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Sample records for quadriceps strengthening exercises

  1. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  2. A new isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise using EMG-biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Sarman, Hakan; Baran, Tuncay; Memisoglu, Kaya; Binbir, Ismail; Savas, Yilmaz; Isik, Cengiz; Boyraz, Ismail; Koc, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    A new isometric contraction quadriceps-strengthening exercise was developed to restore the quadriceps strength lost after knee surgery more rapidly. This study evaluated the results of this new method. Patients were taught to perform the isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise in the unaffected knee in the supine position, and then they performed it in the affected knee. First, patients were taught the classical isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise, and then they were taught our new alternative method: “pull the patella superiorly tightly and hold the leg in the same position for 10 seconds”. Afterward, the quadriceps contraction was evaluated using a non-invasive Myomed 932 EMG-biofeedback device (Enraf-Nonius, The Netherlands) with gel-containing 48 mm electrodes (Türklab, The Turkey) placed on both knees. The isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise performed using our new method had stronger contraction than the classical method (P < 0.01). The new method involving pulling the patella superiorly appears to be a better choice, which can be applied easily, leading to better patient compliance and greater quadriceps force after arthroscopic and other knee surgeries. PMID:25356122

  3. Closed kinetic chain alone compared to combined open and closed kinetic chain exercises for quadriceps strengthening after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to return to sports: a prospective matched follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, C; Werner, S; Eriksson, E

    2000-01-01

    Rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has focused over the past decade on closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercises due to presumably less strain on the graft than with isokinetic open kinetic chain exercises (OKC); however, recent reports suggest that there are only minor differences in ACL strain values between some CKC and OKC exercises. We studied anterior knee laxity, thigh muscle torque, and return to preinjury sports level in 44 patients with unilateral ACL; group 1 carried out quadriceps strengthening only with CKC while group 2 trained with CKC plus OKC exercises starting from week 6 after surgery. Anterior knee laxity was determined with a KT-1000 arthrometer; isokinetic concentric and eccentric quadriceps and hamstring muscle torque were studied with a Kin-Com dynamometer before and 6 months after surgery. At an average of 31 months after surgery the patients answered a questionnaire regarding their current knee function and physical activity/sports to determine the extent and timing of their recovery. No significant differences in anterior knee laxity were noted between the groups 6 months postsurgery. Patients in group 2 increased their quadriceps torque significantly more than those in group 1, but no differences were found in hamstring torque between the groups. A significantly higher number of patients in group 2 (n = 12) than in group 1 (n = 5) returned to sports at the same level as before the injury (P < 0.05). Patients from group 2 who returned to sports at the same level did so 2 months earlier than those in group 1. Thus the addition of OKC quadriceps training after ACL reconstruction results in a significantly better improvement in quadriceps torque without reducing knee joint stability at 6 months and also leads to a significantly higher number of athletes returning to their previous activity earlier and at the same level as before injury.

  4. An Australian survey of in-patient protocols for quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, T; McEvoy, M; McClelland, J

    2002-12-01

    Current practices regarding in-patient strengthening exercise prescription following anterior cruclate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are scarcely addressed in the literature and remain unreported for Australian hospitals. An observational, questionnaire-based study was used to Investigate in-patient quadriceps strengthening practices in Australian hospitals after ACL reconstruction. Questionnaires were returned by 248 hospitals (76% response rate) and of these 88 hospitals reported performing ACL reconstructions. These hospitals were surveyed to determine the types of quadriceps strengthening exercises prescribed during the in-patient period. Information was sought regarding routine management strengthening practices. A variety of quadriceps exercises such as static quadriceps contractions (SQC), straight leg raises (SLR) and inner range quadriceps (IRQ) were frequently prescribed, although no standard practice currently exists. Static quadriceps exercises were prescribed by 91% of hospitals surveyed, IRQ exercises were used by 30%, and 49% reported using SLR exercises. Current literature tends to support the performance of SQC and SLR exercises during the early postoperative period following ACL reconstruction. Conversely, current clinical practice is incongruent with regard to the scientific recommendations for IRQ performance.

  5. How can we strengthen the quadriceps femoris in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Callaghan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Summary Purpose: the aim of this article was to review the clinical approach of quadriceps strengthening programmes. Methods: a literature search was carried out from 1980 up to September 2011. Eligible studies were those that: (1) evaluated the patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (not healthy or asymptomatic subjects) (2) examined the effect of kinetic chain exercises (3) examined the effect of weight-bearing exercises (4) compared the effect of the combined exercises programme in the treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results and conclusion: patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome may tolerate a closed kinetic chain exercises programme better than open kinetic chain. Weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing quadriceps exercises can significantly improve subjective and clinical outcomes in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Combining treatments as an initial approach to treating patellofemoral pain but developing individualized more functional, global treatments are essential. PMID:23738270

  6. Do early quadriceps exercises affect the outcome of ACL reconstruction? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Triston; Williams, Marie T; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2005-01-01

    A prospective, blinded, randomised controlled trial investigated the effectiveness of quadriceps exercises following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A treatment group (Quadriceps exercise group) performed straight leg raises and isometric quadriceps contractions throughout the first two postoperative weeks, and a second group (No quadriceps exercise group) did not. A battery of outcome measures assessed subjects postoperatively at day one, two weeks, and one, three and six months. A total of 103 patients (Quadriceps exercise n = 48, No quadriceps exercise n = 55) commenced the study with 91 subjects available at final follow up (Quadriceps exercise n = 47, No quadriceps exercise n = 44). Performance of quadriceps exercises significantly improved a number of knee flexion and extension range of motion measurements (p = 0.01 to 0.04). No significant differences were found between the two groups at any postoperative period for quadriceps lag (p = 0.36), functional hop testing (p = 0.49 to 0.51), isokinetic quadriceps strength (p = 0.70 to 0.72), the majority of numerical analogue scores (p = 0.1 to 0.94) and Cincinnati scores (p = 0.10 to 0.84). Subjects performing quadriceps exercises reported significantly higher pain scores with exercise on the first postoperative day (p = 0.02). At six months postoperatively, the Quadriceps exercise subjects reported significantly more favourable Cincinnati scores for symptoms (p = 0.005) and problems with sport (p = 0.05). While average knee laxity was not significantly different between treatment groups over time (p = 0.27 to 0.94), quadriceps exercise performance was associated with a significantly lower incidence of abnormal knee laxity. Isometric quadriceps exercises and straight leg raises can be safely prescribed during the first two postoperative weeks and confer advantages for faster recovery of knee range of motion and stability. It remains to be proven whether the magnitude of differences between groups is

  7. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  8. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  9. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  10. Cross-exercise on quadriceps deficit after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papandreou, Maria; Billis, Evdokia; Papathanasiou, George; Spyropoulos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Nikos

    2013-02-01

    A few studies concerning the improvement of quadriceps muscle strength deficit (QD) at an early stage following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have been conducted whereas, ACL rehabilitation protocols based on contralateral quadriceps strength (QS) do not exist. Given these, the goals of our study were (1) to evaluate the effects of cross-eccentric exercise (CEE) on QD on ACL reconstructed knees, and (2) to explore any changes in QD following CEE provided at the frequencies of 3 or 5 times per week. For this study, 42 ACL-reconstructed patients were randomly assigned into 3 groups, two experimental and one control and followed an 8-week rehabilitation program. Additionally, the experimental groups received CEE for 3 and 5 days per week for 8 weeks in their uninjured knees. QS was evaluated with an isokinetic/isometric test, at 60 degrees of knee flexion of both limbs before and after completion of CEE. Two-factor ANOVA showed a significant improvement of QD between groups (F = 5.16, p = 0.01) after CEE completion on ACL reconstructed knees. Statistically significant results arose from the 3 days per week (D = 18.60, p = 0.01) and 5 days per week (D = 15.12, p = 0.04) experimental groups, whereas the control group did not yield any statistically significant differences. CEE used as an adjunct to the ACL traditional rehabilitation program at the weekly frequencies of 3 and 5 times at the early stage of reconstruction significantly improved QD.

  11. Quadriceps effort during squat exercise depends on hip extensor muscle strategy.

    PubMed

    Bryanton, Megan A; Carey, Jason P; Kennedy, Michael D; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2015-03-01

    Hip extensor strategy, specifically relative contribution of gluteus maximus versus hamstrings, will influence quadriceps effort required during squat exercise, as hamstrings and quadriceps co-contract at the knee. This research examined the effects of hip extensor strategy on quadriceps relative muscular effort (RME) during barbell squat. Inverse dynamics-based torque-driven musculoskeletal models were developed to account for hamstrings co-contraction. Net joint moments were calculated using 3D motion analysis and force platform data. Hamstrings co-contraction was modelled under two assumptions: (1) equivalent gluteus maximus and hamstrings activation (Model 1) and (2) preferential gluteus maximus activation (Model 2). Quadriceps RME, the ratio of quadriceps moment to maximum knee extensor strength, was determined using inverse dynamics only, Model 1 and Model 2. Quadriceps RME was greater in both Models 1 and 2 than inverse dynamics only at barbell loads of 50-90% one repetition maximum. The highest quadriceps RMEs were 120 ± 36% and 87 ± 28% in Models 1 and 2, respectively, which suggests that barbell squats are only feasible using the Model 2 strategy prioritising gluteus maximus versus hamstrings activation. These results indicate that developing strength in both gluteus maximus and quadriceps is essential for lifting heavy loads in squat exercise. PMID:25895990

  12. Comparison of hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between accelerating and decelerating sections during squat exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio between the accelerating and decelerating sections for anterior cruciate ligament protection during squat exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Nine asymptomatic males were enrolled in this study. The hamstring (medial part) and quadriceps (rectus femoris) muscle activities during squat exercise were measured, and the squat exercises were classified into two sections (accelerating and decelerating) by using an accelerometer. [Results] The hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was significantly higher in the decelerating section than in the accelerating section during the squat exercise. [Conclusion] Application of an increasing decelerating section strategy during the squat exercise can prevent damage in patients with a weakened anterior cruciate ligament due to sports activities. PMID:27799671

  13. Combination of Eccentric Exercise and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to Improve Quadriceps Function Post-ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lepley, Lindsey K.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to reduce quadriceps activation failure (QAF), and eccentric exercise has been shown lessen muscle atrophy post-ACL reconstruction. Given that these are two critical components of quadriceps strength, intervention combining these therapies may be effective at reinstituting quadriceps function post-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined NMES and eccentric exercise intervention to improve the recovery of quadriceps activation and strength post-reconstruction. Design Parallel longitudinal design. Setting Laboratory. Participants Thirty-six individuals post-injury were placed into four treatment groups (N&E, NMES and eccentrics; E-only, eccentrics only; N-only, NMES-only; STND, standard of care) and ten healthy controls participated. Intervention N&E and N-only received the NMES protocol 2x per week for the first six weeks post-reconstruction. N&E and E-only received the eccentric exercise protocol 2x per week beginning six weeks post-reconstruction. Main outcome measure Quadriceps activation was assessed via the superimposed burst technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. Quadriceps strength was assessed via maximal voluntary isomeric contractions (Nm/kg). Data was gathered on three occasions: pre-operative, 12-weeks-post-surgery and at return-to-play. Results No differences in pre-operative measures existed (P>0.05). E-only recovered quadriceps activation better than N-only or STND (P<0.05). N&E and E-only recovered strength better than N-only or the STND (P<0.05) and had strength values that were similar to healthy individuals at return-to-play (P>0.05). Conclusion Eccentric exercise was capable of restoring levels of quadriceps activation and strength that were similar to those of healthy adults and better than NMES alone. PMID:25819154

  14. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  15. Reduction in mdx mouse muscle degeneration by low-intensity endurance exercise: a proteomic analysis in quadriceps muscle of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Frinchi, Monica; Giallombardo, Marco; Morici, Giuseppe; Liberto, Valentina Di; Alessandro, Riccardo; De Leo, Giacomo; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2015-01-01

    In our recent study was shown a significant recovery of damaged skeletal muscle of mice with X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) following low-intensity endurance exercise, probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle. Consequently, in the present work, we aimed to identify proteins involved in the observed reduction in degenerating fibres. To this end, we used proteomic analysis to evaluate changes in the protein profile of quadriceps dystrophic muscles of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. Four protein spots were found to be significantly changed and were identified as three isoforms of carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). Protein levels of CA3 isoforms were significantly up-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were completely restored to wild–type (WT) mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Protein levels of SODC were down-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were significantly restored to WT mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Western blot data were in agreement with those obtained using proteomic analysis and revealed the presence of one more CA3 isoform that was significantly changed. Based on data found in the present study, it seems that low-intensity endurance exercise may in part contribute to reduce cell degeneration process in mdx muscles, by counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26182375

  16. Reduction in mdx mouse muscle degeneration by low-intensity endurance exercise: a proteomic analysis in quadriceps muscle of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Frinchi, Monica; Giallombardo, Marco; Morici, Giuseppe; Di Liberto, Valentina; Alessandro, Riccardo; De Leo, Giacomo; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Belluardo, Natale; Mudò, Giuseppa

    2015-01-01

    In our recent study was shown a significant recovery of damaged skeletal muscle of mice with X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) following low-intensity endurance exercise, probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle. Consequently, in the present work, we aimed to identify proteins involved in the observed reduction in degenerating fibres. To this end, we used proteomic analysis to evaluate changes in the protein profile of quadriceps dystrophic muscles of exercised compared with sedentary mdx mice. Four protein spots were found to be significantly changed and were identified as three isoforms of carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] (SODC). Protein levels of CA3 isoforms were significantly up-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were completely restored to wild-type (WT) mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Protein levels of SODC were down-regulated in quadriceps of sedentary mdx mice and were significantly restored to WT mice values, both sedentary and exercised, in quadriceps of exercised mdx mice. Western blot data were in agreement with those obtained using proteomic analysis and revealed the presence of one more CA3 isoform that was significantly changed. Based on data found in the present study, it seems that low-intensity endurance exercise may in part contribute to reduce cell degeneration process in mdx muscles, by counteracting oxidative stress. PMID:26182375

  17. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  18. Assessment of the Quadriceps Femoris Muscle in Women after Injury Induced by Maximal Eccentric Isokinetic Exercise with Low Angular Speed

    PubMed Central

    Serráo, Fábio Viadanna; Serráo, Paula Regina Mendes da Silva; Foerster, Bernd; Tannús, Alberto; Monteiro Pedro, Vanessa; Salvini, Tania F.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to propose a model for exercise- induced muscle injury by way of a maximal eccentric isokinetic exercise at low angular speed, and assess the time course of functional recovery of the injured quadriceps femoris muscle from the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque and electrical activity (root mean square - RMS and median frequency - MDF). The effectiveness of the proposed eccentric exercise in inducing injury was assessed from the activity of creatine kinase (CK). In addition, the presence of edema of the quadriceps femoris muscle was assessed by a visual inspection of the intensity of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal. These measurements were carried out before and after the exercise. Ten healthy women (21.9 ± 1.5) took part in this study. The injury was induced by 4 series of 15 maximal eccentric isokinetic contractions at 5°/s. The MVC torque reduced up to the 4th day after the exercise (p < 0.05). The RMS of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and the rectus femoris (RF) muscles decreased on the 2nd (VMO and RF; p < 0.05) and 3rd (RF; p < 0.05) days after. The MDF of the VMO increased immediately after (p < 0.05), whilst the MDF of the RF and VL decreased immediately after (RF; p < 0.05), on the 1st (RF and VL; p < 0.05) and on the 2nd (VL; p < 0.05) days after. The CK activity increased on the 2nd day after (p < 0.05). An increase in the intensity of the MRI signal was observed on the 2nd and 7th days after. In conclusion: 1- the eccentric exercise with low angular speed was effective in inducing injury, 2- the quadriceps femoris already started its functional recovery, as shown by the MVC torque and electrical activity, in the first week after the exercise, despite the presence of an increase in the intensity of the MRI signal. Key pointsThe low angular speed eccentric exercise was effec-tive in inducing injury of the quadriceps femoris muscle, and could be used as a muscle injury induc-ing model in future

  19. Quadriceps muscle blood flow and oxygen availability during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Athanasopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we wished to determine whether the observed reduction in quadriceps muscle oxygen availability, reported during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing efforts (i.e. hiking), is because of restricted muscle blood flow. Six national-squad Laser sailors initially performed three successive 3-min hiking bouts followed by three successive 3-min cycling tests sustained at constant intensities reproducing the cardiac output recorded during each of the three hiking bouts. The blood flow index (BFI) was determined from assessment of the vastus lateralis using near-infrared spectroscopy in association with the light-absorbing tracer indocyanine green dye, while cardiac output was determined from impedance cardiography. At equivalent cardiac outputs (ranging from 10.3±0.5 to 14.8±0.86 L · min(-1)), the increase from baseline in vastus lateralis BFI across the three hiking bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 3.1±0.6 nM · s(-1)) was lower (P = 0.036) than that seen during the three cycling bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 7.2±1.4 nM · s(-1)) (Cohen's d: 3.80 nM · s(-1)), whereas the increase from baseline in deoxygenated haemoglobin (by ∼17.0±2.9 μM) (an index of tissue oxygen extraction) was greater (P = 0.006) during hiking than cycling (by ∼5.3±2.7 μM) (Cohen's d: 4.17 μM). The results suggest that reduced vastus lateralis muscle oxygen availability during hiking arises from restricted muscle blood flow in the isometrically acting quadriceps muscles.

  20. Quadriceps muscle blood flow and oxygen availability during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Athanasopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we wished to determine whether the observed reduction in quadriceps muscle oxygen availability, reported during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing efforts (i.e. hiking), is because of restricted muscle blood flow. Six national-squad Laser sailors initially performed three successive 3-min hiking bouts followed by three successive 3-min cycling tests sustained at constant intensities reproducing the cardiac output recorded during each of the three hiking bouts. The blood flow index (BFI) was determined from assessment of the vastus lateralis using near-infrared spectroscopy in association with the light-absorbing tracer indocyanine green dye, while cardiac output was determined from impedance cardiography. At equivalent cardiac outputs (ranging from 10.3±0.5 to 14.8±0.86 L · min(-1)), the increase from baseline in vastus lateralis BFI across the three hiking bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 3.1±0.6 nM · s(-1)) was lower (P = 0.036) than that seen during the three cycling bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 7.2±1.4 nM · s(-1)) (Cohen's d: 3.80 nM · s(-1)), whereas the increase from baseline in deoxygenated haemoglobin (by ∼17.0±2.9 μM) (an index of tissue oxygen extraction) was greater (P = 0.006) during hiking than cycling (by ∼5.3±2.7 μM) (Cohen's d: 4.17 μM). The results suggest that reduced vastus lateralis muscle oxygen availability during hiking arises from restricted muscle blood flow in the isometrically acting quadriceps muscles. PMID:21590577

  1. Effects of quadriceps strength after static and dynamic whole-body vibration exercise.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jill A; Blog, Gabriel L; Kang, Jie; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Ratamess, Nicholas A

    2015-05-01

    Numerous studies have shown performance benefits including whole-body vibration (WBV) as a training modality or an acute exercise protocol when used as a component of the resistance training program. Some studies have indicated that performing dynamic exercises as compared with static position exercises while exposed to WBV might be beneficial; however, evidence is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if an acute bout of dynamic versus static squats performed during WBV results in increase in quadriceps force production by means of dynamic isokinetic knee extension and flexion exercise. Nonresistance-trained healthy young men and women (N = 21) of 18-25 years participated in 4 protocols with 2-week rest in-between. Protocol 1 consisted of 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats without vibration; Protocol 2: 5 sets of 30-second static squats without vibration; Protocol 3: 5 sets of 10 dynamic squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes; and Protocol 4: 5 sets of 30-second static squats with 30-Hz WBV for a total of 2.5 minutes. Prestrength tests (1 set of 4 repetitions at 100° · s(-1) for the knee extension exercise) was performed within 5 minutes of starting each protocol, and poststrength testing was performed within 1 minute of completing each protocol. Strength outcomes were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a significance level set at p ≤ 0.05. A significant decrease in strength was observed after dynamic and static squats without WBV (p = 0.002); an increase in strength after dynamic squats with WBV (p = 0.003); and a decrease in strength after static squats with WBV (p = 0.003). The inclusion of WBV to dynamic resistance exercise can be an added modality to increase strength. Whole-body vibration can have varied effects in altering muscle strength in untrained individuals according to the type of resistance training performed. As a dynamic squat with WBV seems to immediately potentiate neuromuscular functioning, the

  2. Quadriceps Muscle Function After Exercise in Men and Women With a History of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kuenze, Christopher M.; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sex differences in lower extremity neuromuscular function have been reported after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Research evidence supports different levels of fatigability in men and women and between patients with ACLR and healthy controls. The influence of sex on the response to continuous exercise in patients with ACLR is not clear. Objective: To compare quadriceps neuromuscular function after exercise between men and women with ACLR. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-six active volunteers (13 men [50%]: age = 24.1 ± 4.4 years, height = 179.1 ± 9.8 cm, mass = 80.1 ± 9.4 kg, months since surgery = 43.5 ± 37.0; 13 women [50%]: age = 24.2 ± 5.6 years, height = 163.0 ± 5.9 cm, mass = 62.3 ± 8.3 kg, months since surgery = 45.8 ± 42.7) with a history of unilateral primary ACLR at least 6 months earlier. Intervention(s): Thirty minutes of continuous exercise comprising 5 separate 6-minute cycles, including 5 minutes of uphill walking and 1 minute of body-weight squatting and step-ups. Main Outcome Measure(s): Normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, quadriceps superimposed-burst torque, and quadriceps central activation ratio before and after exercise. We performed separate 2 (sex: men, women) × 2 (time: preexercise, postexercise) repeated-measures analyses of variance for the 3 variables. Separate, independent-samples t tests were calculated to compare preexercise with postexercise change in all dependent variables between sexes. Results: A significant group-by-time interaction was present for knee-extension torque (P = .04). The percentage reduction in knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (men = 1.94%, women = −10.32%; P = .02) and quadriceps central activation ratio (men = −1.45%, women = −8.69%; P = .03) experienced by men was less than that observed in women. Conclusions: In the presence of

  3. Strengthening the Gluteus Medius Using Various Bodyweight and Resistance Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Tufano, James J.; Golas, Artur; Petr, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT THE GLUTEUS MEDIUS (Gmed) IS AN IMPORTANT MUSCLE AND, IF WEAK, CAN CAUSE KNEE, HIP, OR LOWER-BACK PATHOLOGIES. THIS ARTICLE REVIEWS METHODS OF Gmed STRENGTH ASSESSMENT, PROVIDES EXERCISES THAT TARGET THE Gmed BASED ON ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, PRESENTS HOW TO IMPLEMENT Gmed STRENGTHENING IN HEAVY RESISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAMS, AND EXPLAINS THE IMPORTANCE OF INCLUDING THESE EXERCISES IN THESE PROGRAMS. PMID:27340373

  4. Strengthening physical self-perceptions through exercise.

    PubMed

    Caruso, C M; Gill, D L

    1992-12-01

    Two studies examined the effects of physical activity/exercise on physical self-perceptions, self-efficacy, body satisfaction, fitness and relationships among these variables. In study 1, 34 female undergraduates participated in a 10-week exercise/activity program. Participants were selected from existing classes forming a weight training, aerobic exercise and activity control group. Results revealed changes in physical self-perceptions, strength, and body composition over the 10-weeks. Improvements in physical self-perceptions and fitness occurred independent of exercise/activity group. Groups differed in the perceived importance attached to physical self-perceptions. Correlations among the measures revealed relationships among physical self-perceptions, body satisfaction, global self-esteem, and fitness. In study 2, we hypothesized that weight training would have a greater effect on physical self-perceptions and body image perceptions than physical education activity classes. Thirty-seven males and 28 females were selected from existing classes forming a weight training and activity group. Results revealed no significant changes in physical self-perceptions, body image, or global self-esteem over the 10-week program, while strength and physical self-efficacy improved. Correlations among measures from both studies offer preliminary support for Sonstroem and Morgan's model for the examination of self-esteem in exercise settings. PMID:1293426

  5. Effect of eccentric exercise with reduced muscle glycogen on plasma interleukin-6 and neuromuscular responses of musculus quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2016-07-01

    Eccentric exercise can result in muscle damage and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion. Glycogen availability is a potent stimulator of IL-6 secretion. We examined effects of eccentric exercise in a low-glycogen state on neuromuscular function and plasma IL-6 secretion. Twelve active men (23 ± 4 yr, 179 ± 5 cm, 77 ± 10 kg, means ± SD) completed two downhill treadmill runs (gradient, -12%, 5 × 8 min; speed, 12.1 ± 1.1 km/h) with normal (NG) and reduced muscle glycogen (RG) in randomized order and at least 6 wk apart. Muscle glycogen was reduced using an established cycling protocol until exhaustion and dietary manipulation the evening before the morning run. Physiological responses were measured up to 48 h after the downhill runs. During recovery, force deficits of musculus quadriceps femoris by maximal isometric contractions were similar. Changes in low-frequency fatigue were larger with RG. Voluntary activation and plasma IL-6 levels were similar in recovery between conditions. It is concluded that unaccustomed, damaging eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen of the m. quadriceps femoris 1) exacerbated low-frequency fatigue but 2) had no additional effect on IL-6 secretion. Neuromuscular impairment after eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen appears to have a greater peripheral component in early recovery. PMID:27150832

  6. Effect of eccentric exercise with reduced muscle glycogen on plasma interleukin-6 and neuromuscular responses of musculus quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2016-07-01

    Eccentric exercise can result in muscle damage and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion. Glycogen availability is a potent stimulator of IL-6 secretion. We examined effects of eccentric exercise in a low-glycogen state on neuromuscular function and plasma IL-6 secretion. Twelve active men (23 ± 4 yr, 179 ± 5 cm, 77 ± 10 kg, means ± SD) completed two downhill treadmill runs (gradient, -12%, 5 × 8 min; speed, 12.1 ± 1.1 km/h) with normal (NG) and reduced muscle glycogen (RG) in randomized order and at least 6 wk apart. Muscle glycogen was reduced using an established cycling protocol until exhaustion and dietary manipulation the evening before the morning run. Physiological responses were measured up to 48 h after the downhill runs. During recovery, force deficits of musculus quadriceps femoris by maximal isometric contractions were similar. Changes in low-frequency fatigue were larger with RG. Voluntary activation and plasma IL-6 levels were similar in recovery between conditions. It is concluded that unaccustomed, damaging eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen of the m. quadriceps femoris 1) exacerbated low-frequency fatigue but 2) had no additional effect on IL-6 secretion. Neuromuscular impairment after eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen appears to have a greater peripheral component in early recovery.

  7. Effect of cross exercise on quadriceps acceleration reaction time and subjective scores (Lysholm questionnaire) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papandreou, Maria G; Billis, Evdokia V; Antonogiannakis, Emmanouel M; Papaioannou, Nikos A

    2009-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or reconstruction can cause knee impairments and disability. Knee impairments are related to quadriceps performance – accelerated reaction time (ART) – and disability to performance of daily living activities which is assessed by questionnaires such as the Lysholm knee score. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect of cross exercise, as supplementary rehabilitation to the early phase of ACL reconstruction: a) on quadriceps ART at the angles 45°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion and, b) on the subjective scores of disability in ACL reconstructed patients. Methods 42 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction were randomly divided into 3 groups, two experimental and one control. All groups followed the same rehabilitation program. The experimental groups followed 8 weeks of cross eccentric exercise (CEE) on the uninjured knee; 3 d/w, and 5 d/w respectively. Quadriceps ART was measured at 45°, 60° and 90° of knee flexion pre and nine weeks post-operatively using an isokinetic dynamometer. Patients also completed pre and post operatively the Lysholm questionnaire whereby subjective scores were recorded. Results Two factor ANOVA showed significant differences in ART at 90° among the groups (F = 4.29, p = 0.02, p < 0.05). Post hoc Tukey HSD analysis determined that the significant results arose from the first experimental group in comparison to the control (D = -0.83, p = 0.01). No significant differences were revealed at 45° and 60°. Significant differences were also found in the Lysholm score among the groups (F = 4.75, p = 0.01, p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis determined that the above significant results arose from the first experimental group in comparison with the control (D = 7.5, p < 0.01) and from the second experimental in comparison with the control (D = 3.78, p = 0.03). Conclusion CEE showed improvements on quadriceps ART at 90° at a sequence of 3 d/w and in the Lysholm score at a

  8. Early versus late start of open kinetic chain quadriceps exercises after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring grafts: a prospective randomized outcome study.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Annette; Werner, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate physical outcome after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with early versus late initiation of open kinetic chain (OKC) exercises for the quadriceps in patients operated on either patellar tendon or hamstring grafts. Sixty-eight patients, 36 males and 32 females, with either patellar tendon graft (34 patients) or hamstring graft (34 patients) were enrolled in this study. All patients were randomly allocated to either early (the 4th postoperative week) or late (the 12th postoperative week) start of OKC exercises for the quadriceps, resulting in four subgroups: patellar tendon reconstruction, early start (P4) or late start (P12) of OKC quadriceps exercises, hamstring tendon reconstruction, early start (H4) or late start (H12) of quadriceps OKC exercises. Prior to surgery and 3, 5 and 7 months later, assessments of range of motion (goniometer), anterior knee laxity (KT-1000), postural sway (KAT 2000), thigh muscle torques (Kin-Com dynamometer) and anterior knee pain (anterior knee pain score) were evaluated. No significant group differences were found in terms of range of motion 3, 5 and 7 months postoperatively. The H4 group showed a significantly higher mean difference of laxity over time of 1.0 mm (CI: 0.18-1.86) than the P4 group (P=0.04). Within the same type of surgery, the H4 against the H12, the mean difference over time was 1.2 mm (0.37-2.1) higher in the H4 group than in the H12 group (P=0.01). There were no significant group differences in terms of postural sway or anterior knee pain at the different test occasions. Significant differences in trends (changes over time) were found when comparing the four groups, for both quadriceps muscle torques (P<0.001) and hamstring muscle torques (P<0.001). All groups, except the P4 group, reached preoperative values of quadriceps muscle torques at the 7 months follow-up. In the H4 and the H12 groups, significantly lower hamstring muscle torques at

  9. Nitric oxide and voluntary exercise together promote quadriceps hypertrophy and increase vascular density in female 18-mo-old mice.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Jeff R S; Upadhaya, Ritika; Anderson, Judy E

    2012-05-01

    Age-related sarcopenia reduces the size, strength, and function of muscle, and the diameter of muscle fibers. It also disrupts the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, dislocating nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS-1) and reducing sarcolemmal integrity. This study of quadriceps muscle in 18-mo-old mice showed that NO-donor treatment with isosorbide dinitrate (I) for 6 wk, in combination with voluntary exercise for 3 wk, increased muscle mass by 25% and stimulated cell proliferation. The resulting fiber hypertrophy was accompanied by a lower ratio of protein:DNA, consistent with myogenic-cell hyperplasia. Treatment enhanced the ratio of NOS-1:β-dystroglycan in correlation with fiber diameter, improved sarcolemmal integrity, and increased vascular density after an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor protein at 3 wk. Results demonstrate that age-related muscle refractoriness to exercise can be overcome with NO-donor treatment. Since activation of muscle stem cells and vascular perfusion are limiting factors in the maintenance, regeneration, and growth of aged muscle, results suggest the feasibility of using NO-donor drugs to combat atrophy and muscle ischemia. Improved function and quality of life from the NO-amplified effects of exercise may be useful in aging and other conditions such as disuse, insulin resistance, or microgravity.

  10. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological effects of strengthening exercise for early dementia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, Vadim; Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Hogan, Michael J; Dunnam, Mina; Huber, Daniel; Osborne, Sandra; Shulan, Mollie

    2012-01-01

    Research demonstrates a positive effect of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in older adults. Unfortunately, aerobic exercise is often contraindicated for older adults due to cardiovascular and functional limitations. Low-intensity strengthening exercise may offer a practical alternative, but the neuropsychological benefits and potential neurophysiological mechanisms are less well understood. The current study evaluated the effects of a 10-week strengthening exercise intervention on cognitive functioning and EEG in a sample of 13 older adults with early dementia, and 9 normative controls. Results revealed beneficial effects of strengthening exercise on verbal memory coupled with frontal beta and delta power asymmetries and N200 amplitude asymmetry. Results point to increased cognitive efficiency following 10 weeks of strengthening exercise. The findings suggest it is feasible to conduct a strengthening intervention with early dementia patients, and to gather neuropsychological and neurophysiological data to evaluate outcomes. Strengthening exercise may serve as a useful alternative to aerobic exercise.

  11. Consumption of oxygen and blood flow during exercise and recovery phase evaluated by near-infrared spectroscopy and its relationship to skin forehead, quadriceps, tympanic, and rectal temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdaguer-Codina, Joan; Pujol, P.; Drobnic, F.; Galilea, P.; Riera, J.; Pons, V.; Banquells, M.; Ruiz, O.

    1995-12-01

    The availability of oxygen in the human vastus medialis muscle and the tympanic, skin forehead, quadriceps, and rectal temperatures has been investigated during exercise test and post-exercise with non-invasive near-infrared spectroscopy, infrared thermometer, and an array of four thermistors, respectively. During exercise time rectal temperature was not recorded, before exercise basal values were obtained, and after exercise all the data for two hours were recorded. The signals from near-infrared spectroscopy have been studied by analogy to forced vibration and viscously damped free vibration. Other models have been used to evaluate the temperatures. The time necessary for the reoxygenation signal to cross the baseline during the post exercise period was from 30 min to over 100 min. The peak of pH values was 5 min post-exercise and to arrive at basal levels needed 25 min to more than 40 min. The peak of rectal temperature starts around 20 - 30 min post-exercise remaining 25 - 40 min at the same value, starting to slip down slowly at variable intervals of several minutes requiring over two hours to arrive at basal levels. The data obtained by near-infrared spectroscopy and skin quadriceps, rectal temperatures confirm that the oxygen consumption remains after exercise in the muscle studied.

  12. Perspectives for patients. Knee pain: safely strengthening your thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Quadriceps are the muscles on the front of your thigh that help you straighten your knee. When these muscles are not strong, you may feel pain under your kneecap. Quadriceps can be strengthened by performing squats and leg extensions. However, when you do not perform these exercises properly, you may also feel knee pain. Understanding the load and stress under the kneecap when you execute squats and leg extensions can help you perform these exercises better and with less pain while you strengthen your quadriceps. A study published in the May 2014 issue of JOSPT provides information intended to help physical therapists and their patients use these exercises to strengthen thigh muscles while minimizing the load under the kneecap.

  13. Eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness of the quadriceps induce adjustments in agonist-antagonist activity, which are dependent on the motor task.

    PubMed

    Vila-Chã, C; Hassanlouei, H; Farina, D; Falla, D

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of eccentric exercise and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) of the quadriceps on agonist-antagonist activity during a range of motor tasks. Ten healthy volunteers (age, mean ± SD, 24.9 ± 3.2 years) performed maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) and explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors followed by isometric contractions at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% MVC at baseline, immediately after and 24 h after eccentric exercise of the quadriceps. During each task, force of the knee extensors and surface EMG of the vasti and hamstrings muscles were recorded concurrently. Rate of force development (RFD) was computed from the explosive isometric contraction, and the coefficient of variation of the force (CoV) signal was estimated from the submaximal contractions. Twenty-four hours after exercise, the subjects rated their perceived pain intensity as 4.1 ± 1.2 (score out of 10). The maximum RFD and MVC of the knee extensors was reduced immediately post- and 24 h after eccentric exercise compared to baseline (average across both time points: 19.1 ± 17.1% and 11.9 ± 9.8% lower, respectively, P < 0.05). The CoV for force during the submaximal contractions was greater immediately after eccentric exercise (up to 66% higher than baseline, P < 0.001) and remained higher 24 h post-exercise during the presence of DOMS (P < 0.01). For the explosive and MVC tasks, the EMG amplitude of the vasti muscles decreased immediately after exercise and was accompanied by increased antagonist EMG for the explosive contraction only. On the contrary, reduced force steadiness was accompanied by a general increase in EMG amplitude of the vasti muscles and was accompanied by increased antagonist activity, but only at higher force levels (>15% MVC). This study shows that eccentric exercise and subsequent DOMS of the quadriceps reduce the maximal force, rate of force development and force steadiness of the knee extensors, and is

  14. Exercise and quality of life: strengthening the connections.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen

    2009-02-01

    Exercise improves quality of life (QOL) in people with cancer. Most oncology healthcare providers recognize the statement to be true because the research literature provides strong support for the physical and psychological benefits of exercise. Because the terms exercise, QOL, and people with cancer have different meanings, the contextual connections in which they are used are important to understanding the relationship between exercise and QOL in people with cancer. This article explores the links between exercise and QOL in people with cancer and examines issues that impact the development, implementation, and evaluation of exercise programs for people with cancer. Issues related to exercise goal development, exercise prescription, exercise testing, exercise adherence, and methods to evaluate the efficacy of exercise in relation to QOL are discussed.

  15. Influence of exercise intensity on atrophied quadriceps muscle in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Obatake, Taishi; Hoshino, Koichi; Nakagawa, Takao

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistance training on atrophied skeletal muscle in rats based on evidence derived from physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were forced to undergo squats as resistance training for 3 weeks after atrophying the rectus femoris muscle by hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks. The intensity of resistance training was adjusted to 50% and 70% of the maximum lifted weight, i.e., 50% of the one-repetition maximum and 70% of the one-repetition maximum, respectively. [Results] Three weeks of training did not alter the one-repetition maximum, and muscle fibers were injured while measuring the one-repetition maximum and reloading. The decrease in cross-sectional area in the rectus femoris muscle induced by unloading for 2 weeks was significantly recovered after training at 70% of the one-repetition maximum. The levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 mRNA expression were significantly lower in muscles trained at 70% of the one-repetition maximum than in untrained muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that high-intensity resistance training can promote atrophic muscle recovery, which provides a scientific basis for therapeutic exercise methods for treatment of atrophic muscle in physical therapy. PMID:26696716

  16. Shear-Wave Elastography Assessments of Quadriceps Stiffness Changes prior to, during and after Prolonged Exercise: A Longitudinal Study during an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Andonian, Pierre; Viallon, Magalie; Le Goff, Caroline; de Bourguignon, Charles; Tourel, Charline; Morel, Jérome; Giardini, Guido; Gergelé, Laurent; Millet, Grégoire P.; Croisille, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In sports medicine, there is increasing interest in quantifying the elastic properties of skeletal muscle, especially during extreme muscular stimulation, to improve our understanding of the impact of alterations in skeletal muscle stiffness on resulting pain or injuries, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationships between these parameters. Our main objective was to determine whether real-time shear-wave elastography (SWE) can monitor changes in quadriceps muscle elasticity during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon, a powerful mechanical stress model. Our study involved 50 volunteers participating in an extreme mountain marathon (distance: 330 km, elevation: +24,000 m). Quantitative SWE velocity and shear modulus measurements were performed in most superficial quadriceps muscle heads at the following 4 time points: before the race, halfway through the race, upon finishing the race and after recovery (+48 h). Blood biomarker levels were also measured. A significant decrease in the quadriceps shear modulus was observed upon finishing the race (3.31±0.61 kPa) (p<0.001) compared to baseline (3.56±0.63 kPa), followed by a partial recovery +48 h after the race (3.45±0.6 kPa) (p = 0.002) across all muscle heads, as well as for each of the following three muscle heads: the rectus femoris (p = 0.003), the vastus medialis (p = 0.033) and the vastus lateralis (p = 0.001). Our study is the first to assess changes in muscle stiffness during prolonged extreme physical endurance exercises based on shear modulus measurements using non-invasive SWE. We concluded that decreases in stiffness, which may have resulted from quadriceps overuse in the setting of supra-physiological stress caused by the extreme distance and unique elevation of the race, may have been responsible for the development of inflammation and muscle swelling. SWE may hence represent a promising tool for monitoring physiologic or pathological variations in muscle stiffness and may be useful for

  17. Shear-Wave Elastography Assessments of Quadriceps Stiffness Changes prior to, during and after Prolonged Exercise: A Longitudinal Study during an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon.

    PubMed

    Andonian, Pierre; Viallon, Magalie; Le Goff, Caroline; de Bourguignon, Charles; Tourel, Charline; Morel, Jérome; Giardini, Guido; Gergelé, Laurent; Millet, Grégoire P; Croisille, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In sports medicine, there is increasing interest in quantifying the elastic properties of skeletal muscle, especially during extreme muscular stimulation, to improve our understanding of the impact of alterations in skeletal muscle stiffness on resulting pain or injuries, as well as the mechanisms underlying the relationships between these parameters. Our main objective was to determine whether real-time shear-wave elastography (SWE) can monitor changes in quadriceps muscle elasticity during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon, a powerful mechanical stress model. Our study involved 50 volunteers participating in an extreme mountain marathon (distance: 330 km, elevation: +24,000 m). Quantitative SWE velocity and shear modulus measurements were performed in most superficial quadriceps muscle heads at the following 4 time points: before the race, halfway through the race, upon finishing the race and after recovery (+48 h). Blood biomarker levels were also measured. A significant decrease in the quadriceps shear modulus was observed upon finishing the race (3.31±0.61 kPa) (p<0.001) compared to baseline (3.56±0.63 kPa), followed by a partial recovery +48 h after the race (3.45±0.6 kPa) (p = 0.002) across all muscle heads, as well as for each of the following three muscle heads: the rectus femoris (p = 0.003), the vastus medialis (p = 0.033) and the vastus lateralis (p = 0.001). Our study is the first to assess changes in muscle stiffness during prolonged extreme physical endurance exercises based on shear modulus measurements using non-invasive SWE. We concluded that decreases in stiffness, which may have resulted from quadriceps overuse in the setting of supra-physiological stress caused by the extreme distance and unique elevation of the race, may have been responsible for the development of inflammation and muscle swelling. SWE may hence represent a promising tool for monitoring physiologic or pathological variations in muscle stiffness and may be useful for

  18. Exercise Strengthens Central Nervous System Modulation of Pain in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Laura D.; Stegner, Aaron J.; Schwabacher, Isaac J.; Koltyn, Kelli F.; Cook, Dane B.

    2016-01-01

    To begin to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the benefits of exercise for chronic pain, we assessed the influence of exercise on brain responses to pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Complete data were collected for nine female FM patients and nine pain-free controls (CO) who underwent two functional neuroimaging scans, following exercise (EX) and following quiet rest (QR). Brain responses and pain ratings to noxious heat stimuli were compared within and between groups. For pain ratings, there was a significant (p < 0.05) Condition by Run interaction characterized by moderately lower pain ratings post EX compared to QR (d = 0.39–0.41) for FM but similar to ratings in CO (d = 0.10–0.26), thereby demonstrating that exercise decreased pain sensitivity in FM patients to a level that was analogous to pain-free controls. Brain responses demonstrated a significant within-group difference in FM patients, characterized by less brain activity bilaterally in the anterior insula following QR as compared to EX. There was also a significant Group by Condition interaction with FM patients showing less activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex following QR as compared to post-EX and CO following both conditions. These results suggest that exercise appeared to stimulate brain regions involved in descending pain inhibition in FM patients, decreasing their sensitivity to pain. Thus, exercise may benefit patients with FM via improving the functional capacity of the pain modulatory system. PMID:26927193

  19. Electromyographic biofeedback and recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Draper, V

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of biofeedback-facilitated exercise with exercise alone on the recovery rate of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Functional measures included 1) a dynamometric test of quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque during the 12th postoperative week and 2) the number of days post-operatively that a patient achieved full active extension of the knee. Twenty-two patients with acute ACL injury were randomly assigned to a Treatment (biofeedback) Group (n = 11) or a Control (nonfeedback) Group (n = 11) during the first therapy session one week after reconstructive surgery. After the patients had completed the 12-week exercise program, the quadriceps femoris muscle isometric peak torque in the operative limb was compared with that in the nonoperative limb at three angles (90 degrees, 60 degrees, and 45 degrees) of extension. An analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the Treatment and Control Groups at all three angles. Mean recovery time was calculated for each group, and a t test for independent samples indicated a significant difference between the groups. These results demonstrate that the addition of biofeedback to muscle strengthening exercises facilitates the rate of recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following ACL reconstruction.

  20. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period.

  1. The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ui-Cheol; Sim, Jae-Heon; Kim, Cheol-Yong; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise to strengthen the muscles of the hip together with lumbar segmental stabilization exercise on the lumbar disability index, lumbar muscle strength, and balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly and equally assigned 40 participants who provided written consent to participate in this study to a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus group (SMG + LES group) and a lumbar segmental stabilization exercise group. [Results] Each evaluation item showed a statistically significant effect. [Conclusion] Clinical application of exercise in this study showed that lumbar segmental stabilization exercise plus exercise to strengthen the muscles of the gluteus resulted in a greater decrease in low back pain disability index and increase in lumbar muscle strength and balance ability than lumbar segmental stabilization exercise in chronic low back pain patients receiving the exercise treatments during the same period. PMID:26834359

  2. Conceptual framework for strengthening exercises to prevent hamstring strains.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    High-speed running accounts for the majority of hamstring strains in many sports. The terminal swing phase is believed to be the most hazardous as the hamstrings are undergoing an active lengthening contraction in a long muscle length position. Prevention-based strength training mainly focuses on eccentric exercises. However, it appears crucial to integrate other parameters than the contraction type. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present a conceptual framework based on six key parameters (contraction type, load, range of motion, angular velocity, uni-/bilateral exercises, kinetic chain) for the hamstring's strength exercise for strain prevention. Based on the biomechanical parameters of sprinting, it is proposed to use high-load eccentric contractions. The movement should be performed at a slow to moderate angular velocity and focused at the knee joint, while the hip is kept in a large flexion position in order to reach a greater elongation stress of the hamstrings than in the terminal swing phase. In this way, we believe that, during sprinting, athletes would be better trained to brake the knee extension effectively in the whole range of motion without overstretch of the hamstrings. Finally, based on its functional application, unilateral open kinetic chain should be preferred. PMID:24062275

  3. Conceptual framework for strengthening exercises to prevent hamstring strains.

    PubMed

    Guex, Kenny; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    High-speed running accounts for the majority of hamstring strains in many sports. The terminal swing phase is believed to be the most hazardous as the hamstrings are undergoing an active lengthening contraction in a long muscle length position. Prevention-based strength training mainly focuses on eccentric exercises. However, it appears crucial to integrate other parameters than the contraction type. Therefore, the aim of this study is to present a conceptual framework based on six key parameters (contraction type, load, range of motion, angular velocity, uni-/bilateral exercises, kinetic chain) for the hamstring's strength exercise for strain prevention. Based on the biomechanical parameters of sprinting, it is proposed to use high-load eccentric contractions. The movement should be performed at a slow to moderate angular velocity and focused at the knee joint, while the hip is kept in a large flexion position in order to reach a greater elongation stress of the hamstrings than in the terminal swing phase. In this way, we believe that, during sprinting, athletes would be better trained to brake the knee extension effectively in the whole range of motion without overstretch of the hamstrings. Finally, based on its functional application, unilateral open kinetic chain should be preferred.

  4. Effectiveness and safety of strengthening, aerobic, and coordination exercises for patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Heike A; Roos, Ewa M

    2003-03-01

    Exercise has generated interest as an important nonpharmacological treatment for symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Effect sizes in exercise interventions are small to moderate for pain and functional improvements and are similar to those observed for improvement in pain for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). However, in contrast to NSAIDS, exercise interventions are safe and improve function through a direct effect on muscle strength and function. Both aerobic and strengthening exercises seem to be equally effective in regard to pain and function in patients with OA. In obese patients with OA, a combination of diet and exercise may be advantageous for optimal benefits in health-related quality-of-life and physical function. This article will focus on recent (September 2001-August 2002) randomized controlled trials with exercise as an intervention in patients with OA.

  5. Efficacy of Blood Flow-Restricted Low-Load Resistance Training For Quadriceps Strengthening in Men at Risk of Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Maria D.; Mikesky, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Greater quadriceps strength has been associated with lower risk of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in older adults. However, factors that confer elevated risk of knee OA (eg, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and knee injury) also contribute to a reduced tolerance of resistance training programs at ≥60% 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Therefore, the current study assessed whether concurrent application of blood flow restriction (BFR) to low-load resistance training is an efficacious and tolerable means of improving quadriceps strength in men at risk of symptomatic knee OA. Methods: Men older than age 45, with a history of knee injury or elevated body mass index (BMI), were randomized to low-load resistance training (30% 1RM) either with or without concurrent BFR. Isotonic double-leg press strength and isokinetic knee extensor strength were assessed before and after 4 weeks of training 3 times/wk. Knee pain (Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) was assessed for tolerance. Results: Of the 42 men (mean age 56.1 ± 7.7 years) who were randomized, 41 completed the program. There were no significant intergroup differences in age, BMI, knee pathology, or muscle strength at baseline. Although leg press 1RM improved in both control and BFR groups, there were no significant intergroup differences in primary or secondary measures of muscle strength. The BFR was not associated with worsening of knee pain, but there was a significant improvement in knee pain in the control group. Conclusions: In comparison with training without BFR, addition of BFR to 30% 1RM resistance training for 4 weeks did not confer significantly greater increases in leg press or quadriceps strength in older men with risk factors for symptomatic knee OA. PMID:26328230

  6. Hip Muscle Activity During 3 Side-Lying Hip-Strengthening Exercises in Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Joseph M.; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Cobb, Stephen C.; Huddleston, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Lower extremity overuse injuries are associated with gluteus medius (GMed) weakness. Understanding the activation of muscles about the hip during strengthening exercises is important for rehabilitation. Objective: To compare the electromyographic activity produced by the gluteus medius (GMed), tensor fascia latae (TFL), anterior hip flexors (AHF), and gluteus maximus (GMax) during 3 hip-strengthening exercises: hip abduction (ABD), hip abduction with external rotation (ABD-ER), and clamshell (CLAM) exercises. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty healthy runners (9 men, 11 women; age = 25.45 ± 5.80 years, height = 1.71 ± 0.07 m, mass = 64.43 ± 7.75 kg) participated. Intervention(s): A weight equal to 5% body mass was affixed to the ankle for the ABD and ABD-ER exercises, and an equivalent load was affixed for the CLAM exercise. A pressure biofeedback unit was placed beneath the trunk to provide positional feedback. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography (root mean square normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction) was recorded over the GMed, TFL, AHF, and GMax. Results: Three 1-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance indicated differences for muscle activity among the ABD (F3,57 = 25.903, P<.001), ABD-ER (F3,57 = 10.458, P<.001), and CLAM (F3,57 = 4.640, P=.006) exercises. For the ABD exercise, the GMed (70.1 ± 29.9%), TFL (54.3 ± 19.1%), and AHF (28.2 ± 21.5%) differed in muscle activity. The GMax (25.3 ± 24.6%) was less active than the GMed and TFL but was not different from the AHF. For the ABD-ER exercise, the TFL (70.9 ± 17.2%) was more active than the AHF (54.3 ± 24.8%), GMed (53.03 ± 28.4%), and GMax (31.7 ± 24.1 %). For the CLAM exercise, the AHF (54.2 ± 25.2%) was more active than the TFL (34.4 ± 20.1%) and GMed (32.6 ± 16.9%) but was not different from the GMax (34.2 ± 24.8%). Conclusions: The ABD exercise is preferred if targeted activation of the

  7. Effect of 3 Different Applications of Kinesio Taping Denko® on Electromyographic Activity: Inhibition or Facilitation of the Quadriceps of Males During Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Júlio C.; Mezêncio, Bruno; Claudino, João G.; Soncin, Rafael; Miyashiro, Pedro L. Sampaio; Sousa, Eric P.; Borges, Eduardo; Zanetti, Vinícius; Phillip, Igor; Mochizuki, Luiz; Amadio, Alberto C.

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio taping consists of a technique which uses the application of an elastic adhesive tape. It has become a widely used rehabilitation modality for the prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of the application of Kinesio Taping Denko® in three conditions (facilitation, inhibition, and placebo) on the electromyographic activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles on facilitating or inhibiting the muscle function and on the perceived exertion during the barbell back squat exercise in healthy male subjects. Methods: It was a randomized, single-blinded and controlled study in which 18 males (28.0 ± 6.7 years old; 85.8 ± 8.2 kg mass; 1.80 ± 0.07 m tall; 0.97 ± 0.04 m lower limb length) performed barbell back squat exercise with different conditions of Kinesio Taping Denko® applications: Facilitation, inhibition and placebo. Previous to the mentioned conditions, all individuals were assessed without applying kinesio Taping Denko® during the exercise. OMNI scale was used after each set for perceived exertion evaluation. No differences (p < 0.05) in the electromyographic activity of the biceps femoris, vastus lateralis and vastus medialis or OMNI scale were recorded under any conditions. The results show that the kinesio taping denko®may not alter the magnitude of the electromyography activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and biceps femoris during the squat exercise. Furthermore, the perceived exertion was not affected by the kinesio taping denko® application. Key points Researchers involved in collecting data in this study have no financial or personal interest in the outcome of results or the sponsor. The perceived exertion was not affected by the kinesiology taping application. Kinesiology taping application may not alter the magnitude of EMG activity of vastuslateralis, vastusmedialis, and biceps femoris during the barbell back squat exercise. Electromyographic activity of

  8. Effect of a muscle strengthening exercise program for pelvic control on gait function of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of strengthening exercises for the hip extensors on the gait performance and stability of patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were fifteen stroke patients (ten males, five females). The experimental subjects performed a hip extensor strengthening exercise (HESE) program for a total of four weeks. [Results] The experimental subjects showed significant improvements after the HESE program. Especially, walking speed and the affected side stance phase time significantly increased after the HESE program. Furthermore, the affected side stride length and symmetry index in the stance phase significantly increased after HESE program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the HESE program may, in part, help to improve gait performance ability and stabilize physical disability after stroke. PMID:25931698

  9. Effect of a muscle strengthening exercise program for pelvic control on gait function of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of strengthening exercises for the hip extensors on the gait performance and stability of patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were fifteen stroke patients (ten males, five females). The experimental subjects performed a hip extensor strengthening exercise (HESE) program for a total of four weeks. [Results] The experimental subjects showed significant improvements after the HESE program. Especially, walking speed and the affected side stance phase time significantly increased after the HESE program. Furthermore, the affected side stride length and symmetry index in the stance phase significantly increased after HESE program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the HESE program may, in part, help to improve gait performance ability and stabilize physical disability after stroke. PMID:25931698

  10. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease.

  11. Follistatin-like 3 is a mediator of exercise-driven bone formation and strengthening.

    PubMed

    Nam, J; Perera, P; Gordon, R; Jeong, Y H; Blazek, A D; Kim, D G; Tee, B C; Sun, Z; Eubank, T D; Zhao, Y; Lablebecioglu, B; Liu, S; Litsky, A; Weisleder, N L; Lee, B S; Butterfield, T; Schneyer, A L; Agarwal, S

    2015-09-01

    Exercise is vital for maintaining bone strength and architecture. Follistatin-like 3 (FSTL3), a member of follistatin family, is a mechanosensitive protein upregulated in response to exercise and is involved in regulating musculoskeletal health. Here, we investigated the potential role of FSTL3 in exercise-driven bone remodeling. Exercise-dependent regulation of bone structure and functions was compared in mice with global Fstl3 gene deletion (Fstl3-/-) and their age-matched Fstl3+/+ littermates. Mice were exercised by low-intensity treadmill walking. The mechanical properties and mineralization were determined by μCT, three-point bending test and sequential incorporation of calcein and alizarin complexone. ELISA, Western-blot analysis and qRT-PCR were used to analyze the regulation of FSTL3 and associated molecules in the serum specimens and tissues. Daily exercise significantly increased circulating FSTL3 levels in mice, rats and humans. Compared to age-matched littermates, Fstl3-/- mice exhibited significantly lower fracture tolerance, having greater stiffness, but lower strain at fracture and yield energy. Furthermore, increased levels of circulating FSTL3 in young mice paralleled greater strain at fracture compared to the lower levels of FSTL3 in older mice. More significantly, Fstl3-/- mice exhibited loss of mechanosensitivity and irresponsiveness to exercise-dependent bone formation as compared to their Fstl3+/+ littermates. In addition, FSTL3 gene deletion resulted in loss of exercise-dependent sclerostin regulation in osteocytes and osteoblasts, as compared to Fstl3+/+ osteocytes and osteoblasts, in vivo and in vitro. The data identify FSTL3 as a critical mediator of exercise-dependent bone formation and strengthening and point to its potential role in bone health and in musculoskeletal diseases. PMID:25937185

  12. Follistatin-like 3 is a mediator of exercise-driven bone formation and strengthening

    PubMed Central

    Nam, J; Perera, P; Gordon, R; Jeong, Y; Blazek, AD; Kim, DG; Tee, BC; Sun, Z; Eubank, TD; Zhao, Y; Lablebecioglu, B; Liu, S; Litsky, A; Weisleder, NL; Lee, BS; Butterfield, T; Schneyer, AL; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is vital for maintaining bone strength and architecture. Follistatin like 3 (FSTL3), a member of Follistatin family, is a mechanosensitive protein upregulated in response to exercise and is involved in regulating musculoskeletal health, we investigated the potential role of FSTL3 in exercise-driven bone remodeling. Exercise-dependent regulation of bone structure and functions was compared in mice with global Fstl3 gene deletion (Fstl3−/−) and their age-matched Fstl3+/+ littermates. Mice were exercised by low-intensity treadmill walking. The mechanical properties and mineralization were determined by μCT, three-point bending test and sequential incorporation of calcein and alizarin complexone. ELISA, Western-blot analysis and qRT-PCR were used to analyze the regulation of FSTL3 and associated molecules in the serum specimens and tissues. Daily exercise significantly increased circulating FSTL3 levels in mice, rats and humans. Compared to age-matched littermates, Fstl3−/− mice exhibited significantly lower fracture tolerance, having greater stiffness, but lower strain at fracture and yield energy. Furthermore, increased levels of circulating FSTL3 in young mice paralleled greater strain at fracture compared to the lower levels of FSTL3 in older mice. More significantly, Fstl3−/− mice exhibited loss of mechanosensitivity and irresponsiveness to exercise-dependent bone formation as compared to their Fstl3+/+ littermates. In addition, FSTL3 gene deletion resulted in loss of exercise-dependent sclerostin regulation in osteocytes and osteoblasts, as compared to Fstl3+/+ osteocytes and osteoblasts, in vivo and in vitro. The data identifies FSTL3 as a critical mediator of exercise-dependent bone formation and strengthening and point to its potential role in bone health and in musculoskeletal diseases. PMID:25937185

  13. Nonuniform changes in MRI measurements of the thigh muscles after two hamstring strengthening exercises.

    PubMed

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Garrues, Mirian A; Cronin, John B; Contreras, Bret; Los Arcos, Asier; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Maffulli, Nicola; Idoate, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Although many different hamstring strengthening exercises exist, the effect on site specific activation of these exercises on different muscles of the leg is unclear. This study investigated the effects of the eccentric leg curl (LC) and lunge (L) exercises on the biceps femoris long head (BFl), biceps femoris short head (BFs), semitendinosus (ST), semimembranosus (SM), and adductor magnus (AM). Each leg of 11 male professional soccer players was randomly assigned to an LC or L exercise protocol (3 sets of 6 repetitions). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the subjects' thighs were performed before and 48 hours after the intervention. Fifteen axial scans of the thigh interspaced by a distance of 1/15 right femur length (Lf) were obtained. The fMRI data were analyzed for signal intensity changes. No significant changes were observed in absolute short tau inversion recovery values for the SM and BFs. Significant changes for the ST (∼21-45%) from sections 4 to 10, AM (∼2-13%) at section 4, and BFl (∼ -3 vs. 8%) at section 7 were noted. LC exercises load all the regions of the ST muscle. The L exercises load the proximal regions of the BFl and AM. These findings may have relevance when designing protocols for prevention and rehabilitation of hamstring injuries. PMID:23443215

  14. The effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercise programs accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients’ balance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Kyou Sik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients’ balance ability. [Methods] For six weeks beginning in April 2015, 22 stroke patients receiving physical therapy at K Hospital located in Gyeonggi-do were divided into a functional electrical stimulation (FES), ankle proprioceptive exercise and ankle joint muscle strengthening exercise group (FPS group) of 11 patients and an FES and stretching exercise group (FS group) of 11 patients. The stimulation and exercises were conducted for 30 min per day, five days per week for six weeks. Balance ability was measured using a BioRescue and the Berg balance scale, functional reach test, and the timed up-and-go test were also used as clinical evaluation indices. Repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to examine differences between before the exercises and at three and six weeks after beginning the exercises within each group, and the amounts of change between the two groups were compared. [Results] In the comparison within each group, both groups showed significant differences between before and after the experiment in all the tests and comparison between the groups showed that greater improvement was seen in all values in the FPS group. [Conclusion] In the present study, implementing FES and stretching exercises plus ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises was more effective at improving stroke patients balance ability than implementing only FES and stretching exercises. PMID:26504337

  15. The effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercise programs accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients' balance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Kyou Sik

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises accompanied by functional electrical stimulation on stroke patients' balance ability. [Methods] For six weeks beginning in April 2015, 22 stroke patients receiving physical therapy at K Hospital located in Gyeonggi-do were divided into a functional electrical stimulation (FES), ankle proprioceptive exercise and ankle joint muscle strengthening exercise group (FPS group) of 11 patients and an FES and stretching exercise group (FS group) of 11 patients. The stimulation and exercises were conducted for 30 min per day, five days per week for six weeks. Balance ability was measured using a BioRescue and the Berg balance scale, functional reach test, and the timed up-and-go test were also used as clinical evaluation indices. Repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to examine differences between before the exercises and at three and six weeks after beginning the exercises within each group, and the amounts of change between the two groups were compared. [Results] In the comparison within each group, both groups showed significant differences between before and after the experiment in all the tests and comparison between the groups showed that greater improvement was seen in all values in the FPS group. [Conclusion] In the present study, implementing FES and stretching exercises plus ankle joint muscle strengthening and proprioceptive exercises was more effective at improving stroke patients balance ability than implementing only FES and stretching exercises.

  16. A new silver robot platform for the elderly and the handicapped: Spiderbot TM-posture balancing and muscle strengthening exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Aslam; Farahani, Hossein S.; Jeong, Seung-Gweon; Kim, Hyunho; Ryu, Jeha

    2005-12-01

    By using a new type of silver robot called SpiderBot TM, posture balancing and muscle strengthening exercises were presented. Unlike mobile robots on a floor, SpiderBot TM is conceptualized to generate full mobility in a room and to have higher payload while generating six degrees-of-freedom for assisting daily lives of the elderly and the handicapped. A preliminary prototype of SpiderBot TM has been constructed by using incompletely restrained wire mechanism and simple control algorithms were implemented for two types of exercises for elderly people's health improvement. One is a posture balancing exercise that prevents from falling to any directions. And the other is muscle strengthening exercise that uses the SpiderBot TM as a weight lifting mechanism. Preliminary experimental results show that the proposed new silver robot platform is used for such exercises.

  17. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as "low back pain", "older people", and "strengthening exercise". Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances.

  18. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as "low back pain", "older people", and "strengthening exercise". Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances. PMID:27293970

  19. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as “low back pain”, “older people”, and “strengthening exercise”. Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances. PMID:27293970

  20. Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon rupture occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair.

  1. The effects of gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises for four weeks on navicular drop and lower extremity muscle activity during gait with flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of abductor hallucis and gluteus maximus strengthening exercises on pronated feet. [Subjects and Methods] The present study was conducted with 18 adults without no history of surgery on the foot or ankle. One group performed both gluteus maximus strengthening exercises and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises, while the other group performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] The group that performed both gluteus maximus and abductor hallucis strengthening exercises showed smaller values in the height of navicular drop than the group that performed only abductor hallucis strengthening exercises. The muscle activity of the gluteus maximus and the vastus medialis increased during heel-strike in the group that added gluteus maximus exercises, and the muscle activity of the abductor hallucis significantly increased in both groups. [Conclusion] Given the results of the present study, it can be suggested that strengthening the gluteus maximus while also performing exercises to correct the pronated foot is an effective method for achieving normal gait. PMID:27134383

  2. Effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles on the nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint in a sedentary worker with nonspecific sacroiliac joint pain. [Subject] A 36-year-old female complained of pain in the sacroiliac joints. [Methods] The subject performed individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles for nutation torque of the sacroiliac joint for 3 weeks. Pain-provocation tests and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were evaluated before and after the exercises. [Results] After performing the individual strengthening exercises for the erector spinae, rectus abdominis, and biceps femoris muscles for 3 weeks, the subject displayed no pain in the pain provocation tests, and the VAS score was 2/10. [Conclusion] The individual strengthening exercises for the stabilization muscles of the sacroiliac joint performed in the present study appear to be effective for sedentary workers with sacroiliac joint pain. PMID:25642098

  3. Effect of grip strength and grip strengthening exercises on instantaneous bat velocity of collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shawn S; Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J

    2004-05-01

    Bat velocity is considered to be an important factor for successful hitting. The relationship between grip strength and bat velocity has not been conclusively established. The purposes of this study were to determine the relationship of grip strength to bat velocity and to ascertain whether the performance of resistance training exercises designed to specifically target the forearms and grip would significantly alter bat velocity. The subjects for this study were 23 male members (mean +/- SD, age = 19.7 +/- 1.3 years, height = 182.5 +/- 5.9 cm, weight = 85.4 +/- 15.5 kg, experience = 14.4 +/- 1.7 years) of a varsity baseball team at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II school. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to test grip strength, and the SETPRO Rookie was used to measure instantaneous bat velocity at the point of contact with the ball. Subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. For 6 weeks, both groups participated in their usual baseball practice sessions, but the experimental group also performed extra forearm and grip strengthening exercises, whereas the control group did not. Pretest and posttest correlations between grip strength and bat velocity revealed no significant relationship between grip strength and bat velocity (pretest r = 0.054, p = 0.807; posttest r = 0.315, p = 0.145). A dependent t-test performed on all subjects revealed that a significant (p = 0.001) increase in bat velocity did occur over the course of the study. A covariate analysis, employing pretest bat velocity as the covariate, revealed no significant difference (p = 0.795) in posttest bat velocity scores between the experimental and control groups. Thus, increases in bat velocity occurred, but the differences were similar for both the experimental and control groups. The findings of this study suggest that grip strength and bat velocity are not significantly related, and that the allocation of time and energy for added training

  4. Effect of grip strength and grip strengthening exercises on instantaneous bat velocity of collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shawn S; Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J

    2004-05-01

    Bat velocity is considered to be an important factor for successful hitting. The relationship between grip strength and bat velocity has not been conclusively established. The purposes of this study were to determine the relationship of grip strength to bat velocity and to ascertain whether the performance of resistance training exercises designed to specifically target the forearms and grip would significantly alter bat velocity. The subjects for this study were 23 male members (mean +/- SD, age = 19.7 +/- 1.3 years, height = 182.5 +/- 5.9 cm, weight = 85.4 +/- 15.5 kg, experience = 14.4 +/- 1.7 years) of a varsity baseball team at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II school. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to test grip strength, and the SETPRO Rookie was used to measure instantaneous bat velocity at the point of contact with the ball. Subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. For 6 weeks, both groups participated in their usual baseball practice sessions, but the experimental group also performed extra forearm and grip strengthening exercises, whereas the control group did not. Pretest and posttest correlations between grip strength and bat velocity revealed no significant relationship between grip strength and bat velocity (pretest r = 0.054, p = 0.807; posttest r = 0.315, p = 0.145). A dependent t-test performed on all subjects revealed that a significant (p = 0.001) increase in bat velocity did occur over the course of the study. A covariate analysis, employing pretest bat velocity as the covariate, revealed no significant difference (p = 0.795) in posttest bat velocity scores between the experimental and control groups. Thus, increases in bat velocity occurred, but the differences were similar for both the experimental and control groups. The findings of this study suggest that grip strength and bat velocity are not significantly related, and that the allocation of time and energy for added training

  5. Home-Based Leg Strengthening Exercise Improves Function One Year After Hip Fracture: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, Kathleen K.; Craik, Rebecca L.; Palombaro, Kerstin M.; Tomlinson, Susan S.; Hofmann, Mary T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Examine the effectiveness of a short term leg strengthening exercise program compared to attentional control on improving strength, walking abilities, and function one year after hip fracture. Design Randomized controlled pilot study. Setting Interventions occurred in patients’ homes. Participants Community-dwelling older adults (n=26) six months post hip fracture at baseline. Intervention Exercise and control participants received interventions by physical therapists twice weekly for 10 weeks. The exercise group received high intensity leg strengthening exercises. The control group received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and mental imagery. Measurements Isometric force production of lower extremity muscles; usual and fast gait speed, six minute walk (6-MW) distance, modified physical performance test (mPPT), and SF-36 physical function. Results The primary endpoint was at one year post fracture. Isometric force production (p<.01), usual and fast gait speed (p=.02 & .03, respectively), 6-MW (p<.01), and mPPT (p<.01) improved at one year post fracture with exercise. Effect sizes were 0.79 for strength, 0.81 for mPPT scores, 0.56 for gait speed, 0.49 for 6-MW, and 0.30 for SF-36 scores. More patients in the exercise group made meaningful changes in gait speed and 6-MW distance than control patients (χ2: p=.004). Conclusion A 10-week home-based progressive resistance exercise program was sufficient to achieve moderate to large effects on physical performance and quality of life and may offer an alternative intervention mode for hip fracture patients who are unable to leave home at 6 months after the fracture. The effects were maintained at 3 months after completion of the training program. PMID:20929467

  6. Study of Hyperkyphosis, Exercise and Function (SHEAF) Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Multimodal Spine-Strengthening Exercise in Older Adults With Hyperkyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Vittinghoff, Eric; Kado, Deborah M.; Schafer, Anne L.; Wong, Shirley S.; Gladin, Amy; Lane, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperkyphosis negatively affects health status, physical mobility, and quality of life, but there is no standard protocol for treating people with hyperkyphosis. Treatment options include targeted exercise. Objectives This single-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) will determine the efficacy of a targeted multimodal spine-strengthening exercise program, compared with no exercise intervention, among community-dwelling men and women aged ≥60 years. Design The RCT is a parallel-group design, with 1:1 randomization to exercise and attentional control groups. Setting The study will be conducted at one primary site (one academic medical center partnered with one local community medical center). Participants One hundred men and women, aged ≥60 years, with thoracic kyphosis ≥40 degrees will be randomized. Intervention The targeted multimodal spine-strengthening exercise intervention includes exercise and postural training delivered by a physical therapist in a group of 10 participants, 3 times a week for 6 months. Controls receive monthly health education meetings in a group of 10 participants and monthly calls from the study coordinator to monitor physical activity and any adverse events. Measurements The primary outcome is change in Cobb angle of kyphosis measured from lateral spine radiographs at baseline and 6 months. Secondary outcomes include change in physical function (assessed with the modified Physical Performance Test, Timed “Up & Go” Test, timed loaded standing, 4-m walk, and Six-Minute Walk Test) and health-related quality of life (assessed with the modified Scoliosis Research Society instrument [SRS-30] self-image domain and Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS] global health and physical function indexes). Additional secondary outcomes include pain, physical activity level, spinal flexion and extension muscle strength, paraspinal extensor muscle density, and adverse events. Limitations Blinding of the

  7. The effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and knee function in professional soccer players: return to sport after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Taradaj, J; Halski, T; Kucharzewski, M; Walewicz, K; Smykla, A; Ozon, M; Slupska, L; Dymarek, R; Ptaszkowski, K; Rajfur, J; Pasternok, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of NMES program applied in male soccer players (after ACL reconstruction) on the quadriceps muscle. The 80 participants (NMES = 40, control = 40) received an exercise program, including three sessions weekly. The individuals in NMES group additionally received neuromuscular electrical stimulation procedures on both right and left quadriceps (biphasic symmetric rectangular pulses, frequency of impulses: 2500 Hz, and train of pulses frequency: 50 Hz) three times daily (3 hours of break between treatments), 3 days a week, for one month. The tensometry, muscle circumference, and goniometry pendulum test (follow-up after 1 and 3 months) were applied. The results of this study show that NMES (in presented parameters in experiment) is useful for strengthening the quadriceps muscle in soccer athletes. There is an evidence of the benefit of the NMES in restoring quadriceps muscle mass and strength of soccer players. In our study the neuromuscular electrical stimulation appeared to be safe for biomechanics of knee joint. The pathological changes in knee function were not observed. This trial is registered with Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001168741.

  8. The Effect of NeuroMuscular Electrical Stimulation on Quadriceps Strength and Knee Function in Professional Soccer Players: Return to Sport after ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Taradaj, J.; Halski, T.; Kucharzewski, M.; Walewicz, K.; Smykla, A.; Ozon, M.; Slupska, L.; Dymarek, R.; Ptaszkowski, K.; Rajfur, J.; Pasternok, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of NMES program applied in male soccer players (after ACL reconstruction) on the quadriceps muscle. The 80 participants (NMES = 40, control = 40) received an exercise program, including three sessions weekly. The individuals in NMES group additionally received neuromuscular electrical stimulation procedures on both right and left quadriceps (biphasic symmetric rectangular pulses, frequency of impulses: 2500 Hz, and train of pulses frequency: 50 Hz) three times daily (3 hours of break between treatments), 3 days a week, for one month. The tensometry, muscle circumference, and goniometry pendulum test (follow-up after 1 and 3 months) were applied. The results of this study show that NMES (in presented parameters in experiment) is useful for strengthening the quadriceps muscle in soccer athletes. There is an evidence of the benefit of the NMES in restoring quadriceps muscle mass and strength of soccer players. In our study the neuromuscular electrical stimulation appeared to be safe for biomechanics of knee joint. The pathological changes in knee function were not observed. This trial is registered with Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001168741. PMID:24381943

  9. Strengthening exercises to improve hand strength and functionality in rheumatoid arthritis with hand deformities: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cima, Stephanie Robinson; Barone, Adriana; Porto, Jaqueline Mello; de Abreu, Daniela Cristina Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory and chronic disease of joints, which may result in irreversible deformities. To evaluate the effects of an exercise programme aimed at improving the hand strength in individuals with hand deformities resulting from RA and to analyse the impact these exercises have on functionality. Twenty women with RA hand deformities participated in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups as follows: Group 1 (n = 13) had women participating in the exercise programme aimed at improving handgrip (HS) and pinch strengths (PS) as well as the motor coordination of the hand; Group 2 (n = 7) had women with RA who received no treatment for their hands (control). The treatment programme for hands consisted of 20 sessions, twice a week and at-home exercises. Both groups were submitted to Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and evaluation of HS and PS by means of dynamometry. Re-evaluations were performed after 10 and 20 sessions in Group 1 and after 2 months in Group 2. After 20 sessions of physiotherapy, Group 1 had a significant gain in HS and PS (p < 0.05) in addition to the improvement of functionality as assessed by HAQ (p = 0.016). For Group 2, no difference was found between the variables analysed (p > 0.05). The strengthening exercises for individuals with RA hand deformity are beneficial to improve handgrip and pinch strengths as well as functionality.

  10. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  11. Prescribing strengthening exercises for my patients: which equipment should I select?

    PubMed Central

    Piccininni, JJ

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines various devices used in strength building exercise programs. These include free weights, pulley machines, variable resistance weight machines, isokinetic units and elastic tubing and banding. Advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed and examined from the view point of the health care provider and the suitability of each type of device for prescribed progressive resistance exercise programs for patients. In addition to such practical aspects such as cost and maintenance, biomechanical factors, types of contraction elicited, ease of patient instruction and proprioception benefits are also compared in order to assist the clinician in selecting the most appropriate equipment for each individual patient.

  12. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles.

  13. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  14. The correlation between muscle activity of the quadriceps and balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Jung; Park, Seung Kyu; Uhm, Yo Han; Park, Sam Heon; Chun, Dong Whan; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between quadriceps muscle activity and balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-five stroke patients (30 males 25 females; mean age 58.7 years; stroke duration 4.82 months; Korean mini-mental state examination score 26.4) participated in this study. MP100 surface electromyography, BioRescue, and LUKOtronic were used to measure the quadriceps muscle activity, balance, and gait, respectively. [Results] There was a significant correlation between quadriceps muscle activity (vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction) and balance (limits of stability) and gait (gait velocity) but there was none between vastus lateralis % reference voluntary contraction, vastus medialis % reference voluntary contraction. [Conclusion] An increase in quadriceps muscle activity will improve balance and gait ability. To improve function in stroke patients, training is needed to strengthen the quadriceps muscles. PMID:27630416

  15. [Neglected ipsilateral simultaneous ruptures of patellar and quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Karahasanoğlu, İlker; Yoloğlu, Osman; Kerimoğlu, Servet; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Neglected patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury, but ipsilateral simultaneous patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture was not described in the literature to our knowledge. In this article, we report a 40-year-old healthy male patient with neglected ipsilateral patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures treated by peroneus longus tendon autograft. Patient had received some conservative and surgical treatments for patellar fracture before applying to our clinic. After our treatment using peroneus longus autograft and interference nails, patient was immobilized for six weeks in cylindrical cast. Flexion exercises and full weight bearing were started after cast removal. Patient had no complaint at postoperative second year. Patient was a neglected case. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation enabled us to achieve a satisfactory outcome.

  16. Effects of strengthening and stretching exercise programmes on kinematics and kinetics of running in older adults: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Reginaldo K; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Stirling, Lisa; Ferber, Reed

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of strengthening and stretching exercises on running kinematics and kinetics in older runners. One hundred and five runners (55-75 years) were randomly assigned to either a strengthening (n = 36), flexibility (n = 34) or control (n = 35) group. Running kinematics and kinetics were obtained using an eight-camera system and an instrumented treadmill before and after the eight-week exercise protocol. Measures of strength and flexibility were also obtained using a dynamometer and inclinometer/goniometer. A time effect was observed for the excursion angles of the ankle sagittal (P = 0.004, d = 0.17) and thorax/pelvis transverse (P < 0.001, d = 0.20) plane. Similarly, a time effect was observed for knee transverse plane impulse (P = 0.013, d = 0.26) and ground reaction force propulsion (P = 0.042, d = -0.15). A time effect for hip adduction (P = 0.006, d = 0.69), ankle dorsiflexion (P = 0.002, d = 0.47) and hip internal rotation (P = 0.048, d = 0.30) flexibility, and hip extensor (P = 0.001, d = -0.48) and ankle plantar flexor (P = 0.01, d = 0.39) strength were also observed. However, these changes were irrespective of exercise group. The results of the present study indicate that an eight-week stretching or strengthening protocol, compared to controls, was not effective in altering age-related running biomechanics despite changes in ankle and trunk kinematics, knee kinetics and ground reaction forces along with alterations in muscle strength and flexibility were observed over time. PMID:26805699

  17. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6-71±11%), and ST (60±1-69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8-16±5%) and ST (15±7-17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4-7±5%), ST (8±3-11±2%), SM (6±4-10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6-8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5-7±5%) and ST (7±3-12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies. PMID:27583444

  18. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6-71±11%), and ST (60±1-69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8-16±5%) and ST (15±7-17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4-7±5%), ST (8±3-11±2%), SM (6±4-10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6-8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5-7±5%) and ST (7±3-12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies.

  19. MRI-Based Regional Muscle Use during Hamstring Strengthening Exercises in Elite Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Suarez-Arrones, Luis; Rodas, Gil; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per; Linnehan, Richard; Kreider, Richard; Di Salvo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined site-specific hamstring muscles use with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elite soccer players during strength training. Thirty-six players were randomized into four groups, each performing either Nordic hamstring, flywheel leg-curl, Russian belt or the hip-extension conic-pulley exercise. The transverse relaxation time (T2) shift from pre- to post-MRI were calculated for the biceps femoris long (BFl) and short (BFs) heads, semitendinosus (ST) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles at proximal, middle and distal areas of the muscle length. T2 values increased substantially after flywheel leg-curl in all regions of the BFl (from 9±8 to 16±8%), BFs (41±6–71±11%), and ST (60±1–69±7%). Nordic hamstring induced a substantial T2 increase in all regions of the BFs (13±8–16±5%) and ST (15±7–17±5%). T2 values after the Russian belt deadlift substantially increased in all regions of the BFl (6±4–7±5%), ST (8±3–11±2%), SM (6±4–10±4%), and proximal and distal regions of BFs (6±6–8±5%). T2 values substantially increased after hip-extension conic-pulley only in proximal and middle regions of BFl (11±5–7±5%) and ST (7±3–12±4%). The relevance of such MRI-based inter- and intra-muscle use in designing more effective resistance training for improving hamstring function and preventing hamstring injuries in elite soccer players should be explored with more mechanistic studies. PMID:27583444

  20. Effects of electromyographic biofeedback on quadriceps strength: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lepley, Adam S; Gribble, Phillip A; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2012-03-01

    Quadriceps strength is a vital component to lower extremity function and is often the focus in resistance training interventions and injury rehabilitation. Electromyographic biofeedback (EMGBF) is frequently used to supplement strength gains; however, the true effect remains unknown. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of the treatment effect for EMGBF on quadriceps strength compared with that of placebo and traditional exercise interventions in both healthy and pathological populations. Web of Science and ProQuest databases were searched, and bibliographies of relevant articles were crossreferenced. Six articles measuring isometric quadriceps strength in response to EMGBF training were included and methodologically assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Standardized effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from preintervention and postintervention measures for EMGBF, placebo, and exercise-only interventions. Separate comparisons were made between studies assessing different intervention length (<4 and ≥4 weeks) and patient populations (pathological and healthy). Articles included received an average PEDro score of 6.5 ± 0.84. Homogeneous EMGBF effect sizes were found in all 6 studies (d = 0.01-5.56), with 4 studies reporting CI that crossed 0. A heterogeneous collection of effect sizes was found for exercise alone (d = -0.12 to 1.18) and placebo (d = -0.2 to 1.38), with 4 and 1 studies having a CI that crossed 0, respectively. The greatest EMGBF effects were found in pathological populations (d = 0.01-5.56), with the strongest effect found in the subjects with knee osteoarthritis (d = 5.56, CI = 4.26-6.68). As a group, effects were the strongest for EMGBF compared with that of placebo and exercise-only interventions, yet definitive evidence that EMGBF is beneficial for increasing quadriceps strength could not be concluded because of the 4 studies demonstrating a wide CI. PMID

  1. A Pilot Study of the Head Extension Swallowing Exercise: New Method for Strengthening Swallowing-Related Muscle Activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Chi

    2016-10-01

    This pilot study examined the effect of a new head extension swallowing exercise (HESE) on submental muscle activity and tongue strength in healthy volunteers. Fifteen young adults (10 females and 5 males) were instructed to extend their head backwards as much as possible, and while watching the ceiling, swallowed their saliva every 10 s for a duration of 20 min. Twenty-four treatments were performed over 8 weeks. The outcome variables evaluated at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks of training, and 12-week follow-up included mean and peak submental muscle activation amplitudes during normal and effortful swallowing measured via surface electromyography, and anterior and posterior isometric tongue pressures were measured with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. Results indicated that the muscle activation amplitudes during effortful swallowing increased significantly at 4 and 8 weeks compared to baseline (p < 0.025). However, the increases in amplitudes during normal swallowing were minor (nonsignificant) after 8 weeks compared to baseline. The isometric pressures of the tongue tip and the posterior part of the oral tongue were significantly higher at 8 weeks compared to baseline (p < 0.025). Thus, the 8-week HESE protocol significantly improved suprahyoid muscle activity during effortful swallowing as well as the isometric tongue pressures. The HESE appears effective in exercising and strengthening the suprahyoid muscles and tongue muscles in healthy participants. Although encouraging, these results need to be replicated in clinical trials for testing the therapeutic effects of the HESE in older adults and patients with dysphagia who present with decreased hyolaryngeal elevation.

  2. Quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, L E; Werner, C M L; Heinzelmann, M

    2006-06-01

    Ruptures of the patellar and/or quadriceps tendon are rare injuries that require immediate repair to re-establish knee extensor continuity and to allow early motion. We evaluated 36 consecutive patients with quadriceps or patellar tendon rupture between 1993 and 2000. There were 37 primary ruptures, 3 reruptures, 21 quadriceps and 19 patellar tendon ruptures. Follow up examination (>24 months postoperatively) included the patient's history, assessment of risk factors, clinical examination of both knees, isometric muscle strength measurements and three specific knee scores, Hospital for Special Surgery Score, Knee Society Score and Turba Score, and a short form SF-36. We evaluated 29 patients (26 men) with 33 ruptures (16 patellar tendon, 17 quadriceps tendon). Seven patients were lost to follow up. We found no difference between the range of motion and muscle strength when the injured leg was compared to the non-injured leg. Risk factors did not influence the four scores, patient satisfaction, pain, muscle strength or range of motion. Multiple injured patients had a significant reduction in muscle strength and circumference, however patient satisfaction did not differ to the non-multiple injured patient group.

  3. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  4. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  5. Quadriceps Muscle Function After Rehabilitation With Cryotherapy in Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joseph M.; Kuenze, Christopher M.; Diduch, David R.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Persistent muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction may be due to underlying activation failure and arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). Knee-joint cryotherapy has been shown to improve quadriceps function transiently in those with AMI, thereby providing an opportunity to improve quadriceps muscle activation and strength in patients with a reconstructed ACL. Objective: To compare quadriceps muscle function in patients with a reconstructed ACL who completed a 2-week intervention including daily cryotherapy (ice bag), daily exercises, or both. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 30 patients with reconstructed ACLs who were at least 6 months post-index surgery and had measurable quadriceps AMI. Intervention(s): The patients attended 4 supervised visits over a 2-week period. They were randomly assigned to receive 20 minutes of knee-joint cryotherapy, 1 hour of therapeutic rehabilitation exercises, or cryotherapy followed by exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured quadriceps Hoffmann reflex, normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, central activation ratio using the superimposed-burst technique, and patient-reported outcomes before and after the intervention period. Results: After the 2-week intervention period, patients who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy had higher normalized maximal voluntary isometric contraction torques (P = .002, Cohen d effect size = 1.4) compared with those who received cryotherapy alone (P = .16, d = 0.58) or performed exercise alone (P = .16, d = 0.30). Conclusions: After ACL reconstruction, patients with AMI who performed rehabilitation exercises immediately after cryotherapy experienced greater strength gains than those who performed cryotherapy or exercises alone. PMID:25299442

  6. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin.

  7. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  8. Maximizing quadriceps strength after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palmieri-Smith, Riann M; Thomas, Abbey C; Wojtys, Edward M

    2008-07-01

    The primary objectives of ACL surgery and rehabilitation are to restore knee function to preinjury levels and promote long-term joint health. Often these goals are not achieved, however. The quadriceps is critical to dynamic joint stability, and weakness of this muscle group is related to poor functional outcomes. Because of this, identifying strategies to minimize quadriceps weakness following ACL injury and reconstruction is of great clinical interest. This article reviews the current literature and critically discusses current rehabilitation approaches to restore quadriceps muscle function after ACL reconstruction.

  9. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons.

    PubMed

    Trobisch, Per David; Bauman, Matthias; Weise, Kuno; Stuby, Fabian; Hak, David J

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the rupture-zone was obtained in 22 cases and histologic analysis was performed. Degenerative changes were present in only 14 (64%) of the 22 samples. We observed an increasing ratio of degenerative to nondegenerative tendons with increasing patient age. Our data suggests that quadriceps tendon rupture, especially in younger patients, can occur in the absence of pathologic tendon degeneration.

  10. [Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Modrego, Francisco J; Molina, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous, bilateral, and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare injury. Individuals with this injury are usually predisposed by chronic renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism, gout, diabetes, and lupus erythematosus. Often, primary diagnostic confusion can lead to a delay in treatment. Two cases of a bilateral lesion of the quadriceps tendon, that were treated surgically using the technique of Scuderi, followed by an intense rehabilitation programme, are presented. Surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  11. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  12. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury. PMID:25815224

  13. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  14. Quadriceps tendon rupture through a superolateral bipartite patella.

    PubMed

    Woods, G William; O'Connor, Daniel P; Elkousy, Hussein A

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture through a bipartite patella. Although quadriceps tendon ruptures and patella fractures are common, rupture through a bipartite patella fragment is rare. This case was managed similar to a quadriceps rupture with an excellent result.

  15. Tai Chi as a form of exercise training in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Leung, Regina W M; McKeough, Zoe J; Alison, Jennifer A

    2013-12-01

    Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art which incorporates elements of strengthening, balance, postural alignment and concentration. The benefits of Tai Chi in the healthy population have been widely examined. In comparison, only three studies have evaluated the effects of Tai Chi in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Existing evidence suggests that the exercise intensity of Tai Chi reaches a moderate level in people with COPD. Furthermore, a short-term program of Tai Chi improves exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, balance and quadriceps strength in people with mild to moderate COPD. More studies are warranted to examine the effects of different styles of Tai Chi and the long-term benefits of Tai Chi as an exercise regimen for people with COPD. PMID:24224506

  16. Tai Chi as a form of exercise training in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Leung, Regina W M; McKeough, Zoe J; Alison, Jennifer A

    2013-12-01

    Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art which incorporates elements of strengthening, balance, postural alignment and concentration. The benefits of Tai Chi in the healthy population have been widely examined. In comparison, only three studies have evaluated the effects of Tai Chi in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Existing evidence suggests that the exercise intensity of Tai Chi reaches a moderate level in people with COPD. Furthermore, a short-term program of Tai Chi improves exercise capacity, health-related quality of life, balance and quadriceps strength in people with mild to moderate COPD. More studies are warranted to examine the effects of different styles of Tai Chi and the long-term benefits of Tai Chi as an exercise regimen for people with COPD.

  17. Intervention program in college instrumental musicians, with kinematics analysis of cello and flute playing: a combined program of yogic breathing and muscle strengthening-flexibility exercises.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hie; Carey, Stephanie; Dubey, Rajiv; Matz, Rachel

    2012-06-01

    College musicians encounter health risks not dissimilar to those of professional musicians. Fifteen collegiate instrumental musicians participated in the intervention program of yogic-breathing and muscle-strengthening and flexibility exercises for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention data from the Health-Pain-Injury Inventory (HPI) and the Physical & Musical-Performance Efficacy Assessment Survey (PME) were analyzed for the effects of the program on the musicians' physical and musical-performance efficacy. HPI results showed that the majority of our sample had healthy lifestyles and minimal pain and injuries but irregular eating and exercise habits. The pre-intervention PME data showed a high level of musical efficacy (i.e., awareness of music technique, tone, and flow) but a low-level of physical efficacy (i.e., awareness of posture, tension, and movement flexibility). Post-intervention data showed that the program improved physical efficacy by increased awareness of posture and tension. In 2 volunteer musicians, kinematics motion analysis was conducted for exploratory purposes. Our cellist played the scale using a larger range of motion (ROM) in right shoulder flexion and abduction and slightly increased rotation while keeping decreased right elbow ROM after the intervention program. The flutist shifted the body weight from one foot to the other more in the second playing post-intervention. These changes can be attributed to the increased physical efficacy that allowed freedom to express musicality. Findings from these case scenarios provide empirically based hypotheses for further study. We share our experience so that others may use our model and instruments to develop studies with larger samples. PMID:22739821

  18. Intervention program in college instrumental musicians, with kinematics analysis of cello and flute playing: a combined program of yogic breathing and muscle strengthening-flexibility exercises.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hie; Carey, Stephanie; Dubey, Rajiv; Matz, Rachel

    2012-06-01

    College musicians encounter health risks not dissimilar to those of professional musicians. Fifteen collegiate instrumental musicians participated in the intervention program of yogic-breathing and muscle-strengthening and flexibility exercises for 8 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention data from the Health-Pain-Injury Inventory (HPI) and the Physical & Musical-Performance Efficacy Assessment Survey (PME) were analyzed for the effects of the program on the musicians' physical and musical-performance efficacy. HPI results showed that the majority of our sample had healthy lifestyles and minimal pain and injuries but irregular eating and exercise habits. The pre-intervention PME data showed a high level of musical efficacy (i.e., awareness of music technique, tone, and flow) but a low-level of physical efficacy (i.e., awareness of posture, tension, and movement flexibility). Post-intervention data showed that the program improved physical efficacy by increased awareness of posture and tension. In 2 volunteer musicians, kinematics motion analysis was conducted for exploratory purposes. Our cellist played the scale using a larger range of motion (ROM) in right shoulder flexion and abduction and slightly increased rotation while keeping decreased right elbow ROM after the intervention program. The flutist shifted the body weight from one foot to the other more in the second playing post-intervention. These changes can be attributed to the increased physical efficacy that allowed freedom to express musicality. Findings from these case scenarios provide empirically based hypotheses for further study. We share our experience so that others may use our model and instruments to develop studies with larger samples.

  19. Isokinetic Hamstrings: Quadriceps Ratios in Intercollegiate Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.; Mahaffey, Brian L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared the differences in the concentric hamstrings to quadriceps (H:Q) ratio among athletes in different sports at three velocities. Measurement of H:Q ratio of both knees among male and female college athletes indicated that the H:Q ratio increased as velocity increased. No differences existed for the H:Q ratio for sport or side of body. (SM)

  20. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... article Exercise / physical activity with MS Judy Boone, physical therapist Lynn Williams, Dan Melfi and Dave Altman discuss ... adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with MS can be helpful in designing, ...

  1. Rapid recovery from spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in an active, healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Gaheer, Rajinder Singh; Hawkins, Amanda

    2010-07-13

    Bilateral spontaneous quadriceps rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and is frequently misdiagnosed. It is rarely seen in healthy, active individuals. This article presents a case of bilateral simultaneous and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a healthy, athletic, active and highly motivated patient with rapid recovery from injury and return to full sport activity within a relatively short period of time. A 65-year-old healthy man felt both knees give way while walking down stairs at home and collapsed, unable to bear weight. He was fit and well, not on any medications and basic laboratory screening was within normal limits. He was an active sportsman, horse rider, swimmer, and long-distance cyclist, and had completed a half marathon 1 month before his injury. He was diagnosed with bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures. An ultrasound of both knees confirmed the diagnosis of full-thickness rupture. Surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons was performed 3 days after the injury. Bilateral locking brace in 10 degrees of flexion was used to immobilize both knees and protect the repair for 6 weeks. The patient remained nonweight bearing for 2 weeks, then gradual weight bearing was commenced, with full weight bearing at 6 weeks. Intensive isometric quadriceps exercises were started on the second postoperative day. Immobilization of both knees was maintained for 6 weeks, after which full active range of motion (ROM) was initiated. At 16 weeks after the injury he had bilateral ROM from 0 degrees to 120 degrees flexion, with no extension lag. He was horse riding, playing golf, swimming, and walking distances up to 2 miles at that time.

  2. Bone quality and bone mass as assessed by quantitative ultrasound and dual energy x ray absorptiometry in women with rheumatoid arthritis: relationship with quadriceps strength

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, O; Sorensen, O; Egsmose, C

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships of bone quality as assessed by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2) with quadriceps strength (QS) in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Sixty seven women with RA according to the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria were examined. Mean (SD) age was 62 (13) years, mean disease duration 15 years. Most were or had been receiving glucocorticoid treatment. Calcaneal bone quality expressed as speed of sound (SOS, m/s), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz), and stiffness was measured by QUS. BMD of the femoral neck, spine, and distal forearm was measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA). Maximal voluntary isokinetic quadriceps strength (Nm) was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry. Pain was recorded on a visual analogue scale (VAS), disability was scored by the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and the degree of physical impairment was expressed by the Steinbrocker index (SI). Results: In multiple regression analyses, QS predicted SOS, BUA, and stiffness (rpartial ranging from 0.36 to 0.45, p<0.005) and femoral neck BMD (rpartial=0.30, p<0.05) independently of age, height, weight, disease duration, HAQ, VAS, SI, and cumulative steroid dose. BMD of the spine and distal forearm was not associated with QS. After adjustment for covariates, women with subnormal BMD of the femoral neck (T score <-1), had a 20% lower QS than those with normal BMD (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Calcaneal bone quality and femoral neck BMD were associated with QS in women with RA. This finding indicates that physical activity including muscle strengthening exercises may play a part in the prevention of bone loss in these patients. PMID:11874835

  3. Measurement of quadriceps endurance by fNIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Devrim; Şayli, Ömer; Karahan, Mustafa; Akin, A.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, the changes in muscle deoxygenation trends during a sustained isometric quadriceps (chair squat/half squat) endurance exercise were evaluated among twelve male subjects and the relationship between muscle oxygenation and endurance times was investigated by means of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Neuromuscular activation and predictions of muscle performance decrements during extended fatiguing task was investigated by means of surface electromyography (sEMG). The results of the study showed that in the subjects who maintained exercise longer than five minutes (group 1), mean Hb recovery time (33 [sec.]) was 37.4% less than the others (group 2, 52.7 [sec.]). Also mean HbO II decline amplitude (2.53 [a.u.] in group 1 and 2.07 [a.u.] in group 2) and oxy decline amplitude (8.4 [a.u.] in group 1 and 3.04 [a.u.] in group 2) in the beginning of squat exercise are found to be 22.6% and 176.9% bigger in these group. For the EMG parameters, mean slope of MNF and MDF decline are found to be 57.5% and 42.2% bigger in magnitude in group 2 which indicates higher degree of decrement in mean and median frequencies although their mean squat duration time is less. This indicates higher index of fatigue for this group. It is concluded that training leads to altered oxygenation and oxygen extraction capability in the exercising muscle and investigated fNIRS parameters could be used for endurance evaluation.

  4. The effects of gender on quadriceps muscle activation strategies during a maneuver that mimics a high ACL injury risk position.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E

    2005-04-01

    While the increased incidence of serious knee injuries in female athletes is well established, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms related to the elevated ACL injury rate has yet to be delineated. Video analysis of ACL injury during competitive sports play indicates a common body position associated with non-contact ACL injury; the tibia is externally rotated, the knee is close to full extension, the foot is planted and as the limb is decelerated it collapses into valgus. The purpose of the current prospective study was to evaluate gender differences in quadriceps muscle activation strategies when performing a physically challenging, but reproducible maneuver that mimics the high ACL injury risk position (in the absence of high velocity and high loads). Twenty physically active college-aged subjects (10 male and 10 female) performed multiple sets of the prescribed exercise. EMG recordings were employed to measure the ratio of activation between the medial and lateral quadriceps during the 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20th sets of exercise. Females demonstrated decreased RMS medial-to-lateral quadriceps ratios compared to males (F(1,18)=5.88, p=0.026). There was no main effect of set number on RMS quadriceps ratio (p>0.05). The results of this study suggest that females utilize neuromuscular activation strategies which may contribute to "dynamic valgus" and ACL rupture when performing high-risk maneuvers.

  5. Delayed reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Pocock, C A J; Trikha, S P; Bell, J S P

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury and rapid diagnosis is important because delay in surgical repair generally is believed to adversely affect outcome. One study of 20 patients suggests repair should be done during the first 48 to 72 hours postinjury to achieve a successful outcome and late repair led to unsatisfactory recovery. Cases of delayed tendon repair have been reported, the longest to our knowledge being 11 months before surgical intervention. We present a case of successful outcome of a quadriceps tendon rupture reconstructed at least 8 years after occurrence and a review of the literature of delayed reconstructions. We show that successful restoration of extensor mechanism function can be achieved several years after tendon rupture.

  6. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  7. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Volitional Quadriceps Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher E.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Quadriceps-activation deficits have been reported after meniscectomy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in conjunction with maximal contractions affects quadriceps activation in patients after meniscectomy. Objective: To determine the effect of single-pulsed TMS on quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) in patients after meniscectomy. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty participants who had partial meniscectomy and who had a CAR less than 85% were assigned randomly to the TMS group (7 men, 4 women; age  =  38.1 ± 16.2 years, height  =  176.8 ± 11.5 cm, mass  =  91.8 ± 27.5 kg, postoperative time  =  36.7 ± 34.9 weeks) or the control group (7 men, 2 women; age  =  38.2 ± 17.5 years, height  =  176.5 ± 7.9 cm, mass  =  86.2 ± 15.3 kg, postoperative time  =  36.6 ± 37.4 weeks). Intervention(s): Participants in the experimental group received TMS over the motor cortex that was contralateral to the involved leg and performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions with the involved leg. The control group performed 3 maximal quadriceps contractions without the TMS. Main Outcome Measure(s): Quadriceps activation was assessed using the CAR, which was measured in 70° of knee flexion at baseline and at 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes posttest. The CAR was expressed as a percentage of full activation. Results: Differences in CAR were detected over time (F4,72  =  3.025, P  = .02). No interaction (F4,72  =  1.457, P  =  .22) or between-groups differences (F1,18  =  0.096, P  =  .76) were found for CAR. Moderate CAR effect sizes were found at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]  =  −0.33, 1.37) and 60 (Cohen d  =  0.50, 95% CI  =  −0.37, 1.33) minutes in the TMS group compared with CAR at baseline. Strong effect sizes were found for CAR at 10 (Cohen d  =  0.82, 95% CI

  8. Effect of increased quadriceps tensile stiffness on peak anterior cruciate ligament strain during a simulated pivot landing.

    PubMed

    Lipps, David B; Oh, Youkeun K; Ashton-Miller, James A; Wojtys, Edward M

    2014-03-01

    ACL injury prevention programs often involve strengthening the knee muscles. We posit that an unrecognized benefit of such training is the associated increase in the tensile stiffness of the hypertrophied muscle. We tested the hypothesis that an increased quadriceps tensile stiffness would reduce peak anteromedial bundle (AM-)ACL relative strain in female knees. Twelve female cadaver knees were subjected to compound impulsive two-times body weight loads in compression, flexion, and internal tibial torque beginning at 15° flexion. Knees were equipped with modifiable custom springs to represent the nonlinear rapid stretch behavior of a normal and increased stiffness female quadriceps (i.e., 33% greater stiffness). Peak AM-ACL relative strain was measured using an in situ transducer while muscle forces and tibiofemoral kinematics and kinetics were recorded. A 3D ADAMS™ dynamic biomechanical knee model was used in silico to interpret the experimental results which were analyzed using a repeated-measures Wilcoxon test. Female knees exhibited a 16% reduction in peak AM-ACL relative strain and 21% reduction in change in flexion when quadriceps tensile stiffness was increased by 33% (mean (SD) difference: 0.97% (0.65%), p = 0.003). We conclude that increased quadriceps tensile stiffness reduces peak ACL strain during a controlled study simulating a pivot landing.

  9. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials on exercise parameters in the treatment of patellofemoral pain: what works?

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Daniel; O’Leary, Timothy; Kumar, Saravana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There is research evidence which supports the effectiveness of exercise in reducing pain and increasing function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. However, what is unclear are the parameters underpinning this intervention. This has led to uncertainty when operationalizing exercises for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome in clinical practice. The aim of this review was to evaluate the parameters of exercise programs reported in primary research, to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations for exercise prescription for patellofemoral pain. Methods A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was undertaken. Only trials that identified exercise to be effective in treating patellofemoral pain were included. Appropriate databases and reference lists were searched using established keywords. Data relating to common exercise parameters such as the type of exercise, length, and frequency of intervention, intensity, repetitions, sets, and specific technique were extracted, along with details of co-interventions that may have been used. Results A total of ten randomized controlled trials were included in this review and from these trials 14 interventions arms were evaluated. All 14 interventions focused on active exercises, all but two of which also included a passive stretching component. The current body of evidence demonstrates positive results with exercise interventions such as knee extension, squats, stationary cycling, static quadriceps, active straight leg raise, leg press, and step-up and down exercises for patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. A progressive regime of daily exercises of two to four sets of ten or more repetitions over an intervention period of 6 weeks or more, combined with exercises to address flexibility of the lower limb musculature was commonly used. Conclusion Currently, the primary research on this topic supports the use of closed kinetic chain, strengthening exercises for musculature of

  10. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus®. [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23–29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47–62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35–12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  11. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus(®). [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23-29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47-62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35-12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback.

  12. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.

  13. Wearable sensor-based rehabilitation exercise assessment for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  14. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  15. Quadriceps function relates to muscle size following ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuenze, Christopher M; Blemker, Silvia S; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-09-01

    It remains unclear what role reduced volume and cross-section area (CSA) of individual quadriceps muscles may play in persistent quadriceps weakness and more global dysfunction following ACL reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this investigation was to establish the relationship between cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle group and measures of knee related and quadriceps function following ACLR. Thirty participants with a history of primary, unilateral ACLR experiencing persistent quadriceps activation failure participated in this cohort study. Clinical factors including International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, normalized knee extension MVIC torque (Nm/kg) and quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR, %) were assessed in addition to CSA. Quadriceps CSA was measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; Siemens Avanto 1.5T). Quadriceps CSA (cm(2) ) and quadriceps volume (cm(3) ) as well as individual muscle estimates were identified within a 10 cm mid-thigh capture area. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (r) established relationships between CSA and all other variables. Stepwise linear regression established which CSA factors were able to successfully predict clinical factors. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly correlated with Vastus Intermedius (VI; r =  0.857, p < 0.001) CSA as well as partial VI (r = 0.849, p < 0.001) and quadriceps (r = 0.830, p < 0.001) volume. Partial VI (r = 0.365, p = 0.047) volume was weakly correlated with IKDC score. Knee extension MVIC torque was strongly predicted using VI CSA alone (R(2)  = 0.725) or in combination with Vastus Medialis CSA (VM; R(2)  = 0.756). Statement of Clinical Significance: Atrophy of the VI and VM muscles negatively impacts knee extension strength following ACLR. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1656-1662, 2016.

  16. Recovery of gait after quadriceps muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Beretta, Stephannie Spiandor; Pereira, Vinicius A I; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; dos Santos, Paulo Cezar Rocha; van Dieën, Jaap H; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recovery time after quadriceps muscle fatigue on gait in young adults. Forty young adults (20-40 years old) performed three 8-m gait trials at preferred velocity before and after muscle fatigue, and after 5, 10 and 20min of passive rest. In addition, at each time point, two maximal isometric voluntary contractions were preformed. Muscle fatigue was induced by repeated sit-to-stand transfers until task failure. Spatio-temporal, kinetic and muscle activity parameters, measured in the central stride of each trial, were analyzed. Data were compared between before and after the muscle fatigue protocol and after the recovery periods by one-way repeated measures ANOVA. The voluntary force was decreased after the fatigue protocol (p<0.001) and after 5, 10 and 20min of recovery compared to before the fatigue protocol. Step width (p<0.001) and RMS of biceps femoris (p<0.05) were increased immediately after the fatigue protocol and remained increased after the recovery periods. In addition, stride duration was decreased immediately after the fatigue protocol compared to before and to after 10 and 20min of rest (p<0.001). The anterior-posterior propulsive impulse was also decreased after the fatigue protocol (p<0.001) and remained low after 5, 10 and 20min of rest. We conclude that 20min is not enough to see full recovery of gait after exhaustive quadriceps muscle fatigue.

  17. Isometric exercise (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Isometric exercise works muscles and strengthens bone. Increased muscle mass elevates metabolism, which in turn burns fat. Strength training is also called anaerobic exercise, as opposed to aerobic, because ...

  18. Self-regulatory skills usage strengthens the relations of self-efficacy for improved eating, exercise, and weight in the severely obese: toward an explanatory model.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2011-07-01

    Lack of success with behavioral weight-management treatments indicates a need for a better understanding of modifiable psychological correlates. Adults with class 2 and 3 obesity (N = 183; Mean(BMI) = 42.0 kg/m(2)) volunteered for a 26-week nutrition and exercise treatment, based on social cognitive theory, that focused on self-efficacy and self-regulation applied to increasing cardiovascular exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption. Improved self-efficacy for controlled eating significantly predicted increased fruit and vegetable consumption (R(2) = .15). Improved self-efficacy for exercise significantly predicted increased exercise (R(2) = .46). When changes in self-regulatory skill usage were stepped into the 2 previous equations, the variances accounted for significantly increased. Increases in fruit and vegetable consumption and exercise significantly predicted weight loss (R(2) = .38). Findings suggest that behavioral theory should guide research on weight-loss treatment, and a focus on self-efficacy and self-regulatory skills applied to specific nutrition and exercise behaviors is warranted.

  19. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  20. Reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon ruptures using the quadriceps graft.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Luiz Ellera; de Oliveira Alves, Jairo André; Zimmermann, José Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Several techniques using different grafts have been described for reconstruction of the patellar tendon after a neglected rupture. Retraction of the quadriceps tendon may compromise repair integrity due to progressive stretching of the graft. The authors present a surgical technique using the central one-third of the quadriceps tendon. This is supported by the fact that the resistance to traction of this segment of the quadriceps tendon equals that of a double-looped semitendinosus graft and that the harvesting of this specific graft promotes muscle inhibition, thus protecting the reconstruction during the recovery period.

  1. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  2. Development and delivery of an exercise intervention for rheumatoid arthritis: strengthening and stretching for rheumatoid arthritis of the hand (SARAH) trial.

    PubMed

    Heine, P J; Williams, M A; Williamson, E; Bridle, C; Adams, J; O'Brien, A; Evans, D; Lamb, S E

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a hand exercise intervention for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as part of a large multi-centred randomised controlled trial in a U.K. National Health Service (NHS) setting. Participants are eligible if diagnosed with RA according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, have a history of disease activity, functional deficit or impairment in the hand and/or wrist, and have been on a stable medication regime for at least 3 months. The intervention development was informed by the current evidence base, published guidelines, clinician and expert opinion, and a pilot study. The exercise programme targets known, potentially modifiable physical impairments of the hand with 5 exercise sessions and a home exercise component over a 12 week period. The intervention will be provided to 240 participants along with usual care. A further 240 will receive usual care only as part of the control arm. Specific details of the treatments delivered are described. [ISRCTN no: 89936343].

  3. Dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The study objectives were to examine the dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle in athletes, and investigate its association with participation in sport. The study comprised 168 active competitive non-pregnant athletes, aged 14-24 years. The dynamic strength of their quadriceps muscle was measured, and they answered a questionnaire about sports activity and occupation. The dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle was significantly higher in men than in women, and was positively associated with body weight, years of jogging, years of soccer, and weekly hours of basketball. In conclusion, the dynamic strength of the quadriceps muscle seems to be associated with sports activity. The results suggest sport specific adaptation, which may reflect high levels of running and jumping activity.

  4. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  5. Partial tear of the quadriceps tendon in a child.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, George

    2008-06-01

    We present a case of partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in an 8-year-old girl. This is one of the youngest patients reported with a quadriceps tendon rupture, an entity seen predominantly in middle-aged people. The strength of the muscle tendon unit in a child makes tendon injuries extremely unusual as compared to apophyseal avulsions. The MR imaging findings of this unusual pediatric injury are illustrated.

  6. [Simultaneous rupture of a patellar tendon and contralateral quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Horas, U; Ernst, S; Meyer, C; Halbsguth, A; Herbst, U

    2006-09-01

    The simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a rare injury; only occasional reports exist about the bilateral simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon. Degenerative changes of the tendon due to drugs or diseases lead to the rupture. We describe two cases of simultaneous rupture of the patellar and contralateral quadriceps tendons; only one patient had special risks. We report the management of therapy and the functional results using the Lysholm score and Knee Rating Scale.

  7. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures--jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D W; Carter, V S; Jobe, F W; Kerlan, R K

    1984-01-01

    We reviewed 13 patients with end stage jumper's knee, 10 with patellar tendon ruptures, and 3 with ruptures of the quadriceps tendon to evaluate our long-term results in treating these tendon ruptures in an athletic population. The focus was on the natural history, the time until return, and the level of return, to athletic activity. Jumper's knee affected all patients to a varying degree prior to rupture. Basketball was the most common sport involved. At followup, averaging 4 1/2 years, patients underwent functional and clinical, as well as Cybex and roentgenographic, evaluations. Results indicated patellar tendon ruptures, where the ruptures are complete, have a more favorable prognosis than those of the quadriceps tendon which are incomplete. All of the latter patients continued to have quadriceps tendinitis following repair. In both groups, the poor results were obtained in patients with chondromalacia and/or patella alta. Cybex testing yielded results of greater than 100% strength in three patients with patellar tendon ruptures, but no patient with quadriceps rupture had comparable test results. There was no apparent relationship between ruptures and cortisone injections. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures from indirect injury in athletes represent the end stage of jumper's knee and result from repetitive microtrauma. Excellent function usually follows repair of patellar tendon ruptures when surgery is performed early and care is taken to restore normal patellar tendon length. Results of quadriceps ruptures are less satisfactory since these ruptures are usually incomplete and all degenerative tissue may not be involved in the healing response.

  8. Static vs. Dynamic Acute Stretching Effect on Quadriceps Muscle Activity during Soccer Instep Kicking.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2013-12-18

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of static and dynamic stretching on quadriceps muscle activation during maximal soccer instep kicking. The kicking motion of twelve male college soccer players (body height: 174.66 ± 5.01 cm; body mass: 72.83 ± 4.83 kg; age: 18.83 ± 0.75 years) was captured using six synchronized high-speed infra-red cameras whilst electromyography (EMG) signals from vastus medialis (VM), lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) were recorded before and after static or dynamic stretching. Analysis of variance designs showed a higher increase in knee extension angular velocity (9.65% vs. -1.45%, p < 0.001), RF (37.5% vs. -8.33%, p < 0.001), VM (12% vs. -12%, p < 0.018), and VL EMG activity (20% vs. -6.67%, p < 0.001) after dynamic stretching exercises. Based on these results, it could be suggested that dynamic stretching is probably more effective in increasing quadriceps muscle activity and knee extension angular velocity during the final swing phase of a maximal soccer instep kick than static stretching.

  9. Eccentric Strengthening for Chronic Lateral Epicondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Dennis Y.; Schultz, Brian J.; Schaal, Bob; Graham, Scott T.; Kim, Byung Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective treatments for chronic lateral epicondylosis have not been studied adequately. Eccentric overload exercises have been used with success for other chronic tendinopathy, mainly Achilles and patellar. Hypothesis/Purpose: To compare a wrist extensor eccentric strengthening exercise program with a wrist extensor stretching/modality program for the treatment of chronic lateral epicondylosis. The authors hypothesized that the eccentric strengthening program would produce more favorable results than a stretching/modality program. Study Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Methods: Twenty-eight adults with lateral epicondylosis of greater than 4 weeks’ duration were randomized to an eccentric strengthening group or a stretching group. Exercises were taught by a physical therapist, and participants performed most of the exercises on their own at home. Pain scores with visual analog scale from 0 to 100 were obtained at baseline and then at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks after the start of the exercise program. Results: Both groups improved their pain scores from baseline to the 4-week time point, followed by nonsignificant further decreases in pain scores thereafter. No statistically significant differences were found between the eccentric strengthening group and stretching groups at any follow-up time point. Conclusions: Despite previous reports documenting favorable results with eccentric exercises for other tendinopathy, the authors were unable to show any statistical advantage to eccentric exercises for lateral epicondylosis during these periods compared with local modalities and stretching exercises. PMID:23016049

  10. Effects of Kinesio Tape application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Timur; Aslan, Meryem Doğan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Kinesio Tape (KT) application to quadriceps muscles on isokinetic muscle strength, gait, and functional parameters in patients with stroke. Twenty-four patients were allocated into KT and control groups. All patients participated in the same conventional rehabilitation program 5 times/wk for 4 wk. In addition, KT was applied to quadriceps muscles bilaterally to the patients in the KT group. Compared with baseline, peak torque levels increased significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05). However, change levels were significantly higher in the KT group than the control group at 60 degrees/second angular velocity (AV) in extension (p = 0.04) and 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in flexion (both p = 0.02) on the paretic side. Moreover, the change levels were more prominent in the KT group at 60 and 180 degrees/second AV in extension (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively) on the nonparetic side. Gait, balance, mobility, and quality of life values improved significantly in both groups (all p < 0.05), yet the change levels between the groups did not reach significance (p > 0.05). KT application to quadriceps muscles in addition to conventional exercises for 4 wk is effective on isokinetic but not functional parameters.

  11. Effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] Thirty women over 65 years of age diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis participated in the present study. The subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (n=10), a progressive resistance training group (n=10), or a Russian electrical stimulation group (n=10). [Methods] Each group was treated 3 times weekly for 8 weeks, and each session lasted 45 minutes. Muscle strength was assessed by measuring the peak torque of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline and at the fourth and eighth weeks of the treatment period. [Results] All groups showed significant intragroup differences in the quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque after the treatment intervention. There were significant intergroup differences between the Russian electrical stimulation group and the other groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation can be effective in strengthening the quadriceps femoris muscle in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis.

  12. Effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Hoon; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation on quadriceps femoris muscle strength in elderly women with osteoarthritis of the knee. [Subjects] Thirty women over 65 years of age diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis participated in the present study. The subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (n=10), a progressive resistance training group (n=10), or a Russian electrical stimulation group (n=10). [Methods] Each group was treated 3 times weekly for 8 weeks, and each session lasted 45 minutes. Muscle strength was assessed by measuring the peak torque of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Outcome measurements were performed at baseline and at the fourth and eighth weeks of the treatment period. [Results] All groups showed significant intragroup differences in the quadriceps femoris muscle peak torque after the treatment intervention. There were significant intergroup differences between the Russian electrical stimulation group and the other groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that combined application of progressive resistance training and Russian electrical stimulation can be effective in strengthening the quadriceps femoris muscle in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25931718

  13. Quadriceps atrophy after knee traumatisms and immobilization: electrophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martínez, A; Ramírez, A; Arpa, J

    2000-01-01

    Automatic analysis of EMG (T/A analysis) and invasive muscle fiber conduction velocity in situ (MFCV) were performed in 15 patients after traumatic lesions of the knee and immobilization with quadriceps atrophy. T/A analysis showed transient reduced number of turns, consistent with inhibition of quadriceps motoneurons, that recovered within the first 2 weeks after the plaster cast had been removed. MFCV was significantly slowed and showed a gradual improvement, reaching normal values after 6 weeks. These results suggest that decrement in activated motor units may be the cause of the disproportionate weakness of the quadriceps muscle on the first days after immobilization by the plaster cast. The recovery of MFCV was related with functional improvement of strength after the first weeks.

  14. Comparison of quadriceps inactivation between nerve and muscle stimulation.

    PubMed

    Place, Nicolas; Casartelli, Nicola; Glatthorn, Julia F; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-12-01

    We evaluated the use of direct muscle stimulation for quantifying quadriceps inactivation at different contraction levels as opposed to conventional twitch interpolation using nerve stimulation. Fourteen healthy volunteers were tested. Paired stimuli were delivered to the femoral nerve or to the quadriceps muscle belly during voluntary contractions ranging from 20% to 100% of maximum, and the amplitude of the superimposed doublet was quantified to investigate inactivation. Superimposed doublet for muscle and nerve stimulation, respectively between the range of 60% to 100% of maximum (e.g., at 100%, muscle stimulation was 14 ± 5 Nm and nerve stimulation was 15 ± 6 Nm). Despite higher current doses, muscle stimulation was associated with less discomfort than nerve stimulation (P < 0.05). Collectively, our data suggest that direct muscle stimulation could be used to assess quadriceps inactivation at maximal and quasi-maximal contraction levels as a valid alternative to motor nerve stimulation.

  15. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  16. Repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Barber, F Alan

    2002-01-01

    The repair of ruptured quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the ruptured tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone.

  17. Effects of open and closed kinetic chains of sling exercise therapy on the muscle activity of the vastus medialis oblique and vastus lateralis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Huang, Wei-Syuan; Lee, Chia-Lun; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The muscle strength of the quadriceps muscle is critical in patellofemoral pain syndrome. The quadriceps muscle supplies the power for dynamic patellar movement, and the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) enable the patella to stabilize during tracking. We followed the theories about open and closed kinetic chain exercises to design two exercises, sling open chain knee extension (SOCKE) exercise and sling closed chain knee extension (SCCKE) exercise. The purpose of our study was to research the changes in quadriceps muscle activity during both exercises. [Methods] Electromyographic analysis was used to explore the different effects of the two exercises. The MVC% was calculated for the VMO and VL during exercise for analysis. [Results] We found that the mean MVC% values of the VMO and VL during the SOCKE exercise were higher than those during the SCCKE exercise. The ratio of the VMO to VL was 1.0 ± 0.19 during the SOCKE exercise and 1.11 ± 0.15 during the SCCKE exercise. [Conclusions] The SOCKE exercise is targeted at quadriceps muscle training and has a recruitment effect on the VMO. The beneficial effect of the SOCKE exercise is better than that of the SCCKE exercise. PMID:25276016

  18. Diminished sub-maximal quadriceps force control in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients is related to quadriceps and hamstring muscle dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Telianidis, Stacey; Perraton, Luke; Clark, Ross A; Pua, Yong-Hao; Fortin, Karine; Bryant, Adam L

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) on sub-maximal quadriceps force control with respect to quadriceps and hamstring muscle activity. Thirty ACLR individuals together with 30 healthy individuals participated. With real-time visual feedback of muscle force output and electromyographic electrodes attached to the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects performed an isometric knee extension task where they increased and decreased their muscle force output at 0.128Hz within a range of 5-30% maximum voluntary capacity. The ACLR group completed the task with more error and increased medial hamstring and vastus medialis activation (p<0.05). Moderate negative correlations (p<0.05) were observed between quadriceps force control and medial (Spearman's rho=-0.448, p=0.022) and lateral (Spearman's rho=-0.401, p=0.034) hamstring activation in the ACLR group. Diminished quadriceps sub-maximal force control in ACLR subjects was reflective of medial quadriceps and hamstring dyskinesia (i.e., altered muscle activity patterns and coordination deficits). Within the ACLR group however, augmented hamstring co-activation was associated with better quadriceps force control. Future studies should explore the convergent validity of quadriceps force control in ACLR patients.

  19. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  20. Influence of knee alignment on quadriceps cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Akitoshi; Mukai, Naoki; Miyakawa, Shunpei; Mesaki, Noboru; Maeda, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Gallagher, Philip M; Schrager, Matt; Fry, Andrew C

    2009-10-16

    Previous studies of methods for stimulating the individual muscles composing the quadriceps femoris have not considered the structural features of a subject's knee joint. In this study, we compared the ratios of the individual muscles composing the quadriceps between subjects with different knee alignments using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A total of 18 healthy males were examined: 6 normal knees (age, 23.0+/-0.6 yr; femorotibial angle (FTA), 176.8+/-0.4 degrees), 6 genu varum (age, 21.8+/-2.9 yr; FTA, 181.7+/-2.6 degrees) and 6 genu valgum (age, 21.0+/-1.6 yr; FTA, 172.3+/-1.5 degrees). The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of quadriceps muscles were obtained by MR imaging of the entire left thigh. The CSAs of the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles were obtained by MR imaging of the entire left thigh in a supine position. The VM/VL ratio was also obtained by dividing the CSA of the VM by that of the VL and compared among the three groups of subjects with different knee alignments. The genu varum group showed a significantly higher %CSA of VM in the CSA of the quadriceps (VM/Quad) (49.0+/-2.6%) than values for the other two groups. The genu valgum group showed significantly higher values of RF/Quad (15.2+/-2.1%) and VL/Quad (40.6+/-4.0%) than the other groups. The VM/VL ratio was significantly higher in the genu varum than in values for the other two groups. This difference in CSA, in respect to knee alignment, may be considered when devising muscle training programs. PMID:19698946

  1. The effects of closed kinetic chain exercises and open kinetic chain exercises using elastic bands on electromyographic activity in degenerative gonarthritis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Igsoo; Hwangbo, Gak; Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of closed kinetic chain exercises (CKCEs) and open kinetic chain exercises (OKCEs) with elastic bands on the electromyographic activity of patients with degenerative gonarthritis. [Subjects] The study subjects were 30 degenerative gonarthritis patients who were divided into a CKCE group (CKCEG, n=10), an OKCE group (OKCEG, n=10), and a control group (CG, n=10). [Methods] The CKCEG and the OKCEG performed exercises with elastic bands, and the CG took part in a quadriceps strengthening exercise. All three groups performed the exercises three times per week for four weeks. The electromyographic activities of the subjects' vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were measured and compared. [Results] Within-group comparisons revealed that the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles increased significantly in the CKCEG. The OKCEG displayed significant increases in the electromyographic activity of the VM, RF, ST, and BF muscles, and the CG showed significant increases in the electromyographic activities of the RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles. In between-group comparisons after the intervention, the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, and VL muscles of the CKCEG were significantly higher than those of the CG. The electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, and ST muscles of the OKCEG were significantly higher than those of the CG. [Conclusion] We consider CKCEs with elastic bands are an effective intervention for increasing the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, VL, ST, and BF muscles of degenerative gonarthritis patients, and OKCEs with elastic bands are an effective intervention for increasing the electromyographic activities of the VM, RF, ST, and BF muscles of degenerative gonarthritis patients. PMID:25276041

  2. Effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Tae; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. [Methods] The repositioning error of the knee joint was measured using a digital goniometer when the subjects extended their dominant-side knee to a random target angle (30°, 45°, or 60°) with their eyes closed, before and after a quadriceps muscle fatigue protocol, and after application of kinesiology tape. [Results] We found that repositioning errors of the dominant-side knee joint increased after quadriceps fatigue compared with no-fatigue conditions. However, kinesiology taping of the quadriceps muscle and patella after quadriceps fatigue significantly decreased repositioning errors of the knee joint. [Conclusion] These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue increases the repositioning error of the knee joint, whereas application of kinesiology tape decreases fatigue-induced joint repositioning error.

  3. Functional results after surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    De Baere, T; Geulette, B; Manche, E; Barras, L

    2002-04-01

    We present the long-term results of surgical repair of a traumatic rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a group of 24 patients with a mean age of 58 years. There were 21 male and 3 female patients. Fifteen patients were seen for clinical control after a mean follow-up of 75 months and they all presented with some quadriceps muscle atrophy. Twelve patients had normal knee mobility, three had a flexion deformity of 10 degrees and two had less than 120 degrees of knee flexion. Active knee extension was normal in all patients. Three patients experienced some decrease in stability of their knee joint. Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the result. Nine patients underwent a Cybex-test for evaluation of the isokinetic force of knee flexion and extension, with a comparison between the injured and the uninjured side. For concentric force there was a mean deficit at low speed of 36.1% for the quadriceps muscle; at high speed it was 28.2%. For the knee flexors, the deficits were 30.7% and 27.2% respectively. Regarding eccentric force, the mean deficit for knee extensors was 13.8% and 0.25% respectively and for knee flexors 6.5% and 5.5% respectively.

  4. Synthetic Mesh Augmentation of Acute and Subacute Quadriceps Tendon Repair.

    PubMed

    Morrey, Matthew C; Barlow, Jonathan D; Abdel, Matthew P; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. To date, surgical results have been less than favorable. A novel repair technique that uses Marlex mesh (C R Bard, Murray Hill, New Jersey) has been developed. Use of this repair may allow earlier range of motion and functional restoration of extension. The authors sought to evaluate the technical feasibility, durability, and postoperative function of this repair. This study retrospectively analyzed 8 knees (7 patients) operated on with this technique from 1990 to 2011. Mean follow-up was 9 years. Average age at the time of injury was 69 years. Mean operative time was 130 minutes. No perioperative complications occurred, no patients had clinical evidence of failure, and no patients required subsequent reoperation. Mean flexion at final follow-up was 100°. Of the 8 knees, 7 knees had no extensor lag at final follow-up. Marlex mesh augmentation for quadriceps tendon ruptures has promising clinical results, despite significant comorbidities. The results showed that the technique was feasible, with low cost and reasonable operative time. The clinical results were durable, with no intraoperative complications, no re-ruptures, rare extension lag, and good range of motion. Therefore, synthetic mesh augmentation is a feasible option in acute quadriceps tendon ruptures.

  5. Partial rupture of the quadriceps muscle in a child

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The quadriceps femoris muscle ruptures usually occur in the middle-aged population. We present a 4-year-old patient with partial rupture of the quadriceps femoris muscle. To our knowledge, this is the youngest patient reported with a quadriceps femoris muscle rupture. Case Presentation A 4-year-old girl admitted to our clinic with left knee pain and limitation in knee movements. Her father reported that she felt pain while jumping on sofa. There was no direct trauma to thigh or knee. We located a palpable soft tissue swelling at distal anterolateral side of thigh. The history revealed that 10 days ago the patient was treated for upper tract respiratory infection with intramuscular Clindamycin for 7 days. When we consulted the patient with her previous doctor and nurse, we learnt that multiple daily injections might be injected to same side of left thigh. MRI showed a partial tear of vastus lateralis muscle matching with the injection sites. The patient treated with long leg half-casting for three weeks. Clinical examination and knee flexion had good results with conservative treatment. Conclusions Multiple intramuscular injections may contribute to damage muscles and make prone to tears with muscle contractions. Doctors and nurses must be cautious to inject from different parts of both thighs. PMID:20849662

  6. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2010-08-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to approximately 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow.

  7. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  8. Suture anchor repair of quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Won B; Kamath, Atul F; Israelite, Craig L

    2011-08-01

    Disruption of the extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a devastating complication, usually requiring surgical repair. Although suture anchor fixation is well described for repair of the ruptured native knee quadriceps tendon, no study has discussed the use of suture anchors in quadriceps repair after TKA. We present an illustrative case of successful suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps mechanism after TKA. The procedure has been performed in a total of 3 patients. A surgical technique and brief review of the literature follows. Suture anchor fixation of the quadriceps tendon is a viable option in the setting of rupture after TKA.

  9. Quadriceps strength and weight acceptance strategies continue to improve two years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Roewer, Ben D; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2011-07-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly-injured knee ligament during sporting activities. After injury, most individuals experience episodes of the knee giving way during daily activities (non-copers). Non-copers demonstrate asymmetrical quadriceps strength and movement patterns, which could have long-term deleterious effects on the integrity of the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine if non-copers resolve their strength and movement asymmetries within two years after surgery. 26 Non-copers were recruited to undergo pre-operative quadriceps strength testing and 3-dimensional gait analysis. Subjects underwent surgery to reconstruct the ligament followed by physical therapy focused on restoring normal range of motion, quadriceps strength, and function. Subjects returned for quadriceps strength testing and gait analysis six months and two years after surgery. Acutely after injury, quadriceps strength was asymmetric between limbs, but resolved six months after surgery. Asymmetric knee angles, knee moments, and knee and hip power profiles were also observed acutely after injury and persisted six months after surgery despite subjects achieving symmetrical quadriceps strength. Two years after surgery, quadriceps strength in the involved limb continued to improve and most kinematic and kinetic asymmetries resolved. These findings suggest that adequate quadriceps strength does not immediately resolve gait asymmetries in non-copers. They also suggest that non-copers have the capacity to improve their quadriceps strength and gait symmetry long after ACL reconstruction.

  10. The effect of exercise on vastus medialis oblique muscle architecture: An ultrasound investigation.

    PubMed

    Khoshkhoo, M; Killingback, A; Robertson, C J; Adds, P J

    2016-09-01

    The vastus medialis oblique (VMO) is thought to be implicated in patellofemoral pain (PFP), and weakness in this portion of the vastus medialis muscle may lead to PFP. Management includes physiotherapy to strengthen the VMO. Although this intervention has been shown to be effective, the effects on the architecture of the muscle have not been investigated. This study aims to determine the changes in VMO architecture following a program of strengthening exercises. Twenty-one male participants underwent an initial ultrasound scan to measure the fiber angle and the insertion level of the VMO on the patella. Each subject then undertook a 6-week quadriceps femoris strengthening program; the scan and measurements were then repeated. A significant increase in VMO fiber angle and insertion length was observed. Average fiber angle increased by 5.24°; average insertion length increased by 2.7 mm. There was found to be a significant negative correlation between the initial values and the degree of change. Pearson's coefficient of correlation for measurements of patella length taken before and after exercise was 0.921, indicating a high degree of reliability. There was a significant positive correlation between fiber angle change and declared level of compliance (R(2)  = 0.796). The results reported here indicate that physiotherapy leads to a significant change in VMO morphology. Given the inverse correlation noted between initial architectural parameters and the degree of change, we suggest that patients who would benefit most from physiotherapy can be identified in clinic using a simple ultrasound technique. Clin. Anat. 29:752-758, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26940378

  11. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient on chronic haemodialysis. (Short-term results of treatment with transpatellar sutures augmented with a quadriceps tendon flap).

    PubMed

    Kayali, Cemil; Agus, Haluk; Turgut, Ali; Taskiran, Can

    2008-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries. Although they are generally seen after the age of 50, they may occur in younger patients with certain underlying conditions, including chronic haemodialysis. Several repair techniques have been proposed but the choice of the best method is still a matter of controversy. This paper presents the case of a renal failure patient with 10 years' history of haemodialysis treatment suffering from bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture. The treatment was with transpatellar sutures augmented with a reverse quadriceps tendon flap. His short-term clinical and radiological results are satisfactory.

  12. The Utility of a High-intensity Exercise Protocol to Prospectively Assess ACL Injury Risk.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, F M; García-Pinillos, F; Raja Azidin, R M F; Vanrenterghem, J; Robinson, M A

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the utility of a 5-min high-intensity exercise protocol (SAFT(5)) to include in prospective cohort studies investigating ACL injury risk. 15 active females were tested on 2 occasions during which their non-dominant leg was analysed before SAFT(5) (PRE), immediately after (POST0), 15 min after (POST15), and 30 min after (POST30). On the first occasion, testing included 5 maximum isokinetic contractions for eccentric and concentric hamstring and concentric quadriceps and on the second occasion, 3 trials of 2 landing tasks (i. e., single-leg hop and drop vertical jump) were conducted. Results showed a reduced eccentric hamstring peak torque at POST0, POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05) and a reduced functional HQ ratio (Hecc/Qcon) at POST15 and POST30 (p<0.05). Additionally, a more extended knee angle at POST30 (p<0.05) and increased knee internal rotation angle at POST0 and POST15 (p<0.05) were found in a single-leg hop. SAFT(5) altered landing strategies associated with increased ACL injury risk and similar to observations from match simulations. Our findings therefore support the utility of a high-intensity exercise protocol such as SAFT(5) to strengthen injury screening tests and to include in prospective cohort studies where time constraints apply. PMID:26509378

  13. [Partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a 6-year-old boy].

    PubMed

    Sesia, S B; Hasler, C-C; Köhler, M; Mayr, J

    2007-10-01

    In children, avulsion fractures of the patella are observed more frequently than ruptures of the quadriceps tendon. In cases of suspected lesions of the quadriceps tendon, conventional x-ray imaging and ultrasound comparison of both patellae is recommended. Arthroscopy is helpful for diagnosing concomitant intra-articular knee lesions and permits evacuation of the hemarthrosis.

  14. Examining the Association Between Quadriceps Strength and Cognitive Performance in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Sun, Yu-Shan; Yang, Hui-Fang; Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wu, Li-Wei; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Kao, Tung-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidences showed impaired muscle strength was prevalent in older adults with mild cognition impairment or dementia. However, little was known about the role of quadriceps strength in the cognition decline among older population. The objective of our study was to investigate the relation between quadriceps strength and cognitive performance. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002), a total of 1799 participants aged ≥60 years were enrolled in the study. Every subject completed a household interview, digit symbol substitution test (DSST), physical performances, and a questionnaire regarding personal health. Estimation of relationship between quadriceps strength and cognition was using multiple linear regression and quartile-based analysis with an extended-model approach for covariates adjustment. In a model adjusted for demographics, chronic diseases, health behaviors, and levels of folate and vitamin B12, the level of quadriceps strength was significantly associated with the scores of DSST. The β coefficient interpreted as change of DSST scores for each Newton increment in quadriceps strength comparing participants in the highest quartile of quadriceps strength to those in the lowest quartile was 5.003 (95% confidence interval, 2.725–7.281, P < 0.001). The trends of incremental DSST score across increasing quartiles of quadriceps strength were statistically significant (all P for trend <0.001). Higher quadriceps strength was associated with better cognitive performance. PMID:26266380

  15. The use of suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Whitener, George B; Rubright, James H; Creighton, R Alexander; Logel, Kevin J; Wood, Mark L

    2007-07-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an incapacitating injury that usually requires surgical repair. Traditional repair methods involve transpatellar suture tunnels, but recent reports have introduced the idea of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured tendon. We present 5 cases of our technique of using suture anchors to repair the ruptured quadriceps tendon.

  16. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  17. Influence of step rate and quadriceps load distribution on patellofemoral cartilage contact pressures during running.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Rachel L; Smith, Colin R; Vignos, Michael F; Kaiser, Jarred; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-08-20

    Interventions used to treat patellofemoral pain in runners are often designed to alter patellofemoral mechanics. This study used a computational model to investigate the influence of two interventions, step rate manipulation and quadriceps strengthening, on patellofemoral contact pressures during running. Running mechanics were analyzed using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model that included a knee with six degree-of-freedom tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. An elastic foundation model was used to compute articular contact pressures. The lower extremity model was scaled to anthropometric dimensions of 22 healthy adults, who ran on an instrumented treadmill at 90%, 100% and 110% of their preferred step rate. Numerical optimization was then used to predict the muscle forces, secondary tibiofemoral kinematics and all patellofemoral kinematics that would generate the measured primary hip, knee and ankle joint accelerations. Mean and peak patella contact pressures reached 5.0 and 9.7MPa during the midstance phase of running. Increasing step rate by 10% significantly reduced mean contact pressures by 10.4% and contact area by 7.4%, but had small effects on lateral patellar translation and tilt. Enhancing vastus medialis strength did not substantially affect pressure magnitudes or lateral patellar translation, but did shift contact pressure medially toward the patellar median ridge. Thus, the model suggests that step rate tends to primarily modulate the magnitude of contact pressure and contact area, while vastus medialis strengthening has the potential to alter mediolateral pressure locations. These results are relevant to consider in the design of interventions used to prevent or treat patellofemoral pain in runners.

  18. Influence of Step Rate and Quadriceps Load Distribution on Patellofemoral Cartilage Contact Pressures during Running

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Rachel L.; Smith, Colin R.; Vignos, Michael F.; Kaiser, Jarred; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2015-01-01

    Interventions used to treat patellofemoral pain in runners are often designed to alter patellofemoral mechanics. This study used a computational model to investigate the influence of two interventions, step rate manipulation and quadriceps strengthening, on patellofemoral contact pressures during running. Running mechanics were analyzed using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model that included a knee with six degree-of-freedom tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. An elastic foundation model was used to compute articular contact pressures. The lower extremity model was scaled to anthropometric dimensions of 22 healthy adults, who ran on an instrumented treadmill at 90%, 100% and 110% of their preferred step rate. Numerical optimization was then used to predict the muscle forces, secondary tibiofemoral kinematics and all patellofemoral kinematics that would generate the measured hip, knee and ankle joint accelerations. Mean and peak patella contact pressures reached 5.0 and 9.7 MPa during the midstance phase of running. Increasing step rate by 10% significantly reduced mean contact pressures by 10.4% and contact area by 7.4%, but had small effects on lateral patella translation and tilt. Enhancing vastus medialis strength did not substantially affect pressure magnitudes or lateral patella translation, but did shift contact pressure medially toward the patellar median ridge. Thus, the model suggests that step rate tends to primarily modulate the magnitude of contact pressure and contact area, while vastus medialis strengthening has the potential to alter mediolateral pressure locations. These results are relevant to consider in the design of interventions used to prevent or treat patellofemoral pain in runners. PMID:26070646

  19. Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture: a rare finding in a healthy man after minimal trauma.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Michael; Forman, Edward S

    2010-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury; the incidence of simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is extremely rare. Two distinct categories-individuals older than 50 years and between 27 and 54 years-have been described. Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is more common in patients older than 50 years and is thought to be the result of tendon weakening due to obesity and arteriosclerosis-induced fibrotic changes, or previous injury.In younger individuals, bilateral simultaneous quadriceps rupture is less frequent and has been associated with anabolic steroid use, but more frequently with underlying comorbid medical conditions such as chronic renal failure, hyperparathyroidism, endocrine disorder, gout, diabetes and obesity, which predispose the patients to tendon rupture. Our case report is unique because we report the simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture following minor trauma in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old man with no predisposing comorbidity.

  20. Is Single-Radius Design Better for Quadriceps Recovery in Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Kyoon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Bae, Dae-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although single-radius (SR) designs have a theoretical advantage in quadriceps recovery following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there has been a paucity of objective evaluation studies. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty minimally invasive TKAs were prospectively randomized by a single surgeon into 2 groups: SR design TKA group and multi-radius design TKA group. Quadriceps force and power were assessed using a dynamometer, and clinical data were investigated preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Results There were no differences between two groups in quadriceps recovery and clinical results throughout the follow-up period. Furthermore, the proportion of patients whose postoperative quadriceps force and power reached preoperative level was similar in both groups. Conclusions Femoral component design itself would not significantly influence quadriceps recovery after TKA. PMID:26676282

  1. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles. PMID:26246835

  2. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles.

  3. Inter-limb differences in quadriceps strength and volitional activation.

    PubMed

    Pietrosimone, Brian G; Park, Chang M; Gribble, Phillip A; Pfile, Kate R; Tevald, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    In this crossover study, we wished to determine if normalized inter-limb differences in strength differed from inter-limb differences in voluntary activation at 30°, 70°, and 90° of knee flexion. We also assessed the relationship between inter-limb differences in torque with the inter-limb differences in activation. Twenty-five healthy volunteers were used for final data analyses; the order of leg tested, joint angle, and measurement technique (isokinetic strength, voluntary activation) were randomly assigned. Quadriceps strength was measured isokinetically at 1.05 rad · s(-1), while quadriceps voluntary activation was assessed via the central activation ratio. Absolute values of inter-limb differences for both measures were calculated by subtracting the non-dominant leg values from those of the dominant leg. Inter-limb isokinetic strength differences were greater than inter-limb central activation ratio differences at all joint angles (P = 0.003). Interestingly, inter-limb deficits between measures were not strongly correlated, suggesting that these measurements may be evaluating completely different phenomena within the neuromuscular system. These measurement techniques may provide unique information regarding neuromuscular function, suggesting that researchers and clinicians must utilize information from both techniques to determine the true clinical nature of inter-limb deficits.

  4. Does running strengthen bone?

    PubMed

    Boudenot, Arnaud; Achiou, Zahra; Portier, Hugues

    2015-12-01

    Bone is a living tissue needing mechanical stress to maintain strength. Traditional endurance exercises offer only modest effects on bone. Walking and running produce low impact but lead to bone fatigue. This article is specifically addressed to therapists and explains the mechanisms involved for the effects of exercise on bone. Intermittent exercise limits bone fatigue, and downhill exercises increase ground impact forces and involve eccentric muscle contractions, which are particularly osteogenic. PMID:26562001

  5. The effects of squatting with visual feedback on the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique and the vastus lateralis in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Pil-Neo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of performing squat exercises with visual feedback on the activation of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles in young adults with an increased quadriceps angle (Q-angle). [Subjects] This study used a motion analysis program (Dartfish, Switzerland) to select 20 young adults with an increased Q-angle, who were then divided into a squat group that received visual feedback (VSG, n=10) and a squat group that received no visual feedback (SG, n=10). [Methods] The intensity of exercises was increased every two weeks over a six-week exercise period in both groups. A visual marker was attached to the patella of the subjects in the VSG, and they then performed squat exercises with a maximum of 90° of knee flexion within a route marked on a mirror. The SG performed squat exercises with a maximum 90° of knee flexion without attaching a visual feedback device. [Results] Analysis of the muscle activation due to 90° squat exercises indicated that both groups had statistically significant increases in activation of the VL. The VSG exhibited statistically significant increases in activation of the VMO. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that squat exercises with visual feedback are effective in activation of the VMO and VL muscles. The findings are meaningful in terms of preventing the occurrence of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26157251

  6. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise Health Benefits One of the Healthiest Things You ... activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging. Exercise or Physical Activity? Some people may wonder what ...

  7. Post-exercise alcohol ingestion exacerbates eccentric-exercise induced losses in performance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2010-03-01

    The effect of acute alcohol intake on muscular performance in both the exercising and non-exercising legs in the days following strenuous eccentric exercise was investigated to ascertain whether an interaction between post-exercise alcohol use and muscle damage causes an increase in damage-related weakness. Ten healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed either a beverage containing 1 g of ethanol per kg bodyweight ethanol (as vodka and orange juice; ALC) or a non-alcoholic beverage (OJ). At least 2 weeks later they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed the other beverage. Measurement of peak and average peak isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced by the quadriceps of both exercising and non-exercising legs was made before and 36 and 60 h post-exercise. Greatest decreases in exercising leg performance were observed at 36 h with losses of 28.7, 31.9 and 25.9% occurring for OJ average peak isometric, concentric, and eccentric torques, respectively. However, average peak torque loss was significantly greater in ALC with the same performance measures decreasing by 40.9, 42.8 and 44.8% (all p < 0.05). Performance of the non-exercising leg did not change significantly under either treatment. Therefore, consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol after damaging exercise magnifies the loss of force associated with strenuous eccentric exercise. This weakness appears to be due to an interaction between muscle damage and alcohol rather than the systemic effects of acute alcohol consumption. PMID:20012446

  8. Novel treatment of a failed quadriceps tendon repair in a diabetic patient using a patella-quadriceps tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Druskin, Sasha C; Rodeo, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    Recurrent quadriceps tendon rupture is a debilitating condition that may be challenging to treat, especially in the presence of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (Bedi et al., J Shoulder Elbow Surg 19:978-988, 2010; Chbnou and Frenette, Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 5:R952-R957, 2004; Chen et al., J Shoulder Elbow Surg 5:416-421, 2003). Many surgical treatment protocols have been proposed (Azar, in Canale and Beatty, eds., Campbell's Operative Orthopedics, Mosby/Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA, 2008; Ilan et al., J Am Acad Orthop Surg 3:192-200, 2003; Rodeo and Izawa, in Garrett et al., eds., Principles and Practice of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA, 2000). We report the case of a diabetic male with multiple treatment failures. He ultimately sustained a good outcome following treatment with a novel surgical technique that utilized a patella quadriceps tendon allograft. Tendon allograft-to-native bone healing had previously failed in this patient, so we used a bone-tendon construct allograft to provide an allograft bone-to-native bone healing site. Now, 13 months postoperative, the patient has increased strength, minimal pain, 20 ° of extensor lag and 130 ° of flexion.

  9. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunseok; Kim, Byounggook; Chung, Ju-Hwan; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous bilateral spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare condition and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. The etiology is not clear yet. But it occurs infrequently in patients with chronic metabolic disorders. A 30-year-old female patient with simultaneous bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon rupture visited our hospital. She had chronic renal failure and her parathyroid hormone level was elevated due to parathyroid adenoma. We report a surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons of a patient with chronic renal failure as well as management of hyperparathyroidism.

  10. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  11. Spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon. A case report.

    PubMed

    Alpantaki, Kaliopi; Papadokostakis, George; Katonis, Pavlos; Hadjpavlou, Alexander

    2004-02-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon has rarely been reported; it generally occurs in association with chronic metabolic disorders, such as chronic renal failure, obesity, diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism. The case presented here was in an 85-year-old man with no known risk factors, who sustained simultaneous and spontaneous rupture of both quadriceps tendons. The patient suffered from spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in the knee menisci. These findings suggest that instability of the knee due to meniscal damage, and quadriceps weakness as a result of spinal stenosis, may have played a significant role in the pathogenesis of this injury.

  12. Persistent Neuromuscular and Corticomotor Quadriceps Asymmetry After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kuenze, Christopher M.; Hertel, Jay; Weltman, Arthur; Diduch, David; Saliba, Susan A.; Hart, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Return to activity in the presence of quadriceps dysfunction may predispose individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to long-term joint degeneration. Asymmetry may manifest during movement and result in altered knee-joint–loading patterns; however, the underlying neurophysiologic mechanisms remain unclear. Objective: To compare limb symmetry of quadriceps neuromuscular function between participants with ACLR and participants serving as healthy controls. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 22 individuals with ACLR (12 men, 10 women) and 24 individuals serving as healthy controls (12 men, 12 women). Main Outcome Measure(s): Normalized knee-extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque (Nm/kg), quadriceps central activation ratio (CAR) (%), quadriceps motor-neuron–pool excitability (Hoffmann reflex to motor wave ratio), and quadriceps active motor threshold (AMT) (% 2.0 T) were measured bilaterally and used to calculate limb symmetry indices for comparison between groups. We used analyses of variance to compare quadriceps Hoffmann reflex to motor wave ratio, normalized knee-extension MVIC torque, quadriceps CAR, and quadriceps AMT between groups and limbs. Results: The ACLR group exhibited greater asymmetry in knee-extension MVIC torque (ACLR group = 0.85 ± 0.21, healthy group = 0.97 ± 0.14; t44 = 2.26, P = .03), quadriceps CAR (ACLR group = 0.94 ± 0.11, healthy group = 1.00 ± 0.08; t44 = 2.22, P = .04), and quadriceps AMT (ACLR group = 1.13 ± 0.18, healthy group = 1.02 ± 0.11; t34 = −2.46, P = .04) than the healthy control group. Conclusions: Asymmetries in measures of quadriceps function and cortical excitability were present in patients with ACLR. Asymmetry in quadriceps strength, activation, and cortical excitability persisted in individuals with ACLR beyond return to recreational activity. Measuring the magnitude of asymmetry

  13. Antiparasitic effect of Dinoponera quadriceps giant ant venom.

    PubMed

    Lima, Danya Bandeira; Sousa, Paloma Leão; Torres, Alba Fabíola Costa; Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da França; Mello, Clarissa Perdigão; Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra de; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; Quinet, Yves Patric; de Oliveira, Márcia Rosa; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2016-09-15

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTD) are treated with toxic therapy of limited efficacy. Previously, we studied the antimicrobial effect of Dinoponera quadriceps venom (DqV) against bacteria. To continue the study, we report in this short communication the antimicrobial effect of DqV against Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi. DqV inhibits the promastigote forms of L. amazonensis and all T. cruzi developmental forms, with low toxicity in host cells. DqV causes cell death in T. cruzi through necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms observed by staining the cells with annexin V-FITC (AX) and propidium iodide (PI), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential by flow cytometry analyses and confocal microscopy and morphological alterations, such as loss of membrane integrity and cell shrinkage by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, we suggest there is an antimicrobial effect also on parasites. PMID:27530664

  14. Full-thickness quadriceps tendon: An easy cruciate reconstruction graft.

    PubMed

    Slullitel, D; Blasco, A; Periotti, G

    2001-09-01

    Full-thickness quadriceps tendon strength has been found to be similar or higher than that of the patellar tendon. Current techniques spare the deep vastus intermedius to avoid piercing the suprapatellar pouch, which might result in loss of visualization. This approach mainly results in loss of graft thickness and surgical problems related to the dissection made through the tendon. We describe a technique where a full-thickness graft can be used, making tendon stripping easier. We also describe how to preserve visualization during surgery. A double anchorage of the tendinous part of the graft on the femoral side is used together with fixation of the bone end on the tibial side, allowing early motion and thereby avoiding suprapatellar pouch adhesions.

  15. Quadriceps Strength, Quadriceps Power, and Gait Speed in Older U.S. Adults with Diabetes: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999–2002

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Tra, Yolande; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Egan, Josephine M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent association of diabetes (and its duration and severity) with quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, and gait speed in a national population of older adults. Design Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. Setting U.S. Participants We examined 2573 adults ≥50 years of age in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002 who had assessment of quadriceps strength. Methods Diabetes was ascertained by questionnaire. Measurement of isokinetic knee extensors (quadriceps) strength was performed at 60 degrees/second. Gait speed was assessed using a 20-foot walk test. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes status and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders or mediators. Results Among older U.S. adults, those with versus without diabetes had significantly slower gait speed (0.96±0.02 versus 1.08±0.01 m/s; p<0.001). After adjusting for demographics, weight, and height, diabetes was also associated with significantly lower quadriceps strength (−4.6±1.9 Newton-meters; p=0.02), quadriceps power (−4.9±2.0 Watts; p=0.02), in addition to gait speed (−0.05±0.02 m/s; p=0.002). Associations remained significant after adjusting for physical activity and C-reactive protein. After accounting for comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, amputation, cancer, arthritis, fracture, COPD), diabetes was only independently associated with gait speed (−0.04±0.02 m/s; p=0.02). Diabetes duration in men and women was negatively associated with age-adjusted quadriceps strength (−5.7 and −3.5 Newton-meters/decade of diabetes, respectively) and power (−6.1 and −3.8 Watts/decade of diabetes, respectively) (all p≤0.001, no significant interactions by gender). Hemoglobin A1c was not associated with outcomes accounting for body weight. Conclusion Compared to persons without diabetes, older U.S. adults with diabetes have lower quadriceps

  16. Range of motion and leg rotation affect electromyography activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen M; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-09-01

    Leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed 8 LE REP at their 8 repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP × ROM interaction was detected (p < 0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (p ≤ 0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p < 0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p < 0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO, the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  17. Range of motion and leg rotation affect EMG activation levels of the superficial quadriceps muscles during leg extension.

    PubMed

    Signorile, Joseph F; Lew, Karen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Pluchino, Alessandra; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2014-06-30

    The leg extension (LE) is commonly used to strengthen the quadriceps muscles during training and rehabilitation. This study examined the effects of limb position (POS) and range of motion (ROM) on quadriceps electromyography (EMG) during 8 repetitions (REP) of LE. Twenty-four participants performed eight LE REP at their 8-repetition maximum with lower limbs medially rotated (TI), laterally rotated (TO), and neutral (NEU). Each REP EMG was averaged over the first, middle, and final 0.524 rad ROM. For vastus medialis oblique (VMO), a REP x ROM interaction was detected (p<0.02). The middle 0.524 rad produced significantly higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 6-8 and the final 0.524 rad produced higher EMG than the initial 0.524 rad for REP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 (p<0.05). For rectus femoris (RF), EMG activity increased across REP with TO generating the greatest activity (p<0.001). For vastus lateralis (VL), EMG increased across REP (p<0.001) with NEU and TO EMG increasing linearly throughout ROM, and TI activity greatest during the middle 0.524 rad. We conclude that to target the VMO the optimal ROM is the final 1.047 rad regardless of POS, while maximum EMG for the RF is generated using TO regardless of ROM. In contrast, the VL is maximally activated using TI over the first 1.047 rad ROM or in NEU over the final 0.524 rad ROM.

  18. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Diekman, E F; Visser, G; Schmitz, J P J; Nievelstein, R A J; de Sain-van der Velden, M; Wardrop, M; Van der Pol, W L; Houten, S M; van Riel, N A W; Takken, T; Jeneson, J A L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  19. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diekman, E. F.; Visser, G.; Schmitz, J. P. J.; Nievelstein, R. A. J.; de Sain-van der Velden, M.; Wardrop, M.; Van der Pol, W. L.; Houten, S. M.; van Riel, N. A. W.; Takken, T.; Jeneson, J. A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  20. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  1. [Rupture of the quadriceps tendon after lateral retinaculum release by arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Trobisch, P D; Baumann, M; Weise, K; Fischer, R

    2010-06-01

    Complications after arthroscopic surgery of the knee joint are infrequent. Quadriceps tendon ruptures after knee arthroscopy are rarities. Only two cases have been published in the medical literature. This article presents a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture that occurred in a 19-year-old patient 5 weeks after lateral release of the retinaculum by arthroscopy. The late occurrence differentiates this case from the other previously published cases.

  2. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits.

  3. Mechanical tensile properties of the quadriceps tendon and patellar ligament in young adults.

    PubMed

    Stäubli, H U; Schatzmann, L; Brunner, P; Rincón, L; Nolte, L P

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed mechanical tensile properties of 16 10-mm wide, full-thickness central parts of quadriceps tendons and patellar ligaments from paired knees of eight male donors (mean age, 24.9 years). Uniaxial tensile testing was performed in a servohydraulic materials testing machine at an extension rate of 1 mm/sec. Sixteen specimens were tested unconditioned and 16 specimens were tested after cyclic preconditioning (200 cycles between 50 N and 800 N at 0.5 Hz). Mean cross-sectional areas measured 64.6 +/- 8.4 mm2 for seven unconditioned and 61.9 +/- 9.0 mm2 for eight preconditioned quadriceps tendons and were significantly larger than those values of seven unconditioned and seven preconditioned patellar ligaments (36.8 +/- 5.7 mm2 and 34.5 +/- 4.4 mm2, respectively). Mean ultimate tensile stress values of unconditioned patellar ligaments were significantly larger than those values of unconditioned quadriceps tendons: 53.4 +/- 7.2 N/mm2 and 33.6 +/- 8.1 N/mm2, respectively. Strain at failure was 14.4% +/- 3.3% for preconditioned patellar ligaments and 11.2% +/- 2.2% for preconditioned quadriceps tendons (P = 0.0428). Preconditioned patellar ligaments exhibited significantly higher elastic modulus than preconditioned quadriceps tendons. Based on mechanical tensile properties analyses, the quadriceps tendon-bone construct may represent a versatile alternative graft in primary and revision anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  4. [A simplified technique for repair of quadriceps tendon rupture by transpatellar PDS-cord].

    PubMed

    Hosseini, H; Agneskirchner, J D; Lobenhoffer, P

    2005-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are relatively unusual injuries caused by direct or more frequently indirect trauma. Since complete ruptures lead to loss of active extension of the knee joint, operative treatment is usually indicated. Several techniques are described in the literature. However, relatively little is known about the functional outcome after operative treatment of acute quadriceps tendon ruptures. We present a new operative technique using a 1.3-mm PDS cord passed through a transverse drill hole in the proximal pole of the patella. We operated ten consecutive cases of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures with the technique described between January 2000 and June 2003. Eight of ten patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 38 months by physical examination, IKDC Subjective score, Lysholm and Tegner score as well as an isokinetic test of the quadriceps strength. No complications were noted in this period. The average postoperative scores were 87 (IKDC), 98 (Lysholm), and 4.5 (Tegner). Isokinetic testing showed an average of 25% quadriceps strength deficit. The operative treatment of complete quadriceps tendon ruptures using a PDS cord through a drill hole in the patella is a safe and effective technique permitting functional postoperative treatment.

  5. Contributors to Fatigue Resistance of the Hamstrings and Quadriceps in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Noelle G; Li, Li; Geaghan, James P; Damiano, Diane L

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to elucidate relationships between quadriceps and hamstrings voluntary muscle fatigue and upper motor lesion impairments in cerebral palsy in order to gain a better understanding of their contribution to the observed fatigue resistance. Methods Seventeen ambulatory subjects with cerebral palsy (mean age: 17.0, SD = 4.8 years) were recruited. Quantitative measures of strength, spasticity, cocontraction, and stiffness for both muscle groups were collected on an isokinetic dynamometer and entered in a factor analysis. The resulting factors were used as independent variables in a multiple regression analysis with quadriceps and hamstrings fatigue as dependent variables. Findings Five independent factors explained 90% of the variance. In order of loadings, higher hamstring cocontraction and spasticity and lower hamstring strength were associated with lower levels of hamstring fatigue. Higher quadriceps cocontraction and lower quadriceps strength were the most predictive of lower levels of quadriceps fatigue. Interpretation Greater motor impairments of the agonist muscle, particularly cocontraction, spasticity, and weakness, were associated with lower rates of muscle fatigue of the same muscle during performance of a voluntary fatigue protocol for the hamstrings and quadriceps. Muscles are highly adaptable; therefore, the results of this study suggest that the observed fatigue resistance may be due to the effect of the primary neural insult on motor unit recruitment and rate modulation or the result of secondary adaptations to spasticity, weakness, or excessive cocontraction. PMID:19264384

  6. Accuracy of predicting maximal quadriceps force from submaximal effort contractions after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Sara J; Chmielewski, Terese L; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-10-01

    Weakness and failure of voluntary activation of the quadriceps femoris muscles often occur after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Side-to-side strength comparisons are used as a measure of progress, and are inaccurate if the quadriceps has activation failure. Burst superimposition testing is commonly used to assess quadriceps strength and activation during a maximal volitional isometric contraction (MVIC), using the central activation ratio (CAR) calculation. A recently developed mathematical model predicts the MVIC from submaximal efforts. The purpose of this study was to compare the CAR calculation to the mathematical model. We hypothesized that the model would be a more accurate predictor of strength than the CAR calculation when voluntary activation failure is present. Data from the involved and uninvolved quadriceps muscles of 100 consecutive subjects with complete, isolated ACL rupture were retrospectively evaluated. Subjects who required multiple trials to produce an MVIC with full activation (true MVIC) were used to compare the CAR calculation, the mathematical model, and this true MVIC. Subjects unable to produce a true MVIC with multiple trials were used to compare the mathematical model to the CAR calculation. Results demonstrate that both methods reliably and accurately estimate the quadriceps weakness associated with ACL rupture. We recommend use of the CAR calculation to provide estimations of true quadriceps strength to facilitate clinical decisions about progress in rehabilitation after ACL rupture.

  7. Multiplane loading of the extensor mechanism alters the patellar ligament force/quadriceps force ratio.

    PubMed

    Powers, Christopher M; Chen, Yu-Jen; Scher, Irving S; Lee, Thay Q

    2010-02-01

    Since the direction of the quadriceps force and location of the patellofemoral contact point likely differ between axial and multiplane loadings, the force and moment balance solutions for a multiplane loading condition may not yield the same patella ligament force/quadriceps force ratio (F(PL)/F(Q) ratio) when compared with an axial loading condition. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an axial loading condition and an anatomical, multiplane loading condition on the F(PL)/F(Q) ratio at various knee flexion angles. Ten cadaver knees were used in this investigation. Each was mounted on a custom jig that was fixed to an Instron frame. Quadriceps muscle loads were applied with same resultant force magnitudes under two force directions, as follows: (1) axial loading (central quadriceps tendon loading parallel to the femoral axis), and (2) an anatomically based, multiplane loading condition (individual vasti loaded, taking into consideration physiologic muscle fiber orientation). Patellar ligament tension was measured using a buckle transducer. The patellar ligament force/quadriceps force ratio (F(PL)/F(Q) ratio) was calculated for both loading conditions at 0 deg, 20 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg of knee flexion. Across the range of knee motion evaluated, the F(PL)/F(Q) ratio for the axial loading condition was significantly greater than the F(PL)/F(Q) ratio for the multiplane loading condition. Our results suggest that loading orientation affects the transfer of forces from the quadriceps tendon to the patellar ligament.

  8. Correlation between Quadriceps Endurance and Adduction Moment in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear whether the strength or endurance of thigh muscles (quadriceps and hamstring) is positively or negatively correlated with the adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees. This study therefore assessed the relationships between the strength and endurance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and adduction moment in osteoarthritic knees and evaluated predictors of the adduction moment. The study cohort comprised 35 patients with unilateral medial osteoarthritis and varus deformity who were candidates for open wedge osteotomy. The maximal torque (60°/sec) and total work (180°/sec) of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and knee adduction moment were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device and gait analysis system. The total work of the quadriceps (r = 0.429, P = 0.037) and hamstring (r = 0.426, P = 0.045) muscles at 180°/sec each correlated with knee adduction moment. Preoperative varus deformity was positively correlated with adduction moment (r = 0.421, P = 0.041). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that quadriceps endurance at 180°/sec was the only factor independently associated with adduction moment (β = 0.790, P = 0.032). The adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees correlated with the endurance, but not the strength, of the quadriceps muscle. However, knee adduction moment did not correlate with the strength or endurance of the hamstring muscle. PMID:26539830

  9. Effects of Kinesiology Taping on Repositioning Error of the Knee Joint after Quadriceps Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin Tae; Lee, Jung-hoon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of kinesiology taping on repositioning error of the knee joint after quadriceps muscle fatigue. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. [Methods] The repositioning error of the knee joint was measured using a digital goniometer when the subjects extended their dominant-side knee to a random target angle (30°, 45°, or 60°) with their eyes closed, before and after a quadriceps muscle fatigue protocol, and after application of kinesiology tape. [Results] We found that repositioning errors of the dominant-side knee joint increased after quadriceps fatigue compared with no-fatigue conditions. However, kinesiology taping of the quadriceps muscle and patella after quadriceps fatigue significantly decreased repositioning errors of the knee joint. [Conclusion] These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue increases the repositioning error of the knee joint, whereas application of kinesiology tape decreases fatigue-induced joint repositioning error. PMID:25013297

  10. Correlation between Quadriceps Endurance and Adduction Moment in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon-Hyuck; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear whether the strength or endurance of thigh muscles (quadriceps and hamstring) is positively or negatively correlated with the adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees. This study therefore assessed the relationships between the strength and endurance of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and adduction moment in osteoarthritic knees and evaluated predictors of the adduction moment. The study cohort comprised 35 patients with unilateral medial osteoarthritis and varus deformity who were candidates for open wedge osteotomy. The maximal torque (60°/sec) and total work (180°/sec) of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles and knee adduction moment were evaluated using an isokinetic testing device and gait analysis system. The total work of the quadriceps (r = 0.429, P = 0.037) and hamstring (r = 0.426, P = 0.045) muscles at 180°/sec each correlated with knee adduction moment. Preoperative varus deformity was positively correlated with adduction moment (r = 0.421, P = 0.041). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that quadriceps endurance at 180°/sec was the only factor independently associated with adduction moment (β = 0.790, P = 0.032). The adduction moment of osteoarthritic knees correlated with the endurance, but not the strength, of the quadriceps muscle. However, knee adduction moment did not correlate with the strength or endurance of the hamstring muscle.

  11. Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Decreased Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Nondiabetic Adults Aged ≥70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Cotsonis, George A.; Walston, Jeremy; Schwartz, Ann V.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Miljkovic, Iva; Harris, Tamara B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Lower-limb muscle strength is reduced in many people with diabetes. In this study, we examined whether quadriceps muscle strength is reduced in relation to insulin resistance in well-functioning ambulatory nondiabetic individuals. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (age ≥70 years) underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning to ascertain muscle and fat mass, tests of quadriceps strength, computed tomography scanning of the quadriceps to gauge muscle lipid content, and fasting insulin and glucose level measurements from which homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was derived. RESULTS In regression analysis, quadriceps strength per kilogram of muscle mass was negatively associated (P < 0.0001) with HOMA-IR independent of other factors negatively associated with strength such as increased age, female sex, low-physical activity, impaired fasting glucose, and increased total body fat. Muscle lipid content was not associated with strength. CONCLUSIONS A small decrease in quadriceps muscle force is associated with increased HOMA-IR in well-functioning nondiabetic adults, suggesting that diminished quadriceps muscle strength begins before diabetes. PMID:19171728

  12. Therapeutic exercise for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Semble, E L; Loeser, R F; Wise, C M

    1990-08-01

    Therapeutic exercise in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis may be useful in improving aerobic capacity, strengthening muscles, improving endurance and increasing flexibility. This article reviews the major studies of exercise in these conditions and summarizes the authors recommendations regarding the use of therapeutic exercise in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis.

  13. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... do when I don't have access to physical therapy? While VEDA does not recommend doing vestibular exercises ... already existing ringing Fluid discharge from your ears Pain and ... try a general low-impact and balance-strengthening fitness program. The more ...

  14. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees.

  15. Influence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear on Thigh Muscle Strength and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung-Eun; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical compensation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear could cause quadriceps weakness and hamstring activation, preventing anterior tibial subluxation and affecting the expected hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio. Although quadriceps weakness often occurs after ACL tears, it remains unclear whether hamstring strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio increase in ACL deficient knees. This meta-analysis compared the isokinetic muscle strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, of the injured and injured limbs of patients with ACL tears. This meta-analysis included all studies comparing isokinetic thigh muscle strengths and hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in the injured and uninjured legs of patients with ACL tear, without or before surgery. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Quadriceps and hamstring strengths were 22.3 N∙m (95% CI: 15.2 to 29.3 N∙m; P<0.001) and 7.4 N∙m (95% CI: 4.3 to 10.5 N∙m; P<0.001) lower, respectively, on the injured than on the uninjured side. The mean hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio was 4% greater in ACL deficient than in uninjured limbs (95% CI: 1.7% to 6.3%; P<0.001). Conclusively, Decreases were observed in both the quadriceps and hamstring muscles of patients with ACL tear, with the decrease in quadriceps strength being 3-fold greater. These uneven reductions slightly increase the hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio in ACL deficient knees. PMID:26745808

  16. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in a healthy, active duty soldier: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony E; Rose, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    Unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are not uncommon. These injuries have been reported to occur spontaneously and after seemingly trivial trauma in elderly individuals, patients undergoing renal dialysis, and patients with metabolic derangements such as hyperparathyroidism. In young patients, unilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures have been reported as complications of burns, anabolic steroid abuse, and elective orthopedic surgery. Bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures in young healthy patients are rare injuries. We present the case of a young, healthy, active duty soldier who sustained bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures after a relatively minor trauma.

  17. Size of quadriceps femoris may contribute to thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zi-Wei; He, Ying; Yao, Yu; Qiu, Li; Tian, Hao-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) frequently occurs on male individuals at their third and forth decades. The major site of involvement is the proximal muscles of lower limbs. Increasing evidence has shown that the occurrence of TPP is determined by multiple factors. We hypothesized that apart from hormonal fluctuations, skeletal muscle itself may explain for the age and sex variance as well. Our study was established to explore whether the size of lower limb skeletal muscles were related to TPP. We conducted a clinical experiment including 43 patients diagnosed with TPP (Group 1) and 39 pure hyperthyroidism individuals (Group 2). Current age, body mass index (BMI), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), average girth of bilateral upper arm and thigh, physical activity level (PAL) were measured. We also adopted B mode ultrasound to quantify the muscle thickness (MT) of the major muscle involved in the disease, the quadriceps femoris (QF, including rectus femoris, RF; vastus intermedius, VI; vastus medialis, VM and vastus lateralis, VL). Patients were matched in TSH, FT4 and FT3. PAL was also statistically identical between groups. Age, BMI, thigh girth, the average of bilateral MT of QF were statistically different. After adjusting for age, BMI and girth, Group 1 still presented with larger MT of QF than Group 2, regardless of their current thyroid hormone level. There indeed exists an independent relationship between muscle thickness and TPP. PMID:26519100

  18. Electromyographic fatigue characteristics of the quadriceps in patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, M J; McCarthy, C J; Oldham, J A

    2001-02-01

    This study compared the fatigue characteristics of the vastus medialis oblique (VMO), vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. Ten healthy subjects with 10 patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) performed an isometric leg press for 60 seconds at 60% MVIC with data collected using surface EMG. The power spectrum was analyzed and the extracted median frequency normalised to calculate a linear regression slope for each muscle. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed no significant differences, neither between the groups (P=0.592) nor the muscles (P=0.434). However, the slopes for the VMO and VL were different between the two groups with similar slopes for the RF. There was much larger variability of MF values in the PFPS group. The VMO:VL ratio calculated from these slopes for the healthy subjects was 1.17 and for the PFPS group was 1.78. These results may indicate unusual features in the fatigue indices of the quadriceps in PFPS.

  19. Serial Changes of Quadriceps and Hamstring Muscle Strength Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Young-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze serial changes in thigh muscles, including quadriceps and hamstring muscles, from before to one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). All studies sequentially comparing isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths between the TKA side and the contralateral uninjured limb were included in this meta-analysis. Five studies with 7 cohorts were included in this meta-analysis. The mean differences in the strengths of quadriceps and hamstring muscles between the TKA and uninjured sides were greatest three months after surgery (26.8 N∙m, 12.8 N∙m, P<0.001), but were similar to preoperative level at six months (18.4 N∙m, 7.4 N∙m P<0.001) and were maintained for up to one year (15.9 N∙m, 4.1 N∙m P<0.001). The pooled mean differences in changes in quadriceps and hamstring strengths relative to preoperative levels were 9.2 N∙m and 4.9 N∙m, respectively, three months postoperatively (P = 0.041), but were no longer significant after six months and one year. During the year after TKA, quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengths were lowest after 3 months, recovering to preoperative level after six months, but not reaching the muscle strength on the contralateral side. Relative to preoperative levels, the difference in muscle strength between the TKA and contralateral knees was only significant at three months. Because decrease of strength of the quadriceps was significantly greater than decrease in hamstring muscle strength at postoperative three months, early rehabilitation after TKA should focus on recovery of quadriceps muscle strength.

  20. Peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles in basketball and soccer players of different divisions.

    PubMed

    Zakas, A; Mandroukas, K; Vamvakoudis, E; Christoulas, K; Aggelopoulou, N

    1995-09-01

    Basketball and soccer are two games with different training and playing procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine the maximal voluntary peak torques of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and the torque ratio between these muscle groups in basketball players (n = 61) and soccer players (n = 51) participating in teams of different divisions. Isokinetic peak torques were measured using the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 60 and 180 degrees.s-1. Basketball players of the national team produced higher peak torque values of quadriceps muscles than the other basketball players of different divisions (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Hamstring peak torques of the national basketball team were significantly higher the only velocities measured compared with the players from division II and IV (p < 0.05). Peak torque values of quadriceps muscles relative to body weight were significantly higher in the national basketball team compared with basketball players from division I. No significant differences were found in peak torque values of quadriceps and hamstring muscles within the different basketball and soccer divisions. Peak torque expressed in absolute terms was significantly higher in basketball players than in soccer players (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). However, these differences were not significant when the strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles was expressed relative to body weight. The H/Q ratio did not differ either ditto among the different divisions of basketball and soccer players. Based on the data obtained in this study, we concluded that the subjects' body weight have a decisive effect on the production of peak torque values of quadriceps and hamstring muscles in basketball and soccer players. Furthermore that the playing in different divisions, as well as participating in different sports, i.e. basketball or soccer, have surprisingly small effects on the peak isokinetic torque production of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles.

  1. Physiological responses during downhill walking: A new exercise modality for subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Burtin, Chris; Hornikx, Miek; Demeyer, Heleen; De Bent, Kristien; van Remoortel, Hans; Osadnik, Christian R; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle quadriceps low-frequency fatigue (LFF) during exercise promotes improvements in exercise capacity with exercise training. In healthy subjects, eccentric muscle work induced by downhill walking (DW) generates higher muscular stress, whilst metabolic cost is lower compared to level walking (LW). We investigated quadriceps LFF and metabolic cost of DW in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten participants (67 ± 7 years, FEV1 51 ± 15% predicted) performed DW, DW carrying a load (DWL) of 10% body weight via vest and LW, in random order. Quadriceps potentiated twitch force (TWqpot) was assessed before and after each walk, and muscle damage was assessed before and 24 hours after each walk via serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Ventilation (VE) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured via breath-by-breath analysis during each walk. DW and DWL resulted in a greater decrease in TWqpot (-30 ± 14 N in DW, p < 0.05; and -22 ± 16 N in DWL, p < 0.05) compared to LW (-3 ± 21 N, p > 0.05). CK levels only increased 24 hours following DW and DWL (p < 0.05). DW and DWL showed lower VE and VO2 than LW (p < 0.05). DW is associated with enhanced quadriceps LFF and lower cardiorespiratory costs than LW. The addition of a chest load to DW does not seem to enhance these effects. PMID:25758676

  2. Quadriceps Strength Asymmetry Following ACL Reconstruction Alters Knee Joint Biomechanics and Functional Performance at Time of Return to Activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri-Smith, RM; Lepley, LK

    2016-01-01

    Background Quadriceps strength deficits are observed clinically following anterior cruciate injury and reconstruction and are often not overcome despite rehabilitation. Given that quadriceps strength may be important for achieving symmetrical joint biomechanics and promoting long-term joint health, determining the magnitude of strength deficits that lead to altered mechanics is critical. Purpose To determine if the magnitude of quadriceps strength asymmetry alters knee and hip biomechanical symmetry, as well as functional performance and self-reported function. Study Design Cross-Sectional study. Methods Seventy-three patients were tested at the time they were cleared for return to activity following ACL reconstruction. Quadriceps strength and activation, scores on the International Knee Documentation Committee form, the hop for distance test, and sagittal plane lower extremity biomechanics were recorded while patients completed a single-legged hop. Results Patients with high and moderate quadriceps strength symmetry had larger central activation ratios as well as greater limb symmetry indices on the hop for distance compared to patients with low quadriceps strength symmetry (P<0.05). Similarly, knee flexion angle and external moment symmetry was higher in the patients with high and moderate quadriceps symmetry compared to those with low symmetry (P<0.05). Quadriceps strength was found to be associated with sagittal plane knee angle and moment symmetry (P<0.05). Conclusion Patients with low quadriceps strength displayed greater movement asymmetries at the knee in the sagittal plane. Quadriceps strength was related to movement asymmetries and functional performance. Rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction needs to focus on maximizing quadriceps strength, which likely will lead to more symmetrical knee biomechanics. PMID:25883169

  3. Delayed quadriceps weakness after continuous adductor canal block for total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Veal, Christopher; Auyong, David B; Hanson, Neil A; Allen, Cindy J; Strodtbeck, Wyndam

    2014-03-01

    Adductor canal catheters have been shown to improve analgesia while maintaining quadriceps strength after total knee arthroplasty. We describe a patient who underwent total knee arthroplasty that likely had delayed quadriceps weakness as a result of a standard continuous 0.2% ropivacaine infusion at 8 ml/h within the adductor canal. On the day of surgery, the patient was able to stand and ambulate with minimal assistance. On the first post-operative day after surgery, approximately 20 h after starting the ropivacaine infusion, profound weakness of the quadriceps was noted with no ability to stand. Contrast subsequently injected through the adductor canal catheter under fluoroscopy revealed proximal spread approaching the common femoral nerve with as little as 2 ml of volume. This rare case of profound quadriceps weakness after a continuous adductor canal block reveals that local anaesthetic at the adductor canal can spread in a retrograde fashion towards the common femoral nerve, potentially resulting in quadriceps weakness. PMID:24372058

  4. Patellar hypomobility and the flexibility of the iliotibial band and the femoral quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Getka, Aleksandra

    2005-12-30

    Background. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not the flexibility of the iliotibial band and femoral quadriceps have an impact on patellar hypomobility, due to their connections with the patellar stabilizers. Material and methods. We examined 62 patients (44 females, 18 males) with a median age of 15 years (range 9-19). All these patients had patellofemoral dysfunction in the tested knees (101). The medial and distal glide of the patella were tested with a manual test according to Kaltenborn's scale. Ober's test was performed to test the tightness of the iliotibial band. The flexibility of the quadriceps femoris was tested while the patient was lying prone with the tested leg on the couch and the other beside it. Results. Statistical analysis based on the c2 test (P=0.05) found no dependence between the flexibility parameters of the iliotibial band or the femoral quadriceps and the parameters of patellar hypomobility. Of the tested joints, 37.6% showed hypomobile patella and positive Ober's test, while 34.7% had hypomobile patella and a positive test for femoral quadriceps flexibility. Conclusions. The flexibility of the iliotibial band and femoral quadriceps has no direct influence on passive patellar hypomobility, but can affect the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint and the location of the point of contact on articular surfaces during dynamic knee work. The flexibility of these muscles should be a diagnostic factor in patients with patellofemoral dysfunction.

  5. Strengthening Resilience in Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guild, Diane; Espiner, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Rolling with Resilience (RwR) provides a springboard for developing strategies that build strengths and supports to foster developmental assets in children and youth (Benson, Scales, & Roehlkepartain, 2011). In Circle of Courage terms, resilience is strengthened by opportunities for Belonging, Mastery, Independence, and Generosity (Brendtro,…

  6. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  7. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  8. Effect of eccentric isokinetic strengthening in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis: Isogo, a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Femorotibial knee osteoarthritis is associated with muscle weakness in the lower limbs, particularly in the quadriceps, which results in disease progression. The interest of having muscular strengthening as part of the therapeutic arsenal for the medical treatment of knee osteoarthritis is now well established. The functional disability induced by knee osteoarthritis manifests itself principally when walking, notably downhill, during which the muscles are called upon to contract eccentrically. We can therefore think that eccentric muscular strengthening could bring a functional benefit that is superior to concentric muscular strengthening. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomized, bicenter, parallel-group, international study. Eighty patients aged from 40 to 75 years old, suffering from medical-stage knee osteoarthritis, will undertake 6 weeks of isokinetic muscular strengthening. Randomization determines the mode of muscular strengthening: either exclusively eccentric or exclusively concentric. The principal objective is to demonstrate the superiority of the improvement in the quadriceps isokinetic torque after isokinetic muscular strengthening by the eccentric mode compared to the concentric mode. The following parameters are also evaluated: the variations in the level of pain, the parameters of walking (maximum speed over 10 and 200 meters, analysis on a computerized Gaitrite™ treadmill), static equilibrium (on a FUSYO™ force platform), and the functional status of the patient using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) questionnaire after the strengthening period and at 6 months. Discussion A better knowledge of the most effective mode of muscular strengthening is needed to optimize the functional benefits to the patients. In case of superiority in terms of efficacy of the eccentric mode, the latter could be given priority in the rehabilitation treatment of knee osteoarthritis patients. Trial

  9. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-05-06

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up.

  11. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases. PMID:27154985

  12. Osteotendinous repair of bilateral spontaneous quadriceps tendon ruptures with the Krackow technique in two patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kara, Adnan; Sari, Seçkin; Şeker, Ali; Öztürk, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Although unilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture is a relatively frequent pathology, bilateral non-traumatic spontaneous ruptures are uncommon and are usually associated with chronic renal failure, hyperparathyroidism, gout, and systemic lupus erythematosus. This paper aimed to discuss two patients with chronic renal failure treated with the Krackow suture technique for spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

  13. Spontaneous and simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, David; Calvo, Rafael; Vaisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon and serious injury that usually occurs in middle aged to elderly patients. It is frequently associated with chronic metabolic disorders like diabetes, hyperparathyroidism, gout, chronic renal failure or the chronic use of steroids. We report a case of spontaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  14. An examination of possible quadriceps force at the time of anterior cruciate ligament injury during landing: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Domire, Zachary J; Boros, Rhonda L; Hashemi, Javad

    2011-05-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common and traumatic injury. Although, identifying the mechanism of ACL injury has received considerable research attention, there are still many unanswered questions. One proposed mechanism asserts that the ACL is injured due to an aggressive quadriceps muscle contraction. However, recently it has been questioned if the magnitude of quadriceps force needed to tear the ACL is physiologically realistic under the conditions where injury occurs during landing (e.g. near full knee extension and within 50ms after impact). To answer this question, a simple simulation model was developed to examine the upper bounds of quadriceps force that can be developed under these conditions. The model included force-length, and force-velocity properties as well as activation dynamics. Model parameters were chosen to provide a high estimate for possible quadriceps force in a young healthy man. The effects of varying quadriceps pre-activation levels were also examined. When using realistic pre-activation levels, the simulated quadriceps force was less than half of what has been shown to cause ACL injury. Even when using maximum pre-activation, the quadriceps force still did not reach close to the level shown to cause injury. Therefore, we conclude that quadriceps force alone seems to be an unlikely mechanism for ACL injury.

  15. [Amino acid composition of the rat quadriceps femoris muscle after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, T F; Miroshnikova, E B; Poliakov, V V; Murugova, T P

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid composition of the quadriceps muscle of rats flown onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 and exposed to the ground-based synchronous control experiment was studied. The weightless rats showed changes in the amino acid concentration in the quadriceps muscle. The centrifuged flight and synchronous rats displayed an accumulation of free amino acids in the above muscle.

  16. The Gluteus Medius Vs. Thigh Muscles Strength Ratio and Their Relation to Electromyography Amplitude During a Farmer’s Walk Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Petr; Lehnert, Michal; Zaatar, Amr; Svoboda, Zdenek; Xaverova, Zuzana; Pietraszewski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The strength ratio between hamstrings and quadriceps (H/Q) is associated with knee injuries as well as hip abductor muscle (HAB) weakness. Sixteen resistance trained men (age, 32.5 ± 4.2 years) performed 5 s maximal isometric contractions at 75° of knee flexion/extension and 15° of hip abduction on a dynamometer. After this isometric test they performed a Farmer’s walk exercise to find out if the muscle strength ratio predicted the electromyography amplitude expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC). The carried load represented a moderate intensity of 75% of the exercise six repetitions maximum (6RM). Electromyography data from the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF) and gluteus medius (Gmed) on each leg were collected during the procedure. The groups selected were participants with H/Q ≥ 0.5, HQ < 0.5, HAB/H ≥ 1, HAB/H < 1, HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 and HAB/Q < 0.5. One way ANOVA showed that Gmed activity was significantly greater in the group with HAB/H < 1 (42 ± 14 %MVIC) as compared to HAB/H ≥ 1 (26 ± 10 %MVIC) and HAB/Q < 0.5 (47 ± 19 %MVIC) compared to HAB/Q ≥ 0.5 (26 ± 12 %MVIC). The individuals with HAB/H < 1 were found to have greater activation of their Gmed during the Farmer’s walk exercise. Individuals with HAB/Q < 0.5 had greater activation of the Gmed. Gmed strength ratios predict the muscle involvement when a moderate amount of the external load is used. The Farmer’s walk is recommended as an exercise which can strengthen the gluteus medius, especially for individuals with a HAB/H ratio < 1 and HAB/Q < 0.5. PMID:25964819

  17. Effects of trunk-hip strengthening on standing in children with spastic diplegia: a comparative pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Hwi; Seo, Hye-Jung

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of trunk-hip strengthening exercise on trunk-hip activation and pelvic tilt motion during standing in children with spastic diplegia and compared the improvement of pelvic tilt between the modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise and conventional exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten ambulant children with spastic diplegia were randomized to the modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise (n = 5) or conventional exercise (n = 5) group. The intervention consisted of a 6-week modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise 3 times per week. The children were tested for trunk-hip muscles activation and pelvic tilt motion during standing by surface electromyography and an inclinometer before and after the intervention. [Results] The anterior pelvic tilt angle and activation of the extensor spinae, rectus femoris, and semitendinosus during standing decreased significantly in the modified exercise group. The activation of extensor spinae differed significantly between groups. [Conclusion] Compared to the conventional exercise, the modified exercise was more effective for trunk-hip activation improvement and anterior pelvic tilt motion decrease during standing in children with spastic diplegia. We suggest clinicians use an individually tailored modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise for strengthening the weakest muscle groups in children with standing ability problems. PMID:26157214

  18. Effects of trunk-hip strengthening on standing in children with spastic diplegia: a comparative pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Hwi; Seo, Hye-Jung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of trunk-hip strengthening exercise on trunk-hip activation and pelvic tilt motion during standing in children with spastic diplegia and compared the improvement of pelvic tilt between the modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise and conventional exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten ambulant children with spastic diplegia were randomized to the modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise (n = 5) or conventional exercise (n = 5) group. The intervention consisted of a 6-week modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise 3 times per week. The children were tested for trunk-hip muscles activation and pelvic tilt motion during standing by surface electromyography and an inclinometer before and after the intervention. [Results] The anterior pelvic tilt angle and activation of the extensor spinae, rectus femoris, and semitendinosus during standing decreased significantly in the modified exercise group. The activation of extensor spinae differed significantly between groups. [Conclusion] Compared to the conventional exercise, the modified exercise was more effective for trunk-hip activation improvement and anterior pelvic tilt motion decrease during standing in children with spastic diplegia. We suggest clinicians use an individually tailored modified trunk-hip strengthening exercise for strengthening the weakest muscle groups in children with standing ability problems. PMID:26157214

  19. [Bilateral quadriceps rupture in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. A case report].

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Dueñas, Jesús Alejandro; Torres Castro, Carlos; Estrada Gómez, José Andrés; Algarín Reyes, José Antonio; Bello González, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a 24-year-old patient with bilateral quadriceps rupture and history of type I congenital osteogenesis imperfecta diagnosed clinically and with ultrasound. Bilateral quadriceps tenoplasty was performed with an anterior approach and without any complications. The patient was discharged with bilateral neoprene knee-guards. The sutures were removed at the 21-day follow-up visit, rehabilitation was started at six weeks and the patient was doing well at the 2- and 3-month follow-up visits. Timely management and early rehabilitation contribute to decrease the risk of sequelae despite the poor functional prognosis.

  20. Suture anchor versus suture through tunnel fixation for quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lighthart, William A; Cohen, David A; Levine, Richard G; Parks, Brent G; Boucher, Henry R

    2008-05-01

    This biomechanical study compared suture anchors versus transosseous sutures for repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using a force of 150 N at a frequency of 0.5 Hz. No significant difference in displacement was found between the 2 techniques with initial loading or with load or no load after 1000 cycles. Displacement after 1000 cycles for suture anchors and bone tunnels was 4.65 and 4.50 mm, respectively. These findings suggest a possible role for suture anchors in repairing quadriceps tendon ruptures. Suture anchors are relatively expensive but require less dissection over the patella and do not involve suture placement about the patella tendon.

  1. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  2. Strengthening family systems.

    PubMed

    Starn, J

    1993-01-01

    The childbearing year is a psychosocial transition that involves changes in roles and status for each member of the family. This change is perhaps most significant in the transition that occurs with the birth of the first child. Thus, childbirth education can be looked upon as an opportunity to strengthen family systems through anticipatory guidance and skill building that family members may use throughout the life cycle.

  3. Using squat testing to predict training loads for the deadlift, lunge, step-up, and leg extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Feldmann, Christina R; Dayne, Andrea; Mitsche, Diana; Chmielewski, Lauren M; Alexander, Paul; Knetgzer, Kenneth J

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a linear relationship between the squat and a variety of quadriceps resistance training exercises for the purpose of creating prediction equations for the determination of quadriceps exercise loads based on the squat load. Six-repetition maximums (RMs) of the squat, as well as four common resistance training exercises that activate the quadriceps including the deadlift, lunge, step-up, and leg extension, were determined for each subject. Subjects included 21 college students. Data were evaluated using linear regression analysis to predict quadriceps exercise loads from 6RM squat data and were cross-validated with the prediction of sum of squares statistic. Analysis of the data revealed that the squat is a significant predictor of loads for the dead lift (R2 = 0.81, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 12.50 kg), lunge (R2 = 0.62, SEE = 12.57 kg), step-up (R2 = 0.71, SEE = 9.58 kg), and leg extension (R2=0.67, SEE = 10.26 kg) exercises. Based on the analysis of the data, the following 6RM prediction equations were devised for each exercise: (a) deadlift load = squat load (0.83) + 14.92 kg, (b) lunge load = squat load (0.52) + 14.82 kg, (c) step-up load = squat load (0.50) + 3.32 kg, and (d) leg extension load = squat load (0.48) + 9.58 kg. Results from testing core exercises such as the squat can provide useful data for the assignment of loads for other exercises. PMID:18978614

  4. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  5. Foraging activity rhythms of Dinoponera quadriceps (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jeniffer; Azevedo, Dina L O; Santana, Melquisedec A D; Lopes, Talita R P; Araújo, Arrilton

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the foraging activity of the queenless ant Dinoponera quadriceps (Kempf) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in its natural environment by testing the hypotheses that foraging activity presents both daily and seasonal rhythmic variations, and that these rhythms are related to environmental variables. Four colonies of D. quadriceps were observed in an area of secondary Atlantic forest in northeastern Brazil. Data collection was performed over 72 h every three months during an annual cycle. Both daily and seasonal foraging activity rhythms of D. quadriceps colonies were related to environmental factors, but colony differences also explained part of foraging variations. Foraging activity of D. quadriceps colonies was predominantly diurnal independently of season. In the early dry season, the colonies had two activity peaks, one in the morning and another in the afternoon, with a decrease in foraging at midday; however, during the rest of the year, foraging activity was distributed more evenly throughout the daylight hours. The daily rhythm of foraging activity was likely determined by an endogenous circadian rhythm year-round, but in the dry season, temperature and relative humidity also influenced daily foraging activity, with a negative effect of temperature and a positive effect of relative humidity. On a seasonal scale, foraging activity peaked in the early dry season and suddenly declined at the end of this season, increasing again at the late rainy season. The seasonal rhythm of foraging was negatively related to relative humidity and positively related to prey availability. PMID:25525097

  6. Quadriceps and hamstrings prelanding myoelectric activity during landing from different heights among male and female athletes.

    PubMed

    de Britto, Morgana Alves; Carpes, Felipe P; Koutras, Georgios; Pappas, Evangelos

    2014-08-01

    ACL tear is a major concern among athletes, coaches and sports scientists. More than taking the athlete away from training and competition, ACL tear is a risk factor for early-onset of knee osteoarthritis, and, therefore addressing strategies to avoid such injury is pertinent not only for competitive athletes, but for all physically active subjects. Imbalances in the prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles have been linked to ACL injuries. We investigated the effect of landing from different heights on prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles in recreational athletes. Thirty recreational athletes (15 male and 15 female) performed three bilateral drop jumps from two different heights; 20cm and 40cm while myoelectric activity of the vastus medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings were collected. When increasing the height of drop landing tasks prelanding normalized myoelectric activity of the quadriceps was increased by 15-20% but no significant changes were found for the hamstrings. Female athletes exhibited higher activity of the medial hamstrings compared to their male counterparts. We concluded that increasing the height of drop landing tasks is associated with increased myoelectric activity of the quadriceps but not the hamstrings in recreational athletes. These differences in muscle activity may be related to increased risk for ACL injury when the height is increased. Female athletes demonstrated higher recruitment of the medial hamstrings.

  7. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis.

  8. Comprehensive isokinetic knee measurements and quadriceps tendon evaluations in footballers for assessing functional performance

    PubMed Central

    Ozcakar, L; Kunduracyoolu, B; Cetin, A; Ulkar, B; Guner, R; Hascelik, Z

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To ascertain whether detailed isokinetic knee muscle testing reflects the results of other functional measurements in footballers and to look for any correlations between quadriceps tendon thickness and knee strength. Methods: Ultrasonographic evaluation of the quadriceps tendon (Hitachi EUB-405), isokinetic knee testing (Biodex System 3), and sprint measurements using telemetric photoelectric cells (Chronometre Prosport ESC TX02) were carried out on 29 elite footballers. Jumping capacity was evaluated using Bosco's jumping mat (Ergojump). Anaerobic fitness was assessed by auricular capillary blood lactate measurements (YSI Model 1500 Sport Lactate Analyzer). Results: Quadriceps tendon thickness correlated positively with jumping and sprint measurements and negatively with extensor and flexor strength. However, these correlations did not reach statistical significance. There were significant correlations between knee extensor strength at 60 °/s and jumping or sprint measurements and between the extension acceleration values of both knees during isokinetic tests at 240 °/s and the sprint measurements. No significant correlation was found between the fatigue ratio values of both knees at 240 °/s and the calculated fatigue ratios from the sprint measurements. Conclusions: Apart from a few variables which correlated with the performance tests, the isokinetic studies did not fully predict the various functional measurements. Neither was there any relation between the quadriceps tendon measurements and the knee strength values nor with the functional performance. PMID:14665589

  9. Oxidative stress participates in quadriceps muscle dysfunction during the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Dur-Zong; Chu, Pei-Yi; Wu, Po-Ting; Shen, Po-Chuan; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population. Quadriceps muscle weakness is one of the risk factors of osteoarthritis development. Oxidative stress has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of various muscle dysfunction; however, whether it is involved in osteoarthritis-associated quadriceps muscle weakness has never been investigated. The aim of the present study is to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in quadriceps muscle dysfunction in the initiation of osteoarthritis in rats. Rat osteoarthritis was initiated by conducting meniscectomy (MNX). Quadriceps muscle dysfunction was evaluated by assessing muscular interleukin-6, citrate synthase activity, and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression levels. Muscular oxidative stress was assessed by determining lipid peroxidation, Nrf2 expression, reactive oxygen species, and circulating antioxidants. Increased muscular interleukin-6 production as well as decreased citrate synthase activity and myosin heavy chain IIa mRNA expression were observed at 7 and 14 days after MNX. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were significantly increased after MNX. Muscular free radical counts were increased while glutathione and glutathione peroxidase expression were decreased in MNX-treated rats. We conclude that oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of muscle dysfunction in MNX-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:26722436

  10. Atrophy of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip.

    PubMed

    Robben, S G; Lequin, M H; Meradji, M; Diepstraten, A F; Hop, W C

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps muscle in children with a painful hip. Between January 1994 and September 1997, 327 consecutive children with a unilateral painful hip and/or limping were evaluated prospectively with ultrasonography. Quadriceps thickness was measured on both sides. Moreover, muscle thickness was measured in 59 control subjects. The patients were divided into eight groups; transient synovitis (n = 134), Perthes' disease (n = 35), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (n = 5), osteomyelitis (n = 4), aspecific synovitis (n = 5), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 3) and miscellaneous (n = 16). In 125 patients, no sonographic and radiological abnormalities were found and during follow-up the symptoms disappeared ('no pathology' group). Ipsilateral muscle wasting was present in all patient groups, whereas the control subjects showed no significant difference in muscle thickness between legs. The degree of muscle wasting was compared between transient synovitis, the 'no pathology' group, Perthes' disease and control subjects. For both quadriceps and vastus intermedius muscles, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between control subjects and the 'no pathology' group. For the rectus femoris muscle, there was a significant difference between these groups, except between transient synovitis and 'no pathology'. Muscle wasting showed a positive correlation with duration of symptoms and pre-existing muscle mass. In conclusion, different diseases show different degrees of muscle wasting, and there are different patterns of muscle wasting of various components of the quadriceps femoris muscle.

  11. Comparison of quadriceps strength and handgrip strength in their association with health outcomes in older adults in primary care.

    PubMed

    Chan, On Ying A; van Houwelingen, Anne H; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Blom, Jeanet W; den Elzen, Wendy P J

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is thought to play a major role in the functional impairment that occurs with old age. In clinical practice, sarcopenia is often determined by measuring handgrip strength. Here, we compared the lower limb quadriceps strength to the handgrip strength in their association with health outcomes in older adults in primary care. Our study population consisted of older adults (n = 764, 68.2% women, median age 83) that participated in the Integrated Systemic Care for Older People (ISCOPE) study. Participants were visited at baseline to measure quadriceps strength and handgrip strength. Data on health outcomes were obtained at baseline and after 12 months (including life satisfaction, disability in daily living, GP contact-time and hospitalization). Quadriceps strength and handgrip strength showed a weak association (β = 0.42 [95% CI 0.33-0.50]; R (2) = 0.17). Quadriceps strength and handgrip strength were independently associated with health outcomes at baseline, including quality of life, disability in daily living, GP contact-time, hospitalization, and gait speed. Combined weakness of the quadriceps and handgrip distinguished a most vulnerable subpopulation that presented with the poorest health outcomes. At follow-up, handgrip strength showed an association with quality of life (β = 0.05; P = 0.002) and disability in daily living (β = -0.5; P = 0.004). Quadriceps weakness did not further contribute to the prediction of the measured health outcomes. We conclude that quadriceps strength is only moderately associated with handgrip strength in an older population and that the combination of quadriceps strength and handgrip strength measurements may aid in the identification of older adults in primary care with the poorest health outcomes. In the prediction of poor health outcomes, quadriceps strength measurements do not show an added value to the handgrip strength.

  12. The patella ligament insertion angle influences quadriceps usage during walking of anterior cruciate ligament deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, Choongsoo S; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2007-12-01

    Following ACL injury a reduction in the peak knee flexion moment during walking (thought to be created by a decrease of quadriceps contraction) has been described as an adaptation to reduce anterior tibial translation (ATT) relative to the femur. However, the amount of ATT caused by quadriceps contraction is influenced by the patellar ligament insertion angle (PLIA). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that quadriceps usage during walking correlates to individual anatomical variations in the extensor mechanism as defined by PLIA. PLIA and gait were measured for ACL-deficient knees, using subjects' contralateral knees as controls. In ACL-deficient knees, PLIA was negatively correlated (R2 = 0.59) to peak knee flexion moment (balanced by net quadriceps moment), while no correlation was found in contralateral knees. Reduction in peak flexion moment in ACL-deficient knees compared to their contralateral knees was distinctive in subjects with large PLIA, possibly to avoid excessive ATT. These results suggest that subject-specific anatomic variability of knee extensor mechanism may account for the individual variability previously observed in adaptation to a quadriceps reduction strategy following ACL injury. The average (+/-1 SD) PLIA of ACL-deficient knees (21.1 +/- 3.4 degrees) was less than the average PLIA of contralateral knees (23.9 +/- 3.1 degrees). This altered equilibrium position of the tibiofemoral joint associated with reduced PLIA and adaptations of gait patterns following ACL injury may be associated with degenerative changes in the articular cartilage. In the future, individually tailored treatment and rehabilitation considering individuals' specific extensor anatomy may improve clinical outcomes.

  13. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  14. Hip and knee muscle function following aerobic exercise in individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ott, Brittany; Cosby, Nicole L; Grindstaff, Terry L; Hart, Joseph M

    2011-08-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a commonly experienced knee disorder that can result in altered muscle activation of the surrounding musculature. There is little evidence on effects of aerobic exercise on quadriceps torque and EMG activation of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), vastus lateralis (VL), and gluteus medius (GM). In this study 20 healthy individuals and 20 patients with PFPS had measures of torque and muscle activation taken following aerobic exercise. A modified Balke-Ware protocol was used for the exercise intervention. Baseline and post-aerobic measurements of knee extension torque and VMO, VL, and GM activation during a single leg anterior reaching task. These measurements were only taken on the injured limb. Following exercise, knee extension torque was lower in PFPS patients when compared to controls (p=0.03). Patients reporting no pain after exercise experienced decreases (p=0.021) in GM activation following exercise. There was a decrease in VMO (p=0.010) and VL (p=0.021) activation in PFPS patients with elevated knee pain. Recreationally active individuals with PFPS may experience different responses in the quadriceps and GM after exercise. Responses may be confounded by whether or not pain is exacerbated by exercise.

  15. Effects of Directional Exercise on Lingual Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather M.; O'Brien, Katy; Calleja, Aimee; Corrie, Sarah Newcomb

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the application of known muscle training principles to tongue strengthening exercises and to answer the following research questions: (a) Did lingual strength increase following 9 weeks of training? (b) Did training conducted using an exercise moving the tongue in one direction result in strength changes for tongue movements in…

  16. Quadriceps tendon rupture and periosteal sleeve avulsion fracture of the proximal patella pole in an active adolescent.

    PubMed

    Bimmel, R; Reddy, K

    2008-07-01

    A unique case of anterior knee pain in an active adolescent is described: a periosteal sleeve avulsion and quadriceps rupture in a young basketball player. The trauma mechanism was without any direct trauma on the knee. A review of overuse-related anterior knee pain in the young and active is presented. A quadriceps rupture with a periosteal sleeve avulsion fracture in an active adolescent is very rare. To our knowledge there are no similar cases described. This article presents a case of a 14-year-old adolescent boy who sustained a quadriceps rupture with a periosteal sleeve avulsion.

  17. Quadriceps oxygenation changes during walking and running on a treadmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresima, Valentina; Pizzi, Assunta; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Ferrari, Adriano; de Angelis, Marco; Ferrari, Marco

    1995-04-01

    Vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation was investigated on volunteers as well as muscular dystrophy patients during a walking test, and on volunteers during a free running by a continuous wave near infrared instrument. The data were analyzed using an oxygenation index independent on pathlength changes. Walking did not significantly affect the oxygenation of volunteers and patients. A relative deoxygenation was found only during free running indicating an unbalance between oxygen supply and tissue oxygen extraction. Preliminary measurements of exercising muscle oxygen saturation were performed by a 110 MHz frequency-domain, multisource instrument.

  18. Determinants of exercise and aerobic fitness in outpatients with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, G B; Kasal, S; Smith, K V; Hassanein, R; DeViney, S

    1994-01-01

    Factors that influenced exercise behaviors and aerobic fitness were identified in 100 outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Data included perceived health status, benefits of and barriers to exercise, and impact of arthritis on health; demographic and biologic characteristics; and past exercise behavior. Exercise measures included range-of-motion and strengthening exercises, 7-day activity recall, and the exercise subscale of the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile. An aerobic fitness level was obtained on each subject by bicycle ergometer testing. The theoretical model predicted 20% of the variance in composite exercise scores but none of the variance in aerobic fitness levels. Perceived benefits of exercise was a significant predictor of exercise participation. Subjects with less formal education, longer duration of arthritis, and higher impact of arthritis scores perceived fewer benefits of exercise, while subjects who reported exercising in their youth perceived more benefits of exercise.

  19. Resistance Exercise in Pregnancy and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Ruben; Perales, Maria

    2016-09-01

    As the health benefits of exercise are increasingly recognized, the traditional advice to rest during pregnancy has changed toward a more healthy and active pregnancy, therefore different forms of exercise have been integrated into the life of the pregnant woman. Although the benefits of using a combination of resistance and aerobic exercises are not yet determined, studies about resistance and strengthen training programs are few although no adverse outcomes were reported. PMID:27388962

  20. The Efficacy of Exercise Programs for Parkinson's Disease: Tai Chi versus Combined Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Sang-Myung; Chae, Bo-Kyung; Sung, Hye-Ryun; Lee, Geon Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Exercise is recommended for every patient with Parkinson's disease (PD). The effectiveness of two different forms of exercise for PD, Tai Chi and combined stretching-strengthening exercise, was compared. Methods Patients with mild-to-moderate PD were recruited to join either the combined stretching-strengthening exercise group (n=7), the Tai Chi group (n=9), or the control (nonintervention) group (n=7). Exercise was performed three times a week over a period of 8 weeks. The Tai Chi exercise was led by certified instructors based on a Tai-Chi-for-arthritis program. The combined stretching-strengthening exercise comprised folk dancing, stepping, and elastic-band exercises. The subjects' functional fitness, parkinsonian symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and depression were evaluated. Results Both exercise groups yielded better results in their overall functional fitness after the intervention. However, no improvement with exercise was found for parkinsonian symptoms, as evaluated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. With respect to the domains of QoL, the combined stretching-strengthening exercise group fared better in the social domain of QoL, and the Tai Chi group fared better in the emotional domain, while QoL and depression worsened in the control group. The postintervention QoL was improved relative to the control condition only for the Tai Chi group. Although the exercise interventions did not have any effect on depression, the control group was associated with a significant deterioration. Conclusions Exercise improved the functional fitness and QoL of PD patients, with Tai Chi yielding better results in QoL and favorable results in functional fitness. These findings suggest that Tai Chi could be a good exercise strategy for patients with PD. PMID:24285965

  1. Does hydrotherapy improve strength and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis—a randomised controlled trial comparing a gym based and a hydrotherapy based strengthening programme

    PubMed Central

    Foley, A; Halbert, J; Hewitt, T; Crotty, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of a hydrotherapy resistance exercise programme with a gym based resistance exercise programme on strength and function in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Single blind, three arm, randomised controlled trial. Subjects: 105 community living participants aged 50 years and over with clinical OA of the hip or knee. Methods: Participants were randomised into one of three groups: hydrotherapy (n = 35), gym (n = 35), or control (n = 35). The two exercising groups had three exercise sessions a week for six weeks. At six weeks an independent physiotherapist unaware of the treatment allocation performed all outcome assessments (muscle strength dynamometry, six minute walk test, WOMAC OA Index, total drugs, SF-12 quality of life, Adelaide Activities Profile, and the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale). Results: In the gym group both left and right quadriceps significantly increased in strength compared with the control group, and right quadriceps strength was also significantly better than in the hydrotherapy group. The hydrotherapy group increased left quadriceps strength only at follow up, and this was significantly different from the control group. The hydrotherapy group was significantly different from the control group for distance walked and the physical component of the SF-12. The gym group was significantly different from the control group for walk speed and self efficacy satisfaction. Compliance rates were similar for both exercise groups, with 84% of hydrotherapy and 75% of gym sessions attended. There were no differences in drug use between groups over the study period. Conclusion: Functional gains were achieved with both exercise programmes compared with the control group. PMID:14644853

  2. Jogging gait kinetics following fatiguing lumbar paraspinal exercise.

    PubMed

    Hart, Joseph M; Kerrigan, D Casey; Fritz, Julie M; Saliba, Ethan N; Gansneder, Bruce; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    A relationship exists between lumbar paraspinal muscle fatigue and quadriceps muscle activation. The objective of this study was to determine whether hip and knee joint moments during jogging changed following paraspinal fatiguing exercise. Fifty total subjects (25 with self-reported history of low back pain) performed fatiguing, isometric lumbar extension exercise until a shift in EMG median frequency corresponding to a mild level of muscle fatigue was observed. We compared 3-dimensional external joint moments of the hip and knee during jogging before and after lumbar paraspinal fatigue using a 10-camera motion analysis system. Reduced external knee flexion, knee adduction, knee internal rotation and hip external rotation moments and increased external knee extension moments resulted from repetitive lumbar paraspinal fatiguing exercise. Persons with a self-reported history of LBP had larger knee flexion moments than controls during jogging. Neuromuscular changes in the lower extremity occur while resisting knee and hip joint moments following isolated lumbar paraspinal exercise. Persons with a history of LBP seem to rely more heavily on quadriceps activity while jogging.

  3. Mechanical, hormonal, and hypertrophic adaptations to 10 weeks of eccentric and stretch-shortening cycle exercise training in old males.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Márk; Nagy, Szilvia A; Kőszegi, Tamás; Ambrus, Míra; Bogner, Péter; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Tóth, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2014-10-01

    The growth promoting effects of eccentric (ECC) contractions are well documented but it is unknown if the rate of stretch per se plays a role in such muscular responses in healthy aging human skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training of the quadriceps muscle with low rate ECC and high rate ECC contractions in the form of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) but at equal total mechanical work would produce rate-specific adaptations in healthy old males age 60-70. Both training programs produced similar improvements in maximal voluntary isometric (6%) and ECC torque (23%) and stretch-shortening cycle function (reduced contraction duration [24%] and enhanced elastic energy storage [12%]) (p<0.05). The rate of torque development increased 30% only after SSC exercise (p<0.05). Resting testosterone and cortisol levels were unchanged but after each program the acute exercise-induced cortisol levels were 12-15% lower (p<0.05). Both programs increased quadriceps size 2.5% (p<0.05). It is concluded that both ECC and SSC exercise training produces favorable adaptations in healthy old males' quadriceps muscle. Although the rate of muscle tension during the SSC vs. ECC contractions was about 4-fold greater, the total mechanical work seems to regulate the hypetrophic, hormonal, and most of the mechanical adaptations. However, SSC exercise was uniquely effective in improving a key deficiency of aging muscle, i.e., its ability to produce force rapidly.

  4. Effect of time-dependent cryotherapy on redox balance of quadriceps injuries.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marco Aurélio dos Santos; Carvalho, Taiara Ramos de; Cruz, Amanda Cristina Marques Barros da; Jesus, Lennon Rafael Guedine de; Silva Neto, Larissa Alexsandra da; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2016-02-01

    Muscle trauma represents a high number of injuries in professional sport and recreation and may occur through several mechanisms. This study aims at analyzing time-dependent effects of cryotherapy on the redox balance in lesioned quadriceps muscles in F1 mice. Twenty male F1 mice were divided into five groups: (a) animals were not subjected to muscle lesioning or treatment (CTR); (b) quadriceps muscle was lesioned without treatment (L); (c) quadriceps muscle was lesioned and treated with cryotherapy for 5 min (LC5); (d) quadriceps muscle was lesioned and treated with cryotherapy for 20 min (LC20); and quadriceps muscle was lesioned and treated with cryotherapy for 40 min (LC40). The mice were euthanized; the quadriceps muscles were collected and subjected to analyses for levels of protein, hydroperoxides, nitrite, catalase (CAT) activity, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH). Protein levels were reduced in L (-39%; p < 0.05), LC5 (-54%; p < 0.05), LC20 (-40%; p < 0.05) and LC40 (-50%; p < 0.05) compared to CTR. There was an increase in lipid peroxidation in L (158%; p < 0.05), LC5 (300%; p < 0.01), LC20 (292%; p < 0.01) and LC40 (362%; p < 0.01) compared to CTR. We observed a significant increase in CAT activity in L (164%; p < 0.05) and LC5 (193%; p < 0.01) compared to CTR; a significant reduction in GSH in L (-60%; p < 0.05) and LC20 (-61%; p < 0.05) compared to CTR; and a significant increase in GSSG in LC5 (171%; p < 0.05) compared to CTR. In addition, GSH/GSSG was reduced in L (-89%; p < 0.01), LC5 (-95%; p < 0.01), LC20 (-59%; p < 0.05), and LC40 (-82%; p < 0.01) compared to CTR. This study showed that the cryotherapy does not improve the oxidative stress in lesioned muscles.

  5. Inspiratory muscle work in acute hypoxia influences locomotor muscle fatigue and exercise performance of healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Pegelow, David F; Jacques, Anthony J; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-11-01

    Our aim was to isolate the independent effects of 1) inspiratory muscle work (W(b)) and 2) arterial hypoxemia during heavy-intensity exercise in acute hypoxia on locomotor muscle fatigue. Eight cyclists exercised to exhaustion in hypoxia [inspired O(2) fraction (Fi(O(2))) = 0.15, arterial hemoglobin saturation (Sa(O(2))) = 81 +/- 1%; 8.6 +/- 0.5 min, 273 +/- 6 W; Hypoxia-control (Ctrl)] and at the same work rate and duration in normoxia (Sa(O(2)) = 95 +/- 1%; Normoxia-Ctrl). These trials were repeated, but with a 35-80% reduction in W(b) achieved via proportional assist ventilation (PAV). Quadriceps twitch force was assessed via magnetic femoral nerve stimulation before and 2 min after exercise. The isolated effects of W(b) in hypoxia on quadriceps fatigue, independent of reductions in Sa(O(2)), were revealed by comparing Hypoxia-Ctrl and Hypoxia-PAV at equal levels of Sa(O(2)) (P = 0.10). Immediately after hypoxic exercise potentiated twitch force of the quadriceps (Q(tw,pot)) decreased by 30 +/- 3% below preexercise baseline, and this reduction was attenuated by about one-third after PAV exercise (21 +/- 4%; P = 0.0007). This effect of W(b) on quadriceps fatigue occurred at exercise work rates during which, in normoxia, reducing W(b) had no significant effect on fatigue. The isolated effects of reduced Sa(O(2)) on quadriceps fatigue, independent of changes in W(b), were revealed by comparing Hypoxia-PAV and Normoxia-PAV at equal levels of W(b). Q(tw,pot) decreased by 15 +/- 2% below preexercise baseline after Normoxia-PAV, and this reduction was exacerbated by about one-third after Hypoxia-PAV (-22 +/- 3%; P = 0.034). We conclude that both arterial hypoxemia and W(b) contribute significantly to the rate of development of locomotor muscle fatigue during exercise in acute hypoxia; this occurs at work rates during which, in normoxia, W(b) has no effect on peripheral fatigue.

  6. Chronic quadriceps rupture: treatment with lengthening and early mobilization without cerclage augmentation and a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rizio, Louis; Jarmon, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 3 patients with chronic quadriceps tears and gaps < 2 cm were treated with a V-Y lengthening of the tendon, repair of the tendon through drill holes in the patella without cerclage augmentation, and early mobilization. The gap was < or = 2 cm following adequate surgical mobilization of the quadriceps tendon. Results of this technique are presented with a minimum of 1-year follow-up.

  7. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise ECG; ECG - exercise treadmill; EKG - exercise treadmill; Stress ECG; Exercise electrocardiography; Stress test - exercise treadmill; CAD - treadmill; Coronary artery disease - treadmill; Chest pain - treadmill; Angina - treadmill; ...

  8. Surgical management of acute quadriceps tendon rupture (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is uncommon and often overlooked in emergency. Tearing affects weakening tendon by systemic diseases or some medications. The mechanism is generally indirect. Inability to actively extend the knee associated to a supra-patellar defect evoke easily the diagnosis without other investigations. Surgical repair is realized in emergency to completely restore the extension. We report a case of a patient who has sustained of complete quadriceps tendon tear after a long period of tendon weakening by statin therapy, hypertension and diabetes. The repair has consisted on end-to-end Krackow sutures associated with bone suture to the proximal pole of the patella. Surgeons and emergency physicians must think to this form of extensor apparatus rupture, because early diagnosis leads to early treatment and to best outcomes.

  9. Free Bone Plug Quadriceps Tendon Harvest and Suspensory Button Attachment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Todor, Adrian; Caterev, Sergiu; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Khallouki, Youssef

    2016-06-01

    The most commonly used autografts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendons. Each has its advantages and limitations. The bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft can lead to more donor-site morbidity, and the hamstring autograft can be unpredictable in size. The quadriceps tendon, with or without a bone block, has been described as an alternative graft source and has been used especially in revision cases, but in recent years, it has attracted attention even for primary cases. We report a technique for harvesting a free bone quadriceps tendon graft and attaching an extracortical button for femoral fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27656375

  10. Anatomic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    PubMed

    Crall, Timothy S; Gilmer, Brian B

    2015-12-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently gained popularity, in part because of its bone-sparing socket preparation and reported lower pain levels after surgery. However, because this technique uses suture loops and cortical suspension buttons for graft fixation, it has mostly been limited to looped graft constructs (e.g., hamstring autograft, peroneus longus allograft). Quadriceps tendon autograft offers several advantages in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but, until recently, has not been compatible with suture-loop and cortical suspensory fixation. We describe a technique that allows a relatively short (<75 mm) quadriceps tendon autograft (without bone block) to be used with established all-inside anatomic techniques. PMID:27284521

  11. Effects of quadriceps muscle fatigue on stiff-knee gait in patients with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Delouf, Eric; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between neuromuscular fatigue and locomotion has never been investigated in hemiparetic patients despite the fact that, in the clinical context, patients report to be more spastic or stiffer after walking a long distance or after a rehabilitation session. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of quadriceps muscle fatigue on the biomechanical gait parameters of patients with a stiff-knee gait (SKG). Thirteen patients and eleven healthy controls performed one gait analysis before a protocol of isokinetic quadriceps fatigue and two after (immediately after and after 10 minutes of rest). Spatiotemporal parameters, sagittal knee and hip kinematics, rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) kinematics and electromyographic (EMG) activity were analyzed. The results showed that quadriceps muscle weakness, produced by repetitive concentric contractions of the knee extensors, induced an improvement of spatiotemporal parameters for patients and healthy subjects. For the patient group, the increase in gait velocity and step length was associated with i) an increase of sagittal hip and knee flexion during the swing phase, ii) an increase of the maximal normalized length of the RF and VL and of the maximal VL lengthening velocity during the pre-swing and swing phases, and iii) a decrease in EMG activity of the RF muscle during the initial pre-swing phase and during the latter 2/3 of the initial swing phase. These results suggest that quadriceps fatigue did not alter the gait of patients with hemiparesis walking with a SKG and that neuromuscular fatigue may play the same functional role as an anti-spastic treatment such as botulinum toxin-A injection. Strength training of knee extensors, although commonly performed in rehabilitation, does not seem to be a priority to improve gait of these patients.

  12. Firing rate analysis using decompostion-enhanced spike triggered averaging in the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Conwit, R A; Tracy, B; Cowl, A; McHugh, M; Stashuk, D; Brown, W F; Metter, E J

    1998-10-01

    Electromyographic signals detected from the quadriceps femoris during various constant force contractions were decomposed to identify individual motor unit discharges and mean firing rates (FRs). Subject and group mean FRs were calculated for each force level. Mean FR values and FR variability increased with force. Individual, subject, and group mean FRs showed slight increases until 30% of maximum voluntary contraction and larger increases thereafter. Findings are discussed in relation to motor unit recruitment, frequency modulation, and fatigue. PMID:9736067

  13. Relationship between quadriceps femoris echo intensity, muscle power, and functional capacity of older men.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Eurico Nestor; Rech, Anderson; Minozzo, Felipe; Radaelli, Regis; Botton, Cíntia Ehlers; Pinto, Ronei Silveira

    2014-06-01

    Increased proportion of non-contractile elements can be observed during aging by enhanced skeletal muscle echo intensity (EI). Studies have demonstrated that an increase in rectus femoris EI may affect physical performance. However, it is still unknown whether the whole quadriceps femoris EI (QEI) influences strength, power, and functional capacity of an older population. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the correlation between QEI, the four individual quadriceps portions EI, and muscular performance of older men. Fifty sedentary healthy men (66.1 ± 4.5 years, 1.75 ± 0.06 m, 80.2 ± 11.0 kg) volunteered for the present study. The QEI and EI of the four quadriceps portions were calculated by ultrasound imaging. Knee extension one repetition maximum (1RM), isometric peak torque (PT), and rate of torque development (RTD) were obtained as measures of muscular strength. Muscular power was determined by knee extension with 60 % of 1RM and countermovement jump (CMJ). The 30-s sit-to-stand test was evaluated as a functional capacity parameter. QEI and all individual EI were correlated to functional capacity and power during CMJ (p ≤ 0.05), but rectus femoris EI was not related to knee extension average power (p > 0.05). There were significant correlations between all EI variables, 1RM, PT, and RTD at 0.2 s (p ≤ 0.05), but only vastus medialis EI and QEI were correlated to RTD at 0.05 s (p ≤ 0.05). The results of the present study suggest that QEI is related to muscular power and functional capacity of older subjects, but the EI of some individual quadriceps portions may underestimate the correlations with muscular performance.

  14. Fatigue affects peak joint torque angle in hamstrings but not in quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Bellin, Giuseppe; Beato, Marco; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Primary aim of this study was to investigate peak joint torque angle (i.e. the angle of peak torque) changes recorded during an isokinetic test before and after a fatiguing soccer match simulation. Secondarily we want to investigate functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratio changes due to fatigue. Before and after a standardised soccer match simulation, twenty-two healthy male amateur soccer players performed maximal isokinetic strength tests both for hamstrings and for quadriceps muscles at 1.05 rad · s(‒1), 3.14 rad · s(‒1) and 5.24 rad · s(‒1). Peak joint torque angle, peak torque and both functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratios were examined. Both dominant and non-dominant limbs were tested. Peak joint torque angle significantly increased only in knee flexors. Both eccentric and concentric contractions resulted in such increment, which occurred in both limbs. No changes were found in quadriceps peak joint torque angle. Participants experienced a significant decrease in torque both in hamstrings and in quadriceps. Functional Hecc:Qconc ratio was lower only in dominant limb at higher velocities, while Hconc:Qconc did not change. This study showed after specific fatiguing task changes in hamstrings only torque/angle relationship. Hamstrings injury risk could depend on altered torque when knee is close to extension, coupled with a greater peak torque decrement compared to quadriceps. These results suggest the use eccentric based training to prevent hamstrings shift towards shorter length.

  15. Quadriceps neural alterations in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed patients: A 6-month longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lepley, A S; Gribble, P A; Thomas, A C; Tevald, M A; Sohn, D H; Pietrosimone, B G

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate differences in quadriceps corticospinal excitability, spinal-reflexive excitability, strength, and voluntary activation before, 2 weeks post and 6 months post-anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLr). This longitudinal, case-control investigation examined 20 patients scheduled for ACLr (11 females, 9 males; age: 20.9 ± 4.4 years; height:172.4 ± 7.5 cm; weight:76.2 ± 11.8 kg) and 20 healthy controls (11 females, 9 males; age:21.7 ± 3.7 years; height: 173.7 ± 9.9 cm; weight: 76.1 ± 19.7 kg). Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC), central activation ratio (CAR), normalized Hoffmann spinal reflexes, active motor threshold (AMT), and normalized motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes at 120% of AMT were measured in the quadriceps muscle at the specific time points. ACLr patients demonstrated bilateral reductions in spinal-reflexive excitability compared with controls before surgery (P = 0.02) and 2 weeks post-surgery (P ≤ 0.001). ACLr patients demonstrated higher AMT at 6 months post-surgery (P ≤ 0.001) in both limbs. No MEP differences were detected. Quadriceps MVIC and CAR were lower in both limbs of the ACLr group before surgery and 6 months post-surgery (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. Diminished excitability of spinal-reflexive and corticospinal pathways are present at different times following ACLr and occur in combination with clinical deficits in quadriceps strength and activation. Early rehabilitation strategies targeting spinal-reflexive excitability may help improve postoperative outcomes, while later-stage rehabilitation may benefit from therapeutic techniques aimed at improving corticospinal excitability.

  16. Prevention of quadriceps wasting after immobilization: an evaluation of the effect of electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, I; Arvidsson, H; Eriksson, E; Jansson, E

    1986-11-01

    Eighteen male and 20 female patients who underwent reconstruction of their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with a flap from the patellar tendon were randomly assigned into either closed cast, isometric muscle training and electric stimulation (ES group), or closed cast and isometric training alone (control group). The degree of quadriceps wasting was determined from computerized tomographic scans (CT) before and 6 weeks after surgery. Electrical stimulation was given with a battery operated stimulator that produced a rectangular asymmetric balanced biphasic pulse shape. The pulse rate was 40 Hz and the pulse width 300 microseconds. Patients received 30 min of stimulation three times daily during 5.5 weeks. Female control patients showed a larger decrease in quadriceps area on CT than male control patients (P less than .001). No significant difference was found between male electrically stimulated patients and control patients. In female patients, there was on the contrary, a highly significant difference in favor of electrical stimulation (P less than .001) When the different parts of the quadriceps were studied, a significantly lower degree of atrophy of the vastus medialis was found after electrical stimulation. Vastus lateralis did not show any difference. Measurements of CT attenuation, pre- and post-operatively, showed a decrease in attenuation of 17% for the vastus medialis and lateralis of the operated leg after immobilization, indicating an increase in fat content. In the rectus femoris, however, there was an increase in attenuation of 14.6%. Percutaneous muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained before, one week after, and 6 weeks after surgery revealed that the cross-sectional area of the individual muscle fibers decreased less in the electrically stimulated than in controls, but the difference was not significant. There were no differences between the two groups in the activity of an oxidative enzyme, citrate synthase, or a glycolytic enzyme

  17. Evaluation of Electromyographic Biofeedback for the Quadriceps Femoris: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wasielewski, Noah J.; Parker, Tonya M.; Kotsko, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To critically review evidence for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback (EMGB) of the quadriceps femoris muscle in treating various knee conditions. Data Sources: Databases used to locate randomized controlled trials included PubMed (1980–2010), Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, 1995–2007), Web of Science (1986–2010), SPORTDiscus (1990–2007), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Key words were knee and biofeedback. Study Selection: The criteria for selection were clinical randomized controlled trials in which EMGB of the quadriceps femoris was used for various knee conditions of musculoskeletal origin. Trials were excluded because of research designs other than randomized controlled trials, articles published in a non-English language, inclusion of healthy research participants, inability to identify EMGB as the source of clinical improvement, and lack of pain, functional outcome, or quadriceps torque as outcome measures. Data Extraction: Twenty specific data points were abstracted from each clinical trial under the broad categories of attributes of the patient and injury, treatment variables for the EMGB group, treatment variables for the control group, and attributes of the research design. Data Synthesis: Eight trials yielded a total of 319 participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome (n = 86), anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (n = 52), arthroscopic surgery (n = 91), or osteoarthritis (n = 90). The average methodologic score of the included studies was 4.6/10 based on PEDro criteria. Pooled analyses demonstrated heterogeneity of the included studies, rendering the interpretation of the pooled data inappropriate. The EMGB appeared to benefit short-term postsurgical pain or quadriceps strength in 3 of 4 postsurgical investigations but was ineffective for chronic knee conditions such as patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis in all 4 studies. Because the findings are based on limited

  18. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability. PMID:26504270

  19. Effects of 4 weeks preoperative exercise on knee extensor strength after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Kyung; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Won Hah

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] After an anterior cruciate ligament injury and subsequent reconstruction, quadriceps muscle weakness and disruption of proprioceptive function are common. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 4 weeks preoperative exercise intervention on knee strength power and function post-surgery. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty male patients (27.8±5.7 age), scheduled for reconstruction surgery, were randomly assigned to two groups, the preoperative exercise group (n=40) and a no preoperative exercise group (n=40). The preoperative exercise group participated in a 4-week preoperative and 12-week post-operative programs, while the no preoperative exercise group participated only in the 12-week postoperative exercise program. Isokinetic measured of quadriceps strength were obtained at 4 weeks before and 3 months after surgery. [Results] The knee extensor strength deficits measured at 60°/s and 180°/s was significantly lower in the preoperative exercise group compared with the no preoperative exercise group. At 3 months after surgery, the extensor strength deficit was 28.5±9.0% at 60°/sec and 23.3±9.0% at 180°/sec in the preoperative exercise group, whereas the no preoperative exercise group showed extensor strength deficits of 36.5±10.7% and 27.9±12.6% at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, respectively. The preoperative exercise group demonstrated significant improvement the single-leg hop distance. [Conclusion] Four week preoperative exercise may produce many positive effects post reconstruction surgery, including faster recovery of knee extensor strength and function, as measured by single-leg hop ability.

  20. Absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response: An underrecognized neurological sign.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    As opposed to finger flexion response upon tapping the styloid process with absent brachioradialis reflex (inverted brachioradialis reflex), toe flexion response upon patellar percussion with absent quadriceps reflex is a quite underrecognized neurological sign, and has been reported only once in the literature. Similar to the inverted brachioradialis reflex, this sign can also be useful for neurological localization. We hereby report a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of an anterior epidural mass compressing the cauda equina at L2-L4, without evidence of myelopathy. Upon examination, the patient had bilateral absent quadriceps reflexes with a right toe flexor response when the right patella was percussed. An absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response is proposed as a lower extremity equivalent of the inverted brachioradialis reflex, likely localizing to L3-L4 levels. Spindle hypersensitivity due to lack of reciprocal inhibition from antagonist muscles is hypothesized as a possible underlying mechanism. Further observations should help clarify the most common underlying etiology (radicular vs. radiculomyelopathy). Neurologists should be able to recognize this sign, as it can be helpful for neurological localization. PMID:27458829

  1. [Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture and coexistent femoral neck fracture in a patient with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Kazimoğlu, Cemal; Yağdi, Serhan; Karapinar, Hasan; Sener, Muhittin

    2007-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a very rare injury mostly seen in patients with chronic renal failure or other systemic chronic diseases. Metabolic acidosis in chronic renal failure predisposes these patients to tendon degeneration. A 37-year-old woman who received hemodialysis for chronic renal failure for two years presented with complaints of severe pain in the left hip and inability to walk. She had a history of two consecutive falls in the past two months. On physical examination, there were joint spaces in both suprapatellar areas, active extension of both knees was inhibited, and movements of the left hip were quite painful. Knee ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture from patellar attachment. At surgery, full-thickness quadriceps tendon tears were repaired with Tycron transpatellar suture anchors. Internal fixation was not considered for hip fracture due to the presence of chronic renal failure, so hemiarthroplasty with bipolar endoprosthesis was performed in the same session for femoral neck fracture. Six months after the operation, the patient was able to walk without support and almost regained her normal knee functions.

  2. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up. PMID:27274474

  3. Isometric quadriceps strength determines sailing performance and neuromuscular fatigue during an upwind sailing emulation.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Jan G; Callewaert, Margot; Celie, Bert; De Clercq, Dirk; Boone, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the physiological responses to upwind sailing on a laser emulation ergometer and analyses the components of the physical profile that determine the physiological responses related to sailing level. Ten male high-level laser sailors performed an upwind sailing test, incremental cycling test and quadriceps strength test. During the upwind sailing test, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and lactate concentration were measured, combined with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electromyography (EMG) registration of the M. Vastus lateralis. Repeated measures ANOVA showed for the cardio-respiratory, metabolic and muscles responses (mean power frequency [MPF], root mean square [RMS], deoxy[Hb+Mb]) during the upwind sailing test an initial significant increase followed by a stabilisation, despite a constant increase in RPE. Stepwise regression analysis showed that better sailing level was for 46.5% predicted by lower MPF decrease. Lower MPF decrease was for 57.8% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. In conclusion, this study indicates that higher sailing level was mainly determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during the upwind sailing test (as indicated by MPF decrease). Additionally, the level of neuromuscular fatigue was mainly determined by higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength stressing the importance of resistance training in the planning of training.

  4. Isometric quadriceps strength determines sailing performance and neuromuscular fatigue during an upwind sailing emulation.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Jan G; Callewaert, Margot; Celie, Bert; De Clercq, Dirk; Boone, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the physiological responses to upwind sailing on a laser emulation ergometer and analyses the components of the physical profile that determine the physiological responses related to sailing level. Ten male high-level laser sailors performed an upwind sailing test, incremental cycling test and quadriceps strength test. During the upwind sailing test, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and lactate concentration were measured, combined with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electromyography (EMG) registration of the M. Vastus lateralis. Repeated measures ANOVA showed for the cardio-respiratory, metabolic and muscles responses (mean power frequency [MPF], root mean square [RMS], deoxy[Hb+Mb]) during the upwind sailing test an initial significant increase followed by a stabilisation, despite a constant increase in RPE. Stepwise regression analysis showed that better sailing level was for 46.5% predicted by lower MPF decrease. Lower MPF decrease was for 57.8% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. In conclusion, this study indicates that higher sailing level was mainly determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during the upwind sailing test (as indicated by MPF decrease). Additionally, the level of neuromuscular fatigue was mainly determined by higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength stressing the importance of resistance training in the planning of training. PMID:26323461

  5. Mechanism of quadriceps femoris muscle weakness in patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Fukubayashi, T; Takeshita, D

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle in patients who with less than 6 month-history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. For this purpose, we compared the response to vibration stimulation in 10 patients with ACL repair and 12 normal healthy subjects, by measuring the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) and integrated electromyograms (I-EMG) of the quadriceps muscles. Pre-vibration data were obtained from each subject by measuring the MVC of the knee extension and the I-EMG from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles. Vibration stimulation was applied to the infrapatellar tendons, followed immediately by repeating the MVC and I-EMG recording. Prolonged vibration resulted in a significant decrease of both MVC and I-EMG in the control group. In contrast, the same stimulus failed to elicit changes in ACL-repair group. Our results suggest the presence of abnormal gamma loop function in the quadriceps femoris muscle of patients with ACL repair, which may explain the muscle weakness often described in such patients.

  6. A Novel Noninvasive Method for Measuring Fatigability of the Quadriceps Muscle in Noncooperating Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Jesper B.; Rose, Martin H.; Møller, Kirsten; Perner, Anders; Jensen, Bente R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Critical illness is associated with muscle weakness leading to long-term functional limitations. Objectives. To assess the reliability of a novel method for evaluating fatigability of the quadriceps muscle in noncooperating healthy subjects. Methods. On two occasions, separated by seven days, nonvoluntary isometric contractions (twitch and tetanic) of the quadriceps femoris muscle evoked by transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation were recorded in twelve healthy adults. For tetanic contractions, the Fatigue Index (ratio of peak torque values) and the slope of the regression line of peak torque values were primary outcome measures. For twitch contractions, maximum peak torque and rise time were calculated. Relative (intraclass correlation, ICC3.1) and absolute (standard error of measurement, SEM) reliability were assessed and minimum detectable change was calculated using a 95% confidence interval (MDC95%). Results. The Fatigue Index (ICC3.1, 0.84; MDC95%, 0.12) and the slope of the regression line (ICC3.1, 0.99; MDC95%, 0.03) showed substantial relative and absolute reliability during the first 15 and 30 contractions, respectively. Conclusion. This method for assessing fatigability of the quadriceps muscle produces reliable results in healthy subjects and may provide valuable data on quantitative changes in muscle working capacity and treatment effects in patients who are incapable of producing voluntary muscle contractions. PMID:26266252

  7. Absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response: An underrecognized neurological sign.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    As opposed to finger flexion response upon tapping the styloid process with absent brachioradialis reflex (inverted brachioradialis reflex), toe flexion response upon patellar percussion with absent quadriceps reflex is a quite underrecognized neurological sign, and has been reported only once in the literature. Similar to the inverted brachioradialis reflex, this sign can also be useful for neurological localization. We hereby report a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of an anterior epidural mass compressing the cauda equina at L2-L4, without evidence of myelopathy. Upon examination, the patient had bilateral absent quadriceps reflexes with a right toe flexor response when the right patella was percussed. An absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response is proposed as a lower extremity equivalent of the inverted brachioradialis reflex, likely localizing to L3-L4 levels. Spindle hypersensitivity due to lack of reciprocal inhibition from antagonist muscles is hypothesized as a possible underlying mechanism. Further observations should help clarify the most common underlying etiology (radicular vs. radiculomyelopathy). Neurologists should be able to recognize this sign, as it can be helpful for neurological localization.

  8. Ultrasound characteristics of the patellar and quadriceps tendons among young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Visnes, H; Tegnander, A; Bahr, R

    2015-04-01

    Tendons adapt in response to sports-specific loading, but sometimes develop tendinopathy. If the presence of ultrasound changes like hypoechoic areas and neovascularization in asymptomatic tendons precede (and predict) future tendon problems is unknown. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between the development of ultrasound changes in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and symptoms of jumper's knee, as well to examine the medium-term effects of intensive training on tendon thickness among adolescent athletes. Elite junior volleyball athletes were followed with semi-annual ultrasound and clinical examinations (average follow-up: 1.7 years). Of the 141 asymptomatic athletes included, 22 athletes (35 patellar tendons) developed jumper's knee. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a baseline finding of a hypoechoic tendon area (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.2) increased the risk of developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Patellar tendon thickness among healthy athletes did not change (Wilk's lambda, P = 0.07) while quadriceps tendon thickness increased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, ultrasound changes at baseline were risk factors for developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Also, among healthy athletes, we observed a 7-11% increase in quadriceps tendon thickness, while there was no increase in patellar tendon thickness.

  9. Effects of loaded voluntary wheel exercise on performance and muscle hypertrophy in young and old male C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Soffe, Z; Radley-Crabb, H G; McMahon, C; Grounds, M D; Shavlakadze, T

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the capacity of young and old male C57Bl/6J mice to exercise with increasing resistance over 10 weeks, and its impact on muscle mass. Young mice (aged 15-25 weeks) were subjected to low (LR) and high (HR) resistance exercise, whereas only LR was used for old mice (107-117 weeks). Weekly patterns of voluntary wheel activity, food consumption and body weights were measured. Running patterns changed over time and with age, with two peaks of activity detected for young, but only one for old mice: speed and distance run was also less for old mice. The mass for six limb muscles was measured at the end of the experiment. The most pronounced increase in mass in response to exercise was for the soleus in young and old mice, and also quadriceps and gastrocnemius in young mice. Soleus and quadriceps muscles were analyzed histologically for myofiber number and size. A striking feature was the many small myofibers in response to exercise in young (but not old) soleus, whereas these were not present after exercise in young or old quadriceps. Overall, there was a striking difference in response to exercise between muscles and this was influenced by age.

  10. Unstable Surface Improves Quadriceps:Hamstring Co-contraction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Rebecca; Silder, Amy; Malone, Maria; Braun, Hillary Jane; Dragoo, Jason Logan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increasing quadriceps:hamstring muscular co-contraction at the knee may reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this investigation was to examine muscle activation in the quadriceps and hamstrings and peak kinematics of the knee, hip, and trunk when performing a single-leg drop (SLD) on to a Bosu ball (unstable surface) compared with on to the floor (stable surface). Hypotheses: (1) The SLD on an unstable surface would lower the quadriceps to hamstrings electromyographic (EMG) activation ratio (Q:H EMG activation ratio) compared with being performed on the floor. (2) Lower Q:H EMG activation ratio would be caused by a relative increase in hamstring activation, with no significant change in quadriceps activation. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Thirty-nine Division I National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) female athletes performed 3 SLDs per leg onto a Bosu ball and onto the floor. Muscle activity of the vastus lateralis and lateral hamstrings were used to estimate peak quadriceps and hamstring activation, along with the Q:H EMG activation ratio. Kinematic measures at the knee, hip, and trunk were also estimated. Differences between landings were assessed using a 2-level analysis of variance (limb and surface). Results: The maximum Q:H EMG activation ratio was significantly reduced when athletes performed an SLD onto the Bosu ball (20%, P < 0.001) compared with the floor. Peak hamstring activity was higher when athletes landed on a Bosu ball (18% higher, P = 0.029) compared with when they landed on the floor. Conclusion: Compared with landing on the floor (a stable surface), landing on a Bosu ball (unstable surface) changed the athlete’s co-contraction at the knee and increased hamstring activity. However, landing on a Bosu ball also decreased the athlete’s knee flexion, which was an undesired effect. Clinical Relevance: These findings highlight the potential utility of unstable surfaces

  11. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... of power to help them cope with low self-esteem. Although compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany ... a downward spiral of negative thinking and low self-esteem. continue Why Is Exercising Too Much a Bad ...

  12. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  13. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (p<0.01), but not at m. quadriceps. FM patients had lower PPTs at all sites compared to healthy controls (p<0.001) and myalgia patients (p<0.001). During contraction of m. infraspinatus PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.003), but not in myalgia or FM patients. During contraction of m. quadriceps PPTs increased compared to baseline at the end of contraction in healthy controls (all sites: p<0.001) and myalgia patients (all sites: p<0.02), but not in FM patients. In conclusion, we found a normal activation of endogenous pain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions.

  14. Regional Differences of Metabolic Response During Dynamic Incremental Exercise by (31)P-CSI.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Kime, Ryotaro; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the differences in muscle metabolic response of the quadriceps during incremental dynamic knee exercise using regional (31)Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging ((31)P-CSI). Sixteen healthy men participated in this study (age 28 ± 5 years, height 171.4 ± 3.9 cm, weight 67.1 ± 9.8 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed isometric unilateral knee extension exercise to detect their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in prone position. Then they performed dynamic unilateral knee extension exercise in the magnet at 10, 20, 30 and 40 % of their MVC with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps. The subjects pulled down a rope with the adjusted weight attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 380 s. Intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) peak relative to phosphocreatine (PCr). The quadriceps were divided into three regions, (1) medial, (2) anterior, (3) lateral, and in comparison, there was no significant difference in Pi/PCr nor in pHi between regions, except Pi/PCr of the medial region was significantly higher than the anterior region at maximum intensity (p < 0.05). These results suggest that regional muscle metabolic response is similar in the quadriceps except at maximum intensity. PMID:27526153

  15. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p < 0.05) when quadriceps pretension was applied. These findings indicate that quadriceps pretension could play a role in the stability of a CrCL deficient stifle and should then be considered in rehabilitation programs and conservative treatment of CrCL rupture in dogs.

  16. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p < 0.05) when quadriceps pretension was applied. These findings indicate that quadriceps pretension could play a role in the stability of a CrCL deficient stifle and should then be considered in rehabilitation programs and conservative treatment of CrCL rupture in dogs. PMID:25487559

  17. Bilateral simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with psoriasis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is not common in the absence of systemic disease. Patients with chronic systemic diseases such as uremia and systemic lupus erythematosus and patients who are being treated with systemic steroids or local steroid injections are more prone to tendon rupture. The tendon can rupture spontaneously or as a result of trauma. We report an unusual case of simultaneous bilateral traumatic quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient with psoriasis who was being treated with topical steroid preparations. Case presentation A 57-year-old Caucasian man with a known history of psoriasis, for which he was being treated with topical steroid preparations, presented to our hospital with clinical signs of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture after he fell while walking down stairs. The diagnosis was confirmed by bilateral ultrasound scans of the thighs. The patient underwent surgery to repair both quadriceps tendons. Post-operatively, the patient was immobilized first in bilateral cylinder casts for six weeks, then in knee braces for the next four weeks. His knees were actively mobilized during physiotherapy. Conclusion Bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare occurrence in patients with psoriasis who are being treated with topical steroids. PMID:21801390

  18. Exercise addiction.

    PubMed

    Landolfi, Emilio

    2013-02-01

    This article examines the nature of exercise addiction. It presents a broad, congruent and discerning narrative literature review with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the condition 'exercise addiction', including symptoms and options for treatment. In addition, guidelines are provided with respect to 'healthy' levels of exercise. Criteria used for determining the eligibility of studies evaluated in the review included the provision of relevant information in studies identified using pertinent search terms. The review highlights some of the key distinctions between healthy levels of exercise and exercise addiction. The findings suggest that an individual who is addicted to exercise will continue exercising regardless of physical injury, personal inconvenience or disruption to other areas of life including marital strain, interference with work and lack of time for other activities. 'Addicted' exercisers are more likely to exercise for intrinsic rewards and experience disturbing deprivation sensations when unable to exercise. In contrast, 'committed' exercisers engage in physical activity for extrinsic rewards and do not suffer severe withdrawal symptoms when they cannot exercise. Exercisers must acquire a sense of life-balance while embracing an attitude conducive to sustainable long-term physical, psychological and social health outcomes. Implementation of recommendations by the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology, which states that all apparently healthy adults between 18 and 64 years of age should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate (5 or 6 on a scale of 0-10) to vigorous (7 or 8 on a scale of 0-10) intensity aerobic physical activity per week in bouts of 10 minutes or more, also expressed as 30 minutes per day distributed over 5 days per week, would be a good start.

  19. Age-related changes in neuromuscular function of the quadriceps muscle in physically active adults.

    PubMed

    Mau-Moeller, Anett; Behrens, Martin; Lindner, Tobias; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2013-06-01

    Substantial evidence exists for the age-related decline in maximal strength and strength development. Despite the importance of knee extensor strength for physical function and mobility in the elderly, studies focusing on the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms of the quadriceps muscle weakness are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the contributions of age-related neural and muscular changes in the quadriceps muscle to decreases in isometric maximal voluntary torque (iMVT) and explosive voluntary strength. The interpolated twitch technique and normalized surface electromyography (EMG) signal during iMVT were analyzed to assess changes in neural drive to the muscles of 15 young and 15 elderly volunteers. The maximal rate of torque development as well as rate of torque development, impulse and neuromuscular activation in the early phase of contraction were determined. Spinal excitability was estimated using the H reflex technique. Changes at the muscle level were evaluated by analyzing the contractile properties and lean mass. The age-related decrease in iMVT was accompanied by a decline in voluntary activation and normalized surface EMG amplitude. Mechanical parameters of explosive voluntary strength were reduced while the corresponding muscle activation remained primarily unchanged. The spinal excitability of the vastus medialis was not different while M wave latency was longer. Contractile properties and lean mass were reduced. In conclusion, the age-related decline in iMVT of the quadriceps muscle might be due to a reduced neural drive and changes in skeletal muscle properties. The decrease in explosive voluntary strength seemed to be more affected by muscular than by neural changes. PMID:23453325

  20. Rapid hamstring/quadriceps force capacity in male vs. female elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Zebis, Mette K; Andersen, Lars L; Ellingsgaard, Helga; Aagaard, Per

    2011-07-01

    Knee joint injuries are a serious issue in soccer. The ability to protect the knee from injury depends largely on the strength of the hamstring relatively to the quadriceps, that is, a low hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratio is suggested as a risk factor. Although maximal muscle strength (MVC) has often been used to evaluate the H/Q ratio, the ability to rapidly develop force (rate of force development [RFD]) is more relevant in relation to fast dynamic movements. The aim of this study was to introduce and investigate a rapid RFD H/Q strength ratio compared with the traditional MVC H/Q strength ratio in elite soccer players. Twenty-three elite soccer players (11 women, 12 men) performed maximal voluntary static contraction for the hamstring and quadriceps in an isokinetic dynamometer, from which the maximal muscles strength (MVC) and RFD were extracted. Test-retest reliability for the RFD H/Q ratio was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.664-0.933). The initial contraction phase up to 50 milliseconds from the onset of contraction showed a low RFD H/Q ratio compared to the MVC H/Q ratio (p < 0.001). These results suggest a reduced potential for knee joint stabilization during the very initial phase of muscle contraction. Two female players-both with a markedly low RFD H/Q ratio, but a normal MVC H/Q ratio, compared with the group mean-sustained ACL rupture at a later occasion. The high reliability of the new RFD H/Q strength ratio indicates that the method is a relevant tool in standardized clinical evaluation of the knee joint agonist-antagonist relationship.

  1. Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch of maximal voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2007-08-01

    Force enhancement during and following muscle stretch has been observed for electrically and voluntarily activated human muscle. However, especially for voluntary contractions, the latter observation has only been made for adductor pollicis and the ankle joint muscles, but not for large muscles like quadriceps femoris. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of active muscle stretch on force production for maximal voluntary contractions of in vivo human quadriceps femoris (n = 15). Peak torques during and torques at the end of stretch, torques following stretch, and passive torques following muscle deactivation were compared to the isometric torques at corresponding muscle length. In addition, muscle activation of rectus femoris, vastus medialis and vastus lateralis was obtained using surface EMG. Stretches with different amplitudes (15, 25 and 35 degrees at a velocity of 60 degrees s(-1)) were performed on the plateau region and the descending limb of the force-length relation in a random order. Data analysis showed four main results: (1) peak torques did not occur at the end of the stretch, but torques at the end of the stretch exceeded the corresponding isometric torque; (2) there was no significant force enhancement following muscle stretch, but a small significant passive force enhancement persisted for all stretch conditions; (3) forces during and following stretch were independent of stretch amplitude; (4) muscle activation during and following muscle stretch was significantly reduced. In conclusion, although our results showed passive force enhancement, we could not provide direct evidence that there is active force enhancement in voluntarily activated human quadriceps femoris.

  2. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-11-05

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment.

  3. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22791858

  4. Gender-based analysis of hamstring and quadriceps muscle activation during jump landings and cutting.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Petushek, Erich J; Garceau, Luke R; Hsu, Brittni E; Lutsch, Brittney N; Feldmann, Christina R

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated gender differences in the magnitude and timing of hamstring and quadriceps activation during activities that are believed to cause anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Twelve men (age = 21.0 +/- 1.2 years; body mass = 81.61 +/- 13.3 kg; and jump height = 57.61 +/- 10.15 cm) and 12 women (age = 19.91 +/- 0.9 years; body mass = 64.36 +/- 6.14 kg; and jump height = 43.28 +/- 7.5) performed 3 repetitions each of the drop jump (jump) normalized to the subject's vertical jump height, and a sprint and cut at a 45-degree angle (cut). Electromyography (EMG) was used to quantify rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), lateral hamstring (LH), and medial hamstrings (MH) activation, timing, activation ratios, and timing ratios before and after foot contact for the jump and cut and normalized to each subject's hamstring and quadriceps maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Data were analyzed using an analysis of variance with results demonstrating that during the postcontact phase of the cut, men demonstrated greater LH and MH activation than women. In the precontact phase of the jump, men showed earlier activation of the VL and VM, than women. Women produced longer RF and VM muscle bursts during the postcontact phase of the cut. Additionally, men showed a trend toward higher hamstring to quadriceps activation ratio than women for the postcontact phase of the cut. This study provides evidence that men are LH dominant during the postcontact phase of the cut compared with women, whereas women sustain RF activation longer than men during this phase. Men activate quadriceps muscles earlier than women in the precontact phase of the jump. Training interventions may offer the potential for increasing the rate and magnitude of hamstring muscle activation. These outcomes should be evaluated using EMG during movements that are similar to those that cause ACL injuries to determine if gender differences in muscle activation can be

  5. Summer Science Can Strengthen Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Ava F.; Smith, Ruby

    1989-01-01

    Described are 22 activities which can be done by students outside of school. Topics include the seashore, shadows, restaurants, water, amusement parks, factories, museums, camping, weather, animals, photography, plants, food, and exercise. (CW)

  6. Vascular Occlusion and Sequential Compression for Recovery After Resistance Exercise.

    PubMed

    Northey, Joseph M; Rattray, Ben; Argus, Christos K; Etxebarria, Naroa; Driller, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vascular occlusion (OCC) and sequential intermittent pneumatic compression (SIPC) as recovery strategies after fatiguing resistance exercise. Twelve strength-trained male participants (age: 24.0 ± 6.3 years, height: 180.4 ± 9.7 cm, and weight: 84.8 ± 9.6 kg) participated in a randomized cross-over study. Participants performed a fatiguing resistance exercise bout consisting of 10 sets with 10 repetitions of back squats at 70% 1 repetition maximum with 3-minute rest between sets. Outcome measures of perceived recovery status, muscle soreness, concentric peak isokinetic torque of the quadriceps, squat jump (SJ) height, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height were taken before the fatiguing resistance exercise bout and repeated immediately post, 1 hour, and 24 hours later. Immediately after the postexercise measures, participants undertook 1 of the 3 recovery strategies: OCC, SIPC, and a passive control (CON). Concentric peak isokinetic torque of the quadriceps was decreased significantly immediately post and 1 hour after the fatiguing resistance exercise bout compared with baseline values (p ≤ 0.05). Mean SJ and CMJ jump height decreased significantly immediately post and 1 hour compared with baseline measures, but only the SJ was significantly decreased at 24 hours. There were no significant differences between conditions for any of the postexercise measures (p > 0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates that OCC and SIPC are not effective for attenuating muscle performance loss after a fatiguing resistance exercise bout relative to passive recovery.

  7. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  8. Horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation resulting in quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis E; Simoni, Michael K

    2013-07-01

    Intra-articular patellar dislocations are rare. We present a 13-year-old boy who sustained a complete horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation following blunt trauma to the flexed knee. Closed reduction was unsuccessful and open reduction indicated a repairable quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear. He is the youngest patient to sustain a quadriceps rupture and the only patient to sustain a medial patellofemoral ligament tear to date. His flexed knee and the horizontally positioned patella (seen on lateral radiograph) were indicative of a complete rotational injury with extensor mechanism involvement. Open reduction allowed for the repair of both injuries and a favorable outcome.

  9. Simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon and contralateral patellar tendon in a patient with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Muratli, Hasan Hilmi; Celebi, Levent; Hapa, Onur; Biçimoğlu, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture is rare. Mechanical factors and coexisting systemic and local factors are taken into consideration in the pathogenesis of these ruptures. In patients with some chronic systemic diseases, simultaneous rupture can occur spontaneously or with minor traumas. We present a case of simultaneous quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture in a 21-year-old man with chronic renal failure in this report. He was treated surgically by osseotendinous repair with suture anchors and supplemental cerclage wire fixation on both sides. He regained his normal knee joint functions 18 months after the operation.

  10. GNE mutations in an American family with quadriceps-sparing IBM and lack of mutations in s-IBM.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Olavo M; Raju, Raghavan; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-12-10

    Analysis for GNE mutations was performed in an American, non-Iranian Jewish, family with quadriceps-sparing inclusion body myopathy (QS-IBM) and in 11 patients with sporadic IBM (s-IBM). Two novel nonallosteric site missense mutations were found in the QS-IBM kinship. No mutations were identified in s-IBM patients. After 8 years of follow-up and severe disease progression, the quadriceps muscle in the QS-IBM patient remains strong despite subclinical involvement documented with repeat MRI and muscle biopsy.

  11. Interstitial pH, K(+), lactate, and phosphate determined with MSNA during exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLean, D. A.; Imadojemu, V. A.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to use the microdialysis technique to simultaneously measure the interstitial concentrations of several putative stimulators of the exercise pressor reflex during 5 min of intermittent static quadriceps exercise in humans (n = 7). Exercise resulted in approximately a threefold (P < 0.05) increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and 13 +/- 3 beats/min (P < 0.05) and 20 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.05) increases in heart rate and blood pressure, respectively. During recovery, all reflex responses quickly returned to baseline. Interstitial lactate levels were increased (P < 0.05) from rest (1.1 +/- 0.1 mM) to exercise (1. 6 +/- 0.2 mM) and were further increased (P < 0.05) during recovery (2.0 +/- 0.2 mM). Dialysate phosphate concentrations were 0.55 +/- 0. 04, 0.71 +/- 0.05, and 0.48 +/- 0.03 mM during rest, exercise, and recovery, respectively, and were significantly elevated during exercise. At the onset of exercise, dialysate K(+) levels rose rapidly above resting values (4.2 +/- 0.1 meq/l) and continued to increase during the exercise bout. After 5 min of contractions, dialysate K(+) levels had peaked with an increase (P < 0.05) of 0.6 +/- 0.1 meq/l and subsequently decreased during recovery, not being different from rest after 3 min. In contrast, H(+) concentrations rapidly decreased (P < 0.05) from resting levels (69.4 +/- 3.7 nM) during quadriceps exercise and continued to decrease with a mean decline (P < 0.05) of 16.7 +/- 3.8 nM being achieved after 5 min. During recovery, H(+) concentrations rapidly increased and were not significantly different from baseline after 1 min. This study represents the first time that skeletal muscle interstitial pH, K(+), lactate, and phosphate have been measured in conjunction with MSNA, heart rate, and blood pressure during intermittent static quadriceps exercise in humans. These data suggest that interstitial K(+) and phosphate, but not lactate and H(+), may contribute to the stimulation

  12. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  13. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  14. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders.

  15. Gastrocnemius myotendinous flap for patellar or quadriceps tendon repair, or both.

    PubMed

    Rhomberg, M; Schwabegger, A H; Ninkovic, M; Bauer, T; Ninkovic, M

    2000-08-01

    The authors' experience with simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps femoris or patellar tendon or both and soft tissue defect using a musculotendinous unit of the gastrocnemius muscle is presented. Five patients with a partial or complete defect of the quadriceps or patellar tendon or both and additional large soft tissue defects underwent reconstruction applying this technique as a one-stage surgical procedure in different variations. In cases with a partial defect of the tendon or loss of tendon thickness, the thick aponeurosis from the deeper aspect of the gastrocnemius was dissected and transferred as a pedicled tendon flap to reconstruct the tendon defect. In cases with a complete defect of the tendon, the superficial layer of the Achilles tendon together with the deep aponeurotic layer of the gastrocnemius muscle served to reconstruct the tendon. In both procedures the gastrocnemius muscle belly provided soft tissue coverage and was covered with a split thickness skin graft. One patient had a marginal deep necrosis develop that had to be covered with the other gastrocnemius muscle in a second operation. One patient with chronic polyarthritis and infection of his knee prosthesis declined additional reconstruction surgery and had the leg amputated. The average followup was 3.5 years. All patients achieved good results in active extension of the knee with an extension deficit of only 5 degrees to 15 degrees. The range of flexion was at least 90 degrees. The surgical technique described in this report provides functional tendon reconstruction and adequate soft tissue repair simultaneously.

  16. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  17. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders. PMID:16609979

  18. Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon rupture after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo

    2010-05-12

    We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon rupture, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon rupture in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for rupture repair, particularly with concommitant ruptures of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor.

  19. Bilateral quadriceps rupture: results with and without platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanzetti, Riccardo Maria; Vadalà, Antonio; Morelli, Federico; Iorio, Raffaele; Ciompi, Alessandro; Vetrano, Mario; Argento, Giuseppe; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Di Sanzo, Vincenzo; Ferretti, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a 46-year-old man with bilateral atraumatic quadriceps rupture that occurred while he was descending stairs. The patient underwent surgery the day after the accident. In the left knee, quadriceps reinsertion was performed using a conventional technique. In the right knee, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), both in its liquid and semisolid patterns, was added intraoperatively. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluations were performed 1, 6, and 24 months postoperatively. At 6 and 24 months postoperatively, clinical and functional evaluations also were performed. Clinical examination showed no differences between the knees, and functional scores were the same for both knees. Ultrasonographic evaluation showed bilateral persistent tendon thickening and gross echotexture abnormalities, with no side-to-side differences. Magnetic resonance imaging showed signals of vascularized granulation tissue in both knees, which was more evident in the right (PRP) knee at 1 month postoperatively, along with a better signal of scar tissue in the right knee at 6 and 24 months postoperatively. The use of PRP yielded no better clinical or functional results than the lack of its use. However, a more intense and significant reparative healing process occurred where the PRP was used, thus suggesting a more rapid completion of the healing process, although this effect seems to remain only a radiographic finding with no clinical correlation.

  20. [Quadriceps tendon insufficiency and rupture : Treatment options in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Thiele, K; von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Preininger, B; Perka, C

    2016-05-01

    Quadriceps tendon injuries and insufficiencies in total knee arthroplasty are rare, but are followed by a devastating complication that left untreated leads to a complete loss of function of the knee. This review article summarizes the functional anatomy, risk factors, and the prevalence and diagnosis of quadriceps tendon injuries, in addition to the possible management options for partial and complete ruptures. The treatment options are adapted according to the extent of the loss of function (partial, complete) and the duration of the injury (acute vs chronic). Furthermore, the choice of treatment should take into account the quality and availability of primary tissue, the patient's general health, along with their likely functional requirements. Conservative treatment is often justified in partial ruptures with good results. Complete ruptures require surgical intervention and multiple operative techniques are described. Treatment options for acute ruptures include direct primary repair with autogenous or synthetic tissue augmentation. In the case of chronic insufficiency and a lack of soft-tissue surroundings, reconstruction with the aid of a muscle flap or allograft tissue can be considered. All surgical intervention techniques used so far have been fraught with complications and rarely lead to satisfactory results. A new surgical approach to the reconstruction and augmentation of the extensor mechanism consists of the use of a synthetic mesh. The technique is described here in detail.

  1. Sequential rupture of triceps and quadriceps tendons in a dialysis patient using hormone supplements.

    PubMed

    Soo, I; Christiansen, J; Marion, D; Courtney, M; Luyckx, V A

    2011-02-01

    Spontaneous rupture of tendons is rare, and typically occurs in large weight bearing tendons such as the quadriceps, Achilles and patellar tendon, in the context of various chronic diseases including end-stage renal disease. In general, tendon rupture in dialysis patients is associated with hyperparathyroidism, long duration of dialysis, steroid and quinolone use. We present a case of a young man on chronic dialysis who presented with sequential rupture of triceps and quadriceps tendons requiring surgical repair, several months after initiating use of multiple hormone supplements including human growth hormone and androgens. The supplements were obtained over the internet with the aim of improving his kidney function. Although this patient did have hyperparathyroidism, it is likely his PTH elevation was exacerbated by use of human growth hormone, and tendon rupture risk increased by concurrent use of an androgen supplement. This case highlights the fact that dialysis patients do utilize alternative remedies and that there may be unexpected, dialysis-specific complications associated with their use.

  2. Measurement of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Walton, J M; Roberts, N; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To define a method for measurement of the cross sectional area and volume of the quadriceps femoris muscle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with stereology, and to compare the results of measurements obtained by the MRI method with those obtained by the conventional method of static B-mode ultrasound in order to evaluate whether MRI is a reliable alternative to ultrasound. METHODS: A preliminary MRI study was undertaken on a single female volunteer in order to optimise the scanning technique and sampling design for estimating the muscle volume using the Cavalieri method. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the method comparison study. Each volunteer underwent static B-mode ultrasonography, immediately followed by MRI. The cross sectional area of the quadriceps femoris was estimated at the junction of the proximal one third and distal two thirds of the thigh, and seven systematic sections of the thigh were obtained in order to estimate muscle volume by both modalities. RESULTS: Seven sections through the muscle are required to achieve a coefficient of error of 4-5%. There was no significant difference in the cross sectional area estimates or volume estimates when ultrasound and MRI were compared. CONCLUSION: Muscle cross sectional area and volume can be measured without bias by MRI in conjunction with stereological methods and the method is a reliable alternative to static B-mode ultrasound for this purpose. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9132215

  3. A new method of repair for quadriceps tendon ruptures. A case report.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, P; Bertone, C; Rivera, F; Bocchi, L

    2000-09-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury observed predominantly in subjects over 40 years old. Multiple surgical techniques have been employed to repair fresh and neglected ruptures; methods that make use of allograft and augmentation with tissues harvested from around the knee have been reported. We describe a case of surgical repair of a tendon-bone junction rupture in a 64-year-old patient by use of suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone and improve fixation of the soft tissue elements. Clinical diagnosis of rupture was confirmed radiographically and echographically. Surgical repair was performed within 24 hours of injury. Active movement of the knee started after 3 weeks and the patient was permitted to walk without weight-bearing with a knee cage. Three weeks later, he was permitted to walk with full weight-bearing unassisted by crutches; the knee cage was removed 6 weeks after surgery. At his most recent follow-up 24 months postoperative, quadriceps strength was equal to that of the controlateral knee and the patient has returned to sports and daily activities. The surgical method presented here provides a suture of the tendon ends without putting excess stress on the suture line during the period of early knee mobilization. Advantages over other techniques include reduced operative time, easy access to the implantation site, and better resistance of the suture material: the patient is thus able to initiate physical therapy earlier and more aggressively.

  4. The effects of a prolonged running exercise on strength characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lepers, R; Pousson, M L; Maffiuletti, N A; Martin, A; Van Hoecke, J

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine concentric, isometric, and eccentric strength reductions in the quadriceps muscle following a prolonged running exercise. Before and after a 2 h run (28.4+/-1.4 km) peak torque (PT) of the knee extensors at angular velocities of -120, -90, -60, 0, 60, 120, 180, 240 degrees x s(-1) using an isokinetic dynamometer, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) muscles and height of a counter movement jump were recorded in twelve well-trained triathletes. Counter movement jump performances decreased by 10% and PT values were all significantly lower (p < 0.01) at each angular velocity following the run. The torque loss was significantly (p < 0.01) greater under eccentric contractions (from 18 to 21%) than under concentric ones (from 11 to 14%). EMG activity (RMS) was lower in both VL and VM muscles after the 2 h run but no difference existed in RMS losses between concentric and eccentric contractions. The present results demonstrate that 1) a prolonged running exercise more greatly affects eccentric force production in the quadriceps muscle, and 2) this specificity seems to be due to an impairment of the muscular contractile mechanism rather than a modification to the neural input.

  5. A low dose of alcohol does not impact skeletal muscle performance after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2011-04-01

    Moderate, acute alcohol consumption after eccentric exercise has been shown to magnify the muscular weakness that is typically associated with exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). As it is not known whether this effect is dose-dependent, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a low dose of alcohol on EIMD-related losses in muscular performance. Ten healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed either a beverage containing 0.5 g of alcohol per kg bodyweight (as vodka and orange juice) or an isocaloric, isovolumetric non-alcoholic beverage. At least 2 weeks later, they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed the other beverage. Measurement of peak and average peak isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced by the quadriceps was made before and 36 and 60 h post-exercise. Significant decreases in all measures of muscular performance were observed over time under both conditions (all P < 0.05); however, no difference between treatments was evident at any of the measured time points (all P > 0.05). Therefore, consumption of a low dose of alcohol after damaging exercise appears to have no effect on the loss of force associated with strenuous eccentric exercise. PMID:20878178

  6. A low dose of alcohol does not impact skeletal muscle performance after exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2011-04-01

    Moderate, acute alcohol consumption after eccentric exercise has been shown to magnify the muscular weakness that is typically associated with exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). As it is not known whether this effect is dose-dependent, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a low dose of alcohol on EIMD-related losses in muscular performance. Ten healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed either a beverage containing 0.5 g of alcohol per kg bodyweight (as vodka and orange juice) or an isocaloric, isovolumetric non-alcoholic beverage. At least 2 weeks later, they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed the other beverage. Measurement of peak and average peak isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced by the quadriceps was made before and 36 and 60 h post-exercise. Significant decreases in all measures of muscular performance were observed over time under both conditions (all P < 0.05); however, no difference between treatments was evident at any of the measured time points (all P > 0.05). Therefore, consumption of a low dose of alcohol after damaging exercise appears to have no effect on the loss of force associated with strenuous eccentric exercise.

  7. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2<τ /{τy0}≤slant 0.5 and then transitions to a power-law form at even lower stresses τ /{τy0}<0.03 . Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and {τy0} remains as the reference energy and stress scales over the entire range of stresses. The model is applied to literature data on solution strengthening in Cu alloys and captures the experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively. Most importantly, the model accurately captures the transition in strength from the low-temperature to intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  8. The effect of rowing ergometry and resistive exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Krainski, Felix; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Heinicke, Katja; Romain, Nadine; Pacini, Eric L; Snell, Peter G; Wyrick, Phil; Palmer, M Dean; Haller, Ronald G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to microgravity causes functional and structural impairment of skeletal muscle. Current exercise regimens are time-consuming and insufficiently effective; an integrated countermeasure is needed that addresses musculoskeletal along with cardiovascular health. High-intensity, short-duration rowing ergometry and supplemental resistive strength exercise may achieve these goals. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers completed 5 wk of head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR): 18 were randomized to exercise, 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of rowing ergometry 6 days/wk, including interval training, and supplemental strength training 2 days/wk. Measurements before and after HDBR and following reambulation included assessment of strength, skeletal muscle volume (MRI), and muscle metabolism (magnetic resonance spectroscopy); quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained to assess muscle fiber types, capillarization, and oxidative capacity. Sedentary bed rest (BR) led to decreased muscle volume (quadriceps: -9 ± 4%, P < 0.001; plantar flexors: -19 ± 6%, P < 0.001). Exercise (ExBR) reduced atrophy in the quadriceps (-5 ± 4%, interaction P = 0.018) and calf muscle, although to a lesser degree (-14 ± 6%, interaction P = 0.076). Knee extensor and plantar flexor strength was impaired by BR (-14 ± 15%, P = 0.014 and -22 ± 7%, P = 0.001) but preserved by ExBR (-4 ± 13%, P = 0.238 and +13 ± 28%, P = 0.011). Metabolic capacity, as assessed by maximal O2 consumption, (31)P-MRS, and oxidative chain enzyme activity, was impaired in BR but stable or improved in ExBR. Reambulation reversed the negative impact of BR. High-intensity, short-duration rowing and supplemental strength training effectively preserved skeletal muscle function and structure while partially preventing atrophy in key antigravity muscles. Due to its integrated cardiovascular benefits, rowing ergometry could be a primary component of exercise prescriptions for astronauts or patients suffering from severe

  9. The effect of rowing ergometry and resistive exercise on skeletal muscle structure and function during bed rest.

    PubMed

    Krainski, Felix; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Heinicke, Katja; Romain, Nadine; Pacini, Eric L; Snell, Peter G; Wyrick, Phil; Palmer, M Dean; Haller, Ronald G; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-06-15

    Exposure to microgravity causes functional and structural impairment of skeletal muscle. Current exercise regimens are time-consuming and insufficiently effective; an integrated countermeasure is needed that addresses musculoskeletal along with cardiovascular health. High-intensity, short-duration rowing ergometry and supplemental resistive strength exercise may achieve these goals. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers completed 5 wk of head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR): 18 were randomized to exercise, 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of rowing ergometry 6 days/wk, including interval training, and supplemental strength training 2 days/wk. Measurements before and after HDBR and following reambulation included assessment of strength, skeletal muscle volume (MRI), and muscle metabolism (magnetic resonance spectroscopy); quadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained to assess muscle fiber types, capillarization, and oxidative capacity. Sedentary bed rest (BR) led to decreased muscle volume (quadriceps: -9 ± 4%, P < 0.001; plantar flexors: -19 ± 6%, P < 0.001). Exercise (ExBR) reduced atrophy in the quadriceps (-5 ± 4%, interaction P = 0.018) and calf muscle, although to a lesser degree (-14 ± 6%, interaction P = 0.076). Knee extensor and plantar flexor strength was impaired by BR (-14 ± 15%, P = 0.014 and -22 ± 7%, P = 0.001) but preserved by ExBR (-4 ± 13%, P = 0.238 and +13 ± 28%, P = 0.011). Metabolic capacity, as assessed by maximal O2 consumption, (31)P-MRS, and oxidative chain enzyme activity, was impaired in BR but stable or improved in ExBR. Reambulation reversed the negative impact of BR. High-intensity, short-duration rowing and supplemental strength training effectively preserved skeletal muscle function and structure while partially preventing atrophy in key antigravity muscles. Due to its integrated cardiovascular benefits, rowing ergometry could be a primary component of exercise prescriptions for astronauts or patients suffering from severe

  10. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    Age and exercise ... to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry if you have never exercised, ... things you enjoy and stay independent as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also ...

  11. Lack of Correlation between Dynamic Balance and Hamstring-to-Quadriceps Ratio in Patients with Chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Jeong, Hye-Jin; Lee, Seok-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and hamstring-to-quadriceps (HQ) ratio, as well as the relationships of these parameters with dynamic balance, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Materials and Methods We compared 25 patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral ACL tears and 25 age-matched healthy volunteers. The maximal torque of the quadriceps and hamstring and dynamic balance were measured. Results Although the isokinetic maximal peak torques were about 50% lower in the quadriceps (57%, p<0.001) and hamstring (56%, p=0.001) muscles in the chronic ACL tear group than in the control group, their HQ ratios were similar (56%±17% vs. 58%±6%, p=0.591). HQ ratio was significantly correlated with anterior-posterior stability index (r=-0.511, p=0.021) and overall stability index (r=-0.476, p=0.034) in control group, but these correlations were not observed in chronic ACL tear group. Conclusions Thigh muscle strength was about 50% lower in the chronic ACL tear group than in the control group, but the HQ ratio was similar. The dynamic balance of the knee was not influenced by thigh muscle strength but was influenced by HQ ratio in healthy young individuals. However, HQ ratio was not correlated with dynamic knee balance in chronic ACL tear patients. PMID:26060609

  12. Effect of a Periodized Power Training Program on the Functional Performances and Contractile Properties of the Quadriceps in Sprinters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas; Duchateau, Jacques; Stanislovaitiene, Jurate

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effect of a periodized preparation consisting of power endurance training and high-intensity power training on the contractile properties of the quadriceps muscle and functional performances in well trained male sprinters (n = 7). After 4 weeks of high-intensity power training, 60-m sprint running time improved by an…

  13. [Bilateral dysfunction of the quadriceps muscle after unilateral cruciate ligament rupture with concomitant injury central activation deficit].

    PubMed

    Urbach, D; Nebelung, W; Röpke, M; Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the ability to activate the quadriceps femoris muscle voluntarily in patients after severe knee injuries and it's influence on muscle function. 33 male patients after ACL-rupture with concomitant injuries were investigated with a twitch-interpolation-method to determine the maximal voluntary contraction force (MVC) and the ability to activate the quadriceps muscle voluntarily. The results were compared to a previously investigated group of patients after isolated ACL-rupture and to an aged-matched control group. The patients with extensive knee injuries presented a significant higher deficit of voluntary quadriceps muscle activation on the injured (78.8 +/- 2.09%, mean +/- SEM) and equally on the uninjured side (78.9 +/- 1.91%) compared to the patients after isolated ACL-rupture and to controls. A minor MVC-deficit of the patients quadriceps muscle of the uninjured side could be explained by the voluntary activation deficit alone, the major MVC deficit of the injured side by muscle atrophy and a voluntary activation deficit. The activation deficit is probably the underlying reason for persisting muscle wasting and [not readable: see text

  14. Neglected rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with chronic renal failure (case report and review of the literature).

    PubMed

    Hassani, Zouhir Ameziane; Boufettal, Moncef; Mahfoud, Moustapha; Elyaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the quadriceps tendon are infrequent injuries, it is seen primarily in patients with predisposing diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic renal failure. A 32-year-old man had a history of end stage renal disease and received regular hemodialysis treatment for more than 5 years. He was admitted in our service for total functional impotence of the right lower limb with knee pain after a common fall two months ago. The radiogram showed a ''patella baja" with suprapatellar calcifications. The ultrasound and MRI showed an aspect of rupture of the quadriceps tendon in its proximal end with retraction of 3 cm. Quadriceps tendon repair was performed with a lengthening plasty, and the result was satisfactory after a serial rehabilitation program. The diagnosis of quadriceps tendon ruptures needs more attention in patients with predisposing diseases. They should not be unknown because the treatment of neglected lesions is more difficult. We insist on the early surgical repair associated with early rehabilitation that can guarantee recovery of good active extension.

  15. One-incision endoscopic technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2001-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft is an alternative graft choice for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A 2-incision technique with outside-in fixation at the femoral condyle is generally used. In this article, we describe a 1-incision endoscopic technique for PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft. The graft consists of a proximal patellar bone plug and central quadriceps tendon. The bone plug is trapezoidal, 20 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 8 mm thick. The tendon portion is 80 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 6 mm thick, including the full-thickness of the rectus femoris and partial thickness of the vastus intermedius. Three arthroscopic portals, including anteromedial, anterolateral, and posteromedial, are used. All procedures are performed in an endoscopic manner with only 1 incision at the proximal tibia. At the femoral side, the bone plug is fixed by an interference screw. At the tibial side, the tendon portion is fixed by a suture to a screw on the anterior cortex and an interference bioscrew in the posterior tibial tunnel opening. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantages of being self-available, allowing for easier arthroscopic technique, and providing comparable graft size. The 1-incision technique provides a simple reconstruction method for PCL insufficiency without a second incision at the medial femoral condyle.

  16. Comparison of Lower Body Specific Resistance Training on the Hamstring to Quadriceps Strength Ratios in Men and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorgo, Sandor; Edupuganti, Pradeep; Smith, Darla R.; Ortiz, Melchor

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we compared hamstring (H) and quadriceps (Q) strength changes in men and women, as well as changes in conventional and functional H:Q ratios following an identical 12-week resistance training program. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess 14 male and 14 female participants before and after the intervention, and conventional…

  17. Quadriceps Contusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  18. Exercise performance is regulated during repeated sprints to limit the development of peripheral fatigue beyond a critical threshold.

    PubMed

    Hureau, Thomas J; Olivier, Nicolas; Millet, Guillaume Y; Meste, Olivier; Blain, Gregory M

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that exercise performance is adjusted during repeated sprints in order not to surpass a critical threshold of peripheral fatigue. Twelve men randomly performed three experimental sessions on different days, i.e. one single 10 s all-out sprint and two trials of 10 × 10 s all-out sprints with 30 s of passive recovery in between. One trial was performed in the unfatigued state (CTRL) and one following electrically induced quadriceps muscle fatigue (FTNMES). Peripheral fatigue was quantified by comparing pre- with postexercise changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw-pot) evoked by supramaximal magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve. Central fatigue was estimated by comparing pre- with postexercise voluntary activation of quadriceps motor units. The root mean square (RMS) of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis EMG normalized to maximal M-wave amplitude (RMS.Mmax (-1)) was also calculated during sprints. Compared with CTRL condition, pre-existing quadriceps muscle fatigue in FTNMES (ΔQtw-pot = -29 ± 4%) resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in power output (-4.0 ± 0.9%) associated with a reduction in RMS.Mmax (-1). However, ΔQtw-pot postsprints decreased by 51% in both conditions, indicating that the level of peripheral fatigue was identical and independent of the degree of pre-existing fatigue. Our findings show that power output and cycling EMG are adjusted during exercise in order to limit the development of peripheral fatigue beyond a constant threshold. We hypothesize that the contribution of peripheral fatigue to exercise limitation involves a reduction in central motor drive in addition to the impairment in muscular function. PMID:24728680

  19. Signal intensity of MR-images of thigh muscles following acute open- and closed chain kinetic knee extensor exercise - index of muscle use.

    PubMed

    Enocson, A G; Berg, H E; Vargas, R; Jenner, G; Tesch, P A

    2005-07-01

    Exercise-induced shifts in signal intensity (SI) of magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined to assess indirectly muscle use in closed- and open-chain knee extensor exercises. Eight men performed five sets of 8-12 repetitions in the leg press (LP) and the seated knee extension (KE) exercises at 50, 75 and 100%, respectively of the 5 x 10 repetition maximum (RM) load. Prior to exercise and after each load setting, images of the thigh were obtained. The increase in SI (Delta SI) of the quadriceps at 100% load was greater (P < 0.05) after KE (32.1 +/- 9.0%) than after LP (21.9 +/- 9.2%). Regardless of load, the four individual muscles of the quadriceps showed similar changes in SI after LP. The three vastii muscles showed comparable increases in SI after KE. M. rectus femoris showed greater (P < 0.05) Delta SI than the vastii muscles at 100%. Neither exercise produced increase in SI of mm. semimembranosus, semitendinosus, gracilis or biceps femoris. Mm. adductor magnus and longus showed increased (13.3 +/- 6.5%; P < 0.05) SI after LP, but not after KE, at 100% load. The present data also infer greater involvement of the quadriceps muscle in the open-chain knee extension than in the closed-chain leg press exercise. The results of the current investigation also indicate similar over-all use among the three vastii muscles in LP and KE, but differential m. rectus femoris use between the two exercises. This report extends the merits of the MR imaging technique as an aid to study individual muscle involvement in a particular exercise task. PMID:15918061

  20. Chronic exercise preserves lean muscle mass in masters athletes.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Andrew P; Amati, Francesca; Smiley, Mark A; Goodpaster, Bret; Wright, Vonda

    2011-09-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a loss of muscle mass and strength, resulting in falls, functional decline, and the subjective feeling of weakness. Exercise modulates the morbidities of muscle aging. Most studies, however, have examined muscle-loss changes in sedentary aging adults. This leaves the question of whether the changes that are commonly associated with muscle aging reflect the true physiology of muscle aging or whether they reflect disuse atrophy. This study evaluated whether high levels of chronic exercise prevents the loss of lean muscle mass and strength experienced in sedentary aging adults. A cross-section of 40 high-level recreational athletes ("masters athletes") who were aged 40 to 81 years and trained 4 to 5 times per week underwent tests of health/activity, body composition, quadriceps peak torque (PT), and magnetic resonance imaging of bilateral quadriceps. Mid-thigh muscle area, quadriceps area (QA), subcutaneous adipose tissue, and intramuscular adipose tissue were quantified in magnetic resonance imaging using medical image processing, analysis, and visualization software. One-way analysis of variance was used to examine age group differences. Relationships were evaluated using Spearman correlations. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.31) and lean mass (P = 0.15) did not increase with age and were significantly related to retention of mid-thigh muscle area (P < 0.0001). This occurred despite an increase in total body fat percentage (P = 0.003) with age. Mid-thigh muscle area (P = 0.12), QA (P = 0.17), and quadriceps PT did not decline with age. Specific strength (strength per QA) did not decline significantly with age (P = 0.06). As muscle area increased, PT increased significantly (P = 0.008). There was not a significant relationship between intramuscular adipose tissue (P = 0.71) or lean mass (P = 0.4) and PT. This study contradicts the common observation that muscle mass and strength decline as a function of aging alone. Instead, these

  1. An MR-compatible bicycle ergometer for in-magnet whole-body human exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Jeneson, Jeroen A L; Schmitz, Joep P J; Hilbers, Peter A J; Nicolay, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    An MR-compatible ergometer was developed for in-magnet whole-body human exercise testing. Designed on the basis of conventional mechanically braked bicycle ergometers and constructed from nonferrous materials, the ergometer was implemented on a 1.5-T whole-body MR scanner. A spectrometer interface was constructed using standard scanner hardware, complemented with custom-built parts and software to enable gated data acquisition during exercise. High-quality 31P NMR spectra were reproducibly obtained from the medial head of the quadriceps muscle of the right leg of eight healthy subjects during two-legged high-frequency pedaling (80 revolutions per minute) at three incremental workloads, including maximal. Muscle phosphocreatine content dropped 82%, from 32.2+/-1.0 mM at rest to 5.7+/-1.1 mM at maximal workload (mean+/-standard error; n=8), indicating that the majority of quadriceps motor units were recruited. The cardiovascular load of the exercise was likewise significant, as evidenced by heart rates of 150 (+/-10%) beats per minute, measured immediately afterward. As such, the newly developed MR bicycling exercise equipment offers a powerful new tool for clinical musculoskeletal and cardiovascular MR investigation. The basic design of the ergometer is highly generic and adaptable for application on a wide selection of whole-body MR scanners.

  2. Clinical outcomes after repair of quadriceps tendon rupture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, Vincenzo; Gudipati, Suribabu; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Soucacos, P N; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-11-01

    The existing evidence regarding the management of quadriceps tendon rupture remains obscure. The aim of the current review is to investigate the characteristics, the different techniques employed and to analyse the clinical outcomes following surgical repair of quadriceps tendon rupture. An Internet based search of the English literature of the last 25 years was carried out. Case reports and non-clinical studies were excluded. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. All data regarding mechanism and site of rupture, type of treatment, time elapsed between diagnosis and repair, patients' satisfaction, clinical outcome, return to pre-injury activities, complications and recurrence rates were extracted and analysed. Out of 474 studies identified, 12 met the inclusion criteria. The average of Coleman Methodology Score was 50.46/100. In total 319 patients were analysed with a mean age of 57 years (16-85). The mean time of follow-up was 47.5 months (3 months to 24 years). The most common mechanism of injury was simple fall (61.5%). Spontaneous ruptures were reported in 3.2% of cases. The most common sites of tear were noted between 1cm and 2 cm of the superior pole of the patella and, in the older people, at the osseotendinous junction. The most frequently used repair technique was patella drill holes (50% of patients). Simple sutures were used in mid-substance ruptures. Several reinforcement techniques were employed in case of poor quality or retraction of the torn ends of tendon. The affected limb was immobilised in a cast for a period of 3-10 weeks. Quadriceps muscular atrophy and muscle strength deficit were present in most of the cases. Worst results were noted in delayed repairs. Reported complications included heterotopic ossifications in 6.9% of patients, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in 2.5%, superficial infection in 1.2% and deep infection in 1.1%. It appears that the type of surgical

  3. Quadriceps Muscle Mechanical Simulator for Training of Vastus Medialis Obliquus and Vastus Lateralis Obliquus Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Irmak, Rafet; Irmak, Ahsen; Biçer, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In classical anatomy quadriceps muscle has four heads. Clinical studies have demostrated 6 heads of this muscle. These heads were demostrated seperately not only by their functional properties,but also by innervation and kinesiological properties. In our previous study we have developed and demostrated electrophysiological properties of vastus medialis obliquus by an electronic patient simulator. The purpose of this study is to develop a mechanical simulator which can be used to demostrate mechanical properties of 6 heads of quadriceps muscle and the screw home mechanism. Methods: Quadriceps femoris muscle has 6 heads: rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus medialis obliquus, vastus medialis longus, vastus lateralis obliquus and vastus lateralis longus. The fundamental mechanical properties of each head is seperated by insersio and angle of pull. Main design principle was to demostrate all heads with insersio and angle of pull properties. Second design principle was to demostrate the screw-home mechanism which is the result of difference in articular surfaces of medial and lateral of condyles of femur. Results: Final design of the simulator consists of three planes for demostration of angle of pull and pulling forces (patellar plane, proximal and distal planes) of each heads. On each plane channels were graved as origo and insersio for demostration of angle of pull. Distal plane was movable for demostration of pulling forces in different angels of knee flexion and extention. Also proximal plane was adjustable to demostrate different sitting and standing positions. Srew home mechanism was demostrated by specially designed hingle mechanism. Left and right side hingle mechanisms have different radii as femoral condyles and this difference can cause rotation in terminal extension as in the screw home mechanism. Conclusion: Vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis obliquus and screw-home mechanism have clinical significance. We were not able to find

  4. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Many teens who play sports have higher self-esteem than their less active pals, and exercise can ... may have a distorted body image and low self-esteem. They may see themselves as overweight or out ...

  5. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking, hiking, running, aerobic dance, biking, rowing, swimming, and cross-country ... Brisk walking can burn as many calories as running, but it is less likely to cause injuries ...

  6. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  7. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in snowboarders: a quadriceps-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hywel; Tietjens, Barry; Van Sterkenburg, Maayke; Mehgan, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in snowboarders are rare. However, in expert boarders landing big jumps, ACL injuries are occurring more frequently. We identified 35 snowboarders with an identical injury mechanism. All these patients were landing from a jump. All described a flat landing on a flexed knee with significant knee compression. In 31 of 35 boarders, it was the front knee that was injured. Only two riders felt there was any twisting component to their injury. We postulate that the ACL rupture is due to maximal eccentric quadriceps contraction, as the boarder resists a compressive landing. Internal tibial rotation of the front knee in the snowboarding stance results in preloading of the ACL predisposing to injury.

  8. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  9. Estimation of critical torque using intermittent isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the quadriceps in humans.

    PubMed

    Burnley, Mark

    2009-03-01

    To determine whether the asymptote of the torque-duration relationship (critical torque) could be estimated from the torque measured at the end of a series of maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the quadriceps, eight healthy men performed eight laboratory tests. Following familiarization, subjects performed two tests in which they were required to perform 60 isometric MVCs over a period of 5 min (3 s contraction, 2 s rest), and five tests involving intermittent isometric contractions at approximately 35-60% MVC, each performed to task failure. Critical torque was determined using linear regression of the torque impulse and contraction time during the submaximal tests, and the end-test torque during the MVCs was calculated from the mean of the last six contractions of the test. During the MVCs voluntary torque declined from 263.9 +/- 44.6 to 77.8 +/- 17.8 N x m. The end-test torque was not different from the critical torque (77.9 +/- 15.9 N x m; 95% paired-sample confidence interval, -6.5 to 6.2 N x m). The root mean squared error of the estimation of critical torque from the end-test torque was 7.1 N x m. Twitch interpolation showed that voluntary activation declined from 90.9 +/- 6.5% to 66.9 +/- 13.1% (P < 0.001), and the potentiated doublet response declined from 97.7 +/- 23.0 to 46.9 +/- 6.7 N.m (P < 0.001) during the MVCs, indicating the development of both central and peripheral fatigue. These data indicate that fatigue during 5 min of intermittent isometric MVCs of the quadriceps leads to an end-test torque that closely approximates the critical torque.

  10. Does quadriceps neuromuscular activation capability explain walking speed in older men and women?

    PubMed

    Clark, David J; Reid, Kieran F; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M; Ring, Sarah A; Wu, Samuel S; Fielding, Roger A

    2014-07-01

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that the capability to produce rapid neuromuscular activation during maximal effort leg muscle contractions will be shown to be an independent predictor of mobility function in older men and women after accounting for muscle size and adiposity, body composition and age. Twenty six older men and eighteen older women (aged 70-85years) participated in this study. Mobility function was assessed by the 400-m walk test. Neuromuscular activation of the quadriceps muscle group was assessed by surface electromyography ("rate of EMG rise"). Thigh muscle cross sectional area and adiposity were assessed by computed tomography. In males, univariate regression analysis revealed strong associations between walking speed and a number of predictors including age (p<0.01), muscle area (p<0.01), intermuscular adipose tissue area (p<0.01), and rate of EMG rise (p<0.001). Subsequent multiple regression analysis with all variables accounted for 72% of the variability in walking speed (p<.0001), with age and rate of EMG rise as the dominant variables in the model. In females, univariate analysis showed a significant association only between walking speed and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (p<0.05). Multiple regression analysis accounted for only 44% of the variability in walking speed, and was not statistically significant (p=0.18). The present findings indicate that the capability to rapidly activate the quadriceps muscle group is an important factor accounting for inter-individual variability of walking speed among older men, but not among older women. This research is important for informing the design of assessments and interventions that seek to detect and prevent impairments that contribute to age-related mobility

  11. Meta-analysis of the effect of strengthening interventions in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the evidence that strengthening interventions can improve muscle strength and activity in individuals with cerebral palsy. The search focused on studies that employed strength training for children with cerebral palsy for which six electronic databases were used to extract literature published from 2001 to 2012. The key terms used in these searches were combined strength training, strengthening, weight training, weight lifting, resistance, and cerebral palsy. The quality of each study was assessed using the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale. Thirteen randomized controlled trial studies were selected and divided into categories according to program type, mode, and outcome measures. The overall effect sizes of each study and types of strengthening were large. Strengthening exercise improved muscle strength to a greater degree, when practiced 3 times per week in 40-50 min sessions than in other categories of session length, and greater improvement was observed in younger children than in older. The effect size of the activities and variables related to gait, except for gait endurance, were medium to large. The effect size of individual muscles was large, but the effect sizes for ankle plantar flexor, hip abductor/adductor, and extensor were insignificant. Strengthening interventions are useful for increasing muscle strength in individuals with cerebral palsy, specifically in youth and children, and optimal exercise consisted of 40- to 50-min sessions performed 3 times per week. Although strengthening interventions may improve activities, including gait, more studies that are rigorous are needed to determine the contributions to gross motor function.

  12. Meta-analysis of the effect of strengthening interventions in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the evidence that strengthening interventions can improve muscle strength and activity in individuals with cerebral palsy. The search focused on studies that employed strength training for children with cerebral palsy for which six electronic databases were used to extract literature published from 2001 to 2012. The key terms used in these searches were combined strength training, strengthening, weight training, weight lifting, resistance, and cerebral palsy. The quality of each study was assessed using the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale. Thirteen randomized controlled trial studies were selected and divided into categories according to program type, mode, and outcome measures. The overall effect sizes of each study and types of strengthening were large. Strengthening exercise improved muscle strength to a greater degree, when practiced 3 times per week in 40-50 min sessions than in other categories of session length, and greater improvement was observed in younger children than in older. The effect size of the activities and variables related to gait, except for gait endurance, were medium to large. The effect size of individual muscles was large, but the effect sizes for ankle plantar flexor, hip abductor/adductor, and extensor were insignificant. Strengthening interventions are useful for increasing muscle strength in individuals with cerebral palsy, specifically in youth and children, and optimal exercise consisted of 40- to 50-min sessions performed 3 times per week. Although strengthening interventions may improve activities, including gait, more studies that are rigorous are needed to determine the contributions to gross motor function. PMID:24291625

  13. Differences in Neuromuscular Control and Quadriceps Morphology Between Potential Copers and Noncopers Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Toran D.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cross-sectional study. Objectives To compare knee muscle morphology and voluntary neuromuscular control in individuals who sustained an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and were identified as being capable of avoiding surgery (potential copers) and those who were recommended for surgery (noncopers), within 6 months of injury. Background Quadriceps atrophy and poor neuromuscular control have been found in noncopers. However, the reasons why some noncopers may be able to avoid surgery remain elusive. Methods Twenty participants (10 ACL-deficient noncopers and 10 ACL-deficient potential copers) were included in this study. Axial spin-echo, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data of the lower extremities were captured. The volume and maximum cross-sectional area (CSA) of each muscle of the quadriceps and hamstrings were calculated following digital reconstruction. In addition, voluntary neuromuscular control was evaluated using an established target-matching task that required participants to produce static isometric loads across the knee joint. Electromyography was acquired from 5 muscles as participants performed the target-matching task. Circular statistics were used to calculate a specificity index to describe how well focused each muscle was activated toward its primary direction of muscle action. The ACL-deficient limb was then compared to the uninvolved limb of the noncopers and potential copers. Results The vasti (vastus medialis and vastus intermedius) of the involved limb of the noncopers were significantly smaller (P<.031) in comparison to those of their uninvolved limb. The potential copers' vastus lateralis maximum CSA (P = .047), total quadriceps muscle volume (P = .020) and maximum CSA (P = .015), and quadriceps-hamstring ratio volume (P = .021) and maximum CSA (P = .007) demonstrated quadriceps atrophy. However, only the ACL-deficient limb of the older (mean ± SD age, 27.4 ± 11.4 versus 19.9 ± 3.3 years; P = .032

  14. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture in a patient with hyperparathyroidism undergoing long-term haemodialysis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mao-Feng; Yang, Hui-Lin; Shi, Wei-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury that represents < 5% of all quadriceps tendon ruptures. It is generally associated with chronic metabolic disorders and is seen in patients with uraemia undergoing maintenance haemodialysis. The present case was a 46-year-old man who presented with pain and the inability to extend his knees following a minor accident. A physical examination combined with X-radiography and magnetic resonance imaging investigations resulted in a diagnosis of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture. He had a history of uraemia and had received regular haemodialysis for 7 years. He had high levels of serum parathyroid hormone and he was diagnosed with secondary hyperparathyroidism. Following surgical repair of both quadriceps tendons, in addition to management of the secondary hyperparathyroidism, the patient regained full active mobility of both knee joints and was able to participate in normal activities of daily living.

  15. 27 CFR 24.153 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In any instance where the penal sum of the bond on file becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum or give a... limiting the amount of either bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds will show...

  16. 27 CFR 26.69 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Bonds § 26.69 Strengthening bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of... surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to cover the entire liability. Strengthening... penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date of execution and the effective date....

  17. 27 CFR 19.246 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In all cases when the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new... amount of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  18. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    DOEpatents

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  19. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  20. Resistance Exercise Training Alters Mitochondrial Function in Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Craig; Reidy, Paul T.; Bhattarai, Nisha; Sidossis, Labros S.; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Loss of mitochondrial competency is associated with several chronic illnesses. Therefore, strategies that maintain or increase mitochondrial function will likely be of benefit in a number of clinical settings. Endurance exercise has long been known to increase mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Comparatively little is known regarding the impact of resistance exercise training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. Purpose The purpose of the current study was to determine the impact of chronic resistance training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and function. Methods Here, we studied the impact of a 12-week resistance exercise training program on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in eleven young healthy men. Muscle biopsies were collected before and after the 12-week training program and mitochondrial respiratory capacity determined in permeabilized myofibers by high-resolution respirometry. Results Resistance exercise training increased lean body mass and quadriceps muscle strength by 4 and 15%, respectively (P<0.001). Coupled mitochondria respiration supported by complex I, and complex I and II substrates, increased by 2- and 1.4-fold, respectively (P<0.01). The ratio of coupled complex I supported respiration to maximal respiration increased with resistance exercise training (P<0.05), as did complex I protein abundance (P<0.05), while the substrate control ratio for succinate was reduced after resistance exercise training (P<0.001). Transcripts responsible for proteins critical to electron transfer and NAD+ production increased with training (P<0.05), while transcripts involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were unaltered. Conclusion Collectively, 12-weeks of resistance exercise training resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. This adaptation occurs with modest changes in mitochondrial proteins and transcript expression. Resistance exercise training

  1. Effects of Group-Based Exercise on Range of Motion, Muscle Strength, Functional Ability, and Pain During the Acute Phase After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Yoshinori; Kamitani, Tsukasa; Wada, Osamu; Mizuno, Kiyonori; Yamada, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study including a historical control group. Background The extent to which group-based exercise (G-EXE) improves knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and gait ability is similar to that of individualized exercise (I-EXE) at 6 weeks and 8 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the benefits of G-EXE for patients during the acute recovery phase after TKA remain unclear. Objective To determine the effects of G-EXE during the acute recovery phase after TKA on knee ROM, quadriceps strength, functional ability, and knee pain. Methods Two hundred thirty-one patients participated in G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises twice daily during the hospital stay. Outcomes were compared to those of a retrospectively identified, historical control group (I-EXE group [n = 206]) that included patients who performed exercises identical to those performed by the G-EXE group. The outcomes included knee ROM, quadriceps strength, pain intensity, and timed up-and-go test score at 1 month before surgery and at discharge. Analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, length of hospital stay, and preoperative values. Results Changes in ROM of knee flexion and extension (P<.001) and quadriceps strength (P<.001) were significantly better in the G-EXE group than those in the I-EXE group at discharge. The pain intensity improved more in the G-EXE group than in the I-EXE group at discharge (P<.001). However, the changes in the timed up-and-go scores were not significantly different. Conclusion Patients performing G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises demonstrated greater changes in knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and knee pain than those performing I-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises. The nonrandomized, asynchronous design decreases certainty of these findings. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b

  2. Validity and reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for the assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in patients with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, K; Lauermann, S P; Schneider, D; Item-Glatthorn, J F; Casartelli, N C; Maffiuletti, N A

    2013-12-01

    Reliability of isometric, isokinetic and isoinertial modalities for quadriceps strength evaluation, and the relation between quadriceps strength and physical function was investigated in 29 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients, with an average age of 63 years. Isometric maximal voluntary contraction torque, isokinetic peak torque, and isoinertial one-repetition maximum load of the involved and uninvolved quadriceps were evaluated as well as objective (walking parameters) and subjective physical function (WOMAC). Reliability was good and comparable for the isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial strength outcomes on both sides (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.947-0.966; standard error of measurement range: 5.1-9.3%). Involved quadriceps strength was significantly correlated to walking speed (r range: 0.641-0.710), step length (r range: 0.685-0.820) and WOMAC function (r range: 0.575-0.663), independent from the modality (P < 0.05). Uninvolved quadriceps strength was also significantly correlated to walking speed (r range: 0.413-0.539), step length (r range: 0.514-0.608) and WOMAC function (r range: 0.374-0.554) (P < 0.05), except for WOMAC function/isokinetic peak torque (P > 0.05). In conclusion, isometric, isokinetic, and isoinertial modalities ensure valid and reliable assessment of quadriceps muscle strength in TKA patients.

  3. Dynamics of thermographic skin temperature response during squat exercise at two different speeds.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Damiano; Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Michielon, Giovanni; Caumo, Andrea; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-07-01

    Low intensity resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation has been shown to create blood flow restriction within muscles that may affect thermoregulation through the skin. We aimed to investigate the influence of two speeds of exercise execution on skin temperature dynamics using infrared thermography. Thirteen active males performed randomly two sessions of squat exercise (normal speed, 1s eccentric/1s concentric phase, 1s; slow speed, 5s eccentric/5s concentric phase, 5s), using ~50% of 1 maximal repetition. Thermal images of ST above muscles quadriceps were recorded at a rate of 0.05Hz before the exercise (to determine basal ST) and for 480s following the initiation of the exercise (to determine the nonsteady-state time course of ST). Results showed that ST changed more slowly during the 5s exercise (p=0.002), whereas the delta (with respect to basal) excursions were similar for the two exercises (p>0.05). In summary, our data provided a detailed nonsteady-state portrait of ST changes following squat exercises executed at two different speeds. These results lay the basis for further investigations entailing the joint use of infrared thermography and Doppler flowmetry to study the events taking place both at the skin and the muscle level during exercises executed at slow speed. PMID:27264889

  4. Evidence for determining the exercise prescription in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaught, Amber M; Carneiro, Kevin A

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease that affects more than one-third of older adults (age > 65 years), most often involving the hip and knee. Osteoarthritis causes pain and limits mobility, thereby reducing patient quality of life. Conservative, nonsurgical, nonpharmacologic treatment strategies include weight reduction, orthotics, physical therapy modalities, acupuncture, massage, and exercise. The breadth of the current literature on OA can make determining the appropriate exercise prescription challenging. Aerobic exercise, strengthening exercise, Tai chi, and aquatic exercise can all alleviate pain and improve function in patients with OA. The choice of the specific type and mode of delivery of the exercise should be individualized and should consider the patient's preferences. Ongoing monitoring and supervision by a health care professional are essential for patients to participate in and benefit from exercise.

  5. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  6. Exercise and Posture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Shop Exercise & Posture About Spondylitis / Exercise & Posture Overview For The ... Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Exercise Exercise is an integral part of any spondylitis ...

  7. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  8. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  9. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  10. Noninvasive detection of change in skeletal muscle oxygenation during incremental exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Luo, Qingming; Xu, Guodong; Li, Pengcheng

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been developed as a non-invasive method to assess O2 delivery, O2 consumption and blood flow, in diverse local muscle groups at rest and during exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate local O2 consumption in exercising muscle by use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Ten elite athletes of different sport items were tested in rest and during step incremental load exercise. Local variations of quadriceps muscles were investigated with our wireless NIRS blood oxygen monitor system. The results show that the changes of blood oxygen relate on the sport items, type of muscle, kinetic capacity et al. These results indicate that NIRS is a potential useful tool to detect local muscle oxygenation and blood flow profiles; therefore it might be easily applied for evaluating the effect of athletes training.

  11. Treatment of knee arthrofibrosis and quadriceps insufficiency after patellar tendon repair: a case report including use of the graston technique.

    PubMed

    Black, Douglass W

    2010-06-23

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is a surgical complication that can limit range of motion, inhibit muscle activity, and decrease patient function. Optimal conservative treatment has not been well established in the literature, leaving a clinician with limited evidence for treatment planning. Described here is part of the rehabilitative course of care for a patient with arthrofibrotic limitations after a mid-substance patellar tendon repair with augmentation. Marked limitations in knee flexion range of motion and quadriceps activity were addressed using the Graston Technique to deal with soft-tissue adhesions; traditional physical therapy care was also provided. Clear improvement in range of motion and quadriceps activity and function was noted over the course of 5 treatments during 1 month. Treatment process and clinical reasoning are offered to promote understanding and to facilitate future inquiry.

  12. Treatment of Knee Arthrofibrosis and Quadriceps Insufficiency after Patellar Tendon Repair: A Case Report Including Use of the Graston Technique

    PubMed Central

    Black, Douglass W.

    2010-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is a surgical complication that can limit range of motion, inhibit muscle activity, and decrease patient function. Optimal conservative treatment has not been well established in the literature, leaving a clinician with limited evidence for treatment planning. Described here is part of the rehabilitative course of care for a patient with arthrofibrotic limitations after a mid-substance patellar tendon repair with augmentation. Marked limitations in knee flexion range of motion and quadriceps activity were addressed using the Graston Technique to deal with soft-tissue adhesions; traditional physical therapy care was also provided. Clear improvement in range of motion and quadriceps activity and function was noted over the course of 5 treatments during 1 month. Treatment process and clinical reasoning are offered to promote understanding and to facilitate future inquiry. PMID:21589706

  13. The effects of hip external rotator exercises and toe-spread exercises on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking in subjects with pronated foot

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toe-spread (TS) exercises and hip external rotator strengthening exercises for pronated feet on lower extremity muscle activities during stair-walking. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were 20 healthy adults with no present or previous pain, no past history of surgery on the foot or the ankle, and no foot deformities. Ten subjects performed hip external rotator strengthening exercises and TS exercises and the remaining ten subjects performed only TS exercises five times per week for four weeks. [Results] Less change in navicular drop height occurred in the group that performed hip external rotator exercises than in the group that performed only TS exercises. The group that performed only TS exercises showed increased abductor hallucis muscle activity during both stair-climbing and -descending, and the group that performed hip external rotator exercises showed increased muscle activities of the vastus medialis and abductor hallucis during stair-climbing and increased muscle activity of only the abductor hallucis during stair-descending after exercise. [Conclusion] Stair-walking can be more effectively performed if the hip external rotator muscle is strengthened when TS exercises are performed for the pronated foot. PMID:27134364

  14. Real-time noninvasive optical imaging of exercising muscle and brain upon cognitive stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresima, Valentina; van der Sluijs, Marco C.; Menssen, Jan; Grillotti, Lucia; Ferrari, Marco; Colier, Willy N.

    2001-06-01

    The monitoring of a single muscle location does not reflect the heterogeneity of the muscle groups activation during exercise. In the past, measurements of oxygen consumption (VO2) at single muscle locations could be carried out non-invasively by near-infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRCWS) at rest or during isometric contractions. In the present study, human regional quadriceps (vastus lateralis and rectus femoris) VO2 was investigated at rest and during maximal voluntary contractions using a 12- channel NIRCWS system with an acquisition time of 0.1 s.

  15. Vitamin D deficiency associates with γ-tocopherol and quadriceps weakness but not inflammatory cytokines in subjects with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tyler; Henriksen, Vanessa T.; Rogers, Victoria E.; Aguirre, Dale; Trawick, Roy H.; Lynn Rasmussen, G.; Momberger, Nathan G.

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint condition and a leading cause of physical disability in the United States. Quadriceps weakness and inflammatory cytokines contribute to the pathogenesis of knee OA, and both of which, increase with vitamin D deficiency. Other micronutrients, such as vitamins C and E and β-carotene, modulate inflammatory cytokines and decrease during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency associates with quadriceps weakness, an increase in serum cytokines, and a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with knee OA. Subjects (age, 48±1 y; serum 25(OH)D, 25.8±1.1 ng/mL) with knee OA were categorized as vitamin D deficient (n=17; serum 25(OH)D≤20 ng/mL), insufficient (n=21; serum 25(OH)D 20–29 ng/mL), or sufficient (n=18; serum 25(OH)D≥30 ng/mL). Single-leg strength (concentric knee extension–flexion contraction cycles at 60 °/s) and blood cytokine, carotene (α and β), ascorbic acid, and tocopherol (α and γ) concentrations were measured. Quadriceps peak torque, average power, total work, and deceleration were significantly (all p<0.05) impaired with vitamin D deficiency. Serum γ-tocopherol concentrations were significantly (p<0.05) increased with vitamin D deficiency. In the vitamin D sufficient group, γ-tocopherol inversely correlated (r=−0.47, p<0.05) with TNF-α, suggesting a pro-inflammatory increase with a γ-tocopherol decrease despite a sufficient serum 25(OH)D concentration. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental to quadriceps function, and in subjects with vitamin D sufficiency, γ-tocopherol could have an important anti-inflammatory role in a pathophysiological condition mediated by inflammation. PMID:24624336

  16. Vitamin D deficiency associates with γ-tocopherol and quadriceps weakness but not inflammatory cytokines in subjects with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Tyler; Henriksen, Vanessa T; Rogers, Victoria E; Aguirre, Dale; Trawick, Roy H; Lynn Rasmussen, G; Momberger, Nathan G

    2014-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint condition and a leading cause of physical disability in the United States. Quadriceps weakness and inflammatory cytokines contribute to the pathogenesis of knee OA, and both of which, increase with vitamin D deficiency. Other micronutrients, such as vitamins C and E and β-carotene, modulate inflammatory cytokines and decrease during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency associates with quadriceps weakness, an increase in serum cytokines, and a decrease in circulating micronutrients in subjects with knee OA. Subjects (age, 48±1 y; serum 25(OH)D, 25.8±1.1 ng/mL) with knee OA were categorized as vitamin D deficient (n=17; serum 25(OH)D≤20 ng/mL), insufficient (n=21; serum 25(OH)D 20-29 ng/mL), or sufficient (n=18; serum 25(OH)D≥30 ng/mL). Single-leg strength (concentric knee extension-flexion contraction cycles at 60 °/s) and blood cytokine, carotene (α and β), ascorbic acid, and tocopherol (α and γ) concentrations were measured. Quadriceps peak torque, average power, total work, and deceleration were significantly (all p<0.05) impaired with vitamin D deficiency. Serum γ-tocopherol concentrations were significantly (p<0.05) increased with vitamin D deficiency. In the vitamin D sufficient group, γ-tocopherol inversely correlated (r=-0.47, p<0.05) with TNF-α, suggesting a pro-inflammatory increase with a γ-tocopherol decrease despite a sufficient serum 25(OH)D concentration. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental to quadriceps function, and in subjects with vitamin D sufficiency, γ-tocopherol could have an important anti-inflammatory role in a pathophysiological condition mediated by inflammation.

  17. Prospective Case Series of NMES for Quadriceps Weakness and Decrease Function in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jeffery J; McElroy, Mark J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bhave, Anil; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee can lead to substantial disability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) device in a small case series of treatment of quadriceps muscle weakness and decreased function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We evaluated isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength, objective functional improvement, subjective functional improvement, quality of life, and pain relief. Patients were then matched with a previously studied cohort with similar osteoarthritic characteristics. Testing demonstrated improvement in isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength, as well as several functional and patient-reported metrics. Conversely, patients reported a decrease in Knee Society Score (KSS) functional score, short-form 36 health survey (SF-36), lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain; however, no changes were observed in relation to the mean reported VAS pain score and SF-36 physical component. Control cohort analysis of the patient reported outcomes showed that patients improved from their first visit to 3 months follow-up in functional KSS, SF-36 physical component, and LEFS. However, VAS pain score and objective KSS were unchanged at follow-up. Similarly, a decrease was observed in the scores of the SF-36 mental component. In conclusion, the use of NMES for quadriceps muscle weakness has been shown to improve muscle strength. Additionally, NMES was shown to potentially improve functionality but demonstrated minimal effects on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes compared with the initial visit. However, larger, longer-term, prospective, randomized studies are needed to better evaluate these outcomes. PMID:26852638

  18. Use of a turndown quadriceps tendon flap for rupture of the patellar tendon after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Chun; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2007-09-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. The results of surgical treatment of this complication were discouraging in most of the reports. We describe a case of rupture of patellar tendon 7 weeks after total knee arthroplasty treated with a turndown quadriceps flap and circumferential wiring. Two years and 6 months after operation, the patient had no extension lag of the knee and knee flexion to 110 degrees .

  19. Influence of patellar ligament insertion angle on quadriceps usage during walking in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed subjects.

    PubMed

    Shin, Choongsoo S; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2009-06-01

    Reduced quadriceps contraction has been suggested as an adaptation to prevent anterior tibial translation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees. This theory has been supported by a recent study that peak knee flexion moment (thought to be created by a decrease of quadriceps contraction) during walking was negatively correlated with patellar ligament insertion angle (PLIA) in ACL-deficient knees, but not in contralateral, uninjured knees. In addition, the PLIA was significantly smaller in ACL-deficient knees than in contralateral, uninjured knees. However, it is unknown whether ACL reconstruction restores the PLIA or whether the relationship between the PLIA and knee flexion moments previously observed in ACL-deficient knees disappears. This study tested the following hypotheses: (1) The PLIA of ACL-reconstructed knees is significantly smaller than the PLIA of uninjured contralateral knees; (2) Peak knee flexion moment (balanced by net quadriceps moment) during walking is negatively correlated with the PLIA in ACL-reconstructed knees. The PLIA of 24 ACL-reconstructed and contralateral knees were measured using MRI, and peak knee flexion moments during walking were measured. Results showed that the PLIA of ACL-reconstructed (22.9 +/- 4.4 degrees) knees was not significantly smaller (p = 0.09, power = 0.99) than the PLIA of contralateral (24.1 +/- 4.8 degrees) knees. Peak knee flexion moment was not correlated with the PLIA following ACL reconstruction (R2 = 0.016, power = 0.99). However, the magnitude of the knee flexion moment remained significantly lower in ACL-reconstructed knees. In summary, this study has shown that the PLIA of ACL-reconstructed knees returned to normal and that patients no longer adapt their gait in response to the PLIA, though quadriceps function did not return to normal levels.

  20. Quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical comparison of transosseous equivalent double-row suture anchor versus transosseous tunnel repair.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan D; Wallace, Matthew K; Scovell, J Field; Krupp, Ryan J; Cook, Chad; Wyland, Douglas J

    2012-09-01

    Quadriceps rupture off the patella is traditionally repaired by a transosseous tunnel technique, although a single-row suture anchor repair has recently been described. This study biomechanically tested a new transosseous equivalent (TE) double-row suture anchor technique compared with the transosseous repair for quadriceps repair. After simulated quadriceps-patella avulsion in 10 matched cadaveric knees, repairs were completed by either a three tunnel transosseous (TT = 5) or a TE suture anchor (TE = 5) technique. Double-row repairs were done using two 5.5 Bio-Corkscrew FT (fully threaded) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) and two 3.5 Bio-PushLock anchors (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) with all 10 repairs done with #2 FiberWire suture (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL). Cyclic testing from 50 to 250 N for 250 cycles and pull to failure load (1 mm/s) were undertaken. Gap formation and ultimate tensile load (N) were recorded and stiffness data (N/mm) were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using a Mann-Whitney U test and survival characteristics examined with Kaplan-Meier test. No significant difference was found between the TE and TT groups in stiffness (TE = 134 +/- 15 N/mm, TT = 132 +/- 26 N/mm, p = 0.28). The TE group had significantly less ultimate tensile load (N) compared with the TT group (TE = 447 +/- 86 N, TT = 591 +/- 84 N, p = 0.04), with all failures occurring at the suture eyelets. Although both quadriceps repairs were sufficiently strong, the transosseous repairs were stronger than the TE suture anchor repairs. The repair stiffness and gap formation were similar between the groups.

  1. Effect of Exercise Training and +Gz Acceleration Training on Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Simonson, Shawn R.; Stocks, Jodie M.; Evans, Joyce; Knapp, Charles F.; Cowell, Stephenie A.; Pemberton, Kendra N.; Wilson, Heather W.; Vener, Jamie M.; Evetts, Simon N.

    2001-01-01

    Countermeasures for reduction in work capacity (maximal oxygen uptake and strength) during spaceflight and enhanced orthostatic intolerance during re-entry, landing and egress from the return vehicle are continuing problems. The purpose for this study was to test the hypothesis that passive-acceleration training; supine, interval, exercise plus acceleration training and exercise combined with acceleration training would improve orthostatic tolerance in ambulatory men; and that addition of the aerobic exercise conditioning would not alter this improved tolerance from that of passive-acceleration training. Seven men (24-38 yr) underwent "Passive" training on the Ames human-powered centrifuge (HPC) for 30 min, "Exercise" training on the cycle ergometer with constant +Gz acceleration; and "Combined" exercise training at 40% to 90% of the HPC +Gz(max) exercise level. Maximal supine exercise loads increased significant (P<0.05) by 8.3% (Passive), 12.6% (Exercise), and by 15.4% (Combined) after training, but their post-training maximal oxygen uptakes and maximal heart rates were unchanged. Maximal time to fatigue (endurance) was unchanged with Passive was increased (P<0.05) with Exercise and Combined training. Thus, the exercise in the Exercise and Combined training Phases resulted in greater maximal loads and endurance without effect on maximal oxygen uptake or heart rate. There was a 4% to 6% increase (P<0.05) in all four quadriceps muscle volumes (right and left) after post-Combined training. Resting pre-tilt heart rate was elevated by 12.9% (P<0.05) only after Passive training suggesting that the exercise training attenuated the HR response. Plasma volume (% Delta) was uniformly decreased by 8% to 14% (P<0.05) at tilt-tolerance pre- vs. post-training indicating essentially no effect of training on the level of hypovolemia. Post-training tilt-tolerance time and heart rate were increased (P<0.05) only with Passive training by 37.8% and by 29.1%, respectively. Thus

  2. Budget Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clowes, Darrel A.

    Following a discussion of the factors to be considered in constructing feasible college budgets, an exercise in budget development is presented involving a hypothetical community college with 2,500 full-time equivalent (FTE) students, 500 in developmental education, 750 each in transfer and technical programs, and 500 undecided. Exercise…

  3. [Exercise addiction].

    PubMed

    Petit, A; Lejoyeux, M

    2013-01-01

    Socially valorised, sport like other forms of behaviour, can take on an addictive aspect. A review of the English and French literatures from 1979 to 2012 was conducted, using PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and PsycInfo, using the following key words alone or combined :sport, dependence, exercise, addiction. Exercise dependence is defined as a craving for physical activity that leads to extreme exercise intensity and generates physiological and psychological symptoms. Measurement scales have been proposed to make the diagnosis. No epidemiological studies have examined the prevalence of exercise dependence in the general population, although some studies suggest a frequency ranging from 10 to 80%. Disorders begin with a search for pleasure in physical effort, which then gives way to an obsession for sport resulting in a need to practice a sport more and more frequently and intensely. This addiction is more common among alcohol and illicit drug addicts than among the general population, while the rate of eating disorders can reach 40%. Personality traits most often associated are perfectionism, extraversion, and sensation seeking, while possible links between sporting activity and intensive doping will be discussed.

  4. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  5. Quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation for a midsubstance tear of the medial collateral ligament during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Su Chan; Hwang, Seung Hyun; Jung, Soong Hyun

    2009-12-01

    Primary repair of a disrupted midsubstance MCL during TKA can provide satisfactory stability. However, in cases with poor soft tissue quality or a gap between the ligament ends, primary repair may not be feasible. In these cases, we have used an augmented repair. The purpose of this study is to describe the technique of augmented repair using a quadriceps tendon free graft and present our experience of five patients. A total of five patients underwent augmented repair of a transected MCL substance using a quadriceps tendon free graft. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 16 months. Augmented repair of the transected MCL substance was successful in all five patients, with a mean additional surgery time of 17 min, no coronal instability, a mean Knee Society Score of 87.0+/-2.7 (range, 85 to 90), and a mean function score of 85.0+/-3.5 (range, 80 to 90). There were no complications associated with the extensor mechanism. This data suggests that quadriceps tendon free graft augmentation might be a useful alternative for repairing midsubstance tears of the MCL in special situations, where the quality of the remaining tendon is poor, there is suspicion of stretching, and there is a small gap between both the repaired ligament ends resulting in late laxity.

  6. Effect of a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol on knee joint mechanics and muscle activation during gait in young adults.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Gillian Hatfield; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of impaired quadriceps function on knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular function during gait. Surface electromyograms, three-dimensional motion and ground reaction forces were collected during gait before and after 20 healthy adults completed a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol. Pattern recognition techniques were utilized to examine changes in amplitude and temporal characteristics of all gait variables. The fatigue protocol resulted in decreased knee extensor torque generation and quadriceps median power frequencies for 18 of 20 participants (p < 0.05). The gait data from these 18 participants was analyzed. The knee external rotation angle increased (p < 0.05), the net external flexion and external rotation moments decreased (p < 0.05), and the net external adduction moment increased (p < 0.05). Post-fatigue changes in periarticular muscle activation patterns were consistent with the biomechanical changes, but were not significantly altered. Even for this low demand task of walking the knee motion and loading characteristics were altered following a high intensity fatigue protocol in a manner that may place the knee joint at greater risk for joint pathology and injury.

  7. ACL repair might induce further abnormality of gamma loop in the intact side of the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y U

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surgery on the gamma-loop in the quadriceps of patients with ACL injuries. We compared the response to vibration stimulation in subjects with ACL repair, subjects with ACL rupture, and normal subjects, by measuring the maximal strength and integrated electromyography (I-EMG) of the quadriceps. Pre-vibration data were obtained from each subject by measuring the MVC of the knee extension and the I-EMG from the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris. Vibration stimulation was applied to the infrapatellar tendon, followed immediately by repeating maximal strength and I-EMG recording. The results of this study indicated that alpha motor neuron activity of the intact side of the vastus lateralis in response to prolonged vibration stimulation was altered by surgery, but no effect was detected in the injured side. The results could suggest that abnormality of the gamma-loop existed even in the quadriceps of patients with ACL rupture since the vibration stimulus failed to elicit changes in ACL-rupture group as compared with those of normal subjects. In comparison, abnormality of the gamma-loop in the intact side of the QF was probably induced by the rupture, and further abnormality of gamma-loop was induced by surgery.

  8. Kinesio Taping Does Not Alter Quadriceps Isokinetic Strength and Power in Healthy Nonathletic Men: A Prospective Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Paweł; Straburzyńska-Lupa, Anna; Rutkowski, Radosław; Gruszczyński, Jakub; Lewandowski, Jacek; Straburzyński-Lupa, Marcin; Łochyński, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The effects of Kinesio Taping (KT) on muscular performance remain largely unclear. This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of KT on the maximum concentric and eccentric quadriceps isokinetic strength. Study Design. This is a single-blinded, placebo crossover, repeated measures study. Methods. Maximum isokinetic concentric/eccentric extension torque, work, and power were assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer without taping (NT) and with KT or placebo taping (PT) in 17 healthy young men. Repeated measures one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analyses. Results. Testing concentric contractions at 60°/s or 180°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in peak torque (Nm), total work (J), or mean power (W) were noted among the application modes under different conditions. Testing eccentric contractions at 30°/s or 60°/s isokinetic speed, no significant differences in mentioned parameters were noted, respectively. KT on the quadriceps neither decreased nor increased muscle strength in the participants. Conclusion. KT application onto the skin overlying the quadriceps muscle does not enhance the strength or power of knee extensors in healthy men. PMID:26819953

  9. Adverse effect of femoral nerve blockade on quadriceps strength and function after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron; Arutyunyan, Grigoriy; Kuzma, Scott; Levy, Bruce; Dahm, Diane; Stuart, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if quadriceps strength and functional outcomes were similar at 6 months following anterior cruciate ligament [ACL] reconstruction in patients receiving a continuous 48-hour femoral nerve blockade for postoperative analgesia (FNB group) versus patients with no FNB (control group). A retrospective cohort was designed including athletes who underwent primary ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft between 2005 and 2010 at our institution with identical rehabilitation protocols. The FNB group included 96 patients with an average age of 21 years and the control group included 100 patients with an average age of 20 years. At 6 months following ACL reconstruction, isokinetic strength (slow and fast activation) and functional tests including vertical jump, single hop, triple hop, and return to sport were analyzed with an α value < 0.05 as significant. Multivariate regression models were used to compare these outcomes between the FNB and control groups after adjusting for gender and competitive athlete status. At 6 months, fast extension isokinetic strength was inferior in the FNB group (78 vs. 85%; p < 0.01). After adjusting for gender and competitive athlete status, fast (p = 0.002) and slow extension strength (p = 0.01), vertical jump (p = 0.03) and single jump (p = 0.02) were also inferior in the FNB group. There were no significant differences in full return to sport between the two groups (86% at 7.5 months in the FNB group vs. 93% at 7.3 months in the control group). In this retrospective comparative study, the hypothesis that patients treated with continuous FNB for postoperative analgesia following ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft will have inferior knee extension (quadriceps) strength and function at 6 months follow-up was affirmed. However, no differences were observed in return to sport, bringing into question whether these statistical differences translate into

  10. Hamstring exercises for track and field athletes: injury and exercise biomechanics, and possible implications for exercise selection and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Pehlivanidis, Hercules; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Valle, Xavier; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring strain injuries are the most prevalent muscle injuries in track and field (TF). These injuries often cause prolonged symptoms and a high risk of re-injury. Strengthening of the hamstring muscles has been recommended for injury prevention. The authors review the possible role of eccentric training in TF hamstring injury prevention and introduce exercise classification criteria to guide clinicians in designing strengthening programmes adapted to TF. The principles exposed may serve as a foundation for future development and application of new eccentric programmes to decrease the high incidence of this type of injury in other sports.

  11. Somatosensory feedback from the limbs exerts inhibitory influences on central neural drive during whole body endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Proctor, Lester T; Sebranek, Joshua J; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether somatosensory feedback from contracting limb muscles exerts an inhibitory influence on the determination of central command during closed-loop cycling exercise in which the subject voluntarily determines his second-by-second central motor drive. Eight trained cyclists performed two 5-km time trials either without (5K(Ctrl)) or with lumbar epidural anesthesia (5K(Epi); 24 ml of 0.5% lidocaine, vertebral interspace L(3)-L(4)). Percent voluntary quadriceps muscle activation was determined at rest using a superimposed twitch technique. Epidural lidocaine reduced pretime trial maximal voluntary quadriceps strength (553 +/- 45 N) by 22 +/- 3%. Percent voluntary quadriceps activation was also reduced from 97 +/- 1% to 81 +/- 3% via epidural lidocaine, and this was unchanged following the 5K(Epi), indicating the presence of a sustained level of neural impairment throughout the trial. Power output was reduced by 9 +/- 2% throughout the race (P < 0.05). We found three types of significant effects of epidural lidocaine that supported a substantial role for somatosensory feedback from the exercising limbs as a determinant of central command throughout high-intensity closed-loop cycling exercise: 1) significantly increased relative integrated EMG of the vastus lateralis; 2) similar pedal forces despite the reduced number of fast-twitch muscle fibers available for activation; 3) and increased ventilation out of proportion to a reduced carbon dioxide production and heart rate and increased blood pressure out of proportion to power output and oxygen consumption. These findings demonstrate the inhibitory influence of somatosensory feedback from contracting locomotor muscles on the conscious and/or subconscious determination of the magnitude of central motor drive during high intensity closed-loop endurance exercise.

  12. Current ISS Exercise Countermeasures: Where are we now?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. C.; Loerch, L.; Davis-Street, J.; Haralson, Cortni; Sams, C.

    2006-01-01

    Current International Space Station (ISS) crew schedules include 1.5 h/d for completion of resistive exercise and 1 h/d of aerobic exercise , 6 d/wk. While ISS post flight decrements in muscle strength, bone m ineral density, and aerobic capacity improved in some crewmembers, de conditioning was still evident even with this volume of exercise. Res ults from early ISS expeditions show maximum loss in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and pelvis in excess of 1.5% per month, with all crewmembers demonstrating significant bone loss in one or more re gions. Similarly, post flight muscle strength losses in the hamstring and quadriceps muscle groups exceeded 30% in the immediate post miss ion period in some crewmembers. Measures of aerobic capacity early in the mission show average decrements of 15%, but with onboard aerobic exercise capability, the crew has been able to "train up" over the co urse of the mission. These findings are highly variable among crewmem bers and appear to be correlated with availability and reliability of the inflight resistive exercise device (RED), cycle ergometer, and t readmill. This suite of hardware was installed on ISS with limited op erational evaluation in groundbased test beds. As a result, onorbit hardware constraints have resulted in inadequate physical stimulus, d econditioning, and increased risk for compromised performance during intra and extravehicular activities. These issues indicate that the c urrent ISS Countermeasures System reliability or validity are not ade quate for extendedduration exploration missions. Learning Objective: A better understanding of the status of ISS exercise countermeasures , their ability to protect physiologic systems, and recommendations for exploration exercise countermeasures.

  13. The effects of trunk stability exercise and a combined exercise program on pain, flexibility, and static balance in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Hwangbo, Gak; Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong-Gil; Kim, Hyeon-Su

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of trunk stability exercise and combined exercise program on pain, flexibility, and static balance in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty persons diagnosed with chronic low back pain were divided into a trunk stability exercise group and a combined exercise group and then conducted exercise for six weeks. [Results] VAS and sway lengths decreased significantly in both groups. A comparison of sway lengths after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the trunk stability exercise group had a bigger decrease than the combined exercise group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that trunk stability exercise would have bigger effect than combined exercise on the daily activities of chronic low back pain patients as it strengthens deep abdominal muscles and improves flexibility and balancing ability.

  14. Adaptive Force Regulation of Muscle Strengthening Rehabilitation Device With Magnetorheological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  15. Adaptive force regulation of muscle strengthening rehabilitation device with magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-03-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home. PMID:16562632

  16. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps and hamstring normative data for elite collegiate American football players participating in the NFL Scouting Combine.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, John E; Toriscelli, Todd A; Merrick, W Shannon; Papp, Derek F; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2014-04-01

    Isokinetic concentric quadriceps and hamstring strength data using a Cybex dynamometer are collected for elite collegiate American football players invited to the annual National Football League Scouting Combine. We constructed a normative (reference) database of the Cybex strength data for the purpose of allowing comparison of an individual's values to his peers. Data reduction was performed to construct frequency distributions of hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) ratios and side-to-side strength differences. For the cohort (n = 1,252 players), a statistically significant but very small (1.9%) mean quadriceps strength preference existed for dominant side vs. nondominant side. Peak torque (Newton meters, best repetition) for quadriceps and hamstrings was significantly correlated to player body mass (weight) (the same relationship was found for other variables using peak torque in the calculation). Peak torque varied by player position, being greatest for offensive linemen and lowest for kickers (p < 0.0001). Adjusting for body weight overcorrected these differences. The H/Q ratios and frequency distributions were similar across positions, with a mean of 0.6837 ± 0.137 for the cohort dominant side vs. 0.6940 ± 0.145 for the nondominant side (p = 0.021, n = 1,252). Considerable variation was seen for dominant-to-nondominant side difference for peak torque. For quadriceps, 47.2% of players had differences between -10% and +10%, 21.0% had a peak torque dominant-side deficit of 10% or greater compared to nondominant side, and for 31.8% of players, dominant-side peak torque was greater than 10% compared to nondominant side. For hamstrings, 57.0% of players had differences between -10% and +10%, 19.6% had a peak torque dominant-side deficit of 10% or greater compared to nondominant side, and 23.4% of players, dominant-side peak torque was greater than 10% compared to nondominant side. We observed that isokinetic absolute strength variables are dependent on body weight and vary

  17. Static postural sway, proprioception, and maximal voluntary quadriceps contraction in patients with knee osteoarthritis and normal control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, B; Mockett, S; Doherty, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate whether subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) have reduced static postural control, knee proprioceptive acuity, and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the quadriceps compared with normal controls, and to determine possible independent predictors of static postural sway.
METHODS—77 subjects with symptomatic and radiographic knee OA (58 women, 19 men; mean age 63.4 years, range 36-82) and 63 controls with asymptomatic and clinically normal knees (45 women, 18 men; mean age 63 years, range 46-85) underwent assessment of static postural sway. 108 subjects (59 patients, 49 controls) also underwent assessment of knee proprioceptive activity and MVC (including calculation of quadriceps activation). In patients with knee OA knee pain, stiffness, and functional disability were assessed using the WOMAC Index. The height (m) and weight (kg) of all subjects was assessed.
RESULTS—Compared with controls, patients with knee OA were heavier (mean difference 15.3 kg, p<0.001), had increased postural lateral sway (controls: median 2.3, interquartile (IQ) range 1.8-2.9; patients: median 4.7, IQ range 1.9-4.7, p<0.001), reduced proprioceptive acuity (controls: mean 7.9, 95% CI 6.9 to 8.9; patients: mean 12.0, 95% CI 10.5 to 13.6, p<0.001), weaker quadriceps strength (controls: mean 22.5, 95% CI 19.9 to 24.6; patients: mean 14.7, 95% CI 12.5 to 16.9, p<0.001), and less percentage activation of quadriceps (controls: mean 87.4, 95% CI 80.7 to 94.2; patients: mean 66.0, 95% CI 58.8 to 73.2, p<0.001). The significant predictors of postural sway were knee pain and the ratio of MVC/body weight.
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with age and sex matched controls, subjects with symptomatic knee OA have quadriceps weakness, reduced knee proprioception, and increased postural sway. Pain and muscle strength may particularly influence postural sway. The interaction between physiological, structural, and functional abnormalities in knee OA

  18. Effect of regular exercise on health and disease.

    PubMed

    Karacabey, Kursat

    2005-10-01

    It is known for a long time that exercise increases physical adequacy, has beneficial effects on the general health condition as well as a playing preventing role against various disease states. To decrease the risk of disease and maintain good health, the natural defense system of the organism needs to be strengthened. It is thought that in addition to increasing the body's resistance to disease through the strengthening of the immune system, decreases the convalescence time, increases work efficiency and improves the sportive performance of the individual all which would contribute positively to the national economy. The positive effects of regular exercising of aerobic nature such as strengthening of the immune system, protection against diseases as well as its positive effects on quality of life will help to emphasize the importance of physical exercise and improve the general view of sports by society. PMID:16264392

  19. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  20. Human quadriceps strength and fatiguability in patients with post viral fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, O M; White, P D

    1991-01-01

    Quadriceps isometric strength, activation and fatiguability were measured in 11 patients with symptoms of fatigue three months after glandular fever or a glandular fever-like illness. Predicted normal and lower limits of normal muscle strength were calculated from height and age. These measures and the fatigue index were compared with a group of healthy students of similar age. Two of the patients were unable to activate fully their muscles. After allowing for this inhibition the group mean (SD) strength was 104 (22%) of predicted. Although there was no significant difference in the fatigue index between the patients and the control group, there was a trend for the patients to show less fatigue than controls. There was no difference in the muscle results for those patients who were found to have Epstein-Barr virus infections and those who did not. The feelings of weakness and fatigue experienced by the patients could not be explained by either physiological muscle fatigue or lack of effort. PMID:1800667

  1. Relationship between quadriceps femoris muscle volume and muscle torque after anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Y; Ikeda, K; Nishino, A; Sunaga, M; Aihara, Y; Fukubayashi, T

    2007-12-01

    This study was performed to obtain evidence regarding bilateral hindrance of motor unit (MU) recruitment in the quadriceps femoris (QF) of patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The subjects included 70 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction and 35 healthy subjects. To identify the muscle torque per unit volume (MTPUV), the peak torque of each velocity of isokinetic performance was divided by muscle volume of the QF measured by a series of cross-sectional images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging scans. Tests revealed that the mean MTPUV of the uninjured (0.113+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.081+/-0.02 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) and injured sides (0.109+/-0.03 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.079+/-0.023 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s) were significantly lower than those of the control group (0.144+/-0.05 N m/cm3 at 60 degrees /s, 0.096+/-0.04 N m/cm3 at 180 degrees /s). Previous studies suggested that MU recruitment in the QF of patients with ACL injury was hindered bilaterally. However, the design of their studies could not provide evidence of bilateral hindrance of MU recruitment in the QF. The results of the present study demonstrated that the MTPUV of both injured and uninjured sides of patients were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  2. Long-term quadriceps femoris functional deficits following intramedullary nailing of isolated tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J; Bealle, D P; Kaufer, H; Johnson, D L

    2001-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed 5 male and 5 female patients, age 35.1+/-16 years, height 171.8+/-12 cm, and weight 75.5+/-18 kg (mean+/-SD) who were more than 1 year post isolated tibial fracture (18+/-6 months) and had been treated with an intramedullary tibial nail. Subjects completed a 12-question visual analog scale, a physical symptom and activity of daily living survey, and were also tested for bilateral isokinetic (60 degrees/s) quadriceps femoris and hamstring strength. Knee pain during activity, stiffness, swelling, and buckling were the primary symptomatic complaints. Perceived functional task deficits were greatest for climbing or descending stairs, pivoting, squatting, and walking on uneven surfaces. Involved lower extremity knee extensor and flexor torque production deficits were 25% and 17%, respectively. Early rehabilitation focuses on maintaining adequate operative site bony fixation while providing controlled, progressive, and regular biomechanical loading to restore functionally competent tissue. Following adequate fracture healing, greater emphasis should be placed on lower extremity functional recovery including commonly performed activities of daily living and other functional tasks that are relevant to the patient's disability level. A cyclic rehabilitation program that progresses the weight-bearing environment to facilitate bone and soft tissue healing and neuromuscular re-education is proposed.

  3. Bilateral concentric and eccentric isokinetic strength evaluation of quadriceps and hamstrings in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Hadzić, Vedran; Erculj, Frane; Bracic, Mitja; Dervisević, Edvin

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the existence of bilateral asymmetry in healthy basketball players of different age, as evidence suggest that it may be an age related phenomenon which develops over the years of training. Fifty healthy basketball players (26 males and 24 females) participated in the study. The quadriceps (Q) and the hamstring (H) were tested concentrically and eccentrically at 60 degrees/s. The main outcome measure was body weight normalized peak torque (PT/BW). We have also calculated different strength ratios as well as the bilateral strength differences. The main findings indicate that (1) bilateral strength asymmetry is noticeable in senior basketball players relating predominantly to the Q (2) some gender related strength differences were mainly associated with the concentric strength of Q and H (3) when corrected for weight and height, age related strength differences were relatively small and observed only with respect to H strength in males (4) superiority of eccentric over concentric strength values of Q and H was more pronounced in females than in males. Strength asymmetry in senior basketball players may be more attributable to the better neuromuscular control during vertical jumping than to the strength itself as there were no age related differences between cadets and senior players.

  4. [Nonpharmacological and nonsurgical therapies for osteoarthritis: orthosis, exercises].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Katherine; Eloumri, Amine; Rannou, Francois; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Unloading valgus knee braces may be more effective than knee sleeves, to improve pain and disability for medial knee osteoarthritis, but have more adverse effects. A lateral-wedge insole could reduce pain in medial knee osteoarthritis. Cushioning insoles and footwear with shock absorbance could be proposed for hip osteoarthritis by authors' recommendations. Nocturnal splints for base-of-thumb osteoarthritis are recommended to reduce pain and disability. Aerobic, strengthening, range-of-motion and proprioceptive exercise are recommended to decrease pain and improve function and quality of life in knee and hip osteoarthritis. Strengthening and range-of-motion exercise is recommended for hand osteoarthritis.

  5. Muscle ultrastructural changes from exhaustive exercise performed after prolonged restricted activity and retraining in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on ultrastructural changes in the quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy dogs, before and after restricted activity (RA), and following a subsequent 2 month treadmill exercise retraining period for the 5 mo group. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2 mo group decreased from 177 + or - 22 min before to 90 + or - 32 min after RA. Retraining increased tolerance to 219 + or - 73 min; 24 pct. above the before RA and 143 pct. above the after RA time. After RA exhaustion time in the 5 mo group was 25 and 45 min. Before RA, pre-exercise muscle structure was normal and post exercise there was only slight swelling of mitochondria. After RA, pre-exercise, numerous glycogen granules and lipid droplets appeared in the muscle fibers, mitochondria were smaller, and sarcoplasmic reticulum channels widened; post exercise these changes were accentuated and some areas were devoid of glycogen, and there was fiber degradation. After 5 mo RA pre-exercise there were more pronounced changes; mitochondria were very small and dense, there were many lipid droplets, myofibrils were often separated, and the fibers appeared edematous and degenerating; post exercise the sarcoplasmic reticulum was swollen, no glycogen was present, and there was marked swelling and deformation of mitochondria. After retraining, both pre-exercise and post exercise there was still evidence of fiber degeneration. Thus, susceptibility of active skeletal muscle structures and subcellular elements, e.g., mitochondria, to the action of damaging factors occurring during exhaustive exercise is enhanced considerably by prolonged disuse.

  6. Orthostasis: exercise and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    There are two major problems here that are not independent. One is the more practically oriented problem of determining the effect of various modes of exercise training on gravitational tolerances, i.e., the point of syncope (unconsciousness) usually estimated from the time of appearance of presyncopal signs and symptoms. The other is more theoretical and concerns the mechanism of blood pressure failure that results in syncope. In many experimental designs these two problems or purposes have been intermingled, with equivocal results.

  7. Effects of supplemental carbohydrate ingestion during superimposed electromyostimulation exercise in elite weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Wax, Benjamin; Kavazis, Andreas N; Brown, Stanley P

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the effects of carbohydrate supplementation on blood parameters and force output during superimposed electromyostimulation (SEMS) single-leg isometric contractions. We hypothesized that carbohydrate ingestion before and during muscle contractions would lead to greater glucose availability and greater total force output for the session. Six elite resistance trained male subjects participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind study. The subjects were randomly assigned to placebo (PL) or carbohydrate (CHO). The subjects in CHO consumed 1 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass loading dose and 0.17 g of carbohydrate · per kilogram of body mass every 6 minutes during the exercise protocol. The PL received an equal volume of a solution made of saccharin and aspartame. The exercise protocol consisted of repeated 20-second isometric contractions of quadriceps muscle at 50% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 40 seconds of rest until failure occurred. Importantly, quadriceps maximal voluntary contraction with SEMS was performed in the beginning and then every 5 minutes during the last 3 seconds of isometric contractions throughout the exercise protocol. Venous blood samples were taken preexercise, immediately postexercise, and at 5 minutes postexercise and analyzed for glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, and glycerol. Our results indicate that CHO ingestion increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose, but no significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected for nonesterified fatty acids or glycerol. Importantly, total force output during exercise protocol was higher (p < 0.05) in CHO compared with that in PL. Therefore, our data suggest that CHO supplementation before and during exercise may be beneficial for individuals performing high-volume resistance training.

  8. Altered cell metabolism in tissues of the knee joint in a rabbit model of Botulinum toxin A-induced quadriceps muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Leumann, A; Longino, D; Fortuna, R; Leonard, T; Vaz, M A; Hart, D A; Herzog, W

    2012-12-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness is frequently associated with knee injuries in sports. The influence of quadriceps weakness on knee joint homeostasis remains undefined. We hypothesized that quadriceps weakness will lead to tissue-specific alterations in the cell metabolism of tissues of the knee. Quadriceps weakness was induced with repetitive injections of Botulinum toxin A in six 1-year-old New Zealand White rabbits for 6 months. Five additional animals served as controls with injections of saline/dextrose. Muscle weakness was assessed by muscle wet mass, isometric knee extensor torque, and histological morphology analysis. Cell metabolism was assessed for patellar tendon, medial and lateral collateral ligament, and medial and lateral meniscus by measuring the total RNA levels and specific mRNA levels for collagen I, collagen III, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, TGF-β, biglycan, IL-1, and bFGF by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction. While the total RNA levels did not change, tissue-specific mRNA levels were lower for relevant anabolic and catabolic molecules, indicating potential changes in tissue mechanical set points. Quadriceps weakness may lead to adaptations in knee joint tissue cell metabolism by altering a subset of anabolic and catabolic mRNA levels corresponding to a new functional and metabolic set point for the knee that may contribute to the high injury rate of athletes with muscle weakness.

  9. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term studies on…

  10. 27 CFR 28.66 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to... of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  11. 27 CFR 17.107 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Strengthening bonds. 17.107 Section 17.107 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... and in effect becomes insufficient, the principal may give a strengthening bond in a sufficient...

  12. Strengthening mechanisms of tungsten powder reinforced uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Krawizcki, M.A.

    1990-04-01

    Tungsten powder reinforced uranium composites exhibit a three-fold increase in yield strength due to precipitation hardening. The tungsten-rich interphase precipitates form at the moving beta to alpha phase boundary during slow cooling. Further increases in yield strength, attained with increasing tungsten content, are due to composite strengthening. The composite strengthening is verified by increasing elastic modulus with increasing tungsten content. Age hardening behavior is observed, with strengthening occurring at aging temperatures low, in the alpha phase. Temperatures higher in alpha give initial strengthening followed by rapid overaging. Beta phase aging temperatures result in a very soft structure with interphase precipitates observable optically. Wrought material exhibits significant strain hardening as well as composite strengthening due to elongation of the tungsten particles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Effect of cyclic preconditioning on the tensile properties of human quadriceps tendons and patellar ligaments.

    PubMed

    Schatzmann, L; Brunner, P; Stäubli, H U

    1998-01-01

    Preconditioning of soft tissues has become a common procedure in tensile testing to assess the history dependence of these viscoelastic materials. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing tensile properties of soft tissues-before and after cyclic preconditioning with high loads. Sixteen quadriceps tendon-bone (QT-B) complexes and 16 patellar ligament-bone (PL-B) complexes from a young population (mean age 24.9 +/- 4.4 years) were loaded to failure with a deformation rate of 1 mm/s. Half of the QT-B and the PL-B complexes underwent 200 uniaxial preconditioning cycles from 75 to 800 N at 0.5 Hz before ultimate failure loading. High-load preconditioning was made possible by the development of a highly reliable and easy-to-use cryofixation device to attach the free tendon end. PL-B complexes were more influenced by preconditioning than the QT-B complexes. Ultimate failure load, stiffness at 200 N and stiffness at 800 N were significantly higher for PL-B complexes after preconditioning, while the structural properties of QT-B complexes exhibited no significant alterations. The values of the mechanical properties like Young's modulus at 200 N and 800 N were much higher for both preconditioned specimen groups. In addition, ultimate stress was augmented by preconditioning for PL-B complexes. Hysteresis and creep effects were highest during the first few loading cycles. More than 160 cycles were needed to reach a steady state. Beyond 160 cycles there was no further creep, and hysteresis was almost constant. Creep values were 2.2% of the initial testing length for the QT-B and 3.2% of the initial testing length for the PL-B complexes. The effect of cyclic preconditioning seems to be caused by progressive fiber recruitment and by alterations of the interstitial fluid milieu.

  14. Angle- and gender-specific quadriceps femoris muscle recruitment and knee extensor torque.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, Danny M; Salfetnikov, Yuliya; Campy, Robert M; Coelho, Alan J

    2004-11-01

    The objectives were to examine knee angle-, and gender-specific knee extensor torque output and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle recruitment during maximal effort, voluntary contractions. Fourteen young adult men and 15 young adult women performed three isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), in a random order, with the knee at 0 degrees (terminal extension), 10 degrees, 30 degrees, 50 degrees, 70 degrees, and 90 degrees flexion. Knee extensor peak torque (PT), and average torque (AT) were expressed in absolute (N m), relative (N m kg(-1)) and allometric-modeled (N m kg(-n)) units. Vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscle EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle 3 s of each contraction, averaged over the three trials at each knee angle, and normalized to the activity recorded at 0 degrees. Muscle recruitment efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the normalized EMG of each muscle to the allometric-modeled average torque (normalized to the values at 0 degrees flexion), and expressed as a percent. Men generated significantly greater knee extensor PT and AT than women in absolute, relative and allometric-modeled units. Absolute and relative PT and AT were significantly highest at 70 degrees, while allometric-modeled values were observed to increase significantly across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees. VM EMG was significantly greater than the VL and RF muscles across all angles, and followed a similar pattern to absolute knee extensor torque. Recruitment efficiency improved across knee joint angles 10-90 degrees and was highest for the VL muscle. VM recruitment efficiency improved more than the VL and RF muscles across 70-90 degrees flexion. The findings demonstrate angle-, and gender-specific responses of knee extensor torque to maximal-effort contractions, while superficial QF muscle recruitment was most efficient at 90 degrees, and less dependent on gender.

  15. Analysis of three different equations for predicting quadriceps femoris muscle strength in patients with COPD *

    PubMed Central

    Nellessen, Aline Gonçalves; Donária, Leila; Hernandes, Nidia Aparecida; Pitta, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare equations for predicting peak quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle force; to determine the agreement among the equations in identifying QF muscle weakness in COPD patients; and to assess the differences in characteristics among the groups of patients classified as having or not having QF muscle weakness by each equation. Methods: Fifty-six COPD patients underwent assessment of peak QF muscle force by dynamometry (maximal voluntary isometric contraction of knee extension). Predicted values were calculated with three equations: an age-height-weight-gender equation (Eq-AHWG); an age-weight-gender equation (Eq-AWG); and an age-fat-free mass-gender equation (Eq-AFFMG). Results: Comparison of the percentage of predicted values obtained with the three equations showed that the Eq-AHWG gave higher values than did the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, with no difference between the last two. The Eq-AHWG showed moderate agreement with the Eq-AWG and Eq-AFFMG, whereas the last two also showed moderate, albeit lower, agreement with each other. In the sample as a whole, QF muscle weakness (< 80% of predicted) was identified by the Eq-AHWG, Eq-AWG, and Eq-AFFMG in 59%, 68%, and 70% of the patients, respectively (p > 0.05). Age, fat-free mass, and body mass index are characteristics that differentiate between patients with and without QF muscle weakness. Conclusions: The three equations were statistically equivalent in classifying COPD patients as having or not having QF muscle weakness. However, the Eq-AHWG gave higher peak force values than did the Eq-AWG and the Eq-AFFMG, as well as showing greater agreement with the other equations. PMID:26398750

  16. Association of muscle strength, power, and optimal shortening velocity with functional abilities of women with chronic osteoarthritis participating in a multi-modal exercise program.

    PubMed

    Kostka, Joanna S; Czernicki, Jan W; Kostka, Tomasz J

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the relative association of quadriceps muscle strength and power as well as optimal shortening velocity (υ(opt)) to physical functioning in 28 women aged 50-87 years with chronic osteoarthritis participating in a three-week multimodal exercise program. Quadriceps muscle strength, power, υ(opt), and functional performance using the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale, Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, Tinetti test, and 6-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) were assessed pre- and postrehabilitation. With rehabilitation, patients improved the values of strength, power, and the results of all functional tests. Both at baseline and postrehabilitation, functional status was more strongly related to power and υ(opt) than to strength. Functional gains obtained with rehabilitation were not related to changes in power or υ(opt), and only very modestly related to changes in strength. Future studies should assess the benefits and feasibility of power- and velocity-oriented training in patients with osteoarthritis.

  17. An exercise programme for the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stasinopoulos, D; Stasinopoulou, K; Johnson, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Home exercise programmes and exercise programmes carried out in a clinical setting are commonly advocated for the treatment of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET), a very common lesion of the arm with a well-defined clinical presentation. The aim of this study is to describe the use and effects of strengthening and stretching exercise programmes in the treatment of LET. Eccentric exercises: Slow progressive eccentric exercises for LET should be performed with the elbow in extension, forearm in pronation, and wrist in extended position (as high as possible). However, it is unclear how the injured tendon, which is loaded eccentrically, returns to the starting position without experiencing concentric loading and how the "slowness" of eccentric exercises should be defined. Nor has the treatment regimen of the eccentric exercises of a supervised exercise programme been defined. Stretching exercises: Static stretching is defined as passively stretching a given muscle-tendon unit by slowly placing and maintaining it in a maximal position of stretch. We recommend the position should be held for 30–45 s, three times before and three times after eccentric exercises during each treatment session with a 30 s rest interval between each procedure. The treatment region of static stretching exercises when a supervised exercise programme is performed is unknown. Discussion: A well designed trial is needed to study the effectiveness of a supervised exercise programme for LET consisting of eccentric and static stretching exercises. The issues relating to the supervised exercise programme should be defined so that therapists can replicate the programme. PMID:16306504

  18. The effect of water exercise therapy given to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danneskiold-Samsøe, B; Lyngberg, K; Risum, T; Telling, M

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis have a reduced muscular function. The positive effect of physical training on rheumatic patients has been shown. In this study the effect of exercise therapy performed in a heated swimming pool has been evaluated for eight patients in a non-acute stage of rheumatoid arthritis. The median pre-treatment maximal isometric and isokinetic quadriceps strength was 88 Nm (44-146) and 99 Nm (62-149) respectively, which was 61% and 70% of that found in a control group of healthy persons. After 2 months exercise therapy the median maximal isometric and isokinetic quadriceps strength increased by 38% and 16% compared to the pre-treatment value (p less than 0.02 and p less than 0.05). All patients, except one who developed cardiac arrhythmia during the second test, accomplished a submaximal bicycle test (a.m. Astrand). An increase in the aerobic capacity was observed in all patients after the training period.

  19. Angle-specific hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio: a comparison of football players and recreationally active males.

    PubMed

    Evangelidis, Pavlos Eleftherios; Pain, Matthew Thomas Gerard; Folland, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear how football participation affects knee-joint muscle balance, which is widely considered a risk factor for hamstrings injury. This study compared the angle-specific functional hamstring-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio (hamstrings eccentric torque as a ratio of quadriceps concentric torque at the same knee-joint angle) of football players with recreationally active controls. Ten male footballers and 14 controls performed maximal voluntary isometric and isovelocity concentric and eccentric contractions (60, 240 and 400° s(-1)) of the knee extensors and flexors. Gaussian fitting to the raw torque values was used to interpolate torque values for knee-joint angles of 100-160° (60° s(-1)), 105-160° (240° s(-1)) and 115-145° (400° s(-1)). The angle-specific functional H:Q ratio was calculated from the knee flexors eccentric and knee extensors concentric torque at the same velocity and angle. No differences were found for the angle-specific functional H:Q ratio between groups, at any velocity. Quadriceps and hamstrings strength relative to body mass of footballers and controls was similar for all velocities, except concentric knee flexor strength at 400° s(-1) (footballers +40%; P < 0.01). In previously uninjured football players, there was no intrinsic muscle imbalance and therefore the high rate of hamstring injuries seen in this sport may be due to other risk factors and/or simply regular exposure to a high-risk activity.

  20. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    Prevention - learn to love exercise; Wellness - learn to love exercise ... With so many options for exercise, there is no need to suffer through a workout you do not like. Be true to yourself. Look for activities that ...

  1. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  2. Diet and Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News & Publications Annual Meeting Calendar Diet and Exercise Tips Diet and Exercise Tips News media interested in covering the latest ... Health Statistics concludes that 35 percent of adults exercise regularly (more than 6 of 10 don’t), ...

  3. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  4. Bonds that strengthen under force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Viola

    2006-03-01

    While the adhesive strength of most receptor-ligand interactions is exponentially reduced if strained, some receptor-ligand complexes exist that strengthen under force which is the hallmark of catch bonds. Although the existence of catch bonds was theoretically predicted, the first experimental demonstrations of their existence were given only recently, i.e. for the bacterial adhesin FimH that is located at the tip of type I fimbriae of E. coli and for p-selectin. In a major collaborative effort, we studied the structural origin by which the FimH-mannose bond is switched by force to a high binding state. Mutational studies were thereby combined with steered molecular dynamic simulations to decipher how force might affect protein conformation. Force-activation of FimH leads to a complex `stick-and-roll' bacterial adhesion behavior in which E. coli preferentially rolls over mannosylated surfaces at low shear but increasingly sticks firmly as the shear is increased. Interesting similarities are further seen if comparing the structural mechanisms by which liganded FimH and liganded integrins are switched to a high binding state. This comparison was made possible by docking fibronectin's 10^th type III module (fnIII10) to αVβ3 integrin. αVβ3 can switch from the ``closed'' αVβ3 integrin headpiece to the ``open'' conformation by opening the hinge angle between the βA domain and the hybrid domain of the β-integrin. The ``open'' state has been implicated by many experimental laboratories to correspond to the activated state of integrins. W. E. Thomas, E. Trintchina, M. Forero, V. Vogel, E. Sokurenko, Bacterial adhesion to target cells enhanced by shear-force, Cell, 109 (2002) 913. W. E. Thomas, L. M. Nilsson, M. Forero, E. V. Sokurenko, V. Vogel, Shear-dependent `stick-and-roll' adhesion of type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli, Molecular Microbiology 53 (2004) 1545. W. Thomas, M. Forero, O. Yakovenko, L. Nilsson, P. Vicini, E. Sokurenko, V. Vogel, Catch Bond Model

  5. Bilateral consecutive rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a man with BstUI polymorphism of the COL5A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Fazio, Vito; Poeta, Maria Luana; Rabitti, Carla; Franceschi, Francesco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    A genetic component has been implicated in tendinopathies involving tendon rupture. Type V collagen, a quantitatively minor fibrillar collagen which forms heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen, plays a role in the regulation of the size and configuration of fibrils of the much more abundant component type I collagen. To date, no data on the genetic component of bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon have been reported. We describe the presence of BstUI polymorphism of the COL5A1 gene in a man with bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon. The COL5A1 (the variant rs12722, BstUI RFLP) can be a candidate gene associated with the development of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

  6. Transcriptome Analysis in Venom Gland of the Predatory Giant Ant Dinoponera quadriceps: Insights into the Polypeptide Toxin Arsenal of Hymenopterans

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Leung, Siu Wai; Prieto-da-Silva, Álvaro R. B.; Havt, Alexandre; Quinet, Yves P.; Martins, Alice M. C.; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Dinoponera quadriceps is a predatory giant ant that inhabits the Neotropical region and subdues its prey (insects) with stings that deliver a toxic cocktail of molecules. Human accidents occasionally occur and cause local pain and systemic symptoms. A comprehensive study of the D. quadriceps venom gland transcriptome is required to advance our knowledge about the toxin repertoire of the giant ant venom and to understand the physiopathological basis of Hymenoptera envenomation. Results We conducted a transcriptome analysis of a cDNA library from the D. quadriceps venom gland with Sanger sequencing in combination with whole-transcriptome shotgun deep sequencing. From the cDNA library, a total of 420 independent clones were analyzed. Although the proportion of dinoponeratoxin isoform precursors was high, the first giant ant venom inhibitor cysteine-knot (ICK) toxin was found. The deep next generation sequencing yielded a total of 2,514,767 raw reads that were assembled into 18,546 contigs. A BLAST search of the assembled contigs against non-redundant and Swiss-Prot databases showed that 6,463 contigs corresponded to BLASTx hits and indicated an interesting diversity of transcripts related to venom gene expression. The majority of these venom-related sequences code for a major polypeptide core, which comprises venom allergens, lethal-like proteins and esterases, and a minor peptide framework composed of inter-specific structurally conserved cysteine-rich toxins. Both the cDNA library and deep sequencing yielded large proportions of contigs that showed no similarities with known sequences. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of the venom gland transcriptome of the New World giant ant D. quadriceps. The glandular venom system was dissected, and the toxin arsenal was revealed; this process brought to light novel sequences that included an ICK-folded toxins, allergen proteins, esterases (phospholipases and carboxylesterases), and lethal

  7. The Independent and Interactive Effects of Navicular Drop and Quadriceps Angle on Neuromuscular Responses to a Weight-Bearing Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J; Carcia, Christopher R; Gansneder, Bruce M; Perrin, David H

    2006-01-01

    Context: Little is known about the effects of static alignment on neuromuscular control of the knee during dynamic motion. Objective: To evaluate the isolated and combined effects of quadriceps angle (QA) and navicular drop (ND) on neuromuscular responses to a weight-bearing perturbation. Design: Mixed-model, repeated-measures design. Setting: Sports medicine and athletic training research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seventy-nine National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate female athletes, classified with below-average ND and QA (LND-LQA); below-average ND and above-average QA (LND-HQA); above-average ND and below-average QA (HND-LQA); or above-average ND and QA (HND-HQA). Intervention(s): A lower extremity perturbation device produced a forward and either internal or external rotation of the trunk and femur on the weight-bearing tibia to evoke a reflex response. Main Outcome Measure(s): Neuromuscular responses were examined in the quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius muscles: preperturbation amplitude 50 milliseconds before the perturbation, reflex time, and postperturbation amplitude 150 milliseconds immediately postperturbation. Results: Navicular drop had the greatest effect on preperturbation amplitude of the lateral hamstrings and postperturbation amplitude of all muscles, with greater activation amplitude noted in subjects in the HND classifications. Quadriceps angle primarily affected reflex time of the quadriceps; in subjects with LQA, reflex time was faster for internal rotation than external rotation perturbations. The interaction between ND and QA had the greatest effect on reflex time of the lateral hamstrings. For internal rotation perturbations, subjects in the LND classifications had faster reflex times in the lateral hamstrings if they had HQA values rather than LQA values. With external rotation perturbations, HND-LQA subjects had slower reflex times than those in all other alignment classifications

  8. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  9. Muscle fatigue during high-intensity exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Sébastien; Duché, Pascale; Williams, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    than that of healthy boys, but others have reported that the fatigue in DMD and in normal muscle was the same. Children with glycogenosis type V and VII and dermatomyositis, and obese children tolerate exercise weakly and show an early fatigue. Studies that have investigated the fatigability in children with cerebral palsy have indicated that the femoris quadriceps was less fatigable than that of a control group but the fatigability of the triceps surae was the same between the two groups. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the origins of muscle fatigue in healthy and diseased children. The use of non-invasive measurement tools such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in paediatric exercise science will give researchers more insight in the future. PMID:17123327

  10. Impaired exercise tolerance and skeletal muscle myopathy in sulfonylurea receptor-2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Stoller, Douglas; Pytel, Peter; Katz, Sophie; Earley, Judy U.; Collins, Keith; Metcalfe, Jamie; Lang, Roberto M.

    2009-01-01

    By sensing intracellular energy levels, ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels help regulate vascular tone, glucose metabolism, and cardioprotection. SUR2 mutant mice lack full-length KATP channels in striated and smooth muscle and display a complex phenotype of hypertension and coronary vasospasm. SUR2 mutant mice also display baseline cardioprotection and can withstand acute sympathetic stress better than normal mice. We now studied response to a form of chronic stress, namely that induced by 4 wk of daily exercise on SUR2 mutant mice. Control mice increased exercise capacity by 400% over the training period, while SUR2 mutant mice showed little increase in exercise capacity. Unexercised SUR2 mutant showed necrotic and regenerating fibers in multiple muscle skeletal muscles, including quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and diaphragm muscles. Unlike exercised control animals, SUR2 mutant mice did not lose weight, presumably due to less overall exertion. Unexercised SUR2 mutant mice showed a trend of mildly reduced cardiac function, measured by fractional shortening, (46 ± 4% vs. 57 ± 7% for SUR2 mutant and control, respectively), and this decrease was not exacerbated by chronic exercise exposure. Despite an improved response to acute sympathetic stress and baseline cardioprotection, exercise intolerance results from lack of SUR2 KATP channels in mice. PMID:19675276

  11. Muscle mitochondrial density after exhaustive exercise in dogs - Prolonged restricted activity and retraining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazar, K.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Philpott, D.; Pohoska, E.; Olszewska, K.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of exhaustive treadmill exercise on mitochondrial density (MD) and ultrastructural changes in quadriceps femoris muscle was studied in 7 normal, healthy, male mongrel dogs before and after restricted activity (RA) and following a subsequent 2-month exercise retraining period. Mean time to exhaustion in the 2-month group decreased from 177 +/- 11 min before to 90 +/- 16 min after RA; retraining increased tolerance to 219 +/- 36 min above the pre-RA and 143 percent above the post-RA time. Post-RA exhaustion time in the 5-months group was 25 and 45 min. Muscle samples taken after RA showed abnormalities indicative of degeneration, which were reversed by retraining. Resting MD decreased from a control level of 27.8 percent to 14.7 percent and 16.3 percent, and was restored to 27.1 percent after retraining. Exhaustive exercise caused an increase in MD under control conditions and after RA, but not following retraining. Disruption of mitochondria after exercise was evident after 5-month confinement. Factors causing mitochondrial changes and eventually their disruption during exercise after restricted activity are not related as much to the state of fatigue as to the pre-exercise quality of the muscle modified by disease or training.

  12. Effect of fluid ingestion on neuromuscular function during prolonged cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vallier, J; Grego, F; Basset, F; Lepers, R; Bernard, T; Brisswalter, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of fluid ingestion on neuromuscular function during prolonged cycling exercise. Methods: Eight well trained subjects exercised for 180 minutes in a moderate environment at a workload requiring ∼60% maximal oxygen uptake. Two conditions, fluid (F) and no fluid (NF) ingestion, were investigated. Results: During maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC), prolonged cycling exercise reduced (p<0.05) the maximal force generating capacity of quadriceps muscles (after three hours of cycling) and root mean square (RMS) values (after two hours of cycling) with no difference between the two conditions despite greater body weight loss (p<0.05) in NF. The mean power frequency (MPF) for vastus lateralis muscle was reduced (p<0.05) and the rate of force development (RFD) was increased (p<0.05) only during NF. During cycling exercise, integrated electromyographic activity and perceived exertion were increased in both conditions (p<0.05) with no significant effect of fluid ingestion. Conclusions: The results suggest that fluid ingestion did not prevent the previously reported decrease in maximal force with exercise duration, but seems to have a positive effect on some indicators of neuromuscular fatigue such as mean power frequency and rate of force development during maximal voluntary contraction. Further investigations are needed to assess the effect of change in hydration on neural mechanisms linked to the development of muscular fatigue during prolonged exercise. PMID:15793075

  13. HIV communication capacity strengthening: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Lettenmaier, Cheryl; Kraft, Joan Marie; Raisanen, Keris; Serlemitsos, Elizabeth

    2014-08-15

    HIV communication is most effective and sustainable when it is designed and implemented locally and tailored to the local context. This requires capacity strengthening at national, subnational, and community levels. Through a review of the published and selected "grey" literature, we examine HIV communication capacity strengthening: definitions, measurements, implementation, and effects. We found limited documentation of HIV communication capacity needs or systematic approaches to address them. Most HIV communication capacity strengthening to date has focused on building individual competencies to design and manage social and behavior change communication programs through training courses, often coupled with networking opportunities for participants, post-training mentoring, and technical assistance. A few of these efforts have been evaluated through pre- and post-training tests and qualitative interviews with participants and have shown potential for improvement in individual skills and knowledge. Health communication capacity assessment tools that measure individual and organizational competencies exist, but they have most often been used to identify capacity building needs, not for evaluating capacity strengthening efforts. A new definition of capacity strengthening, grown out of recent efforts to improve effectiveness of international health and development programs, focuses on improving organizational and societal systems that support performance and individual competencies. We propose a holistic model for HIV communication capacity strengthening and call for rigorous documentation and evaluation to determine and scale-up optimal capacity building interventions for strengthening social and behavior change communication for HIV prevention, care, and treatment in developing countries. PMID:25007200

  14. Emergency exercise methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  15. Association of Quadriceps Muscle Fat With Isometric Strength Measurements in Healthy Males Using Chemical Shift Encoding-Based Water-Fat Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Thomas; Inhuber, Stephanie; Dieckmeyer, Michael; Cordes, Christian; Ruschke, Stefan; Klupp, Elisabeth; Jungmann, Pia M.; Farlock, Rosanna; Eggers, Holger; Kooijman, Hendrik; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Schwirtz, Ansgar; Kirschke, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance–based assessment of quadriceps muscle fat has been proposed as surrogate marker in sarcopenia, osteoarthritis, and neuromuscular disorders. We presently investigated the association of quadriceps muscle fat with isometric strength measurements in healthy males using chemical shift encoding-based water-fat magnetic resonance imaging. Intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with isometric strength (up to r = −0.83 and −0.87, respectively). Reproducibility of intermuscular adipose tissue fraction and intramuscular proton density fat fraction was 1.5% and 5.7%, respectively. PMID:26953765

  16. Exercise countermeasures for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sandler, H

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a physiological basis for the use of exercise as a weightlessness countermeasure, outline special considerations for the development of exercise countermeasures, review and evaluate exercise used during space flight, and provide new approaches and concepts for the implementation of novel exercise countermeasures for future space flight. The discussion of the physiological basis for countermeasures examines maximal oxygen uptake, blood volume, metabolic responses to work, muscle function, bone loss, and orthostatic instability. The discussion of considerations for exercise prescriptions during space flight includes operational considerations, type of exercise, fitness considerations, age and gender, and psychological considerations. The discussion of exercise currently used in space flight examines cycle ergometry, the treadmill, strength training devices, electrical stimulation, and the Penguin suit worn by Russian crews. New approaches to exercise countermeasures include twin bicycles, dynamic resistance exercisers, maximal exercise effects, grasim (gravity simulators), and the relationship between exercise and LBNP. PMID:11541470

  17. A review of the clinical evidence for exercise in osteoarthritis of the hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease with the hip and knee being commonly affected lower limb sites. Osteoarthritis causes pain, stiffness, swelling, joint instability and muscle weakness, all of which can lead to impaired physical function and reduced quality of life. This review of evidence provides recommendations for exercise prescription in those with hip or knee OA. A narrative review was performed. Conservative non-pharmacological strategies, particularly exercise, are recommended by all clinical guidelines for the management of OA and meta-analyses support these exercise recommendations. Aerobic, strengthening, aquatic and Tai chi exercise are beneficial for improving pain and function in people with OA with benefits seen across the range of disease severities. The optimal exercise dosage is yet to be determined and an individualized approach to exercise prescription is required based on an assessment of impairments, patient preference, co-morbidities and accessibility. Maximising adherence is a key element dictating success of exercise therapy. This can be enhanced by the use of supervised exercise sessions (possibly in class format) in the initial exercise period followed by home exercises. Bringing patients back for intermittent consultations with the exercise practitioner, or attendance at "refresher" group exercise classes may also assist long-term adherence and improved patient outcomes. Few studies have evaluated the effects of exercise on structural disease progression and there is currently no evidence to show that exercise can be disease modifying. Exercise plays an important role in managing symptoms in those with hip and knee OA.

  18. Roles of exercise and pharmacokinetics in cerivastatin-induced skeletal muscle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Seachrist, Jennifer L; Loi, Cho-Ming; Evans, Mark G; Criswell, Kay A; Rothwell, Charles E

    2005-12-01

    Three-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are associated with adverse skeletal muscle effects, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To determine whether toxicity involves the level of drug exposure in muscle tissue and to test the effect of exercise on cerivastatin (CVA)-induced skeletal muscle damage, female rats were administered vehicle or CVA at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg/day by gavage for two weeks and exercised or not on treadmills for 20 min/day. Clinical chemistry and plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics were evaluated; light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of Type I and Type II fiber-predominant skeletal muscles were performed. Serum levels of AST, ALT, CK, and plasma lactic acid were significantly elevated dose-dependently. CVA treatment decreased psoas and quadriceps weights. At 1 mg/kg all muscles except soleus demonstrated degeneration. Exercise-exacerbated severity of CVA-induced degeneration was evident in all muscles sampled except soleus and quadriceps. Early mitochondrial involvement in toxicity is suggested by the numerous membranous whorls and degenerate mitochondria observed in muscles at 0.5 mg/kg. No significant differences in CVA concentrations between either EDL and soleus or plasma and muscle were found. We found that CVA had no effect on cleaved caspase 3. In summary, we found that treadmill exercise exacerbated the incidence and severity of CVA-induced damage in Type II fiber-predominant muscles. Tissue exposure is likely not the key factor mediating CVA-induced skeletal muscle toxicity.

  19. Strengthening Concurrent Enrollment through NACEP Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Kent; McLemore, Yvette; Lowe, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how implementing the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships' 17 accreditation standards strengthens a concurrent enrollment program, enhances secondary-postsecondary relations, and benefits students, their families, and secondary and postsecondary institutions.

  20. Strengthening mechanisms of tungsten powder reinforced uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.K.; Hill, M.A.; Rollett, A.D.; Dunn, P.S.; Mortensen, A.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA )

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten powder reinforced uranium exhibits a three-fold increase in yield strength due to precipitation hardening. The tungsten-rich interphase precipitates form at moving phase boundaries during slow cooling. Further increases in yield strength, attained with increasing tungsten content, are due to composite strengthening; this is verified by increasing elastic modulus with increasing tungsten content. Age hardening behavior is observed, with strengthening occurring at aging temperatures low in the alpha phase. Aging higher in alpha gives initial strengthening followed by rapid overaging. Beta phase aging results in a very soft structure with precipitates visible optically. Wrought material exhibits significant strain hardening as well as composite strengthening due to elongation of the tungsten particles. 7 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Sleep On It: How Snoozing Strengthens Memories

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Sleep On It How Snoozing Strengthens Memories When you learn something new, the best way to remember it is to sleep on it. That’s because sleeping ...

  2. Bone mineral density, muscle strength, and recreational exercise in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow-Harter, C.; Whalen, R.; Myburgh, K.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Muscle strength has been shown to predict bone mineral density (BMD) in women. We examined this relationship in 50 healthy men who ranged in age from 28 to 51 years (average 38.3 years). BMD of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, whole body, and tibia were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000W). Dynamic strength using one repetition maximum was assessed for the biceps, quadriceps, and back extensors and for the hip abductors, adductors, and flexors. Isometric grip strength was measured by dynamometry. Daily walking mileage was assessed by 9 week stepmeter records and kinematic analysis of video filming. Subjects were designated as exercisers and nonexercisers. Exercisers participated in recreational exercise at least two times each week. The results demonstrated that BMD at all sites correlated with back and biceps strength (p < 0.01 to p = 0.0001). Body weight correlated with tibia and whole-body BMD (p < 0.001); age negatively correlated with Ward's triangle BMD (p < 0.01). In stepwise multiple regressions, back strength was the only independent predictor of spine and femoral neck density (R2 = 0.27). Further, back strength was the most robust predictor of BMD at the trochanter, Ward's triangle, whole body, and tibia, although biceps strength, age, body weight, and leg strength contributed significantly to BMD at these skeletal sites, accounting for 35-52% of the variance in BMD. Exercisers and nonexercisers were similar for walking (3.97 versus 3.94 miles/day), age (37.8 versus 38.5) years, and weight (80.0 versus 77.7 kg). However, BMD and muscle strength were significantly greater in exercises than in nonexercisers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  4. Knee extensor torque and quadriceps femoris EMG during perceptually-guided isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Coelho, A J; Campy, R M; Salfetnikov, Y; Suter, E

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine superficial quadriceps femoris (QF) EMG and torque at perceived voluntary contraction efforts. Thirty subjects (15 males, 15 females) performed 9, 5 s, sub-maximal contractions at prescribed levels of perceived voluntary effort at points 1-9 on an 11-point scale (0-10), in a random order. Surface electromyograms (EMG) of the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles, as well as QF peak torque (PT), average torque (AT), and torque coefficient of variation (C.V.), were sampled. The raw EMG signals were full-wave rectified and integrated over the middle three s of each contraction. The sampled EMG signals, and PT and AT at each perceived exertion level were normalized to the average of three maximal voluntary contractions. The normalized EMG and torque values at each perceived exertion level were then compared to equivalent percent values (i.e., 10% at a perceived level of 1). The results demonstrated that at all perceived exertion levels, with the exception of the RF at a level of 2 which was equivalent to 20%, and the VL and RF muscles at a level 1 in which activation was greater than 10%, activation was significantly less than the equivalent percent value at each point on the scale. VM EMG was found to be less than the VL and RF from contraction levels 3-9. PT was shown to be less than the equivalent percent values at contraction levels 6-9. The AT was found to be lower than the expected percent value at perceived effort levels 2-9. Torque C.V. was not found to be different across the range of perceived effort. The major findings of this study suggested that humans over-estimate voluntary QF muscle torque when guided by perceptual sensations. It is also suggested that the produced EMG signals revealed a reliance on the VL muscle for knee extensor torque generation at sub-maximal levels.

  5. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  6. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  7. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  8. A preliminary, randomized trial of aerobic exercise for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard A; Abrantes, Ana M; Minami, Haruka; Read, Jennifer P; Marcus, Bess H; Jakicic, John M; Strong, David R; Dubreuil, Mary Ella; Gordon, Alan A; Ramsey, Susan E; Kahler, Christopher W; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-07-01

    Interventions targeting physical activity may be valuable as an adjunct to alcohol treatment, but have been relatively untested. In the current study, alcohol dependent, physically sedentary patients were randomized to: a 12-week moderate-intensity, group aerobic exercise intervention (AE; n=25) or a brief advice to exercise intervention (BA-E; n=23). Results showed that individuals in AE reported significantly fewer drinking and heavy drinking days, relative to BA-E during treatment. Furthermore adherence to AE strengthened the beneficial effect of intervention on alcohol use outcomes. While high levels of moderate-intensity exercise appeared to facilitate alcohol recovery regardless of intervention arm, attending the group-based AE intervention seemed to further enhance the positive effects of exercise on alcohol use. Study findings indicate that a moderate intensity, group aerobic exercise intervention is an efficacious adjunct to alcohol treatment. Improving adherence to the intervention may enhance its beneficial effects on alcohol use.

  9. [Diabetes mellitus and exercise].

    PubMed

    Yoh, Kousei

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important life-style related diseases. As for the type 2 diabetes mellitus in particular, lack of exercise has a large influence on the onset and disease progress. We can improve glucose tolerance by exercising. Exercise is the most important fundamental treatment in diabetes mellitus. Continuation and safety become important to let exercise therapy succeed. It is important with a diabetic that a lot of patients without exercise habit should start to gain exercise habit. When we expect an exercise effect, we should take consideration of intensity and volume in exercise for performing. We should consider each contraindication matter even if we put it to have many complications with a diabetic when we perform exercise therapy. A case-by-case exercise treatment in diabetic patient is required.

  10. Increased hypoxic ventilatory sensitivity during exercise in man: are neural afferents necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, J J; Bergstrom, E; Frankel, H L; Robbins, P A

    1994-01-01

    1. The acute ventilatory response to 3 min periods of hypoxia (AHR) was examined in nine patients with clinically complete spinal cord transection (T4-T7) during (a) rest and (b) electrically induced leg exercise (EEL). 2. EEL was produced by surface electrode stimulation of the quadriceps muscles so as to cause the legs to extend at the knee against gravity. End-tidal PCO2 was held constant 1-2 mmHg above resting values throughout both protocols. 3. On exercise, the average increase in metabolic CO2 production (VCO2 +/- S.E.M.) was 41 +/- 5 ml min-1. Venous lactate levels did not rise with exercise. 4. Baseline euoxic ventilation did not increase significantly with EEL, but there was a consistent and highly significant increase in the ventilatory response to hypoxia during EEL (mean delta AHR +/- S.E.M. of 1.6 +/- 0.21 min-1). 5. We conclude that an increase in hypoxic sensitivity during exercise can occur in the absence of volitional control of exercise and in the absence of afferent neural input from the limbs. PMID:8071884

  11. The effects of electrical stimulation and exercise therapy in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel A.; Tan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation on muscle strength and functional activities in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 24 subjects who were diagnosed with LGMD by the Neurology Department of the Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey and were referred to the Physical Therapy Department between May 2013 and December 2014. Subjects were enrolled into an electrical stimulation (11 patients) group, or an exercise therapy (13 patients) group. Results: The mean age of patients was 31.62 years in the electrical stimulation group, and 30.14 years in the exercise therapy group. The most important results in this controlled clinical study were that the muscle strength in both groups was significantly decreased and post-treatment evaluation results indicated that muscle strength of the Deltoideus was higher in the electrical stimulation group, and the difference between the groups was maintained in the follow-up period (p<0.05). However, the muscle strength of quadriceps was similar in both groups, according to the post-treatment and follow-up evaluation results (p>0.05). Additionally, the electrical stimulation group presented more obvious overall improvements than the exercise therapy group according to muscle strength, endurance, and timed performance tests. Conclusions: Since no definitive treatments currently exist for patients with LGMD, these results provide important information on the role of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation for clinicians working in rehabilitation. PMID:26166595

  12. Self directed home based electrical muscle stimulation training improves exercise tolerance and strength in healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Brian; Prendergast, Ann; Rainsford, Gary; Minogue, Conor

    2013-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with a gradual decline in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and subsequent capacity for activities of daily living. It is important that we develop effective strategies to halt this process of gradual decline in order to enhance functional ability and capacity for independent living. To achieve this, we must overcome the challenge of sustaining ongoing engagement in physical exercise programmes in the sedentary elderly population, particularly those who experience barriers to exercise participation. Recent developments in electrical muscle stimulation technology could provide a potential solution. In this pilot case-control study we investigated the effects of a self-directed home based programme of electrical muscle stimulation training on muscle strength and exercise tolerance in a group of 16 healthy elderly volunteers (10f, 6m). Study participants completed 30 separate 1-hour electrical muscle stimulation sessions at home over a 6-week period. We observed significant improvements in quadriceps muscle strength and 6-minute walk distance, suggesting that this form of electrical muscle stimulation training has promise as an exercise modality in the elderly population.

  13. Physiological benefits of exercise in artificial gravity: A broadband countermeasure to space flight related deconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Jessica L.; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence R.

    2008-07-01

    Current countermeasures to space flight related physiological deconditioning have not been sufficiently effective. We believe that a comprehensive countermeasure is the combination of intermittent centrifugation (artificial gravity) and exercise. We aim to test the long-term effectiveness of this combination in terms of fitness benefits. As a first-order determination of effectiveness, subjects participated in an eight-week exercise program. Three times per week, they exercised using a stair-stepper on a short-radius (2 m) centrifuge spinning at 30 RPM, maintaining a target heart rate that was systematically increased over the exercise period. During the sessions, foot forces and stepping cadence, heart rate, and perceived exertion were measured. Before and after the eight-week exercise program, measurements included: body fat percentage, bone mineral content, quadriceps extension strength, push-ups endurance, stepping cadence for a given heart rate, and maximum stepping endurance. We find that stair-stepping on a centrifuge is safe and comfortable. Preliminary fitness results indicate that stair-stepping on a centrifuge may be effective in improving aerobic fitness, body composition, and strength. These results indicate that such a combination may also be effective as a countermeasure to space flight deconditioning.

  14. Muscle recruitment patterns regulate physiological responses during exercise of the same intensity.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, M R; Kraemer, W J; McCoy, R W; Volek, J S; Turner, B M; Weinlein, J C

    2000-12-01

    On different days, 10 men performed 30-min sessions of cycling at 50-55% of their peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)); one at 40 rpm and another at 80 rpm. Rectal temperature, heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma lactate, glucose, insulin, and cortisol were measured before exercise, during the 15th and 30th min of exercise, and at 5 and 10 min postexercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed 15 and 30 min into exercise. Electromyography established cadence-specific different intensities of quadriceps activation during cycling. At minute 30 of exercise and 5 min postexercise, HR was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at 40 rpm than at 80 rpm. MAP remained elevated longer after the 40-rpm than after the 80-rpm bout. Similarly, exercise-induced increases in plasma lactate persisted longer after the 40-rpm bout. Cortisol levels were elevated only at 40 rpm. RPE was higher during the slower cadence. These data indicated that the more pronounced muscle activation pattern associated with pedaling at 40 rpm resulted in greater physiological and psychophysiological stress than that observed at 80 rpm even though VO(2) was the same.

  15. Inhibition of α-adrenergic tone disturbs the distribution of blood flow in the exercising human limb.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Wendelin-Saarenhovi, Maria; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Knuuti, Juhani; Scheinin, Mika; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2013-07-15

    The role of neuronal regulation of human cardiovascular function remains incompletely elucidated, especially during exercise. Here we, by positron emission tomography, monitored tissue-specific blood flow (BF) changes in nine healthy young men during femoral arterial infusions of norepinephrine (NE) and phentolamine. At rest, the α-adrenoceptor agonist NE reduced BF by ~40%, similarly in muscles (from 3.2 ± 1.9 to 1.4 ± 0.3 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1) in quadriceps femoris muscle), bone (from 1.1 ± 0.4 to 0.5 ± 0.2 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)) and adipose tissue (AT) (from 1.2 ± 0.7 to 0.7 ± 0.3 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)). During exercise, NE reduced exercising muscle BF by ~16%. BF in AT was reduced similarly as rest. The α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine increased BF similarly in the different muscles and other tissues of the limb at rest. During exercise, BF in inactive muscle was increased 3.4-fold by phentolamine compared with exercise without drug, but BF in exercising muscles was not influenced. Bone and AT (P = 0.055) BF were also increased by phentolamine in the exercise condition. NE increased and phentolamine decreased oxygen extraction in the limb during exercise. We conclude that inhibition of α-adrenergic tone markedly disturbs the distribution of BF and oxygen extraction in the exercising human limb by increasing BF especially around inactive muscle fibers. Moreover, although marked functional sympatholysis also occurs during exercise, the arterial NE infusion that mimics the exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity commonly seen in patients with cardiovascular disease was still capable of directly limiting BF in the exercising leg muscles.

  16. Reduction of O2 slow component by priming exercise: novel mechanistic insights from time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Poole, David C; Barstow, Thomas J; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiwaki, Masato; Okushima, Dai; Koga, Shunsaku

    2015-01-01

    Novel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS), with adipose tissue thickness correction, was used to test the hypotheses that heavy priming exercise reduces the V̇O2 slow component (V̇O2SC) (1) by elevating microvascular [Hb] volume at multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris (2) rather than reducing the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics. Twelve subjects completed two 6-min bouts of heavy work rate exercise, separated by 6 min of unloaded cycling. Priming exercise induced faster overall V̇O2 kinetics consequent to a substantial reduction in the V̇O2SC (0.27 ± 0.12 vs. 0.11 ± 0.09 L·min−1, P < 0.05) with an unchanged primary V̇O2 time constant. An increased baseline for the primed bout [total (Hb + Mb)] (197.5 ± 21.6 vs. 210.7 ± 22.5 μmol L−1, P < 0.01), reflecting increased microvascular [Hb] volume, correlated significantly with the V̇O2SC reduction. At multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris, priming exercise reduced the baseline and slowed the increase in [deoxy (Hb + Mb)]. Changes in the intersite coefficient of variation in the time delay and time constant of [deoxy (Hb + Mb)] during the second bout were not correlated with the V̇O2SC reduction. These results support a mechanistic link between priming exercise-induced increase in muscle [Hb] volume and the reduced V̇O2SC that serves to speed overall V̇O2 kinetics. However, reduction in the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics does not appear to be an obligatory feature of the priming response. PMID:26109190

  17. Transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity affects exercise-induced changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability and inhibition and voluntary activation.

    PubMed

    Bachasson, D; Temesi, J; Gruet, M; Yokoyama, K; Rupp, T; Millet, G Y; Verges, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex during voluntary contractions elicits electrophysiological and mechanical responses in the target muscle. The effect of different TMS intensities on exercise-induced changes in TMS-elicited variables is unknown, impairing data interpretation. This study aimed to investigate TMS intensity effects on maximal voluntary activation (VATMS), motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), and silent periods (SPs) in the quadriceps muscles before, during, and after exhaustive isometric exercise. Eleven subjects performed sets of ten 5-s submaximal isometric quadriceps contractions at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) strength until task failure. Three different TMS intensities (I100, I75, I50) eliciting MEPs of 53 ± 6%, 38 ± 5% and 25 ± 3% of maximal compound action potential (Mmax) at 20% MVC were used. MEPs and SPs were assessed at both absolute (40% baseline MVC) and relative (50%, 75%, and 100% MVC) force levels. VATMS was assessed with I100 and I75. When measured at absolute force level, MEP/Mmax increased during exercise at I50, decreased at I100 and remained unchanged at I75. No TMS intensity effect was observed at relative force levels. At both absolute and relative force levels, SPs increased at I100 and remained stable at I75 and I50. VATMS assessed at I75 tended to be lower than at I100. TMS intensity affects exercise-induced changes in MEP/Mmax (only when measured at absolute force level), SPs, and VATMS. These results indicate a single TMS intensity assessing maximal voluntary activation and exercise-induced changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability/inhibition may be inappropriate.

  18. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  19. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  20. Boron strengthening in FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; Li, X.; Xiao, H.; Klein, O.; Nelson, C.; Carleton, R.L.; George, E.P.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of boron on the strength of B2-structured FeAl is considered as a function of composition, grain size and temperature. Boron does not affect the concentrations of antisite atoms or vacancies present, with the former increasing and the latter decreasing with increasing deviation from the stoichiometric composition. When vacancies are absent, the strength increase per at. % B per unit lattice strain, {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) increases with increasing aluminum concentration, but when vacancies are present (>45 at. % Al), {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) decreases again. Boron increases grain size strengthening in FeAl. B strengthening is roughly independent of temperature up to the yield strength peak but above the point, when diffusion-assisted deformation occurs, boron strengthening increases dramatically.

  1. New concept of critical infrastructure strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, Talgat R.; Orlov, Pavel E.; Zabolotsky, Alexander M.; Kuksenko, Sergey P.

    2016-06-01

    Strengthening of critical infrastructure is considered. Modal reservation of electronics is proposed as a new concept of the strengthening. The concept combines a widely used cold backup and a recently proposed modal filtration. It makes electronics reliable as well as protected against electromagnetic interference, especially the ultra-wide band pulses. New printed circuit board structure is suggested for implementation of the proposed concept. Results of simulation in time and frequency domains are presented for the suggested structures. Considerable attenuation of dangerous excitations shows that the new concept and structure are promising.

  2. Recovery from cycling exercise: effects of carbohydrate and protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Boop, Christopher A; Luden, Nicholas D; Smith, Alexia G; Womack, Christopher J; Saunders, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different carbohydrate-protein (CHO + Pro) beverages were compared during recovery from cycling exercise. Twelve male cyclists (VO(2peak): 65 ± 7 mL/kg/min) completed ~1 h of high-intensity intervals (EX1). Immediately and 120 min following EX1, subjects consumed one of three calorically-similar beverages (285-300 kcal) in a cross-over design: carbohydrate-only (CHO; 75 g per beverage), high-carbohydrate/low-protein (HCLP; 45 g CHO, 25 g Pro, 0.5 g fat), or low-carbohydrate/high-protein (LCHP; 8 g CHO, 55 g Pro, 4 g fat). After 4 h of recovery, subjects performed subsequent exercise (EX2; 20 min at 70% VO(2peak) + 20 km time-trial). Beverages were also consumed following EX2. Blood glucose levels (30 min after beverage ingestion) differed across all treatments (CHO > HCLP > LCHP; p < 0.05), and serum insulin was higher following CHO and HCLP ingestion versus LCHP. Peak quadriceps force, serum creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and fatigue/energy ratings measured pre- and post-exercise were not different between treatments. EX2 performance was not significantly different between CHO (48.5 ± 1.5 min), HCLP (48.8 ± 2.1 min) and LCHP (50.3 ± 2.7 min). Beverages containing similar caloric content but different proportions of carbohydrate/protein provided similar effects on muscle recovery and subsequent exercise performance in well-trained cyclists. PMID:22852050

  3. Acute alcohol consumption aggravates the decline in muscle performance following strenuous eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute moderate alcohol intake on muscular performance during recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Eleven healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed a beverage containing 1g/kg bodyweight ethanol (as vodka and orange juice) (ALC). On another occasion they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed an isocaloric quantity of orange juice (OJ). Measurement of maximal isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced across the knee, plasma creatine kinase (CK) concentrations and muscle soreness were made before and at 36 and 60h following each exercise bout. All measures of muscle performance were significantly reduced at 36 and 60h post-exercise compared to pre-exercise measures (all p<0.05). The greatest decreases in peak strength were observed at 36h with losses of 12%, 28% and 19% occurring for OJ isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions, respectively. However, peak strength loss was significantly greater in ALC with the same performance measures decreasing by 34%, 40% and 34%, respectively. Post-exercise plasma creatine kinase activity and ratings of muscle soreness were not different between conditions (both p>0.05). These results indicate that consumption of even moderate amounts of alcohol following eccentric-based exercise magnifies the normally observed losses in dynamic and static strength. Therefore, to minimise exercise related losses in muscle function and expedite recovery, participants in sports involving eccentric muscle work should avoid alcohol-containing beverages in the post-event period. PMID:19230764

  4. Recovery of damaged skeletal muscle in mdx mice through low-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Frinchi, M; Macaluso, F; Licciardi, A; Perciavalle, V; Coco, M; Belluardo, N; Morici, G; Mudò, G

    2014-01-01

    The lack of dystrophin in mdx mice leads to cycles of muscle degeneration and regeneration processes. Various strategies have been proposed in order to reduce the muscle-wasting component of muscular dystrophy, including implementation of an exercise programme. The aim of this study was to examine how low-intensity endurance exercise affects the degeneration-regeneration process in dystrophic muscle of male mdx mice. Mice were subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise by running on a motorized Rota-Rod for 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Histomorphological analysis showed a significant reduction of measured inflammatory-necrotic areas in both gastrocnemius and quadriceps muscle of exercised mdx mice as compared to matched sedentary mdx mice. The degenerative-regenerative process was also evaluated by examining the protein levels of connexin 39 (Cx39), a specific gene expressed in injured muscles. Cx39 was not detected in sedentary wild type mice, whereas it was found markedly increased in sedentary mdx mice, revealing active muscle degeneration-regeneration process. These Cx39 protein levels were significantly reduced in muscles of mdx mice exercised for 30 and 40 days, revealing together with histomorphological analysis a strong reduction of degeneration process in mice subjected to low-intensity endurance exercise. Muscles of exercised mdx mice did not show significant changes in force and fatigue resistance as compared to sedentary mdx mice. Overall in this study we found that specific low-intensity endurance exercise induces a beneficial effect probably by reducing the degeneration of dystrophic muscle.

  5. Exercise Increases and Browns Muscle Lipid in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Tiffany L; Galior, Kornelia; McGrath, Cody; Wu, Xin; Uzer, Gunes; Uzer, Guniz Bas; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Tyson, David; Rubin, Janet; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Muscle lipid increases with high-fat feeding and diabetes. In trained athletes, increased muscle lipid is not associated with insulin resistance, a phenomenon known as the athlete's paradox. To understand if exercise altered the phenotype of muscle lipid, female C57BL/6 mice fed CTL or high-fat diet (HFD for 6 or 18 weeks) were further divided into sedentary or exercising groups (CTL-E or HFD-E) with voluntary access to running wheels for the last 6 weeks of experiments, running 6 h/night. Diet did not affect running time or distance. HFD mice weighed more than CTL after 18 weeks (p < 0.01). Quadriceps muscle TG was increased in running animals and in sedentary mice fed HFD for 18 weeks (p < 0.05). In exercised animals, markers of fat, Plin1, aP2, FSP27, and Fasn, were increased significantly in HFD groups. Ucp1 and Pgc1a, markers for brown fat, increased with exercise in the setting of high fat feeding. Fndc5, which encodes irisin, and CytC were sensitive to exercise regardless of diet. Plin5 was increased with HFD and unaffected by exercise; the respiratory exchange ratio was 15% lower in the 18-week HFD group compared with CTL (p < 0.001) and 10% lower in 18 weeks HFD-E compared with CTL-E (p < 0.001). Increased Ucp1 and Pgc1a in exercised muscle of running mice suggests that a beige/brown fat phenotype develops, which differs from the fat phenotype that induces insulin resistance in high fat feeding. This suggests that increased muscle lipid may develop a "brown" phenotype in the setting of endurance exercise training, a shift that is further promoted by HFD. PMID:27445983

  6. Changes in voluntary activation assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation during prolonged cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Jubeau, Marc; Rupp, Thomas; Perrey, Stephane; Temesi, John; Wuyam, Bernard; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2014-01-01

    Maximal central motor drive is known to decrease during prolonged exercise although it remains to be determined whether a supraspinal deficit exists, and if so, when it appears. The purpose of this study was to evaluate corticospinal excitability and muscle voluntary activation before, during and after a 4-h cycling exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed three 80-min bouts on an ergocycle at 45% of their maximal aerobic power. Before exercise and immediately after each bout, neuromuscular function was evaluated in the quadriceps femoris muscles under isometric conditions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation at the cortical level (VATMS), corticospinal excitability via motor-evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical inhibition by cortical silent period (CSP). Electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure voluntary activation at the peripheral level (VAFNES) and muscle contractile properties. Maximal voluntary force was significantly reduced after the first bout (13 ± 9%, P<0.01) and was further decreased (25 ± 11%, P<0.001) at the end of exercise. CSP remained unchanged throughout the protocol. Rectus femoris and vastus lateralis but not vastus medialis MEP normalized to maximal M-wave amplitude significantly increased during cycling. Finally, significant decreases in both VATMS and VAFNES (∼ 8%, P<0.05 and ∼ 14%, P<0.001 post-exercise, respectively) were observed. In conclusion, reductions in VAFNES after a prolonged cycling exercise are partly explained by a deficit at the cortical level accompanied by increased corticospinal excitability and unchanged intracortical inhibition. When comparing the present results with the literature, this study highlights that changes at the cortical and/or motoneuronal levels depend not only on the type of exercise (single-joint vs. whole-body) but also on exercise intensity and/or duration. PMID:24586559

  7. Neuromuscular function following prolonged intense self-paced exercise in hot climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Périard, Julien D; Cramer, Matthew N; Chapman, Phillip G; Caillaud, Corinne; Thompson, Martin W

    2011-08-01

    Muscle weakness following constant load exercise under heat stress has been associated with hyperthermia-induced central fatigue. However, evidence of central fatigue influencing intense self-paced exercise in the heat is lacking. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate force production capacity and central nervous system drive in skeletal muscle pre- and post-cycle ergometer exercise in hot and cool conditions. Nine trained male cyclists performed a 20-s maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) prior to (control) and following a 40-km time trial in hot (35°C) and cool (20°C) conditions. MVC force production and voluntary activation of the knee extensors was evaluated via percutaneous tetanic stimulation. In the cool condition, rectal temperature increased to 39.0°C and reached 39.8°C in the heat (P < 0.01). Following exercise in the hot and cool conditions, peak force declined by ~90 and ~99 N, respectively, compared with control (P < 0.01). Mean force decreased by 15% (hot) and 14% (cool) (P < 0.01 vs. control). Voluntary activation during the post-exercise MVC declined to 93.7% (hot) and 93.9% (cool) (P < 0.05 vs. control). The post-exercise decline in voluntary activation represented ~20% of the decrease in mean force production in both conditions. Therefore, the additional increase in rectal temperature did not exacerbate the loss of force production following self-paced exercise in the heat. The impairment in force production indicates that the fatigue exhibited by the quadriceps is mainly of peripheral origin and a consequence of the prolonged contractile activity associated with exercise. PMID:21188412

  8. Exercise Increases and Browns Muscle Lipid in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Tiffany L.; Galior, Kornelia; McGrath, Cody; Wu, Xin; Uzer, Gunes; Uzer, Guniz Bas; Sen, Buer; Xie, Zhihui; Tyson, David; Rubin, Janet; Styner, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Muscle lipid increases with high-fat feeding and diabetes. In trained athletes, increased muscle lipid is not associated with insulin resistance, a phenomenon known as the athlete’s paradox. To understand if exercise altered the phenotype of muscle lipid, female C57BL/6 mice fed CTL or high-fat diet (HFD for 6 or 18 weeks) were further divided into sedentary or exercising groups (CTL-E or HFD-E) with voluntary access to running wheels for the last 6 weeks of experiments, running 6 h/night. Diet did not affect running time or distance. HFD mice weighed more than CTL after 18 weeks (p < 0.01). Quadriceps muscle TG was increased in running animals and in sedentary mice fed HFD for 18 weeks (p < 0.05). In exercised animals, markers of fat, Plin1, aP2, FSP27, and Fasn, were increased significantly in HFD groups. Ucp1 and Pgc1a, markers for brown fat, increased with exercise in the setting of high fat feeding. Fndc5, which encodes irisin, and CytC were sensitive to exercise regardless of diet. Plin5 was increased with HFD and unaffected by exercise; the respiratory exchange ratio was 15% lower in the 18-week HFD group compared with CTL (p < 0.001) and 10% lower in 18 weeks HFD-E compared with CTL-E (p < 0.001). Increased Ucp1 and Pgc1a in exercised muscle of running mice suggests that a beige/brown fat phenotype develops, which differs from the fat phenotype that induces insulin resistance in high fat feeding. This suggests that increased muscle lipid may develop a “brown” phenotype in the setting of endurance exercise training, a shift that is further promoted by HFD. PMID:27445983

  9. Effect of triceps surae and quadriceps muscle fatigue on the mechanics of landing in stepping down in ongoing gait.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, F A; Gobbi, L T B; Lee, Y J; Pijnappels, M; van Dieën, J H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of muscle fatigue of triceps surae and quadriceps muscles in stepping down in ongoing gait. We expected that the subjects would compensate for muscle fatigue to prevent potential loss of balance in stepping down. A total of 10 young participants walked over a walkway at a self-selected velocity to step down a height difference of 10-cm halfway. Five trials were performed before and after a muscle fatigue protocol. Participants performed two fatigue protocols: one for ankle muscle fatigue and another for knee muscle fatigue. Kinematics of and ground reaction forces on the leading leg were recorded. Fatigue did not cause a change in the frequency of heel or toe landing. Our results indicate that in stepping down fatigue effects are compensated by redistributing work to unfatigued muscle groups and by gait changes aimed at enhancing balance control, which was however only partially successful.

  10. [Innervation disturbances of the quadriceps muscle in chondropathia patellae. A critical appraisal of the current concept of chondropathia].

    PubMed

    Weh, L; Eickhoff, W

    1983-01-01

    In a group of patients with typical histories of chondropathy, but in whom no other criteria of selection were applied, evidence of neurogenic damage in the quadriceps muscle was found. Innervational damage was also found regularly in the corresponding segments of the paravertebral musculature. Only in three cases, in which horn cell damage was suspected, were there no changes in the paravertebral musculature. There were abnormal structural or functional findings in the lumbar spine in all the patients. A disequilibrium between the median and lateral vastus groups, attributable to innervation, was postulated and subsequently confirmed by electromyography. The nature of chondropathia patellae as an insertion tendopathy is discussed, taking the lack of concomitance of chondropathy and chondromalacia into consideration as well as the findings in the group of patients examined. Phenomena associated with chondropathy which have hitherto incongruous may be explained on the basis of an asymmetrical innervation disturbance.

  11. 'Serious thigh muscle strains': beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-02-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in 'muscle strain'. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh 'muscle strain'.

  12. A modified arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament double-bundle reconstruction technique with autogenous quadriceps tendon graft: remnant-preserving technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Seung-Bae; Kim, Tai-Won; Chang, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Heon-Sik; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) double-bundle reconstruction have been introduced to improve the functional outcome and restore normal kinematics of the knee. Meanwhile, a remnant-preserving technique was developed to preserve the proprioception and to enhance the revascularization of the reconstructed ACL. We developed double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique using autogenous quadriceps tendon graft while preserving the remnant. With this technique, two femoral sockets and one tibial tunnel are made. To preserve the remnant of the ACL, the rotational direction of the reamer was set to counterclockwise just before perforation of the tibial tunnel. To pass the graft more easily without disturbance of the remnant, the graft passage was achieved through the tibial tunnel. We suggest that the remnant-preserving technique could be an effective alternative considering its mechanical stability as well as the proprioception and vascularization recovery in arthroscopic double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  13. Extended healing validation of an artificial tendon to connect the quadriceps muscle to the Tibia: 180-day study.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Alan J; Litsky, Alan S; Mayerson, Joel L; Stringer, Keith; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2012-07-01

    Whenever a tendon or its bone insertion is disrupted or removed, existing surgical techniques provide a temporary connection or scaffolding to promote healing, but the interface of living to non-living materials soon breaks down under the stress of these applications, if it must bear the load more than acutely. Patients are thus disabled whose prostheses, defect size, or mere anatomy limit the availability or outcomes of such treatments. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to join skeletal muscle to prosthetic or natural structures without this interface breakdown. In this study, the goat knee extensor mechanism (quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon) was removed from the right hind limb in 16 goats. The device connected the quadriceps muscle to a stainless steel bone plate on the tibia. Mechanical testing and histology specimens were collected from each operated leg and contralateral unoperated control legs at 180 days. Maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated) were 1,400 ± 93 N (vs. 1,179 ± 61 N), linear stiffnesses were 33 ± 3 N/mm (vs. 37 ± 4 N/mm), and elongations at failure were 92.1 ± 5.3 mm (vs. 68.4 ± 3.8 mm; mean ± SEM). Higher maximum forces (p = 0.02) and elongations at failure (p=0.008) of legs with the device versus unoperated controls were significant; linear stiffnesses were not (p=0.3). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction.

  14. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Andersen, Lars Louis; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. Design This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%–100% contraction failure). Results Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 99.3 and 105.5 %EMGmax at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.009 and 0.004). Median power frequency decreased significantly over contractions from a mean of 66.8 and 64.2 Hz (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 59.9 and 60.1 Hz at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.0006 and 0.0187). Conclusion In patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty, 10 repetition maximum–loaded knee extensions performed in one set until contraction failure increases voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during the set. Clinical Trials Gov-identifier: NCT01713140 to the abstract to increase trial transparency. PMID:26339729

  15. Extended Healing Validation of an Artificial Tendon to Connect the Quadriceps Muscle to the Tibia: 180-day Study

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan J.; Litsky, Alan S.; Mayerson, Joel L.; Stringer, Keith; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Whenever a tendon or its bone insertion is disrupted or removed, existing surgical techniques provide a temporary connection or scaffolding to promote healing, but the interface of living to nonliving materials soon breaks down under the stress of these applications, if it must bear the load more than acutely. Patients are thus disabled whose prostheses, defect size, or mere anatomy limit the availability or outcomes of such treatments. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to join skeletal muscle to prosthetic or natural structures without this interface breakdown. In this study, the goat knee extensor mechanism (quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon) was removed from the right hind limb in 16 goats. The device connected the quadriceps muscle to a stainless steel bone plate on the tibia. Mechanical testing and histology specimens were collected from each operated leg and contra lateral unoperated control legs at 180 days. Maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated) were 1400± 93N (vs. 1179± 61 N), linear stiffnesses were 33± 3 N/mm (vs. 37 ± 4N/mm), and elongations at failure were 92.1 ± 5.3 mm (vs. 68.4 ± 3.8 mm; mean ± SEM). Higher maximum forces (p = 0.02) and elongations at failure (p = 0.008) of legs with the device versus unoperated controls were significant; linear stiffnesses were not (p = 0.3). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopaedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction. PMID:22179930

  16. The reliability of surface electromyography to assess quadriceps fatigue during multi joint tasks in healthy and painful knees.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Michael J; McCarthy, Christopher J; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2009-02-01

    This study's aim was to determine the between days reliability of surface EMG recordings from the superficial quadriceps during a multi joint sub-maximal fatiguing protocol. Three subject groups (healthy n=29; patellofemoral pain syndrome n=74; knee osteoarthritis n=55) performed the task at 60 maximum voluntary isometric contraction on three separate days. Spectral and amplitude EMG parameters were recorded from vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris and were analysed for between days reliability using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC((2,1))), the standard errors of measure and smallest detectable differences. For frequency results, initial and final frequency values had 'good' or 'excellent' reliability in all groups for all muscles. ICCs for median frequency slopes for vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris respectively, in the osteoarthritis group were 0.04, 0.55, and 0.72; in the patellofemoral pain group were 0.41, 0.17, and 0.33; in the healthy group were 0.68, 0.64, and 0.31. The standard errors of measurement and smallest detectable differences for all groups and for all muscles were unacceptably high. For amplitude results, ICC root mean squared initial and final values were 'good' to 'excellent' for all groups and all muscles, albeit with high measurement error. The ICCs for root mean squared slopes in all tests were 'poor' with extremely high measurement error. The poor between days reliability and high measurement error suggests that surface EMG should not be adopted to assess fatigue during multi joint sub-maximal isometric quadriceps testing.

  17. Muscle and intensity based hamstring exercise classification in elite female track and field athletes: implications for exercise selection during rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tsaklis, Panagiotis; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Korakakis, Vasileios; Tsapralis, Kyriakos; Pyne, Debasish; Malliaras, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Hamstring injuries are common in many sports, including track and field. Strains occur in different parts of the hamstring muscle but very little is known about whether common hamstring loading exercises specifically load different hamstring components. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation of different components of the hamstring muscle during common hamstring loading exercises. Methods Twenty elite female track and field athletes were recruited into this study, which had a single-sample, repeated-measures design. Each athlete performed ten hamstring loading exercises, and an electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the biceps femoris and semitendinosus components of the hamstring. Hamstring EMG during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used to normalize the mean data across ten repetitions of each exercise. An electrogoniometer synchronized to the EMG was used to determine whether peak EMG activity occurred during muscle-tendon unit lengthening, shortening, or no change in length. Mean EMG values were compared between the two recording sites for each exercise using the Student’s t-test. Results The lunge, dead lift, and kettle swings were low intensity (<50% MVIC) and all showed higher EMG activity for semitendinosus than for biceps femoris. Bridge was low but approaching medium intensity, and the TRX, hamstring bridge, and hamstring curl were all medium intensity exercises (≥50% or <80% MVIC). The Nordic, fitball, and slide leg exercises were all high intensity exercises. Only the fitball exercise showed higher EMG activity in the biceps femoris compared with the semitendinosus. Only lunge and kettle swings showed peak EMG in the muscle-tendon unit lengthening phase and both these exercises involved faster speed. Conclusion Some exercises selectively activated the lateral and medial distal hamstrings. Low, medium, and high intensity exercises were demonstrated. This information enables the clinician, strength

  18. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise; Osteopenia - exercise ... your bones strong and lower your risk of osteoporosis and fractures as you get older. Before you begin an exercise program, talk with your health care provider if: ...

  19. Didactic/Experiential Program for Memory Strengthening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenoweth, Barbara; And Others

    This paper describes a program for memory strengthening for older adults which combines lectures by experts with small group discussions. The importance of peer counselor involvement, particularly in focusing on the concerns of older people and the most effective ways to address these concerns is emphasized. Program objectives, session topics, and…

  20. Strengthening Language Experiences for Children through Fingerplays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Fingerplays--brief stories that rhyme and can be dramatized by using the fingers--are an old activity for children that can be traced in Indian lore to a time before Columbus. Today, fingerplays delight and fascinate young children and provide a variety of learning opportunities. Fingerplays can provide a source for strengthening language…

  1. Strengthening 4-H Program Communication through Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robideau, Kari; Santl, Karyn

    2011-01-01

    Advances in technology are transforming how youth and parents interact with programs. The Strengthening 4-H Communication through Technology project was implemented in eight county 4-H programs in Northwest Minnesota. This article outlines the intentional process used to effectively implement technology in program planning. The project includes:…

  2. Strengthening 4-H by Analyzing Enrollment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Northern, Angela; Neff, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here used data from the ACCESS 4-H Enrollment System to gain insight into strengthening New York State's 4-H programming. Member enrollment lists from 2009 to 2012 were analyzed using Microsoft Excel to determine trends and dropout rates. The descriptive data indicate declining 4-H enrollment in recent years and peak…

  3. The effects of short-term exercise training on peak-torque are time- and fiber-type dependent.

    PubMed

    Ureczky, Dóra; Vácz, Gabriella; Costa, Andreas; Kopper, Bence; Lacza, Zsombor; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, József

    2014-08-01

    We examined the susceptibility of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers in the quadriceps muscle to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Nine healthy men (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years) performed maximal eccentric quadriceps contractions at 120°·s-1 over a 120° of knee joint range of motion for 6 consecutive days. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before repeated bouts of eccentric exercise on the third and seventh day. Immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine fiber composition and fibronectin activity. Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined in serum. Average torque was calculated in each day for each subject. Relative to baseline, average torque decreased 37.4% till day 3 and increased 43.0% from the day 3 to day 6 (p < 0.001). Creatine kinase and LDH were 70.6 and 1.5 times higher on day 3 and 75.5 and 1.4 times higher on day 6. Fibronectin was found in fast fibers in subjects with high CK level on day 3 and 7 after exercise, but on day 7, fibronectin seemed in both slow and fast fibers except in muscles of 2 subjects with high fast fiber percentage. Peak torque and muscle fiber-type composition measured at baseline showed a strong positive association on day 3 (r = 0.76, p < 0.02) and strong negative association during recovery between day 3 and day 6 (r = -0.76, p < 0.02), and day 1 and day 6 (r = 0.84, p < 0.001). We conclude that the damage of fast fibers preceded the damage of slow fibers, and muscles with slow fiber dominance were more susceptible to repeated bouts of eccentric exercise than fast fiber dominance muscles. The data suggest that the responses to repeated bouts of eccentric exercise are fiber-type-dependent in the quadriceps muscle, which can be the basis for the design of individualized strength training protocols.

  4. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  5. Kids and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family How Can Families Be ... a Fit Kid Why Exercise Is Cool Cold-Weather Sports Strength Training Weight Management: Strength Training Exercises ( ...

  6. Exercise during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise During Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise During Pregnancy FAQ119, May 2016 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  7. Exercise After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise After Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise After Pregnancy FAQ131, June 2015 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  8. Why Exercise Is Wise

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. Exercising causes the body to produce endorphins, chemicals ...

  9. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running and intense gym training) could actually cause harm. Studies have shown that people who follow a moderately energetic lifestyle, benefit most from starting (and sticking to) an exercise ...

  10. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main ... jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using ...

  11. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  12. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  13. (.)VO(2) and EMG activity kinetics during moderate and severe constant work rate exercise in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Cleuziou, Christophe; Perrey, Stephane; Borrani, Fabio; Lecoq, Anne Marie; Courteix, Daniel; Germain, Philippe; Obert, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare O(2) uptake ((.)VO(2)) and muscle electromyography activity kinetics during moderate and severe exercise to test the hypothesis of progressive recruitment of fast-twitch fibers in the explanation of the VO(2) slow component. After an incremental test to exhaustion, 7 trained cyclists (mean +/- SD, 61.4 +/- 4.2 ml x min(-1) x kg(- 1)) performed several square-wave transitions for 6 min at moderate and severe intensities on a bicycle ergometer. The (.)VO(2) response and the electrical activity (i.e., median power frequency, MDF) of the quadriceps vastus lateralis and vastus medialis of both lower limbs were measured continuously during exercise. After 2 to 3 min of exercise onset, MDF values increased similarly during moderate and severe exercise for almost all muscles whereas a (.)VO(2) slow component occurred during severe exercise. There was no relationship between the increase of MDF values and the magnitude of the (.)VO(2) slow component during the severe exercise. These results suggest that the origin of the slow component may not be due to the progressive recruitment of fast-twitch fibers.

  14. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  15. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R.; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190– -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29–150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72–0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes. PMID:24993908

  16. Skeletal muscle adiposity is associated with physical activity, exercise capacity and fibre shift in COPD.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, Matthew; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Vitoriano, Simone; Natanek, Samantha A; Tanner, Rebecca J; Hart, Nicholas; Kemp, Paul R; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S

    2014-11-01

    Quadriceps muscle phenotype varies widely between patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cannot be determined without muscle biopsy. We hypothesised that measures of skeletal muscle adiposity could provide noninvasive biomarkers of muscle quality in this population. In 101 patients and 10 age-matched healthy controls, mid-thigh cross-sectional area, percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were calculated using computed tomography images and standard tissue attenuation ranges: fat -190- -30 HU; skeletal muscle -29-150 HU. Mean±sd percentage intramuscular fat was higher in the patient group (6.7±3.5% versus 4.3±1.2%, p = 0.03). Both percentage intramuscular fat and skeletal muscle attenuation were associated with physical activity level, exercise capacity and type I fibre proportion, independent of age, mid-thigh cross-sectional area and quadriceps strength. Combined with transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide, these variables could identify >80% of patients with fibre type shift with >65% specificity (area under the curve 0.83, 95% CI 0.72-0.95). Skeletal muscle adiposity assessed by computed tomography reflects multiple aspects of COPD related muscle dysfunction and may help to identify patients for trials of interventions targeted at specific muscle phenotypes.

  17. Supraspinal fatigue after normoxic and hypoxic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Stuart; González-Alonso, José; Ali, Leena; Ross, Emma Z; Romer, Lee M

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate cerebral O₂ availability has been proposed to be an important contributing factor to the development of central fatigue during strenuous exercise. Here we tested the hypothesis that supraspinal processes of fatigue would be increased after locomotor exercise in acute hypoxia compared to normoxia, and that such change would be related to reductions in cerebral O₂ delivery and tissue oxygenation. Nine endurance-trained cyclists completed three constant-load cycling exercise trials at ∼80% of maximal work rate: (1) to the limit of tolerance in acute hypoxia; (2) for the same duration but in normoxia (control); and (3) to the limit of tolerance in normoxia. Throughout each trial, prefrontal cortex tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAV) were assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy and trans-cranial Doppler sonography, respectively. Cerebral O₂ delivery was calculated as the product of arterial O₂ content and MCAV. Before and immediately after each trial, twitch responses to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation were obtained to assess neuromuscular and cortical function, respectively. Exercise time was reduced by 54%in hypoxia compared to normoxia (3.6 ± 1.3 vs. 8.1 ± 2.9 min; P<0.001). Cerebral O₂ delivery,cerebral oxygenation and maximum O₂ uptake were reduced whereas muscle electromyographic activity was increased in hypoxia compared to control (P <0.05).Maximum voluntary force and potentiated quadriceps twitch force were decreased below baseline after exercise in each trial;the decreases were greater in hypoxia compared to control (P<0.001), but were not different in the exhaustive trials (P>0.05). Cortical voluntary activation was also decreased after exercise in all trials, but the decline in hypoxia (Δ18%) was greater than in the normoxic trials (Δ5-9%)(P <0.05). The reductions in cortical voluntary activation were paralleled by reductions in cerebral O₂ delivery

  18. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Geertsen, Svend S.; Christiansen, Lasse; Ritz, Christian; Roig, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A single bout of high intensity aerobic exercise (~90% VO2peak) was previously demonstrated to amplify off-line gains in skill level during the consolidation phase of procedural memory. High intensity exercise is not always a viable option for many patient groups or in a rehabilitation setting where low to moderate intensities may be more suitable. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of intensity in mediating the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on motor skill learning. We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on the retention (performance score) of a visuomotor accuracy tracking task. Thirty six healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups that performed either a single bout of aerobic exercise at 20 min post motor skill learning at 45% (EX45), 90% (EX90) maximal power output (Wmax) or rested (CON). Randomization was stratified to ensure that the groups were matched for relative peak oxygen consumption (ml O2/min/kg) and baseline score in the tracking task. Retention tests were carried out at 1 (R1) and 7 days (R7) post motor skill learning. At R1, changes in performance scores were greater for EX90 compared to CON (p<0.001) and EX45 (p = 0.011). The EX45 and EX90 groups demonstrated a greater change in performance score at R7 compared to the CON group (p = 0.003 and p<0.001, respectively). The change in performance score for EX90 at R7 was also greater than EX45 (p = 0.049). We suggest that exercise intensity plays an important role in modulating the effects that a single bout of cardiovascular exercise has on the consolidation phase following motor skill learning. There appears to be a dose-response relationship in favour of higher intensity exercise in order to augment off-line effects and strengthen procedural memory. PMID:27454423

  19. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Intensity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard; Johnsen, Line K; Geertsen, Svend S; Christiansen, Lasse; Ritz, Christian; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A single bout of high intensity aerobic exercise (~90% VO2peak) was previously demonstrated to amplify off-line gains in skill level during the consolidation phase of procedural memory. High intensity exercise is not always a viable option for many patient groups or in a rehabilitation setting where low to moderate intensities may be more suitable. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of intensity in mediating the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on motor skill learning. We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on the retention (performance score) of a visuomotor accuracy tracking task. Thirty six healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups that performed either a single bout of aerobic exercise at 20 min post motor skill learning at 45% (EX45), 90% (EX90) maximal power output (Wmax) or rested (CON). Randomization was stratified to ensure that the groups were matched for relative peak oxygen consumption (ml O2/min/kg) and baseline score in the tracking task. Retention tests were carried out at 1 (R1) and 7 days (R7) post motor skill learning. At R1, changes in performance scores were greater for EX90 compared to CON (p<0.001) and EX45 (p = 0.011). The EX45 and EX90 groups demonstrated a greater change in performance score at R7 compared to the CON group (p = 0.003 and p<0.001, respectively). The change in performance score for EX90 at R7 was also greater than EX45 (p = 0.049). We suggest that exercise intensity plays an important role in modulating the effects that a single bout of cardiovascular exercise has on the consolidation phase following motor skill learning. There appears to be a dose-response relationship in favour of higher intensity exercise in order to augment off-line effects and strengthen procedural memory. PMID:27454423

  20. Acute Exercise and Motor Memory Consolidation: The Role of Exercise Intensity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard; Johnsen, Line K; Geertsen, Svend S; Christiansen, Lasse; Ritz, Christian; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A single bout of high intensity aerobic exercise (~90% VO2peak) was previously demonstrated to amplify off-line gains in skill level during the consolidation phase of procedural memory. High intensity exercise is not always a viable option for many patient groups or in a rehabilitation setting where low to moderate intensities may be more suitable. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of intensity in mediating the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on motor skill learning. We investigated the effects of different exercise intensities on the retention (performance score) of a visuomotor accuracy tracking task. Thirty six healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups that performed either a single bout of aerobic exercise at 20 min post motor skill learning at 45% (EX45), 90% (EX90) maximal power output (Wmax) or rested (CON). Randomization was stratified to ensure that the groups were matched for relative peak oxygen consumption (ml O2/min/kg) and baseline score in the tracking task. Retention tests were carried out at 1 (R1) and 7 days (R7) post motor skill learning. At R1, changes in performance scores were greater for EX90 compared to CON (p<0.001) and EX45 (p = 0.011). The EX45 and EX90 groups demonstrated a greater change in performance score at R7 compared to the CON group (p = 0.003 and p<0.001, respectively). The change in performance score for EX90 at R7 was also greater than EX45 (p = 0.049). We suggest that exercise intensity plays an important role in modulating the effects that a single bout of cardiovascular exercise has on the consolidation phase following motor skill learning. There appears to be a dose-response relationship in favour of higher intensity exercise in order to augment off-line effects and strengthen procedural memory.

  1. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  2. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  3. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise.

  4. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  5. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  6. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise. PMID:22721740

  7. Exercise, Aging and Longevity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stanley P.; Cundiff, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether or not a lifelong program of exercise actually has a bearing on longevity is discussed. The effects of exercise on the aging process, and the longevity-exercise relationship are reviewed. The conflicting evidence on the subject is presented. (JL)

  8. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  9. Comparison between the Effects of Horseback Riding Exercise and Trunk Stability Exercise on the Balance of Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Su; Lee, Chae-Woo; Lee, In-Sil

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of horseback riding exercise and trunk stability exercise on static and dynamic balance in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two normal adults residing in communities were randomly divided into a horseback riding exercise group and a trunk stability exercise group, and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Sway times of the COG (center of gravity) decreased significantly, and the A-P (anterior-posterior) and M-L (medial-lateral) velocities significantly decreased in both groups. A comparison of sway times of the COG after the intervention between the two groups revealed that the horseback riding exercise group showed larger decreases than the trunk stability exercise group. [Conclusion] In terms of the musculoskeletal factor, horseback riding may result in functional improvement and increased stability, and it may stimulate proprioceptive sense input in neurological terms. It is therefore considered a composite exercise method that may strengthen the two factors simultaneously. PMID:25276009

  10. Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bankolé, Landry-Cyrille; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Temesi, John; Bachasson, Damien; Ravelojaona, Marion; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel; Ponsot, Elodie; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Kadi, Fawzi; Féasson, Léonard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients. Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n = 8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35 minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention. Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P = 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P = 0.008) and 46% (P = 0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG. Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients’ daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue. PMID:27495097

  11. Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tagesson, S; Oberg, B; Kvist, J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different rehabilitation exercises with respect to dynamic anterior tibial translation and muscle activation 5 weeks after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Another aim was to compare the ACL-reconstructed knee with the ACL-injured and the uninjured knees for differences in anterior tibial translation and muscle activation during the exercises. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured during the Lachman test (static translation) and during seven rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients. Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared with those obtained before the ACL reconstruction (ACL-deficient and uninjured knee). After ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension produced more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg. The ACL reconstruction reduced the static and the dynamic tibial translation and the tibial translations measured in ACL-reconstructed knees were similar to those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a joint stiffening strategy that used more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibial translation. Although all exercises tested are suitable for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction, to protect the graft from excessive strain, the straight leg raise and squat on one leg are preferable for quadriceps training in the early phase of rehabilitation.

  12. Effects of whole-body vibration after eccentric exercise on muscle soreness and muscle strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Timon, Rafael; Tejero, Javier; Brazo-Sayavera, Javier; Crespo, Carmen; Olcina, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not a single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise can reduce muscle soreness and enhance muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty untrained participants were randomly assigned to two groups: a vibration group (n=10) and control group (n=10). Participants performed eccentric quadriceps training of 4 sets of 5 repetitions at 120% 1RM, with 4 min rest between sets. After that, the vibration group received 3 sets of 1 min whole body vibration (12 Hz, 4 mm) with 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Serum creatine kinase, blood urea nitrogen, muscle soreness (visual analog scale) and muscle strength (peak isometric torque) were assessed. [Results] Creatine kinase was lower in the vibration group than in the control group at 24 h (200.2 ± 8.2 vs. 300.5 ± 26.1 U/L) and at 48 h (175.2 ± 12.5 vs. 285.2 ± 19.7 U/L) post-exercise. Muscle soreness decreased in vibration group compared to control group at 48 h post-exercise (34.1 ± 11.4 vs. 65.2 ± 13.2 mm). [Conclusion] Single whole-body vibration treatment after eccentric exercise reduced delayed onset muscle soreness but it did not affect muscle strength recovery. PMID:27390415

  13. Muscle Adaptations Following Short-Duration Bed Rest with Integrated Resistance, Interval, and Aerobic Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, Kyle J.; Scott, Jessica M.; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd-Goetchius, Elizabeth; Crowell, J. Brent; Everett, Meghan E.; Wickwire, Jason; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Unloading of the musculoskeletal system during space flight results in deconditioning that may impair mission-related task performance in astronauts. Exercise countermeasures have been frequently tested during bed rest (BR) and limb suspension; however, high-intensity, short-duration exercise prescriptions have not been fully explored. PURPOSE: To determine if a high intensity resistance, interval, and aerobic exercise program could protect against muscle atrophy and dysfunction when performed during short duration BR. METHODS: Nine subjects (1 female, 8 male) performed a combination of supine exercises during 2 weeks of horizontal BR. Resistance exercise (3 d / wk) consisted of squat, leg press, hamstring curl, and heel raise exercises (3 sets, 12 repetitions). Aerobic (6 d / wk) sessions alternated continuous (75% VO2 peak) and interval exercise (30 s, 2 min, and 4 min) and were completed on a supine cycle ergometer and vertical treadmill, respectively. Muscle volumes of the upper leg were calculated pre, mid, and post-BR using magnetic resonance imaging. Maximal isometric force (MIF), rate of force development (RFD), and peak power of the lower body extensors were measured twice before BR (averaged to represent pre) and once post BR. ANOVA with repeated measures and a priori planned contrasts were used to test for differences. RESULTS: There were no changes to quadriceps, hamstring, and adductor muscle volumes at mid and post BR time points compared to pre BR (Table 1). Peak power increased significantly from 1614 +/- 372 W to 1739 +/- 359 W post BR (+7.7%, p = 0.035). Neither MIF (pre: 1676 +/- 320 N vs. post: 1711 +/- 250 N, +2.1%, p = 0.333) nor RFD (pre: 7534 +/- 1265 N/ms vs. post: 6951 +/- 1241 N/ms, -7.7%, p = 0.136) were significantly impaired post BR.

  14. Treatment of Progressive First Metatarsophalangeal Hallux Valgus Deformity: A Biomechanically Based Muscle-Strengthening Approach.

    PubMed

    Glasoe, Ward M

    2016-07-01

    Synopsis Hallux valgus is a progressive deformity of the first metatarsophalangeal joint that changes the anatomy and biomechanics of the foot. To date, surgery is the only treatment to correct this deformity, though the recurrence rate is as high as 15%. This clinical commentary provides instruction in a strengthening approach for treatment of hallux valgus deformity, by addressing the moment actions of 5 muscles identified as having the ability to counter the hallux valgus process. Unlike surgery, muscle strengthening does not correct the deformity, but, instead, reduces the pain and associated gait impairments that affect the mobility of people who live with the disorder. This review is organized in 4 parts. Part 1 defines the terms of foot motion and posture. Part 2 details the anatomy and biomechanics, and describes how the foot is changed with deformity. Part 3 details the muscles targeted for strengthening; the intrinsics being the abductor hallucis, adductor hallucis, and the flexor hallucis brevis; the extrinsics being the tibialis posterior and fibularis longus. Part 4 instructs the exercise and reviews the related literature. Instructions are given for the short-foot, the toe-spread-out, and the heel-raise exercises. The routine may be performed by almost anyone at home and may be adopted into physical therapist practice, with intent to strengthen the foot muscles as an adjunct to almost any protocol of care, but especially for the treatment of hallux valgus deformity. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):596-605. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6704. PMID:27266887

  15. A comprehensive review of the effectiveness of different exercise programs for patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Allen, Kelli D; Caine, Dennis J

    2012-11-01

    Exercise is recommended as a first-line conservative intervention approach for osteoarthritis (OA). A wide range of exercise programs are available and scientific evidence is necessary for choosing the optimal strategy of treatment for each patient. The purpose of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of different types of exercise programs for OA based on trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses in the literature. Publications from January 1997 to July 2012 were searched in 4 electronic databases using the terms osteoarthritis, exercise, exercise program, effectiveness, and treatment outcome. Strong evidence supports that aerobic and strengthening exercise programs, both land- and water-based, are beneficial for improving pain and physical function in adults with mild-to-moderate knee and hip OA. Areas that require further research include examination of the long-term effects of exercise programs for OA, balance training for OA, exercise programs for severe OA, the effect of exercise programs on progression of OA, the effectiveness of exercise for joint sites other than the knee or hip, and the effectiveness of exercise for OA by such factors as age, sex, and obesity. Efforts to improve adherence to evidence-based exercise programs for OA and to promote the dissemination and implementation of these programs are crucial.

  16. Exercise and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Orla; Cronin, Owen; Clarke, Siobhan F; Murphy, Eileen F; Molloy, Micheal G; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is linked with poor health, most commonly obesity and associated disorders, the corollary being that exercise offers a preventive strategy. However, the scope of exercise biology extends well beyond energy expenditure and has emerged as a great ‘polypill’, which is safe, reliable and cost-effective not only in disease prevention but also treatment. Biological mechanisms by which exercise influences homeostasis are becoming clearer and involve multi-organ systemic adaptations. Most of the elements of a modern lifestyle influence the indigenous microbiota but few studies have explored the effect of increased physical activity. While dietary responses to exercise obscure the influence of exercise alone on gut microbiota, professional athletes operating at the extremes of performance provide informative data. We assessed the relationship between extreme levels of exercise, associated dietary habits and gut microbiota composition, and discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise may exert a direct or indirect influence on gut microbiota. PMID:25800089

  17. Biomechanics of front and back squat exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidot, A. A.; Brusa, M. H.; Lestussi, F. E.; Parera, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    Squat constitutes one of the most popular exercises to strengthen the muscles of the lower limbs. It is considered one of the most widely spread exercises for muscle sport training and is part of the competition movements comprised within olympic weight-lifting. In physical rehabilitation, squats are used for muscular recovery after different injuries of the lower limbs, especially the knee. In previous anterior cruciate ligament injuries, the mini-squats are generally used, in a knee flexion motion range from 0° to 50° because in this range the shear forces, the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral compression forces decrease related to greater flexion angles. The aim of this work is to make a comparative bidimensional study of the kinematic and dynamic variables of the excecution of the parallel squat exercise with the front and back bar. It is observed in the knee a better development of energy with the front bar, allowing a better muscular exercise with the same load. The mean power absorbed by the hip with the back bar is considerably greater, associated to the speed of the gesture.

  18. 27 CFR 25.94 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Requirement. When the penal sum of the brewer's bond (calculated as provided in § 25.93) in effect is not... strengthening bond in sufficient penal sum if the surety is the same as on the bond in effect. If the surety is... bond may not in any way release a former bond or limit a bond to less than the full penal sum. (c)...

  19. Strengthening an affiliation without a merger.

    PubMed

    Hegwer, Laura Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin have created a shared governance structure with joint committees focused on value, IT, marketing, strategic planning, and other areas. A new funds-flow model shifts a percentage of the health system's bottom line to the medical college to support physician recruitment,joint initiatives, academic programs, and a strategic reserve. The strengthened affiliation has enhanced the ability of the organizations to engage in accountable care and population health initiatives, among other benefits.

  20. Strengthening an affiliation without a merger.

    PubMed

    Hegwer, Laura Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Froedtert Health and the Medical College of Wisconsin have created a shared governance structure with joint committees focused on value, IT, marketing, strategic planning, and other areas. A new funds-flow model shifts a percentage of the health system's bottom line to the medical college to support physician recruitment,joint initiatives, academic programs, and a strategic reserve. The strengthened affiliation has enhanced the ability of the organizations to engage in accountable care and population health initiatives, among other benefits. PMID:26665524