynamical DWF ensembles with much lighter pion mass of 180 and 250 MeV and a much larger lattice spatial exent of 4.6 fm. A combination of the Iwasaki and dislocation-suppressing-determinant-ratio (I+DSDR) gauge action and DWF fermion action allows us to generate these ensembles at cutoff of about 1.4 GeV while keeping the residual breaking of chiral symmetry sufficiently small. Nucleon source Gaussian smearing has been optimized. Preliminary nucleon mass estimates are 0.98 and 1.05 GeV.

  15. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Z; Hoelbling, C; Krieg, S; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K K; Varnhorst, L

    2016-08-19

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on N_{f}=2+1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ϵ=0.73(2)(5)(17), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, m_{u}=2.27(6)(5)(4) and m_{d}=4.67(6)(5)(4)  MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2  GeV and the isospin breaking ratios m_{u}/m_{d}=0.485(11)(8)(14), R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4), and Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4). Our results exclude the m_{u}=0 solution to the strong CP problem by more than 24 standard deviations. PMID:27588847

  16. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Krieg, S.; Lellouch, L.; Lippert, Th.; Portelli, A.; Sastre, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Varnhorst, L.; Budapest-Marseille-Wuppertal Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on Nf=2 +1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ɛ =0.73 (2 )(5 )(17 ), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, mu=2.27 (6 )(5 )(4 ) and md=4.67 (6 )(5 )(4 ) MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2 G e V and the isospin breaking ratios mu/md=0.485 (11 )(8 )(14 ), R =38.2 (1.1 )(0.8 )(1.4 ), and Q =23.4 (0.4 )(0.3 )(0.4 ). Our results exclude the mu=0 solution to the strong C P problem by more than 24 standard deviations.

  17. Mass modification of /D-meson at finite density in QCD sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashigaki1, A.

    2000-08-01

    We evaluate the mass shift of isospin-averaged /D-meson in the nuclear medium. Borel-transformed QCD sum rules are used to describe an interaction between the /D-meson and a nucleon by taking into account all the lowest dimension-4 operators in the operator product expansion (OPE). We find at normal matter density the /D-meson mass shift is about /10 times (/~50 MeV) larger than that of /J/ψ. This originates from the fact that the dominant contribution in the OPE for the /D-meson is the nucleon matrix element of mcq¯q, where mc is the charm-quark mass and /q denotes light quarks. We also discuss that the mass shift of the /D-meson in nuclear matter may cause the level crossings of the charmonium states and the /DD¯ threshold. This suggests an additional mechanism of the /J/ψ suppression in high energy heavy-ion collisions.

  18. The Gell-Mann - Okubo Mass Relation among Baryons from Fully-Dynamical, Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos; Silas Beane; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We explore the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation among the octet baryons using fully-dynamical, mixed-action (domain-wall on rooted-staggered) lattice QCD calculations at a lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.125 fm and pion masses of m{sub pi} {approx} 290 MeV, 350 MeV, 490 MeV and 590 MeV. Deviations from the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation are found to be small at each quark mass.

  19. Heavy-Quark Mass and Heavy-Meson Decay Constants from QCD Sum Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2011-05-23

    We present a sum-rule extraction of decay constants of heavy mesons from the two-point correlator of heavy-light pseudoscalar currents. Our primary concern is to control the uncertainties of the decay constants, induced by both input QCD parameters and limited accuracy of the sum-rule method. Gaining this control is possible by applying our novel procedure for the extraction of hadron observables utilizing Borel-parameter-depending dual thresholds. For the charmed mesons, we obtain f{sub D} (206.2{+-}7.3{sub (OPE){+-}}5.1{sub (syst)}) MeV and f{sub D{sub s}} (245.3{+-}15.7{sub (OPE){+-}}4.5{sub (syst)}) MeV. In the case of the beauty mesons, the decay constants prove to be extremely sensitive to the exact value of the b-quark MS mass m-bar{sub b}(m-bar{sub b}). By matching our sum-rule prediction for f{sub B} to the lattice outcomes, the very accurate b-mass value m-bar{sub b}(m-bar{sub b}) = (4.245{+-}0.025) GeV is found, which yields f{sub B} = (193.4{+-}12.3{sub (OPE){+-}}4.3{sub (syst)}) MeV and f{sub B{sub s}} (232.5{+-}18.6{sub (OPE){+-}}2.4{sub (syst)}) MeV.

  20. Dual condensate and QCD phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Bruckmann, Falk; Fodor, Zoltan; Szabo, Kalman K.; Gattringer, Christof

    2011-05-23

    The dual condensate is a new QCD phase transition order parameter, which connnects confinement and chiral symmetry breaking as different mass limits. We discuss the relation between the fermion spectrum at general boundary conditions and the dual condensate and show numerical results for the latter from unquenched SU(3) lattice configurations.

  1. The Symmetries of QCD

    ScienceCinema

    Sekhar Chivukula

    2010-01-08

    The symmetries of a quantum field theory can be realized in a variety of ways. Symmetries can be realized explicitly, approximately, through spontaneous symmetry breaking or, via an anomaly, quantum effects can dynamically eliminate a symmetry of the theory that was present at the classical level.  Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the modern theory of the strong interactions, exemplify each of these possibilities. The interplay of these effects determine the spectrum of particles that we observe and, ultimately, account for 99% of the mass of ordinary matter. 

  2. tmLQCD: A program suite to simulate Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Karl; Urbach, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    We discuss a program suite for simulating Quantum Chromodynamics on a 4-dimensional space-time lattice. The basic Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is introduced and a number of algorithmic improvements are explained. We then discuss the implementations of these concepts as well as our parallelisation strategy in the actual simulation code. Finally, we provide a user guide to compile and run the program. Program summaryProgram title: tmLQCD Catalogue identifier: AEEH_v1_0 Program summary URL::http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence (GPL) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 122 768 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 931 042 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C and MPI Computer: any Operating system: any with a standard C compiler Has the code been vectorised or parallelised?: Yes. One or optionally any even number of processors may be used. Tested with up to 32 768 processors RAM: no typical values available Classification: 11.5 External routines: LAPACK [1] and LIME [2] library Nature of problem: Quantum Chromodynamics Solution method: Markov Chain Monte Carlo using the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scales [3]. Iterative solver for large systems of linear equations. Restrictions: Restricted to an even number of (not necessarily mass degenerate) quark flavours in the Wilson or Wilson twisted mass formulation of lattice QCD. Running time: Depending on the problem size, the architecture and the input parameters from a few minutes to weeks. References:http://www.netlib.org/lapack/. USQCD, http://usqcd.jlab.org/usqcd-docs/c-lime/. C. Urbach, K. Jansen, A. Shindler, U. Wenger, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174 (2006) 87, hep-lat/0506011.

  3. Quark masses and the meson spectrum: A holographic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, S. S.; Pusenkov, I. V.

    2015-09-01

    Based on experimental data, we can assume that the radial spectrum of vector mesons with a hidden quark flavor has a Regge form and propose its concrete form. The parameters of the Regge spectrum turn out to depend strongly on the mass of the quarks forming the mesons. We consider the problem of finding the form of these dependences in the framework of the holographic approach to strong interactions. The obtained results agree well with the phenomenology and with models of Veneziano-like dual amplitudes.

  4. On the consistency of recent QCD lattice data of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Semke, A.

    2012-11-01

    In our recent analysis of lattice data of the BMW, LHPC and PACS-CS groups we determined a parameter set of the chiral Lagrangian that allows a simultaneous description of the baryon octet and decuplet masses as measured by those lattice groups. The results on the baryon spectrum of the HSC group were recovered accurately without their inclusion into our six parameter fit. We show that the same parameter set provides an accurate reproduction of the recent results of the QCDSF-UKQCD group probing the baryon masses at quite different quark masses. This shows a remarkable consistency amongst the different lattice simulations. With even more accurate lattice data in the near future it will become feasible to determine all low-energy parameters relevant at N3LO.

  5. Spectrum and Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of Ω baryons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jian; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Wei-Feng; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Bo; CLQCD Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Ω baryons with J P = 3/2±, 1/2± are studied on the lattice in the quenched approximation. Their mass levels are ordered as M 3/2+ < M 3/2‑ ≈ M 1/2‑ < M 1/2+ , as is expected from the constituent quark model. The mass values are also close to those of the four Ω states observed in experiments. We calculate the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of Ω(3/2+) and Ω(1/2+) and find there is a radial node for the Ω(1/2+) Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, which may imply that Ω(1/2+) is an orbital excitation of Ω baryons as a member of the supermultiplet in the SU(6) ⊗ O(3) quark model description. Our results are helpful for identifying the quantum numbers of experimentally observed Ω states. The numerical calculations were carried out on Tianhe-1A at the National Supercomputer Center (NSCC) in Tianjin. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11105153, 11335001, 11405053), Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS, NSFC (11261130311) (CRC 110 by DFG and NSFC)

  6. Mass spectrum and Higgs profile in B -L symmetric SSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ün, Cem Salih; Özdal, Özer

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the predictions on the mass spectrum and Higgs boson decays in the supersymmetric standard model extended by U (1 )B-L symmetry (BLSSM). The model requires two singlet Higgs fields, which are responsible for the radiative breaking of U (1 )B-L symmetry. It predicts degenerate right-handed neutrino masses (1.7-2.2 TeV) as well as the right-handed sneutrinos of mass ≲4 TeV . The presence of right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos triggers the baryon and lepton number violation processes, until they decouple from the standard model particles. Besides, the model predicts rather heavy colored particles; mt ˜ , mb ˜≳1.5 TeV , while mτ ˜≳100 GeV and mχ˜1±≳600 GeV . Even though the implications are similar to the minimal supersymmetric standard model, BLSSM can predict another Higgs boson lighter than 150 GeV. We find that the second Higgs boson can be degenerate with the lightest charge parity (C P )-even Higgs boson of mass about 125 GeV and contribute to the Higgs decay into two photons. In addition, it can provide an explanation for the excess in h →4 l at the mass scale ˜145 GeV .

  7. Spectral continuity in dense QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tachibana, Motoi

    2008-07-01

    The vector mesons in three-flavor quark matter with chiral and diquark condensates are studied using the in-medium QCD sum rules. The diquark condensate leads to a mass splitting between the flavor-octet and flavor-singlet channels. At high density, the singlet vector meson disappears from the low-energy spectrum, while the octet vector mesons survive as light excitations with a mass comparable to the fermion gap. A possible connection between the light gluonic modes and the flavor-octet vector mesons at high density is also discussed.

  8. Higgs mass predictions of public NMSSM spectrum generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, Florian; Athron, Peter; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Gröber, Ramona; Mühlleitner, Margarete; Slavich, Pietro; Voigt, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The publicly available spectrum generators for the NMSSM often lead to different predictions for the mass of the standard model-like Higgs boson, even though they all implement two-loop computations in the DR bar renormalization scheme. Depending on the parameter point, the differences can exceed 5 GeV, and even reach 8 GeV for moderate superparticle masses of up to 2 TeV. It is shown here that these differences can be traced back to the calculation of the running standard model parameters entering all calculations, to the approximations used in the two-loop corrections included in the different codes, and to different choices for the renormalization conditions and scales. In particular, the importance of the calculation of the top Yukawa coupling is pointed out.

  9. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.« less

  10. The Higgs mass and natural supersymmetric spectrum from the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Howard; Barger, Vernon; Savoy, Michael; Serce, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In supersymmetric models where the superpotential μ term is generated with μ ≪msoft (e.g. from radiative Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking or compactified string models with sequestration and stabilized moduli), and where the string landscape 1. favors soft supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking terms as large as possible and 2. where the anthropic condition that electroweak symmetry is properly broken with a weak scale m W , Z , h ∼ 100 GeV (i.e. not too weak of weak interactions), then these combined landscape/anthropic requirements act as an attractor pulling the soft SUSY breaking terms towards values required by models with radiatively-driven naturalness: near the line of criticality where electroweak symmetry is barely broken and the Higgs mass is ∼ 125 GeV. The pull on the soft terms serves to ameliorate the SUSY flavor and CP problems. The resulting sparticle mass spectrum may barely be accessible at high-luminosity LHC while the required light higgsinos should be visible at a linear e+e- collider with √{ s} > 2 m (higgsino).

  11. OPE, charm-quark mass, and decay constants of D and Ds mesons from QCD sum rules

    PubMed Central

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    We present a sum-rule extraction of the decay constants of the charmed mesons D and Ds from the two-point correlator of pseudoscalar currents. First, we compare the perturbative expansion for the correlator and the decay constant performed in terms of the pole and the running MS¯ masses of the charm quark. The perturbative expansion in terms of the pole mass shows no signs of convergence whereas reorganizing this very expansion in terms of the MS¯ mass leads to a distinct hierarchy of the perturbative expansion. Furthermore, the decay constants extracted from the pole-mass correlator turn out to be considerably smaller than those obtained by means of the MS¯-mass correlator. Second, making use of the OPE in terms of the MS¯ mass, we determine the decay constants of both D and Ds mesons with an emphasis on the uncertainties in these quantities related both to the input QCD parameters and to the limited accuracy of the method of sum rules. PMID:21949465

  12. Radiative Charmonium Physics from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards; Nilmani Mathur

    2007-08-09

    Charmonium is an attractive system for the application of lattice QCD methods owing to the possibility of computing with the physical quark mass in a reasonable time. While the sub-threshold spectrum has been considered in some detail in previous works, it is only very recently that further properties such as radiative transitions and two-photon decays have come to be calculated; herein we discuss this recent progress.

  13. A model for QCD at high density and large quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Seiler, Erhard; Stamatescu, Ion-Olimpiu

    2007-12-01

    We study the high density region of QCD within an effective model obtained in the frame of the hopping parameter expansion and choosing Polyakov-type loops as the main dynamical variables representing the fermionic matter. To get a first idea of the phase structure, the model is analyzed in strong coupling expansion and using a mean field approximation. In numerical simulations, the model still shows the so-called sign problem, a difficulty peculiar to nonzero chemical potential, but it permits the development of algorithms which ensure a good overlap of the Monte Carlo ensemble with the true one. We review the main features of the model and present calculations concerning the dependence of various observables on the chemical potential and on the temperature, in particular, of the charge density and the diquark susceptibility, which may be used to characterize the various phases expected at high baryonic density. We obtain in this way information about the phase structure of the model and the corresponding phase transitions and crossover regions, which can be considered as hints for the behavior of nonzero density QCD.

  14. QCD equation of state at nonzero chemical potential: continuum results with physical quark masses at order μ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Sz.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Ratti, C.; Szabó, K. K.

    2012-08-01

    We determine the equation of state of QCD for nonzero chemical potentials via a Taylor expansion of the pressure. The results are obtained for N f = 2 + 1 flavors of quarks with physical masses, on various lattice spacings. We present results for the pressure, interaction measure, energy density, entropy density, and the speed of sound for small chemical potentials. At low temperatures we compare our results with the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We also express our observables along trajectories of constant entropy over particle number. A simple parameterization is given (the Matlab/Octave script parameterization.m, submitted to the arXiv along with the paper), which can be used to reconstruct the observables as functions of T and μ, or as functions of T and S/N.

  15. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  16. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  17. Constraining Amplitude and Slope of the Mass Fluctuation Spectrum Using a Cluster Baryon Mass Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voevodkin, A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2004-02-01

    We derive the baryon mass function for a complete sample of low-redshift clusters and argue that it is an excellent proxy for the total mass function if the ratio fb=Mb/Mtot in all clusters is close to its universal value, Ωb/ΩM. Under this assumption, the baryon mass function can be used to constrain the amplitude and slope of the density fluctuation power spectrum on cluster scales. This method does not use observational determinations of the total mass and thus bypasses major uncertainties in the traditional analyses based on the X-ray temperature function. However, it is sensitive to possible systematic variations of the baryon fraction as a function of cluster mass. Adapting a weak dependence fb(M), suggested by observations and numerical simulations by Bialek et al., we derive σ8=0.72+/-0.04 and the shape parameter ΩMh=0.13+/-0.07, in good agreement with a number of independent methods. We discuss the sensitivity of these values to other cosmological parameters and to different assumptions about variations in fb.

  18. Bottom hadrons from lattice QCD with domain wall and NRQCD fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel, William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Matthew Wingate

    2009-07-01

    Dynamical 2+1 flavor lattice QCD is used to calculate the masses of bottom hadrons, including B mesons, singly and doubly bottom baryons, and for the first time also the triply-bottom baryon Omega{sub bbb}. The domain wall action is used for the up-, down-, and strange quarks (both valence and sea), while the bottom quark is implemented with non-relativistic QCD. A calculation of the bottomonium spectrum is also presented.

  19. RECENT LATTICE RESULTS ON FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY QCD, PART 1.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.

    2007-07-09

    We discuss recent progress made studies of bulk thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter through lattice simulations of QCD with an almost physical light and strange quark mass spectrum. We present results on the QCD equation of state at vanishing and non-vanishing quark chemical potential and show first results on baryon number and strangeness fluctuations, which might be measured in event-by-event fluctuations in low energy runs at RHIC as well as at FAIR.

  20. Renormalization scheme dependence of the two-loop QCD corrections to the neutral Higgs-boson masses in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowka, S.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer, S.; Heinrich, G.; Hollik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Reaching a theoretical accuracy in the prediction of the lightest MSSM Higgs-boson mass, , at the level of the current experimental precision requires the inclusion of momentum-dependent contributions at the two-loop level. Recently two groups presented the two-loop QCD momentum-dependent corrections to (Borowka et al., Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014; Degrassi et al., Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015), using a hybrid on-shell- scheme, with apparently different results. We show that the differences can be traced back to a different renormalization of the top-quark mass, and that the claim in Ref. Degrassi et al. (Eur Phys J C 75(2):61, 2015) of an inconsistency in Ref. Borowka et al. (Eur Phys J C 74(8):2994, 2014) is incorrect. We furthermore compare consistently the results for obtained with the top-quark mass renormalized on-shell and . The latter calculation has been added to the FeynHiggs package and can be used to estimate missing higher-order corrections beyond the two-loop level.

  1. Precise MS light-quark masses from lattice QCD in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Jaeger, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    We compute the conversion factors needed to obtain the MS and renormalization-group-invariant (RGI) up, down, and strange quark masses at next-to-next-to-leading order from the corresponding parameters renormalized in the recently proposed RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }renormalization schemes. This is important for obtaining the MS masses with the best possible precision from numerical lattice QCD simulations, because the customary RI{sup (')}/MOM scheme is afflicted with large irreducible uncertainties both on the lattice and in perturbation theory. We find that the smallness of the known one-loop matching coefficients is accompanied by even smaller two-loop contributions. From a study of residual scale dependences, we estimate the resulting perturbative uncertainty on the light-quark masses to be about 2% in the RI/SMOM scheme and about 3% in the RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }scheme. Our conversion factors are given in fully analytic form, for general covariant gauge and renormalization point. We provide expressions for the associated anomalous dimensions.

  2. Non-perturbative Calculation of the Positronium Mass Spectrum in Basis Light-Front Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecki, Paul; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xingbo; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2015-09-01

    We report on recent improvements to our non-perturbative calculation of the positronium spectrum. Our Hamiltonian is a two-body effective interaction which incorporates one-photon exchange terms, but neglects fermion self-energy effects. This effective Hamiltonian is diagonalized numerically in a harmonic oscillator basis at strong coupling () to obtain the mass eigenvalues. We find that the mass spectrum compares favorably to the Bohr spectrum of non-relativistic quantum mechanics evaluated at this unphysical coupling.

  3. Baryon Self-Energy with qqq Bethe-Salpeter Dynamics in the Nonperturbative QCD Regime:. n-p Mass Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anju; Mitra, A. N.

    A qqq BSE formalism based on DBχS of an input four-fermion Lagrangian of "current" u, d quarks interacting pairwise via gluon-exchange-propagator in its nonperturbative regime, is employed for the calculation of baryon self-energy via quark-loop integrals. To that end the baryon-qqq vertex function is derived under Covariant Instantaneity Ansatz (CIA), using Green function techniques. This is a three-body extension of an earlier qbar q (two-body) result on the exact 3D-4D interconnection for the respective BS wave functions under 3D kernel support. The nonperturbative QCD feature of this approach (vis-a-vis chiral perturbation theory — see text for comparison) is preserved through the gluon exchange propagator in the infrared regime (characterized by two parameters C0, ω0), precalibrated to both qbar q and qqq spectra plus other observables, together with a DBχ S mechanism to generate the dynamical mass m(p). The quark-loop integrals for the neutron (n) - proton (p) mass difference receive contributions from two sources: (i) the strong SU(2) effect arising from the d-u mass difference (4 MeV); (ii) the e.m. effect of the respective quark charges. The resultant n-p difference comes dominantly from the d-u effect (+1.71 MeV), which is mildly offset by e.m. effect (-0.44), subject to gauge corrections. For an estimate of the latter a general method for QED gauge corrections to an arbitrary momentum dependent vertex function is outlined (in App. C), and a calculation made for the (two-body) kaon as a test case, indicates an increase by 0.612 MeV in the earlier kaon e.m. value (1.032 MeV). This result is taken as a rough indication of the percentage gauge correction expected for the n-p case. A critical comparison is given with the results from QCD sum rules.

  4. Quark mass relations to four-loop order in perturbative QCD.

    PubMed

    Marquard, Peter; Smirnov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Vladimir A; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2015-04-10

    We present results for the relation between a heavy quark mass defined in the on-shell and minimal subtraction (MS[over ¯]) scheme to four-loop order. The method to compute the four-loop on-shell integral is briefly described and the new results are used to establish relations between various short-distance masses and the MS[over ¯] quark mass to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy. These relations play an important role in the accurate determination of the MS[over ¯] heavy quark masses. PMID:25910112

  5. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 -i/2 129 (3) (1) 7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  6. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  7. Comparing symmetry restoration trends for meson masses and mixing angles in the QCD-like three quark flavor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vivek Kumar

    2013-10-01

    We are computing the modifications for the scalar and pseudoscalar meson masses and mixing angles due to the proper accounting of fermionic vacuum fluctuation in the framework of the generalized 2+1 flavor quark meson model and the Polyakov loop augmented quark meson model (PQM). The renormalized contribution of the divergent fermionic vacuum fluctuation at one loop level makes these models effective QCD-like models. It has been explicitly shown that analytical expressions for the model parameters, meson masses, and mixing angles do not depend on any arbitrary renormalization scale. We have investigated how the incorporation of fermionic vacuum fluctuation in quark meson and PQM models qualitatively and quantitatively affects the convergence in the masses of the chiral partners in pseudoscalar (π,η,η',K) and scalar (σ,a0,f0,κ) meson nonets as the temperature is varied on the reduced temperature scale. Comparison of present results in the quark meson model with vacuum term and the PQM model with vacuum term with the already existing calculations in the bare 2+1 quark meson and PQM models shows that the restoration of chiral symmetry becomes smoother due to the influence of the fermionic vacuum term. We find that the melting of the strange condensate registers a significant increase in the presence of the fermionic vacuum term and its highest melting is found in the PQM model with vacuum term. The role of the UA(1) anomaly in determining the isoscalar masses and mixing angles for the pseudoscalar (η and η') and scalar (σ and f0) meson complex has also been significantly modified due to the fermionic vacuum correction. In its influence, the interplay of chiral symmetry restoration and the setting up of the UA(1) restoration trends have also been shown to be significantly modified.

  8. Lattice QCD for parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadling, Henley Sean

    Lattice QCD is an important tool in the investigation of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This is particularly true at lower energies where traditional perturbative techniques fail, and where other non-perturbative theoretical efforts are not entirely satisfactory. Important features of QCD such as confinement and the masses of the low lying hadronic states have been demonstrated and calculated in lattice QCD simulations. In calculations such as these, non-lattice techniques in QCD have failed. However, despite the incredible advances in computer technology, a full solution of lattice QCD may still be in the too-distant future. Much effort is being expended in the search for ways to reduce the computational burden so that an adequate solution of lattice QCD is possible in the near future. There has been considerable progress in recent years, especially in the research of improved lattice actions. In this thesis, a new approach to lattice QCD algorithms is introduced, which results in very significant efficiency improvements. The new approach is explained in detail, evaluated and verified by comparing physics results with current lattice QCD simulations. The new sub-lattice layout methodology has been specifically designed for current and future hardware. Together with concurrent research into improved lattice actions and more efficient numerical algorithms, the very significant efficiency improvements demonstrated in this thesis can play an important role in allowing lattice QCD researchers access to much more realistic simulations. The techniques presented in this thesis also allow ambitious QCD simulations to be performed on cheap clusters of commodity computers.

  9. Mass of the b quark and B -meson decay constants from Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted-mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussone, A.; Carrasco, N.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Lami, P.; Lubicz, V.; Picca, E.; Riggio, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; ETM Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present precise lattice computations for the b -quark mass, the quark mass ratios mb/mc and mb/ms as well as the leptonic B -decay constants. We employ gauge configurations with four dynamical quark flavors, up-down, strange and charm, at three values of the lattice spacing (a ˜0.06 - 0.09 fm ) and for pion masses as low as 210 MeV. Interpolation in the heavy quark mass to the bottom quark point is performed using ratios of physical quantities computed at nearby quark masses exploiting the fact that these ratios are exactly known in the static quark mass limit. Our results are also extrapolated to the physical pion mass and to the continuum limit and read mb(MS ¯ ,mb)=4.26 (10 ) GeV , mb/mc=4.42 (8 ), mb/ms=51.4 (1.4 ), fB s=229 (5 ) MeV , fB=193 (6 ) MeV , fB s/fB=1.184 (25 ) and (fB s/fB)/(fK/fπ)=0.997 (17 ).

  10. Meson effective mass in the isospin medium in hard-wall AdS/QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    We study a mass splitting of the light vector, axial-vector, and pseudoscalar mesons in the isospin medium in the framework of the hard-wall model. We write an effective mass definition for the interacting gauge fields and scalar field introduced in gauge field theory in the bulk of AdS space-time. Relying on holographic duality we obtain a formula for the effective mass of a boundary meson in terms of derivative operator over the extra bulk coordinate. The effective mass found in this way coincides with the one obtained from finding of poles of the two-point correlation function. In order to avoid introducing distinguished infrared boundaries in the quantization formula for the different mesons from the same isotriplet we introduce extra action terms at this boundary, which reduces distinguished values of this boundary to the same value. Profile function solutions and effective mass expressions were found for the in-medium ρ , a_1, and π mesons.

  11. From QCD to physical resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In this talk, we present the first chiral extrapolation of a resonant scattering amplitude obtained from lattice QCD. Finite-volume spectra, determined by the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration at mπ = 236 MeV [1], for the isotriplet ππ channel are analyzed using the Lüscher method to determine the infinite-volume scattering amplitude. Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory is then used to extrapolate the scattering amplitude to the physical light quark masses. The viability of this procedure is demonstrated by its agreement with the experimentally determined scattering phase shift up to center-of-mass energies of 1.2 GeV. Finally, we analytically continue the amplitude to the complex plane to obtain the ρ-pole at [ 755 (2 )(1 )(02 20 ) -i/2 129 (3 )(1 )(1 7 ) ] MeV.

  12. CHIRAL LIMIT AND LIGHT QUARK MASSES IN 2+1 FLAVOR DOMAIN WALL QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOLZ,E.; LIN, M.

    2007-07-30

    We present results for meson masses and decay constants measured on 24{sup 3} x 64 lattices using the domain wall fermion formulation with an extension of the fifth dimension of L{sub s} = 16 for N{sub f} 2 + 1 dynamical quark flavors. The lightest dynamical meson mass in our set-up is around 331MeV. while partially quenched mesons reach masses as low as 250MeV. The applicability of SU(3) x SU(3) and SU(2) x SU(2) (partially quenched) chiral perturbation theory will be compared and we quote values for the low-energy constants from both approaches. We will extract the average light quark and strange quark masses and use a non-perturbative renormalization technique (RI/MOM) to quote their physical values. The pion and kaon decay constants are determined at those values from our chiral fits and their ratio is used to obtain the CKM-matrix element |V{sub us}|. The results presented here include statistical errors only.

  13. Threshold resummation S factor in QCD: The case of unequal masses

    SciTech Connect

    Solovtsova, O. P.; Chernichenko, Yu. D.

    2010-09-15

    A new relativistic Coulomb-like threshold resummation S factor in quantum chromodynamics is obtained. The analysis in question is performed within the quantum-field-theory quasipotential approach formulated in the relativistic configuration representation for the case of interaction between two relativistic particles that have unequal masses.

  14. Radiative transitions in charm-strange meson from Nf = 2 twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Wu, Ya-Jie

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study on the radiative transition for the charm-strange meson: Ds∗→ D sγ using Nf = 2 twisted mass lattice quantum chromodynamics gauge configurations. The form factor for Ds meson is also determined. The simulation is performed on lattices with lattice spacings a = 0.067 fm and lattice size 323 × 64, and a = 0.085 fm and lattice size 243 × 48, respectively. Our numerical results for radiative decay width and the experimental data overlap within the margin of error.

  15. B{sub K}-parameter from N{sub f}=2 twisted mass lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, M.; Panagopoulos, H.; Skouroupathis, A.; Stylianou, F.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Rossi, G. C.; Gimenez, V.; Lubicz, V.; Papinutto, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an unquenched N{sub f}=2 lattice computation of the B{sub K} parameter which controls K{sup 0}-K{sup 0} oscillations. A partially quenched setup is employed with two maximally twisted dynamical (sea) light Wilson quarks, and valence quarks of both the maximally twisted and the Osterwalder-Seiler variety. Suitable combinations of these two kinds of valence quarks lead to a lattice definition of the B{sub K} parameter which is both multiplicatively renormalizable and O(a) improved. Employing the nonperturbative RI-MOM scheme, in the continuum limit and at the physical value of the pion mass we get B{sub K}{sup RGI}=0.729{+-}0.030, a number well in line with the existing quenched and unquenched determinations.

  16. The QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    dynamics, and it gives a remarkable connection between the perturbative QCD scale Λ and hadron masses. One can also identify a specific scale Q0 which demarcates the division between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. We also review other important methods for computing the QCD coupling, including lattice QCD, the Schwinger-Dyson equations and the Gribov-Zwanziger analysis. After describing these approaches and enumerating their conflicting predictions, we discuss the origin of these discrepancies and how to remedy them. Our aim is not only to review the advances in this difficult area, but also to suggest what could be an optimal definition of αs(Q2) in order to bring better unity to the subject.

  17. QCD physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.

    1992-05-01

    We present measurements of jet production and isolated prompt photon production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--89 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). To test QCD with jets, the inclusive jet cross section (p{bar p} {yields} J + X) and two jet angular distributions (p{bar P} {yields} JJ + X) are compared to QCD predictions and are used to search for composite quarks. The ratio of the scaled jet cross sections at two Tevatron collision energies ({radical}s= 546 and 1800 GeV) is compared to QCD predictions for X{sub T} scaling violations. Also, we present the first evidence for QCD interference effects (color coherence) in third jet production (p{bar p} {yields} JJJ + X). To test QCD with photons, we present measurements of the transverse momentum spectrum of single isolated prompt photon production (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma} + X), double isolated prompt photon production (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} + X), and the angular distribution of photon-jet events (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma} J + X). We have also measured the isolated production ratio of {eta} and {pi}{sup 0} mesons (p{bar p} {yields} {eta} + X)/(p{bar p} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + X) = 1.02 {plus minus} .15(stat) {plus minus} .23(sys).

  18. QCD physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1992-05-01

    We present measurements of jet production and isolated prompt photon production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--89 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). To test QCD with jets, the inclusive jet cross section (p{bar p} {yields} J + X) and two jet angular distributions (p{bar P} {yields} JJ + X) are compared to QCD predictions and are used to search for composite quarks. The ratio of the scaled jet cross sections at two Tevatron collision energies ({radical}s= 546 and 1800 GeV) is compared to QCD predictions for X{sub T} scaling violations. Also, we present the first evidence for QCD interference effects (color coherence) in third jet production (p{bar p} {yields} JJJ + X). To test QCD with photons, we present measurements of the transverse momentum spectrum of single isolated prompt photon production (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma} + X), double isolated prompt photon production (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} + X), and the angular distribution of photon-jet events (p{bar p} {yields} {gamma} J + X). We have also measured the isolated production ratio of {eta} and {pi}{sup 0} mesons (p{bar p} {yields} {eta} + X)/(p{bar p} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + X) = 1.02 {plus_minus} .15(stat) {plus_minus} .23(sys).

  19. Renormalization of quark propagators from twisted-mass lattice QCD at N{sub f}=2

    SciTech Connect

    Blossier, B.; Boucaud, Ph.; Pene, O.; Petrov, K.; Brinet, M.; Liu, Z.; Morenas, V.

    2011-04-01

    We present results concerning the nonperturbative evaluation of the renormalization constant for the quark field, Z{sub q}, from lattice simulations with twisted-mass quarks and three values of the lattice spacing. We use the regularization-invariant momentum-subtraction (RI'-MOM) scheme. Z{sub q} has very large lattice spacing artefacts; it is considered here as a test bed to elaborate accurate methods which will be used for other renormalization constants. We recall and develop the nonperturbative correction methods and propose tools to test the quality of the correction. These tests are also applied to the perturbative correction method. We check that the lattice-spacing artefacts indeed scale as a{sup 2}p{sup 2}. We then study the running of Z{sub q} with particular attention to the nonperturbative effects, presumably dominated by the dimension-two gluon condensate in Landau gauge. We show indeed that this effect is present, and not small. We check its scaling in physical units, confirming that it is a continuum effect. It gives a {approx}4% contribution at 2 GeV. Different variants are used in order to test the reliability of our result and estimate the systematic uncertainties. Finally, combining all our results and using the known Wilson coefficient of , we find g{sup 2}({mu}{sup 2}){sub {mu}}{sup 2}{sub CM}=2.01(11)({sub -0.73}{sup +0.61})GeV{sup 2} at {mu}=10 GeV, the local operator A{sup 2} being renormalized in the MS scheme. This last result is in fair agreement within uncertainties with the value independently extracted from the strong coupling constant. We convert the nonperturbative part of Z{sub q} from the regularization-invariant momentum-subtraction (RI'-MOM) scheme to MS. Our result for the quark field renormalization constant in the MS scheme is Z{sub q} {sup MS} {sup pert}((2 GeV){sup 2},g{sub bare}{sup 2})=0.750(3)(7)-0.313(20)(g{sub bare}{sup 2}-1.5) for the perturbative contribution and Z{sub q

  20. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A.; O'Carroll, Michael; Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-03-01

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  1. Analysis of the p p-bar mass spectrum in J/Psi

    SciTech Connect

    J. Haidenbauer; S. Krewald; U.-G. Meissner; A. Sibirtsev; A. W. Thomas

    2005-05-16

    The near-threshold enhancement in the p p-bar invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/Psi --> gamma p p-bar, observed in an experiment by the BES Collaboration, is analysed. It is shown, within the Watson-Migdal approach to final state interactions, that the mass dependence of the p p-bar spectrum close to the threshold can be reproduced by the S-wave p p-bar interaction of the Jülich N N-bar model in the isospin I=1 state. Difficulties in the consistent interpretation of the p invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/Psi --> pi^0 p p-bar, where there are no obvious signs for a final state interaction, are discussed.

  2. QCD physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, T.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    The CDF collaboration is engaged in a broad program of QCD measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. I will discuss inclusive jet production at center-of-mass energies of 1800 GeV and 630 GeV, properties of events with very high total transverse energy and dijet angular distributions.

  3. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  4. Cool QCD: Hadronic Physics and QCD in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    QCD is the only strongly-coupled theory given to us by Nature, and it gives rise to a host of striking phenomena. Two examples in hadronic physics include the dynamic generation of mass and the confinement of quarks. Indeed, the vast majority of the mass of visible matter is due to the kinetic and potential energy of the massless gluons and the essentially massless quarks. QCD also gives rise to the force that binds protons and neutrons into nuclei, including subtle effects that have historically been difficult to understand. Describing these phenomena in terms of QCD has represented a daunting task, but remarkable progress has been achieved in both theory and experiment. Both CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and RHIC at Brookhaven National Lab have provided unprecedented experimental tools for investigating QCD, and upgrades at both facilities promise even greater opportunities in the future. Also important are programs at FermiLab as well as the LHC at CERN. Looking further ahead, an electron ion collider (EIC) has the potential to answer whole new sets of questions regarding the role of gluons in nuclear matter, an issue that lies at the heart of the generation of mass. On the theoretical side, rapid progress in supercomputers is enabling stunning progress in Lattice QCD calculations, and approximate forms of QCD are also providing deep new physical insight. In this talk I will describe both recent advances in Cool QCD as well as the exciting scientific opportunities that exist for the future.

  5. Enhancing MALDI Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer Performance through Spectrum Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C.; Bark, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30–50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  6. Enhancing MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometer performance through spectrum averaging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Morgan; Mali, Sujina; King, Charles C; Bark, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers are simple and robust mass spectrometers used for analysis of biologically relevant molecules in diverse fields including pathogen identification, imaging mass spectrometry, and natural products chemistry. Despite high nominal resolution and accuracy, we have observed significant variability where 30-50% of individual replicate measurements have errors in excess of 5 parts-per-million, even when using 5-point internal calibration. Increasing the number of laser shots for each spectrum did not resolve this observed variability. What is responsible for our observed variation? Using a modern MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument, we evaluated contributions to variability. Our data suggest a major component of variability is binning of the raw flight time data by the electronics and clock speed of the analog-to-digital (AD) detection system, which requires interpolation by automated peak fitting algorithms and impacts both calibration and the observed mass spectrum. Importantly, the variation observed is predominantly normal in distribution, which implies multiple components contribute to the observed variation and suggests a method to mitigate this variability through spectrum averaging. Restarting the acquisition impacts each spectrum within the electronic error of the AD detector system and defines a new calibration function. Therefore, averaging multiple independent spectra and not a larger number of laser shots leverages this inherent binning error to mitigate variability in accurate MALDI-TOF mass measurements. PMID:25798583

  7. Advances in Light-Front QCD and New Perspectives for QCD from AdS/CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2005-10-26

    The light-front quantization of gauge theories in light-cone gauge provides a frame-independent wavefunction representation of relativistic bound states, simple forms for current matrix elements, explicit unitarity, and a Fock space built on a trivial vacuum. The AdS/CFT correspondence has led to important insights into the properties of quantum chromodynamics even though QCD is a broken conformal theory. We have recently shown how a model based on a truncated AdS space can be used to obtain the hadronic spectrum of q{bar q}, qqq and gg bound states, as well as their respective light-front wavefunctions. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state, including orbital angular momentum excitations. The predicted mass spectrum is linear M {proportional_to} L at high orbital angular momentum, in contrast to the quadratic dependence M{sup 2}/L found in the description of spinning strings. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of {Delta} to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions. As a specific application of QCD dynamics from AdS/CFT duality, we describe a computation of the proton magnetic form factor in both the space-like and time-like regions. The extended AdS/CFT space-time theory also provides an analytic model for hadronic light-front wavefunctions, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level. The model wavefunctions display confinement at large inter-quark separation and conformal symmetry at short distances. In particular, the scaling and conformal properties of the LFWFs at high relative momenta agree with perturbative QCD. These AdS/CFT model wavefunctions could be used as an initial ansatz for a variational treatment of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian.

  8. Determination of the Chiral Condensate from (2+1)-Flavor Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Noaki, J.; Onogi, T.

    2010-03-26

    We perform a precise calculation of the chiral condensate in QCD using lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of dynamical overlap quarks. Up and down quark masses cover a range between 3 and 100 MeV on a 16{sup 3}x48 lattice at a lattice spacing {approx}0.11 fm. At the lightest sea quark mass, the finite volume system on the lattice is in the {epsilon} regime. By matching the low-lying eigenvalue spectrum of the Dirac operator with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory at the next-to-leading order, we determine the chiral condensate in (2+1)-flavor QCD with strange quark mass fixed at its physical value as {Sigma}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=[242(04)((+19/-18)) MeV]{sup 3} where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  9. Holographic two dimensional QCD and Chern-Simons term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Ho-Ung; Zahed, Ismail

    2011-07-01

    We present a holographic realization of large N c massless QCD in two dimensions using a D2/ D8 brane construction. The flavor axial anomaly is dual to a three dimensional Chern-Simons term which turns out to be of leading order, and it affects the meson spectrum and holographic renormalization in crucial ways. The massless flavor bosons that exist in the spectrum are found to decouple from the heavier mesons, in agreement with the general lore of non-Abelian bosonization. We also show that an external dynamical photon acquires a mass through the three dimensional Chern-Simons term as expected from the Schwinger mechanism. Massless two dimensional QCD at large N c exhibits anti-vector-meson dominance due to the axial anomaly.

  10. Polychromatic sparse image reconstruction and mass attenuation spectrum estimation via B-spline basis function expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Renliang; Dogandžić, Aleksandar

    2015-03-01

    We develop a sparse image reconstruction method for polychromatic computed tomography (CT) measurements under the blind scenario where the material of the inspected object and the incident energy spectrum are unknown. To obtain a parsimonious measurement model parameterization, we first rewrite the measurement equation using our mass-attenuation parameterization, which has the Laplace integral form. The unknown mass-attenuation spectrum is expanded into basis functions using a B-spline basis of order one. We develop a block coordinate-descent algorithm for constrained minimization of a penalized negative log-likelihood function, where constraints and penalty terms ensure nonnegativity of the spline coefficients and sparsity of the density map image in the wavelet domain. This algorithm alternates between a Nesterov's proximal-gradient step for estimating the density map image and an active-set step for estimating the incident spectrum parameters. Numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  11. Polychromatic sparse image reconstruction and mass attenuation spectrum estimation via B-spline basis function expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Renliang E-mail: ald@iastate.edu; Dogandžić, Aleksandar E-mail: ald@iastate.edu

    2015-03-31

    We develop a sparse image reconstruction method for polychromatic computed tomography (CT) measurements under the blind scenario where the material of the inspected object and the incident energy spectrum are unknown. To obtain a parsimonious measurement model parameterization, we first rewrite the measurement equation using our mass-attenuation parameterization, which has the Laplace integral form. The unknown mass-attenuation spectrum is expanded into basis functions using a B-spline basis of order one. We develop a block coordinate-descent algorithm for constrained minimization of a penalized negative log-likelihood function, where constraints and penalty terms ensure nonnegativity of the spline coefficients and sparsity of the density map image in the wavelet domain. This algorithm alternates between a Nesterov’s proximal-gradient step for estimating the density map image and an active-set step for estimating the incident spectrum parameters. Numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  12. Unification and mass spectrum in a B-L extended MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Pinto, R. J.; Perez-Lorenzana, A.

    2009-04-20

    The simplest B-L extension of the minimum supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) may change some of the conceptions about the path for gauge unification as well as to affect the predicted spectrum of the supersymmetric particles at low energy. We present our results for the running of gauge coupling constants and mass parameter in this context.

  13. Determination of hadron-quark phase transition line from lattice QCD and two-solar-mass neutron star observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Junpei; Kouno, Hiroaki; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2016-07-01

    We aim at drawing the hadron-quark phase transition line in the QCD phase diagram by using the two-phase model (TPM) in which the entanglement Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (EPNJL) model with the vector-type four-quark interaction is used for the quark phase and the relativistic mean field (RMF) model is used for the hadron phase. A reasonable TPM is constructed by using lattice QCD data and neutron star observations as reliable constraints. For the EPNJL model, we determine the strength of vector-type four-quark interaction at zero quark chemical potential from lattice QCD data on quark number density normalized by its Stefan-Boltzmann limit. For the hadron phase, we consider three RMF models: NL3; TM1; and the model proposed by Maruyama, Tatsumi, Endo, and Chiba (MTEC). We find that MTEC is most consistent with the neutron star observations and TM1 is the second best. Assuming that the hadron-quark phase transition occurs in the core of a neutron star, we explore the density dependence of vector-type four-quark interaction. Particularly for the critical baryon chemical potential μBc at zero temperature, we determine a range of μBc for the quark phase to occur in the core of a neutron star. The values of μBc lie in the range 1560 MeV ≤μBc≤1910 MeV .

  14. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-10-14

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. As a result, energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  15. Neutrino mass limits: Robust information from the power spectrum of galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, Antonio J.; Niro, Viviana; Verde, Licia

    2016-09-01

    We present cosmological upper limits on the sum of active neutrino masses using large-scale power spectrum data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) sample of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG). Combining measurements on the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarisation anisotropies by the Planck satellite together with WiggleZ power spectrum results in a neutrino mass bound of 0.37 eV at 95% C.L., while replacing WiggleZ by the SDSS-DR7 LRG power spectrum, the 95% C.L. bound on the sum of neutrino masses is 0.38 eV. Adding Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements, the neutrino mass upper limits greatly improve, since BAO data break degeneracies in parameter space. Within a ΛCDM model, we find an upper limit of 0.13 eV (0.14 eV) at 95% C.L., when using SDSS-DR7 LRG (WiggleZ) together with BAO and Planck. The addition of BAO data makes the neutrino mass upper limit robust, showing only a weak dependence on the power spectrum used. We also quantify the dependence of neutrino mass limit reported here on the CMB lensing information. The tighter upper limit (0.13 eV) obtained with SDSS-DR7 LRG is very close to that recently obtained using Lyman-alpha clustering data, yet uses a completely different probe and redshift range, further supporting the robustness of the constraint. This constraint puts under some pressure the inverted mass hierarchy and favours the normal hierarchy.

  16. Light-Front Holographic QCD and the Confinement Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2014-06-01

    Light-Front Hamiltonian theory, derived from the quantization of the QCD Lagrangian at fixed light-front time τ = t + z / c, provides a rigorous frame-independent framework for solving nonperturbative QCD. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian predict the hadronic mass spectrum, and the corresponding eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure. The valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrödinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. In fact, the potential U has a unique form if one requires that the action for zero quark mass remains conformally invariant. We also show that the holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD with a specific soft-wall dilaton yields the same light-front Schrödinger equation. Light-front holography also leads to a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension z of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. The elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are found to be well described in this framework. The predictions of the LF equations of motion include a zero-mass pion in the chiral mq → 0 limit, and linear Regge trajectories M2 (n, L) ∝ n + L with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent representation of color-confining dynamics, Regge spectroscopy, and the excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark meson and baryon bound states in QCD in terms of a single mass parameter. We also briefly discuss the implications of the underlying conformal template of QCD for renormalization scale-setting and

  17. Neutrino mass from the beta spectrum in the decay of tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, S.; Golutvin, A.; Laptin, L.; Lubimov, V.; Nagovizin, V.; Nozik, V.; Novikov, E.; Soloshenko, V.; Tihomirov, I.; Tretjakov, E.; and others

    1987-05-18

    The data from the spectrum measurement of the tritium decay in a valine molecule carried out in a wide energy range (3.4 KeV) with the ITEP spectrometer are analyzed. The combined analysis of both these data and the data of the previous cycle gives the neutrino mass 30.3/sub -8//sup +2/ eV. The model-independent mass interval 17mass difference of the doublet /sup 3/H-/sup 3/He.

  18. Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass from the beta spectrum of gaseous tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.A.

    1986-12-01

    A measurement has been made of the mass of the electron antineutrino using the beta spectrum from a source of gaseous molecular tritium, and an upper limit of 36 eV/c/sup 2/ has been set on this mass. This measurement is the first upper limit on neutrino mass that does not rely on assumptions about the atomic configuration after the beta decay, and it has significantly smaller systematic errors associated with it than do previous measurements. 130 refs., 83 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Δ S =2 and Δ C =2 bag parameters in the standard model and beyond from Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted-mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, N.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Lubicz, V.; Rossi, G. C.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; ETM Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We present unquenched lattice QCD results for the matrix elements of four-fermion operators relevant to the description of the neutral K and D mixing in the standard model and its extensions. We have employed simulations with Nf=2 +1 +1 dynamical sea quarks at three values of the lattice spacings in the interval 0.06-0.09 fm and pseudoscalar meson masses in the range 210-450 MeV. Our results are extrapolated to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass. Renormalization constants have been determined nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. In particular, for the kaon bag parameter, which is relevant for the K¯ 0-K0 mixing in the standard model, we obtain BKRGI=0.717 (24 ) .

  20. QCD tests at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, E.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    We present results for the inclusive jet cross section and the dijet mass distribution. The inclusive cross section and dijet mass both exhibit significant deviations from the predictions of NLO QCD for jets with E{sub T}>200 GeV, or dijet masses > 400 GeV/c{sup 2}. We show that it is possible, within a global QCD analysis that includes the CDF inclusive jet data, to modify the gluon distribution at high x. The resulting increase in the jet cross-section predictions is 25-35%. Owing to the presence of k{sub T} smearing effects, the direct photon data does not provide as strong a constraint on the gluon distribution as previously thought. A comparison of the CDF and UA2 jet data, which have a common range in x, is plagued by theoretical and experimental uncertainties, and cannot at present confirm the CDF excess or the modified gluon distribution.

  1. Absorption-line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass-losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10 (exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  2. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  3. A study of Θ+(ududs¯) in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ting-Wai; Hsieh, Tung-Han

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the mass spectrum of the pentaquark baryon ( ududs¯) in quenched lattice QCD with exact chiral symmetry. Using 3 different interpolating operators, we measure the 3×3 correlation matrix and obtain the eigenvalues A(t) with ± parity. For odd parity states, A(t) deviates from pure exponential decay even at large t, which implies that it cannot be a resonance with narrow decay width, thus is ruled out as a candidate of Θ(1540). For even parity states, they behave like usual resonances seen in quenched lattice QCD, and the mass of the lowest lying J=1/2 state is determined to be 1583 ± 121 MeV.

  4. Baryon Spectroscopy and Operator Construction in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; I. Sato; S. Wallace; R. Edwards; D. Richards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U. Heller; C. Morningstar

    2004-07-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances. I will describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons, and enable comparison both with experiment, and with QCD-inspired pictures of hadron structure, such as calculations in the limit of large N{sub c}.

  5. Learning score function parameters for improved spectrum identification in tandem mass spectrometry experiments

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Marina; Bereman, Michael S.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    The identification of proteins from spectra derived from a tandem mass spectrometry experiment involves several challenges: matching each observed spectrum to a peptide sequence, ranking the resulting collection of peptide-spectrum matches, assigning statistical confidence estimates to the matches, and identifying the proteins. The present work addresses algorithms to rank peptide-spectrum matches. Many of these algorithms, such as PeptideProphet, IDPicker, or Q-ranker, follow similar methodology that includes representing peptide-spectrum matches as feature vectors and using optimization techniques to rank them. We propose a richer and more flexible feature set representation that is based on the parametrization of the SEQUEST XCorr score and that can be used by all of these algorithms. This extended feature set allows a more effective ranking of the peptide-spectrum matches based on the target-decoy strategy, in comparison to a baseline feature set devoid of these XCorr-based features. Ranking using the extended feature set gives 10–40% improvement in the number of distinct peptide identifications relative to a range of q-value thresholds. While this work is inspired by the model of the theoretical spectrum and the similarity measure between spectra used specifically by SEQUEST, the method itself can be applied to the output of any database search. Further, our approach can be trivially extended beyond XCorr to any linear operator that can serve as similarity score between experimental spectra and peptide sequences. PMID:22866926

  6. The QCD running coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    regime and its prediction for the analytic form of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$. The AdS/QCD light-front holographic analysis predicts the color confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and dynamics, and it gives a remarkable connection between the perturbative QCD scale $$\\Lambda$$ and hadron masses. One can also identify a specific scale $Q_0$ which demarcates the division between perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. We also review other important methods for computing the QCD coupling, including Lattice QCD, Schwinger-Dyson equations and the Gribov-Zwanziger analysis. After describing these approaches and enumerating conflicting results, we provide a partial discussion on the origin of these discrepancies and how to remedy them. Our aim is not only to review the advances on this difficult subject, but also to suggest what could be the best definition of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in order to bring better unity to the subject.« less

  7. Dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψππ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewon; Ko, P.

    2005-02-01

    It is pointed out that dipion invariant mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψππ is a useful probe for the JPC quantum number of the X(3872), complementary to the angular distributions. If X(3872) is a 1P1 state, the dipion has a peak at a low mππ region, which is not in accordance with the preliminary Belle data. If X(3872) is a 3D2 or 3D3 state, the dipion spectrum shows a peak at a high mππ region, which is broader than the ρ resonance that might come from the decay of a molecular state: (DD*¯)(I=1)→J/ψρ→J/ψπ+π-. Better measurement of the mππ spectrum will shed light on the nature of X(3872).

  8. Near threshold enhancement of the p p-bar mass spectrum in J/Psi decay

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev; J. Haidenbauer; S. Krewald; Ulf-G. Meissner; A.W. Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the nature of the near-threshold enhancement in the p {bar p} invariant mass spectrum of the reaction J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma} p {bar p} reported recently by the BES Collaboration. Using the Juelich N {bar N} model we show that the mass dependence of the p {bar p} spectrum close to the threshold can be reproduced by the S-wave p {bar p} final state interaction in the isospin I=1 state within the Watson-Migdal approach. However, because of our poor knowledge of the N {bar N} interaction near threshold and of the J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma} p {bar p} reaction mechanism and in view of the controversial situation in the decay J/{Psi} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} p {bar p}, where no obvious signs of a p {bar p} final state interaction are seen, explanations other than final state interactions cannot be ruled out at the present stage.

  9. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application. PMID:20545180

  10. QCD phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Peter O.

    2006-09-25

    A review is presented on the contributions of Mexican Scientists to QCD phenomenology. These contributions range from Constituent Quark model's (CQM) with a fixed number of quarks (antiquarks) to those where the number of quarks is not conserved. Also glueball spectra were treated with phenomenological models. Several other approaches are mentioned.

  11. The radial dependence of the mass-spectrum and lifetime of molecular clouds in our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, D.-L.; Lou, G.-F.

    1985-09-01

    The galactic radial distribution of several parameters of interstellar molecules and clouds deduced from observational data is described. The radial distribution of the physical properties of the (C-13)O clouds are not in one-to-one correspondence with the 21 cm H I arms identified by Cohen (1980). Large-mass clouds and hot clouds show no clear tendency toward concentrating in the arms. Small clouds show a gapless distribution. The arm and interarm regions have the same mass spectrum, hence the same growth rate and cloud lifetime.

  12. Excited light isoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-07-01

    I report a recent lattice QCD calculation of an excited spectrum of light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now proved challenging for lattice QCD. With novel techniques we extract an extensive spectrum with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and, for the first time, light isoscalars with exotic quantum numbers. In addition, the hidden flavour content of these mesons is determined, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I comment on future prospects including applications to the study of resonances.

  13. Predictions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S.; Allison, I.F.; Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.; Davies, C.T.H.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; Freeland, E.D.; Gottlieb, Steven; Gray, A.; Gregor, E.; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Maresca, F.; Menscher, D.; Nobes, M.; Okamoto, M.; Oktay, M.B.; /Fermilab /Glasgow U. /Columbia U. /Washington U., St. Louis /Utah U. /DePaul U. /Art Inst. of Chicago /Indiana U. /Ohio State U. /Arizona U. /APS, New York /U. Pacific, Stockton /Illinois U., Urbana /Cornell U., LEPP /Simon Fraser U. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-09-01

    In the past year, we calculated with lattice QCD three quantities that were unknown or poorly known. They are the q{sup 2} dependence of the form factor in semileptonic D {yields} K/{nu} decay, the decay constant of the D meson, and the mass of the B{sub c} meson. In this talk, we summarize these calculations, with emphasis on their (subsequent) confirmation by experiments.

  14. Curvature of the critical line on the plane of quark chemical potential and pseudoscalar meson mass for three-flavor QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao-Yong; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Takeda, Shinji; Ukawa, Akira

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the phase structure of three-flavor QCD in the presence of finite quark chemical potential μ /T ≲1.2 by using the nonperturbatively O (a ) improved Wilson fermion action on lattices with a fixed temporal extent Nt=6 and varied spatial linear extents Ns=8 , 10, 12. Especially, we focus on locating the critical end point that characterizes the phase structure, and extracting the curvature of the critical line on the μ -mπ plane. For Wilson-type fermions, the correspondence between bare parameters and physical parameters is indirect. Hence we present a strategy to transfer the bare parameter phase structure to the physical one, in order to obtain the curvature. Our conclusion is that the curvature is positive. This implies that, if one starts from a quark mass in the region of crossover at zero chemical potential, one would encounter a first-order phase transition when one raises the chemical potential.

  15. Measurement of the Dipion Mass Spectrum in the Decay X(3872) -> J/psi pi+ pi- at the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitin, Alexander Y

    2005-06-01

    The author presents a measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in the decay X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a 360 pb{sup -1} sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. As a benchmark, they also extract the dipion mass distribution for {psi}(2S) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. The X(3872) dipion mass spectrum is compared to QCD multipole expansion predictions for various charmonium states, as well as to the hypothesis X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0}. They find that the measured spectrum is compatible with {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and with the X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0} hypothesis. There is, however, no {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium state available for assignment to the X(3872). The multipole expansion calculations for {sup 1}P{sub 1} and {sup 3}D{sub J} states are in clear disagreement with the X(3872) data. For the {psi}(2S) the data agrees well with previously published results and to multipole expansion calculations for {sup 3}S{sub 1} charmonium. Other, non-charmonium, models for the X(3872) are described too. They conclude that since the dipion mass spectrum for X(3872) is compatible with J/{psi}{rho}{sup 0} hypothesis, the X(3872) should be C-positive. This conclusion is supported by recent results from Belle Collaboration which observed X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{gamma} decay. They argue that if X(3872) is a charmonium, then it should be either 1{sup 1}D{sub 2{sup -+}} or 2{sup 3}P{sub 1{sup ++}} state, decaying into J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} in violation of isospin conservation. A non-charmonium assignment, such as D{bar D}* molecule, is also quite possible.

  16. Goldstone bosons and fermions in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Zwanziger, Daniel

    2010-06-15

    We consider the version of QCD in Euclidean Landau gauge in which the restriction to the Gribov region is implemented by a local, renormalizable action. This action depends on the Gribov parameter {gamma}, with dimensions of (mass){sup 4}, whose value is fixed in terms of {Lambda}{sub QCD}, by the gap equation, known as the horizon condition, ({partial_derivative}{Gamma}/{partial_derivative}{gamma})=0, where {Gamma} is the quantum effective action. The restriction to the Gribov region suppresses gluons in the infrared, which nicely explains why gluons are not in the physical spectrum, but this only makes more mysterious the origin of the long-range force between quarks. In the present article we exhibit the symmetries of {Gamma}, and show that the solution to the gap equation, which defines the classical vacuum, spontaneously breaks some of the symmetries of {Gamma}. This implies the existence of massless Goldstone bosons and fermions that do not appear in the physical spectrum. Some of the Goldstone bosons may be exchanged between quarks, and are candidates for a long-range confining force. As an exact result we also find that in the infrared limit the gluon propagator vanishes like k{sup 2}.

  17. Baryon resonances in large Nc QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2015-01-01

    The current status and open challenges of large Nc QCD baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. After introducing the 1 /Nc expansion method, the latest achievements for the ground state properties are revisited. Next the applicability of this method to excited states is presented using two different approaches with their advantages and disadvantages. Selected results for the spectrum and strong and electromagnetic decays are described. Also further developments for the applicability of the method to excited states are presented, based on the qualitative compatibility between the quark excitation picture and the meson-nucleon scattering picture. A quantitative comparison between results obtained from the mass formula of the 1 /Nc expansion method and quark models brings convincing support to quark models and the implications of different large Nc limits are discussed. The SU(6) spin-flavor structure of the large Nc baryon allows a convenient classification of highly excited resonances into SU(3) multiplets and predicts mass ranges for the missing partners.

  18. QCD and Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2010-10-27

    The soft-wall AdS/QCD model, modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The model predicts a zero-mass pion for zero-mass quarks and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number N. Light-Front Holography maps the amplitudes which are functions of the fifth dimension variable z of anti-de Sitter space to a corresponding hadron theory quantized on the light front. The resulting Lorentz-invariant relativistic light-front wave equations are functions of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. The result is to a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states, which in turn predict the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors. The theory implements chiral symmetry in a novel way: the effects of chiral symmetry breaking increase as one goes toward large interquark separation, consistent with spectroscopic data, and the the hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS} (Q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub g1} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms. A new perspective on quark and gluon condensates is also reviewed.

  19. A featureless transmission spectrum for the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Heather A; Benneke, Björn; Deming, Drake; Homeier, Derek

    2014-01-01

    GJ 436b is a warm--approximately 800 kelvin--exoplanet that periodically eclipses its low-mass (half the mass of the Sun) host star, and is one of the few Neptune-mass planets that is amenable to detailed characterization. Previous observations have indicated that its atmosphere has a ratio of methane to carbon monoxide that is 10(5) times smaller than predicted by models for hydrogen-dominated atmospheres at these temperatures. A recent study proposed that this unusual chemistry could be explained if the planet's atmosphere is significantly enhanced in elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. Here we report observations of GJ 436b's atmosphere obtained during transit. The data indicate that the planet's transmission spectrum is featureless, ruling out cloud-free, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere models with an extremely high significance of 48σ. The measured spectrum is consistent with either a layer of high cloud located at a pressure level of approximately one millibar or with a relatively hydrogen-poor (three per cent hydrogen and helium mass fraction) atmospheric composition. PMID:24380953

  20. Topologically induced local P and CP violation in hot QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev,D.E.

    2009-02-01

    Very stringent experimental bounds exist on the amount of P and CP violation in strong interactions. Nevertheless, the presence of non-Abelian topological solutions and the axial anomaly make the issue of CP invariance in QCD non-trivial ('the strong CP problem'). Even in the absence of a global P and CP violation the fluctuations of topological charge in the QCD vacuum are expected to play an important role in the breaking of chiral symmetry, and in the mass spectrum and other properties of hadrons. Here I argue that topological fluctuations in hot QCD matter can become directly observable in the presence of a very intense external magnetic field by inducing local P- and CP-odd effects. These local parity-violating phenomena can be described by using the Maxwell-Chern-Simons, or axion, electrodynamics as an effective theory. Local P and CP violation in hot QCD matter can be observed in experiment through the 'chiral magnetic effect' - the separation of electric charge along the axis of magnetic field that is created by the colliding relativistic ions. There is a recent evidence for the electric charge separation relative to the reaction plane of heavy ion collisions from the STAR Collaboration at RHIC.

  1. A Featureless Transmission Spectrum for the Neptune-Mass Exoplanet GJ 436b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Heather; Benneke, B.; Deming, D.; Homeier, D.

    2013-10-01

    Observations of eclipsing extrasolar planets offer an invaluable window into the properties of planetary atmospheres. The Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b has a size intermediate between hydrogen-dominated gas giants and the compositionally diverse “super-Earths,” and observations of its atmosphere therefore provide important clues as to the nature of planets in this transitional mass regime. Moses et al. (2013) recently proposed that this planet's puzzling dayside chemistry could be explained if its atmosphere is enhanced in elements heavier than H and He by a factor of ten or more relative to Neptune. We present complementary observations of GJ 436b’s transmission spectrum obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. By measuring the wavelength-dependence of the planet’s near-infrared transit depth when it passes in front of its host star we should have been able to determine the amount of water vapor in its atmosphere. Our observations instead indicate that the planet’s transmission spectrum is effectively featureless, ruling out cloud-free, hydrogen-dominated atmosphere models with high statistical significance. The measured spectrum is consistent with either a high cloud deck located at a pressure of approximately 1 mbar or with a hydrogen-poor atmospheric composition. A hydrogen-poor atmosphere would place stringent constraints on the bulk composition and corresponding formation scenarios for this planet unless it can be shown that proximity to a younger and more luminous primary could have stripped off a primordial hydrogen atmosphere.

  2. Mass exponent spectrum analysis of human ECG signals and its application to complexity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Du, Sidan; Ning, Xinbao; Bian, Chunhua

    2008-06-01

    The complexity of electrocardiogram (ECG) signal may reflect the physiological function and healthy status of the heart. In this paper, we introduced two novel intermediate parameters of multifractality, the mass exponent spectrum curvature and area, to characterize the nonlinear complexity of ECG signal. These indicators express the nonlinear superposition of the discrepancies of singularity strengths from all the adjacent points of the spectrum curve and thus overall subsets of original fractal structure. The evaluation of binomial multifractal sets validated these two variables were entirely effective in exploring the complexity of this time series. We then studied the ECG mass exponent spectra taken from the cohorts of healthy, ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI) sufferer based on a large sets of 12 leads’ recordings, and took the statistical averages among each crowd. Experimental results suggest the two values from healthy ECG are apparently larger than those from the heart diseased. While the values from ECG of MI sufferer are much smaller than those from the other two groups. As for the ischemia sufferer, they are almost of moderate magnitude. Afterward, we compared these new indicators with the nonlinear parameters of singularity spectrum. The classification indexes and results of total separating ratios (TSR, defined in the paper) both indicated that our method could achieve a better effect. These conclusions may be of some values in early diagnoses and clinical applications.

  3. Measurement and Interpretation of Moments of the Combined Hadronic Mass and Energy Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic B-Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Klose, Verena

    2011-08-12

    This thesis presents first measurements of moments of the hadronic nX2 distribution measured in inclusive semileptonic decays of B mesons to final states containing a charm quark, B → Xcℓν. The variable nX2 is a combination of the invariant mass of the charmed meson mX, its energy in the B-meson rest-frame EX;BRF, and a constant ~Λ = 0.65 GeV, nX2 = mX2c4-2~ΛEX,BRF + ~Λ2. The moments Xk> with k = 2,4,6 are measured as proposed by theory to constrain assumptions made in the theoretical description of inclusive observables in semileptonic B-meson decays. This description uses Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), an effective QCD combined with an Operator Product Expansion. The measurement is based on a sample of 231.6 million e+e- → Υ(4S) {yields} B$\\bar{B}$ events recorded with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e--storage rings at SLAC. We reconstruct the semileptonic decay by identifying a charged lepton in events tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of the second B meson. Correction procedures are derived from Monte Carlo simulations to ensure an unbiased measurement of the moments of the nX2 distribution. All moments are measured requiring minimum lepton momenta between 0.8 GeV/c and 1.9 GeV/c in the rest frame of the B meson. Performing a simultaneous fit to the measured moments Xk> up to order k = 6 combined with other measurements of moments of the lepton-energy spectrum in decays B → Xcℓν and moments of the photon-energy spectrum in decays B → Xsγ, we determine the quark-mixing parameter |Vcb|, the bottom and charm quark masses, the semileptonic branching fraction β(B → Xcℓν), and four non-perturbative heavy quark

  4. QCD inequalities for hadron interactions.

    PubMed

    Detmold, William

    2015-06-01

    We derive generalizations of the Weingarten-Witten QCD mass inequalities for particular multihadron systems. For systems of any number of identical pseudoscalar mesons of maximal isospin, these inequalities prove that near threshold interactions between the constituent mesons must be repulsive and that no bound states can form in these channels. Similar constraints in less symmetric systems are also extracted. These results are compatible with experimental results (where known) and recent lattice QCD calculations, and also lead to a more stringent bound on the nucleon mass than previously derived, m_{N}≥3/2m_{π}. PMID:26196617

  5. Mean-field theory of baryonic matter for QCD in the large Nc and heavy quark mass limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Prabal; Cohen, Thomas D.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss theoretical issues pertaining to baryonic matter in the combined heavy-quark and large Nc limits of QCD. Witten's classic argument that baryons and interacting systems of baryons can be described in a mean-field approximation with each of the quarks moving in an average potential due to the remaining quarks is heuristic. It is important to justify this heuristic description for the case of baryonic matter since systems of interacting baryons are intrinsically more complicated than single baryons due to the possibility of hidden color states—states in which the subsystems making up the entire baryon crystal are not color-singlet nucleons but rather colorful states coupled together to make a color-singlet state. In this work, we provide a formal justification of this heuristic prescription. In order to do this, we start by taking the heavy quark limit, thus effectively reducing the problem to a many-body quantum mechanical system. This problem can be formulated in terms of integrals over coherent states, which for this problem are simple Slater determinants. We show that for the many-body problem, the support region for these integrals becomes narrow at large Nc, yielding an energy which is well approximated by a single coherent state—that is a mean-field description. Corrections to the energy are of relative order 1/Nc. While hidden color states are present in the exact state of the heavy quark system, they only influence the interaction energy below leading order in 1/Nc.

  6. Applications of AdS/QCD and Light-Front Holography to Baryon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2011-10-21

    The correspondence between theories in anti--de Sitter space and field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. These equations, for both mesons and baryons, give a very good representation of the observed hadronic spectrum, including a zero mass pion. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. The meson and baryon wave-functions derived from light-front holography and AdS/QCD also have remarkable phenomenological features, including predictions for the electromagnetic form factors and decay constants. The approach can be systematically improved using light-front Hamiltonian methods. Some novel features of QCD for baryon physics are also discussed.

  7. Applications of AdS/QCD and Light-Front Holography to Baryon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2011-08-22

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. These equations, for both mesons and baryons, give a very good representation of the observed hadronic spectrum, including a zero mass pion. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. The meson and baryon wavefunctions derived from light-front holography and AdS/QCD also have remarkable phenomenological features, including predictions for the electromagnetic form factors and decay constants. The approach can be systematically improved using light-front Hamiltonian methods. Some novel features of QCD for baryon physics are also discussed.

  8. Potential NRQCD for unequal masses and the B c spectrum at N3LO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    We determine the 1 /m and 1 /m 2 spin-independent heavy quarkonium potentials in the unequal mass case with {O} ( α 3) and {O} ( α 2) accuracy, respectively. We discuss in detail different methods to calculate the potentials, and show the equivalence among them. In particular we obtain, for the first time, the manifestly gauge invariant 1 /m and 1 /m 2 potentials in terms of Wilson loops with next-to-leading order (NLO) precision. As an application of our results we derive the theoretical expression for the B c spectrum in the weak-coupling limit through next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO).

  9. Super-heavy nuclei with Z = 118 and their mass and charge spectrum of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyuk, V. T.; Smolyanyuk, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The first results of the calculation of the mass and charge yields of fission fragments for over 60 isotopes which have Z = 118 are presented. The results were obtained from the condition of thermodynamic ordering of the ensemble of fission fragments. The role of neutrons shells with N = 82 or N = 126 and protons shells with Z = 50 in the realization of symmetric (or one-humped) and asymmetric (2- or 3-humped) shapes of the fission-fragment yields with the transition from neutron-proficient to neutron-deficient isotopes was investigated. The data of fragments yields had been analyzed under the conditions of a “cold” and “hot” fission. The calculations show the possibility to identify super-heavy nuclei with Z ≥ 118 produced synthetically by heavy-ion reaction on their mass/charge spectrum division.

  10. Kenneth Wilson and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

  11. Renormalization of quark propagator, vertex functions, and twist-2 operators from twisted-mass lattice QCD at Nf=4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossier, Benoît.; Brinet, Mariane; Guichon, Pierre; Morénas, Vincent; Pène, Olivier; Rodríguez-Quintero, Jose; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-06-01

    We present a precise nonperturbative determination of the renormalization constants in the mass independent RI'-MOM scheme. The lattice implementation uses the Iwasaki gauge action and four degenerate dynamical twisted-mass fermions. The gauge configurations are provided by the ETM Collaboration. Renormalization constants for scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial operators, as well as the quark propagator renormalization, are computed at three different values of the lattice spacing, two volumes and several twisted-mass parameters. The method we developed allows for a precise cross-check of the running, thanks to the particular proper treatment of hypercubic artifacts. Results for the twist-2 operator O44 are also presented.

  12. Primary cystic peritoneal masses and mimickers: spectrum of diseases with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Arraiza, María; Metser, Ur; Vajpeyi, Rajkumar; Khalili, Korosh; Hanbidge, Anthony; Kennedy, Erin; Ghai, Sangeet

    2015-04-01

    Cystic lesions within the peritoneum have been classified classically according to their lining on histology into four categories-endothelial, epithelial, mesothelial, and others (germ cell tumors, sex cord gonadal stromal tumors, cystic mesenchymal tumors, fibrous wall tumors, and infectious cystic peritoneal lesions). In this article, we will proceed to classify cystic peritoneal lesions focusing on the degree of radiological complexity into three categories-simple cystic, mildly complex, and cystic with solid component lesions. Many intra-abdominal collections within the peritoneal cavity such as abscess, seroma, biloma, urinoma, or lymphocele may mimic primary peritoneal cystic masses and need to be differentiated. Clinical history and imaging features may help differentiate intra-abdominal collections from primary peritoneal masses. Lymphangiomas are benign multilocular cystic masses that can virtually occur in any location within the abdomen and insinuate between structures. Ultrasound may help differentiate enteric duplication cysts from other mesenteric and omental cysts in the abdomen. Double-layered wall along the mesenteric side of bowel may suggest its diagnosis in the proper clinical setting. Characteristic imaging features of hydatid cysts are internal daughter cysts, floating membranes and matrix, peripheral calcifications, and collagenous pericyst. Non-pancreatic psuedocysts usually have a fibrotic thick wall and chylous content may lead to a fat-fluid level. Pseudomyxoma peritonei appears as loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity, omentum, and mesentery and may scallop visceral surfaces. Many of the primary cystic peritoneal masses have specific imaging features which can help in accurate diagnosis and management of these entities. Knowledge of the imaging spectrum of cystic peritoneal masses is necessary to distinguish from other potential cystic abdominal mimicker masses. PMID:25269999

  13. Precision lattice QCD: challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shoji

    2013-04-01

    With Peta-flops scale computational resources, lattice QCD simulation has recently reached one of its primary goals, i.e. reproducing the low-lying hadron spectrum starting from the QCD Lagrangian. Applications to various other phenomenological quantities, for which no other way of precise theoretical calculation is available, would become the next milestone. In this talk I will provide a brief overview of the field and summarize the remaining problems to be solved before achieving the precision calculations.

  14. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  15. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu, Graham Moir, Michael Peardon, Sinead Ryan, Christopher Thomas, Pol Vilaseca, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Balint Joo, David Richards

    2012-07-01

    We present a spectrum of highly excited charmonium mesons up to around 4.5 GeV calculated using dynamical lattice QCD. Employing novel computational techniques and the variational method with a large basis of carefully constructed operators, we extract and reliably identify the continuum spin of an extensive set of excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0+-, 1-+, 2+-) and states with high spin. Calculations are performed on two lattice volumes with pion mass ? 400 MeV and the mass determinations have high statistical precision even for excited states. We discuss the results in light of experimental observations, identify the lightest 'supermultiplet' of hybrid mesons and comment on the phenomenological implications of the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  16. Effects of perturbative exchanges in a QCD-string model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Weda; J. Tjon

    2004-03-01

    The QCD-string model for baryons derived by Simonov and used for the calculation of baryon magnetic moments in a previous paper is extended to include also perturbative gluon and meson exchanges. The mass spectrum of the baryon multiplet is studied. For the meson interaction either the pseudoscalar or pseudovector coupling is used. Predictions are compared with the experimental data. Besides these exchanges the influence of excited quark orbitals on the baryon ground state are considered by performing a multichannel calculation. The nucleon-Delta splitting increases due to the mixing of higher quark states while the baryon magnetic momenta decrease. The multichannel calculation with perturbative exchanges is shown to yield reasonable magnetic moments while the mass spectrum is close to experiment.

  17. QCD on the Light-Front. A Systematic Approach to Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2014-06-01

    Light-front Hamiltonian theory, derived from the quantization of the QCD Lagrangian at fixed light-front time x + = x 0 + x 3, provides a rigorous frame-independent framework for solving nonperturbative QCD. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian H LF predict the hadronic mass spectrum, and the corresponding eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions which describe hadron structure, providing a direct connection to the QCD Lagrangian. In the semiclassical approximation the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrödinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. Remarkably, the potential U has a unique form of a harmonic oscillator potential if one requires that the chiral QCD action remains conformally invariant. A mass gap and the color confinement scale also arises when one extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light-front Hamiltonian theory. In the case of mesons, the valence Fock-state wavefunctions of H LF for zero quark mass satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion in the invariant variable , which is conjugate to the invariant mass squared . The result is a nonperturbative relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. Only one mass parameter appears. The corresponding light-front Dirac equation provides a dynamical and spectroscopic model of nucleons. The same light-front equations arise from the holographic mapping of the soft-wall model modification of AdS5 space with a unique dilaton profile to QCD

  18. Shock interactions, turbulence and the origin of the stellar mass spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E; Kevlahan, N K-R

    2013-11-28

    Supersonic turbulence is an essential element in understanding how structure within interstellar gas is created and shaped. In the context of star formation, many computational studies show that the mass spectrum of density and velocity fluctuations within dense clouds, as well as the distribution of their angular momenta, trace their origin to the statistical and physical properties of gas that is lashed with shock waves. In this paper, we review the observations, simulations and theories of how turbulent-like processes can account for the structures we see in molecular clouds. We then compare traditional ideas of supersonic turbulence with a simpler physical model involving the effects of multiple shock waves and their interactions in the interstellar medium. Planar intersecting shock waves produce dense filaments and generate vortex sheets that are essential to create the broad range of density and velocity structure in clouds. As an example, the lower-mass behaviour of the stellar initial mass function can be traced to the tendency of a collection of shock waves to build up a lognormal density distribution (or column density). Vorticity--which is essential to produce velocity structure over a very broad range of length scales in shocked clouds--can also be generated by the passage of curved shocks or intersecting planar shocks through such media. Two major additional physical forces affect the structure of star-forming gas--gravity and feedback processes from young stars. Both of these can produce power-law tails at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. PMID:24146011

  19. Black magic session of concordance: Regge mass spectrum from Casson’s invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodenko, Arkady

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there had been a great deal of interest in obtaining and describing all kinds of knots in links in hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, non-Abelian gauge field theories and gravity. Although knots and links are observables of the Chern-Simons (CS) functional, the dynamical conditions for their generation lie outside the scope of the CS theory. The nontriviality of dynamical generation of knotted structures is caused by the fact that the complements of all knots/links, say, in S3 are 3-manifolds which have positive, negative or zero curvature. The ability to curve the ambient space is thus far attributed to masses. The mass theorem of general relativity requires the ambient 3-manifolds to be of nonnegative curvature. Recently, we established that, in the absence of boundaries, complements of dynamically generated knots/links are represented by 3-manifolds of nonnegative curvature. This fact opens the possibility to discuss masses in terms of dynamically generated knotted/linked structures. The key tool is the notion of knot/link concordance. The concept of concordance is a specialization of the concept of cobordism to knots and links. The logic of implementation of the concordance concept to physical masses results in new interpretation of Casson’s surgery formula in terms of the Regge trajectories. The latest thoroughly examined Chew-Frautschi (CF) plots associated with these trajectories demonstrate that the hadron mass spectrum for both mesons and baryons is nicely described by the data on the corresponding CF plots. The physics behind Casson’s surgery formula is similar but not identical to that described purely phenomenologically by Keith Moffatt in 1990. The developed topological treatment is fully consistent with available rigorous mathematical and experimentally observed results related to physics of hadrons.

  20. Determination of |V(us)|| from a lattice QCD calculation of the K → πℓν semileptonic form factor with physical quark masses.

    PubMed

    Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; Bouchard, C M; Detar, C; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, Jongjeong; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Oktay, M B; Qiu, Si-Wei; Simone, J N; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, Ran

    2014-03-21

    We calculate the kaon semileptonic form factor f+(0) from lattice QCD, working, for the first time, at the physical light-quark masses. We use gauge configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration with Nf = 2 + 1 + 1 flavors of sea quarks, which incorporate the effects of dynamical charm quarks as well as those of up, down, and strange. We employ data at three lattice spacings to extrapolate to the continuum limit. Our result, f+(0) = 0.9704(32), where the error is the total statistical plus systematic uncertainty added in quadrature, is the most precise determination to date. Combining our result with the latest experimental measurements of K semileptonic decays, one obtains the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V(us)| = 0.22290(74)(52), where the first error is from f+(0) and the second one is from experiment. In the first-row test of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity, the error stemming from |V(us)| is now comparable to that from |V(ud)|. PMID:24702353

  1. Tom Bonner Prize Lecture: The Beta Spectrum of Tritium and the Problem of Neutrino Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    1997-04-01

    Enrico Fermi showed more than 60 years ago that the shape of beta spectra was sensitive to the mass of the unobserved particle, the neutrino, proposed by Wolfgang Pauli. With the discovery of tritium and its small decay energy, increasingly stringent limits were placed on the electron antineutrino mass. A roadblock at about 50 eV, namely the atomic and molecular structure of tritium-containing substances, was surmounted in the 1980s with the development at Los Alamos of methods for high-resolution beta spectroscopy with gases, together with worldwide theoretical work on the structure of diatomic T2 and T^3He^+. It was then possible to reach the very interesting region of cosmological relevance below 20 eV. An unexpected and strange new roadblock has now been encountered in all experiments on T_2. The spectrum near the endpoint is not consistent with theory either with or without neutrino mass. The questions now are, do the experiments all report the same phenomenon, and (if so) is it atomic theory, particle theory, or perhaps cosmology that needs repair?

  2. Neutron star structure from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-03-01

    In this review article, we argue that our current understanding of the thermodynamic properties of cold QCD matter, originating from first principles calculations at high and low densities, can be used to efficiently constrain the macroscopic properties of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that combining state-of-the-art results from Chiral Effective Theory and perturbative QCD with the current bounds on neutron star masses, the Equation of State of neutron star matter can be obtained to an accuracy better than 30% at all densities.

  3. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J.C.

    1990-10-10

    In this paper we report recent QCD analysis with the new data taken from CDF detector. CDF recorded an integrated luminosity of 4.4 nb{sup {minus}1} during the 1988--1989 run at center of mass system (CMS) energy of 1.8 TeV. The major topics of this report are inclusive jet, dijet, trijet and direct photon analysis. These measurements are compared of QCD predictions. For the inclusive jet an dijet analysis, tests of quark compositeness are emphasized. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Energy enhancement and spectrum narrowing in terahertz electron sources due to negative mass instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Bratman, V. L.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Simulations of coherent spontaneous undulator radiation in a waveguide demonstrate that the use of negative mass instability (NMI) for retaining longitudinal sizes of dense electron bunches, which are formed in laser-driven photoinjectors, allows one to increase power capabilities of a terahertz radiation source by many times. The NMI is realized in an undulator with combined helical and over-resonance uniform longitudinal magnetic fields due to nonisochronous longitudinal oscillations of electrons, whose frequencies increase/decrease with increasing/decreasing particle energy. In such conditions, an effective longitudinal size of the bunches can be preserved at long distance even at an extremely high electron density. Correspondingly, an energy extraction efficiency of more than 20% is revealed at a narrow frequency radiation spectrum, suggesting realization of a compact and powerful THz source.

  5. Observation of variations in the T +T neutron spectrum with varying center-of-mass energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, T.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Sayre, D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hatarik, R.; McNabb, D. P.; Pino, J. E.; Bacher, A.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y.; Bourgade, J.-. L.; Landoas, O.; Rosse, B.

    2014-10-01

    C. BRUNE, Ohio University - The T +T fusion reaction, which produces two neutrons and an alpha particle in a 3-body final state, has been studied in a series of direct-drive, T2-gas-filled thin (~3 μm) glass-capsule implosions at OMEGA. The shapes of the reaction product spectra are dictated by the final-state interactions between n- α (5He in the ground- and excited states) and n-n (di-neutron interaction). The theory behind final-state interactions is not well understood and detailed study of the reaction product spectra can teach us about the intricacies of the nuclear theory involved. In this presentation, measured neutron spectra are interpreted in terms of the sequential decay through 5He in the ground- and excited states. A clear energy dependence in relative reaction-channel strength at low center-of-mass energy (18-55 keV) is observed in the data. The role of the di-neutron interaction could be more clearly deduced through study of the alpha particle spectrum. In the presentation, we also identify steps required to successfully measure the T +T alpha spectrum in future experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLNL and LLE.

  6. Measurement of the Dipion Mass Spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψπ+π- Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Ben Haim, E.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bishai, M.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bourov, S.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carron, S.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chapman, J.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, I.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chu, P. H.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciljak, M.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Coca, M.; Connolly, A.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cruz, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cyr, D.; Daronco, S.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dagenhart, D.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; Lentdecker, G. De; Dell'Orso, M.; Demers, S.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dituro, P.; Dörr, C.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Donega, M.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Efron, J.; Ehlers, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, I.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Flores-Castillo, L. R.; Foland, A.; Forrester, S.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, I.; Gajjar, A.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garcia Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.; Giokaris, N.; Giolo, K.; Giordani, M.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Goldstein, J.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gotra, Y.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Griffiths, M.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Hahn, K.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Hayward, H.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Hennecke, M.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Holloway, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Huston, J.; Ikado, K.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ishizawa, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jensen, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kang, J.; Karagoz-Unel, M.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kemp, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirby, M.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, H.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kordas, K.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kovalev, A.; Kraus, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Kreps, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecci, C.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, K.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Loverre, P.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Manca, G.; Margaroli, F.; Marginean, R.; Marino, C.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Maruyama, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazini, R.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, D.; McIntyre, P.; McNamara, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; von der Mey, M.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Miller, J. S.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Miquel, R.; Miscetti, S.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyamoto, A.; Moggi, N.; Mohr, B.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Nachtman, J.; Nahn, S.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Naumov, D.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Ogawa, T.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Pope, G.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Rakitin, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Ratnikov, F.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; van Remortel, N.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Rinnert, K.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Rott, C.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Ryan, D.; Saarikko, H.; Sabik, S.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Salto, O.; Saltzberg, D.; Sanchez, C.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, K.; Savard, P.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Semeria, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Sjolin, J.; Skiba, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Staveris-Polykalas, A.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumorok, K.; Sun, H.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takikawa, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Tether, S.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Tönnesmann, M.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tsuchiya, R.; Tsuno, S.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Unverhau, T.; Uozumi, S.; Usynin, D.; Vacavant, L.; Vaiciulis, A.; Vallecorsa, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Velev, G.; Veramendi, G.; Veszpremi, V.; Vickey, T.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vollrath, I.; Volobouev, I.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Wan, Z.; Wang, M. J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, B.; Waschke, S.; Waters, D.; Watts, T.; Weber, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Worm, S.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zetti, F.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, J.; Zucchelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    We measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872)→J/ψπ+π- decays using 360pb-1 of p¯p collisions at s=1.96TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity (S13, P11, and DJ3) charmonia decaying to J/ψπ+π-, as well as even C-parity states in which the pions are from ρ0 decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D0D¯*0 molecule. Only the S13 and J/ψρ hypotheses are compatible with our data. Since S13 is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/ψρ is favored, which implies C=+1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/ψ-ρ angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of ρ-ω interference, enables good descriptions of our data for both L=0 and 1.

  7. Measurement of the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) ---> J/psi pi+ pi- decays

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-12-01

    The authors measure the dipion mass spectrum in X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays using 360 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. The spectrum is fit with predictions for odd C-parity ({sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}D{sub J}) charmonia decaying to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as event C-parity states in which the pions are from {rho}{sup 0} decay. The latter case also encompasses exotic interpretations, such as a D{sup 0}{bar D}*{sup 0} molecule. Only the {sup 3}S{sub 1} and J/{psi} {rho} hypotheses are compatible with the data. Since {sup 3}S{sub 1} is untenable on other grounds, decay via J/{psi} {rho} is favored, which implies C = +1 for the X(3872). Models for different J/{psi}-{rho} angular momenta L are considered. Flexibility in the models, especially the introduction of {rho}-{omega} interference, enable good descriptions of the data for both L = 0 and 1.

  8. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  9. Neutrino masses and cosmology with Lyman-alpha forest power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Baur, Julien; Magneville, Christophe; Rossi, Graziano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Borde, Arnaud; Burtin, Etienne; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, James; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David

    2015-11-01

    We present constraints on neutrino masses, the primordial fluctuation spectrum from inflation, and other parameters of the ΛCDM model, using the one-dimensional Lyα-forest power spectrum measured by [1] from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), complemented by Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and other cosmological probes. This paper improves on the previous analysis by [2] by using a more powerful set of calibrating hydrodynamical simulations that reduces uncertainties associated with resolution and box size, by adopting a more flexible set of nuisance parameters for describing the evolution of the intergalactic medium, by including additional freedom to account for systematic uncertainties, and by using Planck 2015 constraints in place of Planck 2013. Fitting Lyα data alone leads to cosmological parameters in excellent agreement with the values derived independently from CMB data, except for a weak tension on the scalar index ns. Combining BOSS Lyα with Planck CMB constrains the sum of neutrino masses to ∑ mν < 0.12 eV (95% C.L.) including all identified systematic uncertainties, tighter than our previous limit (0.15 eV) and more robust. Adding Lyα data to CMB data reduces the uncertainties on the optical depth to reionization τ, through the correlation of τ with σ8. Similarly, correlations between cosmological parameters help in constraining the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial fluctuations r. The tension on ns can be accommodated by allowing for a running dns/d ln k. Allowing running as a free parameter in the fits does not change the limit on ∑ mν. We discuss possible interpretations of these results in the context of slow-roll inflation.

  10. Predictions for diphoton production at the LHC through NNLO in QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Li, Ye; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-07-29

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculation of the processmore » $$pp\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$$ that we have implemented into the parton level Monte Carlo code MCFM. We do not find agreement with the previous calculation of this process in the literature. In addition to the $$\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$$ corrections present at NNLO, we include some effects arising at $$\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^3)$$, namely those associated with gluon-initiated closed fermion loops. We investigate the role of this process in the context of studies of QCD at colliders and as a background for searches for new physics, paying particular attention to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum. We demonstrate that the NNLO QCD prediction for the shape of this spectrum agrees well with functional forms used in recent data-driven fits.« less

  11. Predictions for diphoton production at the LHC through NNLO in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Li, Ye; Williams, Ciaran

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculation of the process pp → γγ that we have implemented into the parton level Monte Carlo code MCFM. We do not find agreement with the previous calculation of this process in the literature. In addition to the O({α}_s^2) corrections present at NNLO, we include some effects arising at O({α}_s^3) , namely those associated with gluon-initiated closed fermion loops. We investigate the role of this process in the context of studies of QCD at colliders and as a background for searches for new physics, paying particular attention to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum. We demonstrate that the NNLO QCD prediction for the shape of this spectrum agrees well with functional forms used in recent data-driven fits.

  12. Conditions for statistical determination of the neutrino mass spectrum in radiative emission of neutrino pairs in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ningqiang; Boyero Garcia, R.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Peralta Conde, A.; Taron, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The photon spectrum in macrocoherent atomic deexcitation via radiative emission of neutrino pairs has been proposed as a sensitive probe of the neutrino mass spectrum, capable of competing with conventional neutrino experiments. In this paper we revisit this interesting proposal in order to quantify the requirements for statistical determination of some of the properties of the neutrino spectrum, in particular, the neutrino mass scale and the mass ordering. Our results are shown as the product of the experimental lifetime, the target volume, and the number density of atoms which have to be set in a coherence state with a given electric field in the target, needed for determination of these properties with a given confidence level.

  13. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  14. Optical spectrum of HDE 226868 = Cygnus X-1. II. Spectrophotometry and mass estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D.R.; Bolton, C.T.

    1986-05-01

    In part I of this series, Gies and Bolton (1982) have presented the results of radial velocity measures of 78 high-dispersion spectrograms of HDE 226868 = Cyg X-1. For the present study, 55 of the best plates considered by Gies and Bolton were selected to form 10 average spectra. An overall mean spectrum with S/N ratio = 300 was formed by coadding the 10 averaged spectra. There is no evidence for statistically significant variations of the spectral type about the mean value of 09.7 Iab, and all the absorption line strengths are normal for the spectral type. Evidence is presented that the He II lambda 4846 emission line is formed in the stellar wind above the substellar point on the visible star. Probable values regarding the mass for the visible star and its companion are 33 and 16 solar masses, respectively. Theoretical He II lambda 4686 emission line profiles are computed for the focused stellar wind model for the Cyg X-1 system considered by Friend and Castor (1982). 105 references.

  15. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the large hadron collider.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knapitsch, A; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Trauner, C; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, S; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, S; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Lingemann, J; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Weber, M

    2012-03-16

    A search for signatures of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb(-1). In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10. PMID:22540461

  16. Towards the chiral limit in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Shailesh Chandrasekharan

    2006-02-28

    Computing hadronic observables by solving QCD from first principles with realistic quark masses is an important challenge in fundamental nuclear and particle physics research. Although lattice QCD provides a rigorous framework for such calculations many difficulties arise. Firstly, there are no good algorithms to solve lattice QCD with realistically light quark masses. Secondly, due to critical slowing down, Monte Carlo algorithms are able to access only small lattice sizes on coarse lattices. Finally, due to sign problems it is almost impossible to study the physics of finite baryon density. Lattice QCD contains roughly three mass scales: the cutoff (or inverse lattice spacing) a{sup -1}, the confinement scale {Lambda}{sub QCD}, and the pion mass m{sub {pi}}. Most conventional Monte Carlo algorithms for QCD become inefficient in two regimes: when {Lambda}{sub QCD} becomes small compared to a{sup -1} and when m{sub {pi}} becomes small compared to {Lambda}{sub QCD}. The former can be largely controlled by perturbation theory thanks to asymptotic freedom. The latter is more difficult since chiral extrapolations are typically non-analytic and can be unreliable if the calculations are not done at sufficiently small quark masses. For this reason it has been difficult to compute quantities close to the chiral limit. The essential goal behind this proposal was to develop a new approach towards understanding QCD and QCD-like theories with sufficiently light quarks. The proposal was based on a novel cluster algorithm discovered in the strong coupling limit with staggered fermions [1]. This algorithm allowed us to explore the physics of exactly massless quarks and as well as light quarks. Thus, the hope was that this discovery would lead to the complete solution of at least a few strongly coupled QCD-like theories. The solution would be far better than those achievable through conventional methods and thus would be able to shed light on the chiral physics from a new

  17. NICMOS Imaging Survey of Dusty Debris Around Nearby Stars Across the Stellar Mass Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Association of planetary systems with dusty debris disks is now quite secure, and advances in our understanding of planet formation and evolution can be achieved by the identification and characterization of an ensemble of debris disks orbiting a range of central stars with different masses and ages. Imaging debris disks in starlight scattered by dust grains remains technically challenging so that only about a dozen systems have thus far been imaged. A further advance in this field needs an increased number of imaged debris disks. However, the technical challege of such observations, even with the superb combination of HST and NICMOS, requires the best targets. Recent HST imaging investigations of debris disks were sample-limited not limited by the technology used. We performed a search for debris disks from a IRAS/Hipparcos cross correlation which involved an exhaustive background contamination check to weed out false excess stars. Out of ~140 identified debris disks, we selected 22 best targets in terms of dust optical depth and disk angular size. Our target sample represents the best currently available target set in terms of both disk brightness and resolvability. For example, our targets have higher dust optical depth, in general, than newly identified Spitzer disks. Also, our targets cover a wider range of central star ages and masses than previous debris disk surveys. This will help us to investigate planetary system formation and evolution across the stellar mass spectrum.The technical feasibility of this program in two-gyro mode guiding has been proven with on-orbit calibration and science observations during HST cycles 13, 14, and 15.

  18. QCD sum rules on the complex Borel plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Ken-Ji; Ohtani, Keisuke; Gubler, Philipp; Oka, Makoto

    2014-07-01

    Borel-transformed QCD sum rules conventionally use a real-valued parameter (the Borel mass) for specifying the exponential weight over which hadronic spectral functions are averaged. In this paper, it is shown that the Borel mass can be generalized to have complex values and that new classes of sum rules can be derived from the resulting averages over the spectral functions. The real and imaginary parts of these novel sum rules turn out to have damped oscillating kernels and potentially contain a larger amount of information on the hadronic spectrum than the real-valued QCD sum rules. As a first practical test, we have formulated complex Borel sum rules for the φ -meson channel and have analyzed them using the maximum entropy method, by which we can extract the most probable spectral function from the sum rules without strong assumptions on its functional form. As a result, it is demonstrated that, compared to earlier studies, the complex-valued sum rules allow us to extract the spectral function with a significantly improved resolution and thus to study more detailed structures of the hadronic spectrum than previously possible.

  19. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel π >K, ηK scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  20. Photoionization mass spectrometric study of HOCl: Photoionization efficiency spectrum and ionization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, R.P. Jr.; Stief, L.J.

    1999-02-18

    The photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range {lambda} = 102--115 nm, using a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) apparatus coupled to a synchrotron radiation source. The PIE spectra displayed steplike behavior near threshold. This study represents the first determination of the HOCl photoionization efficiency spectrum and the photoionization threshold. A value of 11.12{sub 3} {+-} 0.01{sub 8} eV was obtained for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of HOCl from analysis of photoion thresholds, corresponding to the HOCl{sup +}(X{sup 2}A{double_prime}) {l_arrow} HOCl(X{sup 1}A{double_prime}) transition. The PIMS result is identical to the only previous experimental measurement and in good agreement with a recent ab initio calculation. From the result for IE(HOCl), a value of 999.4 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} was calculated for {Delta}{sub f}H{degree}{sub 0}(HOCl{sup +}), and from the latter, the proton affinity of ClO at T = 0 K, PA{sub 0}(ClO), was determined to be 629.6 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. At 298 K, the computed values for {Delta}{sub f}H{degree}{sub 298}(HOCl{sup +}) and PA{sub 298}(ClO) are 996.5 {+-} 3.6 and 635.1 {+-} 3.6 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively.

  1. Excited light meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas, Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    I report on recent progress in calculating excited meson spectra using lattice QCD, emphasizing results and phenomenology. With novel techniques we can now extract extensive spectra of excited mesons with high statistical precision, including spin-four states and those with exotic quantum numbers. As well as isovector meson spectra, I will present new calculations of the spectrum of excited light isoscalar mesons, something that has up to now been a challenge for lattice QCD. I show determinations of the flavor content of these mesons, including the eta-eta' mixing angle, providing a window on annihilation dynamics in QCD. I will also discuss recent work on using lattice QCD to map out the energy-dependent phase shift in pi-pi scattering and future applications of the methodology to the study of resonances and decays.

  2. PI: An open-source software package for validation of the SEQUEST result and visualization of mass spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has emerged as the leading method for high- throughput protein identification in proteomics. Recent technological breakthroughs have dramatically increased the efficiency of MS/MS data generation. Meanwhile, sophisticated algorithms have been developed for identifying proteins from peptide MS/MS data by searching available protein sequence databases for the peptide that is most likely to have produced the observed spectrum. The popular SEQUEST algorithm relies on the cross-correlation between the experimental mass spectrum and the theoretical spectrum of a peptide. It utilizes a simplified fragmentation model that assigns a fixed and identical intensity for all major ions and fixed and lower intensity for their neutral losses. In this way, the common issues involved in predicting theoretical spectra are circumvented. In practice, however, an experimental spectrum is usually not similar to its SEQUEST -predicted theoretical one, and as a result, incorrect identifications are often generated. Results Better understanding of peptide fragmentation is required to produce more accurate and sensitive peptide sequencing algorithms. Here, we designed the software PI of novel and exquisite algorithms that make a good use of intensity property of a spectrum. Conclusions We designed the software PI with the novel and effective algorithms which made a good use of intensity property of the spectrum. Experiments have shown that PI was able to validate and improve the results of SEQUEST to a more satisfactory degree. PMID:21672262

  3. Foundations of Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John

    2011-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Why QCD?; 3. Basics of QCD; 4. Infra-red safety and non-safety; 5. Libby-Sterman analysis and power counting; 6. Parton model to parton theory I; 7. Parton model to parton theory II; 8. Factorization; 9. Corrections to the parton model in QCD; 10. Factorization and subtractions; 11. DIS in QCD; 12. Fragmentation; 13. TMD factorization; 14. Hadron-hadron collisions; 15. More advanced topics; Appendices; References; Index.

  4. Foundations of Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John

    2013-11-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Why QCD?; 3. Basics of QCD; 4. Infra-red safety and non-safety; 5. Libby-Sterman analysis and power counting; 6. Parton model to parton theory I; 7. Parton model to parton theory II; 8. Factorization; 9. Corrections to the parton model in QCD; 10. Factorization and subtractions; 11. DIS in QCD; 12. Fragmentation; 13. TMD factorization; 14. Hadron-hadron collisions; 15. More advanced topics; Appendices; References; Index.

  5. QCD mechanisms for heavy particle production

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-09-01

    For very large pair mass, the production of heavy quarks and supersymmetric particles is expected to be governed by ACD fusion subprocesses. At lower mass scales other QCD mechanisms such as prebinding distortion and intrinsic heavy particle Fock states can become important, possibly accounting for the anomalies observed for charm hadroproduction. We emphasize the importance of final-state Coulomb interactions at low relative velocity in QCD and predict the existence of heavy narrow four quark resonances (c c-bar u u-bar) and (cc c-bar c-bar) in ..gamma gamma.. reactions. Coherent QCD contributions are discussed as a contribution to the non-additivity of nuclear structure functions and heavy particle production cross sections. We also predict a new type of amplitude zero for exclusive heavy meson pair production which follows from the tree-graph structure of QCD. 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The phase-shift of isospin-2 pi-pi scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef J. Dudek, Robert G. Edwards, Michael J. Peardon, David G. Richards, Christopher E. Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Finite-volume lattice QCD calculations offer the possibility of extracting resonance parameters from the energy-dependent elastic phase-shift computed using the L\\"uscher technique. In this letter, as a trial of the method, we report on the extraction of the non-resonant phase-shift for $S$ and $D$-wave $\\pi\\pi$ isospin-2 scattering from dynamical lattice QCD computations. We define a variational basis of operators resembling pairs of pions of definite relative momentum and extract a spectrum of excited states that maps to phase-shifts at a set of discrete scattering momenta. Computations are performed with pion masses between $400$ and $520$ MeV on multiple spatial volumes. We observe no significant quark mass dependence in the phase-shifts extracted which are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at low momentum.

  7. Phase shift of isospin-2 {pi}{pi} scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Peardon, Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    Finite-volume lattice QCD calculations offer the possibility of extracting resonance parameters from the energy-dependent elastic phase-shift computed using the Luescher technique. In this letter, as a trial of the method, we report on the extraction of the nonresonant phase-shift for S and D-wave {pi}{pi} isospin-2 scattering from dynamical lattice QCD computations. We define a variational basis of operators resembling pairs of pions of definite relative momentum and extract a spectrum of excited states that maps to phase-shifts at a set of discrete scattering momenta. Computations are performed with pion masses between 400 and 520 MeV on multiple spatial volumes. We observe no significant quark mass dependence in the phase-shifts extracted which are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data at low momentum.

  8. A Machine Learning Based Approach to de novo Sequencing of Glycans from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kumozaki, Shotaro; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, glycomics has been actively studied and various technologies for glycomics have been rapidly developed. Currently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the key experimental tools for identification of structures of oligosaccharides. MS/MS can observe MS/MS peaks of fragmented glycan ions including cross-ring ions resulting from internal cleavages, which provide valuable information to infer glycan structures. Thus, the aim of de novo sequencing of glycans is to find the most probable assignments of observed MS/MS peaks to glycan substructures without databases. However, there are few satisfiable algorithms for glycan de novo sequencing from MS/MS spectra. We present a machine learning based approach to de novo sequencing of glycans from MS/MS spectrum. First, we build a suitable model for the fragmentation of glycans including cross-ring ions, and implement a solver that employs Lagrangian relaxation with a dynamic programming technique. Then, to optimize scores for the algorithm, we introduce a machine learning technique called structured support vector machines that enable us to learn parameters including scores for cross-ring ions from training data, i.e., known glycan mass spectra. Furthermore, we implement additional constraints for core structures of well-known glycan types including N-linked glycans and O-linked glycans. This enables us to predict more accurate glycan structures if the glycan type of given spectra is known. Computational experiments show that our algorithm performs accurate de novo sequencing of glycans. The implementation of our algorithm and the datasets are available at http://glyfon.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/. PMID:26671799

  9. Probability-Based Pattern Recognition and Statistical Framework for Randomization: Modeling Tandem Mass Spectrum/Peptide Sequence False Match Frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating and controlling the frequency of false matches between a peptide tandem mass spectrum and candidate peptide sequences is an issue pervading proteomics research. To solve this problem, we designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths fr...

  10. QCD on the Massively Parallel Computer AP1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemi, K.; Fujisaki, M.; Okuda, M.; Tago, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Hioki, S.; Miyamura, O.; Takaishi, T.; Nakamura, A.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Hege, C.; Stamatescu, I. O.

    We present the QCD-TARO program of calculations which uses the parallel computer AP1000 of Fujitsu. We discuss the results on scaling, correlation times and hadronic spectrum, some aspects of the implementation and the future prospects.

  11. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC the author gives an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q{sup 2} frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors the author discusses high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. The author introduces the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420m downstream of ATLAS and CMS.

  12. QCD with chiral 4-fermion interactions ({chi}QCD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, J.B.; Sinclair, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Lattice QCD with staggered quarks is augmented by the addition of a chiral 4-fermion interaction. The Dirac operator is now non-singular at m{sub q}=0, decreasing the computing requirements for light quark simulations by at least an order of magnitude. We present preliminary results from simulations at finite and zero temperatures for m{sub q}=0, with and without gauge fields. Chiral QCD enables simulations at physical u and d quark masses with at least an order of magnitude saving in CPU time. It also enables simulations with zero quark masses which is important for determining the equation of state. A renormalization group analysis will be needed to continue to the continuum limit. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  14. Quark eigenmodes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guofeng

    In this thesis, we study a number of topics in lattice QCD through the low-lying quark eigenmodes in the domain wall fermion (DWF) formulation in the quenched approximation. Specifically, we present results for the chiral condensate measured from these eigenmodes; we investigate the QCD vacuum structure by looking at the correlation between the magnitude of the chirality density, |psi†(x)gamma5psi( x)|, and the normal density, psi†( x)psi(x), for these states; we study the behavior of DWF formulation at large quark masses by investigating the mass dependence of the eigenvalues of the physical four dimensional-states as well as the bulk, five-dimensional states.

  15. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  16. Female children with autism spectrum disorder: an insight from mass-univariate and pattern classification analyses.

    PubMed

    Calderoni, Sara; Retico, Alessandra; Biagi, Laura; Tancredi, Raffaella; Muratori, Filippo; Tosetti, Michela

    2012-01-16

    Several studies on structural MRI in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have mainly focused on samples prevailingly consisting of males. Sex differences in brain structure are observable since infancy and therefore caution is required in transferring to females the results obtained for males. The neuroanatomical phenotype of female children with ASD (ASDf) represents indeed a neglected area of research. In this study, we investigated for the first time the anatomic brain structures of a sample entirely composed of ASDf (n=38; 2-7 years of age; mean=53 months; SD=18) with respect to 38 female age and non verbal IQ matched controls, using both mass-univariate and pattern classification approaches. The whole brain volumes of each group were compared using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL) procedure, allowing us to build a study-specific template. Significantly more gray matter (GM) was found in the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG) in ASDf subjects compared to controls. The GM segments obtained in the VBM-DARTEL preprocessing are also classified with a support vector machine (SVM), using the leave-pair-out cross-validation protocol. Then, the recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE) approach allows for the identification of the most discriminating voxels in the GM segments and these prove extremely consistent with the SFG region identified by the VBM analysis. Furthermore, the SVM-RFE map obtained with the most discriminating set of voxels corresponding to the maximum Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC(max)=0.80) highlighted a more complex circuitry of increased cortical volume in ASDf, involving bilaterally the SFG and the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The SFG and TPJ abnormalities may be relevant to the pathophysiology of ASDf, since these structures participate in some core atypical features of autism. PMID:21896334

  17. Neutrino Mass Spectrum from Gravitational Waves Generated by Double Neutrino Spin-Flip in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.; Lambiase, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The supernova (SN) neutronization phase produces mainly electron (νe) neutrinos, the oscillations of which must take place within a few mean free paths of their resonance surface located nearby their neutrinosphere. The latest research on the SN dynamics suggests that a significant part of these νe can convert into right-handed neutrinos by virtue of the interaction of the electrons and the protons flowing with the SN outgoing plasma, whenever the Dirac neutrino magnetic moment is of strength μν < 10-11μB, with μB being the Bohr magneton. In the SN envelope, some of these neutrinos can flip back to the left-handed flavors due to the interaction of the neutrino magnetic moment with the magnetic field in the SN expanding plasma (see the work by Kuznetsov & Mikheev; Kuznetsov, Mikheev, & Okrugin; Akhmedov & Khlopov; Itoh & Tsuneto; and Itoh et al.), a region where the field strength is currently accepted to be Bgtrsim 1013 G. This type of ν oscillation was shown to generate powerful gravitational wave (GW) bursts (see the work by Mosquera Cuesta; Mosquera Cuesta & Fiuza; and Loveridge). If such a double spin-flip mechanism does run into action inside the SN core, then the release of both the oscillation-produced νμ and ντ particles and the GW pulse generated by the coherent ν spin-flips provides a unique emission offset Δ TemiGW leftrightarrow ν = 0 for measuring the ν travel time to Earth. As massive ν particles get noticeably delayed on their journey to Earth with respect to the Einstein GW they generated during the reconversion transient, then the accurate measurement of this time-of-flight delay by SNEWS + LIGO, VIRGO, BBO, DECIGO, etc., might readily assess the absolute ν mass spectrum.

  18. Flavor symmetry breaking in lattice QCD with a mixed action

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Oliver; Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2011-03-01

    We study the phase structure of mixed-action QCD with two Wilson sea quarks and any number of chiral valence quarks (and ghosts), starting from the chiral Lagrangian. A priori the effective theory allows for a rich phase structure, including a phase with a condensate made of sea and valence quarks. In such a phase, mass eigenstates would become admixtures of sea and valence fields, and pure-sea correlation functions would depend on the parameters of the valence sector, in contradiction with the actual setup of mixed-action simulations. Using that the spectrum of the chiral Dirac operator has a gap for nonzero quark mass we prove that spontaneous symmetry breaking of the flavor symmetries can only occur within the sea sector. This rules out a mixed condensate and implies restrictions on the low-energy constants of the effective theory.

  19. Gravidynamics Scalar-Tensor Gravitation) and the Observed Discrete Mass Spectrum of Compact Stellar Remnants in Close Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    There are two new observational facts: the mass spectrum of neutron stars and black hole candidates (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of compact objects with masses within the interval from 2 M⊙ (with a peak for neutron stars about 1.4 M⊙) to about 6 M⊙, and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6 M⊙) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the masses distribution of black hole candidates) is close to 7 M⊙. The problem of the compact objects discrete mass spectra demands some solution both in the context of the supernovae and gamma-ray bursts relation, and in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism itself. In the totally non-metric scalar-tensor model of gravitational interaction (in a modified or extended Feynman field approach to gravitation) the total mass of a compact relativistic object with extremely strong gravitational field (an analog of black holes in General Relativity) is approximately equal to 6.7 M⊙ with radius of a region filled with a matter (quark-gluon plasma) ≈ 10 km. Polarized emission of long gamma-ray bursts, a black-body component in their spectrum and other observed properties could be explained by the direct manifestation of a surface of these collapsars.

  20. Some new/old approaches to QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, D.J.

    1992-11-01

    In this lecture I shall discuss some recent attempts to revive some old ideas to address the problem of solving QCD. I believe that it is timely to return to this problem which has been woefully neglected for the last decade. QCD is a permanent part of the theoretical landscape and eventually we will have to develop analytic tools for dealing with the theory in the infra-red. Lattice techniques are useful but they have not yet lived up to their promise. Even if one manages to derive the hadronic spectrum numerically, to an accuracy of 10% or even 1%, we will not be truly satisfied unless we have some analytic understanding of the results. Also, lattice Monte-Carlo methods can only be used to answer a small set of questions. Many issues of great conceptual and practical interest-in particular the calculation of scattering amplitudes, are thus far beyond lattice control. Any progress in controlling QCD in an explicit analytic, fashion would be of great conceptual value. It would also be of great practical aid to experimentalists, who must use rather ad-hoc and primitive models of QCD scattering amplitudes to estimate the backgrounds to interesting new physics. I will discuss an attempt to derive a string representation of QCD and a revival of the large N approach to QCD. Both of these ideas have a long history, many theorist-years have been devoted to their pursuit-so far with little success. I believe that it is time to try again. In part this is because of the progress in the last few years in string theory. Our increased understanding of string theory should make the attempt to discover a stringy representation of QCD easier, and the methods explored in matrix models might be employed to study the large N limit of QCD.

  1. Some New/Old Approaches to QCD

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gross, D. J.

    1992-11-01

    In this lecture I shall discuss some recent attempts to revive some old ideas to address the problem of solving QCD. I believe that it is timely to return to this problem which has been woefully neglected for the last decade. QCD is a permanent part of the theoretical landscape and eventually we will have to develop analytic tools for dealing with the theory in the infra-red. Lattice techniques are useful but they have not yet lived up to their promise. Even if one manages to derive the hadronic spectrum numerically, to an accuracy of 10% or even 1%, we will not be truly satisfied unless we have some analytic understanding of the results. Also, lattice Monte-Carlo methods can only be used to answer a small set of questions. Many issues of great conceptual and practical interest-in particular the calculation of scattering amplitudes, are thus far beyond lattice control. Any progress in controlling QCD in an explicit analytic, fashion would be of great conceptual value. It would also be of great practical aid to experimentalists, who must use rather ad-hoc and primitive models of QCD scattering amplitudes to estimate the backgrounds to interesting new physics. I will discuss an attempt to derive a string representation of QCD and a revival of the large N approach to QCD. Both of these ideas have a long history, many theorist-years have been devoted to their pursuit-so far with little success. I believe that it is time to try again. In part this is because of the progress in the last few years in string theory. Our increased understanding of string theory should make the attempt to discover a stringy representation of QCD easier, and the methods explored in matrix models might be employed to study the large N limit of QCD.

  2. Statistical and evaporation models for the neutron emission energy spectrum in the center-of-mass system from fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Stetcu, I.; Chadwick, M. B.

    2013-09-01

    The neutron emission energy spectra in the CMS (center-of-mass) frame from two compound nuclei produced by fission are studied. The neutron spectra calculated with the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model are compared with the evaporation theory, and the definition of the temperature is revisited. Using the Monte Carlo technique we average the CMS neutron spectra from many fission fragments to construct the representative CMS spectrum from both the light and heavy fragments. The CMS spectra for each fission fragment pair are also converted into the laboratory frame to calculate the total prompt fission neutron spectrum that can be observed experimentally. This is compared to measured laboratory data for thermal neutron induced fission on 235U. We show that the Hauser-Feshbach calculation gives a different spectrum shape than the Madland-Nix model calculation.

  3. INFRARED SPECTRUM OF POTASSIUM-CATIONIZED TRIETHYLPHOSPHATE GENERATED USING TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY AND INFRARED MULTIPLE PHOTON DISSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Christopher M. Leavitt; Ryan P. Dain; Jos Oomens; Jeff Steill; van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2009-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry and wavelength selective infrared photodissociation was used to generate an infrared spectrum of gas-phase triethylphosphate cationized by attachment of K+. Prominent absorptions were observed in the region of 900 to 1300 cm-1 that are characteristic of phosphate P=O and P-O-R stretches. The relative positions and intensities of the IR absorptions were reproduced well by density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+g(d), 6-311+g(d,p) and 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis sets. Because of good correspondence between experiment and theory for the cation, DFT was then used to generate a theoretical spectrum for neutral triethylphosphate, which in turn accurately reproduces the IR spectrum of the neat liquid when solvent effects are included in the calculations.

  4. The application of an optical Fourier spectrum analyzer on detecting defects in mass-produced satellite photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athale, R.; Lee, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    Various defects in mass-produced pictures transmitted to earth from a satellite are investigated. It is found that the following defects are readily detectable via Fourier spectrum analysis: (1) bit slip, (2) breakup causing loss of image, and (3) disabled track at the top of the imagery. The scratches made on the film during mass production, which are difficult to detect by visual observation, also show themselves readily in Fourier spectrum analysis. A relation is established between the number of scratches, their width and depth and the intensity of their Fourier spectra. Other defects that are found to be equally suitable for Fourier spectrum analysis or visual (image analysis) detection are synchronous loss without blurring of image, and density variation in gray scale. However, the Fourier spectrum analysis is found to be unsuitable for detection of such defects as pin holes, annotation error, synchronous loss with blurring of images, and missing image in the beginning of the work order. The design of an automated, real time system, which will reject defective films, is treated.

  5. QCD In Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    Introduction Symmetry and the Phenomena of QCD Apparent and Actual Symmetries Asymptotic Freedom Confinement Chiral Symmetry Breaking Chiral Anomalies and Instantons High Temperature QCD: Asymptotic Properties Significance of High Temperature QCD Numerical Indications for Quasi-Free Behavior Ideas About Quark-Gluon Plasma Screening Versus Confinement Models of Chiral Symmetry Breaking More Refined Numerical Experiments High-Temperature QCD: Phase Transitions Yoga of Phase Transitions and Order Parameters Application to Glue Theories Application to Chiral Transitions Close Up on Two Flavors A Genuine Critical Point! (?) High-Density QCD: Methods Hopes, Doubts, and Fruition Another Renormalization Group Pairing Theory Taming the Magnetic Singularity High-Density QCD: Color-Flavor Locking and Quark-Hadron Continuity Gauge Symmetry (Non)Breaking Symmetry Accounting Elementary Excitations A Modified Photon Quark-Hadron Continuity Remembrance of Things Past More Quarks Fewer Quarks and Reality

  6. High-resolution mass-analyzed threshold ion spectrum of Argon obtained on beamline 9.0.2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Lu, K.T.; Evans, M.

    1997-04-01

    The first mass analyzed threshold ion (MATI) spectrum using dc electric fields and a continuous wave light source has been obtained on End Station 2 of the Chemical Dynamics Beamline (9.0.2.2) at the Advanced Light Source. MATI provides researchers with fundamental spectroscopic information about atomic and molecular ions with the added advantage of mass analysis. The MATI technique involves the detection of ions formed by field ionization of long-lived high-n Rydberg states approaching an ionization threshold. The MATI apparatus consists of a differentially pumped supersonic molecular beam source, a photoionization region followed by a series of electrostatic lenses, a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a Daly-type detector. The MATI technique can be used to probe the Rydberg states approaching an ionization continuum and yield information about the lifetimes of these states. In addition, MATI could be used to obtain the spectrum of a single species present in a sample mixture due to the mass selective nature of the experiment. MATI could also be used to form mass selected and state specific ions for use in ion molecule reaction experiments.

  7. Nucleon QCD sum rules in the instanton medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskin, M. G.; Drukarev, E. G. Sadovnikova, V. A.

    2015-09-15

    We try to find grounds for the standard nucleon QCD sum rules, based on a more detailed description of the QCD vacuum. We calculate the polarization operator of the nucleon current in the instanton medium. The medium (QCD vacuum) is assumed to be a composition of the small-size instantons and some long-wave gluon fluctuations. We solve the corresponding QCD sum rule equations and demonstrate that there is a solution with the value of the nucleon mass close to the physical one if the fraction of the small-size instantons contribution is w{sub s} ≈ 2/3.

  8. Dark energy from QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Federico R.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-08-30

    We review two mechanisms rooted in the infrared sector of QCD which, by exploiting the properties of the QCD ghost, as introduced by Veneziano, provide new insight on the cosmological dark energy problem, first, in the form of a Casimir-like energy from quantising QCD in a box, and second, in the form of additional, time-dependent, vacuum energy density in an expanding universe. Based on [1, 2].

  9. Bottom-up approach to moduli dynamics in heavy gravitino scenario: Superpotential, soft terms, and sparticle mass spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Koichi

    2005-07-01

    The physics of moduli fields is examined in the scenario where the gravitino is relatively heavy with mass of order 10 TeV, which is favored in view of the severe gravitino problem. The form of the moduli superpotential is shown to be determined, if one imposes a phenomenological requirement that no physical CP phase arise in gaugino masses from conformal anomaly mediation. This bottom-up approach allows only two types of superpotential, each of which can have its origins in a fundamental underlying theory such as superstring. One superpotential is the sum of an exponential and a constant, which is identical to that obtained by Kachru et al. (KKLT), and the other is the racetrack superpotential with two exponentials. The general form of soft supersymmetry-breaking masses is derived, and the pattern of the superparticle mass spectrum in the minimal supersymmetric standard model is discussed with the KKLT-type superpotential. It is shown that the moduli mediation and the anomaly mediation make comparable contributions to the soft masses. At the weak scale, the gaugino masses are rather degenerate compared to the minimal supergravity, which bring characteristic features on the superparticle masses. In particular, the lightest neutralino, which often constitutes the lightest superparticle and thus a dark matter candidate, is a considerable admixture of gauginos and Higgsinos. We also find a small mass hierarchy among the moduli, gravitino, and superpartners of the standard-model fields. Cosmological implications of the scenario are briefly described.

  10. The AdS/QCD Correspondence and Exclusive Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Deur, Alexandre; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-08-25

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between theories in AdS space and conformal field theories in physical space-time provides an analytic, semi-classical, color-confining model for strongly-coupled QCD. The soft-wall AdS/QCD model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics at zero quark mass, including a zero-mass pion and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. One also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS}(q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub ga} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. Light-front holography, which connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta}, allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties as well as decay constants, form factors, deeply virtual Compton scattering, exclusive heavy hadron decays and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. One thus obtains a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level with dimensional counting for hard exclusive reactions at high momentum transfer. As specific examples we discuss the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors in the space-like and time-like regions. We also review the phenomenology of exclusive processes including some anomalous empirical results.

  11. Search for Resonances in the Dijet Mass Spectrum from 7 TeV pp Collisions at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-10-01

    A search for narrow resonances with a mass of at least 1 TeV in the dijet mass spectrum is performed using pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 inverse femtobarn, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. No resonances are observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are presented on the product of the resonance cross section, branching fraction into dijets, and acceptance, separately for decays into quark-quark, quark-gluon, and gluon-gluon pairs. The data exclude new particles predicted in the following models at the 95% confidence level: string resonances with mass less than 4.00 TeV, E6 diquarks with mass less than 3.52 TeV, excited quarks with mass less than 2.49 TeV, axigluons and colorons with mass less than 2.47 TeV, and W' bosons with mass less than 1.51 TeV.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SPACETIME GEOMETRY AROUND 10 STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES FROM THE DISK'S THERMAL SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lingyao; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-12-20

    In a previous paper, one of us (C. Bambi) described a code to compute the thermal spectrum of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disks around generic stationary and axisymmetric black holes, which are not necessarily of the Kerr type. As the structure of the accretion disk and the propagation of electromagnetic radiation from the disk to the distant observer depend on the background metric, the analysis of the thermal spectrum of thin disks can be used to test the actual nature of black hole candidates. In this paper, we consider the 10 stellar-mass black hole candidates for which the spin parameter has already been estimated from the analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum under the assumption of the Kerr background, and we translate the measurements reported in the literature into constraints on the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane. The analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum can be used to estimate only one parameter of the geometry close to the compact object; therefore, it is not possible to get independent measurements of both the spin and the deformation parameters. The constraints obtained here will be used in combination with other measurements in future work with the final goal of breaking the degeneracy between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution and thus test the Kerr black hole hypothesis.

  13. Constraints on the Spacetime Geometry around 10 Stellar-mass Black Hole Candidates from the Disk's Thermal Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingyao; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-12-01

    In a previous paper, one of us (C. Bambi) described a code to compute the thermal spectrum of geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disks around generic stationary and axisymmetric black holes, which are not necessarily of the Kerr type. As the structure of the accretion disk and the propagation of electromagnetic radiation from the disk to the distant observer depend on the background metric, the analysis of the thermal spectrum of thin disks can be used to test the actual nature of black hole candidates. In this paper, we consider the 10 stellar-mass black hole candidates for which the spin parameter has already been estimated from the analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum under the assumption of the Kerr background, and we translate the measurements reported in the literature into constraints on the spin parameter-deformation parameter plane. The analysis of the disk's thermal spectrum can be used to estimate only one parameter of the geometry close to the compact object; therefore, it is not possible to get independent measurements of both the spin and the deformation parameters. The constraints obtained here will be used in combination with other measurements in future work with the final goal of breaking the degeneracy between the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution and thus test the Kerr black hole hypothesis.

  14. QCD results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2005-01-01

    Recent QCD measurements from the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron are presented, together with future prospects as the luminosity increases. The measured inclusive jet cross section is compared to pQCD NLO predictions. Precise measurements on jet shapes and hadronic energy flows are compared to different phenomenological models that describe gluon emissions and the underlying event in hadron-hadron interactions.

  15. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosin, V. V.; Berezhnev, S. F.; Budnev, N. M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O. A.; Dyachok, A. V.; Epimakhov, S. N.; Gress, O. A.; Gress, T. I.; Kalmykov, N. N.; Karpov, N. I.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Korobchenko, A. V.; Korosteleva, E. E.; Kozhin, V. A.; Kuzmichev, L. A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lubsandorzhiev, N. B.; Mirgazov, R. R.; Monkhoev, R. D.; Osipova, E. A.; Pakhorukov, A. L.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Pankov, L. V.; Popova, E. G.; Ptuskin, V. S.; Semeney, Y. A.; Silaev, A. A.; Silaev, A. A., Jr.; Skurikhin, A. V.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L. G.; Zagorodnikov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS) Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014.-The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ṡ 1015-1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  16. A QCD sum rule calculation of the X± (5568) → Bs0 π± decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J. M.; Khemchandani, K. P.; Martínez Torres, A.; Nielsen, M.; Zanetti, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    To understand the nature of the X (5568), recently observed in the mass spectrum of the Bs0 π± system by the D0 Collaboration, we have investigated, in a previous work, a scalar tetraquark (diquak-antidiquark) structure for it, within the two-point QCD sum rules method. We found that it is possible to obtain a stable value of the mass compatible with the D0 result, although a rigorous QCD sum rule constrained analysis led to a higher value of mass. As a continuation of our investigation, we calculate the width of the tetraquark state with same quark content as X (5568), to the channel Bs0 π±, using the three-point QCD sum rule. We obtain a value of (20.4 ± 8.7) MeV for the mass ∼ 5568 MeV, which is compatible with the experimental value of 21.9 ± 6.4 (sta)-2.5+5.0 (syst) MeV /c2. We find that the decay width to Bs0 π± does not alter much for a higher mass state.

  17. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  18. Applications of AdS/CFT Duality to QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2005-09-28

    Even though quantum chromodynamics is a broken conformal theory, the AdS/CFT correspondence has led to important insights into the properties of QCD. For example, as shown by Polchinski and Strassler, dimensional counting rules for the power-law falloff of hadron scattering amplitudes follow from dual holographic models with conformal behavior at short distances and confinement at large distances. We find that one also obtains a remarkable representation of the entire light-quark meson and baryon spectrum, including all orbital excitations, based on only one mass parameter. We also show how hadron light-front wavefunctions and hadron form factors in both the space-like and time-like regions can be predicted.

  19. Hadronic Spectra and Light-Front Wavefunctions in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.

    2006-03-03

    We show how the string amplitude {Phi}(z) defined on the fifth dimension in AdS{sub 5} space can be precisely mapped to the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical spacetime. We find an exact correspondence between the holographic variable z and an impact variable {zeta}, which represents the measure of transverse separation of the constituents within the hadrons. In addition, we derive effective four dimensional Schroedinger equations for the bound states of massless quarks and gluons which exactly reproduce the AdS/CFT results and give a realistic description of the light-quark meson and baryon spectrum as well as the form factors for spacelike Q{sup 2}. Only one parameter which sets the mass scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced.

  20. Changes in the ultraviolet spectrum of the mass-losing Be star 59 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlborough, J. M.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of a few selected wavelength regions in the ultraviolet spectrum of the Be star 59 Cyg, obtained in 1975 November, are compared with the complete low-resolution Copernicus scan of the same star obtained in 1972 October. Changes in the spectrum between the two times are discussed and interpreted in terms of the two distinct shell episodes revealed by optical data. A wide range of ionization exists from Fe III to N V, with a range in radial velocity of approximately 1000 km/s. Changes in the Si III, Si IV, and N V absorption arising in the stellar wind show that the velocity structure of the wind may have changed, and that the ionization balance also was altered over the 3 year interim.

  1. Hadron spectrum, quark masses, and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R.; Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.

    2007-04-01

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3}48 and for pion masses down to {approx_equal}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho, and nucleon masses; the light and strange quark masses; and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a{approx_equal}0.1 fm and {approx_equal}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well.

  2. Nucleon, $$\\Delta$$ and $$\\Omega$$ excited states in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    John Bulava; Edwards, Robert G.; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2010-07-22

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon,more » $$\\Delta$$ and $$\\Omega$$ are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses $$m_{\\pi}$$ = 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we find reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. In addition, the need to include operators that couple to the expected multi-hadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified.« less

  3. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  4. Study of the Dijet Mass Spectrum in pp→W+jets Events at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. 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A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. 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U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report an investigation of the invariant mass spectrum of the two jets with highest transverse momentum in pp→W+2-jet and W+3-jet events to look for resonant enhancement. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at s=7TeV. We find no evidence for the anomalous structure reported by the CDF Collaboration, and establish an upper limit of 5.0 pb at 95% confidence level on the production cross section for a generic Gaussian signal with mass near 150 GeV. Additionally, we exclude two theoretical models that predict a CDF-like dijet resonance near 150 GeV.

  5. Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    The relation between the hadronic short-distance constituent quark and gluon particle limit and the long-range confining domain is yet one of the most challenging aspects of particle physics due to the strong coupling nature of Quantum Chromodynamics, the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. The central question is how one can compute hadronic properties from first principles; i.e., directly from the QCD Lagrangian. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time. Lattice numerical results follow from computation of frame-dependent moments of distributions in Euclidean space and dynamical observables in Minkowski spacetime, such as the time-like hadronic form factors, are not amenable to Euclidean lattice computations. The Dyson-Schwinger methods have led to many important insights, such as the infrared fixed point behavior of the strong coupling constant, but in practice, the analyses are limited to ladder approximation in Landau gauge. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. New theoretical tools are thus of primary interest for the interpretation of the results expected at the new mass scale and kinematic regions accessible to the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The AdS/CFT correspondence between gravity or string theory on a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space and conformal field theories in physical space-time has led to a semiclassical approximation for strongly-coupled QCD, which provides physical insights into its nonperturbative dynamics. The correspondence is holographic in the sense that it determines a duality between theories in different number of space-time dimensions. This geometric approach leads in fact to a simple analytical and phenomenologically compelling nonperturbative approximation to the full light

  6. A SEYFERT-2-LIKE SPECTRUM IN THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY MICROQUASAR V4641 SGR

    SciTech Connect

    Morningstar, Warren R.; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Maitra, Dipankar E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu

    2014-05-10

    We present an analysis of three archival Chandra observations of the black hole V4641 Sgr, performed during a decline into quiescence. The last two observations in the sequence can be modeled with a simple power law. The first spectrum, however, is remarkably similar to spectra observed in Seyfert-2 active galactic nuclei, which arise through a combination of obscuration and reflection from distant material. This spectrum of V4641 Sgr can be fit extremely well with a model including partial-covering absorption and distant reflection. This model recovers a Γ ≅ 2.0 power-law incident spectrum, typical of black holes at low Eddington fractions. The implied geometry is plausible in a high-mass X-ray binary like V4641 Sgr, and may be as compelling as explanations invoking Doppler-split line pairs in a jet, and/or unusual Comptonization. We discuss potential implications and means of testing these models.

  7. QCD as a topologically ordered system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2013-09-15

    We argue that QCD belongs to a topologically ordered phase similar to many well-known condensed matter systems with a gap such as topological insulators or superconductors. Our arguments are based on an analysis of the so-called “deformed QCD” which is a weakly coupled gauge theory, but nevertheless preserves all the crucial elements of strongly interacting QCD, including confinement, nontrivial θ dependence, degeneracy of the topological sectors, etc. Specifically, we construct the so-called topological “BF” action which reproduces the well known infrared features of the theory such as non-dispersive contribution to the topological susceptibility which cannot be associated with any propagating degrees of freedom. Furthermore, we interpret the well known resolution of the celebrated U(1){sub A} problem where the would be η{sup ′} Goldstone boson generates its mass as a result of mixing of the Goldstone field with a topological auxiliary field characterizing the system. We then identify the non-propagating auxiliary topological field of the BF formulation in deformed QCD with the Veneziano ghost (which plays the crucial role in resolution of the U(1){sub A} problem). Finally, we elaborate on relation between “string-net” condensation in topologically ordered condensed matter systems and long range coherent configurations, the “skeletons”, studied in QCD lattice simulations. -- Highlights: •QCD may belong to a topologically ordered phase similar to condensed matter (CM) systems. •We identify the non-propagating topological field in deformed QCD with the Veneziano ghost. •Relation between “string-net” condensates in CM systems and the “skeletons” in QCD lattice simulations is studied.

  8. Exclusive hadronic and nuclear processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Hadronic and nuclear processes are covered, in which all final particles are measured at large invariant masses compared with each other, i.e., large momentum transfer exclusive reactions. Hadronic wave functions in QCD and QCD sum rule constraints on hadron wave functions are discussed. The question of the range of applicability of the factorization formula and perturbation theory for exclusive processes is considered. Some consequences of quark and gluon degrees of freedom in nuclei are discussed which are outside the usual domain of traditional nuclear physics. 44 refs., 7 figs. (LEW)

  9. String breaking in four dimensional lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Eichten, E.; Thacker, H.

    2001-06-01

    Virtual quark pair screening leads to breaking of the string between fundamental representation quarks in QCD. For unquenched four dimensional lattice QCD, this (so far elusive) phenomenon is studied using the recently developed truncated determinant algorithm (TDA). The dynamical configurations were generated on a 650 MHz PC. Quark eigenmodes up to 420 MeV are included exactly in these TDA studies performed at low quark mass on large coarse [but O(a{sup 2}) improved] lattices. A study of Wilson line correlators in Coulomb gauge extracted from an ensemble of 1000 two-flavor dynamical configurations reveals evidence for flattening of the string tension at distances R{approx}>1 fm.

  10. Broad spectrum drug screening using electron-ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of drugs and internal standard (promazine) is performed by mixing urine at basic pH with 1-chlorobutane. There are no hydrolysis or derivatization steps. After centrifugation the organic (upper) layer is transferred to another tube and evaporated. The dried extract is reconstituted with ethyl acetate and 1 microL is injected onto the GCMS. Drugs are volatilized in the GC inlet and separated on a capillary column. In the EI source drugs become positively charged and fragment. Mass analysis of ionized fragments occurs with a single quadrupole. The resulting full scan mass spectra are automatically searched against three libraries. PMID:20077071

  11. Solving QCD using multi-regge theory.

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. R.

    1998-07-13

    This talk outlines the derivation of a high-energy, transverse momentum cut-off, solution of QCD in which the Regge pole and ''single gluon'' properties of the pomeron are directly related to the confinement and chiral symmetry breaking properties of the hadron spectrum. In first approximation, the pomeron is a single reggeized gluon plus a ''wee parton'' component that compensates for the color and particle properties of the gluon. This solution corresponds to a supercritical phase of Reggeon Field Theory.

  12. Hadron energy spectrum in polarized top-quark decays considering the effects of hadron and bottom quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Balali, Mahboobe

    2016-03-01

    We present the analytical expressions for the next-to-leading order corrections to the partial decay width t(\\uparrow ) rightarrow bW^+, followed by brightarrow H_bX, for nonzero b-quark mass (m_bne 0) in the fixed-flavor-number scheme (FFNs). To make the predictions for the energy distribution of outgoing hadrons H_b, as a function of the normalized H_b-energy fraction x_H, we apply the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme (GM-VFNs) in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization of top quark is evaluated relative to the b-quark momentum. We also study the effects of gluon fragmentation and finite hadron mass on the hadron energy spectrum so that hadron masses are responsible for the low-x_H threshold. In order to describe both the b-quark and the gluon hadronizations in top decays we apply realistic and nonperturbative fragmentation functions extracted through a global fit to the e^+e^- annihilation data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC by relying on their universality and scaling violations.

  13. QCD sign problem for small chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Splittorff, K.; Verbaarschot, J. J. M.

    2007-06-01

    The expectation value of the complex phase factor of the fermion determinant is computed in the microscopic domain of QCD at nonzero chemical potential. We find that the average phase factor is nonvanishing below a critical value of the chemical potential equal to half the pion mass and vanishes exponentially in the volume for larger values of the chemical potential. This holds for QCD with dynamical quarks as well as for quenched and phase quenched QCD. The average phase factor has an essential singularity for zero chemical potential and cannot be obtained by analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential or by means of a Taylor expansion. The leading order correction in the p-expansion of the chiral Lagrangian is calculated as well.

  14. FINAL REPORT. REAL-TIME BROAD SPECTRUM CHARACTERIZATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE BY MEMBRANE INTRODUCTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to expand the range of chemical species that may be detected by membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) in environmental, and specifically in Mixed Waste, monitoring and characterization applications. There were three major thrusts to this work...

  15. The fragmentation of expanding shells - III. Oligarchic accretion and the mass spectrum of fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, James E.; Wünsch, Richard; Smith, Rowan J.; Whitworth, Anthony; Palouš, Jan

    2011-03-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to investigate the gravitational fragmentation of expanding shells through the linear and non-linear regimes. The results are analysed using spherical-harmonic decomposition to capture the initiation of structure during the linear regime, the potential-based method of Smith et al. to follow the development of clumps in the mildly non-linear regime and sink particles to capture the properties of the final bound objects during the highly non-linear regime. In the early, mildly non-linear phase of fragmentation, we find that the clump mass function still agrees quite well with the mass function predicted by the analytic model. However, the sink mass function is quite different, in the sense of being skewed towards high-mass objects. This is because, once the growth of a condensation becomes non-linear, it tends to be growing non-competitively from its own essentially separate reservoir; we call this oligarchic accretion.

  16. REAL-TIME BROAD SPECTRUM CHARACTERIZATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE BY MEMBRANE INTRODUCTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to expand the real-time monitoring capabilities of Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) to the pivotal problem of Mixed Hazardous Wastes, with secondary emphasis on monitoring incinerator stack gases for both organics and toxic metals. The methodologies devel...

  17. Resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  18. Hadron Spectroscopy and Wavefunctions in QCD and the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2006-02-11

    The AdS/CFT correspondence has led to important insights into the properties of quantum chromodynamics even though QCD is a broken conformal theory. We have recently shown how a holographic model based on a truncated AdS space can be used to obtain the hadronic spectrum of light qq-bar, qqq and gg bound states. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state, including orbital angular momentum excitations. The predicted mass spectrum is linear M {proportional_to} L at high orbital angular momentum, in contrast to the quadratic dependence M2 {proportional_to} L found in the description of spinning strings. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale {lambda}QCD, is introduced, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of {delta} to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions. The light-front quantization of gauge theories in light-cone gauge provides a frame-independent wavefunction representation of relativistic bound states, simple forms for current matrix elements, explicit unitarity, and a trivial vacuum. The light-front Fock-state wavefunctions encode the bound state properties of hadrons in terms of their quark and gluon degrees of freedom at the amplitude level. One can also use the extended AdS/CFT space-time theory to obtain a model for hadronic light-front wavefunctions, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level. The model wavefunctions display confinement at large inter-quark separation and conformal symmetry at short distances. In particular, the scaling and conformal properties of the LFWFs at high relative momenta agree with perturbative QCD. These AdS/CFT model wavefunctions could be used as an initial ansatz for a variational treatment of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian. We also show how hadron form factors in both the space

  19. Broad-Spectrum Drug Screening Using Liquid Chromatography-Hybrid Triple-Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Urine is processed with a simple C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) and reconstituted in mobile phase. The liquid chromatography system (LC) injects 10 μL of extracted sample onto a reverse-phase LC column for gradient analysis with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mobile phases. Drugs in the column eluent become charged in the ion source using positive electrospray ionization (ESI). Pseudomolecular ions (M + H) are analyzed by a hybrid triple-quadrupole linear ion trap (QqQ and QqLIT) mass spectrometer using an SRM-IDA-EPI acquisition. An initial 125 compound selected ion monitoring (SRM) survey scan (triple quadrupole or QqQ mode) is processed by the information-dependent acquisition (IDA) algorithm. The IDA algorithm selects SRM signals from the survey scan with a peak height above the threshold (the three most abundant SRM signals above 1000 cps) to define precursor ions for subsequent dependent scanning. In the dependent QqLIT scan(s), selected precursor ion(s) are passed through the first quadrupole (Q1), fragmented with three different collision energies in the collision cell (Q2 or q), and product ions are collected in the third quadrupole (Q3), now operating as a linear ion trap (LIT). The ions are scanned out of the LIT in a mass dependent manner to produce a full-scan product ion spectrum (m/z 50-700) defined as an Enhanced (meaning acquired in LIT mode) Product Ion (EPI) spectrum (Mueller et al., Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 19:1332-1338, 2005). Each EPI spectrum is linked to its precursor ion and to the associated SRM peak from the survey scan. EPI spectra are automatically searched against a 125 drug library of reference EPI spectra for identification. When the duty cycle is complete (one survey scan of 125 SRMs plus 0-3 dependent IDA-EPI scans) the mass spectrometer begins another survey scan of the 125 SRMs. PMID:26660183

  20. QCD (&) event generators

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments in QCD phenomenology have spurred on several improved approaches to Monte Carlo event generation, relative to the post-LEP state of the art. In this brief review, the emphasis is placed on approaches for (1) consistently merging fixed-order matrix element calculations with parton shower descriptions of QCD radiation, (2) improving the parton shower algorithms themselves, and (3) improving the description of the underlying event in hadron collisions.

  1. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Peardon, M J; Ryan, S M; Thomas, C; Vilaseca, P; Dudek, J; Edwards, R; Joo, B; Richards, D G

    2012-12-01

    We study the charmonium spectrum in full QCD on anisotropic lattices generated by Hadron Spectrum Collaboration. We adopt a large basis of interpolating operators to extract the excited charmonium states using the variational method. A detailed spectrum of excited charmonium mesons in many J{sup PC} channels is obtained. Some exotic hybrid states ( with J{sup PC} = 0{sup +-} , 1{sup -+} , 2{sup +-}) are also studied

  2. Nucleon Axial Charge in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.G.; Richards, D.G.; Fleming, G.T.; Haegler, Ph.; Negele, J.W.; Pochinsky, A.V.; Orginos, K.; Renner, D.B.; Schroers, W.

    2006-02-10

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm){sup 3}. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 7% statistical errors.

  3. Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and Supersymmetric Features of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2016-03-01

    Light-Front Quantization—Dirac's "Front Form"—provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic light-front wavefunctions. One obtains new insights into the hadronic spectrum, light-front wavefunctions, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography—the duality between the front form and AdS5, the space of isometries of the conformal group. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons of the same parity. The mass scale κ underlying confinement and hadron masses can be connected to the parameter {Λ_{overline {MS}}} in the QCD running coupling by matching the nonperturbative dynamics, as described by the effective conformal theory mapped to the light-front and its embedding in AdS space, to the perturbative QCD regime. The result is an effective coupling defined at all momenta. This matching of the high and low momentum transfer regimes determines a scale Q 0 which sets the interface between perturbative and nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The use of Q 0 to resolve the factorization scale uncertainty for structure functions and distribution amplitudes, in combination with the principle of maximal conformality for setting the renormalization scales, can greatly improve the precision of perturbative QCD predictions for collider phenomenology. The absence of vacuum excitations of the causal, frame-independent front form vacuum has important consequences for the cosmological constant. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is non-universal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for nuclear parton distribution functions.

  4. Light-Front Holography, Color Confinement, and Supersymmetric Features of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2016-08-01

    Light-Front Quantization—Dirac's "Front Form"—provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic light-front wavefunctions. One obtains new insights into the hadronic spectrum, light-front wavefunctions, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography—the duality between the front form and AdS5, the space of isometries of the conformal group. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons of the same parity. The mass scale {κ} underlying confinement and hadron masses can be connected to the parameter {Λ_{overline {MS}}} in the QCD running coupling by matching the nonperturbative dynamics, as described by the effective conformal theory mapped to the light-front and its embedding in AdS space, to the perturbative QCD regime. The result is an effective coupling defined at all momenta. This matching of the high and low momentum transfer regimes determines a scale Q 0 which sets the interface between perturbative and nonperturbative hadron dynamics. The use of Q 0 to resolve the factorization scale uncertainty for structure functions and distribution amplitudes, in combination with the principle of maximal conformality for setting the renormalization scales, can greatly improve the precision of perturbative QCD predictions for collider phenomenology. The absence of vacuum excitations of the causal, frame-independent front form vacuum has important consequences for the cosmological constant. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is non-universal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for nuclear parton distribution functions.

  5. Mass spectrum in SQCD and problems with the Seiberg duality. Another scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyak, V. L.

    2012-01-15

    The N = 1 SQCD with SU(N{sub c}) colors and N{sub F} flavors of light quarks is considered within the dynamical scenario that assumes that quarks can be in the two different phases only: the heavy-quark phase, where they are confined, and the phase of higgsed quarks, at the appropriate values of the Lagrangian parameters. The mass spectra of this (direct) theory and its Seiberg dual are obtained and compared for quarks of small equal or unequal masses. It is shown that in those regions of the parameter space where an additional small parameter exists (it is bar b{sub 0} /N{sub F} = (3N{sub c} - N{sub F} )/N{sub F} <<1 at the right end of the conformal window, where the direct theory is weakly coupled in the vicinity of its IR fixed point, or its analog 0 < b{sub 0}/N{sub F} = (2N{sub F} - 3N{sub c})/N{sub F} Much-Less-Than 1 for the dual theory at the left end of the conformal window), the mass spectra of the direct and dual theories are parametrically different. A number of other regimes are also considered.

  6. Observation of a broad structure in the pi+ pi- J/psi mass spectrum around 4.26 GeV/c2.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Williams, G; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-30

    We study initial-state radiation events, e+ e- --> gammaISR pi+ pi- J/psi, with data collected with the BABAR detector. We observe an accumulation of events near 4.26 GeV/c2 in the invariant-mass spectrum of pi+ pi- J/psi. Fits to the mass spectrum indicate that a broad resonance with a mass of about 4.26 GeV/c2 is required to describe the observed structure. The presence of additional narrow resonances cannot be excluded. The fitted width of the broad resonance is 50 to 90 MeV/c2, depending on the fit hypothesis. PMID:16241645

  7. Conversion of Ca2+ salt of an organic compound to its Li+ salt to simplify the fast atom bombardment mass spectrum.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Baba, Yoshiyasu; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Hashimoto, Yuichi

    2003-11-01

    The FAB mass spectrum of the Ca(2+) salt of RK-682 (1, MW 368), a potent protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, shows a complex pattern due to Ca(2+) adduct ions with multimers of 1 and their decomposition ions. Addition of LiCl greatly simplified the FAB mass spectrum, providing a prominent Li(+) adduct ion of 1 at m/z 381 [M+2Li-H](+). The addition of LiCl also greatly simplified the FAB mass spectrum of calcium pantothenate. This approach may be generally useful for molecular weight determination of multivalent metal salts of organic compounds, or organic compounds that can form Li salts, by FAB mass spectrometry. PMID:14600389

  8. Localization and mass spectrum of q-form fields on branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate localization of a bulk massless q-form field on codimension-one branes by using a new Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition, for which there are two types of KK modes for the bulk q-form field, the q-form and (q - 1)-form modes. The first modes may be massive or massless while the second ones are all massless. These two types of KK modes satisfy two Schrödinger-like equations. For a five-dimensional brane model with a finite extra dimension, the spectrum of a bulk 3-form field on the brane consists of some massive bound 3-form KK modes as well as some massless bound 2-form ones with different configuration along the extra dimension. These 2-form modes are different from those obtained from a bulk 2-form field. For a five-dimensional degenerated Bloch brane model with an infinite extra dimension, some massive 3-form resonant KK modes and corresponding massless 2-form resonant ones are obtained for a bulk 3-form field.

  9. DSP-Based dual-polarity mass spectrum pattern recognition for bio-detection

    SciTech Connect

    Riot, V; Coffee, K; Gard, E; Fergenson, D; Ramani, S; Steele, P

    2006-04-21

    The Bio-Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) instrument analyzes single aerosol particles using a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer recording simultaneously spectra of thirty to a hundred thousand points on each polarity. We describe here a real-time pattern recognition algorithm developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that has been implemented on a nine Digital Signal Processor (DSP) system from Signatec Incorporated. The algorithm first preprocesses independently the raw time-of-flight data through an adaptive baseline removal routine. The next step consists of a polarity dependent calibration to a mass-to-charge representation, reducing the data to about five hundred to a thousand channels per polarity. The last step is the identification step using a pattern recognition algorithm based on a library of known particle signatures including threat agents and background particles. The identification step includes integrating the two polarities for a final identification determination using a score-based rule tree. This algorithm, operating on multiple channels per-polarity and multiple polarities, is well suited for parallel real-time processing. It has been implemented on the PMP8A from Signatec Incorporated, which is a computer based board that can interface directly to the two one-Giga-Sample digitizers (PDA1000 from Signatec Incorporated) used to record the two polarities of time-of-flight data. By using optimized data separation, pipelining, and parallel processing across the nine DSPs it is possible to achieve a processing speed of up to a thousand particles per seconds, while maintaining the recognition rate observed on a non-real time implementation. This embedded system has allowed the BAMS technology to improve its throughput and therefore its sensitivity while maintaining a large dynamic range (number of channels and two polarities) thus maintaining the systems specificity for bio-detection.

  10. Broad spectrum drug screening using liquid chromatography-hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Centrifuged urine, internal standard (promazine), and ammonium formate buffer are mixed in an autosampler vial to achieve a 10-fold dilution of the specimen. Without additional pretreatment, 10 microL of the sample is injected onto a C18 reverse phase column for gradient analysis with ammonium formate/acetonitrile mobile phases. Drugs in the column eluent become charged in the ion source using positive electrospray atmospheric pressure ionization. Pseudomolecular drug ions are analyzed by a hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer operated with a 264-drug selected ion monitoring (SRM) acquisition method that includes an information-dependant acquisition (IDA) algorithm. PMID:20077072

  11. Regge spectra of excited mesons, harmonic confinement, and QCD vacuum structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelko, Sergei N.; Voronin, Vladimir E.

    2016-05-01

    An approach to QCD vacuum as a medium describable in terms of a statistical ensemble of almost everywhere homogeneous Abelian (anti-)self-dual gluon fields is briefly reviewed. These fields play the role of the confining medium for color charged fields as well as underline the mechanism of realization of chiral S UL(Nf)×S UR(Nf) and UA(1 ) symmetries. Hadronization formalism based on this ensemble leads to manifestly defined quantum effective meson action. Strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions of mesons are represented in the action in terms of nonlocal n -point interaction vertices given by the quark-gluon loops averaged over the background ensemble. New systematic results for the mass spectrum and decay constants of radially excited light, heavy-light mesons, and heavy quarkonia are presented. The interrelation between the present approach, models based on ideas of soft-wall anti-de Sitter/QCD, light-front holographic QCD, and the picture of harmonic confinement is outlined.

  12. FOREWORD: Extreme QCD 2012 (xQCD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Bazavov, Alexei; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2013-04-01

    The Extreme QCD 2012 conference, held at the George Washington University in August 2012, celebrated the 10th event in the series. It has been held annually since 2003 at different locations: San Carlos (2011), Bad Honnef (2010), Seoul (2009), Raleigh (2008), Rome (2007), Brookhaven (2006), Swansea (2005), Argonne (2004), and Nara (2003). As usual, it was a very productive and inspiring meeting that brought together experts in the field of finite-temperature QCD, both theoretical and experimental. On the experimental side, we heard about recent results from major experiments, such as PHENIX and STAR at Brookhaven National Laboratory, ALICE and CMS at CERN, and also about the constraints on the QCD phase diagram coming from astronomical observations of one of the largest laboratories one can imagine, neutron stars. The theoretical contributions covered a wide range of topics, including QCD thermodynamics at zero and finite chemical potential, new ideas to overcome the sign problem in the latter case, fluctuations of conserved charges and how they allow one to connect calculations in lattice QCD with experimentally measured quantities, finite-temperature behavior of theories with many flavors of fermions, properties and the fate of heavy quarkonium states in the quark-gluon plasma, and many others. The participants took the time to write up and revise their contributions and submit them for publication in these proceedings. Thanks to their efforts, we have now a good record of the ideas presented and discussed during the workshop. We hope that this will serve both as a reminder and as a reference for the participants and for other researchers interested in the physics of nuclear matter at high temperatures and density. To preserve the atmosphere of the event the contributions are ordered in the same way as the talks at the conference. We are honored to have helped organize the 10th meeting in this series, a milestone that reflects the lasting interest in this

  13. Mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants in the bilocal relativistic potential model

    SciTech Connect

    Ablakulov, Kh. Narzikulov, Z.

    2015-01-15

    A phenomenological model is developed in terms of bilocal meson fields in order to describe a vector meson and its leptonic decays. A new Salpeter equation for this particle and the Schwinger-Dyson equation allowing for the presence of an arbitrary potential and for a modification associated with the renormalization of the quark (antiquark ) wave function within the meson are given. An expression for the constant of the leptonic decay of the charged rho meson is obtained from an analysis of the decay process τ → ρν via parametrizing in it the hadronization of intermediate charged weak W bosons into a bilocal vector meson. The potential is chosen in the form of the sum of harmonic-oscillator and Coulomb potentials, and the respective boundary-value problem is formulated. It is shown that the solutions to this problem describe both the mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants.

  14. CFM-ID: a web server for annotation, spectrum prediction and metabolite identification from tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Wilson, Michael; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2014-07-01

    CFM-ID is a web server supporting three tasks associated with the interpretation of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) for the purpose of automated metabolite identification: annotation of the peaks in a spectrum for a known chemical structure; prediction of spectra for a given chemical structure and putative metabolite identification--a predicted ranking of possible candidate structures for a target spectrum. The algorithms used for these tasks are based on Competitive Fragmentation Modeling (CFM), a recently introduced probabilistic generative model for the MS/MS fragmentation process that uses machine learning techniques to learn its parameters from data. These algorithms have been extensively tested on multiple datasets and have been shown to out-perform existing methods such as MetFrag and FingerId. This web server provides a simple interface for using these algorithms and a graphical display of the resulting annotations, spectra and structures. CFM-ID is made freely available at http://cfmid.wishartlab.com. PMID:24895432

  15. CFM-ID: a web server for annotation, spectrum prediction and metabolite identification from tandem mass spectra

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Felicity; Pon, Allison; Wilson, Michael; Greiner, Russ; Wishart, David

    2014-01-01

    CFM-ID is a web server supporting three tasks associated with the interpretation of tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) for the purpose of automated metabolite identification: annotation of the peaks in a spectrum for a known chemical structure; prediction of spectra for a given chemical structure and putative metabolite identification—a predicted ranking of possible candidate structures for a target spectrum. The algorithms used for these tasks are based on Competitive Fragmentation Modeling (CFM), a recently introduced probabilistic generative model for the MS/MS fragmentation process that uses machine learning techniques to learn its parameters from data. These algorithms have been extensively tested on multiple datasets and have been shown to out-perform existing methods such as MetFrag and FingerId. This web server provides a simple interface for using these algorithms and a graphical display of the resulting annotations, spectra and structures. CFM-ID is made freely available at http://cfmid.wishartlab.com. PMID:24895432

  16. The Top Quark, QCD, And New Physics.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dawson, S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup+}e{sup -}+ t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup+}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  17. THE TOP QUARK, QCD, AND NEW PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON,S.

    2002-06-01

    The role of the top quark in completing the Standard Model quark sector is reviewed, along with a discussion of production, decay, and theoretical restrictions on the top quark properties. Particular attention is paid to the top quark as a laboratory for perturbative QCD. As examples of the relevance of QCD corrections in the top quark sector, the calculation of e{sup +}e{sup -} + t{bar t} at next-to-leading-order QCD using the phase space slicing algorithm and the implications of a precision measurement of the top quark mass are discussed in detail. The associated production of a t{bar t} pair and a Higgs boson in either e{sup +}e{sup -} or hadronic collisions is presented at next-to-leading-order QCD and its importance for a measurement of the top quark Yulrawa coupling emphasized. Implications of the heavy top quark mass for model builders are briefly examined, with the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model and topcolor discussed as specific examples.

  18. The Origin of the Stellar Mass Spectrum in Turbulence and Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is one of the oldest problems in theoretical astrophysics, and one of the most profound. This distribution touches virtually every area of astrophysics, from interpreting observations of integrated starlight, to synthesis of heavy elements, to formation of galaxies, to the development of life. A comprehensive theory of the IMF, and its possible variation, is directly relevant to the NASA mission of understanding our origins, and would also be invaluable for interpreting observations from NASA missions that measure integrated starlight. While the problem of the IMF has stood for a long time, recent developments in both numerical and analytic techniques make the problem ripe for solution. We propose to develop a comprehensive theory for the origin of the IMF that is based on two main ingredients: the statistical properties of the ubiquitous turbulence in interstellar clouds, and the role of stellar radiative feedback in shaping how that gas fragments under the action of self-gravity. This work will proceed on two fronts. Analytically, we will extend the excursion set formalism for turbulence recently developed by Hopkins to account for the effects of local sources of stellar radiative feedback, which have been shown by both simulations and observations to have profound effects on how gas fragments. In parallel, we will conduct adaptive mesh refinement radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to test and guide the development of this analytic framework. The goal will be to develop a predictive theory of the IMF that is capable of explaining both the shape and the normalization of the stellar mass function, and its possible variation with star-forming environment.

  19. Big bang nucleosynthesis and ΛQCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2003-11-01

    Big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) has increasingly become the tool of choice for investigating the permitted variation of fundamental constants during the earliest epochs of the Universe. Here we present a BBN calculation that has been modified to permit changes in the QCD scale, ΛQCD. The primary effects of changing the QCD scale upon BBN are through the deuteron binding energy BD and the neutron-proton mass difference δmnp, which both play crucial roles in determining the primordial abundances. In this paper we show how a simplified BBN calculation allows us to restrict the nuclear data we need to just BD and δmnp yet still gives useful results so that any variation in ΛQCD may be constrained via the corresponding shifts in BD and δmnp by using the current estimates of the primordial deuterium abundance and helium mass fraction. The simplification predicts the helium-4 and deuterium abundances to within 1% and 50%, respectively, when compared with the results of a standard BBN code. But ΛQCD also affects much of the remaining required nuclear input so this method introduces a systematic error into the calculation and we find a degeneracy between BD and δmnp. We show how increased understanding of the relationship of the pion mass and/or BD to other nuclear parameters, such as the binding energy of tritium and the cross section of T+D→4He+n, would yield constraints upon any change in BD and δmnp at the 10% level.

  20. QCD and Light-Front Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Costa Rica U.

    2011-01-10

    AdS/QCD, the correspondence between theories in a dilaton-modified five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space and confining field theories in physical space-time, provides a remarkable semiclassical model for hadron physics. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The result is a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The hadron eigenstates generally have components with different orbital angular momentum; e.g., the proton eigenstate in AdS/QCD with massless quarks has L = 0 and L = 1 light-front Fock components with equal probability. Higher Fock states with extra quark-anti quark pairs also arise. The soft-wall model also predicts the form of the nonperturbative effective coupling and its {beta}-function. The AdS/QCD model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method to systematically include QCD interaction terms. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates. A method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level is outlined.

  1. RECENT LATTICE RESULTS ON FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY QCD, PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.

    2007-07-09

    We discuss recent progress in studies of QCD thermodynamics with almost physical light quark masses and a physical value of the strange quark mass. We summarize results on the transition temperature in QCD and analyze the relation between deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration.

  2. Gravitational waves from the cosmological QCD transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão Roque, V. R. C.; Roque, G. Lugones o.; Lugones, G.

    2014-09-01

    We determine the minimum fluctuations in the cosmological QCD phase transition that could be detectable by the eLISA/NGO gravitational wave observatory. To this end, we performed several hydrodynamical simulations using a state-of-the-art equation of state derived from lattice QCD simulations. Based on the fact that the viscosity per entropy density of the quark gluon plasma obtained from heavy-ion collision experiments at the RHIC and the LHC is extremely small, we considered a non-viscous fluid in our simulations. Several previous works about this transition considered a first order transition that generates turbulence which follows a Kolmogorov power law. We show that for the QCD crossover transition the turbulent spectrum must be very different because there is no viscosity and no source of continuous energy injection. As a consequence, a large amount of kinetic energy accumulates at the smallest scales. From the hydrodynamic simulations, we have obtained the spectrum of the gravitational radiation emitted by the motion of the fluid, finding that, if typical velocity and temperature fluctuations have an amplitude Δ v /c ≳ 10-2 and/or Δ T/T_c ≳ 10-3, they would be detected by eLISA/NGO at frequencies larger than ˜ 10-4 Hz.

  3. QCD Evolution 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    These are the proceedings of the QCD Evolution 2015 Workshop which was held 26-30 May, 2015 at Jefferson Lab, Newport News, Virginia, USA. The workshop is a continuation of a series of workshops held during four consecutive years 2011, 2012, 2013 at Jefferson Lab, and in 2014 in Santa Fe, NM. With the rapid developments in our understanding of the evolution of parton distributions including low-x, TMDs, GPDs, higher-twist correlation functions, and the associated progress in perturbative QCD, lattice QCD and effective field theory techniques we look forward with great enthusiasm to the 2015 meeting. A special attention was also paid to participation of experimentalists as the topics discussed are of immediate importance for the JLab 12 experimental program and a future Electron Ion Collider.

  4. Novel QCD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2007-07-06

    I discuss a number of novel topics in QCD, including the use of the AdS/CFT correspondence between Anti-de Sitter space and conformal gauge theories to obtain an analytically tractable approximation to QCD in the regime where the QCD coupling is large and constant. In particular, there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimension coordinate z of AdS space and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of mesons and baryons, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of exclusive scattering amplitudes. I also discuss a number of novel phenomenological features of QCD. Initial- and final-state interactions from gluon-exchange, normally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions, leading to leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, the breakdown of the Lam Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, and nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing--leading-twist physics not incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target computed in isolation. I also discuss tests of hidden color in nuclear wavefunctions, the use of diffraction to materialize the Fock states of a hadronic projectile and test QCD color transparency, and anomalous heavy quark effects. The presence of direct higher-twist processes where a proton is produced in the hard subprocess can explain the large proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions.

  5. Domain walls in supersymmetric QCD: The taming of the zoo

    SciTech Connect

    Binosi, Daniele; ter Veldhuis, Tonnis

    2001-04-15

    We provide a unified picture of the domain wall spectrum in supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} colors and N{sub f} flavors of quarks in the (anti) fundamental representation. Within the framework of the Veneziano-Yankielowicz-Taylor effective Lagrangian, we consider domain walls connecting chiral symmetry breaking vacua, and we take the quark masses to be degenerate. For N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1/2, there is one BPS saturated domain wall for any value of the quark mass m. For 1/2{<=}N{sub f}/N{sub c}<1 there are two critical masses m{sub *} and m{sub **} which depend on the number of colors and flavors only through the ratio N{sub f}/N{sub c}. If mm{sub **}, there is no domain wall. We numerically determine m{sub *} and m{sub **} as a function of N{sub f}/N{sub c}, and we find that m{sub **} approaches a constant value in the limit that this ratio goes to 1.

  6. The mass of the planet-hosting giant star β Geminorum determined from its p-mode oscillation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Zechmeister, M.; Matthews, J.; Kuschnig, R.; Walker, G. A. H.; Döllinger, M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: Our aim is to use precise radial velocity measurements and photometric data to derive the frequency spacing of the p-mode oscillation spectrum of the planet-hosting star β Gem. This spacing along with the interferometric radius for this star can then be used to derive an accurate stellar mass. Methods: We use a long time series of over 60 h of precise stellar radial velocity measurements of β Gem taken with an iodine absorption cell at the echelle spectrograph mounted on the 2 m Alfred Jensch Telescope. We also present complementary photometric data for this star taken with the MOST microsatellite spanning 3.6 d. A Fourier analysis is used to derive the frequencies that are present in each data set. Results: The Fourier analysis of the radial velocity data reveals the presence of up to 17 significant pulsation modes in the frequency interval 10-250 μHz. Most of these fall on a grid of equally-spaced frequencies having a separation of 7.14 ± 0.12 μHz. An analysis of 3.6 days of high precision photometry taken with the MOST space telescopes shows the presence of up to 16 modes, six of which are consistent with modes found in the spectral (radial velocity) data. This frequency spacing is consistent with high overtone radial pulsations; however, until the pulsation modes are identified we cannot be sure if some of these are nonradial modes or even mixed modes. The radial velocity frequency spacing along with angular diameter measurements of β Gem via interferometry results in a stellar mass of M = 1.91 ± 0.09 M⊙. This value confirms the intermediate mass of the star determined using stellar evolutionary tracks. Conclusions.β Gem is confirmed to be an intermediate mass star. Stellar pulsations in giant stars along with interferometric radius measurements can provide accurate determinations of the stellar mass of planet hosting giant stars. These can also be used to calibrate stellar evolutionary tracks. Based on observations obtained at the 2 m Alfred

  7. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-06-01

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  8. Nucleon Structure from Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-W.

    2007-06-13

    We present lattice QCD numerical calculations of hadronic structure functions and form factors from full-QCD lattices, with a chirally symmetric fermion action, domain-wall fermions, for the sea and valence quarks. The lattice spacing is about 0.12 fm with physical volume approximately (2 fm)3 for RBC 2-flavor ensembles and (3 fm)3 for RBC/UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical ones. The lightest sea quark mass is about 1/2 the strange quark mass for the former ensembles and 1/4 for the latter ones. Our calculations include: isovector vector- and axial-charge form factors and the first few moments of the polarized and unpolarized structure functions of the nucleon. Nonperturbative renormalization in RI/MOM scheme is applied.

  9. Measurement of the Hadronic Mass Spectrum in B to Xulnu Decaysand Determination of the b-Quark Mass at the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Kerstin

    2008-06-26

    I present preliminary results of the measurement of the hadronic mass spectrum and its first three spectral moments in inclusive charmless semileptonic B-meson decays. The truncated hadronic mass moments are used for the first determination of the b-quark mass and the nonperturbative parameters μπ2 and ρD3 in this B-meson decay channel. The study is based on 383 x 106 B$\\bar{B}$ decays collected with the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage rings, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The first, second central, and third central hadronic mass moment with a cut on the hadronic mass mX2 < 6.4GeV2 and the lepton momentum p* > 1 GeV are measured to be: M1 = (1.96 ± 0.34stat ± 0.53syst) GeV2; U2 = (1.92 ± 0.59stat ± 0.87syst) GeV4; and U3 = (1.79 ± 0.62stat ± 0.78syst) GeV6; with correlation coefficients ρ12 = 0.99, ρ23 = 0.94, and ρ13 = 0.88, respectively. Using Heavy Quark Effective Theory-based predictions in the kinetic scheme we extract: mb = (4.60 ± 0.13stat ± 0.19syst ± 0.10theo GeV); μπ2 = (0.40 ± 0.14stat ± 0.20syst ± 0.04theo) GeV2; ρD3 = (0.10 ± 0.02stat ± 0.02syst ± 0.07theo) GeV3; at μ = 1 GeV, with correlation coefficients ρmbμπ2 = -0.99, ρ μπ2ρD3 = 0.57, and ρmbρD3 = -0.59. The results are in good agreement with earlier determinations in inclusive charmed semileptonic and radiative penguin B-meson decays and have a

  10. Hadron Spectroscopy and Wavefunctions in QCD and the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /SLAC /Costa Rica U.

    2005-10-13

    The AdS/CFT correspondence has led to important insights into the properties of quantum chromodynamics even though QCD is a broken conformal theory. We have recently shown how a holographic model based on a truncated AdS space can be used to obtain the hadronic spectrum of light q{bar q}, qqq and gg bound states. Specific hadrons are identified by the correspondence of string modes with the dimension of the interpolating operator of the hadron's valence Fock state, including orbital angular momentum excitations. The predicted mass spectrum is linear M {proportional_to} L at high orbital angular momentum, in contrast to the quadratic dependence M{sup 2} {proportional_to} L found in the description of spinning strings. Since only one parameter, the QCD scale LQCD, is introduced, the agreement with the pattern of physical states is remarkable. In particular, the ratio of D to nucleon trajectories is determined by the ratio of zeros of Bessel functions. The light-front quantization of gauge theories in light-cone gauge provides a frame-independent wavefunction representation of relativistic bound states, simple forms for current matrix elements, explicit unitarity, and a trivial vacuum. The light-front Fock-state wavefunctions encode the bound state properties of hadrons in terms of their quark and gluon degrees of freedom at the amplitude level. One can also use the extended AdS/CFT space-time theory to obtain a model for hadronic light-front wavefunctions, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level. The model wavefunctions display confinement at large inter-quark separation and conformal symmetry at short distances. In particular, the scaling and conformal properties of the LFWFs at high relative momenta agree with perturbative QCD. These AdS/CFT model wavefunctions could be used as an initial ansatz for a variational treatment of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian. We also show how hadron form factors in both the space-like and

  11. REGGE TRAJECTORIES IN QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.; Efremov, Anatoly Vasilievich; Ginzburg, Ilya F.

    2013-04-01

    We discuss some problems concerning the application of perturbative QCD to high energy soft processes. We show that summing the contributions of the lowest twist operators for non-singlet $t$-channel leads to a Regge-like amplitude. Singlet case is also discussed.

  12. QCD and Hadron Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  13. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  14. QCD: Quantum Chromodynamics

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-06-28

    The strongest force in the universe is the strong nuclear force and it governs the behavior of quarks and gluons inside protons and neutrons. The name of the theory that governs this force is quantum chromodynamics, or QCD. In this video, Fermilab?s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the intricacies of this dominant component of the Standard Model.

  15. QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    Results are presented for hadronic jet and direct photon production at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV. The data are compared with next-to-leading QCD calculations. A new limit on the scale of possible composite structure of the quarks is also reported. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Baryons and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-03-01

    The author presents an idiosyncratic view of baryons which calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD. He advocates a treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of q pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections.

  17. Dual of QCD with one adjoint fermion

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-03-15

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling, and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  18. A Toy Model for QCD: Hadrons, Penta- and Heptaquarks

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, M.; Hess, P.O.; Civitarese, O.; Reboiro, M.

    2004-09-13

    A toy model for QCD is presented and applied to the hadron spectrum. As a byproduct the structure of penta- and hepta-quarks is obtained. A complete classification of the states is given. One essential feature of the model is the non-conservation of particle number.

  19. Lattice QCD Beyond Ground States

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Saul D. Cohen

    2007-09-11

    In this work, we apply black box methods (methods not requiring input) to find excited-state energies. A variety of such methods for lattice QCD were introduced at the 3rd iteration of the numerical workshop series. We first review a selection of approaches that have been used in lattice calculations to determine multiple energy states: multiple correlator fits, the variational method and Bayesian fitting. In the second half, we will focus on a black box method, the multi-effective mass. We demonstrate the approach on a toy model, as well as on real lattice data, extracting multiple states from single correlators. Without complicated operator construction or specialized fitting programs, the black box method shows good consistency with the traditional approaches.

  20. Electroweak symmetry breaking via QCD.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Jisuke; Lim, Kher Sham; Lindner, Manfred

    2014-08-29

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the electroweak scale within the framework of QCD, which is extended to include conformally invariant scalar degrees of freedom belonging to a larger irreducible representation of SU(3)c. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered dynamically via the Higgs portal by the condensation of the colored scalar field around 1 TeV. The mass of the colored boson is restricted to be 350  GeV≲mS≲3  TeV, with the upper bound obtained from perturbative renormalization group evolution. This implies that the colored boson can be produced at the LHC. If the colored boson is electrically charged, the branching fraction of the Higgs boson decaying into two photons can slightly increase, and moreover, it can be produced at future linear colliders. Our idea of nonperturbative electroweak scale generation can serve as a new starting point for more realistic model building in solving the hierarchy problem. PMID:25215976

  1. Mass spectrum and leptonic decay constants of ground and radially excited states of ηc and ηb in a Bethe-Salpeter equation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negash, Hluf; Bhatnagar, Shashank

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we study the mass spectrum and decay constants of ground state (1S) and radially excited states (2S and 3S) of heavy equal mass pseudoscalar mesons, ηc and ηb. We have employed the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) under Covariant Instantaneous Ansatz (CIA). Our predictions are in reasonable agreement with the data on available states and results of other models.

  2. Baryons in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-15

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8 holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and {rho} mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large N{sub c}, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and {rho}-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the {rho}-meson profile G-tilde(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without {rho} mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and {rho} mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant {rho}-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  3. Novel QCD Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-08-12

    I review a number of topics where conventional wisdom in hadron physics has been challenged. For example, hadrons can be produced at large transverse momentum directly within a hard higher-twist QCD subprocess, rather than from jet fragmentation. Such 'direct' processes can explain the deviations from perturbative QCD predictions in measurements of inclusive hadron cross sections at fixed x{sub T} = 2p{sub T}/{radical}s, as well as the 'baryon anomaly', the anomalously large proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions. Initial-state and final-state interactions of the struck quark, the soft-gluon rescattering associated with its Wilson line, lead to Bjorken-scaling single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, as well as nuclear shadowing and antishadowing. The Gribov-Glauber theory predicts that antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is not universal, but instead depends on the flavor quantum numbers of each quark and antiquark, thus explaining the anomalous nuclear dependence measured in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering. Since shadowing and antishadowing arise from the physics of leading-twist diffractive deep inelastic scattering, one cannot attribute such phenomena to the structure of the nucleus itself. It is thus important to distinguish 'static' structure functions, the probability distributions computed from the square of the target light-front wavefunctions, versus 'dynamical' structure functions which include the effects of the final-state rescattering of the struck quark. The importance of the J = 0 photon-quark QCD contact interaction in deeply virtual Compton scattering is also emphasized. The scheme-independent BLM method for setting the renormalization scale is discussed. Eliminating the renormalization scale ambiguity greatly improves the precision of QCD predictions and increases the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC

  4. Two-flavor lattice QCD in the {epsilon} regime and chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Chiu, T. W.; Ogawa, K.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Yamada, N.; Matsufuru, H.; Noaki, J.; Onogi, T.

    2007-09-01

    The low-lying eigenvalue spectrum of the QCD Dirac operator in the {epsilon} regime is expected to match with that of chiral random matrix theory (ChRMT). We study this correspondence for the case including sea quarks by performing two-flavor QCD simulations on the lattice. Using the overlap fermion formulation, which preserves exact chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacings, we push the sea quark mass down to {approx}3 MeV on a 16{sup 3}x32 lattice at a lattice spacing a{approx_equal}0.11 fm. We compare the low-lying eigenvalue distributions and find a good agreement with the analytical predictions of ChRMT. By matching the lowest-lying eigenvalue we extract the chiral condensate, {sigma}{sup MS}(2 GeV)=(251{+-}7{+-}11 MeV){sup 3}, where errors represent statistical and higher order effects in the {epsilon} expansion. We also calculate the eigenvalue distributions on the lattices with heavier sea quarks at two lattice spacings. Although the {epsilon} expansion is not applied for those sea quarks, we find a reasonable agreement of the Dirac operator spectrum with ChRMT. The value of {sigma}, after extrapolating to the chiral limit, is consistent with the estimate in the {epsilon} regime.

  5. Scattering in the πN negative parity channel in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, C. B.; Verduci, V.

    2013-03-01

    We study the coupled πN system (negative parity, isospin (1)/(2)) based on a lattice QCD simulation for nf=2 mass degenerate light quarks. Both standard 3-quark baryon operators as well as meson-baryon (4+1)-quark operators are included. This is an exploratory study for just one lattice size and lattice spacing and at a pion mass of 266 MeV. Using the distillation method and variational analysis we determine energy levels of the lowest eigenstates. Comparison with the results of simple 3-quark correlation studies exhibits drastic differences and a new level appears. A clearer picture of the negative parity nucleon spectrum emerges. For the parameters of the simulation we may assume elastic s-wave scattering and can derive values of the phase shift.

  6. Comparing Massed-Trial Instruction, Distributed-Trial Instruction, and Task Interspersal to Teach Tacts to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdalany, Lina M.; Wilder, David A.; Greif, Abigail; Mathisen, David; Saini, Valdeep

    2014-01-01

    Although massed-trial instruction, distributed-trial instruction, and task interspersal have been shown to be effective methods of teaching skills to children with autism spectrum disorders, they have not been directly compared. In the current study, we taught 6 children to tact shapes of countries using these methods to determine which would…

  7. QCD with many fermions and QCD topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuryak, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Major nonperturbative phenomena in QCD - confinement and chiral symmetry breaking - are known to be related with certain topological objects. Recent lattice advances into the domain of many Nf = O(10) fermion flavors have shown that both phase transitions had shifted in this case to much stronger coupling. We discuss confinement in terms of monopole Bose condensation, and discuss how it is affected by fermions "riding" on the monopoles, ending with the Nf dependence of the critical line. Chiral symmetry breaking is discussed in terms of the (anti)selfdual dyons, the instanton constituents. The fermionic zero modes of those have a different meaning and lead to strong interaction between dyons and antidyons. We report some qualitative consequences of this theory and also some information about our first direct numerical study of the dyonic ensemble, in respect to both chiral symmetry breaking and confinement (via back reaction to the holonomy potential).

  8. AdS/QCD and Light Front Holography: A New Approximation to QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy

    2010-02-15

    The combination of Anti-de Sitter space (AdS) methods with light-front holography leads to a semi-classical first approximation to the spectrum and wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states. Starting from the bound-state Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we derive relativistic light-front wave equations in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. These equations of motion in physical space-time are equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. Its eigenvalues give the hadronic spectrum, and its eigenmodes represent the probability distribution of the hadronic constituents at a given scale. Applications to the light meson and baryon spectra are presented. The predicted meson spectrum has a string-theory Regge form M{sup 2} = 4{kappa}{sup 2}(n+L+S/2); i.e., the square of the eigenmass is linear in both L and n, where n counts the number of nodes of the wavefunction in the radial variable {zeta}. The space-like pion form factor is also well reproduced. One thus obtains a remarkable connection between the description of hadronic modes in AdS space and the Hamiltonian formulation of QCD in physical space-time quantized on the light-front at fixed light-front time {tau}. The model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms.

  9. The moment ⟨x ⟩u -d of the nucleon from Nf=2 lattice QCD down to nearly physical quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Gunnar S.; Collins, Sara; Gläßle, Benjamin; Göckeler, Meinulf; Najjar, Johannes; Rödl, Rudolf H.; Schäfer, Andreas; Schiel, Rainer W.; Sternbeck, André; Söldner, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    We present an update of our analysis [1] which includes additional ensembles at different quark masses, lattice spacings and volumes, all with high statistics. We use Nf=2 mass-degenerate quark flavors, employing the nonperturbatively improved clover action. The lattice matrix elements are converted to the MS ¯ scheme via renormalization factors determined nonperturbatively in the RI' -MOM scheme. We have systematically investigated excited state contributions, in particular, at the smallest, near physical, pion mass. While our results (with much increased precision) are consistent with Ref. [1], comparing to previous determinations we find that excited state contributions can be significant if the quark smearing is not suitably optimized, in agreement with other recent studies. The difference with respect to the value for ⟨x ⟩u-d extracted from experimental data is reduced but not resolved. Using lattice sizes in the range L mπ˜3.4 - 6.7 , no significant finite volume effects have been observed. Performing a controlled continuum limit that may remove the discrepancy will require simulations at lattice spacings a <0.06 fm .

  10. Lattice QCD study of mixed systems of pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Smigielski

    2011-07-01

    The O(100) different ground state energies of N-pion and M-kaon systems for N+M <= 12 are studied in lattice QCD. These energies are then used to extract the various two- and three- body interactions that occur in these systems. These calculations are performed using one ensemble of 2+1 flavor anisotropic lattices with a spatial lattice spacing $a_s$ ~ 0.125 fm, an anisotropy factor $\\xi=a_s/a_t=3.5$, and a spatial volume $L^3\\sim (2.5\\ {\\rm fm})^3$. Particular attention is paid to additional thermal states present in the spectrum because of the finite temporal extent. The quark masses used correspond to pion and kaon masses of $m_\\pi$ ~ 383 MeV and $m_K$ ~ 537 MeV, respectively. The isospin and strangeness chemical potentials of these systems are found to be in the region where chiral perturbation theory and hadronic models predict a phase transition between a pion condensed phase and a kaon condensed phase.

  11. Universality and the QCD Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G; Pittler, Ferenc

    2014-03-14

    We study the Anderson-type transition previously found in the spectrum of the QCD quark Dirac operator in the high-temperature, quark-gluon plasma phase. Using finite size scaling for the unfolded level spacing distribution, we show that in the thermodynamic limit there is a genuine mobility edge, where the spectral statistics changes from Poisson to Wigner-Dyson statistics in a nonanalytic way. We determine the correlation length critical exponent ν and find that it is compatible with that of the unitary Anderson model. PMID:24679282

  12. Observation of a Broad Structure in the $\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$ Mass Spectrum around 4.26~GeV/$c^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    The authors study initial-state radiation events, e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} J/{psi}, with data collected with the BABAR detector. They observe an accumulation of events near 4.26 GeV/c{sup 2} in the invariant-mass spectrum of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} J/{psi}. Fits of the mass spectrum indicate that a broad resonance with a mass of about 4.26 GeV/c{sup 2} is required to describe the observed structure. The presence of additional narrow resonances cannot be excluded. The fitted width of the broad resonance is 50 to 90 MeV/c{sup 2}, depending on the fit hypothesis.

  13. Broad-spectrum drug screening of meconium by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ristimaa, Johanna; Gergov, Merja; Pelander, Anna; Halmesmäki, Erja; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of the major drugs of abuse in meconium has been established in clinical practice for detecting fetal exposure to illicit drugs, particularly for the ready availability of the sample and ease of collection from diapers, compared with neonatal hair and urine. Very little is known about the occurrence and detection possibilities of therapeutic and licit drugs in meconium. Meconium specimens (n = 209) were collected in delivery hospitals, from infants of mothers who were suspected to be drug abusers. A targeted analysis method by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for abused drugs: amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, oxycodone, methadone, tramadol, buprenorphine, and norbuprenorphine. A separate LC-MS/MS method was developed for 11-nor-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid. A screening method based on LC coupled to time-of-flight MS was applied to a broad spectrum of drugs. As a result, a total of 77 different compounds were found. The main drug findings in meconium were as follows: local anesthetics 82.5% (n = 172), nicotine or its metabolites 61.5% (n = 129), opioids 48.5% (n = 101), stimulants 21.0% (n = 44), hypnotics and sedatives 19.0% (n = 40), antidepressants 18.0% (n = 38), antipsychotics 5.5% (n = 11), and cannabis 3.0% (n = 5). By revealing drugs and metabolites beyond the ordinary scope, the present procedure helps the pediatrician in cases where maternal denial is strong but the infant seems to suffer from typical drug-withdrawal symptoms. Intrapartum drug administration cannot be differentiated from gestational drug use by meconium analysis, which affects the interpretation of oxycodone, tramadol, fentanyl, pethidine, and ephedrine findings. PMID:20617307

  14. QCD and Asymptotic Freedom:. Perspectives and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    QCD is now a mature theory, and it is possible to begin to view its place in the conceptual universe of physics with an appropriate perspective. There is a certain irony in the achievements of QCD. For the problems which initially drove its development — specifically, the desire to understand in detail the force that holds atomic nuclei together, and later the desire to calculate the spectrum of hadrons and their interactions — only limited insight has been achieved. However, I shall argue that QCD is actually more special and important a theory than one had any right to anticipate. In many ways, the importance of the solution transcends that of the original motivating problems. After elaborating on these quasiphilosophical remarks, I discuss two current frontiers of physics that illustrate the continuing vitality of the ideas. The recent wealth of beautiful precision experiments measuring the parameters of the standard model have made it possible to consider the unification of couplings in unprecedented quantitative detail. One central result emerging from these developments is a tantalizing hint of virtual supersymmetry. The possibility of phase transitions in matter at temperatures of order ~102 MeV, governed by QCD dynamics, is of interest from several points of view. Besides having a certain intrinsic grandeur, the question “Does the nature of matter change qualitatively, as it is radically heated?” is important for cosmology, relevant to planned high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments, and provides a promising arena for numerical simulations of QCD. Recent numerical work seems to be consistent with expectations suggested by renormalization group analysis of the potential universality classes of the QCD chiral phase transition; specifically, that the transition is second-order for two species of massless quarks but first order otherwise. There is an interesting possibility of long-range correlations in heavy ion collisions due to the creation of

  15. QCD THERMODYNAMICS AT ZERO AND NON-ZERO DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2007-07-03

    We present recent results on thermodynamics of QCD with almost physical light quark masses and a physical strange quark mass value. These calculations have been performed with an improved staggered action especially designed for finite temperature lattice QCD. In detail we present a calculation of the transition temperature, using a combined chiral and continuum extrapolation. Furthermore we present preliminary results on the interaction measure and energy density at almost realistic quark masses. Finally we discuss the response of the pressure to a finite quark chemical potential. Within the Taylor expansion formalism we calculate quark number susceptibilities and leading order corrections to finite chemical potential. This is particularly useful for mapping out the critical region in the QCD phase diagram.

  16. Exponentially modified QCD coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Valenzuela, Cristian

    2008-04-01

    We present a specific class of models for an infrared-finite analytic QCD coupling, such that at large spacelike energy scales the coupling differs from the perturbative one by less than any inverse power of the energy scale. This condition is motivated by the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics operator product expansion philosophy. Allowed by the ambiguity in the analytization of the perturbative coupling, the proposed class of couplings has three parameters. In the intermediate energy region, the proposed coupling has low loop-level and renormalization scheme dependence. The present modification of perturbative QCD must be considered as a phenomenological attempt, with the aim of enlarging the applicability range of the theory of the strong interactions at low energies.

  17. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  18. Future directions for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    New directions for exploring QCD at future high-energy colliders are sketched. These include jets within jets. BFKL dynamics, soft and hard diffraction, searches for disoriented chiral condensate, and doing a better job on minimum bias physics. The new experimental opportunities include electron-ion collisions at HERA, a new collider detector at the C0 region of the TeVatron, and the FELIX initiative at the LHC.

  19. QCD tests at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Giannetti, P. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent analysis of jet data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}S = 1.8 Tev are presented. Inclusive jet, dijet, trijet and direct photon measurements are compared to QCD parton level calculations, at orders {alpha}{sub s}{sup 3} or {alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}. The large total transverse energy events are well described by the Herwig shower Montecarlo. 19 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Pion observables and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) are a tower of coupled integral equations that relate the Green functions of QCD to one another. Solving these equations provides the solution of QCD. This tower of equations includes the equation for the quark self-energy, which is the analogue of the gap equation in superconductivity, and the Bethe-Salpeter equation, the solution of which is the quark-antiquark bound state amplitude in QCD. The application of this approach to solving Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories is reviewed. The nonperturbative DSE approach is being developed as both: (1) a computationally less intensive alternative and; (2) a complement to numerical simulations of the lattice action of QCD. In recent years, significant progress has been made with the DSE approach so that it is now possible to make sensible and direct comparisons between quantities calculated using this approach and the results of numerical simulations of Abelian gauge theories. Herein the application of the DSE approach to the calculation of pion observables is described: the {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths (a{sub 0}{sup 0}, a{sub 0}{sup 2}, A{sub 1}{sup 1}, a{sub 2}{sup 2}) and associated partial wave amplitudes; the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay width; and the charged pion form factor, F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). Since this approach provides a straightforward, microscopic description of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (D{sub X}SB) and confinement, the calculation of pion observables is a simple and elegant illustrative example of its power and efficacy. The relevant DSEs are discussed in the calculation of pion observables and concluding remarks are presented.

  1. Uncertainty quantification in lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin J.

    2015-02-05

    The numerical technique of Lattice QCD holds the promise of connecting the nuclear forces, nuclei, the spectrum and structure of hadrons, and the properties of matter under extreme conditions with the underlying theory of the strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics. A distinguishing, and thus far unique, feature of this formulation is that all of the associated uncertainties, both statistical and systematic can, in principle, be systematically reduced to any desired precision with sufficient computational and human resources. As a result, we review the sources of uncertainty inherent in Lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics, and discuss how each is quantified in current efforts.

  2. Electromagnetic polarizabilities: Lattice QCD in background fields

    SciTech Connect

    W. Detmold, B.C. Tiburzi, A. Walker-Loud

    2012-04-01

    Chiral perturbation theory makes definitive predictions for the extrinsic behavior of hadrons in external electric and magnetic fields. Near the chiral limit, the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of pions, kaons, and nucleons are determined in terms of a few well-known parameters. In this limit, hadrons become quantum mechanically diffuse as polarizabilities scale with the inverse square-root of the quark mass. In some cases, however, such predictions from chiral perturbation theory have not compared well with experimental data. Ultimately we must turn to first principles numerical simulations of QCD to determine properties of hadrons, and confront the predictions of chiral perturbation theory. To address the electromagnetic polarizabilities, we utilize the background field technique. Restricting our attention to calculations in background electric fields, we demonstrate new techniques to determine electric polarizabilities and baryon magnetic moments for both charged and neutral states. As we can study the quark mass dependence of observables with lattice QCD, the lattice will provide a crucial test of our understanding of low-energy QCD, which will be timely in light of ongoing experiments, such as at COMPASS and HI gamma S.

  3. QCD with 2 light quark flavours: Thermodynamics on a 16[sup 3] [times] 8 lattice and glueballs and topological charge on a 16[sup 3] [times] 32 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1992-11-20

    The HTMCGC collaboration has been simulating lattice QCD with two light staggered quarks with masses m[sub q] = 0.0125 and also m[sub q] = 0.00625 on a 16[sup 3] [times] 8 lattice. We have been studying the behavior of the transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma and the properties of that plasma. We have been measuring entropy densities, Debye and hadronic screening lengths, the spacial string tension and topological susceptibility in addition to the standard order parameters. The HEMCGC collaboration has simulated lattice QCD with two light staggered quarks,m[sub q] = 0.025 and m[sub q] = 0.010 on a 16[sup 3] [times] 32 lattice. We have measured the glueball spectrum and topological susceptibilities for these runs.

  4. QCD with 2 light quark flavours: Thermodynamics on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice and glueballs and topological charge on a 16{sup 3} {times} 32 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.; HEMCGC collaboration; HTMCGC collaboration

    1992-11-20

    The HTMCGC collaboration has been simulating lattice QCD with two light staggered quarks with masses m{sub q} = 0.0125 and also m{sub q} = 0.00625 on a 16{sup 3} {times} 8 lattice. We have been studying the behavior of the transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma and the properties of that plasma. We have been measuring entropy densities, Debye and hadronic screening lengths, the spacial string tension and topological susceptibility in addition to the standard order parameters. The HEMCGC collaboration has simulated lattice QCD with two light staggered quarks,m{sub q} = 0.025 and m{sub q} = 0.010 on a 16{sup 3} {times} 32 lattice. We have measured the glueball spectrum and topological susceptibilities for these runs.

  5. Pomeron intercept and slope: A QCD connection

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2009-12-01

    The ratio r of intercept to slope of the Pomeron trajectory is derived in a QCD inspired parton model approach to diffraction based on a (re)normalization of the pp/pp single-diffractive cross section designed to enforce unitarity constraints by eliminating overlapping rapidity gaps. As the collision energy increases, the renormalized single-diffractive cross section tends to a constant which depends on the ratio r. Identifying the constant as the {sigma}{sub o} of the total cross section, {sigma}={sigma}{sub o}{center_dot}s{sup {epsilon}}, yields the ratio r in terms of measured parameters that can be phenomenologically expressed in terms of the pion mass and QCD color factors. The result agrees with the measured value of r.

  6. Classification of QCD defects via holography

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, Alexander S.; Zakharov, Valentin I.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2009-05-15

    We discuss classification of defects of various codimensions within a holographic model of pure Yang-Mills theories or gauge theories with fundamental matter. We focus on their role below and above the phase transition point as well as their weights in the partition function. The general result is that objects which are stable and heavy in one phase are becoming very light (tensionless) in the other phase. We argue that the {theta} dependence of the partition function drastically changes at the phase transition point, and therefore it correlates with stability properties of configurations. We also explore the possibility that novel stable glueballlike particles, with mass which scales like N{sub c} and which are analogous to carbon Fullerenes, may exist in nature on the QCD scale. Some possible applications for studying the QCD vacuum properties above and below the phase transition are also discussed.

  7. Global QCD Analysis and Hadron Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, W.-K.

    2005-03-22

    The role of global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in collider physics at the Tevatron and LHC is surveyed. Current status of PDF analyses are reviewed, emphasizing the uncertainties and the open issues. The stability of NLO QCD global analysis and its prediction on 'standard candle' W/Z cross sections at hadron colliders are discussed. The importance of the precise measurement of various W/Z cross sections at the Tevatron in advancing our knowledge of PDFs, hence in enhancing the capabilities of making significant progress in W mass and top quark parameter measurements, as well as the discovery potentials of Higgs and New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC, is emphasized.

  8. Phase transitions in QCD and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campell, Bruce A.; Ellis, John; Kalara, S.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Olive, Keith A.

    1991-02-01

    We develop a unified effective field theory approach to the high-temperature phase transitions in QCD and string theory, incorporating winding modes (time-like Polyakov loops, vortices) as well as low-mass states (pseudoscalar mesons and glueballs, matter and dilaton supermultiplets). Anomalous scale invariance and the Z3 structure of the centre of SU(3) decree a first-order phase transition with simultaneous deconfinement and Polyakov loop condensation in QCD, whereas string vortex condensation is a second-order phase transition breaking a Z2 symmetry. We argue that vortex condensation is accompanied by a dilaton phase transition to a strong coupling regime, and comment on the possible role of soliton degrees of freedom in the high-temperature string phase. On leave of absence from the School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

  9. QCD quark condensate in external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, G. S.; Bruckmann, F.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Schäfer, A.

    2012-10-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the light condensates in QCD with 1+1+1 sea quark flavors (with mass-degenerate light quarks of different electric charges) at zero and nonzero temperatures of up to 190 MeV and external magnetic fields B<1GeV2/e. We employ stout smeared staggered fermions with physical quark masses and extrapolate the results to the continuum limit. At low temperatures we confirm the magnetic catalysis scenario predicted by many model calculations while around the crossover the condensate develops a complex dependence on the external magnetic field, resulting in a decrease of the transition temperature.

  10. Equation of state in two-, three-, and four-color QCD at nonzero temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, Tyler; Romatschke, Paul

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the equation of state at nonzero temperature and density from first principles in two-, three-, and four-color QCD with two fermion flavors in the fundamental and two-index, antisymmetric representation. By matching low-energy results (from a "hadron resonance gas") to high-energy results from (resummed) perturbative QCD, we obtain results for the pressure and trace anomaly that are in quantitative agreement with full lattice-QCD studies for three colors at zero chemical potential. Our results for nonzero chemical potential at zero temperature constitute predictions for the equation of state in QCD-like theories that can be tested by traditional lattice studies for two-color QCD with two fundamental fermions and four-color QCD with two two-index, antisymmetric fermions. We find that the speed of sound squared at zero temperature can exceed 1 /3 , which may be relevant for the phenomenology of high-mass neutron stars.

  11. Dyonic Flux Tube Structure of Nonperturbative QCD Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandola, H. C.; Pandey, H. C.

    We study the flux tube structure of the nonperturbative QCD vacuum in terms of its dyonic excitations by using an infrared effective Lagrangian and show that the dyonic condensation of QCD vacuum has a close connection with the process of color confinement. Using the fiber bundle formulation of QCD, the magnetic symmetry condition is presented in a gauge covariant form and the gauge potential has been constructed in terms of the magnetic vectors on global sections. The dynamical breaking of the magnetic symmetry has been shown to lead the dyonic condensation of QCD vacuum in the infrared energy sector. Deriving the asymptotic solutions of the field equations in the dynamically broken phase, the dyonic flux tube structure of QCD vacuum is explored which has been shown to lead the confinement parameters in terms of the vector and scalar mass modes of the condensed vacuum. Evaluating the charge quantum numbers and energy associated with the dyonic flux tube solutions, the effect of electric excitation of monopole is analyzed using the Regge slope parameter (as an input parameter) and an enhancement in the dyonic pair correlations and the confining properties of QCD vacuum in its dyonically condensed mode has been demonstrated.

  12. Additional Strange Hadrons from QCD Thermodynamics and Strangeness Freezeout in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Ding, H.-T.; Hegde, P.; Kaczmarek, O.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Maezawa, Y.; Mukherjee, Swagato; Ohno, H.; Petreczky, P.; Schmidt, C.; Sharma, S.; Soeldner, W.; Wagner, M.

    2014-08-01

    We compare lattice QCD results for appropriate combinations of net strangeness fluctuations and their correlations with net baryon number fluctuations with predictions from two hadron resonance gas (HRG) models having different strange hadron content. The conventionally used HRG model based on experimentally established strange hadrons fails to describe the lattice QCD results in the hadronic phase close to the QCD crossover. Supplementing the conventional HRG with additional, experimentally uncharted strange hadrons predicted by quark model calculations and observed in lattice QCD spectrum calculations leads to good descriptions of strange hadron thermodynamics below the QCD crossover. We show that the thermodynamic presence of these additional states gets imprinted in the yields of the ground-state strange hadrons leading to a systematic 5-8 MeV decrease of the chemical freeze-out temperatures of ground-state strange baryons.

  13. Spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays in the energy range 1015-1018 eV derived from the Yakutsk array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, S. P.; Sabourov, A.

    2013-06-01

    A spectrum of cosmic rays within energy range 1015 - 3 × 1017 eV was derived from the data of the small Cherenkov setup, which is a part of the Yakutsk complex EAS array. In this, work a new series of observation is covered. These observations lasted from 2000 till 2010 and resulted in increased number of registered events within interval 1016-1018 eV, which in turn made it possible to reproduce cosmic ray spectrum in this energy domain with better precision. A sign of a thin structure is observed in the shape of the spectrum. It could be related to the escape of heavy nuclei from our Galaxy. Cosmic ray mass composition was obtained for the energy region 1016-1018 eV. A joint analysis of spectrum and mass composition of cosmic rays was performed. Obtained results are considered in the context of theoretical computations that were performed with the use of hypothesis of galactic and meta-galactic origin of cosmic rays.

  14. AGK Rules in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the present status of the AGK cutting rules in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the application of the AGK analysis to diffraction and multiple scattering in DIS at HERA and to pp collisions at the LHC. I also discuss the bootstrap conditions which appear in pQCD.

  15. QCD: Questions, challenges, and dilemmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.

    1996-11-01

    An introduction to some outstanding issues in QCD is presented, with emphasis on work by Diakonov and co-workers on the influence of the instanton vacuum on low-energy QCD observables. This includes the calculation of input valence-parton distributions for deep-inelastic scattering. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  16. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  17. First-principles Calculation of Excited State Spectra in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek,Robert Edwards,Michael Peardon,David Richards,Christopher Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectra of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum of QCD, and then present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I emphasise the need to extend the calculation to encompass multi-hadron contributions, and describe a recent calculation of the I=2 pion-pion energy-dependent phase shifts as a precursor to the study of channels with resonant behavior. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  18. First-principles Calculation of Excited State Spectra in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Peardon, Michael J.

    2011-05-24

    Recent progress at understanding the excited state spectra of mesons and baryons is described. I begin by outlining the application of the variational method to compute the spectrum of QCD, and then present results for the excited meson spectrum, with continuum quantum numbers of the states clearly delineated. I emphasise the need to extend the calculation to encompass multi-hadron contributions, and describe a recent calculation of the I = 2{pi}{pi} energy-dependent phase shifts as a precursor to the study of channels with resonant behavior. I conclude with recent results for the low lying baryon spectrum, and the prospects for future calculations.

  19. Degenerate spectrum in the neutrino mass anarchy with Wishart matrices and implications for 0 ν β β and δCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwang Sik; Kitajima, Naoya; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2015-06-01

    We show that a degenerate neutrino mass spectrum can be realized in the neutrino mass anarchy hypothesis, if the neutrino Yukawa and right-handed neutrino mass matrices are given by the Wishart matrix, i.e., products of N ×3 rectangular random matrices, whose eigenvalue distribution tends to degenerate for large N . The mixing angle and charge-parity (CP) phase distributions are determined by either the Haar measure of U(3) or that of SO(3). We study how large N is allowed to be without tension with the observed neutrino mass squared differences and find that the predicted value of me e can be within the reach of future 0 ν β β experiments especially for N on the high side of the allowed range.

  20. Chiral logarithms in quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; S. J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F. X. Lee; K. F. Liu; N. Mathur; and J. B. Zhang

    2004-08-01

    The quenched chiral logarithms are examined on a 163x28 lattice with Iwasaki gauge action and overlap fermions. The pion decay constant fpi is used to set the lattice spacing, a = 0.200(3) fm. With pion mass as low as {approx}180 MeV, we see the quenched chiral logarithms clearly in mpi2/m and fP, the pseudoscalar decay constant. The authors analyze the data to determine how low the pion mass needs to be in order for the quenched one-loop chiral perturbation theory (chiPT) to apply. With the constrained curve-fitting method, they are able to extract the quenched chiral logarithmic parameter delta together with other low-energy parameters. Only for mpi<=300 MeV do we obtain a consistent and stable fit with a constant delta which they determine to be 0.24(3)(4) (at the chiral scale Lambdachi = 0.8 GeV). By comparing to the 123x28 lattice, they estimate the finite volume effect to be about 2.7% for the smallest pion mass. They also fitted the pion mass to the form for the re-summed cactus diagrams and found that its applicable region is extended farther than the range for the one-loop formula, perhaps up to mpi {approx}500-600 MeV. The scale independent delta is determined to be 0.20(3) in this case. The authors study the quenched non-analytic terms in the nucleon mass and find that the coefficient C1/2 in the nucleon mass is consistent with the prediction of one-loop chiPT. They also obtain the low energy constant L5 from fpi. They conclude from this study that it is imperative to cover only the range of data with the pion mass less than {approx}300 MeV in order to examine the chiral behavior of the hadron masses and decay constants in quenched QCD and match them with quenched one-loop chiPT.

  1. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  2. QCD and strings

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Tadakatsu; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2005-12-02

    We propose a holographic dual of QCD with massless flavors on the basis of a D4/D8-brane configuration within a probe approximation. We are led to a five-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on a curved space-time along with a Chern-Simons five-form on it, both of which provide us with a unifying framework to study the massless pion and an infinite number of massive vector mesons. We make sample computations of the physical quantities that involve the mesons and compare them with the experimental data. It is found that most of the results of this model are compatible with the experiments.

  3. QCD and strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tadakatsu; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2005-12-01

    We propose a holographic dual of QCD with massless flavors on the basis of a D4/D8-brane configuration within a probe approximation. We are led to a five-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on a curved space-time along with a Chern-Simons five-form on it, both of which provide us with a unifying framework to study the massless pion and an infinite number of massive vector mesons. We make sample computations of the physical quantities that involve the mesons and compare them with the experimental data. It is found that most of the results of this model are compatible with the experiments.

  4. QCD, Tevatron results and LHC prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Elvira, V.Daniel; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    We present a summary of the most recent measurements relevant to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) delivered by the D0 and CDF Tevatron experiments by May 2008. CDF and D0 are moving toward precision measurements of QCD based on data samples in excess of 1 fb-1. The inclusive jet cross sections have been extended to forward rapidity regions and measured with unprecedented precision following improvements in the jet energy calibration. Results on dijet mass distributions, bbbar dijet production using tracker based triggers, underlying event in dijet and Drell-Yan samples, inclusive photon and diphoton cross sections complete the list of measurements included in this paper. Good agreement with pQCD within errors is observed for jet production measurements. An improved and consistent theoretical description is needed for photon+jets processes. Collisions at the LHC are scheduled for early fall 2008, opening an era of discoveries at the new energy frontier, 5-7 times higher than that of the Tevatron.

  5. Heavy quark production processes in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Gunion, J.F.

    1984-12-01

    We have identified two novel effects in QCD, each of which acts to enhance the production of heavy quark and supersymmetric particles beyond what is conventionally expected from gluon fusion. Both effects are present in QED, but are compounded in QCD because of the increased number of diagrams and the much larger coupling constant. The intrinsic charm quark distribution in the nucleon could account for the observed enhancements of the charm structure function at large x and features of the charm production data but this mechanism is relatively suppressed for heavier systems. Prebinding distortion of the fusion cross section is, however, likely to be significant for the production at low p/sub T/ of all particles containing heavy colored constituents. At this stage the QCD calculations are highly model dependent although they agree with the general properties which can be inferred from the operator product expansion in the heavy quark mass. Much more theoretical analysis of these effects is clearly needed. It is also clear that much more experimental work is necessary to extend and confirm the reported anomalous heavy quark signals. 22 references.

  6. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  7. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  8. MathQCDSR: a Mathematica Package for QCD Sum Rules Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lai; Lee, Frank X.

    2010-02-01

    We present a software package written in Mathematica for standard QCD sum rules calculations. Two examples are given to demonstrate how to use the package. One is for the mass spectrum of octet baryons from two-point correlation functions; the other for the magnetic moments of octet baryons in the external-field method. The software package FeynCalc is used to handle the gamma-matrix computations. The derived sum rules can be saved in various forms (native Mathematica, JAVA, Fortran, or Latex). Several notebooks are provided to carry out a Monte-Carlo-based numerical analysis of the sum rules, complete with in-line graphical display of sum rule matching, error distributions, scatter plots for correlations, etc. )

  9. Hadronic Spectra and Light-Front Wave Functions in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de

    2006-05-26

    We show how the string amplitude {phi}(z) defined on the fifth dimension in AdS{sub 5} space can be precisely mapped to the light-front wave functions of hadrons in physical space-time. We find an exact correspondence between the holographic variable z and an impact variable {zeta}, which represents the measure of transverse separation of the constituents within the hadrons. In addition, we derive effective four dimensional Schroedinger equations for the bound states of massless quarks and gluons which exactly reproduce the anti-de Sitter conformal field theory results and give a realistic description of the light-quark meson and baryon spectrum as well as the form factors for spacelike Q{sup 2}. Only one parameter which sets the mass scale, {lambda}{sub QCD}, is introduced.

  10. Novel Perspectives from Light-Front QCD, Super-Conformal Algebra, and Light-Front Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-01

    Light-Front Quantization – Dirac’s “Front Form” – provides a physical, frame-independent formalism for hadron dynamics and structure. Observables such as structure functions, transverse momentum distributions, and distribution amplitudes are defined from the hadronic LFWFs. One obtains new insights into the hadronic mass scale, the hadronic spectrum, and the functional form of the QCD running coupling in the nonperturbative domain using light-front holography. In addition, superconformal algebra leads to remarkable supersymmetric relations between mesons and baryons. I also discuss evidence that the antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is nonuniversal; i.e., flavor dependent, and why shadowing and antishadowing phenomena may be incompatible with the momentum and other sum rules for the nuclear parton distribution functions.

  11. Massively Parallel QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  12. Nonperturbative QCD Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellby, Niklas

    1995-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is an exact transformation of the Yang-Mills quantum chromodynamics (QCD) Lagrangrian into a form that is suitable for nonperturbative calculations. The conventional Yang-Mills Lagrangian has proven to be an excellent basis for perturbative calculations, but in nonperturbative calculations it is difficult to separate gauge problems from physical properties. To mitigate this problem, I develop a new equivalent Lagrangian that is not only expressed completely in terms of the field strengths ofthe gauge field but is also manifestly Lorentz and gauge invariant. The new Lagrangian is quadratic in derivatives, with non-linear local couplings, thus it is ideally suited for a numerical calculation. The field-strength Lagrangian is of such a form that it is possible to do a straightforward numerical stationary path expansion and find the fundamental QCD properties. This thesis examines several approximations analytically, investigating different ways to utilize the new Lagrangian. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  13. QCD for Postgraduates (1/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Modern QCD - Lecture 1 Starting from the QCD Lagrangian we will revisit some basic QCD concepts and derive fundamental properties like gauge invariance and isospin symmetry and will discuss the Feynman rules of the theory. We will then focus on the gauge group of QCD and derive the Casimirs CF and CA and some useful color identities.

  14. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Kostas; Richards, David

    2015-02-05

    The solution of QCD on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this study, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  15. Improved methods for the study of hadronic physics from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Konstantinos; Richards, David G.

    2015-03-01

    The solution of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) on a lattice provides a first-principles method for understanding QCD in the low-energy regime, and is thus an essential tool for nuclear physics. The generation of gauge configurations, the starting point for lattice calculations, requires the most powerful leadership-class computers available. However, to fully exploit such leadership-class computing requires increasingly sophisticated methods for obtaining physics observables from the underlying gauge ensembles. In this paper, we describe a variety of recent methods that have been used to advance our understanding of the spectrum and structure of hadrons through lattice QCD.

  16. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross section as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured in 1.8 TeV ppbar collisions. A comparison to leading order QCD predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. The need to take radiation into account requires the study of its spatial distribution and the comparison of the data to the predictions of shower Monte Carlo programs like Isajet and Herwig. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  17. QCD Factorization and PDFs from Lattice QCD Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Qing; Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2015-02-01

    In this talk, we review a QCD factorization based approach to extract parton distribution and correlation functions from lattice QCD calculation of single hadron matrix elements of quark-gluon operators. We argue that although the lattice QCD calculations are done in the Euclidean space, the nonperturbative collinear behavior of the matrix elements are the same as that in the Minkowski space, and could be systematically factorized into parton distribution functions with infrared safe matching coefficients. The matching coefficients can be calculated perturbatively by applying the factorization formalism on to asymptotic partonic states.

  18. Spectrum of Fat-containing Soft-Tissue Masses at MR Imaging: The Common, the Uncommon, the Characteristic, and the Sometimes Confusing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pushpender; Potti, Tommy A; Wuertzer, Scott D; Lenchik, Leon; Pacholke, David A

    2016-01-01

    Fat-containing tumors are the most common soft-tissue tumors encountered clinically. The vast majority of fat-containing soft-tissue masses are benign. Lipomas are the most common benign fat-containing masses and demonstrate a characteristic appearance at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Less common benign soft-tissue masses include lipoblastoma, angiolipoma, spindle cell lipoma/pleomorphic lipoma, myolipoma, chondroid lipoma, lipomatosis of nerve, lipomatosis, hibernoma, and fat necrosis. Well-differentiated liposarcomas (WDLPSs)/atypical lipomatous tumors (ALTs) are locally aggressive soft-tissue masses that do not metastasize. Biologically more aggressive liposarcomas include myxoid, pleomorphic, and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. At MR imaging, lipomas typically resemble subcutaneous fat but may contain a few thin septa. The presence of thick, irregular, enhancing septa and nonfatty soft-tissue mass components suggests liposarcoma rather than lipoma. However, benign lipomatous lesions and WDLPS/ALT often have overlapping MR imaging findings. Distinguishing WDLPS/ALT from a benign lipomatous lesion or from fat necrosis at imaging can be challenging and often requires histologic evaluation. We present the spectrum of fat-containing masses, using the World Health Organization classification of adipocytic tumors, with an emphasis on commonly encountered lesions, characteristic MR imaging findings associated with specific tumors, and overlapping MR imaging findings of certain tumors that may require histologic sampling. We also briefly discuss the role of molecular markers in proper characterization and classification of fat-containing soft-tissue masses. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27163592

  19. A Little Inflation in the Early Universe at the QCD Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Boeckel, Tillmann; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2010-07-23

    We explore a scenario that allows for a strong first order phase transition of QCD at a non-negligible baryon number in the early Universe and its possible observable consequences. The main assumption is a quasistable QCD-vacuum state that leads to a short period of inflation, consequently diluting the net baryon to photon ratio to today's observed value. A strong mechanism for baryogenesis is needed to start out with a baryon asymmetry of order unity, e.g., as provided by Affleck-Dine baryogenesis. The cosmological implications are direct effects on primordial density fluctuations up to dark matter mass scales of M{sub max{approx}}1-10M{sub {center_dot},} change in the spectral slope up to M{sub max{approx}}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}M{sub {center_dot},} production of strong primordial magnetic fields and a gravitational wave spectrum with present day peak strain amplitude of up to h{sub c}({nu}{sub peak}){approx}5x10{sup -15} around {nu}{sub peak{approx}}4x10{sup -8} Hz.

  20. QCD symmetries and the η and η ' in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of QCD symmetries in understanding the η and η ' mesons in nuclear media. Recent results on the η ' mass in nuclei from the CBELSA/TAPS collaboration are very similar to the prediction of the Quark Meson Coupling model.

  1. Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions from Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Philipp Haegler; David Richards; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Wolfram Schroers; Jonathan Bratt; Andrew Pochinsky; Michael Engelhardt; George Fleming; Bernhard Musch; Dru Renner

    2007-07-03

    We present a comprehensive study of the lowest moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions in N_f=2+1 lattice QCD using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks. Our investigation includes helicity dependent and independent generalized parton distributions for pion masses as low as 350 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)^3.

  2. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Jain, Ambar; Stewart, Iain W.; Scimemi, Ignazio

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the ''MSR scheme'' which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the {mu} of MS. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like {mu} in MS). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q{approx}1 GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS.

  3. R evolution: Improving perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Jain, Ambar; Scimemi, Ignazio; Stewart, Iain W.

    2010-07-01

    Perturbative QCD results in the MS¯ scheme can be dramatically improved by switching to a scheme that accounts for the dominant power law dependence on the factorization scale in the operator product expansion. We introduce the “MSR scheme” which achieves this in a Lorentz and gauge invariant way and has a very simple relation to MS¯. Results in MSR depend on a cutoff parameter R, in addition to the μ of MS¯. R variations can be used to independently estimate (i.) the size of power corrections, and (ii.) higher-order perturbative corrections (much like μ in MS¯). We give two examples at three-loop order, the ratio of mass splittings in the B*-B and D*-D systems, and the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule as a function of momentum transfer Q in deep inelastic scattering. Comparing to data, the perturbative MSR results work well even for Q˜1GeV, and power corrections are reduced compared to MS¯.

  4. Two flavor QCD and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Pica, Claudio

    2005-12-01

    We argue that the order of the chiral transition for N{sub f}=2 is a sensitive probe of the QCD vacuum, in particular, of the mechanism of color confinement. A strategy is developed to investigate the order of the transition by use of finite size scaling analysis. An in-depth numerical investigation is performed with staggered fermions on lattices with L{sub t}=4 and L{sub s}=12, 16, 20, 24, 32 and quark masses am{sub q} ranging from 0.01335 to 0.307036. The specific heat and a number of susceptibilities are measured and compared with the expectations of an O(4) second order and of a first order phase transition. A detailed comparison with previous works, which all use similar techniques as ours, is performed. A second order transition in the O(4) and O(2) universality classes are incompatible with our data, which seem to prefer a first order transition. However we have L{sub t}=4 and unimproved action, so that a check with improved techniques (algorithm and action) and possibly larger L{sub t} will be needed to assess this issue on a firm basis.

  5. Contribution of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} Dalitz decays to the dilepton invariant-mass spectrum in 1A GeV heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    TAPS Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The Dalitz-decay contributions of {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} mesons to the di-electron invariant-mass spectrum at 1 A GeV have been obtained from a systematics of inclusive meson production cross sections measured for the collision systems {sup 12}C+{sup nat}C and {sup 40}Ar,{sup 40}Ca+{sup nat}Ca in the bombarding-energy range of 0.8{endash}2.0 A GeV. These results are compared with the recently published di-electron mass spectra of the DLS collaboration. Systematic errors and angular-distribution effects are discussed. We conclude that the low-mass part of the DLS data cannot be explained by the Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons only. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Lattice QCD and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-03-01

    A steady stream of developments in Lattice QCD have made it possible today to begin to address the question of how nuclear physics emerges from the underlying theory of strong interactions. Central role in this understanding play both the effective field theory description of nuclear forces and the ability to perform accurate non-perturbative calculations in lo w energy QCD. Here I present some recent results that attempt to extract important low energy constants of the effective field theory of nuclear forces from lattice QCD.

  7. Hadron physics in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, A. B.; Lombardo, U.; Bonanno, A.

    2012-07-01

    Hadron physics deals with the study of strongly interacting subatomic particles such as neutrons, protons, pions and others, collectively known as baryons and mesons. Physics of strong interaction is difficult. There are several approaches to understand it. However, in the recent years, an approach called, holographic QCD, based on string theory (or gauge-gravity duality) is becoming popular providing an alternative description of strong interaction physics. In this article, we aim to discuss development of strong interaction physics through QCD and string theory, leading to holographic QCD.

  8. QCD structure of nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos G.

    The research presented in this dissertation investigated selected processes involving baryons and nuclei in hard scattering reactions. These processes are characterized by the production of particles with large energies and transverse momenta. Through these processes, this work explored both, the constituent (quark) structure of baryons (specifically nucleons and Delta-Isobars), and the mechanisms through which the interactions between these constituents ultimately control the selected reactions. The first of such reactions is the hard nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering, which was studied here considering the quark exchange between the nucleons to be the dominant mechanism of interaction in the constituent picture. In particular, it was found that an angular asymmetry exhibited by proton-neutron elastic scattering data is explained within this framework if a quark-diquark picture dominates the nucleon's structure instead of a more traditional SU(6) three quarks picture. The latter yields an asymmetry around 90o center of mass scattering with a sign opposite to what is experimentally observed. The second process is the hard breakup by a photon of a nucleon-nucleon system in light nuclei. Proton-proton (pp) and proton-neutron (pn) breakup in 3He, and DeltaDelta-isobars production in deuteron breakup were analyzed in the hard rescattering model (HRM), which in conjunction with the quark interchange mechanism provides a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) description of the reaction. Through the HRM, cross sections for both channels in 3He photodisintegration were computed without the need of a fitting parameter. The results presented here for pp breakup show excellent agreement with recent experimental data. In DeltaDelta-isobars production in deuteron breakup, HRM angular distributions for the two DeltaDelta channels were compared to the pn channel and to each other. An important prediction fromthis study is that the Delta++Delta- channel consistently dominates Delta+Delta0

  9. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  10. Strategy integrating stepped fragmentation and glycan diagnostic ion-based spectrum refinement for the identification of core fucosylated glycoproteome using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qichen; Zhao, Xinyuan; Zhao, Qing; Lv, Xiaodong; Ma, Cheng; Li, Xianyu; Zhao, Yan; Peng, Bo; Ying, Wantao; Qian, Xiaohong

    2014-07-15

    Core fucosylation (CF) is a special glycosylation pattern of proteins that has a strong relationship with cancer. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the core fucosylated α-fetoprotein as a biomarker for the early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The technology for identifying core fucosylated proteins has significant practical value. The major method for core fucosylated glycoprotein/glycopeptide analysis is neutral loss-based MS(3) scanning under collision-induced dissociation (CID) by ion trap mass spectrometry. However, due to the limited speed and low resolution of the MS(3) scan mode, it is difficult to achieve high-throughput, with only dozens of core fucosylated proteins identified in a single run. In this work, we developed a novel strategy for the identification of CF glycopeptides at a large scale, integrating the stepped fragmentation function, one novel feature of quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometry, with "glycan diagnostic ion"-based spectrum optimization. By using stepped fragmentation, we were able to obtain both highly accurate glycan and peptide information of a simplified CF glycopeptide in one spectrum. Moreover, the spectrum could be recorded with the same high speed as the conventional MS(2) scan. By using the "glycan diagnostic ion"-based spectrum refinement method, the efficiency of the CF glycopeptide discovery was significantly improved. We demonstrated the feasibility and reproducibility of our method by analyzing CF glycoproteomes of mouse liver tissue and HeLa cell samples spiked with standard CF glycoprotein. In total, 1364 and 856 CF glycopeptides belonging to 702 and 449 CF glycoproteins were identified, respectively, within a 78-min gradient analysis, which was approximately a 7-fold increase in the identification efficiency of CF glycopeptides compared to the currently used method. In this work, we took core fucosylated glycopeptides as a practical example to demonstrate the great potential of our

  11. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; D. B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; J. M. Zanotti

    2005-03-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the $\\Theta^+$ pentaquark, with minimal quark content $uudd\\bar{s}$, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large $20^{3} \\times 40$ lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  12. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lasscock, B.G.; Hedditch, J.; Kamleh, W.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-07-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudds, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various spin-(1/2) pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3}x40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of binding at quark masses near the physical regime, observed for established baryon resonances, is not observed for spin-(1/2) pentaquark states. Thus we find no evidence supporting the existence of a spin-(1/2) pentaquark resonance in quenched QCD.

  13. Search for the pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Lasscock; J. Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; A. G. Williams; R. D. Young; James Zanotti

    2005-02-01

    Claims concerning the possible discovery of the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark, with minimal quark content uudd{bar s}, have motivated our comprehensive study into possible pentaquark states using lattice QCD. We review various pentaquark interpolating fields in the literature and create a new candidate ideal for lattice QCD simulations. Using these interpolating fields we attempt to isolate a signal for a five-quark resonance. Calculations are performed using improved actions on a large 20{sup 3} x 40 lattice in the quenched approximation. The standard lattice resonance signal of increasing attraction between baryon constituents for increasing quark mass is not observed for spin-1/2 pentaquark states. We conclude that evidence supporting the existence of a spin-1/2 pentaquark resonance does not exist in quenched QCD.

  14. Hadron interactions and exotic hadrons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi

    2014-09-01

    One of the interesting subjects in hadron physics is to look for the multiquark configurations. One of candidates is the H-dibaryon (udsuds), and the possibility of the bound H-dibaryon has been recently studied from lattice QCD. We also extend the HAL QCD method to define potentials on the lattice between baryons to meson-meson systems including charm quarks to search for the bound tetraquark Tcc (ud c c) and Tcs (ud c s). In the presentation, after reviewing the HAL QCD method, we report the results on the H-dibaryon, the tetraquark Tcc (ud c c) and Tcs (ud c s), where we have employed the relativistic heavy quark action to treat the charm quark dynamics with pion masses, mπ = 410, 570, 700 MeV.

  15. Excited Baryons in Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-11-08

    The light-front holographic QCD approach is used to describe baryon spectroscopy and the systematics of nucleon transition form factors. Baryon spectroscopy and the excitation dynamics of nucleon resonances encoded in the nucleon transition form factors can provide fundamental insight into the strong-coupling dynamics of QCD. The transition from the hard-scattering perturbative domain to the non-perturbative region is sensitive to the detailed dynamics of confined quarks and gluons. Computations of such phenomena from first principles in QCD are clearly very challenging. The most successful theoretical approach thus far has been to quantize QCD on discrete lattices in Euclidean space-time; however, dynamical observables in Minkowski space-time, such as the time-like hadronic form factors are not amenable to Euclidean numerical lattice computations.

  16. Chiral and deconfining phase transitions from holographic QCD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhen; He, Song; Li, Danning

    2016-06-01

    A preliminary quantitative study to match the lattice QCD simulation on the chiral and deconfining phase transitions of QCD in the bottom-up holographic framework is given. We constrain the relation between dilaton field ϕ and metric warp factor Ae and get several reasonable models in the Einstein-Dilaton system. Using the potential reconstruction approach, we solve the corresponding gravity background. Then we fit the background-related parameters by comparing the equation of state with the two-flavor lattice QCD results. After that we study the temperature dependent behavior of Polyakov loop and chiral condensate under those background solutions. We find that the results are in good agreement with the two-flavor lattice results. All the studies about the equation of state, the Polyakov loop and the chiral condensate signal crossover behavior of the phase transitions, which are consistent with the current understanding on the QCD phase transitions with physical quark mass. Furthermore, the extracted transition temperatures are comparable with the two-flavor lattice QCD results.

  17. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2006-01-17

    Radiative transitions between charmonium states offer an insight into the internal structure of heavy-quark bound states within QCD. We compute, for the first time within lattice QCD, the transition form-factors of various multipolarities between the lightest few charmonium states. In addition, we compute the experimentally unobservable, but physically interesting vector form-factors of the {eta}{sub c}, J/{psi} and {chi}{sub c0}. To this end we apply an ambitious combination of lattice techniques, computing three-point functions with heavy domain wall fermions on an anisotropic lattice within the quenched approximation. With an anisotropy {xi} = 3 at a{sub s} {approx} 0.1 fm we find a reasonable gross spectrum and a hyperfine splitting {approx}90 MeV, which compares favorably with other improved actions. In general, after extrapolation of lattice data at non-zero Q{sup 2} to the photopoint, our results agree within errors with all well measured experimental values. Furthermore, results are compared with the expectations of simple quark models where we find that many features are in agreement; beyond this we propose the possibility of constraining such models using our extracted values of physically unobservable quantities such as the J/{psi} quadrupole moment. We conclude that our methods are successful and propose to apply them to the problem of radiative transitions involving hybrid mesons, with the eventual goal of predicting hybrid meson photoproduction rates at the GlueX experiment.

  18. Meson Electro-/Photo-Production from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, Raúl A.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results of meson photo-production at the existing electron machines with polarized real photon beams and the measurement of polarization observables of the final state baryons have provided high precision data that led to the discovery of new excited nucleon and Δ states using multi-channel partial wave analyses procedures. The internal structure of several prominent excited states has been revealed employing meson electroproduction processes. On the theoretical front, lattice QCD is now predicting the baryon spectrum with very similar characteristics as the constituent quark model, and continuum QCD, such as is represented in the Dyson-Schwinger equations approach and in light front relativistic quark models, describes the non-perturbative behavior of resonance excitations at photon virtuality of Q^2 > 1.5 GeV^2 . In this talk I discuss the need to continue a vigorous program of nucleon spectroscopy and the study of the internal structure of excited states as a way to reveal the effective degrees of freedom underlying the excited states and their dependence on the distance scale probed.

  19. The QCD equation of state with charm quarks from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michael

    Recently, there have been several calculations of the QCD equation of state (EoS) on the lattice. These calculations take into account the two light quarks and the strange quark, but have ignored the effects of the charm quark, assuming that the charm mass (mc ≈ 1300 MeV) is exponentially suppressed at the temperatures which are explored. However, future heavy ion collisions, such as those planned at the LHC, may well probe temperature regimes where the charm quarks play an important role in the dynamics of the QGP. We present a calculation of the charm quark contribution to the QCD EoS using p4-improved staggered fermions at Nt = 4, 6, 8. This calculation is done with a quenched charm quark, i.e. the relevant operators are measured using a valence charm quark mass on a 2+1 flavor gauge field background. The charm quark masses are determined by calculating charmonium masses (metac and mJ/Psi) and fixing these mesons to their physical masses. The interaction measure, pressure, energy density, and entropy density are calculated. We find that the charm contribution makes a significant contribution, even down to temperatures as low as the pseudo-critical temperature, Tc. However, there are significant scaling corrections at the lattice spacings that we use, preventing a reliable continuum extrapolation.

  20. Exotic and excited-state meson spectroscopy and radiative transitions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We discuss recent progress in extracting the excited meson spectrum and radiative transition form factors using lattice QCD. We mention results in the charmonium sector, including the first lattice QCD calculation of radiative transition rates involving excited charmonium states, highlighting results for high spin and exotic states. We present recent results on a highly excited isovector meson spectrum from dynamical anisotropic lattices. Using carefully constructed operators we show how the continuum spin of extracted states can be reliably identified and confidently extract excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers and states of high spin. This spectrum includes the first spin-four state extracted from lattice QCD. We conclude with some comments on future prospects.

  1. Lattice QCD input for axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Buchoff, Michael I.; Rinaldi, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    One intriguing beyond-the-Standard-Model particle is the QCD axion, which could simultaneously provide a solution to the Strong C P Problem and account for some, if not all, of the dark matter density in the Universe. This particle is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of the conjectured Peccei-Quinn symmetry of the Standard Model. Its mass and interactions are suppressed by a heavy symmetry-breaking scale, fa, the value of which is roughly greater than 109 GeV (or, conversely, the axion mass, ma, is roughly less than 104 μ eV ). The density of axions in the Universe, which cannot exceed the relic dark matter density and is a quantity of great interest in axion experiments like ADMX, is a result of the early Universe interplay between cosmological evolution and the axion mass as a function of temperature. The latter quantity is proportional to the second derivative of the temperature-dependent QCD free energy with respect to the C P -violating phase, θ . However, this quantity is generically nonperturbative, and previous calculations have only employed instanton models at the high temperatures of interest (roughly 1 GeV). In this and future works, we aim to calculate the temperature-dependent axion mass at small θ from first-principle lattice calculations, with controlled statistical and systematic errors. Once calculated, this temperature-dependent axion mass is input for the classical evolution equations of the axion density of the Universe, which is required to be less than or equal to the dark matter density. Due to a variety of lattice systematic effects at the very high temperatures required, we perform a calculation of the leading small-θ cumulant of the theta vacua on large volume lattices for SU(3) Yang-Mills with high statistics as a first proof of concept, before attempting a full QCD calculation in the future. From these pure glue results, the misalignment mechanism yields the axion mass bound ma≥(14.6 ±0.1 ) μ eV when Peccei-Quinn breaking occurs

  2. The nucleon axial charge in full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; George Fleming; P Hagler; John Negele; Konstantinos Orginos; Andrew Pochinsky; Dru Renner; David Richards; Wolfram Schroers

    2005-10-13

    The nucleon axial charge is calculated as a function of the pion mass in full QCD. Using domain wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks, we present the first calculation with pion masses as light as 354 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm)3. We show that finite volume effects are small for our volumes and that a constrained fit based on finite volume chiral perturbation theory agrees with experiment within 5% statistical errors.

  3. Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Andeen, Timothy R., Jr.; /Northwestern U.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 37 (stat.) {+-} 26 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 28 (stat.) {+-} 17 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

  4. A Semiclassical Derivation of the QCD Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, David

    2009-01-01

    The measured value of the QCD coupling alpha(sub s) at the energy M(sub Zo), the variation of alpha(sub s) as a function of energy in QCD, and classical relativistic dynamics are used to investigate virtual pairs of quarks and antiquarks in vacuum fluctuations. For virtual pairs of bottom quarks and antiquarks, the pair lifetime in the classical model agrees with the lifetime from quantum mechanics to good approximation, and the action integral in the classical model agrees as well with the action that follows from the Uncertainty Principle. This suggests that the particles might have small de Broglie wavelengths and behave with well-localized pointlike dynamics. It also permits alpha(sub s) at the mass energy twice the bottom quark mass to be expressed as a simple fraction: 3/16. This is accurate to approximately 10%. The model in this paper predicts the measured value of alpha(sub s)(M(sub Zo)) to be 0.121, which is in agreement with recent measurements within statistical uncertainties.

  5. Nontrivial center dominance in high temperature QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, K.-I.; Iwasaki, Y.; Nakayama, Yu; Yoshie, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of quarks and gluons above the chiral phase transition temperature Tc, using the renormalization group (RG) improved gauge action and the Wilson quark action with two degenerate quarks mainly on a 323 × 16 lattice. In the one-loop perturbation theory, the thermal ensemble is dominated by the gauge configurations with effectively Z(3) center twisted boundary conditions, making the thermal expectation value of the spatial Polyakov loop take a nontrivial Z(3) center. This is in agreement with our lattice simulation of high temperature quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We further observe that the temporal propagator of massless quarks at extremely high temperature β = 100.0(T ≃ 1058T c) remarkably agrees with the temporal propagator of free quarks with the Z(3) twisted boundary condition for t/Lt ≥ 0.2, but differs from that with the Z(3) trivial boundary condition. As we increase the mass of quarks mq, we find that the thermal ensemble continues to be dominated by the Z(3) twisted gauge field configurations as long as mq ≤ 3.0T and above that the Z(3) trivial configurations come in. The transition is similar to what we found in the departure from the conformal region in the zero-temperature many-flavor conformal QCD on a finite lattice by increasing the mass of quarks.

  6. Measurement of the w boson mass at the Collider Detector at Fermilab from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon

    SciTech Connect

    Vollrath, Ian Eberhard; /Toronto U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the W boson mass from a fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the muon in W decay. In past measurements this technique was used as a cross-check, however, now presents the best method in terms of systematic uncertainty. We discuss all sources of systematic uncertainty with emphasis on those to which the muon p{sub T} measurement is particularly sensitive, specifically, those associated with modeling the production and decay of W bosons. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of (191 {+-} 11) pb{sup -1}. We measure the W mass to be (80.316 {+-} 0.066{sub stat.} {+-} 0.051{sub syst.}) GeV/c{sup 2} = (80.316 {+-} 0.083) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. The lightest hybrid meson supermultiplet in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J

    2011-10-01

    We interpret the spectrum of meson states recently obtained in non-perturbative lattice QCD calculations in terms of constituent quark-antiquark bound states and states, called 'hybrids', in which the q{bar q} pair is supplemented by an excitation of the gluonic field. We identify a lightest supermultiplet of hybrid mesons with J{sup PC} = (0,1,2){sup {-+}}, 1{sup -} built from a gluonic excitation of chromomagnetic character coupled to q{bar q} in an S-wave. The next lightest hybrids are suggested to be quark orbital excitations with the same gluonic excitation, while the next distinct gluonic excitation is significantly heavier. Existing models of gluonic excitations are compared to these findings and possible phenomenological consequences explored.

  8. Subcritical string and large N QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Charles B.

    2008-10-15

    We pursue the possibility of using subcritical string theory in 4 spacetime dimensions to establish a string dual for large N QCD. In particular we study the even G-parity sector of the 4 dimensional Neveu-Schwarz dual resonance model as the natural candidate for this string theory. Our point of view is that the open string dynamics given by this model will determine the appropriate subcritical closed string theory, a tree level background of which should describe the sum of planar multiloop open string diagrams. We examine the one-loop open string diagram, which contains information about the closed string spectrum at weak coupling. Higher loop open string diagrams will be needed to determine closed string interactions. We also analyze the field theory limit of the one-loop open string diagram and recover the correct running coupling behavior of the limiting gauge theory.

  9. Discovery and Monitoring of a New Black Hole Candidate XTE J1752-223 with RXTE: RMS Spectrum Evolution, BH Mass and the Source Distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhinikov, Nikolai; Markwardt, Craig; Swank, Jean; Krimm, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery and monitoring observations of a new galactic black hole candidate XTE J1752-223 by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The new source appeared on the X-ray sky on October 21 2009 and was active for almost 8 months. Phenomenologically, the source exhibited the low-hard/highsoft spectral state bi-modality and the variability evolution during the state transition that matches standard behavior expected from a stellar mass black hole binary. We model the energy spectrum throughout the outburst using a generic Comptonization model assuming that part of the input soft radiation in the form of a black body spectrum gets reprocessed in the Comptonizing medium. We follow the evolution of fractional root-mean-square (RMS) variability in the RXTE/PCA energy band with the source spectral state and conclude that broad band variability is strongly correlated with the source hardness (or Comptonized fraction). We follow changes in the energy distribution of rms variability during the low-hard state and the state transition and find further evidence that variable emission is strongly concentrated in the power-law spectral component. We discuss the implication of our results to the Comptonization regimes during different spectral states. Correlations of spectral and variability properties provide measurements of the BH mass and distance to the source. The spectral-timing correlation scaling technique applied to the RXTE observations during the hardto- soft state transition indicates a mass of the BH in XTE J1752-223 between 8 and 11 solar masses and a distance to the source about 3.5 kiloparsec.

  10. Light-Front Holography and Non-Perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2009-12-09

    The combination of Anti-de Sitter space (AdS) methods with light-front holography leads to a semi-classical first approximation to the spectrum and wavefunctions of meson and baryon light-quark bound states. Starting from the bound-state Hamiltonian equation of motion in QCD, we derive relativistic light-front wave equations in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron at equal light-front time. These equations of motion in physical space-time are equivalent to the equations of motion which describe the propagation of spin-J modes in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. Its eigenvalues give the hadronic spectrum, and its eigenmodes represent the probability distribution of the hadronic constituents at a given scale. Applications to the light meson and baryon spectra are presented. The predicted meson spectrum has a string-theory Regge form M{sup 2} = 4{kappa}{sup 2}(n + L + S = 2); i.e., the square of the eigenmass is linear in both L and n, where n counts the number of nodes of the wavefunction in the radial variable {zeta}. The space-like pion form factor is also well reproduced. One thus obtains a remarkable connection between the description of hadronic modes in AdS space and the Hamiltonian formulation of QCD in physical space-time quantized on the light-front at fixed light-front time {tau}. The model can be systematically improved by using its complete orthonormal solutions to diagonalize the full QCD light-front Hamiltonian or by applying the Lippmann-Schwinger method in order to systematically include the QCD interaction terms.

  11. QCD measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, Dmitry; /Florida State U.

    2011-12-01

    Selected quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements performed at the Fermilab Run II Tevatron p{bar p} collider running at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by CDF and D0 Collaborations are presented. The inclusive jet, dijet production and three-jet cross section measurements are used to test perturbative QCD calculations, constrain parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1161{sub -0.0048}{sup +0.0041}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. The diphoton production cross-sections check the validity of the NLO pQCD predictions, soft-gluon resummation methods implemented in theoretical calculations, and contributions from the parton-to-photon fragmentation diagrams. Events with W/Z+jets productions are used to measure many kinematic distributions allowing extensive tests and tunes of predictions from pQCD NLO and Monte-Carlo (MC) event generators. The charged-particle transverse momenta (p{sub T}) and multiplicity distributions in the inclusive minimum bias events are used to tune non-perturbative QCD models, including those describing the multiple parton interactions (MPI). Events with inclusive production of {gamma} and 2 or 3 jets are used to study increasingly important MPI phenomenon at high p{sub T}, measure an effective interaction cross section, {sigma}{sub eff} = 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mb, and limit existing MPI models.

  12. A CONSTRAINT ON THE INTEGRATED MASS POWER SPECTRUM OUT TO z = 1100 FROM LENSING OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Cooray, Asantha; Amblard, Alexandre; Joudaki, Shahab; Serra, Paolo; Munshi, Dipak; Santos, Mario G.

    2011-02-10

    The temperature fluctuations and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are now a well-known probe of the universe at an infant age of 400,000 years. During the transit to us from the surface of last scattering, the CMB photons are expected to undergo modifications induced by the intervening large-scale structure. Among the expected secondary effects is the weak gravitational lensing of the CMB by the foreground dark matter distribution. We derive a quadratic estimator that uses the non-Gaussianities generated by the lensing effect at the four-point function level to extract the power spectrum of lensing potential fluctuations integrated out to z {approx} 1100 with peak contributions from potential fluctuations at z of 2-3. Using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven-year temperature maps, we report the first direct constraints of this lensing potential power spectrum and find that it has an amplitude of A{sub L} = 0.96 {+-} 0.60, 1.06 {+-} 0.69, and 0.97 {+-} 0.47 using the W, V, and W + V bands, respectively.

  13. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUM,T.; CREUTZ,M.; PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-02-24

    With the operation of the RHIC heavy ion program, the theoretical understanding of QCD at finite temperature and density has become increasingly important. Though QCD at finite temperature has been extensively studied using lattice Monte-Carlo simulations over the past twenty years, most physical questions relevant for RHIC (and future) heavy ion experiments remain open. In lattice QCD at finite temperature and density there have been at least two major advances in recent years. First, for the first time calculations of real time quantities, like meson spectral functions have become available. Second, the lattice study of the QCD phase diagram and equation of state have been extended to finite baryon density by several groups. Both issues were extensively discussed in the course of the workshop. A real highlight was the study of the QCD phase diagram in (T, {mu})-plane by Z. Fodor and S. Katz and the determination of the critical end-point for the physical value of the pion mass. This was the first time such lattice calculations at, the physical pion mass have been performed. Results by Z Fodor and S. Katz were obtained using a multi-parameter re-weighting method. Other determinations of the critical end point were also presented, in particular using a Taylor expansion around {mu} = 0 (Bielefeld group, Ejiri et al.) and using analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential (Ph. de Forcrand and O. Philipsen). The result based on Taylor expansion agrees within errors with the new prediction of Z. Fodor and S. Katz, while methods based on analytic continuation still predict a higher value for the critical baryon density. Most of the thermodynamics studies in full QCD (including those presented at this workshop) have been performed using quite coarse lattices, a = 0.2-0.3 fm. Therefore one may worry about cutoff effects in different thermodynamic quantities, like the transition temperature T{sub tr}. At the workshop U. Heller presented a study of the transition

  14. QCD trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Leganger, Lars E.; Strickland, Michael; Su, Nan

    2011-10-15

    In this brief report we compare the predictions of a recent next-to-next-to-leading order hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) calculation of the QCD trace anomaly to available lattice data. We focus on the trace anomaly scaled by T{sup 2} in two cases: N{sub f}=0 and N{sub f}=3. When using the canonical value of {mu}=2{pi}T for the renormalization scale, we find that for Yang-Mills theory (N{sub f}=0) agreement between HTLpt and lattice data for the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly begins at temperatures on the order of 8T{sub c}, while treating the subtracted piece as an interaction term when including quarks (N{sub f}=3) agreement begins already at temperatures above 2T{sub c}. In both cases we find that at very high temperatures the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly increases with temperature in accordance with the predictions of HTLpt.

  15. Higher derivative corrections in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Anirban

    2007-12-15

    We consider the effect of the R{sup 4} term in type IIA string theory on the supergravity background dual to N{sub c} D4-branes compactified on a circle with supersymmetry breaking boundary conditions. We study the dynamics of D8-branes in this perturbed geometry in the probe approximation. This leads to an analysis of higher derivative corrections in holographic QCD beyond the supergravity approximation. We make a rough estimate of the corrections to the masses of some of the lightest (axial) vector mesons. The corrections are suppressed by a factor of (g{sub YM}{sup 2}N{sub c}){sup -3} compared to their supergravity values. We find that the masses of these mesons increase from their supergravity values.

  16. Marginal breaking of conformal SUSY QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin F.; Terning, John

    2016-07-01

    We provide an example of a 4D theory that exhibits the Contino-Pomarol-Rattazzi mechanism, where breaking conformal symmetry by an almost marginal operator leads to a light pseudo-Goldstone boson, the dilaton, and a parametrically suppressed contribution to vacuum energy. We consider SUSY QCD at the edge of the conformal window and break conformal symmetry by weakly gauging a subgroup of the flavor symmetry. Using Seiberg duality we show that for a range of parameters the singlet meson in the dual theory reaches the unitarity bound, however, this theory does not have a stable vacuum. We stabilize the vacuum with soft breaking terms, compute the mass of the dilaton, and determine the range of parameters where the leading contribution to the dilaton mass is from the almost marginal coupling.

  17. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY DURING ECLIPSE OF THE YOUNG SUBSTELLAR ECLIPSING BINARY 2MASS 0535-0546. II. SECONDARY SPECTRUM: NO EVIDENCE THAT SPOTS CAUSE THE TEMPERATURE REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Stassun, Keivan G. E-mail: keivan.stassun@vanderbilt.edu

    2012-10-10

    We present high-resolution optical spectra of the young brown dwarf eclipsing binary 2M0535-05, obtained during eclipse of the higher-mass (primary) brown dwarf. Combined with our previous spectrum of the primary alone (Paper I), the new observations yield the spectrum of the secondary alone. We investigate, through a differential analysis of the two binary components, whether cool surface spots are responsible for suppressing the temperature of the primary. In Paper I, we found a significant discrepancy between the empirical surface gravity of the primary and that inferred via fine analysis of its spectrum. Here we find precisely the same discrepancy in surface gravity, both qualitatively and quantitatively. While this may again be ascribed to either cool spots or model opacity errors, it implies that cool spots cannot be responsible for preferentially lowering the temperature of the primary: if they were, spot effects on the primary spectrum should be preferentially larger, and they are not. The T{sub eff}'s we infer for the primary and secondary, from the TiO-{epsilon} bands alone, show the same reversal, in the same ratio, as is empirically observed, bolstering the validity of our analysis. In turn, this implies that if suppression of convection by magnetic fields on the primary is the fundamental cause of the T{sub eff} reversal, then it cannot be a local suppression yielding spots mainly on the primary (though both components may be equally spotted), but a global suppression in the interior of the primary. We briefly discuss current theories of how this might work.

  18. Decay Constants of Beauty Mesons from QCD Sum Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2014-11-01

    Our recently completed analysis of the decay constants of both pseudoscalar and vector beauty mesons reveals that in the bottom-quark sector two specific features of the sum-rule predictions show up: (i) For the input value of the bottom-quark mass in the M̅S̅ scheme m̅b(m̅b) ≈ 4:18 GeV; the sum-rule result fB ≈ 210-220 MeV for the B meson decay constant is substantially larger than the recent lattice-QCD finding fB ≈ 190 MeV: Requiring QCD sum rules to reproduce the lattice-QCD value of fB yields a significantly larger b-quark mass: m̅b(m̅b) = 4:247 GeV: (ii) Whereas QCD sum-rule predictions for the charmed-meson decay constants fD; fDs, fD* and fDs* are practically independent of the choice of renormalization scale, in the beauty sector the results for the decay constants—and especially for the ratio fB* / fB—prove to be very sensitive to the specific scale setting.

  19. More on the renormalization group limit cycle in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Evgeny Epelbaum; Hans-Werner Hammer; Ulf-G. Meissner; Andreas Nogga

    2006-02-26

    We present a detailed study of the recently conjectured infrared renormalization group limit cycle in QCD using chiral effective field theory. We show that small increases in the up and down quark masses, corresponding to a pion mass around 200 MeV, can move QCD to the critical renormalization group trajectory for an infrared limit cycle in the three-nucleon system. At the critical values of the quark masses, the binding energies of the deuteron and its spin-singlet partner are tuned to zero and the triton has infinitely many excited states with an accumulation point at the three-nucleon threshold. At next-to-leading order in the chiral counting, we find three parameter sets where this effect occurs. For one of them, we study the structure of the three-nucleon system using both chiral and contact effective field theories in detail. Furthermore, we calculate the influence of the limit cycle on scattering observables.

  20. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  1. FORS2 observes a multi-epoch transmission spectrum of the hot Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-49b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Delrez, L.; Gillon, M.; Madhusudhan, N.; Jehin, E.; Queloz, D.; Anderson, D. R.; Demory, B.-O.; Hellier, C.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Transmission spectroscopy has proven to be a useful tool for the study of exoplanet atmospheres, because the absorption and scattering signatures of the atmosphere manifest themselves as variations in the planetary transit depth. Several planets have been studied with this technique, leading to the detection of a small number of elements and molecules (Na, K, H2O), but also revealing that many planets show flat transmission spectra consistent with the presence of opaque high-altitude clouds. Aims: We apply this technique to the MP = 0.40MJ, Rp = 1.20RJ, P = 2.78 d planet WASP-49b, aiming to characterize its transmission spectrum between 0.73 and 1 ¯m and search for the features of K and H2O. Owing to its density and temperature, the planet is predicted to possess an extended atmosphere and is thus a good target for transmission spectroscopy. Methods: Three transits of WASP-49b have been observed with the FORS2 instrument installed at the VLT/UT1 telescope at the ESO Paranal site. We used FORS2 in MXU mode with grism GRIS_600z, producing simultaneous multiwavelength transit light curves throughout the i' and z' bands. We combined these data with independent broadband photometry from the Euler and TRAPPIST telescopes to obtain a good measurement of the transit shape. Strong correlated noise structures are present in the FORS2 light curves, which are due to rotating flat-field structures that are introduced by inhomogeneities of the linear atmospheric dispersion corrector's transparency. We accounted for these structures by constructing common noise models from the residuals of light curves bearing the same noise structures and used them together with simple parametric models to infer the transmission spectrum. Results: We present three independent transmission spectra of WASP-49b between 0.73 and 1.02 ¯m, as well as a transmission spectrum between 0.65 and 1.02 ¯m from the combined analysis of FORS2 and broadband data. The results obtained from the three

  2. QCD Results from the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Andreas; CDF, for the; Collaborations, D0

    2010-01-01

    Selected recent quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements are reviewed for Fermilab Run II Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions studied by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0 Collaborations at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Tantamount to Rutherford scattering studies at the TeV scale, inclusive jet and dijet production cross-section measurements are used to seek and constrain new particle physics phenomena, test perturbative QCD calculations, inform parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, a{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1161{sub -0.0048}{sup +0.0041}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. Events with {gamma} + 3-jet configurations are used to measure the increasingly important double parton scattering (DPS) phenomenon, with an obtained effective interaction cross section of {sigma}{sub eff} = 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mb. Observations of central exclusive particle production demonstrate the viability of observing the Standard Model Higgs boson using similar techniques at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Three areas of inquiry into lower energy QCD, crucial to understanding high-energy collider phenomena, are discussed: the examination of intra-jet track kinematics to infer that jet formation is dominated by pQCD, and not hadronization, effects; detailed studies of the underlying event and its universality; and inclusive minimum-bias charged-particle momentum and multiplicity measurements, which are shown to challenge the Monte Carlo generators.

  3. A study of jet production rates and a test of QCD on the Z 0 resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrawy, M. Z.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P. P.; Anderson, K. J.; Armitage, J. C.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Ashton, P.; Azuelos, G.; Baines, J. T. M.; Ball, A. H.; Banks, J.; Barker, G. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Batley, J. R.; Bavaria, G.; Beard, C.; Beck, F.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Boerner, H.; Breuker, H.; Brown, R. M.; Brun, R.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Couch, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Davies, O. W.; Deninno, M. M.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Duchesneau, D.; Duchovni, E.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dumas, D.; El Mamouni, H.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Fabbri, F.; Farthouat, P.; Fischer, H. M.; Fong, D. G.; French, M. T.; Fukunaga, C.; Gandois, B.; Ganel, O.; Gary, J. W.; Geddes, N. I.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Giacomelli, G.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Granite, D.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Grunhaus, J.; Hagedorn, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, J.; Hattersley, P. M.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Heintze, J.; Hemingway, R. J.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinde, P. S.; Ho, C.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Holl, B.; Homer, R. J.; Hou, S. R.; Howarth, C. P.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imori, M.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jin, E.; Jobes, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kleinwort, C.; Klem, D. E.; Knop, G.; Kobayashi, T.; Köpke, L.; Kokott, T. P.; Koshiba, M.; Kowalewski, R.; Kreutzmann, H.; Von Krogh, J.; Kroll, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lamarche, F.; Larson, W. J.; Lasota, M. M. B.; Layter, J. G.; Le Du, P.; Leblanc, P.; Lellouch, D.; Lennert, P.; Lessard, L.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Lorah, J. M.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Lupu, N.; Ma, J.; Macbeth, A. A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Maringer, G.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, A. C.; Meijers, F.; Menszner, D.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Milstene, C.; Minowa, M.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Moss, M. W.; Muller, A.; Murphy, P. G.; Murray, W. J.; Nellen, B.; Nguyen, H. H.; Nozaki, M.; O'Dowd, A. J. P.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neill, B.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogg, M.; Oh, H.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Patrick, G. N.; Pawley, S. J.; Perez, A.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Plane, D. E.; Poli, B.; Possoz, A.; Pouladdej, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Regimbald, M.; Riles, K.; Roach, C. M.; Roehner, F.; Rollnik, A.; Roney, J. M.; Rossi, A. M.; Routenburg, P.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Sanghera, S.; Sansum, R. A.; Sasaki, M.; Saunders, B. J.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Schappert, W.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; von der Schmitt, H.; Schreiber, S.; Schwarz, J.; Shapira, A.; Shen, B. C.; Sherwood, P.; Simon, A.; Siroli, G. P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Spreadbury, E. J.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Stier, H. E.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turner, M. F.; Tysarczyk, G.; van den Plas, D.; Vandalen, G. J.; Virtue, C. J.; Wagner, A.; Wahl, C.; Wang, H.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Waterhouse, J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, M.; Weisz, S.; Wermes, N.; Weymann, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter, I.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wood, N. C.; Wotton, S.; Wuensch, B.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yaari, R.; Yamashita, H.; Yang, Y.; Yekutieli, G.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.; Zylberajch, S.; OPAL Collaboration

    1990-02-01

    Relative production rates of multijet hadronic final states of Z 0 boson decays, observed in e +e - annihilation around 91 GeV centre of mass energy, are presented. The data can be well described by analytic O( αs2) QCD calculations and by QCD shower model calaculations with parameters as determined at lower energies. A first judgement of Λ overlineMS and of the renormalization scale μ2 in O( αs2) QCD results in values similar to those obtained in the continuum of e +e - annihilations. Significant scaling violations are observed when the 3-jet fractions are compared to the corresponding results from smaller centre of mass energies. They can be interpreted as being entirely due tot the energy dependence of αs, as proposed by the nonabelian nature of QCD, The possibility of an energy independent coupling constant can be excluded with a significance of 5.7 standard deviations.

  4. Full QCD calculation of neutron electric dipole moment with the external electric field method

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, E.; Aoki, S.; Kuramashi, Y.

    2008-07-01

    We have calculated the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) in the presence of the CP violating {theta} term in lattice QCD with two-flavor dynamical clover quarks, using the external electric field method. Accumulating a large number of statistics by the averages over 16 different source points and over forward and backward nucleon propagators, we have obtained nonzero signals of neutron and proton EDM beyond 1 standard deviation at each quark mass in full QCD. We have investigated the quark mass dependence of nucleon EDM in full QCD, and have found that nucleon EDM in full QCD does not decrease toward the chiral limit, as opposed to the theoretical expectation. We briefly discuss possible reasons for this behavior.

  5. Scalar particles mass spectrum and localization on FRW branes embedded in a 5D de Sitter bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariescu, Marina-Aura; Dariescu, Ciprian

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we study the scalar fields evolving on a FRW brane embedded in a five-dimensional de Sitter bulk. The scale function and the warp factor, solutions of the Einstein equations, are employed in the five-dimensional Gordon equation describing the massive scalar field, whose wave function depends on the cosmic time and on the extra-dimension. We point out the existence of bounded states and find a minimum value of the effective four-dimensional mass. For the test (scalar) field envelope along the extra-dimension, we derive the corresponding Schrödinger-like equation which is formally that for the Pöschl-Teller potential. Accordingly, we have obtained the quantization law for the mass parameter of the tested scalar field.

  6. Mass Spectrum Analysis of Gas Emitted during Organic Contaminant Removal from a Metal Surface with an Arc in Low Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Masaya; Takeda, Koichi

    2006-05-05

    The gas emitted during organic contaminant removal from a metal surface with an arc in low vacuum is investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The experimental results show that fragment molecules of the contaminant material, which are created by the decomposition of the contaminant material, exist in the emitted gas. The decomposition rate of the contaminant increased with the treatment current, which indicates that the decomposition occurs not in the cathode spot, but in the arc column.

  7. On the Aerosol Particle Size Distribution Spectrum in Alaskan Air Mass Systems: Arctic Haze and Non-Haze Episodes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Glenn E.

    1983-05-01

    Aerosols in central Alaskan winter air mass system were classified according to size by diffusive separation and light-scattering spectrometry. Particles entering central Alaska from the Pacific Marine environment had number concentrations ranging from 300 to 2000 cm3 (geometric mean 685 cm3) and unimodal size spectra, with maximum in number concentration near 1 × 106 cm radius.Air masses entering Alaska from the Eurasian Arctic possessed a factor of two smaller aerosol number concentrations than Pacific Marine systems (e.g., 150-700 cm3; geometric mean 386 cm3) but contained a factor of two greater particle volume loading within the fine particle radius range 5 × 107 < r < 1 × 105 cm. The particles in Eurasian Arctic air masses were bimodally distributed, with maxima in the particle size spectra near r = 3 × 107 and 5 × 106 cm. Sulfur was the predominant element in all cases studied.A particle depleted region was present in the size spectra obtained for Eurasian Arctic air masses. The deficiency of particles in the 106 cm radius range is interpreted as being the result of thermal coagulation taking place between sulfur-rich nuclei (produced at a rate of 1020 to 1018 g cm3 s1 and in sizes r < 106 cm) and `large' (r 105 cm) imported primary particles. The primary particles are in the removal-resistant Greenfield Gap (r 105 cm) and seem to originate in the central Eurasian region.

  8. The Soft X-ray Spectrum of the High Mass X-Ray Binary V0332+53 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshamouty, Khaled G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Chouinard, Rhys

    2016-08-01

    The behaviour of neutron stars in high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) during periods of low mass transfer is of great interest. Indications of spectral softening in systems at low mass transfer rates suggest that some HMXBs are undergoing fundamental changes in their accretion regime, but the nature of the quiescent X-ray emission is not clear. We performed a 39 ks XMM-Newton observation of the transient HMXB V0332+53, finding it at a very low X-ray luminosity (Lx ˜ 4 × 1032 erg s-1). A power-law spectral fit requires an unusually soft spectral index (4.4^{+0.9}_{-0.6}), while a magnetized neutron star atmosphere model, with temperature LogTeff 6.7±0.2 K and inferred emitting radius of ˜0.2 - 0.3 km, gives a good fit. We suggest that the quiescent X-ray emission from V0332+53 is mainly from a hot spot on the surface of the neutron star. No conclusions on the presence of pulsations could be drawn due to the low count rate. Due to the high absorption column, thermal emission from the rest of the neutron star could be only weakly constrained, to LogTeff <6.14^{+0.05}_{-6.14} K, or <3 × 1033 erg s-1.

  9. LATTICE QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH WILSON QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    EJIRI,S.

    2007-11-20

    We review studies of QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson quarks. After explaining the basic properties of QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature including the phase structure and the scaling properties around the chiral phase transition, we discuss the critical temperature, the equation of state and heavy-quark free energies.

  10. QCD vacuum: nuclear forces, nucleons, pions …

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robilotta, M. R.

    2011-08-01

    This contribution contains six sections, namely: 1. from QCD to chiral perturbation theory - QCD is widely accepted as the theory of strong interactions, but direct applications to low-energy hadronic processes are difficult. In this regime, the light quarks u and d prevail, and one can employ a rigorously equivalent effective theory, known a chiral perturbation theory, based on hadronic degrees of freedom. 2. strong vacuum and the pion - Chiral symmetry is not exact in the real world. Nevertheless, the absence of of parity multiplets and the smallness of the pion mass suggest that it is a good approximate symmetry, realized in the Nambu-Goldstone mode. Its ground state, the vacuum, is filled with a condensate, made of quark-antiquark pairs. In sections 1-3, instances are presented of observables strongly influenced by the QCD vacuum. 3. nuclear forces - In the last few years, chiral perturbation theory has produced a very reliable picture of both two- and three-nucleon forces. In particular, the important isospin independent central potential VC+ is well understood and known to be dominated by the scalar form factor of the nucleon, a function that describes the disturbance it produces over the vacuum. 4. nucleon scalar form factor - The spatial integration of the nucleon scalar form factor gives rise to σN, the nucleon σ-term. The value of this quantity can be extracted from experiment and the empirical value accepted presently is 45±8 MeV. A simple model, based on the idea that the pion cloud of the nucleon is constructed at the expenses of the surrounding condensate, produces a σN in the range 43-49 MeV, with no free parameters. 5. scalar radius of the pion - The value of this radius can be extracted from pion-pion scattering data and the most reliable estimate is Sπ = 0.61±0.04 fm2. The extension of the model described in section 4 to the pion gives rise to a picture in which it is embedded into the condensate. As one moves towards its center, the

  11. Present constraints on the H-dibaryon at the physical point from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Joo, B.; Lin, H. -W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2011-11-10

    The current constraints from Lattice QCD on the existence of the H-dibaryon are discussed. With only two significant Lattice QCD calculations of the H-dibaryon binding energy at approximately the same lattice spacing, the form of the chiral and continuum extrapolations to the physical point are not determined. In this brief report, an extrapolation that is quadratic in the pion mass, motivated by low-energy effective field theory, is considered. An extrapolation that is linear in the pion mass is also considered, a form that has no basis in the effective field theory, but is found to describe the light-quark mass dependence observed in Lattice QCD calculations of the octet baryon masses. In both cases, the extrapolation to the physical pion mass allows for a bound H-dibaryon or a near-threshold scattering state.

  12. Present constraints on the H-dibaryon at the physical point from Lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Joo, B.; Lin, H. -W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; et al

    2011-11-10

    The current constraints from Lattice QCD on the existence of the H-dibaryon are discussed. With only two significant Lattice QCD calculations of the H-dibaryon binding energy at approximately the same lattice spacing, the form of the chiral and continuum extrapolations to the physical point are not determined. In this brief report, an extrapolation that is quadratic in the pion mass, motivated by low-energy effective field theory, is considered. An extrapolation that is linear in the pion mass is also considered, a form that has no basis in the effective field theory, but is found to describe the light-quark mass dependencemore » observed in Lattice QCD calculations of the octet baryon masses. In both cases, the extrapolation to the physical pion mass allows for a bound H-dibaryon or a near-threshold scattering state.« less

  13. Light-Front Holography, Light-Front Wavefunctions, and Novel QCD Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2012-02-16

    Light-Front Holography is one of the most remarkable features of the AdS/CFT correspondence. In spite of its present limitations it provides important physical insights into the nonperturbative regime of QCD and its transition to the perturbative domain. This novel framework allows hadronic amplitudes in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time. The model leads to an effective confining light-front QCD Hamiltonian and a single-variable light-front Schroedinger equation which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum. The coordinate z in AdS space is uniquely identified with a Lorentz-invariant coordinate {zeta} which measures the separation of the constituents within a hadron at equal light-front time and determines the off-shell dynamics of the bound-state wavefunctions, and thus the fall-off as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. The soft-wall holographic model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric, leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics - a semi-classical frame-independent first approximation to the spectra and light-front wavefunctions of meson and baryons. The model predicts a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in the leading orbital angular momentum L of hadrons and the radial quantum number n. The hadron eigensolutions projected on the free Fock basis provides the complete set of valence and non-valence light-front Fock state wavefunctions {Psi}{sub n/H} (x{sub i}, k{sub {perpendicular}i}, {lambda}{sub i}) which describe the hadron's momentum and spin distributions needed to compute the direct measures of hadron structure at the quark and gluon level, such as elastic and transition form factors, distribution amplitudes, structure functions, generalized parton distributions and transverse

  14. Searching for X (3872) using lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song-Haeng; Detar, Carleton; MILC / Fermilab Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    For decades, many excited charmonium states have been discovered that cannot be explained within the conventional quark model. Among the those mesons, the narrow charmonium-like state X (3872) has been examined using various phenomenological models, however, the question for its constituent still remains open. One of the strong candidates is a DD* molecular state because its mass is within 1MeV of the DD* threshold, however, such a molecular state can't be directly studied by perturbative QCD in such a low energy regime where the interaction of the colored quarks and gluons is very strong. Numerical simulation with lattice QCD provides a nonperturbative, ab initio method for studying this mysterious meson state. In this talk, I present preliminary simulation results for this charmonium-like states with quantum numbers JPC =1++ in both the isospin 0 and 1 channels. We use interpolating operators including both the conventional excited P-wave charmonium state (χc 1) and the DD* open charm state for the isospin 0 channel, but only DD* for the isospin 1 channel. We extract large negative S-wave scattering length and find an X (3872) candidate 13 +/- 6 MeV below the DD* threshold in the isospin 0 channel.

  15. Hadron Masses From Novel Fat-Link Fermion Actions

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Zanotti; S. Bilson-Thompson; F. D. R. Bonnet; P. D. Coddington; D. B. Leinweber; A. G. Williams; J. B. Zhang; W. Melnitchouk; F. X. Lee

    2001-11-01

    The hadron mass spectrum is calculated in lattice QCD using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators in the fermion action are constructed using smeared links. The simulations are performed on a 16{sup 3} x 32 lattice with a lattice spacing of a=0.125 fm. We compare actions with n=4 and 12 smearing sweeps with a smearing fraction of 0.7. The n=4 Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) action provides scaling which is superior to mean-field improvement, and offers advantages over nonperturbative 0(a) improvement, including a reduced exceptional configuration problem.

  16. The supercritical pomeron in QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. R.

    1998-06-29

    Deep-inelastic diffractive scaling violations have provided fundamental insight into the QCD pomeron, suggesting a single gluon inner structure rather than that of a perturbative two-gluon bound state. This talk outlines a derivation of a high-energy, transverse momentum cut-off, confining solution of QCD. The pomeron, in first approximation, is a single reggeized gluon plus a ''wee parton'' component that compensates for the color and particle properties of the gluon. This solution corresponds to a super-critical phase of Reggeon Field Theory.

  17. QCD corrections to triboson production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Melnikov, Kirill; Petriello, Frank

    2007-07-01

    We present a computation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of three Z bosons at the Large Hadron Collider. We calculate these corrections using a completely numerical method that combines sector decomposition to extract infrared singularities with contour deformation of the Feynman parameter integrals to avoid internal loop thresholds. The NLO QCD corrections to pp→ZZZ are approximately 50% and are badly underestimated by the leading order scale dependence. However, the kinematic dependence of the corrections is minimal in phase space regions accessible at leading order.

  18. Lattice QCD clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, D.; Mackenzie, Paul B.; Singh, Anitoj; Simone, Jim; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    As part of the DOE SciDAC ''National Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Computing'' project, Fermilab builds and operates production clusters for lattice QCD simulations. This paper will describe these clusters. The design of lattice QCD clusters requires careful attention to balancing memory bandwidth, floating point throughput, and network performance. We will discuss our investigations of various commodity processors, including Pentium 4E, Xeon, Opteron, and PPC970. We will also discuss our early experiences with the emerging Infiniband and PCI Express architectures. Finally, we will present our predictions and plans for future clusters.

  19. Glueball decay in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Tan, C.-I; Terashima, Seiji

    2008-04-15

    Using holographic QCD based on D4-branes and D8-anti-D8-branes, we have computed couplings of glueballs to light mesons. We describe glueball decay by explicitly calculating its decay widths and branching ratios. Interestingly, while glueballs remain less well understood both theoretically and experimentally, our results are found to be consistent with the experimental data for the scalar glueball candidate f{sub 0}(1500). More generally, holographic QCD predicts that decay of any glueball to 4{pi}{sup 0} is suppressed, and that mixing of the lightest glueball with qq mesons is small.

  20. QCD: Challenges for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.; Dawson, S.; Orr, L.; Smith, W.H.

    1997-01-13

    Despite many experimental verifications of the correctness of our basic understanding of QCD, there remain numerous open questions in strong interaction physics and we focus on the role of future colliders in addressing these questions. We discuss possible advances in the measurement of {alpha}{sub s}, in the study of parton distribution functions, and in the understanding of low x physics at present colliders and potential new facilities. We also touch briefly on the role of spin physics in advancing our understanding of QCD.

  1. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2007-09-05

    Recent advances in lattice field theory, in computer technology and in chiral perturbation theory have enabled lattice QCD to emerge as a powerful quantitative tool in understanding hadron structure. I describe recent progress in the computation of the nucleon form factors and moments of parton distribution functions, before proceeding to describe lattice studies of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). In particular, I show how lattice studies of GPDs contribute to building a three-dimensional picture of the proton, I conclude by describing the prospects for studying the structure of resonances from lattice QCD.

  2. Probing a QCD String Axion with Precision Cosmological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P

    2004-09-21

    String and M-theory compactifications generically have compact moduli which can potentially act as the QCD axion. However, as demonstrated here, such a compact modulus can not play the role of a QCD axion and solve the strong CP problem if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation with Hubble constant H{sub inf} {approx}> 10{sup 13} GeV are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment. In this case axion fluctuations generated during inflation would leave a measurable isocurvature and/or non-Gaussian imprint in the spectrum of primordial temperature fluctuations. This conclusion is independent of any assumptions about the initial axion misalignment angle, how much of the dark matter is relic axions, or possible entropy release by a late decaying particle such as the saxion; it relies only on the mild assumption that the Peccei-Quinn symmetry remains unbroken in the early universe.

  3. Lattice QCD at the physical point: simulation and analysis details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, S.; Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Kurth, T.; Lellouch, L.; Lippert, T.; Szabó, K. K.; Vulvert, G.

    2011-08-01

    We give details of our precise determination of the light quark masses m ud = ( m u + m d )/2 and m s in 2 + 1 flavor QCD, with simulated pion masses down to 120 MeV, at five lattice spacings, and in large volumes. The details concern the action and algorithm employed, the HMC force with HEX smeared clover fermions, the choice of the scale setting procedure and of the input masses. After an overview of the simulation parameters, extensive checks of algorithmic stability, autocorrelation and (practical) ergodicity are reported. To corroborate the good scaling properties of our action, explicit tests of the scaling of hadron masses in N f = 3 QCD are carried out. Details of how we control finite volume effects through dedicated finite volume scaling runs are reported. To check consistency with SU(2) Chiral Perturbation Theory the behavior of M π 2 /m ud and F π as a function of m ud is investigated. Details of how we use the RI/MOM procedure with a separate continuum limit of the running of the scalar density R S ( μ, μ') are given. This procedure is shown to reproduce the known value of r 0 m s in quenched QCD. Input from dispersion theory is used to split our value of m ud into separate values of m u and m d . Finally, our procedure to quantify both systematic and statistical uncertainties is discussed.

  4. Observation of an Anomalous Line Shape of the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} Mass Spectrum near the pp[over ¯] Mass Threshold in J/ψ→γη^{'}π^{+}π^{-}.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Achasov, M N; Ahmed, S; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Baldini Ferroli, R; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Berger, N; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Dou, Z L; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Farinelli, R; Fava, L; Fedorov, O; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, X L; Gao, X Y; Gao, Y; Gao, Z; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, L; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, R P; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; Heinsius, F H; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Holtmann, T; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G S; Huang, Y P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, X Z; Huang, Y; Huang, Z L; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kiese, P; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kupsc, A; Kühn, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leithoff, H; Leng, C; Li, C; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, F Y; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H J; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q Y; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y B; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, D; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, M M; Ma, Q M; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y M; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Mezzadri, G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales Morales, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Musiol, P; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pan, Y; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Pettersson, J; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prasad, V; Qi, H R; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Rosner, Ch; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schnier, C; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, M; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X H; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, W P; Wang, X F; Wang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, L J; Wu, Z; Xia, L; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, H; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, J J; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H J; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y N; Zhang, Y T; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zotti, L; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2016-07-22

    Using 1.09×10^{9} J/ψ events collected by the BESIII experiment in 2012, we study the J/ψ→γη^{'}π^{+}π^{-} process and observe a significant abrupt change in the slope of the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} invariant mass distribution at the proton-antiproton (pp[over ¯]) mass threshold. We use two models to characterize the η^{'}π^{+}π^{-} line shape around 1.85  GeV/c^{2}: one that explicitly incorporates the opening of a decay threshold in the mass spectrum (Flatté formula), and another that is the coherent sum of two resonant amplitudes. Both fits show almost equally good agreement with data, and suggest the existence of either a broad state around 1.85  GeV/c^{2} with strong couplings to the pp[over ¯] final states or a narrow state just below the pp[over ¯] mass threshold. Although we cannot distinguish between the fits, either one supports the existence of a pp[over ¯] moleculelike state or bound state with greater than 7σ significance. PMID:27494467

  5. Matter power spectrum covariance matrix from the DEUS-PUR ΛCDM simulations: mass resolution and non-Gaussian errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blot, L.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Alimi, J.-M.; Reverdy, V.; Rasera, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming generation of galaxy surveys will probe the distribution of matter in the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. Measurements of the matter power spectrum at different scales and red shifts will provide stringent constraints on the cosmological parameters. However, on non-linear scales this will require an accurate evaluation of the covariance matrix. Here, we compute the covariance matrix of the three-dimensional matter density power spectrum for the concordance ΛCDM cosmology from an ensemble of N-body simulations of the Dark Energy Universe Simulation - Parallel Universe Runs (DEUS-PUR). This consists of 12 288 realizations of a (656 h-1 Mpc)3 simulation box with 2563 particles. We combine this set with an auxiliary sample of 96 simulations of the same volume with 10243 particles. We find the N-body mass resolution effect to be an important source of systematic errors on the covariance at high redshift and small intermediate scales. We correct for this effect by introducing an empirical statistical method which provide an accurate determination of the covariance matrix over a wide range of scales including the baryon oscillations interval. Contrary to previous studies that used smaller N-body ensembles, we find the power spectrum distribution to significantly deviate from expectations of a Gaussian random density field at k ≳ 0.25 h Mpc-1 and z < 0.5. This suggests that for the finite-volume surveys, an unbiased estimate of the ensemble-averaged band power at these scales and red shifts may require a more careful assessment of non-Gaussian errors than previously considered.

  6. Two-color QCD at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Tamer; Giudice, Pietro; Hands, Simon; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-01-01

    QCD at high chemical potential has interesting properties such as deconfinement of quarks. Two-color QCD, which enables numerical simulations on the lattice, constitutes a laboratory to study QCD at high chemical potential. Among the interesting properties of two-color QCD at high density is the diquark condensation, for which we present recent results obtained on a finer lattice compared to previous studies. The quark propagator in two-color QCD at non-zero chemical potential is referred to as the Gor'kov propagator. We express the Gor'kov propagator in terms of form factors and present recent lattice simulation results.

  7. Mass spectrum of the 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl radical (i-C4H3; X2A')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ying; Gu, Xibin; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2006-03-01

    The crossed molecular beams method has been applied to produce the 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl radical, i-C4H3(X2A') under single collision conditions via the reaction of dicarbon molecules with ethylene. We recorded time-of-flight spectra of the radical at the center-of-mass angle (28.0°) of the parent ion (m/z = 51; C4H3+) and of the fragments at m/z = 50 (C4H2+), m/z = 49 (C4H+), m/z = 48 (C4+), m/z = 39 (C3H3+), m/z = 38 (C3H2+), m/z = 37 (C3H+), and m/z = 36 (C3+). This yielded relative intensity ratios of I(m/z = 51):I(m/z = 50):I(m/z = 49):I(m/z = 48):I(m/z = 39):I(m/z = 38):I(m/z = 37):I(m/z = 36) = 0.47 +/- 0.01:0.94 +/- 0.01:1.0:0.07 +/- 0.02:0.31 +/- 0.01:0.23 +/- 0.02:0.24 +/- 0.01:0.12 +/- 0.01 at 70 eV electron impact energy. Upper limits at mass-to-charge ratios between 27 and m/z = 24 and m/z = 14-12 were derived to be 0.02 +/- 0.01. Note that the intensity of the 13C isotopic peak of the 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl radical at m/z = 52 (13C12C3H3+) is about 0.04 +/- 0.01 relative to m/z = 51. Employing linear scaling methods, the absolute electron impact ionization cross section of the 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl radical was computed to be 7.8 +/- 1.6 × 10-16 cm2. These data can be employed to monitor the 1-butene-3-yne-2-yl radical in oxygen-poor combustion flames and in the framework of prospective explorations of planetary atmospheres (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto) and of their moons (Titan, Triton, Oberon) in situ via matrix interval arithmetic assisted mass spectrometry.

  8. Resonance structure in the {gamma}{gamma} invariant mass spectrum in pC, dC, and dCu interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abraamyan, Kh. U.; Baznat, M. I.; Friesen, A. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Kozhin, M. A.; Lebedev, S. A.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Nikitin, S. A.; Ososkov, G. A.; Reznikov, S. G.; Sigov, A. S.; Sissakian, A. N.; Sorin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2012-06-15

    Along with {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} mesons, a resonance structure in the invariant mass spectrum of two photons atM{sub {gamma}{gamma}} = 360 {+-} 7 {+-} 9 MeV is observed in dC interactions at momentum 2.75 GeV/c per nucleon. This resonance structure is not observed in pC collisions at the beam momentum 5.5 GeV/c. The result obtained in the reaction dC is confirmed by the second experiment carried out on the deuteron beam at momentum 3.83 GeV/c per nucleon with a copper target. Some other checks of the observed effect are presented.

  9. A NuSTAR Observation of the Reflection Spectrum of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1728-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleator, Clio C.; Tomsick, John A.; King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jérôme; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and described well by a blackbody with kT = 1.5 keV and a cutoff power law with Γ = 1.5, and a cutoff temperature of 25 keV. Residuals between 6 and 8 keV provide strong evidence of a broad Fe Kα line. By modeling the spectrum with a relativistically blurred reflection model, we find an upper limit for the inner disk radius of {R}{{in}}≤slant 2{R}{{ISCO}}. Consequently, we find that R NS ≤ 23 km, assuming M = 1.4 M ⊙ and a = 0.15. We also find an upper limit on the magnetic field of B ≤ 2 × 108 G.

  10. Spin-(3/2) pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lasscock, B.G.; Leinweber, D.B.; Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.; Williams, A.G.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-10-01

    The possible discovery of the {theta}{sup +} pentaquark has motivated a number of studies of its nature using lattice QCD. While all the analyses thus far have focused on spin-(1/2) states, here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with spin (3/2). For the spin-(3/2) interpolating field we use a product of the standard N and K* operators. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e., binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the J{sup P}=(3/2){sup -} channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar (3/2){sup +} channel at several quark masses, in accord with the standard lattice resonance signature. This suggests that this is a good candidate for the further study of pentaquarks on the lattice.

  11. QCD Phase Diagram According to the Center Group

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado Mercado, Ydalia; Gattringer, Christof; Evertz, Hans Gerd

    2011-06-03

    We study an effective theory for QCD at finite temperature and density which contains the leading center symmetric and center symmetry breaking terms. The effective theory is studied in a flux representation where the complex phase problem is absent and the model becomes accessible to Monte Carlo techniques also at finite chemical potential. We simulate the system by using a generalized Prokof'ev-Svistunov worm algorithm and compare the results to a low temperature expansion. The phase diagram is determined as a function of temperature, chemical potential, and quark mass. The shape and quark mass dependence of the phase boundaries are as expected for QCD. The transition into the deconfined phase is smooth throughout, without any discontinuities or critical points.

  12. Axion cosmology, lattice QCD and the dilute instanton gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsanyi, Sz.; Dierigl, M.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Mages, S. W.; Nogradi, D.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Szabo, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Axions are one of the most attractive dark matter candidates. The evolution of their number density in the early universe can be determined by calculating the topological susceptibility χ (T) of QCD as a function of the temperature. Lattice QCD provides an ab initio technique to carry out such a calculation. A full result needs two ingredients: physical quark masses and a controlled continuum extrapolation from non-vanishing to zero lattice spacings. We determine χ (T) in the quenched framework (infinitely large quark masses) and extrapolate its values to the continuum limit. The results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation (DIGA). A nice agreement is found for the temperature dependence, whereas the overall normalization of the DIGA result still differs from the non-perturbative continuum extrapolated lattice results by a factor of order ten. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the prediction of the amount of axion dark matter.

  13. More on the infrared renormalization group limit cycle in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    E. Epelbaum; H.-W. Hammer; Ulf-G. Meissner; A. Nogga

    2006-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the recently conjectured infrared renormalization group limit cycle in QCD using chiral effective field theory. It was conjectured that small increases in the up and down quark masses can move QCD to the critical trajectory for an infrared limit cycle in the three-nucleon system. At the critical quark masses, the binding energies of the deuteron and its spin-singlet partner are tuned to zero and the triton has infinitely many excited states with an accumulation point at the three-nucleon threshold. We exemplify three parameter sets where this effect occurs at next-to-leading order in the chiral counting. For one of them, we study the structure of the three-nucleon system in detail using both chiral and contact effective field theories. Furthermore, we investigate the matching of the chiral and contact theories in the critical region and calculate the influence of the limit cycle on three-nucleon scattering observables.

  14. Testing QCD in the non-perturbative regime

    SciTech Connect

    A.W. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This is an exciting time for strong interaction physics. We have a candidate for a fundamental theory, namely QCD, which has passed all the tests thrown at it in the perturbative regime. In the non-perturbative regime it has also produced some promising results and recently a few triumphs but the next decade will see enormous progress in our ability to unambiguously calculate the consequences of non-perturbative QCD and to test those predictions experimentally. Amongst the new experimental facilities being constructed, the hadronic machines at JPARC and GSI-FAIR and the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab, the major new electromagnetic facility worldwide, present a beautifully complementary network aimed at producing precise new measurements which will advance our knowledge of nuclear systems and push our ability to calculate the consequences of QCD to the limit. We will first outline the plans at Jefferson Lab for doubling the energy of CEBAF. The new facility presents some wonderful opportunities for discovery in strong interaction physics, as well as beyond the standard model. Then we turn to the theoretical developments aimed at extracting precise results for physical hadron properties from lattice QCD simulations. This discussion will begin with classical examples, such as the mass of the nucleon and ?, before dealing with a very recent and spectacular success involving information extracted from modern parity violating electron scattering.

  15. Excited-state spectroscopy of triply-bottom baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Meinel

    2012-06-01

    The spectrum of baryons containing three b quarks is calculated in nonperturbative QCD, using the lattice regularization. The energies of ten excited bbb states with J{sup P} = 1/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +}, 5/2{sup +}, 7/2{sup +}, 1/2{sup -}, and 3/2{sup -} are determined with high precision. A domain-wall action is used for the up-, down- and strange quarks, and the bottom quarks are implemented with NRQCD. The computations are done at lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.11 fm and a {approx} 0.08 fm, and the results demonstrate the improvement of rotational symmetry as a is reduced. A large lattice volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3} is used, and extrapolations of the bbb spectrum to realistic values of the light sea-quark masses are performed. All spin-dependent energy splittings are resolved with total uncertainties of order 1 MeV, and the dependence of these splittings on the couplings in the NRQCD action is analyzed.

  16. Evidence for a bound H-dibaryon using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold

    2012-04-01

    The H-dibaryon, a J = 0 state with the valence quark content udsuds, has long been hypothesized to exist because of the attractive nature of color magnetic gluon exchange in the flavor- singlet channel. Using lattice QCD the NPLQCD collaboration have investigated this system and evidence is presented for the existence of a stable H-dibaryon, albeit at a quark mass somewhat larger than that in nature. This calculation is reviewed and combined with subsequent calculations by the HALQCD collaboration at the SU(3) flavor symmetric point to identify bounds on the H-dibaryon mass at the physical quark masses.

  17. Renormalization in Coulomb gauge QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraši, A.; Taylor, John C.

    2011-04-01

    In the Coulomb gauge of QCD, the Hamiltonian contains a non-linear Christ-Lee term, which may alternatively be derived from a careful treatment of ambiguous Feynman integrals at 2-loop order. We investigate how and if UV divergences from higher order graphs can be consistently absorbed by renormalization of the Christ-Lee term. We find that they cannot.

  18. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  19. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  20. QCD Phase Transitions, Volume 15

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, T.; Shuryak, E.

    1999-03-20

    The title of the workshop, ''The QCD Phase Transitions'', in fact happened to be too narrow for its real contents. It would be more accurate to say that it was devoted to different phases of QCD and QCD-related gauge theories, with strong emphasis on discussion of the underlying non-perturbative mechanisms which manifest themselves as all those phases. Before we go to specifics, let us emphasize one important aspect of the present status of non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory in general. It remains true that its studies do not get attention proportional to the intellectual challenge they deserve, and that the theorists working on it remain very fragmented. The efforts to create Theory of Everything including Quantum Gravity have attracted the lion share of attention and young talent. Nevertheless, in the last few years there was also a tremendous progress and even some shift of attention toward emphasis on the unity of non-perturbative phenomena. For example, we have seen some efforts to connect the lessons from recent progress in Supersymmetric theories with that in QCD, as derived from phenomenology and lattice. Another example is Maldacena conjecture and related development, which connect three things together, string theory, super-gravity and the (N=4) supersymmetric gauge theory. Although the progress mentioned is remarkable by itself, if we would listen to each other more we may have chance to strengthen the field and reach better understanding of the spectacular non-perturbative physics.

  1. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  2. Basics of QCD perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soper, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    This is an introduction to the use of QCD perturbation theory, emphasizing generic features of the theory that enable one to separate short-time and long-time effects. The author also covers some important classes of applications: electron-positron annihilation to hadrons, deeply inelastic scattering, and hard processes in hadron-hadron collisions. 31 refs., 38 figs.

  3. Experimenting with Langevin lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.V.; Potvin, J.; Sanielevici, S.

    1987-05-01

    We report on the status of our investigations of the effects of systematic errors upon the practical merits of Langevin updating in full lattice QCD. We formulate some rules for the safe use of this updating procedure and some observations on problems which may be common to all approximate fermion algorithms.

  4. Seven topics in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    The following topics of perturbative QCD are discussed: (1) deep inelastic scattering; (2) higher order corrections to e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, to photon structure functions and to quarkonia decays; (3) higher order corrections to fragmentation functions and to various semi-inclusive processes; (4) higher twist contributions; (5) exclusive processes; (6) transverse momentum effects; (7) jet and photon physics.

  5. Perfect Actions and Operators for Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    1996-05-01

    Wilson's renormalization group implies that lattice actions located on a renormalized trajectory emanating from a fixed point represent perfect discretizations of continuum physics. With a perfect action the spectrum of a lattice theory is identical with the one of the continuum theory even at finite lattice spacing. Similarly, perfect operators yield cut-off independent matrix elements. Hence, continuum QCD can in principle be reconstructed from a lattice with finite spacing. In practice it is difficult to construct perfect actions and perfect operators explicitly. Here perturbation theory is used to derive perfect actions for quarks and gluons by performing a block renormalization group transformation directly from the continuum. The renormalized trajectory for free massive quarks is identified and a parameter in the renormalization group transformation is tuned such that for 1-d configurations the perfect action reduces to the nearest neighbor Wilson fermion action. Then the 4-d perfect action turns out to be extremely local as well, which is vital for numerical simulations. The fixed point action for free gluons is also obtained by blocking from the continuum. For 2-d configurations it reduces to the standard plaquette action, and for 4-d configurations it is still very local. With interactions between quarks and gluons switched on the perfect quark-gluon and 3-gluon vertex functions are computed analytically. In particular, a perfect clover term can be extracted from the quark-gluon vertex. The perturbatively perfect action is directly applicable to heavy quark physics. The construction of a perfect QCD action for light quarks should include nonperturbative effects, which is possible using numerical methods. Classically perfect quark and gluon fields are constructed as well. They allow to interpolate the continuum fields from the lattice data. In this way one can obtain information about space-time regions between lattice points. The classically perfect fields

  6. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility of the QCD vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Musakhanov, M.; Siddikov, M.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic susceptibility of the QCD vacuum, based on the instanton vacuum. Starting from the instanton liquid model for the instanton vacuum, we derive the light-quark partition function Z [ V, T,mˆ ] in the presence of the current quark mass mˆ as well as the external Abelian vector and tensor fields. We calculate a two-point correlation function relevant for the magnetic susceptibility and derive it beyond the chiral limit. We obtain for the different flavors the following magnetic susceptibility: χu, d< i ψu,d†ψu,d > 0 ∼ 40- 45MeV, while χs0 ≃ 6- 10MeV with the quark condensate < iψ† ψ > 0.

  8. Cut-constructible part of QCD amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2006-05-15

    Unitarity cuts are widely used in analytic computation of loop amplitudes in gauge theories such as QCD. We expand upon the technique introduced in hep-ph/0503132 to carry out any finite unitarity cut integral. This technique naturally separates the contributions of bubble, triangle and box integrals in one-loop amplitudes and is not constrained to any particular helicity configurations. Loop momentum integration is reduced to a sequence of algebraic operations. We discuss the extraction of the residues at higher-order poles. Additionally, we offer concise algebraic formulas for expressing coefficients of three-mass triangle integrals. As an application, we compute all remaining coefficients of bubble and triangle integrals for nonsupersymmetric six-gluon amplitudes.

  9. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  10. Study of the pi+pi-J//psi Mass Spectrum Via Initial State Radiation at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; /

    2008-08-15

    We present an update of the study of the Y(4260) resonance, produced in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{sub ISR} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} J/{psi} using initial-state radiation events at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. This study is based on 454 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at a center-of-mass energy in the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance region. From a fit with a single non-relativistic Breit-Wigner shape we obtain updated parameters for the Y(4260) resonance which are m{sub Y} = 4252 {+-} 6{sub -3}{sup +2} MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}{sub Y} = 105 {+-} 18{sub -6}{sup +4} MeV/c{sup 2}; we also measure {Beta}({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} J/{psi}){Lambda}{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}} = (7.5 {+-} 0.9 {+-} 0.8) eV. We cannot confirm the recent BELLE observation of a broad structure around 4.05GeV/c{sup 2} in this decay mode.

  11. Characterization of solvent-extractable organics in urban aerosols based on mass spectrum analysis and hygroscopic growth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Toshiyuki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2011-11-01

    To characterize atmospheric particulate organics with respect to polarity, aerosol samples collected on filters in the urban area of Nagoya, Japan, in 2009 were extracted using water, methanol, and ethyl acetate. The extracts were atomized and analyzed using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer. The atmospheric concentrations of the extracted organics were determined using phthalic acid as a reference material. Comparison of the organic carbon concentrations measured using a carbon analyzer and the HR-ToF-AMS suggests that organics extracted with water (WSOM) and ethyl acetate (EASOM) or those extracted with methanol (MSOM) comprise the greater part of total organics. The oxygen-carbon ratios (O/C) of the extracted organics varied: 0.51-0.75 (WSOM), 0.37-0.48 (MSOM), and 0.27-0.33 (EASOM). In the ion-group analysis, WSOM, MSOM, and EASOM were clearly characterized by the different fractions of the CH and CO(2) groups. On the basis of the hygroscopic growth measurements of the extracts, κ of organics at 90% relative humidity (κ(org)) were estimated. Positive correlation of κ(org) with O/C (r 0.70) was found for MSOM and EASOM, but no clear correlation was found for WSOM. PMID:21877700

  12. Dark-matter QCD-axion searches.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2015-10-01

    In the late 20th century, cosmology became a precision science. Now, at the beginning of the next century, the parameters describing how our universe evolved from the Big Bang are generally known to a few percent. One key parameter is the total mass density of the universe. Normal matter constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass density. Observations suggest this additional mass, the dark matter, is cold (that is, moving nonrelativistically in the early universe) and interacts feebly if at all with normal matter and radiation. There's no known such elementary particle, so the strong presumption is the dark matter consists of particle relics of a new kind left over from the Big Bang. One of the most important questions in science is the nature of this dark matter. One attractive particle dark-matter candidate is the axion. The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle arising in a simple and elegant extension to the standard model of particle physics that nulls otherwise observable CP-violating effects (where CP is the product of charge reversal C and parity inversion P) in quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). A light axion of mass 10(-(6-3)) eV (the invisible axion) would couple extraordinarily weakly to normal matter and radiation and would therefore be extremely difficult to detect in the laboratory. However, such an axion is a compelling dark-matter candidate and is therefore a target of a number of searches. Compared with other particle dark-matter candidates, the plausible range of axion dark-matter couplings and masses is narrowly constrained. This focused search range allows for definitive searches, where a nonobservation would seriously impugn the dark-matter QCD-axion hypothesis. Axion searches use a wide range of technologies, and the experiment sensitivities are now reaching likely dark-matter axion couplings and masses. This article is a selective overview of the current generation of sensitive axion searches. Not all techniques and experiments

  13. Dark-matter QCD-axion searches

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2015-01-01

    In the late 20th century, cosmology became a precision science. Now, at the beginning of the next century, the parameters describing how our universe evolved from the Big Bang are generally known to a few percent. One key parameter is the total mass density of the universe. Normal matter constitutes only a small fraction of the total mass density. Observations suggest this additional mass, the dark matter, is cold (that is, moving nonrelativistically in the early universe) and interacts feebly if at all with normal matter and radiation. There’s no known such elementary particle, so the strong presumption is the dark matter consists of particle relics of a new kind left over from the Big Bang. One of the most important questions in science is the nature of this dark matter. One attractive particle dark-matter candidate is the axion. The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle arising in a simple and elegant extension to the standard model of particle physics that nulls otherwise observable CP-violating effects (where CP is the product of charge reversal C and parity inversion P) in quantum chromo dynamics (QCD). A light axion of mass 10−(6–3) eV (the invisible axion) would couple extraordinarily weakly to normal matter and radiation and would therefore be extremely difficult to detect in the laboratory. However, such an axion is a compelling dark-matter candidate and is therefore a target of a number of searches. Compared with other particle dark-matter candidates, the plausible range of axion dark-matter couplings and masses is narrowly constrained. This focused search range allows for definitive searches, where a nonobservation would seriously impugn the dark-matter QCD-axion hypothesis. Axion searches use a wide range of technologies, and the experiment sensitivities are now reaching likely dark-matter axion couplings and masses. This article is a selective overview of the current generation of sensitive axion searches. Not all techniques and

  14. Gluonic excitations in the hadronic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.

    2014-06-01

    QCD at low energy features a gluonic field that is strongly coupled to itself and to quarks. I will present a summary of what we know about the role that excitations of the gluonic field play in determining the spectrum of meson resonances. Recent studies using lattice techniques have suggested a phenomenology of gluonic excitations within QCD that leads to hybrid mesons with both exotic and non-exotic quantum numbers. I will discuss these calculations and describe their relationship to current experimental knowledge and to forthcoming experiments at Jefferson Lab and elsewhere.

  15. Calculation of the nucleon axial charge in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D. B. Renner; R. G. Edwards; G. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinsky; D. G. Richards; W. Schroers

    2006-09-01

    Protons and neutrons have a rich structure in terms of their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Understanding this structure requires solving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However QCD is extremely complicated, so we must numerically solve the equations of QCD using a method known as lattice QCD. Here we describe a typical lattice QCD calculation by examining our recent computation of the nucleon axial charge.

  16. Twenty-first Century Lattice Gauge Theory: Results from the QCD Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) reduces the strong interactions, in all their variety, to an elegant nonabelian gauge theory. It clearly and elegantly explains hadrons at short distances, which has led to its universal acceptance. Since its advent, however, many of its long-distance, emergent properties have been believed to be true, without having been demonstrated to be true. This paper reviews a variety of results in this regime that have been established with lattice gauge theory, directly from the QCD Lagrangian. This body of work sheds light on the origin of hadron masses, its interplay with dynamical symmetry breaking, as well as on other intriguing features such as the phase structure of QCD. In addition, nonperturbative QCD is quantitatively important to many aspects of particle physics (especially the quark flavor sector), nuclear physics, and astrophysics. This review also surveys some of the most interesting connections to those subjects.

  17. Unconstrained Hamiltonian formulation of low energy QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Hans-Peter

    2014-04-01

    Using a generalized polar decomposition of the gauge fields into gaugerotation and gauge-invariant parts, which Abelianises the Non-Abelian Gauss-law constraints to be implemented, a Hamiltonian formulation of QCD in terms of gauge invariant dynamical variables can be achieved. The exact implementation of the Gauss laws reduces the colored spin-1 gluons and spin-1/2 quarks to unconstrained colorless spin-0, spin-1, spin-2 and spin-3 glueball fields and colorless Rarita-Schwinger fields respectively. The obtained physical Hamiltonian naturally admits a systematic strongcoupling expansion in powers of λ = g-2/3, equivalent to an expansion in the number of spatial derivatives. The leading-order term corresponds to non-interacting hybridglueballs, whose low-lying spectrum can be calculated with high accuracy by solving the Schrödinger-equation of the Dirac-Yang-Mills quantum mechanics of spatially constant fields (at the moment only for the 2-color case). The discrete glueball excitation spectrum shows a universal string-like behaviour with practically all excitation energy going in to the increase of the strengths of merely two fields, the "constant Abelian fields" corresponding to the zero-energy valleys of the chromomagnetic potential. Inclusion of the fermionic degrees of freedom significantly lowers the spectrum and allows for the study of the sigma meson. Higher-order terms in λ lead to interactions between the hybridglueballs and can be taken into account systematically using perturbation theory in λ, allowing for the study of IR-renormalisation and Lorentz invarianz. The existence of the generalized polar decomposition used, the position of the zeros of the corresponding Jacobian (Gribov horizons), and the ranges of the physical variables can be investigated by solving a system of algebraic equations. Its exact solution for the case of one spatial dimension and first numerical solutions for two and three spatial dimensions indicate that there is a finite

  18. QCD investigation of polarization effects in the inclusive photoproduction of SUSY particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykhov, F.S.; Akhmedov, A.I.

    1995-10-01

    Polarization effects in the inclusive photoproduction of SUSY particles is investigated in QCD. Two-spin asymmetries are studied as functions of the transverse momentum, the effective mass of scalar pairs, and the scattering angle. It is shown that information about the masses of scalar quarks can be deduced from the analysis of spin asymmetry. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Characterization of the novel broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor CTx-0294885 as an affinity reagent for mass spectrometry-based kinome profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxi; Holmes, Ian P; Hochgräfe, Falko; Walker, Scott R; Ali, Naveid A; Humphrey, Emily S; Wu, Jianmin; de Silva, Melanie; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Connor, Theresa; Falk, Hendrik; Allan, Lynda; Street, Ian P; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Monahan, Brendon J; Peat, Thomas S; Daly, Roger J

    2013-07-01

    Kinase enrichment utilizing broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors enables the identification of large proportions of the expressed kinome by mass spectrometry. However, the existing inhibitors are still inadequate in covering the entire kinome. Here, we identified a novel bisanilino pyrimidine, CTx-0294885, exhibiting inhibitory activity against a broad range of kinases in vitro, and further developed it into a Sepharose-supported kinase capture reagent. Use of a quantitative proteomics approach confirmed the selectivity of CTx-0294885-bound beads for kinase enrichment. Large-scale CTx-0294885-based affinity purification followed by LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 235 protein kinases from MDA-MB-231 cells, including all members of the AKT family that had not been previously detected by other broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors. Addition of CTx-0294885 to a mixture of three kinase inhibitors commonly used for kinase-enrichment increased the number of kinase identifications to 261, representing the largest kinome coverage from a single cell line reported to date. Coupling phosphopeptide enrichment with affinity purification using the four inhibitors enabled the identification of 799 high-confidence phosphosites on 183 kinases, ∼10% of which were localized to the activation loop, and included previously unreported phosphosites on BMP2K, MELK, HIPK2, and PRKDC. Therefore, CTx-0294885 represents a powerful new reagent for analysis of kinome signaling networks that may facilitate development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000239. PMID:23692254

  20. Macroscopic Universality: Why QCD in Matter is Subtle

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, R.A.; Nowak, M.A.; Papp, G.; Zahed, I. |||||

    1996-12-01

    We use a chiral random matrix model with 2{ital N}{sub {ital f}} flavors to mock up the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential. We show that the 1/{ital N} approximation breaks down in the quenched state with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. The breakdown condition is set by the divergence of a two-point function that is shown to follow the general lore of macroscopic universality. In this state, the fermionic fluctuations are not suppressed in the large {ital N} limit. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Single-Sector Supersymmetry Breaking in Supersymmetric QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Sebastian; Kachru, Shamit; /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    We construct examples of single-sector supersymmetry breaking based on simple deformations of supersymmetric QCD with (weakly) gauged flavor group. These theories are calculable in a weakly coupled Seiberg dual description. In these models, some of the particles in the first two generations of quarks and leptons are composites of the same strong dynamics which leads to dynamical supersymmetry breaking. Such models can explain the hierarchies of Yukawa couplings in the Standard Model, in a way that predictively correlates with the spectrum of SUSY-breaking soft terms.

  2. An Anderson-like model of the QCD chiral transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    We study the problems of chiral symmetry breaking and eigenmode localisation in finite-temperature QCD by looking at the lattice Dirac operator as a random Hamiltonian. We recast the staggered Dirac operator into an unconventional three-dimensional Anderson Hamiltonian ("Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian") carrying internal degrees of freedom, with disorder provided by the fluctuations of the gauge links. In this framework, we identify the features relevant to chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in the ordering of the local Polyakov lines, and in the related correlation between spatial links across time slices, thus tying the two phenomena to the deconfinement transition. We then build a toy model based on QCD and on the Dirac-Anderson approach, replacing the Polyakov lines with spin variables and simplifying the dynamics of the spatial gauge links, but preserving the above-mentioned relevant dynamical features. Our toy model successfully reproduces the main features of the QCD spectrum and of the Dirac eigenmodes concerning chiral symmetry breaking and localisation, both in the ordered (deconfined) and disordered (confined) phases. Moreover, it allows us to study separately the roles played in the two phenomena by the diagonal and the off-diagonal terms of the Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian. Our results support our expectation that chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low modes are closely related, and that both are triggered by the deconfinement transition.

  3. N* Spectroscopy from Lattice QCD: The Roper Explained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinweber, Derek; Kamleh, Waseem; Kiratidis, Adrian; Liu, Zhan-Wei; Mahbub, Selim; Roberts, Dale; Stokes, Finn; Thomas, Anthony W.; Wu, Jiajun

    This brief review focuses on the low-lying even- and odd-parity excitations of the nucleon obtained in recent lattice QCD calculations. Commencing with a survey of the 2014-15 literature we'll see that results for the first even-parity excitation energy can differ by as much as 1 GeV, a rather unsatisfactory situation. Following a brief review of the methods used to isolate excitations of the nucleon in lattice QCD, and drawing on recent advances, we'll see how a consensus on the low-lying spectrum has emerged among many different lattice groups. To provide insight into the nature of these states we'll review the wave functions and electromagnetic form factors that are available for a few of these states. Consistent with the Luscher formalism for extracting phase shifts from finite volume spectra, the Hamiltonian approach to effective field theory in finite volume can provide guidance on the manner in which physical quantities manifest themselves in the finite volume of the lattice. With this insight, we will address the question; Have we seen the Roper in lattice QCD?

  4. anQCD: Fortran programs for couplings at complex momenta in various analytic QCD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd

    2016-02-01

    We provide three Fortran programs which evaluate the QCD analytic (holomorphic) couplings Aν(Q2) for complex or real squared momenta Q2. These couplings are holomorphic analogs of the powers a(Q2)ν of the underlying perturbative QCD (pQCD) coupling a(Q2) ≡αs(Q2) / π, in three analytic QCD models (anQCD): Fractional Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT), Two-delta analytic QCD (2 δanQCD), and Massive Perturbation Theory (MPT). The index ν can be noninteger. The provided programs do basically the same job as the Mathematica package anQCD.m published by us previously (Ayala and Cvetič, 2015), but are now written in Fortran.

  5. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  6. Innovations in Lattice QCD Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today.

  7. Sudakov safety in perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Marzani, Simone; Thaler, Jesse

    2015-06-01

    Traditional calculations in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) are based on an order-by-order expansion in the strong coupling αs. Observables that are calculable in this way are known as "safe." Recently, a class of unsafe observables was discovered that do not have a valid αs expansion but are nevertheless calculable in pQCD using all-orders resummation. These observables are called "Sudakov safe" since singularities at each αs order are regulated by an all-orders Sudakov form factor. In this paper, we give a concrete definition of Sudakov safety based on conditional probability distributions, and we study a one-parameter family of momentum sharing observables that interpolate between the safe and unsafe regimes. The boundary between these regimes is particularly interesting, as the resulting distribution can be understood as the ultraviolet fixed point of a generalized fragmentation function, yielding a leading behavior that is independent of αs.

  8. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, J. |; CDF Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    CDF has recently concluded a very successful 1992--93 data run in which an integrated luminosity of 21.3 pb {sup {minus}1} was written to tape. The large data sample allows for a greater discovery potential for new phenomena and for better statistical and systematic precision in analysis of conventional physics. This paper summarizes some of the new results from QCD analyses for this run.

  9. ADS/CFT and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U. /SLAC

    2007-02-21

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal .eld theories in physical spacetime leads to an analytic, semi-classical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance and dimensional counting at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Although QCD is not conformally invariant, one can nevertheless use the mathematical representation of the conformal group in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space to construct a first approximation to the theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence also provides insights into the inherently non-perturbative aspects of QCD, such as the orbital and radial spectra of hadrons and the form of hadronic wavefunctions. In particular, we show that there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of decay constants, form factors, and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. New relativistic lightfront equations in ordinary space-time are found which reproduce the results obtained using the 5-dimensional theory. The effective light-front equations possess remarkable algebraic structures and integrability properties. Since they are complete and orthonormal, the AdS/CFT model wavefunctions can also be used as a basis for the diagonalization of the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian, thus systematically improving the AdS/CFT approximation.

  10. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27517766

  11. Family of dilatons and metrics for AdS/QCD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Alfredo; Cabrera, Paulina

    2016-06-01

    We explore some possibilities for obtaining useful metrics and dilatons for anti-de Sitter (AdS)/QCD models. As a guideline, we consider dilatons and/or metrics that on the one hand reproduce the mesonic spectrum, and that on the other hand allow us a correct implementation of chiral symmetry breaking in AdS/QCD models. We discuss two procedures: one is based on supersymmetric quantum mechanics techniques and the other considers the interpolation between some limits on dilatons and/or metrics.

  12. Realization of chiral symmetry breaking and restoration in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelabi, Kaddour; Fang, Zhen; Huang, Mei; Li, Danning; Wu, Yue-Liang

    2016-05-01

    With proper profiles of the scalar potential and the dilaton field, for the first time, the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the vacuum and its restoration at finite temperature are correctly realized in the holographic QCD framework. In the chiral limit, a nonzero chiral condensate develops in the vacuum and decreases with temperature, and the phase transition is of the second order for a two-flavor case and of the first order for a three-flavor case. In the case of explicit chiral symmetry breaking, in the two-flavor case, the second-order phase transition turns into a crossover with any nonzero current quark mass, and in the three-flavor case, the first-order phase transition turns into a crossover at a finite current quark mass. The correct description of chiral symmetry breaking and restoration makes the holographic QCD models more powerful in dealing with nonperturbative QCD phenomena. This framework can be regarded as a general setup in an application of AdS/CFT to describe conventional Ginzburg-Landau-Wilson-type phase transitions, e.g. in condensed matter and cosmology systems.

  13. Hadron Physics and QCD: Just the Basic Facts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Crag D.

    2015-07-01

    With discovery of the Higgs boson, the Standard Model of Particle Physics became complete. Its formulation is a remarkable story; and the process of verification is continuing, with the most important chapter being the least well understood. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is that part of the Standard Model which is supposed to describe all of nuclear physics and yet, almost fifty years after the discovery of quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD moulds the basic bricks for nuclei: pious, neutrons, protons. QCD is characterized by two emergent phenomena: confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB), whose implications are extraordinary. This contribution describes how DCSB, not the Higgs boson, generates more than 98% of the visible mass in the Universe, explains why confinement guarantees that condensates, those quantities that were commonly viewed as constant mass- scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons, and elucidates a range of observable consequences of confinement and DCSB whose measurement is the focus of a vast international experimental programme.

  14. FermiQCD: A tool kit for parallel lattice QCD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pierro, M.

    2002-03-01

    We present here the most recent version of FermiQCD, a collection of C++ classes, functions and parallel algorithms for lattice QCD, based on Matrix Distributed Processing. FermiQCD allows fast development of parallel lattice applications and includes some SSE2 optimizations for clusters of Pentium 4 PCs.

  15. Localization and chiral symmetry in three flavor domain wall QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, David J.; Bowler, Kenneth C.; Boyle, Peter A.; Hart, Alistair; Kenway, Richard D.; Tweedie, Robert J.; Christ, Norman H.; Cohen, Saul D.; Li, Shu; Lin, Meifeng; Mawhinney, Robert D.; Clark, Michael A.; Dawson, Chris; Joo, Balint; Jung, Chulwoo; Maynard, Christopher M.; Ohta, Shigemi; Yamaguchi, Azusa

    2008-01-01

    We present results for the dependence of the residual mass of domain wall fermions on the size of the fifth dimension and its relation to the density and localization properties of low-lying eigenvectors of the corresponding Hermitian Wilson Dirac operator in three flavor domain wall QCD. Using the DBW2 and Iwasaki gauge actions, we generate ensembles of configurations with a 16{sup 3}x32 space-time volume and an extent of 8 in the fifth dimension for the sea quarks. We demonstrate the existence of a regime where the degree of locality, the size of chiral symmetry breaking, and the rate of topology change can be acceptable for inverse lattice spacings a{sup -1}{>=}1.6 GeV, enabling a programme of simulations of 2+1 flavor QCD to be conducted safely in this region of parameter space.

  16. Duality between QCD perturbative series and power corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narison, S.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2009-08-01

    We elaborate on the relation between perturbative and power-like corrections to short-distance sensitive QCD observables. We confront theoretical expectations with explicit perturbative calculations existing in literature. As is expected, the quadratic correction is dual to a long perturbative series and one should use one of them but not both. However, this might be true only for very long perturbative series, with number of terms needed in most cases exceeding the number of terms available. What has not been foreseen, the quartic corrections might also be dual to the perturbative series. If confirmed, this would imply a crucial modification of the dogma. We confront this quadratic correction against existing phenomenology (QCD (spectral) sum rules scales, determinations of light quark masses and of αs from τ-decay). We find no contradiction and (to some extent) better agreement with the data and with recent lattice calculations.

  17. Bs→Kℓν form factors from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, C. M.; Lepage, G. Peter; Monahan, Christopher; Na, Heechang; Shigemitsu, Junko

    2014-09-01

    We report the first lattice QCD calculation of the form factors for the standard model tree-level decay Bs→K ℓν. In combination with future measurement, this calculation will provide an alternative exclusive semileptonic determination of |Vub|. We compare our results with previous model calculations, make predictions for differential decay rates and branching fractions, and predict the ratio of differential branching fractions between Bs→Kτν and Bs→Kμν. We also present standard model predictions for differential decay rate forward-backward asymmetries and polarization fractions and calculate potentially useful ratios of Bs→K form factors with those of the fictitious Bs→ηs decay. Our lattice simulations utilize nonrelativistic QCD b and highly improved staggered light quarks on a subset of the MILC Collaboration 2+1 asqtad gauge configurations, including two lattice spacings and a range of light quark masses.

  18. Hyperon-Nulceon Scattering from Fully-Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Elizabetta Pallante; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We present results of the first fully-dynamical lattice QCD determination of hyperon-nucleon scattering. One s-wave phase shift was determined for n{Lambda} scattering in both spin-channels at pion masses of 350, 490, and 590 MeV, and for n{Sigma}^- scattering in both spin channels at pion masses of 490, and 590 MeV. The calculations were performed with domain-wall valence quarks on dynamical, staggered gauge configurations with a lattice spacing of b ~0.125 fm.

  19. Quarkonium-nucleus bound states from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S.  R.; Chang, E.; Cohen, S.  D.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. -W.; Orginos, K.; Parreño, A.; Savage, M.  J.

    2015-06-11

    Quarkonium-nucleus systems are composed of two interacting hadronic states without common valence quarks, which interact primarily through multi-gluon exchanges, realizing a color van der Waals force. We present lattice QCD calculations of the interactions of strange and charm quarkonia with light nuclei. Both the strangeonium-nucleus and charmonium-nucleus systems are found to be relatively deeply bound when the masses of the three light quarks are set equal to that of the physical strange quark. Extrapolation of these results to the physical light-quark masses suggests that the binding energy of charmonium to nuclear matter is B < 40 MeV.

  20. Soft and Hard Scale QCD Dynamics in Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for light quark hadron physics, we explore the extension to masses and electroweak decay constants of ground state pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in the c- and b-quark regions. We make a systematic study of the effectiveness of a constituent mass concept as a replacement for a heavy quark dressed propagator for such states. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is explored within the same model to provide an estimate of the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD.

  1. Non-perturbative QCD Modeling and Meson Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2009-04-01

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for light quark hadron physics, we explore the extension to masses and electroweak decay constants of ground state pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in the c- and b-quark regions. We make a systematic study of the effectiveness of a constituent mass concept as a replacement for a heavy quark dressed propagator for such states. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is explored within the same model to provide an estimate of the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD.

  2. Non-perturbative QCD Modeling and Meson Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2009-04-20

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for light quark hadron physics, we explore the extension to masses and electroweak decay constants of ground state pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in the c- and b-quark regions. We make a systematic study of the effectiveness of a constituent mass concept as a replacement for a heavy quark dressed propagator for such states. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is explored within the same model to provide an estimate of the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD.

  3. QCD for Postgraduates (2/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Modern QCD - Lecture 2 We will start discussing the matter content of the theory and revisit the experimental measurements that led to the discovery of quarks. We will then consider a classic QCD observable, the R-ratio, and use it to illustrate the appearance of UV divergences and the need to renormalize the coupling constant of QCD. We will then discuss asymptotic freedom and confinement. Finally, we will examine a case where soft and collinear infrared divergences appear, will discuss the soft approximation in QCD and will introduce the concept of infrared safe jets.

  4. Comprehensive 2-Dimensional Gas Chromatography coupled to a Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for broad-spectrum organic analysis on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.; Block, B.; Waite, J. H.; Sacks, R.; McGuigan, M.; Libardoni, M.; Stevens, P. T.; Hasselbrink, E. F.; Hunt, P.

    An analytical chemistry suite for in-situ broad-spectrum analysis of organic compounds on the Martian surface will be presented. The purpose is to identify nature and abundance of organic components in solid sample material. The instrument uses pyrolysis extraction followed by a comprehensive 2-dimensional gas chromatograph (2DGC) coupled to a Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). The 2DGC consists of a serial arrangement of two columns connected by a thermal modulator. The first column with a non-stationary phase separates components based primarily on their volatility, whereas the second column with a polar stationary phase separates the sample material based on the polarity. The thermal modulator is a resistively heated and liquid cooled wall coated capillary tube made out of stainless steel. The TOFMS uses electron impact ionization with orthogonal ion acceleration, a reflectron and a multi-channel plate detector. We will present the instrument design for the laboratory prototype, focusing on a discussion of the critical instrument components. We will show experimental results of Martian analogous Earth soil samples. These samples yield a chromatographic peak capacity of more than 1000 peaks. These are displayed as highly structured chromatograms. Qualitative identification of sample constituents can be derived from homologous series standards. These results are further verified via the TOFMS system. By coupling the 2DGC to a TOFMS, quantitative and mass spectrometric information is available for each data point in the chromatogram. This design will allow us to remotely analyze Martian soil samples to determine the presence, nature and abundance of organic materials.

  5. The η ' g* g(*) vertex including the η '-meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Parkhomenko, A. Ya

    2003-10-01

    The η^' g^* g^{(*)} effective vertex function is calculated in the QCD hard-scattering approach, taking into account the η^'-meson mass. We work in the approximation in which only one non-leading Gegenbauer moment for both the quark-antiquark and the gluonic light-cone distribution amplitudes for the η^'-meson is kept. The vertex function with one off-shell gluon is shown to have the form (valid for \\vert q_1^2 \\vert > m_{η^'^2) F_{η^' g^* g} (q_1^2, 0, m_{η^'^2) = m_{η^'^2 H(q_1^2)/(q_1^2 - m_{η^'^2), where H( q 1 2) is a slowly varying function, derived analytically in this paper. The resulting vertex function is in agreement with the phenomenologically inferred form of this vertex obtained from an analysis of the CLEO data on the η^'-meson energy spectrum in the decay Upsilon(1S) to η^' X. We also present an interpolating formula for the vertex function F_{η^' g^* g} (q_1^2, 0, m_{η^'^2) for the space-like region of the virtuality q 1 2, which satisfies the QCD anomaly normalization for on-shell gluons and the perturbative QCD result for the gluon virtuality \\vert q_1^2\\vert gtrsim 2 GeV2.

  6. A novel strategy for the discrimination of gelatinous Chinese medicines based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Shen, Yuping; Xu, Ying; Maqueda, Aida Serra; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Qinan; Tam, James P

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous Chinese medicines made from mammalian skin or horn or reptile shell are a very important type of animal-derived Chinese medicine. They have been extensively used either as both hemopoietic and hemostatic agents to treat vertigo, palpitation, hematuria, and insomnia in traditional Chinese medicine clinics; consumed as a popular tonic for weaker persons such as the elderly or women after giving birth; or further manufactured to health supplements for certain populations. However, they cannot be discriminated from each other by only using the routine approach in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, as it lacks enough specificity and, consequently, and the requirements can be met even by adding assayed ingredients. In this study, our efforts to differentiate three gelatinous Chinese medicines, Asini Corii Colla, Cervi Cornus Colla, and Testudinis Carapacis ET Plastri Colla, are presented, and a novel strategy based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detector analysis is proposed herein. Fourteen diagnostic fragments identified from the digests of these medicines were exclusively selected for their discrimination. By taking advantage of the favorable features of this strategy, it is feasible and convenient to identify enzymatic-digested peptides originated from signature proteins in each medicine, which thus could be employed as potential biomarkers for their form of raw medicinal material, and the pulverized and the complex especially, that being the direct basis for authentication purpose. PMID:26345994

  7. AN Fe XXIV ABSORPTION LINE IN THE PERSISTENT SPECTRUM OF THE DIPPING LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY 1A 1744-361

    SciTech Connect

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-07-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT {approx} 1.0 keV) plus power law ({Gamma} {approx} 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 {+-} 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km s{sup -1}. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27{sup +2}{sub -3} eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >10{sup 3.6} erg cm s{sup -1}. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an 'atoll' source.

  8. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 +/- 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe xxvi (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition.We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of nu < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 +/- 1)×10(exp 17) /sq. cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm/s. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source

  9. Order of the Roberge-Weiss endpoint (finite size transition) in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    We consider the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss (RW) first order transition line present for imaginary baryon chemical potentials. We remark that it coincides with the finite size transition relevant in the context of large Nc QCD and study its order in the theory with two degenerate flavors. The RW endpoint is first order in the limit of large and small quark masses, while it weakens for intermediate masses where it is likely in the Ising 3D universality class. Phenomenological implications and further speculations about the QCD phase diagram are discussed.

  10. AdS/QCD model from an effective action for open string tachyons

    SciTech Connect

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kiritsis, Elias; Paredes, Angel

    2010-06-01

    We construct a new, simple phenomenological model along the lines of AdS/QCD. The essential new ingredient is the brane-antibrane effective action including the open string tachyon proposed by Sen [Phys. Rev. D 68, 066008 (2003).]. Chiral symmetry breaking happens because of tachyon dynamics. We fit a large number of low-spin meson masses at the 10%-15% level. The only free parameters involved in the fits correspond to the overall QCD scale and the quark masses. Several aspects of previous models are qualitatively improved.

  11. Order of the Roberge-Weiss endpoint (finite size transition) in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    We consider the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss (RW) first order transition line present for imaginary baryon chemical potentials. We remark that it coincides with the finite size transition relevant in the context of large N{sub c} QCD and study its order in the theory with two degenerate flavors. The RW endpoint is first order in the limit of large and small quark masses, while it weakens for intermediate masses where it is likely in the Ising 3D universality class. Phenomenological implications and further speculations about the QCD phase diagram are discuss0008.

  12. QCDNUM: Fast QCD evolution and convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botje, M.

    2011-02-01

    The QCDNUM program numerically solves the evolution equations for parton densities and fragmentation functions in perturbative QCD. Un-polarised parton densities can be evolved up to next-to-next-to-leading order in powers of the strong coupling constant, while polarised densities or fragmentation functions can be evolved up to next-to-leading order. Other types of evolution can be accessed by feeding alternative sets of evolution kernels into the program. A versatile convolution engine provides tools to compute parton luminosities, cross-sections in hadron-hadron scattering, and deep inelastic structure functions in the zero-mass scheme or in generalised mass schemes. Input to these calculations are either the QCDNUM evolved densities, or those read in from an external parton density repository. Included in the software distribution are packages to calculate zero-mass structure functions in un-polarised deep inelastic scattering, and heavy flavour contributions to these structure functions in the fixed flavour number scheme. Program summaryProgram title: QCDNUM version: 17.00 Catalogue identifier: AEHV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45 736 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 911 569 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran-77 Computer: All Operating system: All RAM: Typically 3 Mbytes Classification: 11.5 Nature of problem: Evolution of the strong coupling constant and parton densities, up to next-to-next-to-leading order in perturbative QCD. Computation of observable quantities by Mellin convolution of the evolved densities with partonic cross-sections. Solution method: Parametrisation of the parton densities as linear or quadratic splines on a discrete grid, and evolution of the spline

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY DURING ECLIPSE OF THE YOUNG SUBSTELLAR ECLIPSING BINARY 2MASS 0535-0546. I. PRIMARY SPECTRUM: COOL SPOTS VERSUS OPACITY UNCERTAINTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Stassun, Keivan G.; Doppmann, Greg W. E-mail: keivan.stassun@vanderbilt.ed

    2010-10-20

    We present high-resolution Keck optical spectra of the very young substellar eclipsing binary 2MASS J05352184-0546085, obtained during eclipse of the lower-mass (secondary) brown dwarf. The observations yield the spectrum of the higher-mass (primary) brown dwarf alone, with negligible ({approx}1.6%) contamination by the secondary. We perform a simultaneous fine analysis of the TiO-{epsilon} band and the red lobe of the K I doublet, using state-of-the-art PHOENIX DUSTY and COND synthetic spectra. Comparing the effective temperature and surface gravity derived from these fits to the empirically determined surface gravity of the primary (log g = 3.5) then allows us to test the model spectra as well as probe the prevailing photospheric conditions. We find that: (1) fits to TiO-{epsilon} alone imply T{sub eff} = 2500 {+-} 50 K; (2) at this T{sub eff}, fits to K I imply log g = 3.0, 0.5 dex lower than the true value; and (3) at the true log g, K I fits yield T{sub eff} = 2650 {+-} 50 K, {approx}150 K higher than from TiO-{epsilon} alone. On the one hand, these are the trends expected in the presence of cool spots covering a large fraction of the primary's surface (as theorized previously to explain the observed T{sub eff} reversal between the primary and secondary). Specifically, our results can be reproduced by an unspotted stellar photosphere with T{sub eff} = 2700 K and (empirical) log g = 3.5, coupled with axisymmetric cool spots that are 15% cooler (2300 K), have an effective log g = 3.0 (0.5 dex lower than photospheric), and cover 70% of the surface. On the other hand, the trends in our analysis can also be reproduced by model opacity errors: there are lacks in the synthetic TiO-{epsilon} opacities, at least for higher-gravity field dwarfs. Stringently discriminating between the two possibilities requires combining the present results with an equivalent analysis of the secondary (predicted to be relatively unspotted compared to the primary).

  14. QCD tests in electron-positron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, T.

    1995-11-01

    Recent results on QCD tests at the Z{sup o} resonance are described. Measurements of Color factor ratios, and studies of final state photon radiation are performed by the LEP experiments. QCD tests using a longitudinally polarized beam are reported by the SLD experiment.

  15. Lattice QCD and High Baryon Density State

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Keitaro; Nakamura, Atsushi; Motoki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Takuya

    2011-10-21

    We report our recent studies on the finite density QCD obtained from lattice QCD simulation with clover-improved Wilson fermions of two flavor and RG-improved gauge action. We approach the subject from two paths, i.e., the imaginary and chemical potentials.

  16. Solvable models and hidden symmetries in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Yepez-Martinez, Tochtli; Hess, P. O.; Civitarese, O.; Lerma H., S.

    2010-12-23

    We show that QCD Hamiltonians at low energy exhibit an SU(2) structure, when only few orbital levels are considered. In case many orbital levels are taken into account we also find a semi-analytic solution for the energy levels of the dominant part of the QCD Hamiltonian. The findings are important to propose the structure of phenomenological models.

  17. Importance of imaginary chemical potential for determination of QCD phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Kouno, Hiroaki; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2009-10-01

    Lattice QCD (LQCD) calculations have the well-known sign problem at finite real chemical potential. One approach to circumvent the problem is the analytic continuation of LQCD data to real chemical potential from imaginary one. This approach, however, has some problems in moderate real chemical potential region. Therefore, we propose the new approach, Imaginary chemical potential matching approach, to quantitatively determine the QCD phase diagram by using a phenomenological model that reproduce LQCD data at imaginary chemical potential. In this approach, we fit the model parameter by LQCD data at imaginary chemical potential. At the imaginary chemical potential, the QCD partition function has the special periodicity called Roberge-Weiss (RW) periodicity. Therefore, an adopted model must have the RW periodicity. We reveal the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model has the RW periodicity. Moreover, we investigate the meson mass behavior and show that meson mass is useful for fitting the model parameters at imaginary chemical potential.

  18. Windows on the axion. [quantum chromodynamics (QCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the theta vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10(-12)eV is approx. less than m(a) which is approx. less than 10(6)eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Laboratory experiments have excluded masses greater than 10(4)eV, leaving unprobed some 16 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producting detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10(-6)eV is approx. less than m(a) is approx. less than 10(-3)eV and 1eV is approx. less than m(a) is approx. less than 5eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve heavenly axions, are being planned or are underway.

  19. QCD with two flavors of Wilson fermions: The QCD vacuum, the Aoki vacuum, and other vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Azcoiti, V.; Vaquero, A.; Di Carlo, G.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the vacuum structure of QCD with two flavors of Wilson fermions. We derive two possible scenarios: (i) If the spectral density {rho}{sub U}({lambda},{kappa}) of the overlap Hamiltonian in a fixed background gauge field is not symmetric in {lambda}, Hermiticity is violated and Hermiticity violation effects could influence numerical determinations of the {eta} meson mass if we are not near enough to the continuum limit, where Hermiticity should be recovered; (ii) otherwise we argue that, under certain assumptions, new phases appear beside the Aoki phase, which can be characterized by a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value of i{psi}{sub u}{gamma}{sub 5}{psi}{sub u}+i{psi}{sub d}{gamma}{sub 5}{psi}{sub d}, and with vacuum states that cannot be connected with the Aoki vacua by parity-flavor symmetry transformations. Quenched numerical simulations suggest that the second scenario is more likely realized.

  20. NLO QCD corrections to Zbb production with massive bottom quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Febres Cordero, F.; Reina, L.; Wackeroth, D.

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to Zbb production in hadronic collisions including full bottom-quark mass effects. We present results for the total cross section and the invariant mass distribution of the bottom-quark jet pair at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We perform a detailed comparison with a calculation that considers massless bottom quarks, as implemented in the Monte Carlo program MCFM. We find that neglecting bottom-quark mass effects overestimates the total NLO QCD cross section for Zbb production at the Tevatron by about 7%, independent of the choice of the renormalization and factorization scales. Moreover, bottom-quark mass effects can impact the shape of the bottom-quark pair invariant mass distribution, in particular, in the low invariant mass region.